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Sample records for quantum dot semiconductor

  1. Single semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michler, Peter (ed.) [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen

    2009-07-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of semiconductor quantum dots via contributions from some of the most prominent researchers in the scientific community. Special focus is given to optical, quantum optical, and spin properties of single quantum dots due to their potential applications in devices operating with single electron spins and/or single photons. This includes single and coupled quantum dots in external fields, cavity-quantum electrodynamics, and single and entangled photon pair generation. Single Semiconductor Quantum Dots also addresses growth techniques to allow for a positioned nucleation of dots as well as applications of quantum dots in quantum information technologies. (orig.)

  2. Semiconductor double quantum dot micromaser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y-Y; Stehlik, J; Eichler, C; Gullans, M J; Taylor, J M; Petta, J R

    2015-01-16

    The coherent generation of light, from masers to lasers, relies upon the specific structure of the individual emitters that lead to gain. Devices operating as lasers in the few-emitter limit provide opportunities for understanding quantum coherent phenomena, from terahertz sources to quantum communication. Here we demonstrate a maser that is driven by single-electron tunneling events. Semiconductor double quantum dots (DQDs) serve as a gain medium and are placed inside a high-quality factor microwave cavity. We verify maser action by comparing the statistics of the emitted microwave field above and below the maser threshold. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Beer's law in semiconductor quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Adamashvili, G T

    2010-01-01

    The propagation of a coherent optical linear wave in an ensemble of semiconductor quantum dots is considered. It is shown that a distribution of transition dipole moments of the quantum dots changes significantly the polarization and Beer's absorption length of the ensemble of quantum dots. Explicit analytical expressions for these quantities are presented.

  4. Semiconductor quantum dots for electron spin qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; Stopa, M.; Kodera, T.; Hatano, T.; Tarucha, S.

    2006-01-01

    We report on our recent progress in applying semiconductor quantum dots for spin-based quantum computation, as proposed by Loss and DiVincenzo (1998 Phys. Rev. A 57 120). For the purpose of single-electron spin resonance, we study different types of single quantum dot devices that are designed for

  5. Optical Properties of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perinetti, U.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents different optical experiments performed on semiconductor quantum dots. These structures allow to confine a small number of electrons and holes to a tiny region of space, some nm across. The aim of this work was to study the basic properties of different types of quantum dots

  6. Optical Properties of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perinetti, U.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents different optical experiments performed on semiconductor quantum dots. These structures allow to confine a small number of electrons and holes to a tiny region of space, some nm across. The aim of this work was to study the basic properties of different types of quantum dots mad

  7. Electron Spins in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, R.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding and controlling the behavior of the spin degree of freedom of single electrons, confined in semiconductor quantum dots. This research work is motivated by the prospects of using the electron spin as a quantum bit (qubit), the basic

  8. Non-adiabatic geometrical quantum gates in semiconductor quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Solinas, P; Zanghì, N; Rossi, F; Solinas, Paolo; Zanardi, Paolo; Zanghì, Nino; Rossi, Fausto

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we study the implementation of non-adiabatic geometrical quantum gates with in semiconductor quantum dots. Different quantum information enconding/manipulation schemes exploiting excitonic degrees of freedom are discussed. By means of the Aharanov-Anandan geometrical phase one can avoid the limitations of adiabatic schemes relying on adiabatic Berry phase; fast geometrical quantum gates can be in principle implemented

  9. Modulation Response of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Nanocavity Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorke, Michael; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    The modulation response of quantum-dot based nanocavity devices is investigated using a semiconductor theory. We show that high modulation bandwidth is achieved even in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening of the quantum dot ensemble.......The modulation response of quantum-dot based nanocavity devices is investigated using a semiconductor theory. We show that high modulation bandwidth is achieved even in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening of the quantum dot ensemble....

  10. Many electron effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Pandey; Manoj K Harbola; V Ranjan; Vijay A Singh

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) exhibit shell structures, very similar to atoms. Termed as ‘artificial atoms’ by some, they are much larger (1 100 nm) than real atoms. One can study a variety of manyelectron effects in them, which are otherwise difficult to observe in a real atom. We have treated these effects within the local density approximation (LDA) and the Harbola–Sahni (HS) scheme. HS is free of the selfinteraction error of the LDA. Our calculations have been performed in a three-dimensional quantum dot. We have carried out a study of the size and shape dependence of the level spacing. Scaling laws for the Hubbard ‘’ are established.

  11. Semiconductor quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jianjun; Cao, Guozhong

    2013-10-31

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been drawing great attention recently as a material for solar energy conversion due to their versatile optical and electrical properties. The QD-sensitized solar cell (QDSC) is one of the burgeoning semiconductor QD solar cells that shows promising developments for the next generation of solar cells. This article focuses on recent developments in QDSCs, including 1) the effect of quantum confinement on QDSCs, 2) the multiple exciton generation (MEG) of QDs, 3) fabrication methods of QDs, and 4) nanocrystalline photoelectrodes for solar cells. We also make suggestions for future research on QDSCs. Although the efficiency of QDSCs is still low, we think there will be major breakthroughs in developing QDSCs in the future.

  12. Semiconductor quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Tian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs have been drawing great attention recently as a material for solar energy conversion due to their versatile optical and electrical properties. The QD-sensitized solar cell (QDSC is one of the burgeoning semiconductor QD solar cells that shows promising developments for the next generation of solar cells. This article focuses on recent developments in QDSCs, including 1 the effect of quantum confinement on QDSCs, 2 the multiple exciton generation (MEG of QDs, 3 fabrication methods of QDs, and 4 nanocrystalline photoelectrodes for solar cells. We also make suggestions for future research on QDSCs. Although the efficiency of QDSCs is still low, we think there will be major breakthroughs in developing QDSCs in the future.

  13. Electron transport and coherence in semiconductor quantum dots and rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wiel, W.G.

    2002-01-01

    A number of experiments on electron transport and coherence in semiconductor vertical and lateral quantum dots and semiconductor rings is described. Quantum dots are often referred to as "artificial atoms", because of their similarities with real atoms. Examples of such atom-like properties that

  14. Biosensing with Luminescent Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Mattoussi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs are a recentlydeveloped class of nanomaterial whose unique photophysical properties are helping tocreate a new generation of robust fluorescent biosensors. QD properties of interest forbiosensing include high quantum yields, broad absorption spectra coupled to narrow sizetunablephotoluminescent emissions and exceptional resistance to both photobleaching andchemical degradation. In this review, we examine the progress in adapting QDs for severalpredominantly in vitro biosensing applications including use in immunoassays, asgeneralized probes, in nucleic acid detection and fluorescence resonance energy transfer(FRET - based sensing. We also describe several important considerations when workingwith QDs mainly centered on the choice of material(s and appropriate strategies forattaching biomolecules to the QDs.

  15. Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biomedicial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lijia; Gao, Yanfang; Yan, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanometre-scale crystals, which have unique photophysical properties, such as size-dependent optical properties, high fluorescence quantum yields, and excellent stability against photobleaching. These properties enable QDs as the promising optical labels for the biological applications, such as multiplexed analysis of immunocomplexes or DNA hybridization processes, cell sorting and tracing, in vivo imaging and diagnostics in biomedicine. Meanwhile, QDs can be used as labels for the electrochemical detection of DNA or proteins. This article reviews the synthesis and toxicity of QDs and their optical and electrochemical bioanalytical applications. Especially the application of QDs in biomedicine such as delivering, cell targeting and imaging for cancer research, and in vivo photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer are briefly discussed. PMID:22247690

  16. Electron states in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhayal, Suman S., E-mail: ssdhayal@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, P.O. Box 311427, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Ramaniah, Lavanya M., E-mail: lavanya@barc.gov.in [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ruda, Harry E.; Nair, Selvakumar V., E-mail: selva.nair@utoronto.ca [Centre for Nanotechnology, University of Toronto, 170 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E3 (Canada)

    2014-11-28

    In this work, the electronic structures of quantum dots (QDs) of nine direct band gap semiconductor materials belonging to the group II-VI and III-V families are investigated, within the empirical tight-binding framework, in the effective bond orbital model. This methodology is shown to accurately describe these systems, yielding, at the same time, qualitative insights into their electronic properties. Various features of the bulk band structure such as band-gaps, band curvature, and band widths around symmetry points affect the quantum confinement of electrons and holes. These effects are identified and quantified. A comparison with experimental data yields good agreement with the calculations. These theoretical results would help quantify the optical response of QDs of these materials and provide useful input for applications.

  17. Semiconductor quantum-dot lasers and amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Borri, Paola; Ledentsov, N. N.

    2002-01-01

    We have produced GaAs-based quantum-dot edge-emitting lasers operating at 1.16 mu m with record-low transparency current, high output power, and high internal quantum efficiencies. We have also realized GaAs-based quantum-dot lasers emitting at 1.3 mu m, both high-power edge emitters and low...

  18. Semiconductor quantum dot-inorganic nanotube hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreizman, Ronen; Schwartz, Osip; Deutsch, Zvicka; Itzhakov, Stella; Zak, Alla; Cohen, Sidney R; Tenne, Reshef; Oron, Dan

    2012-03-28

    A synthetic route for preparation of inorganic WS(2) nanotube (INT)-colloidal semiconductor quantum dot (QD) hybrid structures is developed, and transient carrier dynamics on these hybrids are studied via transient photoluminescence spectroscopy utilizing several different types of QDs. Measurements reveal efficient resonant energy transfer from the QDs to the INT upon photoexcitation, provided that the QD emission is at a higher energy than the INT direct gap. Charge transfer in the hybrid system, characterized using QDs with band gaps below the INT direct gap, is found to be absent. This is attributed to the presence of an organic barrier layer due to the relatively long-chain organic ligands of the QDs under study. This system, analogous to carbon nanotube-QD hybrids, holds potential for a variety of applications, including photovoltaics, luminescence tagging and optoelectronics.

  19. High-resolution photoluminescence studies of single semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Østergaard, John Erland; Jensen, Jacob Riis

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots, especially those formed by self-organized growth, are considered a promising material system for future optical devices [1] and the optical properties of quantum dot ensembles have been investigated in detail over the past years. Recently, considerable interest has...... developed in the study of single quantum dots, characterized by sharp atomic-like transition lines revealing their zero-dimensional density of states. Substantial information about the fundamental properties of individual quantum dots, as well as their interactions with other dots and the host lattice, can...

  20. Sensitivity of quantum-dot semiconductor lasers to optical feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, D; Hegarty, S P; Huyet, G; Uskov, A V

    2004-05-15

    The sensitivity of quantum-dot semiconductor lasers to optical feedback is analyzed with a Lang-Kobayashi approach applied to a standard quantum-dot laser model. The carriers are injected into a quantum well and are captured by, or escape from, the quantum dots through either carrier-carrier or phonon-carrier interaction. Because of Pauli blocking, the capture rate into the dots depends on the carrier occupancy level in the dots. Here we show that different carrier capture dynamics lead to a strong modification of the damping of the relaxation oscillations. Regions of increased damping display reduced sensitivity to optical feedback even for a relatively large alpha factor.

  1. Semiconductor quantum dot scintillation under gamma-ray irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létant, S E; Wang, T-F

    2006-12-01

    We recently demonstrated the ability of semiconductor quantum dots to convert alpha radiation into visible photons. In this letter, we report on the scintillation of quantum dots under gamma irradiation and compare the energy resolution of the 59 keV line of americium-241 obtained with our quantum dot-glass nanocomposite to that of a standard sodium iodide scintillator. A factor 2 improvement is demonstrated experimentally and interpreted theoretically using a combination of energy-loss and photon-transport models.

  2. High-resolution photoluminescence studies of single semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Østergaard, John Erland; Jensen, Jacob Riis

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots, especially those formed by self-organized growth, are considered a promising material system for future optical devices [1] and the optical properties of quantum dot ensembles have been investigated in detail over the past years. Recently, considerable interest has dev...

  3. Electron spin and charge in semiconductor quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzerman, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, the spin and charge degree of freedom of electrons in semiconductor lateral and vertical quantum dots are experimentally investigated. The lateral quantum dot devices are defined in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) below the surface of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, by metallic

  4. Aptamer-Modified Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots have attracted extensive interest in the biosensing area because of their properties, such as narrow and symmetric emission with tunable colors, high quantum yield, high stability and controllable morphology. The introduction of various reactive functional groups on the surface of semiconductor quantum dots allows one to conjugate a spectrum of ligands, antibodies, peptides, or nucleic acids for broader and smarter applications. Among these ligands, aptamers exhibit many advantages including small size, high chemical stability, simple synthesis with high batch-to-batch consistency and convenient modification. More importantly, it is easy to introduce nucleic acid amplification strategies and/or nanomaterials to improve the sensitivity of aptamer-based sensing systems. Therefore, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers brings more opportunities in bioanalysis. Here we summarize recent advances on aptamer-functionalized semiconductor quantum dots in biosensing applications. Firstly, we discuss the properties and structure of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers. Then, the applications of biosensors based on aptamer-modified semiconductor quantum dots by different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical, electrochemical and electrogenerated chemiluminescence approaches, is discussed. Finally, our perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this promising field are provided.

  5. Aptamer-Modified Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biosensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lin; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Yongxiang; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2017-07-28

    Semiconductor quantum dots have attracted extensive interest in the biosensing area because of their properties, such as narrow and symmetric emission with tunable colors, high quantum yield, high stability and controllable morphology. The introduction of various reactive functional groups on the surface of semiconductor quantum dots allows one to conjugate a spectrum of ligands, antibodies, peptides, or nucleic acids for broader and smarter applications. Among these ligands, aptamers exhibit many advantages including small size, high chemical stability, simple synthesis with high batch-to-batch consistency and convenient modification. More importantly, it is easy to introduce nucleic acid amplification strategies and/or nanomaterials to improve the sensitivity of aptamer-based sensing systems. Therefore, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers brings more opportunities in bioanalysis. Here we summarize recent advances on aptamer-functionalized semiconductor quantum dots in biosensing applications. Firstly, we discuss the properties and structure of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers. Then, the applications of biosensors based on aptamer-modified semiconductor quantum dots by different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical, electrochemical and electrogenerated chemiluminescence approaches, is discussed. Finally, our perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this promising field are provided.

  6. Quantum state preparation in semiconductor dots by adiabatic rapid passage

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yanwen; Piper, I.M.; Ediger, M.; Brereton, P.; Schmidgall, E. R.; Hugues, M.; Hopkinson, M.; Phillips, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    Preparation of a specific quantum state is a required step for a variety of proposed practical uses of quantum dynamics. We report an experimental demonstration of optical quantum state preparation in a semiconductor quantum dot with electrical readout, which contrasts with earlier work based on Rabi flopping in that the method is robust with respect to variation in the optical coupling. We use adiabatic rapid passage, which is capable of inverting single dots to a specified upper level. We d...

  7. Amplification Without Inversion in Semiconductor Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibadali, A.; Abbasian, K.; Rostami, A.

    In this paper, we have realized amplification without inversion (AWI) in quantum dot (QD). A Y-type four-level system of InxGa1-xN quantum dot has been obtained and investigated for AWI. It has been shown that, with proper setting of control fields' amplitude, we can obtain reasonable gain. With proper setting of phase difference of control fields and probe field, we can obtain considerable gain in resonant wavelength. We have designed this system by solving the Schrödinger-Poisson equations for InxGa1-xN quantum dot in GaN substrate, self-consistently.

  8. Heavily Doped Semiconductor Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David Mocatta; Guy Cohen; Jonathan Schattner; Oded Millo; Eran Rabani; Uri Banin

    2011-01-01

    ... of fundamental understanding of this heavily doped limit under strong quantum confinement. We developed a method to dope semiconductor nanocrystals with metal impurities, enabling control of the band gap and Fermi energy...

  9. Second-harmonic imaging of semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Pedersen, Kjeld;

    2000-01-01

    Resonant second-harmonic generation is observed at room temperature in reflection from self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots grown on a GaAs (001) substrate. The detected second-harmonic signal peaks at a pump wavelength of similar to 885 nm corresponding to the quantum-dot photoluminescence maximum....... In addition, the second-harmonic spectrum exhibits another smaller but well-pronounced peak at 765 nm not found in the linear experiments. We attribute this peak to the generation of second-harmonic radiation in the AlGaAs spacer layer enhanced by the local symmetry at the quantum-dot interface. We further...... observe that second-harmonic images of the quantum-dot surface structure show wavelength-dependent spatial variations. Imaging at different wavelength is used to demonstrate second-harmonic generation from the semiconductor quantum dots. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics....

  10. Pulse train amplification and regeneration based on semiconductor quantum dots waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Öhman, Filip; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    We numerical analyze pulse train amplification up to 200 Gbit/s in quantum dot amplifiers and present regeneration properties with saturable absorber based on semiconductor quantum dot waveguides.......We numerical analyze pulse train amplification up to 200 Gbit/s in quantum dot amplifiers and present regeneration properties with saturable absorber based on semiconductor quantum dot waveguides....

  11. Semiconductor Quantum Dots in Chemical Sensors and Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Nikos Chaniotakis; Frasco, Manuela F.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots are nanometre-scale semiconductor crystals with unique optical properties that are advantageous for the development of novel chemical sensors and biosensors. The surface chemistry of luminescent quantum dots has encouraged the development of multiple probes based on linked recognition molecules such as peptides, nucleic acids or small-molecule ligands. This review overviews the design of sensitive and selective nanoprobes, ranging from the type of target molecules to the optical ...

  12. Semiconductor Quantum Dots in Chemical Sensors and Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Chaniotakis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots are nanometre-scale semiconductor crystals with unique optical properties that are advantageous for the development of novel chemical sensors and biosensors. The surface chemistry of luminescent quantum dots has encouraged the development of multiple probes based on linked recognition molecules such as peptides, nucleic acids or small-molecule ligands. This review overviews the design of sensitive and selective nanoprobes, ranging from the type of target molecules to the optical transduction scheme. Representative examples of quantum dot-based optical sensors from this fast-moving field have been selected and are discussed towards the most promising directions for future research.

  13. Quantum Size- Dependent Third- Order Nonlinear Optical Susceptibility in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ting; XIONG Gui-guang

    2005-01-01

    The density matrix approach has been employed to investigate the optical nonlinear polarization in a single semiconductor quantum dot(QD). Electron states are considered to be confined within a quantum dot with infinite potential barriers. It is shown, by numerical calculation, that the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities for a typical Si quantum dot is dependent on the quantum size of the quantum dot and the frequency of incident light.

  14. Charge transport in semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzel, Tamar Shoshana

    In this thesis, we study charge transport in arrays of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots. Nanocrystals are synthesized in solution, and an organic ligand on the surface of the nanocrystal creates a potential barrier that confines charges in the nanocrystal. Optical absorption measurements reveal discrete electronic energy levels in the nanocrystals resulting from quantum confinement. When nanocrystals are deposited on a surface, they self-assemble into a close-packed array forming a nanocrystal solid. We report electrical transport measurements of a PbSe nanocrystal solid that serves as the channel of an inverted field-effect transistor. We measure the conductance as a function of temperature, source-drain bias and. gate voltage. The data indicates that holes are the majority carriers; the Fermi energy lies in impurity states in the bandgap of the nanocrystal; and charges hop between the highest occupied valence state in the nanocrystals (the 1S h states). At low source-drain voltages, the activation energy for hopping is given by the energy required to generate holes in the 1Sh state plus activation over barriers resulting from site disorder. The barriers from site disorder are eliminated with a sufficiently high source-drain bias. From the gate effect, we extract the Thomas-Fermi screening length and a density of states that is consistent with the estimated value. We consider variable-range hopping as an alternative model, and find no self-consistent evidence for it. Next, we employ charge sensing as an alternative to current measurements for studying transport in materials with localized sites. A narrow-channel MOSFET serves as a charge sensor because its conductance is sensitive to potential fluctuations in the nearby environment caused by the motion of charge. In particular, it is sensitive to the fluctuation of single electrons at the silicon-oxide interface within the MOSFET. We pattern a strip of amorphous germanium within 100 nm of the transistor. The

  15. Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers - Physics and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the physics and applications of quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers based on numerical simulations. These devices possess a number of unique properties compared with other types of semiconductor amplifiers, which should allow enhanced performance of semiconductor...... devices in communication systems in the future. The basic properties of quantum dot devices are investigated, especially regarding the potential of realizing amplification and signal processing without introducing pattern dependence. Also the gain recovery of a single short pulse is modeled...... and an explanation for the fast gain recovery observed experimentally is given. The properties of quantum dot amplifiers operating in the linear regime are investigated. The devices are predicted to show high device gain, high saturated output power, and low noise figure, resulting in a performance, that in some...

  16. Entangled Photons from Radiative Cascades in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    CERN Document Server

    Akopian, N; Poem, E; Berlatzky, Y; Avron, J; Gershoni, D; Gerardot, B D; Petroff, P M

    2005-01-01

    We show, for the first time, that polarization-entangled photon pairs can be produced from the biexciton radiative cascade in a semiconductor quantum dot. We select an energy window that erases the ``which path'' information contained in the colors of the emitted photons, and use tomographic analysis to demonstrate that the photon pair violate Bell's inequality and satisfy Peres criterion for entanglement by more than 3 standard deviations of the experimental uncertainty. Our quantitative analysis show that semiconductor quantum dots can be used as sources for ``event-ready'' entangled photons.

  17. Gain dynamics and saturation in semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2004-01-01

    Quantum dot (QD)-based semiconductor optical amplifiers offer unique properties compared with conventional devices based on bulk or quantum well material. Due to the bandfilling properties of QDs and the existence of a nearby reservoir of carriers in the form of a wetting layer, QD semiconductor...... optical amplifiers may be operated in regimes of high linearity, i.e. with a high saturation power, but can also show strong and fast nonlinearities by breaking the equilibrium between discrete dot states and the continuum of wetting layer states. In this paper, we analyse the interplay of these two...

  18. Gain dynamics and saturation in semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2004-01-01

    Quantum dot (QD)-based semiconductor optical amplifiers offer unique properties compared with conventional devices based on bulk or quantum well material. Due to the bandfilling properties of QDs and the existence of a nearby reservoir of carriers in the form of a wetting layer, QD semiconductor...... carrier populations in terms of a simple rate equation model. Based on the steady-state and small-signal properties of the model, we analyse and discuss the optical modulation response and the four-wave mixing properties of QD semiconductor optical amplifiers, in particular emphasizing the role...

  19. Semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers for optical signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Uskov, A. V.; Bischoff, Svend

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of quantum dot semiconductor amplifiers are investigated theoretically with respect to the potential for ultrafast signal processing. The high-speed signal processing capacity of these devices is found to be limited by the wetting layer dynamics in case of electrical pumping, while...

  20. Semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers for optical signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Uskov, A. V.; Bischoff, Svend

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of quantum dot semiconductor amplifiers are investigated theoretically with respect to the potential for ultrafast signal processing. The high-speed signal processing capacity of these devices is found to be limited by the wetting layer dynamics in case of electrical pumping, while...

  1. Ultrafast Dynamics of Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2007-01-01

    We report on a series of experiments on the dynamical properties of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers. We show how the amplifier responds to one or several ultrafast (170 fs) pulses in rapid succession and our results demonstrate applicability and ultimate limitations to application...

  2. Optically programmable electron spin memory using semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroutvar, Miro; Ducommun, Yann; Heiss, Dominik; Bichler, Max; Schuh, Dieter; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J

    2004-11-04

    The spin of a single electron subject to a static magnetic field provides a natural two-level system that is suitable for use as a quantum bit, the fundamental logical unit in a quantum computer. Semiconductor quantum dots fabricated by strain driven self-assembly are particularly attractive for the realization of spin quantum bits, as they can be controllably positioned, electronically coupled and embedded into active devices. It has been predicted that the atomic-like electronic structure of such quantum dots suppresses coupling of the spin to the solid-state quantum dot environment, thus protecting the 'spin' quantum information against decoherence. Here we demonstrate a single electron spin memory device in which the electron spin can be programmed by frequency selective optical excitation. We use the device to prepare single electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots with a well defined orientation, and directly measure the intrinsic spin flip time and its dependence on magnetic field. A very long spin lifetime is obtained, with a lower limit of about 20 milliseconds at a magnetic field of 4 tesla and at 1 kelvin.

  3. Coherent spin dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amand, T.; Senes, M.; Marie, X.; Renucci, P. [Laboratoire de Nanophysique, Magnetisme et Optoelectronique-LPMC, INSA, 135 avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Urbaszek, B. [Laboratoire de Nanophysique, Magnetisme et Optoelectronique-LPMC, INSA, 135 avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Department of Physics, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Krebs, O.; Laurent, S.; Voisin, P. [Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructures, route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Warburton, R.J. [Department of Physics, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2005-05-01

    The anisotropic exchange interaction (AEI) between electrons and holes is shown to play a central role in quantum dots (QDs) spin dynamics. In neutral QDs, AEI is at the origin of spin quantum beats observed under resonant excitation between the lowest energy doublet of linearly dipole-active eigenstates. In negatively charged QDs, AEI is at the origin of QD emission with opposite helicity to the optic al excitation, under non-resonant excitation conditions. Finally, the possibility of leaving a spin information in the system after recombination of the photo-injected electron-hole pair is discussed with respect to the type and the level of the doping. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cundiff, Steven T. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-05-03

    This final report describes the activities undertaken under grant "Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots". The goal of this program was to implement optical 2-dimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy and apply it to electronic excitations, including excitons, in semiconductors. Specifically of interest are quantum wells that exhibit disorder due to well width fluctuations and quantum dots. In both cases, 2-D spectroscopy will provide information regarding coupling among excitonic localization sites.

  5. Static gain saturation in quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuer, Christian; Kim, Jungho; Laemmlin, Matthias; Liebich, Sven; Capua, Amir; Eisenstein, Gadi; Kovsh, Alexey R; Mikhrin, Sergey S; Krestnikov, Igor L; Bimberg, Dieter

    2008-05-26

    Measurements of saturated amplified spontaneous emission-spectra of quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers demonstrate efficient replenishment of the quantum-dot ground state population from excited states. This saturation behavior is perfectly modeled by a rate equation model. We examined experimentally the dependence of saturation on the drive current and the saturating optical pump power as well as on the pump wavelength. A coherent noise spectral hole is observed with which we assess dynamical properties and propose optimization of the SOA operating parameters for high speed applications.

  6. Carrier-phonon interaction in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seebeck, Jan

    2009-03-10

    In recent years semiconductor quantum dots have been studied extensively due to their wide range of possible applications, predominantly for light sources. For successful applications, efficient carrier scattering processes as well as a detailed understanding of the optical properties are of central importance. The aims of this thesis are theoretical investigations of carrier scattering processes in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots on a quantum-kinetic basis. A consistent treatment of quasi-particle renormalizations and carrier kinetics for non-equilibrium conditions is presented, using the framework of non-equilibrium Green's functions. The focus of our investigations is the interaction of carriers with LO phonons. Important for the understanding of the scattering mechanism are the corresponding quasi-particle properties. Starting from a detailed study of quantum-dot polarons, scattering and dephasing processes are discussed for different temperature regimes. The inclusion of polaron and memory effects turns out to be essential for the description of the carrier kinetics in quantum-dot systems. They give rise to efficient scattering channels and the obtained results are in agreement with recent experiments. Furthermore, a consistent treatment of the carrier-LO-phonon and the carrier-carrier interaction is presented for the optical response of semiconductor quantum dots, both giving rise to equally important contributions to the dephasing. Beside the conventional GaAs material system, currently GaN based light sources are of high topical interest due to their wide range of possible emission frequencies. In this material additionally intrinsic properties like piezoelectric fields and strong band-mixing effects have to be considered. For the description of the optical properties of InN/GaN quantum dots a procedure is presented, where the material properties obtained from an atomistic tight-binding approach are combined with a many-body theory for non

  7. Peptide linkers for the assembly of semiconductor quantum dot bioconjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeneman, Kelly; Mei, Bing C.; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Delehanty, James B.; Mattoussi, Hedi; Medintz, Igor

    2009-02-01

    The use of semiconductor luminescent quantum dots for the labeling of biomolecules is rapidly expanding, however it still requires facile methods to attach functional globular proteins to biologically optimized quantum dots. Here we discuss the development of controlled variable length peptidyl linkers to attach biomolecules to poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) coated quantum dots for both in vitro and in vivo applications. The peptides chosen, β-sheets and alpha helices are appended to polyhistidine sequences and this allows for control of the ratio of peptide bioconjugated to QD and the distance from QD to the biomolecule. Recombinant DNA engineering, bacterial peptide expression and Ni-NTA purification of histidine labeled peptides are utilized to create the linkers. Peptide length is confirmed by in vitro fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET).

  8. Precision placement of heteroepitaxial semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, R.; Gray, J.L.; Kammler, M.; Vandervelde, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Kumar, P.; Pernell, T.; Bean, J.C.; Floro, J.A.; Ross, F.M

    2003-08-15

    We describe two new approaches to the patterning of Si(1 0 0) surfaces for controlled nucleation of heteroepitaxial Ge semiconductor clusters. In the first method, a Ga{sup +}-focused ion beam in situ to the growth chamber is used to create local regions of enhanced Ga{sup +} concentration and surface topography. It is shown that at low ion doses ({approx}10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}), implanted Ga causes local nucleation of Ge clusters upon the implanted region. At higher doses ({>=}10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}), a complex surface topography localizes nucleation of Ge clusters. This approach can be used to seed complex patterns of Ge clusters with diameters of tens of nanometers and positional accuracy of sub-100 nm. The second method employs self-assembly of complex strain-stabilized 'quantum quadruplet' and 'quantum fortress' structures, whereby cooperative island nucleation around shallow strain-relieving pits is identified during Ge{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}/Si(1 0 0) heteroepitaxy. These configurations are kinetically limited structures that exist over a range of compositions, growth temperatures, and growth rates, but which are destabilized by strain relaxation (e.g. by the introduction of misfit dislocations) and by growth conditions which provide high adatom surface mobilities. Both methods have broad potential application to nanoelectronic device architectures.

  9. Photon echo in the ensemble of semiconductor quantum dots spread on a glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimullin, K. R.; Knyazev, M. V.; Arzhanov, A. I.; Nurtdinova, L. A.; Naumov, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    Simple procedure to prepare samples containing semiconductor quantum dots was developed. Test photon echo measurements in the ensemble of quantum dots spread on a glass substrate were performed to study optical dephasing processes.

  10. Microwave-Driven Coherent Operation of a Semiconductor Quantum Dot Charge Qubit (Author’s Manuscript)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-16

    Microwave-driven coherent operation of a semiconductor quantum dot charge qubit Dohun Kim,1 D. R. Ward,1 C. B. Simmons,1 John King Gamble,2 Robin...Fig.4a. Coherent microwave ac-gating of a semiconductor quantum dot charge qubit offers fast ( >GHz) manip- ulation rates for all elementary rotation...2014). [12] Kim, D. et al. Quantum control and process tomography of a semiconductor quantum dot hybrid qubit. Nature 511, 70–74 (2014). [13] Vion, D

  11. Control and measurement of electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Elzerman, J.M.; Hanson, R.; Willems van Beveren, L.H.; Vandersypen, L.M.K. [ERATO Mesoscopic Correlation Project, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft (Netherlands)

    2006-11-15

    We present an overview of experimental steps taken towards using the spin of a single electron trapped in a semiconductor quantum dot as a spin qubit [Loss and DiVincenzo, Phys. Rev. A 57, 120 (1998)]. Fabrication and characterization of a double quantum dot containing two coupled spins has been achieved, as well as initialization and single-shot read-out of the spin state. The relaxation time T {sub 1} of single-spin and two-spin states was found to be on the order of a millisecond, dominated by spin-orbit interactions. The time-averaged dephasing time T{sub 2}{sup *}, due to fluctuations in the ensemble of nuclear spins in the host semiconductor, was determined to be on the order of several tens of nanoseconds. Coherent manipulation of single-spin states can be performed using a microfabricated wire located close to the quantum dot, while two-spin interactions rely on controlling the tunnel barrier connecting the respective quantum dots [Petta et al., Science 309, 2180 (2005)]. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Semiconductor quantum dot toxicity in a mouse in vivo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozrova, Svetlana V.; Baryshnikova, Maria A.; Nabiev, Igor; Sukhanova, Alyona

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are increasingly widely used in clinical medicine. Their most promising potential applications are cancer diagnosis, including in vivo tumour imaging and targeted drug delivery. In this connection, the main questions are whether or not QDs are toxic for humans and, if they are, what concentration is relatively harmless. We have carried out in vivo experiments with CdSe/ZnS fluorescent semiconductor core/shell QDs, which are currently the most widely used in research.

  13. Excitability in a quantum dot semiconductor laser with optical injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, D; Hegarty, S P; Rasskazov, O; Melnik, S; Hartnett, M; Greene, G; McInerney, J G; Rachinskii, D; Huyet, G

    2007-04-13

    We experimentally analyze the dynamics of a quantum dot semiconductor laser operating under optical injection. We observe the appearance of single- and double-pulse excitability at one boundary of the locking region. Theoretical considerations show that these pulses are related to a saddle-node bifurcation on a limit cycle as in the Adler equation. The double pulses are related to a period-doubling bifurcation and occur on the same homoclinic curve as the single pulses.

  14. Quantum-dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers in State Space Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hussein Taleb; Kambiz Abedi; Saeed Golmohammadi

    2013-01-01

    A state space model (SSM) is derived for quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers (QD-SOAs).Rate equations of QD-SOA are formulated in the form of state update equations,where average occupation probabilities along QD-SOA cavity are considered as state variables of the system.Simulations show that SSM calculates QD-SOA's static and dynamic characteristics with high accuracy.

  15. Emission energy control of semiconductor quantum dots using phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Shohei; Sato, Yu; Yamamura, Ariyoshi; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have paid much attention as it is a promising candidate for quantum, optical devices, such as quantum computer and quantum dot laser. We propose a local emission energy control method of semiconductor quantum dots using applying strain by volume expansion of phase change material. Phase change material can change its phase crystalline to amorphous, and the volume expand by its phase change. This method can control energy shift direction and amount by amorphous religion and depth. Using this method, we matched emission energy of two InAs/InP quantum dots. This achievement can connect to observing superradiance phenomenon and quantum dot coupling effect.

  16. THz quantum-confined Stark effect in semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil A.;

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an instantaneous all-optical manipulation of optical absorption at the ground state of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) via a quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) induced by the electric field of incident THz pulses with peak electric fields reaching 200 kV/cm in the free space...

  17. Computer-automated tuning of semiconductor double quantum dots into the single-electron regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, T.A.; Eendebak, P.T.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the computer-automated tuning of gate-defined semiconductor double quantum dots in GaAs heterostructures. We benchmark the algorithm by creating three double quantum dots inside a linear array of four quantum dots. The algorithm sets the correct gate voltages for all the gates to tune the

  18. Optical Nonlinearities and Ultrafast Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimov, V.; McBranch, D.; Schwarz, C.

    1998-08-10

    Low-dimensional semiconductors have attracted great interest due to the potential for tailoring their linear and nonlinear optical properties over a wide-range. Semiconductor nanocrystals (NC's) represent a class of quasi-zero-dimensional objects or quantum dots. Due to quantum cordhement and a large surface-to-volume ratio, the linear and nonlinear optical properties, and the carrier dynamics in NC's are significantly different horn those in bulk materials. napping at surface states can lead to a fast depopulation of quantized states, accompanied by charge separation and generation of local fields which significantly modifies the nonlinear optical response in NC's. 3D carrier confinement also has a drastic effect on the energy relaxation dynamics. In strongly confined NC's, the energy-level spacing can greatly exceed typical phonon energies. This has been expected to significantly inhibit phonon-related mechanisms for energy losses, an effect referred to as a phonon bottleneck. It has been suggested recently that the phonon bottleneck in 3D-confined systems can be removed due to enhanced role of Auger-type interactions. In this paper we report femtosecond (fs) studies of ultrafast optical nonlinearities, and energy relaxation and trap ping dynamics in three types of quantum-dot systems: semiconductor NC/glass composites made by high temperature precipitation, ion-implanted NC's, and colloidal NC'S. Comparison of ultrafast data for different samples allows us to separate effects being intrinsic to quantum dots from those related to lattice imperfections and interface properties.

  19. Optoelectronic Properties of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Solids for Photovoltaic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyakov, A A; Zvaigzne, M A; Nikitenko, V R; Tameev, A R; Martynov, I L; Prezhdo, O V

    2017-09-07

    Quantum dot (QD) solids represent a new type of condensed matter drawing high fundamental and applied interest. Quantum confinement in individual QDs, combined with macroscopic scale whole materials, leads to novel exciton and charge transfer features that are particularly relevant to optoelectronic applications. This Perspective discusses the structure of semiconductor QD solids, optical and spectral properties, charge carrier transport, and photovoltaic applications. The distance between adjacent nanoparticles and surface ligands influences greatly electrostatic interactions between QDs and, hence, charge and energy transfer. It is almost inevitable that QD solids exhibit energetic disorder that bears many similarities to disordered organic semiconductors, with charge and exciton transport described by the multiple trapping model. QD solids are synthesized at low cost from colloidal solutions by casting, spraying, and printing. A judicious selection of a layer sequence involving QDs with different size, composition, and ligands can be used to harvest sunlight over a wide spectral range, leading to inexpensive and efficient photovoltaic devices.

  20. Computer-automated tuning of semiconductor double quantum dots into the single-electron regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, T. A.; Eendebak, P. T.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    2016-05-01

    We report the computer-automated tuning of gate-defined semiconductor double quantum dots in GaAs heterostructures. We benchmark the algorithm by creating three double quantum dots inside a linear array of four quantum dots. The algorithm sets the correct gate voltages for all the gates to tune the double quantum dots into the single-electron regime. The algorithm only requires (1) prior knowledge of the gate design and (2) the pinch-off value of the single gate T that is shared by all the quantum dots. This work significantly alleviates the user effort required to tune multiple quantum dot devices.

  1. Semiconductor quantum dots for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samia, Anna C S; Chen, Xiaobo; Burda, Clemens

    2003-12-24

    The applicability of semiconductor QDs in photodynamic therapy (PDT) was evaluated by studying the interaction between CdSe QDs with a known silicon phthalocyanine PDT photosensitizer, Pc4. The study revealed that the QDs could be used to sensitize the PDT agent through a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism, or interact directly with molecular oxygen via a triplet energy-transfer process (TET). Both mechanisms result in the generation of reactive singlet oxygen species that can be used for PDT cancer therapy.

  2. Single photon sources with single semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Guang-Cun; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Shek, Chan Hung; Huang, Wei

    2014-04-01

    In this contribution, we briefly recall the basic concepts of quantum optics and properties of semiconductor quantum dot (QD) which are necessary to the understanding of the physics of single-photon generation with single QDs. Firstly, we address the theory of quantum emitter-cavity system, the fluorescence and optical properties of semiconductor QDs, and the photon statistics as well as optical properties of the QDs. We then review the localization of single semiconductor QDs in quantum confined optical microcavity systems to achieve their overall optical properties and performances in terms of strong coupling regime, efficiency, directionality, and polarization control. Furthermore, we will discuss the recent progress on the fabrication of single photon sources, and various approaches for embedding single QDs into microcavities or photonic crystal nanocavities and show how to extend the wavelength range. We focus in particular on new generations of electrically driven QD single photon source leading to high repetition rates, strong coupling regime, and high collection efficiencies at elevated temperature operation. Besides, new developments of room temperature single photon emission in the strong coupling regime are reviewed. The generation of indistinguishable photons and remaining challenges for practical single-photon sources are also discussed.

  3. Water-solubilization and functionalization of semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrakowski, Christina M; Isovic, Adela; Snee, Preston T

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are highly fluorescent nanocrystals that have abundant potential for uses in biological imaging and sensing. However, the best materials are synthesized in hydrophobic surfactants that prevent direct aqueous solubilization. While several methods have been developed to impart water-solubility, an aqueous QD dispersion has no inherent useful purpose and must be functionalized further. Due to the colloidal nature of QD dispersions, traditional methods of chemical conjugation in water either have low yields or cause irreversible precipitation of the sample. Here, we describe several methods to water-solubilize QDs and further functionalize the materials with chemical and/or biological vectors.

  4. Photoluminescence intermittency of semiconductor quantum dots in dielectric environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaac, A.

    2006-08-11

    The experimental studies presented in this thesis deal with the photoluminescence intermittency of semiconductor quantum dots in different dielectric environments. Detailed analysis of intermittency statistics from single capped CdSe/ZnS, uncapped CdSe and water dispersed CdSe/ZnS QDs in different matrices provide experimental evidence for the model of photoionization with a charge ejected into the surrounding matrix as the source of PL intermittency phenomenon. We propose a self-trapping model to explain the increase of dark state lifetimes with the dielectric constant of the matrix. (orig.)

  5. Semiconductor quantum dot scintillation under gamma-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letant, S E; Wang, T

    2006-08-23

    We recently demonstrated the ability of semiconductor quantum dots to convert alpha radiation into visible photons. In this letter, we report on the scintillation of quantum dots under gamma-ray irradiation, and compare the energy resolution of the 59 keV line of Americium 241 obtained with our quantum dot-glass nanocomposite material to that of a standard sodium iodide scintillator. A factor 2 improvement is demonstrated experimentally and interpreted theoretically using a combination of energy-loss and photon transport models. These results demonstrate the potential of quantum dots for room-temperature gamma-ray detection, which has applications in medical imaging, environmental monitoring, as well as security and defense. Present technology in gamma radiation detection suffers from flexibility and scalability issues. For example, bulk Germanium provides fine energy resolution (0.2% energy resolution at 1.33 MeV) but requires operation at liquid nitrogen temperature. On the other hand, Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride is a good room temperature detector ( 1% at 662 keV) but the size of the crystals that can be grown is limited to a few centimeters in each direction. Finally, the most commonly used scintillator, Sodium Iodide (NaI), can be grown as large crystals but suffers from a lack of energy resolution (7% energy resolution at 662 keV). Recent advancements in nanotechnology6-10 have provided the possibility of controlling materials synthesis at the molecular level. Both morphology and chemical composition can now be manipulated, leading to radically new material properties due to a combination of quantum confinement and surface to volume ratio effects. One of the main consequences of reducing the size of semiconductors down to nanometer dimensions is to increase the energy band gap, leading to visible luminescence, which suggests that these materials could be used as scintillators. The visible band gap of quantum dots would also ensure both efficient photon counting

  6. Fast gain and phase recovery of semiconductor optical amplifiers based on submonolayer quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Bastian, E-mail: BHerzog@physik.tu-berlin.de; Owschimikow, Nina; Kaptan, Yücel; Kolarczik, Mirco; Switaiski, Thomas; Woggon, Ulrike [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Rosales, Ricardo; Strittmatter, André; Bimberg, Dieter; Pohl, Udo W. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-11-16

    Submonolayer quantum dots as active medium in opto-electronic devices promise to combine the high density of states of quantum wells with the fast recovery dynamics of self-assembled quantum dots. We investigate the gain and phase recovery dynamics of a semiconductor optical amplifier based on InAs submonolayer quantum dots in the regime of linear operation by one- and two-color heterodyne pump-probe spectroscopy. We find an as fast recovery dynamics as for quantum dot-in-a-well structures, reaching 2 ps at moderate injection currents. The effective quantum well embedding the submonolayer quantum dots acts as a fast and efficient carrier reservoir.

  7. Lissajous Rocking Ratchet: Realization in a Semiconductor Quantum Dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platonov, Sergey; Kästner, Bernd; Schumacher, Hans W; Kohler, Sigmund; Ludwig, Stefan

    2015-09-04

    Breaking time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in the absence of a net bias can give rise to directed steady-state nonequilibrium transport phenomena such as ratchet effects. Here we present, theoretically and experimentally, the concept of a Lissajous rocking ratchet based on breaking TRS. Our system is a semiconductor quantum dot with periodically modulated dot-lead tunnel barriers. Broken TRS gives rise to single electron tunneling current. Its direction is fully controlled by exploring frequency and phase relations between the two barrier modulations. The concept of Lissajous ratchets can be realized in a large variety of different systems, including nanoelectrical, nanoelectromechanical, or superconducting circuits. It promises applications based on a detailed on-chip comparison of radio-frequency signals.

  8. Quantum model for mode locking in pulsed semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beugeling, W.; Uhrig, Götz S.; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2016-12-01

    Quantum dots in GaAs/InGaAs structures have been proposed as a candidate system for realizing quantum computing. The short coherence time of the electronic quantum state that arises from coupling to the nuclei of the substrate is dramatically increased if the system is subjected to a magnetic field and to repeated optical pulsing. This enhancement is due to mode locking: oscillation frequencies resonant with the pulsing frequencies are enhanced, while off-resonant oscillations eventually die out. Because the resonant frequencies are determined by the pulsing frequency only, the system becomes immune to frequency shifts caused by the nuclear coupling and by slight variations between individual quantum dots. The effects remain even after the optical pulsing is terminated. In this work, we explore the phenomenon of mode locking from a quantum mechanical perspective. We treat the dynamics using the central-spin model, which includes coupling to 10-20 nuclei and incoherent decay of the excited electronic state, in a perturbative framework. Using scaling arguments, we extrapolate our results to realistic system parameters. We estimate that the synchronization to the pulsing frequency needs time scales in the order of 1 s .

  9. Nanoengineering the second order susceptibility in semiconductor quantum dot heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Marcin; Winter, Shoshana; Kolkowski, Radoslaw; Nogues, Claude; Oron, Dan; Zyss, Joseph; Chauvat, Dominique

    2011-03-28

    We study second-harmonic generation from single CdTe/CdS core/shell rod-on-dot nanocrystals with different geometrical parameters, which allow to fine tune the nonlinear properties of the nanostructure. These hybrid semiconductor-semiconductor nanoparticles exhibit extremely strong and stable second-harmonic emission, although the size of CdTe core is still within the strong quantum confinement regime. The orientation sensitive polarization response is analyzed by means of a pointwise additive model of the third-order tensors associated to the nanoparticle components. These findings prove that engineering of semiconducting complex heterostructures at the single nanoparticle scale can lead to extremely bright nanometric nonlinear light sources.

  10. Charge Transfer Dynamics from Photoexcited Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiming; Yang, Ye; Wu, Kaifeng; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-05-01

    Understanding photoinduced charge transfer from nanomaterials is essential to the many applications of these materials. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding charge transfer from quantum dots (QDs), an ideal model system for investigating fundamental charge transfer properties of low-dimensional quantum-confined nanomaterials. We first discuss charge transfer from QDs to weakly coupled acceptors within the framework of Marcus nonadiabatic electron transfer (ET) theory, focusing on the dependence of ET rates on reorganization energy, electronic coupling, and driving force. Because of the strong electron-hole interaction, we show that ET from QDs should be described by the Auger-assisted ET model, which is significantly different from ET between molecules or from bulk semiconductor electrodes. For strongly quantum-confined QDs on semiconductor surfaces, the coupling can fall within the strong coupling limit, in which case the donor-acceptor interaction and ET properties can be described by the Newns-Anderson model of chemisorption. We also briefly discuss recent progress in controlling charge transfer properties in quantum-confined nanoheterostructures through wavefunction engineering and multiple exciton dissociation. Finally, we identify a few key areas for further research.

  11. Quantum control and process tomography of a semiconductor quantum dot hybrid qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohun; Shi, Zhan; Simmons, C B; Ward, D R; Prance, J R; Koh, Teck Seng; Gamble, John King; Savage, D E; Lagally, M G; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S N; Eriksson, Mark A

    2014-07-03

    The similarities between gated quantum dots and the transistors in modern microelectronics--in fabrication methods, physical structure and voltage scales for manipulation--have led to great interest in the development of quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor quantum dots. Although quantum dot spin qubits have demonstrated long coherence times, their manipulation is often slower than desired for important future applications, such as factoring. Furthermore, scalability and manufacturability are enhanced when qubits are as simple as possible. Previous work has increased the speed of spin qubit rotations by making use of integrated micromagnets, dynamic pumping of nuclear spins or the addition of a third quantum dot. Here we demonstrate a qubit that is a hybrid of spin and charge. It is simple, requiring neither nuclear-state preparation nor micromagnets. Unlike previous double-dot qubits, the hybrid qubit enables fast rotations about two axes of the Bloch sphere. We demonstrate full control on the Bloch sphere with π-rotation times of less than 100 picoseconds in two orthogonal directions, which is more than an order of magnitude faster than any other double-dot qubit. The speed arises from the qubit's charge-like characteristics, and its spin-like features result in resistance to decoherence over a wide range of gate voltages. We achieve full process tomography in our electrically controlled semiconductor quantum dot qubit, extracting high fidelities of 85 per cent for X rotations (transitions between qubit states) and 94 per cent for Z rotations (phase accumulation between qubit states).

  12. Uniform Doping in Quantum-Dots-Based Dilute Magnetic Semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Avijit; Shetty, Amitha; Pavan, A R; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro; Viswanatha, Ranjani

    2016-07-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetic spin within a semiconductor leading to a search for ferromagnets with semiconducting properties has evolved into an important field of dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). Although a lot of research is focused on understanding the still controversial origin of magnetism, efforts are also underway to develop new materials with higher magnetic temperatures for spintronics applications. However, so far, efforts toward quantum-dots(QDs)-based DMS materials are plagued with problems of phase separation, leading to nonuniform distribution of dopant ions. In this work, we have developed a strategy to synthesize highly crystalline, single-domain DMS system starting from a small magnetic core and allowing it to diffuse uniformly inside a thick CdS semiconductor matrix and achieve DMS QDs. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy-scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM-EDX) indicates the homogeneous distribution of magnetic impurities inside the semiconductor QDs leading to superior magnetic property. Further, the versatility of this technique was demonstrated by obtaining ultra large particles (∼60 nm) with uniform doping concentration as well as demonstrating the high quality magnetic response.

  13. Mode Competition in Dual-Mode Quantum Dots Semiconductor Microlaser

    CERN Document Server

    Chusseau, Laurent; Viktorovitch, P; Letartre, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling of quantum dots lasers with the aim of assessing the conditions for stable cw dual-mode operation when the mode separation lies in the THz range. Several possible models suited for InAs quantum dots in InP barriers are analytically evaluated, in particular quantum dots electrically coupled through a direct exchange of excitation by the wetting layer or quantum dots optically coupled through the homogeneous broadening of their optical gain. A stable dual-mode regime is shown possible in all cases when quantum dots are used as active layer whereas a gain medium of quantum well or bulk type inevitably leads to bistable behavior. The choice of a quantum dots gain medium perfectly matched the production of dual-mode lasers devoted to THz generation by photomixing.

  14. Study of the evanescent wave coupled semiconductor quantum dot amplifying fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ke-xin; WANG Ting-yun; PANG Fu-fei

    2007-01-01

    Based on the character of semiconductors and the structure of optical fiber coupler,a new amplifying fiber,coupled semiconductor quantum dot amplifying fiber (CSQDAF),has been presented. A simplified model of PbS quantum dot amplifying fiber is built on the energy band structure of semiconductor quantum dots,and a simple expression deduced from the two-level rate equations and light propagation equations is shown in this paper,by which the gain of quantum dot amplifying fiber can be calculated. A gain of approximately 4.5 dB has been measured in this coupled semiconductor quantum dot amplifying fiber at a wavelength of 1310 nm,when the fiber is pumped by a laser operating at a wavelength of 980 nm with power of 30 mW.

  15. Theory of photovoltaic characteristics of semiconductor quantum dot solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuchang; Asryan, Levon V.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a comprehensive rate equations model for semiconductor quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs). The model is based on the continuity equations with a proper account for quantum dots (QDs). A general analytical expression for the total current density is obtained, and the current-voltage characteristic is studied for several specific situations. The degradation in the open circuit voltage of the QDSC is shown to be due to strong spontaneous radiative recombination in QDs. Due to small absorption coefficient of the QD ensemble, the improvement in the short circuit current density is negligible if only one QD layer is used. If spontaneous radiative recombination would be suppressed in QDs, a QDSC with multiple QD layers would have significantly higher short circuit current density and power conversion efficiency than its conventional counterpart. The effects of photoexcitation of carriers from discrete-energy states in QDs to continuum-energy states are discussed. An extended model, which includes excited states in QDs, is also introduced.

  16. Theory of photovoltaic characteristics of semiconductor quantum dot solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuchang, E-mail: yuchangw@cumt.edu.cn [Low Carbon Energy Institute, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Asryan, Levon V., E-mail: asryan@vt.edu [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-08-28

    We develop a comprehensive rate equations model for semiconductor quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs). The model is based on the continuity equations with a proper account for quantum dots (QDs). A general analytical expression for the total current density is obtained, and the current-voltage characteristic is studied for several specific situations. The degradation in the open circuit voltage of the QDSC is shown to be due to strong spontaneous radiative recombination in QDs. Due to small absorption coefficient of the QD ensemble, the improvement in the short circuit current density is negligible if only one QD layer is used. If spontaneous radiative recombination would be suppressed in QDs, a QDSC with multiple QD layers would have significantly higher short circuit current density and power conversion efficiency than its conventional counterpart. The effects of photoexcitation of carriers from discrete-energy states in QDs to continuum-energy states are discussed. An extended model, which includes excited states in QDs, is also introduced.

  17. Injection Locking of a Semiconductor Double Quantum Dot Micromaser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y-Y; Stehlik, J; Gullans, M J; Taylor, J M; Petta, J R

    2015-11-01

    Emission linewidth is an important figure of merit for masers and lasers. We recently demonstrated a semiconductor double quantum dot (DQD) micromaser where photons are generated through single electron tunneling events. Charge noise directly couples to the DQD energy levels, resulting in a maser linewidth that is more than 100 times larger than the Schawlow-Townes prediction. Here we demonstrate a linewidth narrowing of more than a factor 10 by locking the DQD emission to a coherent tone that is injected to the input port of the cavity. We measure the injection locking range as a function of cavity input power and show that it is in agreement with the Adler equation. The position and amplitude of distortion sidebands that appear outside of the injection locking range are quantitatively examined. Our results show that this unconventional maser, which is impacted by strong charge noise and electron-phonon coupling, is well described by standard laser models.

  18. Andreev molecules in semiconductor nanowire double quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhaoen; Tacla, Alexandre B; Hocevar, Moïra; Car, Diana; Plissard, Sébastien R; Bakkers, Erik P A M; Daley, Andrew J; Pekker, David; Frolov, Sergey M

    2017-09-19

    Chains of quantum dots coupled to superconductors are promising for the realization of the Kitaev model of a topological superconductor. While individual superconducting quantum dots have been explored, control of longer chains requires understanding of interdot coupling. Here, double quantum dots are defined by gate voltages in indium antimonide nanowires. High transparency superconducting niobium titanium nitride contacts are made to each of the dots in order to induce superconductivity, as well as probe electron transport. Andreev bound states induced on each of dots hybridize to define Andreev molecular states. The evolution of these states is studied as a function of charge parity on the dots, and in magnetic field. The experiments are found in agreement with a numerical model.Quantum dots in a nanowire are one possible approach to creating a solid-state quantum simulator. Here, the authors demonstrate the coupling of electronic states in a double quantum dot to form Andreev molecule states; a potential building block for longer chains suitable for quantum simulation.

  19. Assembly and separation of semiconductor quantum dot dimers and trimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangxing; Stöttinger, Sven; Battagliarin, Glauco; Hinze, Gerald; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Basché, Thomas

    2011-11-16

    Repeated precipitation of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QD) from a good solvent by adding a poor solvent leads to an increasing number of QD oligomers after redispersion in the good solvent. By using density gradient ultracentrifugation we have been able to separate QD monomer, dimer, and trimer fractions from higher oligomers in such solutions. In the corresponding fractions QD dimers and trimers have been enriched up to 90% and 64%, respectively. Besides directly coupled oligomers, QD dimers and trimers were also assembled by linkage with a rigid terrylene diimide dye (TDI) and separated again by ultracentrifugation. High-resolution transmission electron micrographs show that the interparticle distances are clearly larger than those for directly coupled dots proving that the QDs indeed are cross-linked by the dye. Moreover, energy transfer from the QDs to the TDI "bridge" has been observed. Individual oligomers (directly coupled or dye-linked) can be readily deposited on a substrate and studied simultaneously by scanning force and optical microscopy. Our simple and effective scheme is applicable to a wide range of ligand stabilized colloidal nanoparticles and opens the way to a detailed study of electronic coupling in, e.g., QD molecules.

  20. Quantum simulation of a Fermi-Hubbard model using a semiconductor quantum dot array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensgens, T.; Fujita, T.; Janssen, L.; Li, Xiao; van Diepen, C. J.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Das Sarma, S.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    2017-08-01

    Interacting fermions on a lattice can develop strong quantum correlations, which are the cause of the classical intractability of many exotic phases of matter. Current efforts are directed towards the control of artificial quantum systems that can be made to emulate the underlying Fermi-Hubbard models. Electrostatically confined conduction-band electrons define interacting quantum coherent spin and charge degrees of freedom that allow all-electrical initialization of low-entropy states and readily adhere to the Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian. Until now, however, the substantial electrostatic disorder of the solid state has meant that only a few attempts at emulating Fermi-Hubbard physics on solid-state platforms have been made. Here we show that for gate-defined quantum dots this disorder can be suppressed in a controlled manner. Using a semi-automated and scalable set of experimental tools, we homogeneously and independently set up the electron filling and nearest-neighbour tunnel coupling in a semiconductor quantum dot array so as to simulate a Fermi-Hubbard system. With this set-up, we realize a detailed characterization of the collective Coulomb blockade transition, which is the finite-size analogue of the interaction-driven Mott metal-to-insulator transition. As automation and device fabrication of semiconductor quantum dots continue to improve, the ideas presented here will enable the investigation of the physics of ever more complex many-body states using quantum dots.

  1. Quantum simulation of a Fermi-Hubbard model using a semiconductor quantum dot array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensgens, T; Fujita, T; Janssen, L; Li, Xiao; Van Diepen, C J; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Das Sarma, S; Vandersypen, L M K

    2017-08-02

    Interacting fermions on a lattice can develop strong quantum correlations, which are the cause of the classical intractability of many exotic phases of matter. Current efforts are directed towards the control of artificial quantum systems that can be made to emulate the underlying Fermi-Hubbard models. Electrostatically confined conduction-band electrons define interacting quantum coherent spin and charge degrees of freedom that allow all-electrical initialization of low-entropy states and readily adhere to the Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian. Until now, however, the substantial electrostatic disorder of the solid state has meant that only a few attempts at emulating Fermi-Hubbard physics on solid-state platforms have been made. Here we show that for gate-defined quantum dots this disorder can be suppressed in a controlled manner. Using a semi-automated and scalable set of experimental tools, we homogeneously and independently set up the electron filling and nearest-neighbour tunnel coupling in a semiconductor quantum dot array so as to simulate a Fermi-Hubbard system. With this set-up, we realize a detailed characterization of the collective Coulomb blockade transition, which is the finite-size analogue of the interaction-driven Mott metal-to-insulator transition. As automation and device fabrication of semiconductor quantum dots continue to improve, the ideas presented here will enable the investigation of the physics of ever more complex many-body states using quantum dots.

  2. Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Bioimaging and Biodiagnostic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairdolf, Brad A.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stokes, Todd H.; Wang, May D.; Young, Andrew N.; Nie, Shuming

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are light-emitting particles on the nanometer scale that have emerged as a new class of fluorescent labels for chemical analysis, molecular imaging, and biomedical diagnostics. Compared with traditional fluorescent probes, QDs have unique optical and electronic properties such as size-tunable light emission, narrow and symmetric emission spectra, and broad absorption spectra that enable the simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colors. QDs are also considerably brighter and more resistant to photobleaching than are organic dyes and fluorescent proteins. These properties are well suited for dynamic imaging at the single-molecule level and for multiplexed biomedical diagnostics at ultrahigh sensitivity. Here, we discuss the fundamental properties of QDs; the development of next-generation QDs; and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry, dynamic cellular imaging, and medical diagnostics. For in vivo and clinical imaging, the potential toxicity of QDs remains a major concern. However, the toxic nature of cadmium-containing QDs is no longer a factor for in vitro diagnostics, so the use of multicolor QDs for molecular diagnostics and pathology is probably the most important and clinically relevant application for semiconductor QDs in the immediate future. PMID:23527547

  3. From Random Telegraph to Gaussian Stochastic Noises: Decoherence and Spectral Diffusion in a Semiconductor Quantum Dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Berthelot

    2010-01-01

    We emphasize the generality and the versatility of our model where the inclusion of asymmetric jump processes appears as an essential extension for the understanding of semiconductor quantum dot physics.

  4. Infrared Focal Plane Arrays Based on Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    studied in the framework of this, including the collaborating researchers in each of them, are detailed below: 1. “Ultra Small InAs/GaInP/ InP Quantum Dots ”: with...of detectors, which will be attached to Si based signal processors. D:\\FINAL REPORT.doc 4 Part 1 Ultra Small InAs/GaInP/ InP Quantum Dots The heights of...an ensemble of self-assembled InAs/GaAs or InAs/ InP quantum dots (QDs) are typically in the range of 10-30 monolayers [1]. Here, we report on InAs

  5. Ultrafast optical signal processing using semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear properties of quantum dot amplifiers are discussed on the basis of an extensive theoretical model. These devices show great potential for linear amplification as well as ultrafast signal processing.......The linear and nonlinear properties of quantum dot amplifiers are discussed on the basis of an extensive theoretical model. These devices show great potential for linear amplification as well as ultrafast signal processing....

  6. Noise and saturation properties of semiconductor quantum dot optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of quantum dot optical amplifiers. Due to the presence of a reservoir of wetting layer states, the saturation and noise properties differ markedly from bulk or QW amplifiers and may be significantly improved.......We present a detailed theoretical analysis of quantum dot optical amplifiers. Due to the presence of a reservoir of wetting layer states, the saturation and noise properties differ markedly from bulk or QW amplifiers and may be significantly improved....

  7. Pure dephasing of single Mn spin in semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dingyang; Lai, Wenxi; Yang, Wen

    2017-08-01

    We present comprehensive analytical and numerical studies on the pure dephasing of a single Mn spin in a semiconductor quantum dot due to (i) its sp-d exchange interaction with an electronic environment, and (ii) its hyperfine interaction with the nuclear spin environment. For (i), by modeling the electronic environment by an open two-level system, we provide exact analytical expressions and present detailed analysis for the Mn spin pure dephasing in both the Markovian and non-Markovian regimes. This provides a clear physical picture and a general theoretical framework based on which we estimate the Mn spin pure dephasing due to various fluctuations (such as thermal excitation, optical pumping, tunneling, or electron/hole spin relaxation) of the electronic environment and reveals a series of interesting behaviors, such as thermal, optical, and electrical control of the crossover between the Markov and non-Markov regimes. In particular, we find rapid Mn spin pure dephasing on a nanosecond time scale by the thermal fluctuation and optical pumping, but these mechanisms can be strongly suppressed by shifting the electron envelope function relative to the Mn atom with an external electric field through the quantum-confined Stark effect. The thermal fluctuation mechanism is also exponentially suppressed at low temperature. For (ii), we find that the Mn spin dephasing time is limited by the thermal fluctuation of the nuclear spins to a few microseconds even at low temperature and its value varies from sample to sample, depending on the distribution of spinful isotopes on the nearest-neighbor sites surrounding the substitutional Mn atom. Our findings may be useful to understand and suppress the Mn spin pure dephasing for its applications in quantum information processing.

  8. Spin dynamics and hyperfine interaction in InAs semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eble, B.; Krebs, O.; Voisin, P.; Lemaitre, A.; Kudelski, A. [CNRS - Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructures, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Braun, P.F.; Lombez, L.; Marie, X.; Urbaszek, B.; Amand, T.; Lagarde, D.; Renucci, P. [Laboratoire de Nanophysique Magnetisme et Optoelectronique, INSA, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Kowalik, K. [CNRS - Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructures, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Kalevich, V.K.; Kavokin, K.V. [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, St-Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2006-08-15

    We present a detailed study of the hyperfine interaction between carrier and nuclear spins in InAs semiconductor quantum dots. Time resolved measurements on excitons in positively charged quantum dots show the electron spin relaxation due to random fluctuations of the spin orientation of the nuclei in the quantum dot. A complimentary aspect of the hyperfine interaction can be uncovered in single dot continuous wave photoluminescence experiments in a weak magnetic field, namely the Overhauser shift due to the dynamic polarisation of the nuclei following excitation with circularly polarised light. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Energy transfer processes in semiconductor quantum dots: bacteriorhodopsin hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakovich, Aliaksandra; Sukhanova, Alyona; Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Troyon, Michel; Cohen, Jacques H. M.; Rakovich, Yury; Donegan, John F.; Nabiev, Igor

    2009-05-01

    The potential impact of nanoscience on energy transfer processes in biomolecules was investigated on the example of a complex between fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals and photochromic membrane protein. The interactions between colloidal CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and bacteriorhodopsin (bR) protein were studied by a variety of spectroscopic techniques, including integrated and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies, zeta potential and size measurement, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. QDs' luminescence was found to be strongly modulated by bacteriorhodopsin, but in a controllable way. Decreasing emission lifetimes and blue shifts in QDs' emission at increasing protein concentrations suggest that quenching occurs via Förster resonance energy transfer. On the other hand, concave Stern-Volmer plots and sigmoidal photoluminescence quenching curves imply that the self-assembling of NCs and bR exists, and the number of nanocrystals (NCs) per bacteriorhodopsin contributing to energy transfer can be determined from the inflection points of sigmoidal curves. This number was found to be highly dependent not only on the spectral overlap between NC emission and bR absorption bands, but also on nanocrystal surface charge. These results demonstrate the potential of how inorganic nanoscale materials can be employed to improve the generic molecular functions of biomolecules. The observed interactions between CdTe nanocrystals and bacteriorhodopsin can provide the basis for the development of novel functional materials with unique photonic properties and applications in areas such as all-optical switching, photovoltaics and data storage.

  10. Continuing progress toward controlled intracellular delivery of semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, Joyce; Delehanty, James B; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-01-01

    The biological applications of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) continue to grow at a nearly unabated pace. This growth is driven, in part, by their unique photophysical and physicochemical properties which have allowed them to be used in many different roles in cellular biology including: as superior fluorophores for a wide variety of cellular labeling applications; as active platforms for assembly of nanoscale sensors; and, more recently, as a powerful tool to understand the mechanisms of nanoparticle mediated drug delivery. Given that controlled cellular delivery is at the intersection of all these applications, the latest progress in delivering QDs to cells is examined here. A brief discussion of relevant considerations including the importance of materials preparation and bioconjugation along with the continuing issue of endosomal sequestration is initially provided for context. Methods for the cellular delivery of QDs are then highlighted including those based on passive exposure, facilitated strategies that utilize peptides or polymers and fully active modalities such as electroporation and other mechanically based methods. Following on this, the exciting advent of QD cellular delivery using multiple or combined mechanisms is then previewed. Several recent methods reporting endosomal escape of QD materials in cells are also examined in detail with a focus on the mechanisms by which access to the cytosol is achieved. The ongoing debate over QD cytotoxicity is also discussed along with a perspective on how this field will continue to evolve in the future. PMID:25154379

  11. Growth and Defect Characterization of Quantum Dot-Embedded III-V Semiconductors for Advanced Space Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-15

    intermediate band, quantum dots, metamorphic III-V semiconductors, virtual substrates, defect spectroscopy, molecular beam epitaxy 16. SECURITY...AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2014-0059 TR-2014-0059 GROWTH AND DEFECT CHARACTERIZATION OF QUANTUM DOT-EMBEDDED III-V SEMICONDUCTORS FOR ADVANCED...COVERED (From - To) 2 4 May 2012 – 06 Mar 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Growth and Defect Characterization of Quantum Dot-Embedded III-V Semiconductors

  12. Quantum Electrodynamics with Semiconductor Quantum Dots Coupled to Anderson‐localized Random Cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapienza, Luca; Nielsen, Henri Thyrrestrup; Stobbe, Søren

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the spontaneous emission decay rate of semiconductor quantum dots can be strongly modified by the coupling to disorder-induced Anderson-localized photonic modes. We experimentally measure, by means of time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, the enhancement...... of the spontaneous emission decay rate by up to a factor 15 and an efficiency of channeling single photons into Anderson-localized modes reaching values as high as 94%. These results prove that disordered photonic media provide an efficient platform for quantum electrodynamics, offering a novel route to quantum...

  13. Bias-induced photoluminescence quenching of single colloidal quantum dots embedded in organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Dorn, August; Nair, Gautham P; Bulović, Vladimir; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate reversible quenching of the photoluminescence from single CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots embedded in thin films of the molecular organic semiconductor N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (TPD) in a layered device structure. Our analysis, based on current and charge carrier density, points toward field ionization as the dominant photoluminescence quenching mechanism. Blinking traces from individual quantum dots reveal that the photoluminescence amplitude decreases continuously as a function of increasing forward bias even at the single quantum dot level. In addition, we show that quantum dot photoluminescence is quenched by aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq3) in chloroform solutions as well as in thin solid films of Alq3 whereas TPD has little effect. This highlights the importance of chemical compatibility between semiconductor nanocrystals and surrounding organic semiconductors. Our study helps elucidate elementary interactions between quantum dots and organic semiconductors, knowledge needed for designing efficient quantum dot organic optoelectronic devices.

  14. Long coherence times in self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Leosson, K.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2002-01-01

    We report measurements of ultra-long coherence in self-assembled quantum dots. Transient four-wave mixing experiments at 5 K show an average dephasing time of 372 ps, corresponding to a homogeneous linewidth of 3.5 mueV, which is significantly smaller than the linewidth observed in single-dot...... luminescence. Time-resolved luminescence measurements show a lifetime of the dot ground state of 800 ps demonstrating the presence of pure dephasing at finite temperature. The homogeneous width is lifetime limited only at temperatures approaching 0 K....

  15. QCAD simulation and optimization of semiconductor double quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Erik; Gao, Xujiao; Kalashnikova, Irina; Muller, Richard Partain; Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Young, Ralph Watson

    2013-12-01

    We present the Quantum Computer Aided Design (QCAD) simulator that targets modeling quantum devices, particularly silicon double quantum dots (DQDs) developed for quantum qubits. The simulator has three di erentiating features: (i) its core contains nonlinear Poisson, e ective mass Schrodinger, and Con guration Interaction solvers that have massively parallel capability for high simulation throughput, and can be run individually or combined self-consistently for 1D/2D/3D quantum devices; (ii) the core solvers show superior convergence even at near-zero-Kelvin temperatures, which is critical for modeling quantum computing devices; (iii) it couples with an optimization engine Dakota that enables optimization of gate voltages in DQDs for multiple desired targets. The Poisson solver includes Maxwell- Boltzmann and Fermi-Dirac statistics, supports Dirichlet, Neumann, interface charge, and Robin boundary conditions, and includes the e ect of dopant incomplete ionization. The solver has shown robust nonlinear convergence even in the milli-Kelvin temperature range, and has been extensively used to quickly obtain the semiclassical electrostatic potential in DQD devices. The self-consistent Schrodinger-Poisson solver has achieved robust and monotonic convergence behavior for 1D/2D/3D quantum devices at very low temperatures by using a predictor-correct iteration scheme. The QCAD simulator enables the calculation of dot-to-gate capacitances, and comparison with experiment and between solvers. It is observed that computed capacitances are in the right ballpark when compared to experiment, and quantum con nement increases capacitance when the number of electrons is xed in a quantum dot. In addition, the coupling of QCAD with Dakota allows to rapidly identify which device layouts are more likely leading to few-electron quantum dots. Very efficient QCAD simulations on a large number of fabricated and proposed Si DQDs have made it possible to provide fast feedback for design

  16. Optical dynamics in low-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures. Quantum dots and quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Carsten

    2008-07-01

    This work is focused on the optical dynamics of mesoscopic semiconductor heterostructures, using as prototypes zero-dimensional quantum dots and quantum cascade lasers which consist of quasitwo- dimensional quantum wells. Within a density matrix theory, a microscopic many-particle theory is applied to study scattering effects in these structures: the coupling to external as well as local fields, electron-phonon coupling, coupling to impurities, and Coulomb coupling. For both systems, the investigated effects are compared to experimentally observed results obtained during the past years. In quantum dots, the three-dimensional spatial confinement leads to the necessity to consider a quantum kinetic description of the dynamics, resulting in non-Markovian electron-phonon effects. This can be seen in the spectral phonon sidebands due to interaction with acoustic phonons as well as a damping of nonlinear Rabi oscillations which shows a nonmonotonous intensity and pulse duration dependence. An analysis of the inclusion of the self-interaction of the quantum dot shows that no dynamical local field terms appear for the simple two-level model. Considering local fields which have their origin in many quantum dots, consequences for a two-level quantum dot such as a zero-phonon line broadening and an increasing signal in photon echo experiments are found. For the use of quantum dots in an optical spin control scheme, it is found that the dephasing due to the electron-phonon interaction can be dominant in certain regimes. Furthermore, soliton and breather solutions are studied analytically in nonlinear quantum dot ensembles. Generalizing to quasi-two-dimensional structures, the intersubband dynamics of quantum cascade laser structures is investigated. A dynamical theory is considered in which the temporal evolution of the subband populations and the current density as well as the influence of scattering effects is studied. In the nonlinear regime, the scattering dependence and

  17. Quantum-Confined Stark Effect in Ensemble of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-Bing; ZHANG Hui-Chao; ZHANG Jia-Yu; Huaipeng Su; Y.Andrew Wang

    2010-01-01

    @@ The presence of a strong,changing,randomly-oriented,local electric field,which is induced by the photo-ionization that occurs universally in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots(QDs),makes it difficult to observe the quantumconfined Stark effect in ensemble of colloidal QDs.We propose a way to inhibit such a random electric field,and a clear quantum-confined Stark shift is observed directly in close-packed colloidal QDs.Besides the applications in optical switches and modulators,our experimental results indicate how the oscillator strengths of the optical transitions are changed under external electric fields.

  18. Enhancing slow and fast light effects in quantum dot semiconductor waveguides through ultrafast dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We show that ultrafast carrier dynamics plays an important role on slow and fast light effects based on coherent population oscillations in quantum dot semiconductor waveguides. Fast light in the gain regime and slow light in the absorption regime are found to be enhanced at frequencies beyond th...... the usual limits of the carrier lifetime. The effects are investigated by a comprehensive model and shown to originate from non-equilibrium dynamics within the quantum dot carrier populations....

  19. Enhancing slow- and fast-light effects in quantum dot semiconductor waveguides through ultrafast dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we review our theoretical work on slow and fast light effects in quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers (QD SOAs), in particular we investigate the carrier dynamical contributions to the dynamic gain grating and cross gain modulation induced by unique ultrafast inter...... in microwave photonics, especially targeting the millimeter wave range, we propose that quantum dot devices might be used to realize an optically fed microwave phase shifter in the frequency range of 100GHz....

  20. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Pedersen, K.;

    2001-01-01

    Second-harmonic (SH) optical imaging of self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown on a GaAs(0 0 1) substrate has been accomplished at room temperature by use of respectively a scanning far-field optical microscope in reflection mode and a scanning near-field optical microscope...

  1. Ultrafast dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers and all-optical processing: Bulk versus quantum dot devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Berg, Tommy Winther; Magnúsdóttir, Ingibjörg

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the dynamical properties of semiconductor optical amplifiers and the importance for all-optical signal processing. In particular, the dynamics of quantum dot amplifiers is considered and it is suggested that these may be operated at very high bit-rates without significant patterning...... effects, as opposed to quantum well or bulk devices....

  2. Emission polarization control in semiconductor quantum dots coupled to a photonic crystal microcavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, E; Martínez, L J; Nowak, A K; van der Meulen, H P; Calleja, J M; Tejedor, C; Prieto, I; Granados, D; Taboada, A G; García, J M; Postigo, P A

    2010-06-07

    We study the optical emission of single semiconductor quantum dots weakly coupled to a photonic-crystal micro-cavity. The linearly polarized emission of a selected quantum dot changes continuously its polarization angle, from nearly perpendicular to the cavity mode polarization at large detuning, to parallel at zero detuning, and reversing sign for negative detuning. The linear polarization rotation is qualitatively interpreted in terms of the detuning dependent mixing of the quantum dot and cavity states. The present result is relevant to achieve continuous control of the linear polarization in single photon emitters.

  3. Coherently driven semiconductor quantum dot at a telecommunication wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hiroyuki; Nakaoka, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Kumagai, Naoto; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2008-09-01

    We proposed and demonstrate use of optical driving pulses at a telecommunication wavelength for exciton-based quantum gate operation. The exciton in a self-assembled quantum dot is coherently manipulated at 1.3 microm through Rabi oscillation. The telecom-band exciton-qubit system incorporates standard optical fibers and fiber optic devices. The coherent manipulation of the two-level system compatible with flexible and stable fiber network paves the way toward practical optical implementation of quantum information processing devices.

  4. Formation of strain-induced quantum dots in gated semiconductor nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Thorbeck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A long-standing mystery in the field of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs is: Why are there so many unintentional dots (also known as disorder dots which are neither expected nor controllable. It is typically assumed that these unintentional dots are due to charged defects, however the frequency and predictability of the location of the unintentional QDs suggests there might be additional mechanisms causing the unintentional QDs besides charged defects. We show that the typical strains in a semiconductor nanostructure from metal gates are large enough to create strain-induced quantum dots. We simulate a commonly used QD device architecture, metal gates on bulk silicon, and show the formation of strain-induced QDs. The strain-induced QD can be eliminated by replacing the metal gates with poly-silicon gates. Thus strain can be as important as electrostatics to QD device operation operation.

  5. Formation of strain-induced quantum dots in gated semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorbeck, Ted, E-mail: tcthorbeck@wisc.edu [Quantum Measurement Division, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States); Joint Quantum Institute and Dept. of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland (United States); Zimmerman, Neil M. [Quantum Measurement Division, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States)

    2015-08-15

    A long-standing mystery in the field of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is: Why are there so many unintentional dots (also known as disorder dots) which are neither expected nor controllable. It is typically assumed that these unintentional dots are due to charged defects, however the frequency and predictability of the location of the unintentional QDs suggests there might be additional mechanisms causing the unintentional QDs besides charged defects. We show that the typical strains in a semiconductor nanostructure from metal gates are large enough to create strain-induced quantum dots. We simulate a commonly used QD device architecture, metal gates on bulk silicon, and show the formation of strain-induced QDs. The strain-induced QD can be eliminated by replacing the metal gates with poly-silicon gates. Thus strain can be as important as electrostatics to QD device operation operation.

  6. Broadband microwave phase shifter based on high speed cross gain modulation in quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We present a scheme to achieve tunable ~180 degrees microwave phase shifts at frequencies exceeding 100 GHz based on high speed cross gain modulation in quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers.......We present a scheme to achieve tunable ~180 degrees microwave phase shifts at frequencies exceeding 100 GHz based on high speed cross gain modulation in quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers....

  7. Far-off-resonant coupling between a semiconductor quantum dot and an optical cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Mølbjerg; Settnes, Mikkel; Nielsen, Per Kær

    2014-01-01

    We present an investigation of the far-off-resonant coupling between a semiconductor quantum dot and a cavity. We show that the enhanced coupling observed in experiments is explained by Coulomb interactions with wetting layer carriers. © 2014 Optical Society of America.......We present an investigation of the far-off-resonant coupling between a semiconductor quantum dot and a cavity. We show that the enhanced coupling observed in experiments is explained by Coulomb interactions with wetting layer carriers. © 2014 Optical Society of America....

  8. Charge transport through a semiconductor quantum dot-ring nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Marcin; Kędzierska, Barbara; Janus-Zygmunt, Iwona; Gorczyca-Goraj, Anna; Wach, Elżbieta; Zipper, Elżbieta; Maśka, Maciej M

    2015-07-08

    Transport properties of a gated nanostructure depend crucially on the coupling of its states to the states of electrodes. In the case of a single quantum dot the coupling, for a given quantum state, is constant or can be slightly modified by additional gating. In this paper we consider a concentric dot-ring nanostructure (DRN) and show that its transport properties can be drastically modified due to the unique geometry. We calculate the dc current through a DRN in the Coulomb blockade regime and show that it can efficiently work as a single-electron transistor (SET) or a current rectifier. In both cases the transport characteristics strongly depend on the details of the confinement potential. The calculations are carried out for low and high bias regime, the latter being especially interesting in the context of current rectification due to fast relaxation processes.

  9. Fano Effect and Quantum Entanglement in Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong He

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review the investigation for the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon field in metal nanoparticle (MNP and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs in hybrid SQD-MNP system under the full quantum description. The exciton-plasmon interaction gives rise to the modified decay rate and the exciton energy shift which are related to the exciton energy by using a quantum transformation method. We illustrate the responses of the hybrid SQD-MNP system to external field, and reveal Fano effect shown in the absorption spectrum. We demonstrate quantum entanglement between two SQD mediated by surface plasmon field. In the absence of a laser field, concurrence of quantum entanglement will disappear after a few ns. If the laser field is present, the steady states appear, so that quantum entanglement produced will reach a steady-state entanglement. Because one of all optical pathways to induce Fano effect refers to the generation of quantum entangled states, It is shown that the concurrence of quantum entanglement can be obtained by observation for Fano effect. In a hybrid system including two MNP and a SQD, because the two Fano quantum interference processes share a segment of all optical pathways, there is correlation between the Fano effects of the two MNP. The investigations for the light-matter interaction in hybrid SQD-MNP system can pave the way for the development of the optical processing devices and quantum information based on the exciton-plasmon interaction.

  10. Fano Effect and Quantum Entanglement in Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we review the investigation for the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon field in metal nanoparticle (MNP) and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in hybrid SQD-MNP system under the full quantum description. The exciton-plasmon interaction gives rise to the modified decay rate and the exciton energy shift which are related to the exciton energy by using a quantum transformation method. We illustrate the responses of the hybrid SQD-MNP system to external field, and reveal Fano effect shown in the absorption spectrum. We demonstrate quantum entanglement between two SQD mediated by surface plasmon field. In the absence of a laser field, concurrence of quantum entanglement will disappear after a few ns. If the laser field is present, the steady states appear, so that quantum entanglement produced will reach a steady-state entanglement. Because one of all optical pathways to induce Fano effect refers to the generation of quantum entangled states, It is shown that the concurrence of quantum entanglement can be obtained by observation for Fano effect. In a hybrid system including two MNP and a SQD, because the two Fano quantum interference processes share a segment of all optical pathways, there is correlation between the Fano effects of the two MNP. The investigations for the light-matter interaction in hybrid SQD-MNP system can pave the way for the development of the optical processing devices and quantum information based on the exciton-plasmon interaction. PMID:28632165

  11. Fano Effect and Quantum Entanglement in Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2017-06-20

    In this paper, we review the investigation for the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon field in metal nanoparticle (MNP) and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in hybrid SQD-MNP system under the full quantum description. The exciton-plasmon interaction gives rise to the modified decay rate and the exciton energy shift which are related to the exciton energy by using a quantum transformation method. We illustrate the responses of the hybrid SQD-MNP system to external field, and reveal Fano effect shown in the absorption spectrum. We demonstrate quantum entanglement between two SQD mediated by surface plasmon field. In the absence of a laser field, concurrence of quantum entanglement will disappear after a few ns. If the laser field is present, the steady states appear, so that quantum entanglement produced will reach a steady-state entanglement. Because one of all optical pathways to induce Fano effect refers to the generation of quantum entangled states, It is shown that the concurrence of quantum entanglement can be obtained by observation for Fano effect. In a hybrid system including two MNP and a SQD, because the two Fano quantum interference processes share a segment of all optical pathways, there is correlation between the Fano effects of the two MNP. The investigations for the light-matter interaction in hybrid SQD-MNP system can pave the way for the development of the optical processing devices and quantum information based on the exciton-plasmon interaction.

  12. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid-state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...... of quantum dots, however, results in a large inhomogeneous broadening of quantum dot spectra. Work on self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots will be presented. Properties of atom-like single-dot states are investigated optically using high spatial and spectral resolution. Single-dot spectra can be used...

  13. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...... of quantum dots, however, results in a large inhomogeneous broadening of quantum dot spectra.Work on self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots will be presented. Properties of atom-like single-dots states are investigated optically using high spatial and spectral resolution. Single-dot spectra can be used...

  14. Direct photonic coupling of a semiconductor quantum dot and a trapped ion

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, H M; Steiner, M; Gall, C Le; Matthiesen, C; Clarke, E; Ludwig, A; Reichel, J; Atatüre, M; Köhl, M

    2014-01-01

    Coupling individual quantum systems lies at the heart of building scalable quantum networks. Here, we report the first direct photonic coupling between a semiconductor quantum dot and a trapped ion and we demonstrate that single photons generated by a quantum dot controllably change the internal state of an $\\textrm{Yb}^+$ ion. We ameliorate the effect of the sixty-fold mismatch of the radiative linewidths with coherent photon generation and a high-finesse fiber-based optical cavity enhancing the coupling between the single photon and the ion. The transfer of information presented here via the classical correlations between the $\\sigma_z$-projection of the quantum-dot spin and the internal state of the ion provides a promising step towards quantum state-transfer in a hybrid photonic network.

  15. Direct photonic coupling of a semiconductor quantum dot and a trapped ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, H M; Stockill, R; Steiner, M; Le Gall, C; Matthiesen, C; Clarke, E; Ludwig, A; Reichel, J; Atatüre, M; Köhl, M

    2015-03-27

    Coupling individual quantum systems lies at the heart of building scalable quantum networks. Here, we report the first direct photonic coupling between a semiconductor quantum dot and a trapped ion and we demonstrate that single photons generated by a quantum dot controllably change the internal state of a Yb^{+} ion. We ameliorate the effect of the 60-fold mismatch of the radiative linewidths with coherent photon generation and a high-finesse fiber-based optical cavity enhancing the coupling between the single photon and the ion. The transfer of information presented here via the classical correlations between the σ_{z} projection of the quantum-dot spin and the internal state of the ion provides a promising step towards quantum-state transfer in a hybrid photonic network.

  16. Spin dynamics of an individual Cr atom in a semiconductor quantum dot under optical excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A. [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, 305-8573 Tsukuba (Japan); Utsumi, H.; Kuroda, S. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, 305-8573 Tsukuba (Japan); Boukari, H.; Besombes, L., E-mail: lucien.besombes@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-08-01

    We studied the spin dynamics of a Cr atom incorporated in a II-VI semiconductor quantum dot using photon correlation techniques. We used recently developed singly Cr-doped CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots to access the spin of an individual magnetic atom. Auto-correlation of the photons emitted by the quantum dot under continuous wave optical excitation reveals fluctuations of the localized spin with a timescale in the 10 ns range. Cross-correlation gives quantitative transfer time between Cr spin states. A calculation of the time dependence of the spin levels population in Cr-doped quantum dots shows that the observed spin dynamics is dominated by the exciton-Cr interaction. These measurements also provide a lower bound in the 20 ns range for the intrinsic Cr spin relaxation time.

  17. Spatially correlated two-dimensional arrays of semiconductor and metal quantum dots in GaAs-based heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevedomskiy, V. N., E-mail: nevedom@mail.ioffe.ru; Bert, N. A.; Chaldyshev, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Preobrazhernskiy, V. V.; Putyato, M. A.; Semyagin, B. R. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A single molecular-beam epitaxy process is used to produce GaAs-based heterostructures containing two-dimensional arrays of InAs semiconductor quantum dots and AsSb metal quantum dots. The twodimensional array of AsSb metal quantum dots is formed by low-temperature epitaxy which provides a large excess of arsenic in the epitaxial GaAs layer. During the growth of subsequent layers at a higher temperature, excess arsenic forms nanoinclusions, i.e., metal quantum dots in the GaAs matrix. The two-dimensional array of such metal quantum dots is created by the δ doping of a low-temperature GaAs layer with antimony which serves as a precursor for the heterogeneous nucleation of metal quantum dots and accumulates in them with the formation of AsSb metal alloy. The two-dimensional array of InAs semiconductor quantum dots is formed via the Stranski–Krastanov mechanism at the GaAs surface. Between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots, a 3-nm-thick AlAs barrier layer is grown. The total spacing between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots is 10 nm. Electron microscopy of the structure shows that the arrangement of metal quantum dots and semiconductor quantum dots in the two-dimensional arrays is spatially correlated. The spatial correlation is apparently caused by elastic strain and stress fields produced by both AsSb metal and InAs semiconductor quantum dots in the GaAs matrix.

  18. Nanoassemblies Based on Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Dye Molecules:. Single Objects Detection and Related Interface Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkevich, E.; von Borczyskowski, C.; Kowerko, D.

    2013-05-01

    Single molecule spectroscopy of QD-dye nanoassemblies is shown that single functionalized dye molecules (perylene-bisimides and meso-pyridyl porphyrins) can be considered as extremely sensitive probes for studying exciton and relaxation processes in semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots.

  19. Self-slowdown and -advancement of fs pulses in a quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; Mørk, Jesper; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate changes in the propagation time of 180 femtosecond pulses in a quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier as function of pulse input power and bias current. The results interpreted as a result of pulse reshaping by gain saturation but are also analogous to coherent population...... pulse distortion occurs at zero bias....

  20. Experimental investigation of chirp properties induced by signal amplification in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Motoharu; Ohta, Hiroaki; Seki, Ryota

    2015-03-15

    We experimentally show the dynamic frequency chirp properties induced by signal amplification in a quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA) for the first time. We also compare the red and blue chirp peak values and temporal chirp changes while changing the gain and injected signal powers of the QD-SOA with those of a common SOA.

  1. Electron-hole correlations in semiconductor quantum dots with tight-binding wave fuctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seungwon, L.; Jonsson, L.; Wilkins, J.; Bryant, G.; Klimeck, G.

    2001-01-01

    The electron-hole states of semiconductor quantum dots are investigated within the framework of empirical tight-binding descriptions for Si, as an example of an indirect-gap material, and InAs and CdSe as examples of typical III-V and II-VI direct-gap materials.

  2. Theory of Pulse Train Amplification Without Patterning Effects in Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    A theory for pulse amplification and saturation in quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is developed. In particular, the maximum bit rate at which a data stream of pulses can be amplified without significant patterning effects is investigated. Simple expressions are derived th...

  3. Resonance fluorescence and electron spin in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yong

    2009-11-18

    The work presented in this dissertation contains the first observation of spin-resolved resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot and its application of direct measurement of electron spin dynamics. The Mollow triplet and the Mollow quintuplet, which are the hallmarks of resonance fluorescence, are presented as the non-spin-resolved and spin-resolved resonance fluorescence spectrum, respectively. The negligible laser background contribution, the near pure radiative broadened spectrum and the anti-bunching photon statistics imply the sideband photons are background-free and near transform-limited single photons. This demonstration is a promising step towards the heralded single photon generation and electron spin readout. Instead of resolving spectrum, an alternative spin-readout scheme by counting resonance fluorescence photons under moderate laser power is demonstrated. The measurements of n-shot time-resolved resonance fluorescence readout are carried out to reveal electron spin dynamics of the measurement induced back action and the spin relaxation. Hyperfine interaction and heavy-light hole mixing are identified as the relevant mechanisms for the back action and phonon-assistant spin-orbit interaction dominates the spin relaxation. After a detailed discussion on charge-spin configurations in coupled quantum dots system, the single-shot readout on electron spin are proposed. (orig.)

  4. Kinetics of pulse-induced photoluminescence from a semiconductor quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Leonov, Mikhail Yu; Turkov, Vadim K; Litvin, Aleksandr P; Baimuratov, Anvar S; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V

    2012-12-03

    Optical methods, which allow the determination of the dominant channels of energy and phase relaxation, are the most universal techniques for the investigation of semiconductor quantum dots. In this paper, we employ the kinetic Pauli equation to develop the first generalized model of the pulse-induced photoluminescence from the lowest-energy eigenstates of a semiconductor quantum dot. Without specifying the shape of the excitation pulse and by assuming that the energy and phase relaxation in the quantum dot may be characterized by a set of phenomenological rates, we derive an expression for the observable photoluminescence cross section, valid for an arbitrary number of the quantum dot's states decaying with the emission of secondary photons. Our treatment allows for thermal transitions occurring with both decrease and increase in energy between all the relevant eigenstates at room or higher temperature. We show that in the general case of N states coupled to each other through a bath, the photoluminescence kinetics from any of them is determined by the sum of N exponential functions, whose exponents are proportional to the respective decay rates. We illustrate the application of the developed model by considering the processes of resonant luminescence and thermalized luminescence from the quantum dot with two radiating eigenstates, and by assuming that the secondary emission is excited with either a Gaussian or exponential pulse. Analytic expressions describing the signals of secondary emission are analyzed, in order to elucidate experimental situations in which the relaxation constants may be reliably extracted from the photoluminescence spectra.

  5. Optimizing photon indistinguishability in the emission from incoherently-excited semiconductor quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    F. Troiani; Perea, J. I.; Tejedor, C.

    2005-01-01

    Most optical quantum devices require deterministic single-photon emitters. Schemes so far demonstrated in the solid state imply an energy relaxation which tends to spoil the coherent nature of the time evolution, and with it the photon indistinguishability. We focus our theoretical investigation on semiconductor quantum dots embedded in microcavities. Simple and general relations are identified between the photon indistinguishability and the collection efficiency. The identification of the ke...

  6. Alloyed Mn-Cu-In-S nanocrystals: a new type of diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinghui; Deng, Ruiping; Ji, Xiangling; Pan, Daocheng

    2012-06-29

    A new type of Mn-Cu-In-S diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dots was synthesized and reported for the first time. The quantum dots, with no highly toxic elements, not only show the same classic diluted magnetic behavior as Mn-doped CdSe, but also exhibit tunable luminescent properties in a relatively large window from 542 to 648 nm. An absolute photoluminescence quantum yield up to 20% was obtained after the shell growth of ZnS. This kind of magnetic/luminescent bi-functional Mn-Cu-In-S/ZnS core/shell quantum dot might serve as promising nanoprobes for use in dual-mode optical and magnetic resonance imaging techniques.

  7. Nanocrystal quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    ""Soft"" Chemical Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, J.A. Hollingsworth and V.I. Klimov Electronic Structure in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Optical Experiment, D.J. NorrisFine Structure and Polarization Properties of Band-Edge Excitons in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, A.L. EfrosIntraband Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots, P. Guyot-Sionnest, M. Shim, and C. WangMultiexciton Phenomena in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, V.I. KlimovOptical Dynamics in Single Semiconductor Quantum Do

  8. Hot electron dynamics at semiconductor surfaces: Implications for quantum dot photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdale, William A., III

    Finding a viable supply of clean, renewable energy is one of the most daunting challenges facing the world today. Solar cells have had limited impact in meeting this challenge because of their high cost and low power conversion efficiencies. Semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, are promising materials for use in novel solar cells because they can be processed with potentially inexpensive solution-based techniques and because they are predicted to have novel optoelectronic properties that could enable the realization of ultra-efficient solar power converters. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding regarding the behavior of highly-excited, or "hot," charge carriers near quantum-dot and semiconductor interfaces, which is of paramount importance to the rational design of high-efficiency devices. The elucidation of these ultrafast hot electron dynamics is the central aim of this Dissertation. I present a theoretical framework for treating the electronic interactions between quantum dots and bulk semiconductor surfaces and propose a novel experimental technique, time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (TR-SHG), for probing these interactions. I then describe a series of experimental investigations into hot electron dynamics in specific quantum-dot/semiconductor systems. A two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy (2PPE) study of the technologically-relevant ZnO(1010) surface reveals ultrafast (sub-30fs) cooling of hot electrons in the bulk conduction band, which is due to strong electron-phonon coupling in this highly polar material. The presence of a continuum of defect states near the conduction band edge results in Fermi-level pinning and upward (n-type) band-bending at the (1010) surface and provides an alternate route for electronic relaxation. In monolayer films of colloidal PbSe quantum dots, chemical treatment with either hydrazine or 1,2-ethanedithiol results in strong and tunable electronic coupling between neighboring quantum dots

  9. Analysis of optical properties of strained semiconductor quantum dots for electromagnetically induced transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barettin, D.; Houmark-Nielsen, Jakob; Lassen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Using multiband k*p theory we study the size and geometry dependence on the slow light properties of conical semiconductor quantum dots. We find the V-type scheme for electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) to be most favorable, and identify an optimal height and size for efficient EIT......-trivial quantum dot size dependence of the dipole moments directly related to the biaxial strain component. Due to the separation of the heavy and light holes the optical transition strengths between the lower conduction and upper most valence-band states computed using one-band model and eight-band model show...

  10. Four-wave parametric amplification in semiconductor quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle hybrid molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Bo; He, Meng-Dong; Chen, Li-Qun

    2014-10-06

    We study theoretically four-wave parametric amplification arising from the nonlinear optical response of hybrid molecules composed of semiconductor quantum dots and metallic nanoparticles. It is shown that highly efficient four-wave parametric amplification can be achieved by adjusting the frequency and intensity of the pump field and the distance between the quantum dot and the metallic nanoparticle. Specifically, the induced probe-wave gain is tunable in a large range from 1 to 1.43 × 10⁵. This gain reaches its maximum at the position of three-photon resonance. Our findings hold great promise for developing four-wave parametric oscillators.

  11. Interaction of graphene quantum dots with bulk semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohapatra, P. K.; Singh, B. P., E-mail: bhanups@iitb.ac.in [Department of physics, IIT Bombay, Mumbai-400076 (India); Kushavah, Dushyant; Mohapatra, J. [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology and Science, IIT Bombay-400076, Mumbai (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highly luminescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are synthesized through thermolysis of glucose. The average lateral size of the synthesized GQDs is found to be ∼5 nm. The occurrence of D and G band at 1345 and 1580 cm{sup −1} in Raman spectrum confirms the presence of graphene layers. GQDs are mostly consisting of 3 to 4 graphene layers as confirmed from the AFM measurements. Photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows a distinct broadening of the spectrum when GQDs are on the semiconducting bulk surface compared to GQDs in water. The time resolved PL measurement shows a significant shortening in PL lifetime due to the substrate interaction on GQDs compared to the GQDs in solution phase.

  12. Manipulations of a Qubit in a Semiconductor Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrenner, Artur; Stufler, Stefan; Ester, Patrick; Bichler, Max

    In a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot, the one exciton ground state transition defines a two-level system, which appears as an extremely narrow resonance of only a few μeV width. The resonant interaction of this two-level system with cw laser fields can be studied in detail by photocurrent spectroscopy, revealing the fine structure of the excitonic ground state as well as the effects of nonlinear absorption and power broadening. For the case of pulsed laser fields and in the absence of decoherence, the two-level system represents a qubit. Excitations with ps laser pulses result in qubit rotations, which appear as Rabi oscillations in photocurrent experiments. Double pulse experiments further allow us to infer the decoherence time and to perform coherent control on a two-level system.

  13. Dynamic phase response and amplitude-phase coupling of self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingnau, Benjamin; Herzog, Bastian; Kolarczik, Mirco; Woggon, Ulrike; Lüdge, Kathy; Owschimikow, Nina

    2017-06-01

    The optical excitation of semiconductor gain media introduces both gain and refractive index changes, commonly referred to as amplitude-phase coupling. Quantum-confined structures with an energetically well separated carrier reservoir usually exhibit a decreased amplitude-phase coupling compared to bulk materials. However, its magnitude and definition is still controversially discussed. We investigate the fundamental processes influencing the amplitude-phase coupling in semiconductor quantum-dot media using a coupled-carrier rate-equation model. We are able to analyze the dependence on the electronic structure and suggest routes towards an optimization of the dynamic phase response of the gain material.

  14. Instabilities in the optical response of a semiconductor quantum dot-metal nanoparticle heterodimer : self-oscillations and chaos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nugroho, Bintoro S.; Iskandar, Alexander A.; Malyshev, Victor A.; Knoester, Jasper

    We theoretically investigate the nonlinear optical response of a heterodimer comprising a semiconductor quantum dot strongly coupled to a metal nanoparticle. The quantum dot is considered as a three-level ladder system with ground, one-exciton, and bi-exction states. As compared to the case of a

  15. Coupling semiconductor nanocrystals to a fused-silica microsphere: a quantum-dot microcavity with extremely high Q factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, X; Palinginis, P; Lacey, S; Wang, H; Lonergan, M C

    2000-11-01

    We demonstrate a quantum-dot microcavity by coupling core-shell semiconductor nanocrystals to a fused-silica microsphere. We show that the composite microcavity can feature Q factors of the order of 10(8), providing a model system for investigating cavity QED and microlasers at the level of single quantum dots.

  16. Protein-semiconductor quantum dot hybrids for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansur, Herman; Mansur, Alexandra [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 - Escola de Engenharia - Bloco 2/2233, Belo Horizonte 31.270-901 (Brazil); Gonzalez, Juan [Department of Physics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 - Instituto de Ciencias Exatas - Depto de Fisica, Belo Horizonte 31.270-901 (Brazil)

    2012-06-15

    The present work reports the bioconjugation of CdS quantum dots (QDs) with protein by means of an aqueous route at room temperature, applying colloidal chemistry methods. Essentially, the bioconjugates were developed based on albumin (BSA) used as capping ligands for the stabilization of CdS QDs produced using cadmium perchlorate and thioacetamide precursors. CdS QDs were directly capped with BSA or BSA bioconjugated to polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer. UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), TEM and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) were used to characterize the stability and morphology of CdS nanoparticles. The CdS nanocrystals were produced with estimated average particle size smaller than 4.0 nm, indicating that they were within the so-called ''quantum-size confinement range''. The results have clearly shown that both routes (BSA and BSA conjugates) were effective on stabilizing fluorescent QDs in aqueous dispersions to be potentially used in biomedical applications (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Anisotropic emission from multilayered plasmon resonator nanocomposites of isotropic semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Tuncay; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Sefunc, Mustafa A; Samarskaya, Olga; Ozel, Ilkem O; Mutlugun, Evren; Lesnyak, Vladimir; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmuller, Alexander; Gaponenko, Sergey V; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2011-02-22

    We propose and demonstrate a nanocomposite localized surface plasmon resonator embedded into an artificial three-dimensional construction. Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are assembled between layers of metal nanoparticles to create a highly strong plasmon-exciton interaction in the plasmonic cavity. In such a multilayered plasmonic resonator architecture of isotropic CdTe quantum dots, we observed polarized light emission of 80% in the vertical polarization with an enhancement factor of 4.4, resulting in a steady-state anisotropy value of 0.26 and reaching the highest quantum efficiency level of 30% ever reported for such CdTe quantum dot solids. Our electromagnetic simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental characterization data showing a significant emission enhancement in the vertical polarization, for which their fluorescence decay lifetimes are substantially shortened by consecutive replication of our unit cell architecture design. Such strongly plasmon-exciton coupling nanocomposites hold great promise for future exploitation and development of quantum dot plasmonic biophotonics and quantum dot plasmonic optoelectronics.

  18. Optical gain and laser properties of semiconductor quantum-dot systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorke, Michael

    2008-12-17

    For practical applications of quantum dots in light emitters as well as for fundamental studies of their emission properties, the understanding of many-body processes plays a central role. We employ a microscopic theory to study the optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots. The excitation-induced polarization dephasing due to carrier-phonon and carrier-carrier Coulomb interaction as well as the corresponding lineshifts of the optical interband transitions are determined on the basis of a quantum-kinetic treatment of correlation processes. Our theoretical model includes non-Markovian effects as well as renormalized single-particle states. Thus we achieve an accurate description of the partial compensation between different dephasing contributions and are able to systematically study their temperature and density dependencies. Applications of this theoretical model include optical gain spectra for quantum-dot systems that reveal a novel effect, not present in other gain materials. For large carrier densities, the maximum gain can decrease with increasing carrier density. This behavior arises from a delicate balancing of state filling and dephasing, and implies the necessity of an accurate treatment of the carrier-density dependence of correlations. Measurements of the coherence properties of the light emitted from semiconductor quantum-dot lasers have raised considerable attention in recent years. We study the correlations between individual emission events on the basis of a microscopic semiconductor laser theory. This allows for a study of effects like Pauli blocking, modifications to the source term of spontaneous emission, and the absence of complete inversion, that strongly influence the emission characteristics of quantum dot based devices. A new and challenging material system for applications in the visible spectral range are nitride semiconductors. As crystal symmetry and bandmixing effects strongly influence the optical selection rules, the single

  19. Phonon induced pure dephasing process of excitonic state in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tongyun; Han, Peng; Wang, Xinke; Feng, Shengfei; Sun, Wenfeng; Ye, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yan

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical study on the pure dephasing process of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots induced by lattice vibrations using continuum model calculations. By solving the time dependent Liouville-von Neumann equation, we present the ultrafast Rabi oscillations between excitonic state and virtual state via exciton-phonon interaction and obtain the pure dephasing time from the fast decayed envelope of the Rabi oscillations. The interaction between exciton and longitudinal optical phonon vibration is found to dominate the pure dephasing process and the dephasing time increases nonlinearly with the reduction of exciton-phonon coupling strength. We further find that the pure dephasing time of large quantum dots is more sensitive to temperature than small quantum dots.

  20. Coherent optical spectroscopy in a biological semiconductor quantum dot-DNA hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate coherent optical spectroscopy of a biological semiconductor quantum dot (QD) coupled to DNA molecules. Coupling with DNAs, the linear optical responses of the peptide QDs will be enhanced significantly in the simultaneous presence of two optical fields. Based on this technique, we propose a scheme to measure the vibrational frequency of DNA and the coupling strength between peptide QD and DNA in all-optical domain. Distinct with metallic quantum dot, biological QD is non-toxic and pollution-free to environment, which will contribute to clinical medicine experiments. This article leads people to know more about the optical behaviors of DNAs-quantum dot system, with the currently popular pump-probe technique. PMID:22340277

  1. Coherent optical spectroscopy in a biological semiconductor quantum dot-DNA hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2012-02-16

    We theoretically investigate coherent optical spectroscopy of a biological semiconductor quantum dot (QD) coupled to DNA molecules. Coupling with DNAs, the linear optical responses of the peptide QDs will be enhanced significantly in the simultaneous presence of two optical fields. Based on this technique, we propose a scheme to measure the vibrational frequency of DNA and the coupling strength between peptide QD and DNA in all-optical domain. Distinct with metallic quantum dot, biological QD is non-toxic and pollution-free to environment, which will contribute to clinical medicine experiments. This article leads people to know more about the optical behaviors of DNAs-quantum dot system, with the currently popular pump-probe technique.

  2. Magnetic field induced optical gain in a dilute nitride quaternary semiconductor quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mageshwari, P. Uma; Peter, A. John; Lee, Chang Woo

    2016-10-01

    Effects of magnetic field strength on the electronic and optical properties are brought out in a Ga0.661In0.339N0.0554As0.9446/GaAs quantum dot for the applications of desired wavelength in opto-electronic devices. The band alignment is obtained using band anticrossing model and the model solid theory. The magnetic field dependent electron-heavy hole transition energies with the dot radius in a GaInNAs/GaAs quantum dot are investigated. The magnetic field induced oscillator strength as a function of dot radius is studied. The resonant peak values of optical absorption coefficients and the changes of refractive index with the application of magnetic field strength in a GaInNAs/GaAs quantum dot are obtained. The magnetic field induced threshold current density and the maximum optical gain are found in a GaInNAs/GaAs quantum dot. The results show that the optimum wavelength for fibre optical communication networks can be obtained with the variation of applied magnetic field strength and the outcomes may be useful for the design of efficient lasers based on the group III-N-V semiconductors.

  3. Ultrahigh-frequency microwave phase shifts mediated by ultrafast dynamics in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel scheme to achieve tunable microwave phase shifts at frequencies exceeding 100 GHz based on wavelength conversion induced by high-speed cross-gain modulation in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers.......We present a novel scheme to achieve tunable microwave phase shifts at frequencies exceeding 100 GHz based on wavelength conversion induced by high-speed cross-gain modulation in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers....

  4. Quenching of semiconductor quantum dot photoluminescence by a pi-conjugated polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmarten, Donald; Jones, Marcus; Rumbles, Garry; Yu, Pingrong; Nedeljkovic, Jovan; Shaheen, Sean

    2005-08-25

    In this communication we discuss the possibility of hole transfer between a photoexcited semiconductor quantum dot and a pi-conjugated polymer. This charge-transfer event will be investigated (exploited) on the basis of its implication toward a solar energy conversion scheme. Experimentally, we show that the steady-state photoluminescence (PL) of a solution of InP quantum dots is quenched by the introduction of solvated poly(3-hexylthiophene). Time-resolved PL experiments on these solutions are also presented. It was observed that the PL transients did not significantly change upon the addition of the conductive polymer. These new results indicate that said PL quenching is static in nature. This suggests that in solution, the quantum dot and the polymer exhibit a strong intermolecular interaction. As the two species encounter each other through diffusion, the polymer quenches the quantum dot photoluminescence without altering the population's PL lifetime. This new evidence suggests that the polymer and the quantum dot form a relatively stable complex.

  5. Investigation of Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Waveguide Electroabsorption Modulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work, we investigated the use of 10-layer InAs quantum dot (QD as active region of an electroabsorption modulator (EAM. The QD-EAM is a p-i-n ridge waveguide structure with intrinsic layer thickness of 0.4 μm, width of 10 μm, and length of 1.0 mm. Photocurrent measurement reveals a Stark shift of ~5 meV (~7 nm at reverse bias of 3 V (75 kV/cm and broadening of the resonance peak due to field ionization of electrons and holes was observed for E-field larger than 25 kV/cm. Investigation at wavelength range of 1,300–1320 nm reveals that the largest absorption change occurs at 1317 nm. Optical transmission measurement at this wavelength shows insertion loss of ~8 dB, and extinction ratio of ~5 dB at reverse bias of 5 V. Consequently, methods to improve the performance of the QD-EAM are proposed. We believe that QDs are promising for EAM and the performance of QD-EAM will improve with increasing research efforts.

  6. Green chemistry for large-scale synthesis of semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Hua; Fan, Jun-Bing; Gu, Zheng; Cui, Jing; Xu, Xiao-Bo; Liang, Zhi-Wu; Luo, Sheng-Lian; Zhu, Ming-Qiang

    2008-05-20

    Large-scale synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) with high concentration and high yield through simultaneously increasing the precursor concentration was introduced. This synthetic route conducted in diesel has produced gram-scale CdSe semiconductor quantum dots (In optimal scale-up synthetic condition, the one-pot yield of QDs is up to 9.6g). The reaction has been conducted in open air and at relatively low temperature at 190-230 degrees C in the absence of expensive organic phosphine ligands, aliphatic amine and octadecene, which is really green chemistry without high energy cost for high temperature reaction and unessential toxic chemicals except for Cd, which is the essential building block for QDs.

  7. Single-sideband photonic microwave generation with an optically injected quantum-dot semiconductor laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ying; Cheng, Chih-Hao; Lin, Fan-Yi

    2016-12-26

    We studied single-sideband (SSB) photonic microwave generation with a high sideband rejection ratio (SRR) based on the period-one dynamical states of an optically injected quantum-dot (QD) semiconductor laser and demonstrated that the SSB signals have SRRs of approximately 15 dB higher than those generated with a conventional quantum-well semiconductor laser under conditions of optimal microwave power. The enhancement of SRR in the QD laser, which is important in mitigating the power penalty effect in applications such as radio-over-fiber optical communications, could be primarily attributed to a lower carrier decay rate in the dots, smaller linewidth enhancement factor, and reduced photon decay rate.

  8. Self-similar asymptotic optical beams in semiconductor waveguides doped with quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun-Rong; Yi, Lin; Li, Hua-Mei

    2017-01-01

    The self-similar propagation of asymptotic optical beams in semiconductor waveguides doped with quantum dots is reported. The possibility of controlling the shape of output asymptotic optical beams is demonstrated. The analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations. We give a possible experimental protocol to generate the obtained asymptotic parabolic beams in realistic waveguides. As a generalization to the present work, the self-similar propagation of asymptotic optical beams is proposed in a power-law nonlinear medium.

  9. Slow and fast dynamics of gain and phase in a quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallaitis, T; Koos, C; Bonk, R; Freude, W; Laemmlin, M; Meuer, C; Bimberg, D; Leuthold, J

    2008-01-07

    Gain and phase dynamics in InAs/GaAs quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers are investigated. It is shown that gain recovery is dominated by fast processes, whereas phase recovery is dominated by slow processes. Relative strengths and time constants of the underlying processes are measured. We find that operation at high bias currents optimizes the performance for nonlinear cross-gain signal processing if a low chirp is required.

  10. Proposed coupling of an electron spin in a semiconductor quantum dot to a nanosize optical cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arka; Kaer, Per; Bajcsy, Michal; Kim, Erik D; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G; Rundquist, Armand; Vučković, Jelena

    2013-07-12

    We propose a scheme to efficiently couple a single quantum dot electron spin to an optical nano-cavity, which enables us to simultaneously benefit from a cavity as an efficient photonic interface, as well as to perform high fidelity (nearly 100%) spin initialization and manipulation achievable in bulk semiconductors. Moreover, the presence of the cavity speeds up the spin initialization process beyond the GHz range.

  11. Simple Atomic Quantum Memory Suitable for Semiconductor Quantum Dot Single Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Janik; Buser, Gianni; Horsley, Andrew; Béguin, Lucas; Jöckel, Andreas; Jahn, Jan-Philipp; Warburton, Richard J.; Treutlein, Philipp

    2017-08-01

    Quantum memories matched to single photon sources will form an important cornerstone of future quantum network technology. We demonstrate such a memory in warm Rb vapor with on-demand storage and retrieval, based on electromagnetically induced transparency. With an acceptance bandwidth of δ f =0.66 GHz , the memory is suitable for single photons emitted by semiconductor quantum dots. In this regime, vapor cell memories offer an excellent compromise between storage efficiency, storage time, noise level, and experimental complexity, and atomic collisions have negligible influence on the optical coherences. Operation of the memory is demonstrated using attenuated laser pulses on the single photon level. For a 50 ns storage time, we measure ηe2 e 50 ns=3.4 (3 )% end-to-end efficiency of the fiber-coupled memory, with a total intrinsic efficiency ηint=17 (3 )%. Straightforward technological improvements can boost the end-to-end-efficiency to ηe 2 e≈35 %; beyond that, increasing the optical depth and exploiting the Zeeman substructure of the atoms will allow such a memory to approach near unity efficiency. In the present memory, the unconditional read-out noise level of 9 ×10-3 photons is dominated by atomic fluorescence, and for input pulses containing on average μ1=0.27 (4 ) photons, the signal to noise level would be unity.

  12. Exploring semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, S I [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ing Metalurgica y Q. Inorganica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro. 11510 Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain); Galindo, P L [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro. 11510 Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain); Gonzalez, L; Ripalda, J M [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Varela, M; Pennycook, S J, E-mail: sergio.molina@uca.e [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We review in this communication our contribution to the structural characterisation of semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy, both in phase-contrast and Z-contrast modes. We show how these techniques contribute to predict the preferential sites of nucleation of these nanostructures, and also determine the compositional distribution in 1D and 0D nanostructures. The results presented here were produced in the framework of the European Network of Excellence entitled {sup S}elf-Assembled semiconductor Nanostructures for new Devices in photonics and Electronics (SANDiE){sup .}

  13. Bioinspired photoelectric conversion system based on carbon-quantum-dot-doped dye-semiconductor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zheng; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Wang, Lei; Ming, Hai; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Fang; Liu, Yang; Kang, Zhenhui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2013-06-12

    Compared to nature's photoelectric conversion processes, artificial devices are still far inferior in efficiency and stability. Inspired by light absorption and resonance energy transfer processes of chlorophyll, we developed a highly efficient photoelectric conversion system by introducing Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) as an electron transfer intermediary. Compared with conventional dye-sensitized semiconductor systems, the present CQD-doped system showed significantly higher photoelectric conversion efficiency, as much as 7 times that without CQDs. The CQD-doped dye/semiconductor system may provide a powerful approach to the development of highly efficient photoelectric devices.

  14. Emergence of resonant mode-locking via delayed feedback in quantum dot semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tykalewicz, B; Goulding, D; Hegarty, S P; Huyet, G; Erneux, T; Kelleher, B; Viktorov, E A

    2016-02-22

    With conventional semiconductor lasers undergoing external optical feedback, a chaotic output is typically observed even for moderate levels of the feedback strength. In this paper we examine single mode quantum dot lasers under strong optical feedback conditions and show that an entirely new dynamical regime is found consisting of spontaneous mode-locking via a resonance between the relaxation oscillation frequency and the external cavity repetition rate. Experimental observations are supported by detailed numerical simulations of rate equations appropriate for this laser type. The phenomenon constitutes an entirely new mode-locking mechanism in semiconductor lasers.

  15. Quantum wells, wires and dots theoretical and computational physics of semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Quantum Wells, Wires and Dots provides all the essential information, both theoretical and computational, to develop an understanding of the electronic, optical and transport properties of these semiconductor nanostructures. The book will lead the reader through comprehensive explanations and mathematical derivations to the point where they can design semiconductor nanostructures with the required electronic and optical properties for exploitation in these technologies. This fully revised and updated 4th edition features new sections that incorporate modern techniques and extensive new material including: - Properties of non-parabolic energy bands - Matrix solutions of the Poisson and Schrodinger equations - Critical thickness of strained materials - Carrier scattering by interface roughness, alloy disorder and impurities - Density matrix transport modelling -Thermal modelling Written by well-known authors in the field of semiconductor nanostructures and quantum optoelectronics, this user-friendly guide is pr...

  16. Theory of Pulse Train Amplification Without Patterning Effects in Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    A theory for pulse amplification and saturation in quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is developed. In particular, the maximum bit rate at which a data stream of pulses can be amplified without significant patterning effects is investigated. Simple expressions are derived...... that clearly show the dependence of the maximum bit rate on material and device parameters. A comparative analysis of QD, quantum well (QW), and bulk SOAs shows that QD SOAs may have superior properties; calculations predict patterning-free amplification up to bit rates of 150–200 Gb/s with pulse output...

  17. Coherent control in room-temperature quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers using shaped pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Karni, Ouri; Eisenstein, Gadi; Ivanov, Vitalii; Reithmaier, Johann Peter

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability to control quantum coherent Rabi-oscillations in a room-temperature quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) by shaping the light pulses that trigger them. The experiments described here show that when the excitation is resonant with the short wavelength slope of the SOA gain spectrum, a linear frequency chirp affects its ability to trigger Rabi-oscillations within the SOA: A negative chirp inhibits Rabi-oscillations whereas a positive chirp can enhance them, relative to the interaction of a transform limited pulse. The experiments are confirmed by a numerical calculation that models the propagation of the experimentally shaped pulses through the SOA.

  18. Population Dynamics and the Optical Absorption in Hybrid Metal Nanoparticle - Semiconductor Quantum dot Nanosystem

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Nam-Chol; Ko, Myong-Chol; So, Guang Hyok; Kim, Il-Guang

    2015-01-01

    We studied theoretically the population dynamics and the absorption spectrum of hybrid nanosystem consisted of a matal nanoparticle (MNP) and a semiconductor quantum dot(SQD). We investigated the exciton-plasmon coupling effects on the population dynamics and the absorption properties of the nanostructure. Our results show that the nonlinear optical response of the hybrid nanosystem can be greatly enhanced or depressed due to the exciton-plasmon couplings. The results obtained here may have the potential applications of nanoscale optical devices such as optical switches and quantum devices such as a single photon transistor.

  19. Quantum dot semiconductor disk laser at 1.3  μm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantamäki, Antti; Sokolovskii, Grigorii S; Blokhin, Sergey A; Dudelev, Vladislav V; Soboleva, Ksenia K; Bobrov, Mikhail A; Kuzmenkov, Alexander G; Vasil'ev, Alexey P; Gladyshev, Andrey G; Maleev, Nikolai A; Ustinov, Victor M; Okhotnikov, Oleg

    2015-07-15

    We present a semiconductor disk laser (SDL) emitting at the wavelength of 1.3 μm. The active region of the SDL comprises InAs quantum dots (QDs) that are embedded into InGaAs quantum wells (QWs). An output power over 200 mW is obtained at 15°C, which represents the highest output power reported from QD-based SDLs in this wavelength range. The results demonstrate the feasibility of QD-based gain media for fabricating SDLs emitting at 1.3 μm.

  20. Semiconductor quantum dots enhanced graphene/CdTe heterostructure solar cells by photo-induced doping

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Peng; Xu, Zhijuan; Zhong, Huikai; Wu, Zhiqian; Lin, Shisheng

    2015-01-01

    Photo-induced doping is employed into graphene based solar cell through designing of a novel type of solar cell based on graphene/CdTe Schottky heterostructure. By coating a layer of ultrathin CdSe quantum dots onto graphene/CdTe heterostructure, the performance of the graphene/CdTe solar cell is improved by about 50%. Photo-induced doping is mainly accounted for this enhancement, as evidenced by resistance, photoluminescence and quantum efficiency measurements. This work demonstrates a general and feasible way of designing novel type of solar cells based on two dimensional materials/semiconductor heterostructures.

  1. An All-Optical Quantum Gate in a Semiconductor Quantum Dot

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiaoqin Li; Yanwen Wu; Duncan Steel; D. Gammon; T. H. Stievater; D. S. Katzer; D. Park; C. Piermarocchi; L. J. Sham

    2003-01-01

    We report coherent optical control of a biexciton (two electron-hole pairs), confined in a single quantum dot, that shows coherent oscillations similar to the excited-state Rabi flopping in an isolated atom...

  2. Toxicological studies of semiconductor quantum dots on immune cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricken, James Bryce; Rios, Lynette; Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Bachand, Marlene; Bachand, George David; Greene, Adrienne Celeste; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2008-11-01

    Nanoengineered materials hold a vast promise of enabling revolutionary technologies, but also pose an emerging and potentially serious threat to human and environmental health. While there is increasing knowledge concerning the risks posed by engineered nanomaterials, significant inconsistencies exist within the current data based on the high degree of variability in the materials (e.g., synthesis method, coatings, etc) and biological test systems (e.g., cell lines, whole organism, etc). In this project, we evaluated the uptake and response of two immune cell lines (RAW macrophage and RBL mast cells) to nanocrystal quantum dots (Qdots) with different sizes and surface chemistries, and at different concentrations. The basic experimental design followed a 2 x 2 x 3 factorial model: two Qdot sizes (Qdot 520 and 620), two surface chemistries (amine 'NH{sub 2}' and carboxylic acid 'COOH'), and three concentrations (0, 1 nM, and 1 {micro}M). Based on this design, the following Qdots from Evident Technologies were used for all experiments: Qdot 520-COOH, Qdot 520-NH{sub 2}, Qdot 620-COOH, and Qdot 620-NH{sub 2}. Fluorescence and confocal imaging demonstrated that Qdot 620-COOH and Qdot 620-NH{sub 2} nanoparticles had a greater level of internalization and cell membrane association in RAW and RBL cells, respectively. From these data, a two-way interaction between Qdot size and concentration was observed in relation to the level of cellular uptake in RAW cells, and association with RBL cell membranes. Toxicity of both RBL and RAW cells was also significantly dependent on the interaction of Qdot size and concentration; the 1 {micro}M concentrations of the larger, Qdot 620 nanoparticles induced a greater toxic effect on both cell lines. The RBL data also demonstrate that Qdot exposure can induce significant toxicity independent of cellular uptake. A significant increase in TNF-{alpha} and decrease in IL-10 release was observed in RAW cells, and suggested

  3. Room-temperature luminescence decay of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots: Nonexponentiality revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodunov, Evgeny N. [Department of Physics, Petersburg State Transport University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Danilov, Vladimir V. [Department of Physics, Petersburg State Transport University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Panfutova, Anastasia S. [Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Simoes Gamboa, A.L. [Center of Information Optical Technologies, ITMO University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-15

    While time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy is commonly used as a quantitative tool for the analysis of the dynamics of photoexcitation in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots, the interpretation of the virtually ubiquitous nonexponential decay profiles is frequently ambiguous, because the assumption of multiple discrete exponential components with distinct lifetimes for resolving the decays is often arbitrary. Here, an interpretation of the room-temperature luminescence decay of CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dots in colloidal solutions is presented based on the Kohlrausch relaxation function. It is proposed that the decay can be understood by using the concept of Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assuming that the role of acceptors of photoexcitation energy is played by high-frequency anharmonic molecular vibrations in the environment of the quantum dots. The term EVFRET (Electronic - Vibrational Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer) is introduced in order to unequivocally refer to this energy transfer process. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Charge sensed Pauli blockade in a metal-oxide-semiconductor lateral double quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoi T; Lilly, Michael P; Nielsen, Erik; Bishop, Nathan; Rahman, Rajib; Young, Ralph; Wendt, Joel; Dominguez, Jason; Pluym, Tammy; Stevens, Jeffery; Lu, Tzu-Ming; Muller, Richard; Carroll, Malcolm S

    2013-01-01

    We report Pauli blockade in a multielectron silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot with an integrated charge sensor. The current is rectified up to a blockade energy of 0.18 ± 0.03 meV. The blockade energy is analogous to singlet-triplet splitting in a two electron double quantum dot. Built-in imbalances of tunnel rates in the MOS DQD obfuscate some edges of the bias triangles. A method to extract the bias triangles is described, and a numeric rate-equation simulation is used to understand the effect of tunneling imbalances and finite temperature on charge stability (honeycomb) diagram, in particular the identification of missing and shifting edges. A bound on relaxation time of the triplet-like state is also obtained from this measurement.

  5. Lossless propagation in metal-semiconductor-metal plasmonic waveguides using quantum dot active medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, K; Granpayeh, N; Ahmadi, V; Pahlavan, S

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze and simulate the lossless propagation of lightwaves in the active metal-semiconductor-metal plasmonic waveguides (MSMPWs) at the wavelength range of 1540-1560 nm using a quantum dot (QD) active medium. The Maxwell's equations are solved in the waveguide, and the required gains for achieving lossless propagation are derived. On the other hand, the rate equations in quantum dot active regions are solved by using the Runge-Kutta method, and the achievable optical gain is derived. The analyses results show that the required optical gain for lossless propagation in MSMPWs is achievable using the QD active medium. Also, by adjusting the active medium parameters, the MSMPWs loss can be eliminated in a specific bandwidth, and the propagation length increases obviously.

  6. Probing intermediates of the induction period prior to nucleation and growth of semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyang; Wang, Kun; Wang, Linxi; Han, Shuo; Fan, Hongsong; Rowell, Nelson; Ripmeester, John A.; Renoud, Romain; Bian, Fenggang; Zeng, Jianrong; Yu, Kui

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about the induction period before the nucleation and growth of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we introduce an approach that allows us to probe intermediates present in the induction period. We show that this induction period itself exhibits distinct stages with the evolution of the intermediates, first without and then with the formation of covalent bonds between metal cations and chalcogenide anions. The intermediates are optically invisible in toluene, while the covalent-bonded intermediates become visible as magic-size clusters when a primary amine is added. Such evolution of magic-size clusters provides indirect but compelling evidence for the presence of the intermediates in the induction period and supports the multi-step nucleation model. Our study reveals that magic-size clusters could be readily engineered in a single-size form, and suggests that the existence of the intermediates during the growth of conventional quantum dots results in low product yield.

  7. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    1999-01-01

    of quantum dots, however, results in a large inhomogeneous broadening of quantum dot spectra.Work on self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots will be presented. Properties of atom-like single-dots states are investigated optically using high spatial and spectral resolution. Single-dot spectra can be used......Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...... to probe coherence times of exciton states and relaxation processes, both of which are important for future applications....

  8. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    of quantum dots, however, results in a large inhomogeneous broadening of quantum dot spectra. Work on self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots will be presented. Properties of atom-like single-dot states are investigated optically using high spatial and spectral resolution. Single-dot spectra can be used......Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid-state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...... to probe coherence times of exciton states and relaxation processes, both of which are important for future applications....

  9. Energy scaling for multi-exciton complexes in semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipatov, Andrey; Gerchikov, Leonid; Christiano, Jordan

    2017-08-01

    The ground state properties of an multi-exciton (ME) complex localized in a nanoscale semiconductor quantum dot (QD) have been studied. The calculations have been performed using the envelope function approximation for electron and hole motion in the QD. The many-body quantum mechanical treatment of the electron-hole dynamics was done within the Density Functional Theory approach. The ground state energy dependencies upon QD radius, number of electron-hole pairs, QD dielectric function and effective masses of electron and holes have been analyzed. It is demonstrated that when multi-exciton complex is strongly localized within the QD, the physical properties of the system are determined by a single parameter, the ratio of QD and free exciton radii, and its binding energy is given by the function of this parameter multiplied by the binding energy of an isolated exciton in bulk semiconductor.

  10. ZnCdSe/ZnSe quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mossawi, Muwaffaq Abdullah

    2017-02-01

    Gain of CdZnSe quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is studied theoretically using non-Markovian gain model including many-body effects. The calculations are done at three mole fractions. Spontaneous emission and noise figure of the amplifier are studied. The effect of shot noise is included. High gain, polarization independence, and low noise figure are characterize these QD-SOAs. A multi-mode gain appears for Zn0.69Cd0.31Se structure while the structure Zn0.6Cd0.4Se give a low noise.

  11. Time-domain model of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers for wideband optical signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puris, D; Schmidt-Langhorst, C; Lüdge, K; Majer, N; Schöll, E; Petermann, K

    2012-11-19

    We present a novel theoretical time-domain model for a quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier, that allows to simulate subpicosecond pulse propagation including power-based and phase-based effects. Static results including amplified spontaneous emission spectra, continuous wave amplification, and four-wave mixing experiments in addition to dynamic pump-probe simulations are presented for different injection currents. The model uses digital filters to describe the frequency dependent gain and microscopically calculated carrier-carrier scattering rates for the interband carrier dynamics. It can be used to calculate the propagation of multiple signals with different wavelengths or one wideband signal with high bitrate.

  12. Quantum Wells, Wires and Dots Theoretical and Computational Physics of Semiconductor Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Quantum Wells, Wires and Dots, 3rd Edition is aimed at providing all the essential information, both theoretical and computational, in order that the reader can, starting from essentially nothing, understand how the electronic, optical and transport properties of semiconductor heterostructures are calculated. Completely revised and updated, this text is designed to lead the reader through a series of simple theoretical and computational implementations, and slowly build from solid foundations, to a level where the reader can begin to initiate theoretical investigations or explanations of their

  13. Confined excitons in a semiconductor quantum dot in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shintaro; Segawa, Yusaburo; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic field effects in a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) are studied theoretically. Magneto-optical effects originating from electron-hole pairs in the lowest and the higher excited states are discussed. The theory is based on the effective-mass approximation with the following effects taken into account: the direct Coulomb interaction, the electron-hole exchange interaction, and the valence-band mixing effect. A calculation is performed with a numerical diagonalization method. The transition from the quantum confined Zeeman effect for a weak magnetic field to the quantum confined Paschen-Back effect for a strong magnetic field is discussed. Special attention is paid to a magnetic field dependence of the optical transition probabilities which is found to be a pronounced effect for a CdSe QD, where the confinement by a potential and a magnetic field have competing contributions.

  14. Photon-Storage in Optical Memory Cells Based on a Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Quantum Well Hybrid Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞松保; 唐艳; 李桂荣; 李月霞; 杨富华; 郑厚植; 曾一平

    2003-01-01

    We report a new type of photonic memory cell based on a semiconductor quantum dot (QD)-quantum well (QW)hybrid structure, in which photo-generated excitons can be decomposed into separated electrons and holes, and stored in QW and QDs respectively. Storage and retrieval of photonic signals are verified by time-resolved photoluminescence experiments. A storage time in excess of 100ms has been obtained at a temperature of 10K while the switching speed reaches the order of ten megahertz.

  15. Metal oxide semiconductors for dye- and quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concina, Isabella; Vomiero, Alberto

    2015-04-17

    This Review provides a brief summary of the most recent research developments in the synthesis and application of nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors for dye sensitized and quantum dot sensitized solar cells. In these devices, the wide bandgap semiconducting oxide acts as the photoanode, which provides the scaffold for light harvesters (either dye molecules or quantum dots) and electron collection. For this reason, proper tailoring of the optical and electronic properties of the photoanode can significantly boost the functionalities of the operating device. Optimization of the functional properties relies with modulation of the shape and structure of the photoanode, as well as on application of different materials (TiO2, ZnO, SnO2) and/or composite systems, which allow fine tuning of electronic band structure. This aspect is critical because it determines exciton and charge dynamics in the photoelectrochemical system and is strictly connected to the photoconversion efficiency of the solar cell. The different strategies for increasing light harvesting and charge collection, inhibiting charge losses due to recombination phenomena, are reviewed thoroughly, highlighting the benefits of proper photoanode preparation, and its crucial role in the development of high efficiency dye sensitized and quantum dot sensitized solar cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Quantum fluctuations in semiconductor quantum dots and their contributions to the self-energy functions of exciton states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutygullina, A. A.; Khamadeev, M. A.; Blum, D. O.; Shirdelhavar, A. H.

    2017-06-01

    Influence of quantum fluctuations in a system consisting of a quantum dot and the reservoir of acoustic phonons on processes in which the quantum dot takes part is investigated. Under some conditions this influence is shown to be very strong. We find a contribution from the quantum fluctuations to the self-energy function of the exciton coupled to the quantum dot.

  17. Critical strain region evaluation of self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sales, D L [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I. M. y Q. I., Universidad de Cadiz, Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Pizarro, J [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, Universidad de Cadiz, Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Galindo, P L [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, Universidad de Cadiz, Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Garcia, R [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I. M. y Q. I., Universidad de Cadiz, Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Trevisi, G [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parco delle Scienze 37a, 43100, Parma (Italy); Frigeri, P [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parco delle Scienze 37a, 43100, Parma (Italy); Nasi, L [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parco delle Scienze 37a, 43100, Parma (Italy); Franchi, S [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parco delle Scienze 37a, 43100, Parma (Italy); Molina, S I [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I. M. y Q. I., Universidad de Cadiz, Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2007-11-28

    A novel peak finding method to map the strain from high resolution transmission electron micrographs, known as the Peak Pairs method, has been applied to In(Ga)As/AlGaAs quantum dot (QD) samples, which present stacking faults emerging from the QD edges. Moreover, strain distribution has been simulated by the finite element method applying the elastic theory on a 3D QD model. The agreement existing between determined and simulated strain values reveals that these techniques are consistent enough to qualitatively characterize the strain distribution of nanostructured materials. The correct application of both methods allows the localization of critical strain zones in semiconductor QDs, predicting the nucleation of defects, and being a very useful tool for the design of semiconductor devices.

  18. Potential energy surface of excited semiconductors: Graphene quantum dot and BODIPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colherinhas, Guilherme; Fileti, Eudes Eterno; Chaban, Vitaly V.

    2016-08-01

    Binding energy (BE) is an important descriptor in chemistry, which determines thermodynamics and phase behavior of a given substance. BE between two molecules is not directly accessible from the experiment. It has to be reconstructed from cohesive energies, vaporization heats, etc. We report BE for the excited states of two semiconductor molecules - boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) and graphene quantum dot (GQD) - with water. We show, for the first time, that excitation increases BE twofold at an optimal separation (energy minimum position), whereas higher separations lead to higher differences. Interestingly, the effects of excitation are similar irrespective of the dominant binding interactions (van der Waals or electrostatic) in the complex. This new knowledge is important for simulations of the excited semiconductors by simplified interaction functions.

  19. Optical control of the spin of a magnetic atom in a semiconductor quantum dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besombes L.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The control of single spins in solids is a key but challenging step for any spin-based solid-state quantumcomputing device. Thanks to their expected long coherence time, localized spins on magnetic atoms in a semiconductor host could be an interesting media to store quantum information in the solid state. Optical probing and control of the spin of individual or pairs of Manganese (Mn atoms (S = 5/2 have been obtained in II-VI and IIIV semiconductor quantum dots during the last years. In this paper, we review recently developed optical control experiments of the spin of an individual Mn atoms in II-VI semiconductor self-assembled or strain-free quantum dots (QDs.We first show that the fine structure of the Mn atom and especially a strained induced magnetic anisotropy is the main parameter controlling the spin memory of the magnetic atom at zero magnetic field. We then demonstrate that the energy of any spin state of a Mn atom or pairs of Mn atom can be independently tuned by using the optical Stark effect induced by a resonant laser field. The strong coupling with the resonant laser field modifies the Mn fine structure and consequently its dynamics.We then describe the spin dynamics of a Mn atom under this strong resonant optical excitation. In addition to standard optical pumping expected for a resonant excitation, we show that the Mn spin population can be trapped in the state which is resonantly excited. This effect is modeled considering the coherent spin dynamics of the coupled electronic and nuclear spin of the Mn atom optically dressed by a resonant laser field. Finally, we discuss the spin dynamics of a Mn atom in strain-free QDs and show that these structures should permit a fast optical coherent control of an individual Mn spin.

  20. Highly entangled photons from hybrid piezoelectric-semiconductor quantum dot devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Rinaldo; Wildmann, Johannes S; Zallo, Eugenio; Schmidt, Oliver G; Rastelli, Armando

    2014-06-11

    Entanglement resources are key ingredients of future quantum technologies. If they could be efficiently integrated into a semiconductor platform, a new generation of devices could be envisioned, whose quantum-mechanical functionalities are controlled via the mature semiconductor technology. Epitaxial quantum dots (QDs) embedded in diodes would embody such ideal quantum devices, but a fine-structure splitting (FSS) between the bright exciton states lowers dramatically the degree of entanglement of the sources and hampers severely their real exploitation in the foreseen applications. In this work, we overcome this hurdle using strain-tunable optoelectronic devices, where any QD can be tuned for the emission of photon pairs featuring the highest degree of entanglement ever reported for QDs, with concurrence as high as 0.75 ± 0.02. Furthermore, we study the evolution of Bell's parameters as a function of FSS and demonstrate for the first time that filtering-free violation of Bell's inequalities requires the FSS to be smaller than 1 μeV. This upper limit for the FSS also sets the tuning range of exciton energies (∼1 meV) over which our device operates as an energy-tunable source of highly entangled photons. A moderate temporal filtering further increases the concurrence and the tunability of exciton energies up to 0.82 and 2 meV, respectively, though at the expense of 60% reduction of count rate.

  1. Quantum control study of ultrafast optical responses in semiconductor quantum dot devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jung Y; Lin, Chien Y; Liu, Wei-Sheng; Chyi, Jen-Inn

    2014-12-15

    Two quantum control spectroscopic techniques were applied to study InAs quantum dot (QD) devices, which contain different strain-reducing layers. By adaptively control light matter interaction, a delayed resonant response from the InAs QDs was found to be encoded into the optimal phase profile of ultrafast optical pulse used. We verified the delayed resonant response to originate from excitons coupled to acoustic phonons of InAs QDs with two-dimensional coherent spectroscopy. Our study yields valuable dynamical information that can deepen our understanding of the coherent coupling process of exciton in the quantum-confined systems.

  2. Quantum efficiency of a single microwave photon detector based on a semiconductor double quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Clement H.; Vavilov, Maxim G.

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by recent interest in implementing circuit quantum electrodynamics with semiconducting quantum dots, we consider a double quantum dot (DQD) capacitively coupled to a superconducting resonator that is driven by the microwave field of a superconducting transmission line. We analyze the DQD current response using input-output theory and show that the resonator-coupled DQD is a sensitive microwave single photon detector. Using currently available experimental parameters of DQD-resonator coupling and dissipation, including the effects of 1 /f charge noise and phonon noise, we determine the parameter regime for which incident photons are completely absorbed and near-unit ≳98 % efficiency can be achieved. We show that this regime can be reached by using very high quality resonators with quality factor Q ≃105 .

  3. Investigation of a Nanophotonic Sensor with Electrode Modified by Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Sushko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on optical sensors, namely nanophotonic ones intended for liquid media contained polynuclear aromatics assay. Developed by us nanophotonic sensor includes optically transparent working electrode modified by quantum-dimensional structures such as spherical semiconductor quantum dots (QDs. Monomolecular layer of QDs is plotted onto the electrode by Langmuir-Blodgett technology. Particular attention is paid to the processes of assay in nanophotonic sensor. As an analyte we used polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH such as benzo[a]pyrene (BP, which is known for its carcinogenic properties. The developed nanophotonic sensor can be used in ecology for organic carcinogens detection in water objects of environment as well as for biomedical, physical chemical assays and some others.

  4. Manipulating coherence resonance in a quantum dot semiconductor laser via electrical pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Christian; Lingnau, Benjamin; Schöll, Eckehard; Lüdge, Kathy

    2014-06-02

    Excitability and coherence resonance are studied in a semiconductor quantum dot laser under short optical self-feedback. For low pump levels, these are observed close to a homoclinic bifurcation, which is in correspondence with earlier observations in quantum well lasers. However, for high pump levels, we find excitability close to a boundary crisis of a chaotic attractor. We demonstrate that in contrast to the homoclinic bifurcation the crisis and thus the excitable regime is highly sensitive to the pump current. The excitability threshold increases with the pump current, which permits to adjust the sensitivity of the excitable unit to noise as well as to shift the optimal noise strength, at which maximum coherence is observed. The shift adds up to more than one order of magnitude, which strongly facilitates experimental realizations.

  5. Photon antibunching and nonlinear effects for a quantum dot coupled to a semiconductor cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, F.; Whittaker, D. M.

    2010-09-01

    The models presented simulate pumping techniques that can be used on modern semiconductor devices which are capable of coupling a quantum dot and cavity mode in order to determine a more efficient method of producing a single-photon emitter while taking into consideration typical parameters which are achievable given today’s standards of coupling strength. Cavity quantum electrodynamics are incorporated in the calculations as we compare various pumping schemes for the system that either use on-resonant laser excitation or nonresonant excitation due to a wetting layer. In particular, we look to study how antibunching effects change for each method as the cavity finesse is increased toward the strong coupling regime. Experimentally these studies are equivalent to nonlinear pump-probe measurements, where a strong pump, either resonant or nonresonant, is used to excite the coupled system, and the resulting state is characterized using a weak, resonant probe beam.

  6. Monte Carlo modeling of the dual-mode regime in quantum-well and quantum-dot semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusseau, Laurent; Philippe, Fabrice; Disanto, Filippo

    2014-03-10

    Monte Carlo markovian models of a dual-mode semiconductor laser with quantum well (QW) or quantum dot (QD) active regions are proposed. Accounting for carriers and photons as particles that may exchange energy in the course of time allows an ab initio description of laser dynamics such as the mode competition and intrinsic laser noise. We used these models to evaluate the stability of the dual-mode regime when laser characteristics are varied: mode gains and losses, non-radiative recombination rates, intraband relaxation time, capture time in QD, transfer of excitation between QD via the wetting layer... As a major result, a possible steady-state dual-mode regime is predicted for specially designed QD semiconductor lasers thereby acting as a CW microwave or terahertz-beating source whereas it does not occur for QW lasers.

  7. A functional immobilization of semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) on nanoporous aluminium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobler, Christian; Keusgen, Michael [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Bakowsky, Udo [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (so-called 'quantum dots', QDs) are investigated for about 20 years because of their unique fluorescent and semiconductive properties. QDs were mainly used for analytical systems outside and inside a living organism. However, for most of these analytical systems, surface of QDs has to be modified. Immobilization techniques for semiconductor nanoparticles are showing wide interests within solar-cell technologies and biosensor development. A functional inorganic/organic hybrid nanosystem could be realized by combination of an inorganic synthesis of semiconductor nanoparticles with commonly used amino acid chemistry on the surface of extremely hydrophilic aluminium oxide filter membranes. 3-Aminopropyle-triethoxysilane (APTES), allyloxy-trimethylsilane and Fmoc-(S-t-Bu)-cystine were used for surface modification. After cleavage of protective groups Fmoc and t-Bu, semiconductor nanoparticles were immobilized by self-assembly on filter surface. The immobilization can be explained according to commonly used ligand-exchange reactions. This technique results in strongly fluorescent surfaces presenting an additional amino-group for further functionalization. The obtained membranes are suitable for various diagnostic applications like multi-parameter immunoassays and array applications at nanoscale. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Anisotropy-Induced Quantum Interference and Population Trapping between Orthogonal Quantum Dot Exciton States in Semiconductor Cavity Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen; Agarwal, Girish S

    2017-02-10

    We describe how quantum dot semiconductor cavity systems can be engineered to realize anisotropy-induced dipole-dipole coupling between orthogonal dipole states in a single quantum dot. Quantum dots in single-mode cavity structures as well as photonic crystal waveguides coupled to spin states or linearly polarized excitons are considered. We demonstrate how the dipole-dipole coupling can control the radiative decay rate of excitons and form pure entangled states in the long time limit. We investigate both field-free entanglement evolution and coherently pumped exciton regimes, and show how a double-field pumping scenario can completely eliminate the decay of coherent Rabi oscillations and lead to population trapping. In the Mollow triplet regime, we explore the emitted spectra from the driven dipoles and show how a nonpumped dipole can take on the form of a spectral triplet, quintuplet, or a singlet, which has applications for producing subnatural linewidth single photons and more easily accessing regimes of high-field quantum optics and cavity-QED.

  9. Selective Synthesis and Advanced Characteristic of CdSe Semiconductor Quantum Dots by Aqueous Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This work mainly investigated the influences of some factors, such as, synthesis methods, pre cursor alternatives, and vacuum heat-treating process, etc, on the fluorescent characteristics of the semiconductor quantum dots synthesized by aqueous phase.The research results indicate that the fluorescent characteristic of water-solution sample prepared from Na2 SO3 precursor was sensitive to water bath heating time, and specially, its photoluminescence spectrum shows the unique phenomenon of double excitation and emission peaks.Meanwhile,the fluorescent characteristic of water- solution sample prepared from NaBH4 precursor is slightly influenced by water bath heating time, and the surface of CdSe quantum dots could be passivated by the excessive amount of NaBH4precursor, which results in the effective decrease of surface traps and great enhancement of quantum yield.Furthermore, the fluorescent emission peaks of samples could be sharpeued by vacuum heat-treating process, with its spectral full width at half of maximum (FWHM) around 30-40 nm, so the emission peaks become redshift, ofwhich the intensity greatly increases.

  10. A gate defined quantum dot on the two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductor WSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiang-Xiang; Liu, Di; Mosallanejad, Vahid; You, Jie; Han, Tian-Yi; Chen, Dian-Teng; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2015-10-28

    Two-dimensional layered materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), are promising materials for future electronics owing to their unique electronic properties. With the presence of a band gap, atomically thin gate defined quantum dots (QDs) can be achieved on TMDCs. Herein, standard semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to demonstrate quantum confined structures on WSe2 with tunnel barriers defined by electric fields, therefore eliminating the edge states induced by etching steps, which commonly appear in gapless graphene QDs. Over 40 consecutive Coulomb diamonds with a charging energy of approximately 2 meV were observed, showing the formation of a QD, which is consistent with the simulations. The size of the QD could be tuned over a factor of 2 by changing the voltages applied to the top gates. These results shed light on a way to obtain smaller quantum dots on TMDCs with the same top gate geometry compared to traditional GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures with further research.

  11. EXCITON ENERGY OF THE InAs/GaAs SELF-ASSEMBLED QUANTUM DOT IN A SEMICONDUCTOR MICROCAVITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN LIU-XIAN; LI SHU-SHEN; XIA JlAN-BAI

    2001-01-01

    We report on the theoretical study of the interaction of the quantum dot(QD)exciton with the photon waveguide models in a semiconductor microcavity. The lnAs/GaAs self-assembled QD exciton energies are calculated in a microcavity. The calculated results reveal that the electromagnetic field reduces the exciton energies in a semiconductor microcavity. The effect of the electromagnetic field decreases as the radius of the QD increases. Our calculated results are useful for designing and fabricating photoelectron devices.

  12. Fundamentals and Applications of Semiconductor Nanocrystals : A study on the synthesis, optical properties, and interactions of quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, R.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on both the fundamental aspects as well as applications of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, also called quantum dots (QDs). Due to the unique size-dependent optical and electronic properties of QDs, they hold great promise for a wide range of applications like solar cells, d

  13. On high-speed cross-gain modulation without pattern effects in quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, A.V.; Mørk, Jesper; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    In the regime with maximum linear gain in a quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), instantaneous gain modulation by change of the photon density is possible due to spectral hole burning effects. This, in turn, leads to the opportunity of ultrafast cross-gain modulation (XGM...

  14. Entanglement distribution schemes employing coherent photon-to-spin conversion in semiconductor quantum dot circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreau, Louis; Bogan, Alex; Korkusinski, Marek; Studenikin, Sergei; Austing, D. Guy; Sachrajda, Andrew S.

    2017-09-01

    Long distance entanglement distribution is an important problem for quantum information technologies to solve. Current optical schemes are known to have fundamental limitations. A coherent photon-to-spin interface built with quantum dots (QDs) in a direct bandgap semiconductor can provide a solution for efficient entanglement distribution. QD circuits offer integrated spin processing for full Bell state measurement (BSM) analysis and spin quantum memory. Crucially the photo-generated spins can be heralded by non-destructive charge detection techniques. We review current schemes to transfer a polarization-encoded state or a time-bin-encoded state of a photon to the state of a spin in a QD. The spin may be that of an electron or that of a hole. We describe adaptations of the original schemes to employ heavy holes which have a number of attractive properties including a g-factor that is tunable to zero for QDs in an appropriately oriented external magnetic field. We also introduce simple throughput scaling models to demonstrate the potential performance advantage of full BSM capability in a QD scheme, even when the quantum memory is imperfect, over optical schemes relying on linear optical elements and ensemble quantum memories.

  15. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Jahnke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A guide to the theory, application and potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. It offers an overview of resonance fluorescence emission.$bAn understanding of the interaction between light and matter on a quantum level is of fundamental interest and has many applications in optical technologies. The quantum nature of the interaction has recently attracted great attention for applications of semiconductor nanostructures in quantum information processing. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures is a key guide to the theory, experimental realisation, and future potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. Part one provides a comprehensive overview of single quantum dot systems, beginning with a look at resonance fluorescence emission. Quantum optics with single quantum dots in photonic crystal and micro cavities are explored in detail, before part two goes on to review nanolasers with quantum dot emitters. Light-matter interaction...

  16. Quantifying the cellular uptake of semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles by analytical electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondow, Nicole; Brown, M Rowan; Starborg, Tobias; Monteith, Alexander G; Brydson, Rik; Summers, Huw D; Rees, Paul; Brown, Andy

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles are in demand as optical biomarkers yet the cellular uptake process is not fully understood; quantification of numbers and the fate of internalized particles are still to be achieved. We have focussed on the characterization of cellular uptake of quantum dots using a combination of analytical electron microscopies because of the spatial resolution available to examine uptake at the nanoparticle level, using both imaging to locate particles and spectroscopy to confirm identity. In this study, commercially available quantum dots, CdSe/ZnS core/shell particles coated in peptides to target cellular uptake by endocytosis, have been investigated in terms of the agglomeration state in typical cell culture media, the traverse of particle agglomerates across U-2 OS cell membranes during endocytosis, the merging of endosomal vesicles during incubation of cells and in the correlation of imaging flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy to measure the final nanoparticle dose internalized by the U-2 OS cells. We show that a combination of analytical transmission electron microscopy and serial block face scanning electron microscopy can provide a comprehensive description of the internalization of an initial exposure dose of nanoparticles by an endocytically active cell population and how the internalized, membrane bound nanoparticle load is processed by the cells. We present a stochastic model of an endosome merging process and show that this provides a data-driven modelling framework for the prediction of cellular uptake of engineered nanoparticles in general. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  17. Strain-induced vertical self-organization of semiconductor quantum dots: A computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shtinkov, N., E-mail: nshtinkov@uottawa.ca [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa (Ontario) K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2013-12-28

    Atomistic strain simulations based on the valence force field method are employed to study the vertical arrangements of semiconductor quantum dot (QD) multilayers. The effects of the QD shape, dimensions, and materials parameters are systematically investigated, varying independently the following parameters: spacer width H, QD lateral spacing D, base b, and height h, slope of the side facets, elastic properties of the dot and the substrate materials, and lattice mismatch between the dot and the substrate. The transition between vertically aligned and anti-aligned structures is found to be determined mainly by the ratios H/D and b/D, as well as by the strain anisotropy of the substrate and to a lesser extent of the QD. The dependence on the QD height h is significant only for steep side facets and large aspect ratios h/b, and the effects of the lattice mismatch strain and the bulk elastic moduli are found to be negligible. The comparison with experimental data shows an excellent agreement with the results from the simulations, demonstrating that the presented analysis results in precise theoretical predictions for the vertical self-organization regime in a wide range of QD materials systems.

  18. Non-blinking semiconductor colloidal quantum dots for biology, optoelectronics and quantum optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinicelli, Piernicola; Mahler, Benoit; Buil, Stéphanie; Quélin, Xavier; Dubertret, Benoit; Hermier, Jean-Pierre

    2009-04-14

    Twinkle, twinkle: The blinking of semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals is the main inconvenience of these bright nanoemitters. There are various approaches for obtaining non-blinking nanocrystals, one of which is to grow a thick coat of CdS on the CdSe core (see picture). Applications of this method in the fields of optoelectronic devices, biologic labelling and quantum information processing are discussed.The blinking of semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals is the main inconvenience of these bright nanoemitters. For some years, research on this phenomenon has demonstrated the possibility to progress beyond this problem by suppressing this fluorescence intermittency in various ways. After a brief overview on the microscopic mechanism of blinking, we review the various approaches used to obtain non-blinking nanocrystals and discuss the commitment of this crucial improvement to applications in the fields of optoelectronic devices, biologic labelling and quantum information processing.

  19. Quantum dot nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Henini

    2002-06-01

    These sophisticated technologies for the growth of high quality epitaxial layers of compound semiconductor materials on single crystal semiconductor substrates are becoming increasingly important for the development of the semiconductor electronics industry. This article is intended to convey the flavor of the subject by focusing on the technology and applications of self-assembled quantum dots (QDs and to give an introduction to some of the essential characteristics.

  20. Remote sensing of sample temperatures in nuclear magnetic resonance using photoluminescence of semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycko, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Knowledge of sample temperatures during nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements is important for acquisition of optimal NMR data and proper interpretation of the data. Sample temperatures can be difficult to measure accurately for a variety of reasons, especially because it is generally not possible to make direct contact to the NMR sample during the measurements. Here I show that sample temperatures during magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR measurements can be determined from temperature-dependent photoluminescence signals of semiconductor quantum dots that are deposited in a thin film on the outer surface of the MAS rotor, using a simple optical fiber-based setup to excite and collect photoluminescence. The accuracy and precision of such temperature measurements can be better than ±5K over a temperature range that extends from approximately 50K (-223°C) to well above 310K (37°C). Importantly, quantum dot photoluminescence can be monitored continuously while NMR measurements are in progress. While this technique is likely to be particularly valuable in low-temperature MAS NMR experiments, including experiments involving dynamic nuclear polarization, it may also be useful in high-temperature MAS NMR and other forms of magnetic resonance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Open quantum spin systems in semiconductor quantum dots and atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwager, Heike

    2012-07-04

    In this Thesis, we study open quantum spin systems from different perspectives. The first part is motivated by technological challenges of quantum computation. An important building block for quantum computation and quantum communication networks is an interface between material qubits for storage and data processing and travelling photonic qubits for communication. We propose the realisation of a quantum interface between a travelling-wave light field and the nuclear spins in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a cavity. Our scheme is robust against cavity decay as it uses the decay of the cavity to achieve the coupling between nuclear spins and the travelling-wave light fields. A prerequiste for such a quantum interface is a highly polarized ensemble of nuclear spins. High polarization of the nuclear spin ensemble is moreover highly desirable as it protects the potential electron spin qubit from decoherence. Here we present the theoretical description of an experiment in which highly asymmetric dynamic nuclear spin pumping is observed in a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot. The second part of this Thesis is devoted to fundamental studies of dissipative spin systems. We study general one-dimensional spin chains under dissipation and propose a scheme to realize a quantum spin system using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in which both coherent interaction and dissipation can be engineered and controlled. This system enables the study of non-equilibrium and steady state physics of open and driven spin systems. We find, that the steady state expectation values of different spin models exhibit discontinuous behaviour at degeneracy points of the Hamiltonian in the limit of weak dissipation. This effect can be used to dissipatively probe the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. We moreover study spin models under the aspect of state preparation and show that dissipation drives certain spin models into highly entangled state. Finally, we study a spin chain with

  2. Spectroscopy of size dependent many-particle effects in single self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Savio, C.

    2006-02-20

    Single InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown with the Stranski-Krastanov method in a In{sub 0.12}Ga{sub 0.88}As quantum well embedded in GaAs and emitting in the near infrared have been optically investigated. To perform QD spectroscopy at low temperatures a very stable micro-photoluminescence ({mu}-PL) microscope set-up fully integrated in a liquid helium (LHe) cryostate has been successfully developed. The system is based on the cold finger technique and a Fourier Transform (FT) spectrometer combined with a nitrogen cooled Ge detector. Photoluminescence of the QDs was excited non resonantly with a He-Ne laser and single dot spectroscopy was carried out at temperatures below 60 K. The experimental set-up allows mapping of the optical emission by recording spectra for every point of a scan grid. This mapping mode is used to acquire optical images and to locate a particular dot for investigation. Series of measurement on a single QD were normally performed over a long time (from a few days to a week), with the need of daily adjustment in the sub-micrometer range. At low excitation power a single sharp line (E{sub x}) arising from recombination of a single exciton in the dot is observed. Varying the excitation density the spectra become more complex, with appearance of the biexciton emission line (E{sub xx}) on the lower energies side of the E{sub x} line, followed by emission from excitons occupying higher shells in the dot. Measured biexciton binding energies and power dependence are in good agreement with values reported in the literature. The temperature dependence of the optical emission was investigated. The energy shows the characteristic decrease related to the shrinking of the semiconductor band gap, while the linewidth evolution is compatible with broadening due to coupling with acoustic and optical phonons. A statistics of biexciton binding energies over a dozen of dots was acquired and the results compared with single QD spectroscopy data available in the

  3. Quantum dot-doped porous silicon metal-semiconductor metal photodetector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Man; Cho, Hsing-Tzu; Hsiao, Vincent K S; Yong, Ken-Tye; Law, Wing-Cheung

    2012-06-06

    In this paper, we report on the enhancement of spectral photoresponsivity of porous silicon metal-semiconductor metal (PS-MSM) photodetector embedded with colloidal quantum dots (QDs) inside the pore layer. The detection efficiency of QDs/PS hybrid-MSM photodetector was enhanced by five times larger than that of the undoped PS-MSM photodetector. The bandgap alignment between PS (approximately 1.77 eV) and QDs (approximately 1.91 eV) facilitates the photoinduced electron transfer from QDs to PS whereby enhancing the photoresponsivity. We also showed that the photoresponsitivity of QD/PS hybrid-MSM photodetector depends on the number of layer coatings of QDs and the pore sizes of PS.

  4. All-optical sampling based on quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen; Wang, Yongjun; Wang, Lina

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, the all-optical signal processing system has become a hot research field of optical communication. This paper focused on the basic research of quantum-dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and studied its practical application to all-optical sampling. A multi-level dynamic physical model of QD-SOA is established, and its ultrafast dynamic characteristics are studied through theoretical and simulation research. For further study, an all-optical sampling scheme based on the nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) effect of QD-SOA is also proposed. This paper analyzed the characteristics of optical switch window and investigated the influence of different control light pulses on switch performance. The presented optical sampling method has an important role in promoting the improvement of all-optical signal processing technology.

  5. High-order optical nonlinearities in nanocomposite films dispersed with semiconductor quantum dots at high concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Yasuo; Matsushima, Shun-suke; Yamagami, Ryu-ichi; Jinzenji, Taka-aki; Sakuma, Shohei; Liu, Xiangming; Izuishi, Takuya; Shen, Qing

    2017-06-01

    We describe the nonlinear optical properties of inorganic-organic nanocomposite films in which semiconductor CdSe quantum dots as high as 6.8 vol.% are dispersed. Open/closed Z-scan measurements, degenerate multi-wave mixing and femtosecond pump-probe/transient grating measurements are conducted. It is shown that the observed fifth-order optical nonlinearity has the cascaded third-order contribution that becomes prominent at high concentrations of CdSe QDs. It is also shown that there are picosecond-scale intensity-dependent and nanosecond-scale intensity-independent decay components in absorptive and refractive nonlinearities. The former is caused by the Auger process, while the latter comes from the electron-hole recombination process.

  6. Spin Manipulation through geometric phase in III-V semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prbahakar, Sanjay; Melnik, Roderick

    2015-03-01

    A more robust technique is proposed to flip the spin completely through geometric phase in III-V semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). We transport the QDs adiabatically in a closed loop along the circular trajectory in the plane of two dimensional electron gas with the application of time dependent gate controlled electric fields and investigate the manipulation of Berry phase with the spin-orbit couplings. Here we show that both the Rashba and the Dresselhaus couplings are present for inducing a phase necessary for spin flip. If one of them is absent, the induced phase is trivial and irrelevant for spin-flip (Phys. Rev. B 89, 245310 (2014), Applied Physics Letters 104, 142411 (2014)). We acknowledge the funding agency: Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and Canada Research Chair Program.

  7. Semiconductor quantum dot/albumin complex is a long-life and highly photostable endosome marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaki, Ken-ichi; Momo, Asami; Oku, Taisuke; Komoto, Atsushi; Maenosono, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2003-03-14

    For the purpose of selecting the efficient dispersion condition of hydrophilic semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in biological buffers, the dispersion of the QDs mixed with a serum albumin from 9 different species or an ovalbumin was compared by a fluorescence intensity analysis. The QDs mixed with sheep serum albumin (SSA) showed the highest fluorescence of all when the mixtures were dissolved in Dulbecco's MEM. QD/SSA complexes were accumulated in the endosome/lysosome of Vero cells and the fluorescence could be detected over a 5-day post-incubation period. The photostability of QD/SSA complexes associated with the endosomes was detectable, at least, 30 times as long as that of fluorescein-labeled dextran involved in endosomes. QD/SSA complex, therefore, can be used as a long-life and highly photostable endosome marker.

  8. Quasiparticle parity lifetime of bound states in a hybrid superconductor-semiconductor quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Albrecht, Sven; Kirsanskas, Gediminas; Chang, Willy; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Krogstrup, Peter; Jespersen, Thomas; Nygård, Jesper; Flensberg, Karsten; Marcus, Charles

    2015-03-01

    We measure quasiparticle transport in an InAs nanowire that is half-covered with epitaxial superconducting aluminum, then locally gated to form a quantum dot. We observe negative differential conductance at finite source-drain bias, and temperature dependent even-odd alternations in the Coulomb blockade peak spacings at zero bias. These observations can be understood in terms of a mid-gap semiconductor discrete state and a continuum of BCS quasiparticle states. Comparing with simple models, we bound the discrete state's parity lifetime and the quasiparticle temperature. These results indicate that parity fluctuations are slow, and imply Majorana qubit poisoning times on the order of a millisecond. Additional results indicate that the bound states move to zero energy in a magnetic field, qualitatively consistent with expectations for Majorana fermions in a finite system. Research supported by Microsoft Station Q, Danish National Research Foundation, Villum Foundation, Lundbeck Foundation, and the European Commission.

  9. Numerical characterization of InP-based quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawwar, Omnia M; Emara, Ahmed; Aly, Moustafa H; Okaz, Ali M

    2016-12-10

    This paper is devoted to the development of a steady-state behavior of a quantum dot-semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA). The investigated performance characteristics cover a wide range that includes material gain coefficient, spatial distribution of the occupation probabilities, fiber to fiber gain, gain spectrum as a function of the bias current, relaxation time, and capture time. A set of traveling-wave equations is used to model the signal and spontaneous photons along the device active region. The obtained results indicate a high gain that reaches 34 dB for an InAs/InGaAsP/InP-based QD-SOA, with a corresponding device length of 4 mm. The obtained signal-to-noise ratio is larger than 75 dB for all input powers without using an output filter.

  10. Photoelectrochemical competitive DNA hybridization assay using semiconductor quantum dot conjugated oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baş, Deniz; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2011-05-01

    A competitive DNA hybridization assay based on the photoelectrochemistry of the semiconductor quantum dot-single stranded DNA conjugates (QD-ssDNA) was developed. Hybridization of QD-ssDNA with the capture probe DNA immobilized on the indium-tin oxide electrodes enables photocurrent generation when the electrochemical cell was illuminated with a light source. Upon the competition between QD-ssDNA and single-stranded target DNA, the photocurrent response decreased with the increase in the target DNA concentration. A linear relationship between the photocurrent and the target DNA concentration was obtained (R(2) = 0.991). The selectivity of system towards the target DNA was also demonstrated using non-complementary sample.

  11. An intrinsically fluorescent recognition ligand scaffold based on chaperonin protein and semiconductor quantum-dot conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongzhi; Li, Yi-Fen; Kagawa, Hiromi K; Trent, Jonathan D; Mudalige, Kumara; Cotlet, Mircea; Swanson, Basil I

    2009-05-01

    Genetic engineering of a novel protein-nanoparticle hybrid system with great potential for biosensing applications and for patterning of various types of nanoparticles is described. The hybrid system is based on a genetically modified chaperonin protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae. This chaperonin is an 18-subunit double ring, which self-assembles in the presence of Mg ions and ATP. Described here is a mutant chaperonin (His-beta-loopless, HBLL) with increased access to the central cavity and His-tags on each subunit extending into the central cavity. This mutant binds water-soluble semiconductor quantum dots, creating a protein-encapsulated fluorescent nanoparticle. The new bioconjugate has high affinity, in the order of strong antibody-antigen interactions, a one-to-one protein-nanoparticle stoichiometry, and high stability. By adding selective binding sites to the solvent-exposed regions of the chaperonin, this protein-nanoparticle bioconjugate becomes a sensor for specific targets.

  12. Direct self-assembling and patterning of semiconductor quantum dots on transferable elastomer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Sara; Vespini, Veronica; Olivieri, Federico; Nasti, Giuseppe; Todino, Michele; Mandracchia, Biagio; Pagliarulo, Vito; Ferraro, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    Functionalization of thin and stretchable polymer layers by nano- and micro-patterning of nanoparticles is a very promising field of research that can lead to many different applications in biology and nanotechnology. In this work, we present a new procedure to self-assemble semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) nanoparticles by a simple fabrication process on a freestanding flexible PolyDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS) membrane. We used a Periodically Poled Lithium Niobate (PPLN) crystal to imprint a micrometrical pattern on the PDMS membrane that drives the QDs self-structuring on its surface. This process allows patterning QDs with different wavelength emissions in a single step in order to tune the overall emission spectrum of the composite, tuning the QDs mixing ratio.

  13. Plasmon-enhanced second harmonic generation in semiconductor quantum dots close to metal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea V. Bragas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the enhancement of the optical second harmonic signal in non-centrosymmetric semiconductor CdS quantum dots, when they are placed in close contact with isolated silver nanoparticles. The intensity enhancement is about 1000. We also show that the enhancement increases when the incoming laser frequency $omega$ is tuned toward the spectral position of the silver plasmon at $2omega$, proving that the silver nanoparticle modifies the nonlinear emission.Received: 8 March 2011, Accepted: 30 May 2011; Edited by: L. Viña; Reviewed by: R. Gordon, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; DOI: 10.4279/PIP.030002Cite as: P. M. Jais, C. von Bilderling, A. V. Bragas, Papers in Physics 3, 030002 (2011

  14. InGaAs Quantum Dots on Cross-Hatch Patterns as a Host for Diluted Magnetic Semiconductor Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teeravat Limwongse

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Storage density on magnetic medium is increasing at an exponential rate. The magnetic region that stores one bit of information is correspondingly decreasing in size and will ultimately reach quantum dimensions. Magnetic quantum dots (QDs can be grown using semiconductor as a host and magnetic constituents added to give them magnetic properties. Our results show how molecular beam epitaxy and, particularly, lattice-mismatched heteroepitaxy can be used to form laterally aligned, high-density semiconducting host in a single growth run without any use of lithography or etching. Representative results of how semiconductor QD hosts arrange themselves on various stripes and cross-hatch patterns are reported.

  15. Controlling Photon Echo in a Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifier Using Shaped Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A. K.; Karni, O.; Khanonkin, I.; Eisenstein, G.

    2017-05-01

    Two-pulse photon-echo-based quantum-memory applications require a precise control over the echo strength and appearance time. We describe a numerical investigation of observation and control of photon echo in a room-temperature InAs /InP -based quantum-dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). We address an important case where the spectral excitation is narrower than the inhomogeneous broadening of the SOA. It is revealed that, in such a QD SOA, the amplitude of the echo pulse depends not only on the excitation-to-rephasing pulse temporal separation but also on the interference among the rephrasing pulse and the echo pulses generated during the propagation along the amplifier. More importantly, the appearance time and amplitude of the echo pulse can be precisely controlled by shaping the first (excitation) pulse. We also assert that deviations in the echo pulse stemming from the SOA gain inhomogeneity can be compensated for so as to be utilized in quantum coherent information processing.

  16. Controlling quantum dot emission by integration of semiconductor nanomembranes onto piezoelectric actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastelli, A.; Plumhof, J.D.; Kumar, S.; Trotta, R.; Atkinson, P.; Zallo, E.; Krapek, V.; Schroeter, J.R.; Kiravittaya, S.; Benyoucef, M.; Thurmer, D.J.; Grimm, D.; Schmidt, O.G. [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Ding, F.; Zander, T. [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Deneke, C. [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia (LNNano), Rua Giuseppe Maximo Scolfaro 10000, 13083-100 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Malachias, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, CP 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Herklotz, A.; Doerr, K. [Institute for Metallic Materials, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Singh, R.; Bester, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Hafenbrak, R.; Joens, K.D.; Michler, P. [Institut fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, University of Stuttgart, Allmandring 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    This paper reviews the recent advances obtained by integrating semiconductor epitaxial films with embedded self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) on top of single-crystal piezoelectric substrates made of lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT). This combination allows us to study in detail the effects produced by variable strains (up to about {+-} 0.2%) on the excitonic emission of single QDs and to add a powerful ''tuning knob'' to QDs. Biaxial stress can be used to reversibly shift the emission wavelength of QDs in a spectral range wider than 10 meV and to modify the relative binding energies of excitonic species. Anisotropic stress has instead a strong influence on the fine structure splitting of neutral excitons. Finally, we present experimental results on the effect of biaxial strain on the optical modes of microring optical resonators and show a simple approach enabling the compensation of piezo-creep via a closed-loop system. Schematic illustration of a QD membrane integrated on top of a PMN-PT substrate. Stress provided by the piezoelectric substrate allows broad range tuning of the emission properties of the overlying dots. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Multiple excitons and the electron phonon bottleneck in semiconductor quantum dots: An ab initio perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2008-07-01

    The article presents the current perspective on the nature of photoexcited states in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The focus is on multiple excitons and photo-induced electron-phonon dynamics in PbSe and CdSe QDs, and the advocated view is rooted in the results of ab initio studies in both energy and time domains. As a new type of material, semiconductor QDs represent the borderline between chemistry and physics, exhibiting both molecular and bulk-like properties. Similar to atoms and molecules, the electronic spectra of QD show discrete bands. Just as bulk semiconductors, QDs comprise multiple copies of the elementary unit cell, and are characterized by valence and conduction bands. The electron-phonon coupling in QDs is weaker than in molecules, but stronger than in bulk semiconductors. Unlike either material, the QD properties can be tuned continuously by changing QD size and shape. The molecular and bulk points of view often lead to contradicting conclusions. For example, the molecular view suggests that the excitations in QDs should exhibit strong electron-correlation (excitonic) effects, and that the electron-phonon relaxation should be slow due to the discrete nature of the optical bands and the mismatch of the electronic energy gaps with vibrational frequencies. In contrast, a finite-size limit of bulk properties indicates that the kinetic energy of quantum confinement should be significantly greater than excitonic effects and that the electron-phonon relaxation inside the quasi-continuous bands should be efficient. Such qualitative differences have generated heated discussions in the literature. The great potential of QDs for a variety of applications, including photovoltaics, spintronics, lasers, light-emitting diodes, and field-effect transistors makes it crutual to settle the debates. By synthesizing different viewpoints and presenting a unified atomistic picture of the excited state processes, our ab initio analysis clarifies the controversies

  18. Distance-dependent energy transfer between CdSe/CdS quantum dots and a two-dimensional semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodfellow, Kenneth M.; Vamivakas, A. Nick, E-mail: nick.vamivakas@rochester.edu [Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Chakraborty, Chitraleema [Materials Science, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Sowers, Kelly [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Waduge, Pradeep; Wanunu, Meni [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Krauss, Todd [Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Driscoll, Kristina [Department of Physics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2016-01-11

    Atomically thin semiconductors, such as the transition metal dichalcogenides, show great potential for nanoscale photodetection, energy harvesting, and nanophotonics. Here, we investigate the efficiency of energy transfer between colloidal quantum dots with a cadmium selenide core and cadmium sulfide shell and monolayer molybdenum diselenide (MoSe{sub 2}). We show that MoSe{sub 2} effectively quenches the fluorescence of quantum dots when the two materials are in contact. We then separate the MoSe{sub 2} and quantum dots by inserting variable thickness hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) spacers and show that the efficiency at which the MoSe{sub 2} quenches fluorescence decreases as the h-BN thickness is increased. For distances d, this trend can be modeled by a 1/d{sup 4} decay, in agreement with theory and recent studies involving graphene.

  19. Microwave-driven coherent operation of a semiconductor quantum dot charge qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohun; Ward, D R; Simmons, C B; Gamble, John King; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Savage, D E; Lagally, M G; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S N; Eriksson, M A

    2015-03-01

    An intuitive realization of a qubit is an electron charge at two well-defined positions of a double quantum dot. This qubit is simple and has the potential for high-speed operation because of its strong coupling to electric fields. However, charge noise also couples strongly to this qubit, resulting in rapid dephasing at all but one special operating point called the 'sweet spot'. In previous studies d.c. voltage pulses have been used to manipulate semiconductor charge qubits but did not achieve high-fidelity control, because d.c. gating requires excursions away from the sweet spot. Here, by using resonant a.c. microwave driving we achieve fast (greater than gigahertz) and universal single qubit rotations of a semiconductor charge qubit. The Z-axis rotations of the qubit are well protected at the sweet spot, and we demonstrate the same protection for rotations about arbitrary axes in the X-Y plane of the qubit Bloch sphere. We characterize the qubit operation using two tomographic approaches: standard process tomography and gate set tomography. Both methods consistently yield process fidelities greater than 86% with respect to a universal set of unitary single-qubit operations.

  20. Large enhancements of thermopower and carrier mobility in quantum dot engineered bulk semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanfeng; Sahoo, Pranati; Makongo, Julien P A; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Kim, Sung-Joo; Chi, Hang; Uher, Ctirad; Pan, Xiaoqing; Poudeu, Pierre F P

    2013-05-22

    The thermopower (S) and electrical conductivity (σ) in conventional semiconductors are coupled adversely through the carriers' density (n) making it difficult to achieve meaningful simultaneous improvements in both electronic properties through doping and/or substitutional chemistry. Here, we demonstrate the effectiveness of coherently embedded full-Heusler (FH) quantum dots (QDs) in tailoring the density, mobility, and effective mass of charge carriers in the n-type Ti(0.1)Zr(0.9)NiSn half-Heusler matrix. We propose that the embedded FH QD forms a potential barrier at the interface with the matrix due to the offset of their conduction band minima. This potential barrier discriminates existing charge carriers from the conduction band of the matrix with respect to their relative energy leading to simultaneous large enhancements of the thermopower (up to 200%) and carrier mobility (up to 43%) of the resulting Ti(0.1)Zr(0.9)Ni(1+x)Sn nanocomposites. The improvement in S with increasing mole fraction of the FH-QDs arises from a drastic reduction (up to 250%) in the effective carrier density coupled with an increase in the carrier's effective mass (m*), whereas the surprising enhancement in the mobility (μ) is attributed to an increase in the carrier's relaxation time (τ). This strategy to manipulate the transport behavior of existing ensembles of charge carriers within a bulk semiconductor using QDs is very promising and could pave the way to a new generation of high figure of merit thermoelectric materials.

  1. Boosting photoresponse in silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector using semiconducting quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Chandan; Kim, Yonghwan; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-11-01

    Silicon based metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors have faster photogeneration and carrier collection across the metal-semiconductor Schottky contacts, and CMOS integratibility compared to conventional p-n junction photodetectors. However, its operations are limited by low photogeneration, inefficient carrier-separation, and low mobility. Here, we show a simple and highly effective approach for boosting Si MSM photodetector efficiency by uniformly decorating semiconducting CdSe quantum dots on Si channel (Si-QD). Significantly higher photocurrent on/off ratio was achieved up to over 500 compared to conventional Si MSM photodetector (on/off ratio ~5) by increasing photogeneration and improving carrier separation. Furthermore, a substrate-biasing technique invoked wide range of tunable photocurrent on/off ratio in Si-QD photodetector (ranging from 2.7 to 562) by applying suitable combinations of source-drain and substrate biasing conditions. Strong photogeneration and carrier separation were achieved by employing Stark effect into the Si-QD hybrid system. These results highlight a promising method for enhancing Si MSM photodetector efficiency more than 100 times and simultaneously compatible with current silicon technologies.

  2. ZnS semiconductor quantum dots production by an endophytic fungus Aspergillus flavus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddandarao, Priyanka, E-mail: uddandaraopriyanka@gmail.com; B, Raj Mohan, E-mail: rajmohanbala@gmail.com

    2016-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Endophytic fungus Aspergillus flavus isolated from a medicinal plant Nothapodytes foetida was used for the synthesis of quantum dots. • Morris-Weber kinetic model and Lagergren's pseudo-first-order rate equation were used to study the biosorption kinetics. • Polycrystalline ZnS quantum dots of 18 nm and 58.9 nm from TEM and DLS, respectively. - Abstract: The development of reliable and eco-friendly processes for the synthesis of metal sulphide quantum dots has been considered as a major challenge in the field of nanotechnology. In the present study, polycrystalline ZnS quantum dots were synthesized from an endophytic fungus Aspergillus flavus. It is noteworthy that apart from being rich sources of bioactive compounds, endophytic fungus also has the ability to mediate the synthesis of nanoparticles. TEM and DLS revealed the formation of spherical particles with an average diameter of about 18 nm and 58.9 nm, respectively. The ZnS quantum dots were further characterized using SEM, EDAX, XRD, UV–visible spectroscopy and FTIR. The obtained results confirmed the synthesis of polycrystalline ZnS quantum dots and these quantum dots are used for studying ROS activity. In addition this paper explains kinetics of metal sorption to study the role of biosorption in synthesis of quantum dots by applying Morris-Weber kinetic model. Since Aspergillus flavus is isolated from a medicinal plant Nothapodytes foetida, quantum dots synthesized from this fungus may have great potential in broad environmental and medical applications.

  3. Plasmonic Control of Radiation and Absorption Processes in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiella, Roberto [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Moustakas, Theodore D. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2017-07-31

    This document reviews a research program funded by the DOE Office of Science, which has been focused on the control of radiation and absorption processes in semiconductor photonic materials (including III-nitride quantum wells and quantum dots), through the use of specially designed metallic nanoparticles (NPs). By virtue of their strongly confined plasmonic resonances (i.e., collective oscillations of the electron gas), these nanostructures can concentrate incident radiation into sub-wavelength “hot spots” of highly enhanced field intensity, thereby increasing optical absorption by suitably positioned absorbers. By reciprocity, the same NPs can also dramatically increase the spontaneous emission rate of radiating dipoles located within their hot spots. The NPs can therefore be used as optical antennas to enhance the radiation output of the underlying active material and at the same time control the far-field pattern of the emitted light. The key accomplishments of the project include the demonstration of highly enhanced light emission efficiency as well as plasmonic collimation and beaming along geometrically tunable directions, using a variety of plasmonic excitations. Initial results showing the reverse functionality (i.e., plasmonic unidirectional absorption and photodetection) have also been generated with similar systems. Furthermore, a new paradigm for the near-field control of light emission has been introduced through rigorous theoretical studies, based on the use of gradient metasurfaces (i.e., optical nanoantenna arrays with spatially varying shape, size, and/or orientation). These activities have been complemented by materials development efforts aimed at the synthesis of suitable light-emitting samples by molecular beam epitaxy. In the course of these efforts, a novel technique for the growth of III-nitride quantum dots has also been developed (droplet heteroepitaxy), with several potential advantages in terms of compositional and geometrical

  4. Silver Nanoshell Plasmonically Controlled Emission of Semiconductor Quantum Dots in the Strong Coupling Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ning; Yuan, Meng; Gao, Yuhan; Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Deren

    2016-04-26

    Strong coupling between semiconductor excitons and localized surface plasmons (LSPs) giving rise to hybridized plexciton states in which energy is coherently and reversibly exchanged between the components is vital, especially in the area of quantum information processing from fundamental and practical points of view. Here, in photoluminescence spectra, rather than from common extinction or reflection measurements, we report on the direct observation of Rabi splitting of approximately 160 meV as an indication of strong coupling between excited states of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and LSP modes of silver nanoshells under nonresonant nanosecond pulsed laser excitation at room temperature. The strong coupling manifests itself as an anticrossing-like behavior of the two newly formed polaritons when tuning the silver nanoshell plasmon energies across the exciton line of the QDs. Further analysis substantiates the essentiality of high pump energy and collective strong coupling of many QDs with the radiative dipole mode of the metallic nanoparticles for the realization of strong coupling. Our finding opens up interesting directions for the investigation of strong coupling between LSPs and excitons from the perspective of radiative recombination under easily accessible experimental conditions.

  5. Photoelectrochemical Conversion from Graphitic C3N4 Quantum Dot Decorated Semiconductor Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Tiance; Tang, Jing; Zhang, Yueyu; Quan, Yingzhou; Gong, Xingao; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M; Elzatahry, Ahmed A; Zhang, Lijuan; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-05-25

    Despite the recent progress of developing graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) as a metal-free photocatalyst, the synthesis of nanostructured g-C3N4 has still remained a complicated and time-consuming approach from its bulk powder, which substantially limits its photoelectrochemical (PEC) applications as well as the potential to form composites with other semiconductors. Different from the labor-intensive methods used before, such as exfoliation or assistant templates, herein, we developed a facile method to synthesize graphitic C3N4 quantum dots (g-CNQDs) directly grown on TiO2 nanowire arrays via a one-step quasi-chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process in a homemade system. The as-synthesized g-CNQDs uniformly covered over the surface of TiO2 nanowires and exhibited attractive photoluminescence (PL) properties. In addition, compared to pristine TiO2, the heterojunction of g-CNQD-decorated TiO2 nanowires showed a substantially enhanced PEC photocurrent density of 3.40 mA/cm(2) at 0 V of applied potential vs Ag/AgCl under simulated solar light (300 mW/cm(2)) and excellent stability with ∼82% of the photocurrent retained after over 10 h of continuous testing, attributed to the quantum and sensitization effects of g-CNQDs. Density functional theory calculations were further carried out to illustrate the synergistic effect of TiO2 and g-CNQD. Our method suggests that a variety of g-CNQD-based composites with other semiconductor nanowires can be synthesized for energy applications.

  6. Quantum dot solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The third generation of solar cells includes those based on semiconductor quantum dots. This sophisticated technology applies nanotechnology and quantum mechanics theory to enhance the performance of ordinary solar cells. Although a practical application of quantum dot solar cells has yet to be achieved, a large number of theoretical calculations and experimental studies have confirmed the potential for meeting the requirement for ultra-high conversion efficiency. In this book, high-profile scientists have contributed tutorial chapters that outline the methods used in and the results of variou

  7. Photoinduced 2-way electron transfer in composites of metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Navendu; Paul, Sneha; Samanta, Anunay

    2016-07-01

    In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation between the QDs and NCs in a giant BSA-capped system, a higher electron transfer rate in this composite suggests that unlike other smaller capping agents, which act more like insulators, BSA allows much better electron conduction, as indicated previously.In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation

  8. Semiconductor Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Synthesis Approaches Towards Large-Scale Industrial Production for Energy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Michael Z; Zhu, Ting

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews the experimental synthesis and engineering developments that focused on various green approaches and large-scale process production routes for quantum dots. Fundamental process engineering principles were illustrated. In relation to the small-scale hot injection method, our discussions focus on the non-injection route that could be scaled up with engineering stir-tank reactors. In addition, applications that demand to utilize quantum dots as "commodity" chemicals are discussed, including solar cells and solid-state lightings.

  9. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Quantum Confinement Effect on the Blue Shift in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changiz. Vatankhah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nano particles of zinc sulfide (ZnS of face centered cubic (fcc structures were synthesized using sulphur source of soium sulphide and mercaptoethanol respectively via Chemical Bath Deposition method. The synthesized quantum dots were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and UV-visible spectrophotometry. The average crystallite size calculated from TEM and XRD pattern has been found to in the range 4.6 – 1.9 nm, the pariticles size decreases with the increase of the capping agent concentrations from 0. 001 to 0.7 Mol. The absorption coefficient in the range 325 - 250 nm decreases with increasing capping agent and the particles. ZnS nanoparticles were also derived from time independent Schrodinger equations for ZnS system and calculated the coefficient absorption using the density functional theory (DFT . It is shown that decreasing of ZnS nanosize lead to changes the optical properties and coefficient absorption in the visible region does not occur and the particles act like a transparent material. In this work, the blue shift was observed in absorption-wavelength both theoretical and experimental method due to the quantum confinement effects.

  10. Ultrafast dynamics in InAs quantum dot and GaInNAs quantum well semiconductor heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Malins, David B

    2007-01-01

    The quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) and ultrafast absorption dynamics near the bandedge have been investigated in p-i-n waveguides comprising quantum confined heterostructures grown on GaAs substrates, for emission at 1.3um. The materials are; isolated InAs/InGaAs dot-in-a-well (DWELL) quantum dots (QD), bilayer InAs quantum dots and GaInNAs multiple quantum wells (MQW). The focus was to investigate these dynamics in a planar waveguide geometry, for the purpose of large scale integ...

  11. Monolithically integrated quantum dot optical modulator with Semiconductor optical amplifier for short-range optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Akahane, Kouichi; Umezawa, Toshimasa; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2015-04-01

    A monolithically integrated quantum dot (QD) optical gain modulator (OGM) with a QD semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was successfully developed. Broadband QD optical gain material was used to achieve Gbps-order high-speed optical data transmission, and an optical gain change as high as approximately 6-7 dB was obtained with a low OGM voltage of 2.0 V. Loss of optical power due to insertion of the device was also effectively compensated for by the SOA section. Furthermore, it was confirmed that the QD-OGM/SOA device helped achieve 6.0-Gbps error-free optical data transmission over a 2.0-km-long photonic crystal fiber. We also successfully demonstrated generation of Gbps-order, high-speed, and error-free optical signals in the >5.5-THz broadband optical frequency bandwidth larger than the C-band. These results suggest that the developed monolithically integrated QD-OGM/SOA device will be an advantageous and compact means of increasing the usable optical frequency channels for short-reach communications.

  12. Strain-tuning of the excitonic fine structure splitting in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumhof, Johannes D.; Ding, Fei; Herklotz, Andreas; Doerr, Kathrin; Rastelli, Armando; Schmidt, Oliver G. [IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstr. 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Krapek, Vlastimil; Klenovsky, Petr [Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic); Joens, Klaus D.; Hafenbrak, Robert; Michler, Peter [Institut fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, University of Stuttgart, Allmandring 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    For the creation of polarization entangled photon pairs from semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) it is important to decrease the fine structure splitting (FSS) of the neutral exciton to energies comparable to the emission linewidth. We employ a piezoelectric actuator (PMN-PT) to manipulate the excitonic emission of GaAs/AlGaAs as well as InGaAs/GaAs QDs embedded in {approx}200 nm thick (Al)GaAs membranes. By attaching the membranes on the PMN-PT we can apply anisotropic strain to the nanostructures. Polarization resolved {mu}-photoluminescence spectroscopy is used to estimate the excitonic FSS as well as the orientation of the linear polarization of the emitted light. The strain makes it possible to manipulate the FSS in a range of 70 {mu} eV. We also observe rotations of up to 70 of the linear polarization of the light emitted by neutral excitons. These effects can be explained as an strain-induced anticrossing of the bright excitonic states.

  13. Semiconductor quantum dots as Förster resonance energy transfer donors for intracellularly-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Lauren D.; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Oh, Eunkeu; Medintz, Igor L.; Delehanty, James B.

    2017-02-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assemblies currently comprise a significant portion of intracellularly based sensors. Although extremely useful, the fluorescent protein pairs typically utilized in such sensors are still plagued by many photophysical issues including significant direct acceptor excitation, small changes in FRET efficiency, and limited photostability. Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are characterized by many unique optical properties including size-tunable photoluminescence, broad excitation profiles coupled to narrow emission profiles, and resistance to photobleaching, which can cumulatively overcome many of the issues associated with use of fluorescent protein FRET donors. Utilizing QDs for intracellular FRET-based sensing still requires significant development in many areas including materials optimization, bioconjugation, cellular delivery and assay design and implementation. We are currently developing several QD-based FRET sensors for various intracellular applications. These include sensors targeting intracellular proteolytic activity along with those based on theranostic nanodevices for monitoring drug release. The protease sensor is based on a unique design where an intracellularly expressed fluorescent acceptor protein substrate assembles onto a QD donor following microinjection, forming an active complex that can be monitored in live cells over time. In the theranostic configuration, the QD is conjugated to a carrier protein-drug analogue complex to visualize real-time intracellular release of the drug from its carrier in response to an external stimulus. The focus of this talk will be on the design, properties, photophysical characterization and cellular application of these sensor constructs.

  14. Artificial Neuron Based on Integrated Semiconductor Quantum Dot Mode-Locked Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesaritakis, Charis; Kapsalis, Alexandros; Bogris, Adonis; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2016-12-19

    Neuro-inspired implementations have attracted strong interest as a power efficient and robust alternative to the digital model of computation with a broad range of applications. Especially, neuro-mimetic systems able to produce and process spike-encoding schemes can offer merits like high noise-resiliency and increased computational efficiency. Towards this direction, integrated photonics can be an auspicious platform due to its multi-GHz bandwidth, its high wall-plug efficiency and the strong similarity of its dynamics under excitation with biological spiking neurons. Here, we propose an integrated all-optical neuron based on an InAs/InGaAs semiconductor quantum-dot passively mode-locked laser. The multi-band emission capabilities of these lasers allows, through waveband switching, the emulation of the excitation and inhibition modes of operation. Frequency-response effects, similar to biological neural circuits, are observed just as in a typical two-section excitable laser. The demonstrated optical building block can pave the way for high-speed photonic integrated systems able to address tasks ranging from pattern recognition to cognitive spectrum management and multi-sensory data processing.

  15. Shot Noise of Charge and Spin Current of a Quantum Dot Coupled to Semiconductor Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartipi, Zahra; Vahedi, Javad

    2015-10-15

    On the basis of the scattering matrix theory and nonequilibrium green function method, we have investigated the fluctuations of charge and spin current of the systems that consist of a quantum dot (QD) with a resonant level coupled to two semiconductor contacts within in alternative site (AS) and alternative bond (AB) framework, where two transverse (Bx) and longitudinal (Bz) magnetic fields are applied to the QD. It is only necessary to use the autocorrelation function to characterize the fluctuations of charge current for a twoterminal system because of the relation that is defined as Σα e Sαβ = Σβ e Sαβ = 0. Our result shows that both auto-shot noise (SLL) and cross-shot noise (SLR) are essential to characterize the fluctuations of spin current when Bx is present. Moreover, our model calculations show that the sign of the cross-shot noise of spin current is negative for all surface states of AS/QD/AS junctions, whereas it oscillates between positive and negative values for two surface states of AB/QD/AB junctions as we sweep the gate voltage.

  16. A hot electron-hole pair breaks the symmetry of a semiconductor quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, M Tuan; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Choi, Joshua J; Owen, Jonathan S; Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2013-01-01

    The best-understood property of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is the size-dependent optical transition energies due to the quantization of charge carriers near the band edges. In contrast, much less is known about the nature of hot electron-hole pairs resulting from optical excitation significantly above the bandgap. Here, we show a transient Stark effect imposed by a hot electron-hole pair on optical transitions in PbSe QDs. The hot electron-hole pair does not behave as an exciton, but more bulk-like as independent carriers, resulting in a transient and varying dipole moment which breaks the symmetry of the QD. As a result, we observe redistribution of optical transition strength to dipole forbidden transitions and the broadening of dipole-allowed transitions during the picosecond lifetime of the hot carriers. The magnitude of symmetry breaking scales with the amount of excess energy of the hot carriers, diminishes as the hot carriers cool down and disappears as the hot electron-hole pair becomes an exciton. Such a transient Stark effect should be of general significance to the understanding of QD photophysics above the bandgap.

  17. Artificial Neuron Based on Integrated Semiconductor Quantum Dot Mode-Locked Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesaritakis, Charis; Kapsalis, Alexandros; Bogris, Adonis; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2016-12-01

    Neuro-inspired implementations have attracted strong interest as a power efficient and robust alternative to the digital model of computation with a broad range of applications. Especially, neuro-mimetic systems able to produce and process spike-encoding schemes can offer merits like high noise-resiliency and increased computational efficiency. Towards this direction, integrated photonics can be an auspicious platform due to its multi-GHz bandwidth, its high wall-plug efficiency and the strong similarity of its dynamics under excitation with biological spiking neurons. Here, we propose an integrated all-optical neuron based on an InAs/InGaAs semiconductor quantum-dot passively mode-locked laser. The multi-band emission capabilities of these lasers allows, through waveband switching, the emulation of the excitation and inhibition modes of operation. Frequency-response effects, similar to biological neural circuits, are observed just as in a typical two-section excitable laser. The demonstrated optical building block can pave the way for high-speed photonic integrated systems able to address tasks ranging from pattern recognition to cognitive spectrum management and multi-sensory data processing.

  18. Bio serves nano: biological light-harvesting complex as energy donor for semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werwie, Mara; Xu, Xiangxing; Haase, Mathias; Basché, Thomas; Paulsen, Harald

    2012-04-03

    Light-harvesting complex (LHCII) of the photosynthetic apparatus in plants is attached to type-II core-shell CdTe/CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) exhibiting an absorption band at 710 nm and carrying a dihydrolipoic acid coating for water solubility. LHCII stays functional upon binding to the QD surface and enhances the light utilization of the QDs significantly, similar to its light-harvesting function in photosynthesis. Electronic excitation energy transfer of about 50% efficiency is shown by donor (LHCII) fluorescence quenching as well as sensitized acceptor (QD) emission and corroborated by time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The energy transfer efficiency is commensurable with the expected efficiency calculated according to Förster theory on the basis of the estimated donor-acceptor separation. Light harvesting is particularly efficient in the red spectral domain where QD absorption is relatively low. Excitation over the entire visible spectrum is further improved by complementing the biological pigments in LHCII with a dye attached to the apoprotein; the dye has been chosen to absorb in the "green gap" of the LHCII absorption spectrum and transfers its excitation energy ultimately to QD. This is the first report of a biological light-harvesting complex serving an inorganic semiconductor nanocrystal. Due to the charge separation between the core and the shell in type-II QDs the presented LHCII-QD hybrid complexes are potentially interesting for sensitized charge-transfer and photovoltaic applications.

  19. Proposed Rabi-Kondo correlated state in a laser-driven semiconductor quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbierski, B; Hanl, M; Weichselbaum, A; Türeci, H E; Goldstein, M; Glazman, L I; von Delft, J; Imamoğlu, A

    2013-10-11

    Spin exchange between a single-electron charged quantum dot and itinerant electrons leads to an emergence of Kondo correlations. When the quantum dot is driven resonantly by weak laser light, the resulting emission spectrum allows for a direct probe of these correlations. In the opposite limit of vanishing exchange interaction and strong laser drive, the quantum dot exhibits coherent oscillations between the single-spin and optically excited states. Here, we show that the interplay between strong exchange and nonperturbative laser coupling leads to the formation of a new nonequilibrium quantum-correlated state, characterized by the emergence of a laser-induced secondary spin screening cloud, and examine the implications for the emission spectrum.

  20. Near-infrared nano-spectroscopy of semiconductor quantum dots using a phase-change mask layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumori, N.; Takahashi, M.; Kubota, R.; Regreny, P.; Gendry, M.; Saiki, T.

    2012-02-01

    We propose a technique that uses an optical mask layer of a phase-change material (PCM), which is used for rewritable optical recording media, to achieve highly sensitive near-field imaging spectroscopy of single semiconductor quantum constituents at optical telecommunication wavelengths. An amorphous nanoaperture allows imaging spectroscopy with a high spatial resolution and high collection efficiency. This is due to the large optical contrast between the crystalline and amorphous phases of the phase-change material at visible wavelengths and its high transparency at near-infrared wavelengths. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by numerical simulations and photoluminescence measurements of InAs/InP quantum dots.

  1. Quantum dots for quantum information technologies

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the most recent developments in quantum dot spin physics and the generation of deterministic superior non-classical light states with quantum dots. In particular, it addresses single quantum dot spin manipulation, spin-photon entanglement and the generation of single-photon and entangled photon pair states with nearly ideal properties. The role of semiconductor microcavities, nanophotonic interfaces as well as quantum photonic integrated circuits is emphasized. The latest theoretical and experimental studies of phonon-dressed light matter interaction, single-dot lasing and resonance fluorescence in QD cavity systems are also provided. The book is written by the leading experts in the field.

  2. Photovoltaic nanopillar radial junction diode architecture enhanced by integrating semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals as light harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzeltürk, Burak; Mutlugün, Evren; Wang, Xiaodong; Pey, Kin Leong; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2010-08-01

    We propose and demonstrate colloidal quantum dot hybridized, radial p-n junction based, nanopillar solar cells with photovoltaic performance enhanced by intimately integrating nanocrystals to serve as light harvesting agents around the light trapping pillars. By furnishing Si based nanopillar photovoltaic diodes with CdSe quantum dots, we experimentally showed up to sixfold enhancement in UV responsivity and ˜13% enhancement in overall solar conversion efficiency. The maximum responsivity enhancement achieved by incorporation of nanocrystals in the nanopillar architecture is found to be spectrally more than four times larger than the responsivity enhancement obtained using planar architecture of the same device.

  3. Statistical analysis of time-resolved emission from ensembles of semiconductor quantum dots: Interpretation of exponential decay models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Driel, A.F.; Nikolaev, I.S.; Vergeer, P.

    2007-01-01

    analysis to recent examples of colloidal quantum dot emission in suspensions and in photonic crystals, and we find that this important class of emitters is well described by a log-normal distribution of decay rates with a narrow and a broad distribution, respectively. Finally, we briefly discuss......We present a statistical analysis of time-resolved spontaneous emission decay curves from ensembles of emitters, such as semiconductor quantum dots, with the aim of interpreting ubiquitous non-single-exponential decay. Contrary to what is widely assumed, the density of excited emitters...... and the intensity in an emission decay curve are not proportional, but the density is a time integral of the intensity. The integral relation is crucial to correctly interpret non-single-exponential decay. We derive the proper normalization for both a discrete and a continuous distribution of rates, where every...

  4. Quantum-dot emitters in photonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous emission from self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots is strongly influenced by the environment in which they are placed. This can be used to determine fundamental optical properties of the quantum dots as well as to manipulate and control the quantum-dot emission itself....

  5. Electron correlations in quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Tipton, D L J

    2001-01-01

    Quantum dot structures confine electrons in a small region of space. Some properties of semiconductor quantum dots, such as the discrete energy levels and shell filling effects visible in addition spectra, have analogies to those of atoms and indeed dots are sometimes referred to as 'artificial atoms'. However, atoms and dots show some fundamental differences due to electron correlations. For real atoms, the kinetic energy of electrons dominates over their mutual Coulomb repulsion energy and for this reason the independent electron approximation works well. For quantum dots the confining potential may be shallower than that of real atoms leading to lower electron densities and a dominance of mutual Coulomb repulsion over kinetic energy. In this strongly correlated regime the independent electron picture leads to qualitatively incorrect results. This thesis concentrates on few-electron quantum dots in the strongly correlated regime both for quasi-one-dimensional and two-dimensional dots in a square confining p...

  6. Evaluation of diverse peptidyl motifs for cellular delivery of semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmill, Kelly Boeneman; Muttenthaler, Markus; Delehanty, James B; Stewart, Michael H; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dawson, Philip E; Medintz, Igor L

    2013-07-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have rapidly become a mainstay technology for facilitating the delivery of a wide variety of nanomaterials to cells and tissues. Currently, the library of CPPs to choose from is still limited, with the HIV TAT-derived motif still being the most used. Among the many materials routinely delivered by CPPs, nanoparticles are of particular interest for a plethora of labeling, imaging, sensing, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. The development of nanoparticle-based technologies for many of these uses will require access to a much larger number of functional peptide motifs that can both facilitate cellular delivery of different types of nanoparticles to cells and be used interchangeably in the presence of other peptides and proteins on the same surface. Here, we evaluate the utility of four peptidyl motifs for their ability to facilitate delivery of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in a model cell culture system. We find that an LAH4 motif, derived from a membrane-inserting antimicrobial peptide, and a chimeric sequence that combines a sweet arrow peptide with a portion originating from the superoxide dismutase enzyme provide effective cellular delivery of QDs. Interestingly, a derivative of the latter sequence lacking just a methyl group was found to be quite inefficient, suggesting that even small changes can have significant functional outcomes. Delivery was effected using 1 h incubation with cells, and fluorescent counterstaining strongly suggests an endosomal uptake process that requires a critical minimum number or ratio of peptides to be displayed on the QD surface. Concomitant cytoviability testing showed that the QD-peptide conjugates are minimally cytotoxic in the model COS-1 cell line tested. Potential applications of these peptides in the context of cellular delivery of nanoparticles and a variety of other (bio)molecules are discussed.

  7. A Multi-Section Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifier for Ultrabroad-Band Gain-Flattened Low-Noise Amplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomoyuki; Akiyama; Mitsuru; Sugawara; Koji; Otsubo; Hiroji; Ebe; Nobuaki; Hatori; Yasuhiko; Arakawa

    2003-01-01

    We propose an ultrabroad-band 1R regenerator utilizing a multi-section quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier. Due to the reduced electron states, quantum dot is beneficial in broadening the gain spectrum and lowering the noise figure. Combining this with a multi-section structure drastically improves the gain equality among the different bound states, leading to an increase in the maximum output power and an improvement of the noise figure.

  8. A Multi-Section Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifier for Ultrabroad-Band Gain-Flattened Low-Noise Amplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomoyuki Akiyama; Mitsuru Sugawara; Koji Otsubo; Hiroji Ebe; Nobuaki Hatori; Yasuhiko Arakawa

    2003-01-01

    We propose an ultrabroad-band 1R regenerator utilizing a multi-section quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier.Due to the reduced electron states, quantum dot is beneficial in broadening the gain spectrum and lowering the noise figure. Combining this with a multi-section structure drastically improves the gain equality among the different bound states, leading to an increase in the maximum output power and an improvement of the noise figure.

  9. Quantum dot sensitized solar cells. A tale of two semiconductor nanocrystals: CdSe and CdTe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Jin Ho; Kamat, Prashant V

    2009-06-23

    CdSe and CdTe nanocrystals are linked to nanostructured TiO2 films using 3-mercaptopropionic acid as a linker molecule for establishing the mechanistic aspects of interfacial charge transfer processes. Both these quantum dots are energetically capable of sensitizing TiO2 films and generating photocurrents in quantum dot solar cells. These two semiconductor nanocrystals exhibit markedly different external quantum efficiencies ( approximately 70% for CdSe and approximately 0.1% for CdTe at 555 nm). Although CdTe with a more favorable conduction band energy (E(CB) = -1.0 V vs NHE) is capable of injecting electrons into TiO2 faster than CdSe (E(CB) = -0.6 V vs NHE), hole scavenging by a sulfide redox couple remains a major bottleneck. The sulfide ions dissolved in aqueous solutions are capable of scavenging photogenerated holes in photoirradiated CdSe system but not in CdTe. The anodic corrosion and exchange of Te with S dominate the charge transfer at the CdTe interface. Factors that dictate the efficiency and photostability of CdSe and CdTe quantum dots are discussed.

  10. Influence of phonons on semiconductor quantum emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldtmann, Thomas

    2009-07-06

    A microscopic theory of interacting charge carriers, lattice vibrations, and light modes in semiconductor systems is presented. The theory is applied to study quantum dots and phonon-assisted luminescence in bulk semiconductors and heterostructures. (orig.)

  11. Proposed Coupling of an Electron Spin in a Semiconductor Quantum Dot to a Nanosize Optical Cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majumdar, Arka; Nielsen, Per Kær; Bajcsy, Michal

    2013-01-01

    We propose a scheme to efficiently couple a single quantum dot electron spin to an optical nano-cavity, which enables us to simultaneously benefit from a cavity as an efficient photonic interface, as well as to perform high fidelity (nearly 100%) spin initialization and manipulation achievable in...

  12. Microscopic theory of phonon-induced effects on semiconductor quantum dot decay dynamics in cavity QED

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Kær; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Lodahl, P.

    2012-01-01

    of the physics and emphasize the important role played by the effective phonon density, describing the availability of phonons for scattering, in quantum dot decay dynamics. Based on the analytical expressions, we present the parameter regimes where phonon effects are expected to be important. Also, we include...

  13. Probing Electron-Phonon Interaction through Two-Photon Interference in Resonantly Driven Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reigue, Antoine; Iles-Smith, Jake; Lux, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the temperature dependence of photon coherence properties through two-photon interference (TPI) measurements from a single quantum dot (QD) under resonant excitation. We show that the loss of indistinguishability is related only to the electron-phonon coupling and is not affected...

  14. Terahertz electro-absorption effect enabling femtosecond all-optical switching in semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, M.C.; Monozon, B.S.; Livhits, D.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an instantaneous all-optical manipulation of optical absorption in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) via an electro-absorption effect induced by the electric field of an incident free-space terahertz signal. A terahertz signal with the full bandwidth of 3 THz was directly encoded onto...

  15. Suppressing electron-phonon interactions in semiconductor quantum dot systems by engineering the electronic wavefunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nysteen, Anders; Nielsen, Per Kær; Mørk, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    It is well-known that decoherence deteriorates the efficiency of cavity QED systems containing quantum dots (QDs), and that a major contribution stems from the coupling between the electrical carriers in the QD and acoustic phonons [1]. Employing a recently published model [2], we demonstrate how...

  16. Effect of temperature and phonons on the spectral properties of a multi-level semiconductor quantum dot single-photon source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Kær; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Lodahl, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    Since it was realized that efficient quantum computing can be performed using single photons and standard linear optics elements, immense international research activity has been aimed at developing semiconductor quantum dot (QD) single-photon sources (SPS). In order to optimise the design of SPS...

  17. Controlling the Photophysical Properties of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Arrays by Strategically Altering Their Surface Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Ashley R.

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are interesting materials that, after less than 40 years of research, are used in commercial products. QDs are now found in displays, such as Samsung televisions and the Kindle Fire, and have applications in lighting, bio-imaging, quantum computing, and photovoltaics. They offer a large range of desirable properties: a controllable band gap, solution processability, controlled energy levels, and are currently the best materials for multiple exciton generation. The tunable optoelectronic properties of QDs can be controlled using size, shape, composition, and surface treatments--as shown here. Due to the quasi-spherical shape of QDs the surface to volume ratio is high, i.e. many of the constituent atoms are found on the QD surface. This makes QDs highly sensitive to surface chemistry modifications. This thesis encompasses the effects of surface treatments for QDs of two semiconducting materials: lead chalcogenides and CsPbI3. Our group developed a new synthetic technique for lead chalcogenide QDs via the cation exchange of cadmium chalcogenides. An in-depth chemical analysis is paired with optical and electrical studies and we find that metal halide residue contributes to the oxidative stability and decreased trap state density in cation-exchanged PbS QDs. We exploit these properties to make air-stable QD photovoltaic devices from both PbS and PbSe QD materials. Beyond the effects of residual atoms left from the synthetic technique, I investigated how to controllably add atoms onto the surface of QDs. I found that by introducing metal halides as a post-treatment in an electronically coupled array I am able to control the performance parameters in QD photovoltaic devices. These treatments fully infiltrate the assembled film, even under short exposure times and allow me to add controlled quantities of surface atoms to study their effects on film properties and photovoltaic device performance. Finally, I sought to apply the knowledge of

  18. Synthesis, characterization, Raman, and surface enhanced Raman studies of semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi

    The major contributions and discoveries of the dissertation include: (1) Homogeneous nucleation processes for the formation of nanocrystals can occur at low temperature and do not need to proceed at high temperature to overcome a high energy barrier. Monodisperse PbS quantum dots (QDs) obtained with nucleation and growth at 45°C support this finding. (2) Monodisperse single elemental Se QDs can be produced by simple solution crystallization from TDE (1-tetradecene) or ODE (1-octadecene). (3) TDE is a better non-coordinating solvent compare to ODE. STDE (S dissolved in TDE) and SeTDE (Se dissolved in TDE) are stable reagents with long storage time. They can be used as universal precursors for S-containing and Se-containing QDs. (4) QDs synthesis can be carried out at low temperature and relatively short reaction time using the simple, non-injection, one-pot synthetic method. (5) The one-pot method can be extended for the synthesis of QDs and graphene oxide nanocomposites and metal and graphene oxide nanocomposites. (6) PbCl2-OLA (oleylamine) is a universal system for the synthesis of Pb-chaclogenides QDs. (7) Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is used to probe both size and wave length dependent quantum confinement effects (QCEs) of PbS QDs. (8) Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to elucidate crystal structure of Se nanoclusters with size of 1--2 nm. Semiconductor QDs have attracted considerable attention due to their potential for energy-efficient materials in optoelectronic and solar cell applications. When the radius of a QD is decreased to that of the exciton Bohr radius, the valence and conduction bands are known to split into narrower bands due to QCEs. QCEs are both size and wave length dependent. We have developed, synthesized and characterized a series of Pb-chaclogenide QDs, which all the sizes of the QDs are monodisperse and smaller than their respective exciton Bohr radius, to study the QCEs of these QDs. SERS is used as a crucial tool to

  19. Fundamentals and Applications of Semiconductor Nanocrystals : A study on the synthesis, optical properties, and interactions of quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Koole, R.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on both the fundamental aspects as well as applications of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, also called quantum dots (QDs). Due to the unique size-dependent optical and electronic properties of QDs, they hold great promise for a wide range of applications like solar cells, displays, lasers, or as contrast agent for bio-imaging. The work presented in this thesis can be divided in three sections. In the first part, the synthesis and self-assembly of PbSe nanocrystals of...

  20. Modeling of high-quality factor XNOR gate using quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers at 1 Tb/s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotd, Amer, E-mail: amer_22003@yahoo.com, E-mail: kotb@phys.uconn.edu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Fayoum University, Fayoum, (Egypt)

    2015-06-15

    The modeling of all-optical logic XNOR gate is realized by a series combination of XOR and INVERT gates. This Boolean function is simulated by using Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZIs) utilizing quantum-dots semiconductor optical amplifiers (QDs-SOAs). The study is carried out when the effect of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is included. The dependence of the output quality factor (Q-factor) on signals and QDs-SOAs' parameters is also investigated and discussed. The simulation is conducted under a repetition rate of ∼1 Tb/s. (author)

  1. Phase- and Polarization-Controlled Two-Photon Rabi Oscillation of the Biexciton State in a Semiconductor Quantum Dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlin Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Under a degenerate two-photon resonant excitation, the Rabi oscillation of the four-level biexciton system in a semiconductor quantum dot is theoretically investigated. The influence of the laser phases on the state manipulation is modeled and numerically calculated. Due to the interference between different excitation paths, the laser phase plays an important role and can be utilized as an alternate control knob to coherently manipulate the biexciton state. The phase control can be facilely implemented by changing the light polarization via a quarter-wave plate.

  2. Local control of emission energy of semiconductor quantum dots using volume expansion of a phase-change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Motoki; Syafawati Humam, Nurrul; Tsumori, Nobuhiro; Saiki, Toshiharu; Regreny, Philippe; Gendry, Michel

    2013-03-01

    A method is proposed to precisely control the emission energy of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) by the application of local strain due to volume expansion of a phase-change material (GeSbTe) upon amorphization. The feasibility of the method is experimentally demonstrated using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy of single InAs/InP QDs on which a GeSbTe thin film is deposited. A significant red-shift of the PL peak energy upon amorphization and subsequent recovery by recrystallization with laser annealing were observed.

  3. Interaction of a conjugated polyaromatic molecule with a single dangling bond quantum dot on a hydrogenated semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewski, Szymon; Kolmer, Marek; Engelund, Mads; Kawai, Hiroyo; Zuzak, Rafal; Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Saeys, Mark; Echavarren, Antonio M; Joachim, Christian; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Szymonski, Marek

    2016-02-07

    Controlling the strength of the coupling between organic molecules and single atoms provides a powerful tool for tuning electronic properties of single-molecule devices. Here, using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) supported by theoretical modeling, we study the interaction of a planar organic molecule (trinaphthylene) with a hydrogen-passivated Ge(001):H substrate and a single dangling bond quantum dot on that surface. The electronic structure of the molecule adsorbed on the hydrogen-passivated surface is similar to the gas phase structure and the measurements show that HOMO and LUMO states contribute to the STM filled and empty state images, respectively. Furthermore, we show that the electronic properties are not significantly affected when the molecule is attached to the single dangling bond, which is in contrast with the strong interaction of the molecule with a dangling bond dimer. Our results show that the dangling bond quantum dots could stabilize organic molecules on a hydrogenated semiconductor without affecting their originally designed gas phase electronic properties. Together with the ability to laterally manipulate the molecules on the surface, this will be advantageous in the construction of single-molecule devices, where the coupling and positioning of the molecules on the substrate could be tuned by a proper design of the surface quantum dot arrays, comprising both single and dimerized dangling bonds.

  4. Time resolved single molecule spectroscopy of semiconductor quantum dot/conjugated organic hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoi, Michael Yemoh

    Single molecule studies on CdSe quantum dots functionalized with oligo-phenylene vinylene ligands (CdSe-OPV) provide evidence of strong electronic communication that facilitate charge and energy transport between the OPV ligands and the CdSe quantum dot core. This electronic interaction greatly modify, the photoluminescence properties of both bulk and single CdSe-OPV nanostructure thin film samples. Size-correlated wide-field fluorescence imaging show that blinking suppression in single CdSe-OPV is linked to the degree of OPV coverage (inferred from AFM height scans) on the quantum dot surface. The effect of the complex electronic environment presented by photoexcited OPV ligands on the excited state property of CdSe-OPV is measured with single photon counting and photon-pair correlation spectroscopy techniques. Time-tagged-time-resolved (TTTR) single photon counting measurements from individual CdSe-OPV nanostructures, show excited state lifetimes an order of magnitude shorter relative to conventional ZnS/CdSe quantum dots. Second-order intensity correlation measurements g(2)(tau) from individual CdSe-OPV nanostructures point to a weak multi-excitonic character with a strong wavelength dependent modulation depth. By tuning in and out of the absorption of the OPV ligands we observe changes in modulation depth from g(2) (0) ≈ 0.2 to 0.05 under 405 and 514 nm excitation respectively. Defocused images and polarization anisotropy measurements also reveal a well-defined linear dipole emission pattern in single CdSe-OPV nanostructures. These results provide new insights into to the mechanism behind the electronic interactions in composite quantum dot/conjugated organic composite systems at the single molecule level. The observed intensity flickering , blinking suppression and associated lifetime/count rate and antibunching behaviour is well explained by a Stark interaction model. Charge transfer from photo-excitation of the OPV ligands to the surface of the Cd

  5. Photoinduced electron transfer from semiconductor quantum dots to metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvrdy, Kevin; Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Kamat, Prashant V

    2011-01-04

    Quantum dot-metal oxide junctions are an integral part of next-generation solar cells, light emitting diodes, and nanostructured electronic arrays. Here we present a comprehensive examination of electron transfer at these junctions, using a series of CdSe quantum dot donors (sizes 2.8, 3.3, 4.0, and 4.2 nm in diameter) and metal oxide nanoparticle acceptors (SnO(2), TiO(2), and ZnO). Apparent electron transfer rate constants showed strong dependence on change in system free energy, exhibiting a sharp rise at small driving forces followed by a modest rise further away from the characteristic reorganization energy. The observed trend mimics the predicted behavior of electron transfer from a single quantum state to a continuum of electron accepting states, such as those present in the conduction band of a metal oxide nanoparticle. In contrast with dye-sensitized metal oxide electron transfer studies, our systems did not exhibit unthermalized hot-electron injection due to relatively large ratios of electron cooling rate to electron transfer rate. To investigate the implications of these findings in photovoltaic cells, quantum dot-metal oxide working electrodes were constructed in an identical fashion to the films used for the electron transfer portion of the study. Interestingly, the films which exhibited the fastest electron transfer rates (SnO(2)) were not the same as those which showed the highest photocurrent (TiO(2)). These findings suggest that, in addition to electron transfer at the quantum dot-metal oxide interface, other electron transfer reactions play key roles in the determination of overall device efficiency.

  6. Optical studies of capped quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuister, S.F.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the synthesis and spectroscopy of CdSe and CdTe semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The first chapter gives an introduction into the unique size dependent properties of semiconductor quantum dots. Highly luminescent QDs of CdSe and CdTe were prepared via a high temperature method

  7. Synthesis of Non-blinking Semiconductor Quantum Dots Emitting in the Near-Infrared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, Allison M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mangum, Benjamin D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Piryatinski, Andrei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Young-Shin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Htoon, Han [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-21

    Our previous work demonstrates that Quasi-Type II CdSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots with thick shells (3-5 nm) exhibit unique photophysical characteristics, including improved chemical robustness over typical thin-shelled core/shell systems and the elimination of blinking through suppression of nonradiative Auger recombination. Here we describe a new thick-shelled heterostructure, InP/CdS, which exhibits a Type II bandgap alignment producing near-infrared (NIR) emission. Samples with a range of shell thicknesses were synthesized, enabling shell-thickness-dependent study of the absorbance and emission spectra, fluorescence lifetimes, and quantum yields. InP/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell structures were also synthesized to reduce cadmium exposure for applications in the biological environment. Single particle spectroscopy indicates reduced blinking and improved photostability with increasing shell thickness, resulting in thick-shelled dots that are appropriate for single-particle tracking measurements with NIR emission.

  8. Heterovalent Cation Substitutional and Interstitial Doping in Semiconductor Sensitizers for Quantum Dot Cosensitized Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doped films of TiO2/PbS/CdS have been prepared by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR method. Bi- and Ag-doped-PbS quantum dot (QD were produced by admixing Bi3+ or Ag+ during deposition and the existing forms of the doping element in PbS QD were analyzed. The results show that Bi3+ entered the cube space of PbS as donor yielding interstitial doping Bi-doped-PbS QD, while Ag+ replaced Pb2+ of PbS as acceptor yielding substitutional doping Ag-doped-PbS QD. The novel Bi-doped-PbS/CdS and Ag-doped-PbS/CdS quantum dot cosensitized solar cell (QDCSC were fabricated and power conversion efficiency (PCE of 2.4% and 2.2% was achieved, respectively, under full sun illumination.

  9. Direct growth of CdSe semiconductor quantum dots in glass matrix by femtosecond laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, G.; Filin, A. I.; Romanov, D. A.; Levis, R. J.

    2016-02-01

    Controllable, spatially inhomogeneous distributions of CdSe nanocrystals smaller than the exciton Bohr radius are grown in a glass matrix under combined action of sample heating (below the transformation temperature) and focused high-repetition femtosecond (fs) laser beam. Selective quantum dot precipitation is evidenced by position-dependent absorption and Raman spectra. The particle size is estimated as r = 2.1 ± 0.3 nm by comparing the measured absorption and Raman spectra with those obtained from the samples grown in glass by traditional heat-treatment procedure. Direct growth of CdSe quantum dots in glass is enabled by nonlinear excitation using a focused fs duration laser beam (as differentiated from other methods), and this opens an avenue for adjustable selective growth patterns.

  10. General and Efficient C-C Bond Forming Photoredox Catalysis with Semiconductor Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Jill A; Frenette, Leah C; Zhao, Norman; Sowers, Kelly L; Krauss, Todd D; Weix, Daniel J

    2017-03-29

    Photoredox catalysis has become an essential tool in organic synthesis because it enables new routes to important molecules. However, the best available molecular catalysts suffer from high catalyst loadings and rely on precious metals. Here we show that colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) can serve as efficient and robust, precious-metal free, photoassisted redox catalysts. A single-sized CdSe quantum dot (3.0 ± 0.2 nm) can replace several different dye catalysts needed for five different photoredox reactions (β-alkylation, β-aminoalkylation, dehalogenation, amine arylation, and decarboxylative radical formation). Even without optimization of the QDs or the reaction conditions, efficiencies rivaling those of the best available metal dyes were obtained.

  11. Phonon-assisted gain in a semiconductor double quantum dot maser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullans, M J; Liu, Y-Y; Stehlik, J; Petta, J R; Taylor, J M

    2015-05-15

    We develop a microscopic model for the recently demonstrated double-quantum-dot maser. In characterizing the gain of this device we find that, in addition to the direct stimulated emission of photons, there is a large contribution from the simultaneous emission of a photon and a phonon, i.e., the phonon sideband. We show that this phonon-assisted gain typically dominates the overall gain, which leads to masing. Recent experimental data are well fit with our model.

  12. Interband emission energy in a dilute nitride quaternary semiconductor quantum dot for longer wavelength applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mageshwari, P. Uma; Peter, A. John; Lee, Chang Woo; Duque, C. A.

    2016-07-01

    Excitonic properties are studied in a strained Ga1-xInxNyAs1-y/GaAs cylindrical quantum dot. The optimum condition for the desired band alignment for emitting wavelength 1.55 μm is investigated using band anticrossing model and the model solid theory. The band gap and the band discontinuities of a Ga1-xInxNyAs1-y/GaAs quantum dot on GaAs are computed with the geometrical confinement effect. The binding energy of the exciton, the oscillator strength and its radiative life time for the optimum condition are found taking into account the spatial confinement effect. The effects of geometrical confinement and the nitrogen incorporation on the interband emission energy are brought out. The result shows that the desired band alignment for emitting wavelength 1.55 μm is achieved for the inclusion of alloy contents, y=0.0554% and x=0.339% in Ga1-xInxNyAs1-y/GaAs quantum dot. And the incorporation of nitrogen and indium shows the red-shift and the geometrical confinement shows the blue-shift. And it can be applied for fibre optical communication networks.

  13. Bioengineered II-VI semiconductor quantum dot-carboxymethylcellulose nanoconjugates as multifunctional fluorescent nanoprobes for bioimaging live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Alexandra A P; Mansur, Herman S; Mansur, Rafael L; de Carvalho, Fernanda G; Carvalho, Sandhra M

    2017-08-19

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are light-emitting ultra-small nanoparticles, which have emerged as a new class of nanoprobes with unique optical properties for bioimaging and biomedical diagnostic. However, to be used for most biomedical applications the biocompatibility and water-solubility are mandatory that can achieved through surface modification forming QD-nanoconjugates. In this study, semiconductor II-VI quantum dots of type MX (M=Cd, Pb, Zn, X=S) were directly synthesized in aqueous media and at room temperature using carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt (CMC) behaving simultaneously as stabilizing and surface biofunctional ligand. These nanoconjugates were extensively characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential. The results demonstrated that the biopolymer was effective on nucleating and stabilizing the colloidal nanocrystals of CdS, ZnS, and PbS with the average diameter ranging from 2.0 to 5.0nm depending on the composition of the semiconductor core, which showed quantum-size confinement effect. These QD/polysaccharide conjugates showed luminescent activity from UV-visible to near-infrared range of the spectra under violet laser excitation. Moreover, the bioassays performed proved that these novel nanoconjugates were biocompatible and behaved as composition-dependent fluorescent nanoprobes for in vitro live cell bioimaging with very promising perspectives to be used in numerous biomedical applications and nanomedicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Self Assembled Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Spin Based All Optical and Electronic Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-17

    associates 1. Carmen Stefanita 2. Ifthikar Ahmed 3. V. Avrutin 4. U Ozgur 5. T. Morisato (visiting from Japan) 6. M. Qian 7. A. Reber Graduate...Cahay, “ Monte Carlo simulation of spin transport in nanowires”, IEEE NTC Workshop on Quantum Device and Technology, Clarkson University, Pottsdam

  15. Quantum dots in cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Margarida M

    2011-03-01

    Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that have broad excitation spectra, narrow emission spectra, tunable emission peaks, long fluorescence lifetimes, negligible photobleaching, and ability to be conjugated to proteins, making them excellent probes for bioimaging applications. Here the author reviews the advantages and disadvantages of using quantum dots in bioimaging applications, such as single-particle tracking and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, to study receptor-mediated transport.

  16. Quantum Dots in Cell Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Barroso, Margarida M.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that have broad excitation spectra, narrow emission spectra, tunable emission peaks, long fluorescence lifetimes, negligible photobleaching, and ability to be conjugated to proteins, making them excellent probes for bioimaging applications. Here the author reviews the advantages and disadvantages of using quantum dots in bioimaging applications, such as single-particle tracking and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, to study receptor-mediated t...

  17. Quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier: role of second excited state on ultrahigh bit-rate signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadyar, Seyed Mohsen; Razaghi, Mohammad; Hassanzadeh, Abdollah

    2017-04-20

    In this paper, a theoretical model for a quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QDSOA) is proposed. The dynamics of carriers in ground, excited, and continuum states and wetting layer are considered in this model. The effects of the second excited state (ES2) inclusion are investigated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in the proposed QDSOA model. Moreover, the inhomogeneous broadening effect due to size distribution of dots, and the homogeneous broadening effect of a single dot in the gain spectrum by grouping of dots based on their optical resonant frequency, are included in the model. Furthermore, grouping of photon modes is considered in the model. It is shown that improvement of QDSOA performance is possible by considering ES2 in rate equations. Gain saturation in different injection currents is obtained for various square-shaped pulse train bit-rates. It is shown that carriers' relaxation time plays an important role in signal amplification and processing of QDSOA. The results illustrate that QDSOA can be used for high bit-rate signal processing devices (up to 450 Gbps) with negligible wave distortion and fast gain recovery.

  18. Squeezing terahertz light into nanovolumes: Nanoantenna enhanced terahertz spectroscopy (NETS) of semiconductor quantum dots

    KAUST Repository

    Toma, Andrea

    2015-01-14

    Terahertz spectroscopy has vast potentialities in sensing a broad range of elementary excitations (e.g., collective vibrations of molecules, phonons, excitons, etc.). However, the large wavelength associated with terahertz radiation (about 300 μm at 1 THz) severely hinders its interaction with nano-objects, such as nanoparticles, nanorods, nanotubes, and large molecules of biological relevance, practically limiting terahertz studies to macroscopic ensembles of these compounds, in the form of thick pellets of crystallized molecules or highly concentrated solutions of nanomaterials. Here we show that chains of terahertz dipole nanoantennas spaced by nanogaps of 20 nm allow retrieving the spectroscopic signature of a monolayer of cadmium selenide quantum dots, a significant portion of the signal arising from the dots located within the antenna nanocavities. A Fano-like interference between the fundamental antenna mode and the phonon resonance of the quantum dots is observed, accompanied by an absorption enhancement factor greater than one million. NETS can find immediate applications in terahertz spectroscopic studies of nanocrystals and molecules at extremely low concentrations. Furthermore, it shows a practicable route toward the characterization of individual nano-objects at these frequencies.

  19. Squeezing terahertz light into nanovolumes: nanoantenna enhanced terahertz spectroscopy (NETS) of semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Andrea; Tuccio, Salvatore; Prato, Mirko; De Donato, Francesco; Perucchi, Andrea; Di Pietro, Paola; Marras, Sergio; Liberale, Carlo; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; De Angelis, Francesco; Manna, Liberato; Lupi, Stefano; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Razzari, Luca

    2015-01-14

    Terahertz spectroscopy has vast potentialities in sensing a broad range of elementary excitations (e.g., collective vibrations of molecules, phonons, excitons, etc.). However, the large wavelength associated with terahertz radiation (about 300 μm at 1 THz) severely hinders its interaction with nano-objects, such as nanoparticles, nanorods, nanotubes, and large molecules of biological relevance, practically limiting terahertz studies to macroscopic ensembles of these compounds, in the form of thick pellets of crystallized molecules or highly concentrated solutions of nanomaterials. Here we show that chains of terahertz dipole nanoantennas spaced by nanogaps of 20 nm allow retrieving the spectroscopic signature of a monolayer of cadmium selenide quantum dots, a significant portion of the signal arising from the dots located within the antenna nanocavities. A Fano-like interference between the fundamental antenna mode and the phonon resonance of the quantum dots is observed, accompanied by an absorption enhancement factor greater than one million. NETS can find immediate applications in terahertz spectroscopic studies of nanocrystals and molecules at extremely low concentrations. Furthermore, it shows a practicable route toward the characterization of individual nano-objects at these frequencies.

  20. Four-wave mixing analysis of quantum dot semiconductor lasers for linewidth enhancement factor extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Hao; Lin, Hung-Hsin; Lin, Fan-Yi

    2012-01-02

    We apply a four-wave mixing analysis on a quantum dot laser to simultaneously obtain the linewidth enhancement factor α and other intrinsic laser parameters. By fitting the experimentally obtained regenerative signals and power spectra at different detuning frequencies with the respective curves analytically calculated from the rate equations, parameters including the linewidth enhancement factor, the carrier decay rate in the dots, the differential gain, and the photon decay rate can be determined all at once under the same operating conditions. In this paper, a theoretical model for the four-wave mixing analysis of the QD lasers is derived and verified. The sensitivity and accuracy of the parameter extraction using the four-wave mixing method are presented. Moreover, how each each parameters alter the shapes of the regenerative signals and the power spectra are also discussed.

  1. Inelastic laser light scattering spectroscopy and functionalization of semiconductor quantum dots with peptides and integrins of cancer cells for biophotonic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bairamov, B [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Toporov, V [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Bayramov, F [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Lanzov, V [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, RAS, Gatchina, 188300 (Russian Federation); Dutta, M [Deparment of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Stroscio, M A [Deparment of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Irmer, G [Institute of Theoretical Physics, D-09596, Freiberg (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Results of our study of structural properties of the nanoscale integrated semiconductor quantum dots such as CdS and ZnS-capped CdSe, conjugated with biomolecules such as short peptides and cells are presented. Nanoscale functionalization of semiconductor quantum dots with biomedical structures is promising for many applications and novel studies of intrinsic properties of both constituent systems. We study CdS semiconductor quantum dots functionalized with peptides composed of the following amino acid chains: CGGGRGDS, CGGGRVDS, CGGIKVAV, and CGGGLDV, where R is arginine, D is aspartic acid, S is serine, V is valine, K is lysine and L is Levine. As will be seen the cysteine (C) amino acid links to CdS semiconductor quantum dots via the thiol link. Furthermore, the GGG sequences of glycine (G) amino acids provide a spacer in the amino acid chain. At the same time the RGDS, RVDS, IKAV, and LDV sequences have selective bonding affinities to specialized transmembrane cellular structures known as integrins of neurons and MDA-MB-435 cancer cells, respectively. Since protein hydration is known to be a key factor affecting protein energy balance, we also studied a role that water and other bioenvironments may play in stability, surface properties, dynamical and structural characteristics of these systems. We found also the roles that the quantum confinement and functionalizing in the biomedical environments play in altering and determining the electronic, optical, and vibrational properties of these nanostructures as well as demonstrated the effectiveness to use the semiconductor quantum dots as integrin sensitive biotags.

  2. Scalable quantum computer architecture with coupled donor-quantum dot qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Thomas; Lo, Cheuk Chi; Weis, Christoph; Lyon, Stephen; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-08-26

    A quantum bit computing architecture includes a plurality of single spin memory donor atoms embedded in a semiconductor layer, a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, wherein a first voltage applied across at least one pair of the aligned quantum dot and donor atom controls a donor-quantum dot coupling. A method of performing quantum computing in a scalable architecture quantum computing apparatus includes arranging a pattern of single spin memory donor atoms in a semiconductor layer, forming a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, applying a first voltage across at least one aligned pair of a quantum dot and donor atom to control a donor-quantum dot coupling, and applying a second voltage between one or more quantum dots to control a Heisenberg exchange J coupling between quantum dots and to cause transport of a single spin polarized electron between quantum dots.

  3. Super-Resolution Definition of Coordinates of Single Semiconductor Nanocrystal (Quantum Dot): Luminescence Intensity Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremchev, M. Yu.; Eremchev, I. Yu.; Naumov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    In this research a relation between the accuracy of restoration of the single quantum dots (QD) CdSe/CdS/ZnS cross-cut coordinates and luminescence intensity was investigated. It was shown that the limit of the accuracy of determining the coordinates of a single QD for a considerable total amount of registered photons approaches its limiting value that is comparable to the size of the QD. It also means that the installation used in the research is mechanically stable enough to reach the limiting values of determination accuracy of point emitters coordinates.

  4. Water soluble reduced graphene oxide as an efficient photoluminescence quencher for semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haiping; Sun, Luwei; He, Haiping

    2017-02-01

    Chemically derived water soluble reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is synthesized via a two-step reduction approach assisted with sulfonation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the removal of oxygen-related groups from GO. The obtained rGO can effectively quench the photoluminescence (PL) of CdTe quantum dots. Concentration- and volume-dependent quenching behaviors are investigated to reveal the quenching mechanism. The Stern-Volmer plot shows exponential dependence on the rGO concentration, indicating that "sphere of action" model works when the extent of quenching is large.

  5. Analysis of optical properties of strained semiconductor quantum dots for electromagnetically induced transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barettin, D.; Houmark-Nielsen, Jakob; Lassen, B.;

    2010-01-01

    -trivial quantum dot size dependence of the dipole moments directly related to the biaxial strain component. Due to the separation of the heavy and light holes the optical transition strengths between the lower conduction and upper most valence-band states computed using one-band model and eight-band model show...... operation. In case of the ladder scheme, the existence of additional dipole allowed intraband transitions along with an almost equidistant energy level spacing adds additional decay pathways, which significantly impairs the EIT effect. We further study the influence of strain and band mixing comparing four...

  6. Decoherence processes during optical manipulation of excitonic qubits in semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q. Q.; Muller, A.; Bianucci, P.; Rossi, E.; Xue, Q. K.; Takagahara, T.; Piermarocchi, C.; MacDonald, A. H.; Shih, C. K.

    2005-07-01

    Using photoluminescence spectroscopy, we have investigated the nature of Rabi oscillation damping during optical manipulation of excitonic qubits in self-assembled quantum dots. Rabi oscillations were recorded by varying the pulse amplitude for fixed pulse durations between 4ps and 10ps . Up to five periods are visible, making it possible to quantify the excitation dependent damping. We find that this damping is more pronounced for shorter pulse widths and show that its origin is the nonresonant excitation of carriers in the wetting layer, most likely involving bound-to-continuum and continuum-to-bound transitions.

  7. Super-Resolution Definition of Coordinates of Single Semiconductor Nanocrystal (Quantum Dot: Luminescence Intensity Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremchev M. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research a relation between the accuracy of restoration of the single quantum dots (QD CdSe/CdS/ZnS cross-cut coordinates and luminescence intensity was investigated. It was shown that the limit of the accuracy of determining the coordinates of a single QD for a considerable total amount of registered photons approaches its limiting value that is comparable to the size of the QD. It also means that the installation used in the research is mechanically stable enough to reach the limiting values of determination accuracy of point emitters coordinates.

  8. Quantum dots: Rethinking the electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Dimple

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the Quantum dots are quite interesting for the electronics industry. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-scale crystals, which have unique photo physical, quantum electrical properties, size-dependent optical properties, There small size means that electrons do not have to travel as far as with larger particles, thus electronic devices can operate faster. Cheaper than modern commercial solar cells while making use of a wider variety of photon energies, including "waste heat" from the sun's energy. Quantum dots can be used in tandem cells, which are multi junction photovoltaic cells or in the intermediate band setup. PbSe (lead selenide) is commonly used in quantum dot solar cells.

  9. Momentum Transfer Studies and Studies of Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Metal Colloids and Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, W. E.; Burger, A.; Dyer, K.; George, M.; Henderson, D.; Morgan, S.; Mu, R.; Shi, D.; Conner, D; Thompson, E.; Collins, L.; Curry, L.; Mattox, S.; Williams, G.

    1996-01-01

    Phase 1 of this work involved design work on a momentum transfer device. The progress on design and testing will be presented. Phase 2 involved the systematic study of the MPD thruster for dual uses. Though it was designed as a thruster for space vehicles, the characteristics of the plasma make it an excellent candidate for industrial applications. This project sought to characterize the system for use in materials processing and characterization. The surface modification on ZnCdTe, CdTe, and ZnTe will be presented. Phase 3 involved metal colloids and semiconductor quantum dots. One aspect of this project involves a collaborative effort with the Solid State Division of ORNL. The thrust behind this research is to develop ion implantation for synthesizing novel materials (quantum dots wires and wells, and metal colloids) for applications in all optical switching devices, up conversion, and the synthesis of novel refractory materials. The ions of interest are Au, Ag, Cd, Se, In, P, Sb, Ga, and As. The specific materials of interest are: CdSe, CdTe, InAs, GaAs, InP, GaP, InSb, GaSb, and InGaAs. A second aspect of this research program involves using porous glass (25-200 A) for fabricating materials of finite size. The results of some of this work will also be reported.

  10. Momentum Transfer Studies and Studies of Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Metal Colloids and Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, W. E.; Burger, A.; Dyer, K.; George, M.; Henderson, D.; Morgan, S.; Mu, R.; Shi, D.; Conner, D; Thompson, E.; hide

    1996-01-01

    Phase 1 of this work involved design work on a momentum transfer device. The progress on design and testing will be presented. Phase 2 involved the systematic study of the MPD thruster for dual uses. Though it was designed as a thruster for space vehicles, the characteristics of the plasma make it an excellent candidate for industrial applications. This project sought to characterize the system for use in materials processing and characterization. The surface modification on ZnCdTe, CdTe, and ZnTe will be presented. Phase 3 involved metal colloids and semiconductor quantum dots. One aspect of this project involves a collaborative effort with the Solid State Division of ORNL. The thrust behind this research is to develop ion implantation for synthesizing novel materials (quantum dots wires and wells, and metal colloids) for applications in all optical switching devices, up conversion, and the synthesis of novel refractory materials. The ions of interest are Au, Ag, Cd, Se, In, P, Sb, Ga, and As. The specific materials of interest are: CdSe, CdTe, InAs, GaAs, InP, GaP, InSb, GaSb, and InGaAs. A second aspect of this research program involves using porous glass (25-200 A) for fabricating materials of finite size. The results of some of this work will also be reported.

  11. Composite Semiconductor Quantum Dots CdSe/CdS Co-sensitized TiO2 Nanorod Array Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jingyang; ZHANG Tianjin; WANG Qingqing; WANG Duofa; PAN Ruikun; XIA Hanming

    2012-01-01

    CdSe/CdS semiconductor quantum dots co-sensitized TiO2 nanorod array was fabricated on the transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate using the hydrothermal and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process.The structural and morphological properties of the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD),field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM),and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).The results indicate that CdSe/CdS QDs are uniformly coated on the surface of the TiO2 nanorods.The shift of light absorption edge was monitored by taking UV-visible absorption spectra.Compared with the absorption spectra of the TiO2 nanorod array,deposition of CdSe/CdS QDs shifts the absorption edge to the higher wavelength.The enhanced light absorption in the visible-light region of CdSe/CdS/TiO2 nanorod array indicates that CdSe/CdS layers can act as co-sensitizers in quantum dots sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs).By optimizing the CdSe layer deposition cycles,a photocurrent of 5.78 mA/cm2,an open circuit photovoltage of 0.469 V and a conversion efficiency of 1.34 % were obtained under an illumination of 100 mw/cm2.

  12. 25 Gbit/s differential phase-shift-keying signal generation using directly modulated quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeghuzi, A., E-mail: zeghuzi@mailbox.tu-berlin.de; Schmeckebier, H.; Stubenrauch, M.; Bimberg, D. [Department of Solid-State Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Meuer, C.; Schubert, C. [Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute, Einsteinufer 37, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Bunge, C.-A. [Hochschule fuer Telekommunikation Leipzig (HfTL), Gustav-Freytag-Str. 43-45, 04277 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-05-25

    Error-free generation of 25-Gbit/s differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) signals via direct modulation of InAs quantum-dot (QD) based semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is experimentally demonstrated with an input power level of −5 dBm. The QD SOAs emit in the 1.3-μm wavelength range and provide a small-signal fiber-to-fiber gain of 8 dB. Furthermore, error-free DPSK modulation is achieved for constant optical input power levels from 3 dBm down to only −11 dBm for a bit rate of 20 Gbit/s. Direct phase modulation of QD SOAs via current changes is thus demonstrated to be much faster than direct gain modulation.

  13. Lande g-factor in semiconductor cylinder quantum dots under magnetic fields and spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaati, Abdolrasoul

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the electron effective Lande g-factor in semiconductor cylinder quantum dots is studied in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit effect and an applied magnetic field parallel to the cylinder axis. For this goal, I have obtained an analytical solution to one-particle Schrodinger equation in the presence of both magnetic field and spin-orbit interaction (SOI). Then, using the obtained energy levels, I have study the electron effective Lande g-factor. It is found that: It is found that (i) energy levels strongly depend on the combined effects of external magnetic field and spin-orbit interaction strength. (ii) The effective Lande g-factor decreases when magnetic field increases. (iii) By increasing the cylinder radius ρ, the electron g-factor decreases. (iv) By increasing the strength of SOI, the electron g-factor increases.

  14. High-power InP quantum dot based semiconductor disk laser exceeding 1.3 W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzbäck, T.; Bek, R.; Hargart, F.; Kessler, C. A.; Kahle, H.; Koroknay, E.; Jetter, M.; Michler, P.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate an optically pumped semiconductor disk laser (OP-SDL) using InP quantum dots (QDs) as active material fabricated by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy. The QDs are grown within [(Al0.1Ga0.9)0.52In0.48]0.5P0.5 (abbr. Al0.1GaInP) barriers in order to achieve an emission wavelength around 655 nm. We present optical investigations of the active region showing typical QD behavior like blue shift with increasing excitation power and single emission lines, which show anti-bunching in an intensity auto-correlation measurement. We report maximum output powers of the OP-SDL of 1.39 W at low emission wavelength of ˜654 nm with a slope efficiency of ηdiff=25.4 %.

  15. Rabi oscillations and self-induced transparency in InAs/InP quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier operating at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karni, Ouri; Capua, Amir; Eisenstein, Gadi; Sichkovskyi, Vitalii; Ivanov, Vitalii; Reithmaier, Johann Peter

    2013-11-04

    We report direct observations of Rabi oscillations and self-induced transparency in a quantum dot optical amplifier operating at room temperature. The experiments make use of pulses whose durations are shorter than the coherence time which are characterized using Cross-Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating. A numerical model which solves the Maxwell and Schrödinger equations and accounts for the inhomogeneously broadened nature of the quantum dot gain medium confirms the experimental results. The model is also used to explain the relationship between the observability of Rabi oscillations, the pulse duration and the homogeneous and inhomogeneous spectral widths of the semiconductor.

  16. New features of excitonic emission in metal nanoparticle/semiconductor quantum dot nanosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryuchenko, Yu. V.; Korbutyak, D. V.

    2016-10-01

    We study theoretically the excitonic emission properties of a hybrid nanosystem composed of a spherical metal nanoparticle (NP) and a spherical quantum dot (QD). We show that electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted by a single QD has only dipole, quadrupole, and octupole components, i.e., QD cannot in principle be regarded as an oscillating point dipole, which emits infinite series of multipoles. This leads to a substantial deviation of the characteristics of QD excitonic emission from the emission characteristics of point dipole (molecular fluorophore) located in a vicinity of metal NP at small interparticle distances. The observed fluorescence spectra of the CdTe QD/Ag NP nanostructure are found to be in good agreement with the calculated ones.

  17. Structure direction of II-VI semiconductor quantum dot binary nanoparticle superlattices by tuning radius ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuoying; O'Brien, Stephen

    2008-06-01

    We report a nanoparticle radius ratio dependent study of the formation of binary nanoparticle superlattices (BNSLs) of CdTe and CdSe quantum dots. While keeping all other parameters identical in the system, the effective nanoparticle radius ratio, gamma(eff), was tuned to allow the formation of five different BNSL structures, AlB(2), cub-NaZn(13), ico-NaZn(13), CaCu(5), and MgZn(2). For each structure, gamma(eff) is located close to a local maximum of its space-filling factor, based on a model for space filling principles. We demonstrate the ability to select specific BNSLs based solely on gamma(eff), highlighting the role of entropic forces as a driver for self-assembly.

  18. Optically and electrically controlled circularly polarized emission from cholesteric liquid crystal materials doped with semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovsky, Alexey; Mochalov, Konstantin; Oleinikov, Vladimir; Sukhanova, Alyona; Prudnikau, Anatol; Artemyev, Mikhail; Shibaev, Valery; Nabiev, Igor

    2012-12-04

    Novel types of electro- and photoactive quantum dot-doped cholesteric materials have been engineered. UV-irradiation or electric field application allows one to control the degree of circular polarization and intensity of fluorescence emission by prepared quantum dot-doped liquid crystal films. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Sensitive Detection for Possible Signature of Majorana Fermions via a Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2015-08-27

    In the present work, we theoretically propose an optical scheme to detect the possible signature of Majorana fermions via the optical pump-probe spectroscopy, which is very different from the current tunneling measurement based on electrical methods. The scheme consists of a metal nanoparticle and a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a hybrid semiconductor/superconductor heterostructures. The results show that the probe absorption spectrum of the quantum dot presents a distinct splitting due to the existence of Majorana fermions. Owing to surface plasmon enhanced effect, this splitting will be more obvious, which makes Majorana fermions more easy to be detectable. The technique proposed here open the door for new applications ranging from robust manipulation of Majorana fermions to quantum information processing based on Majorana fermions.

  20. Colloidal quantum dot solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Edward H.

    2012-03-01

    Solar cells based on solution-processed semiconductor nanoparticles -- colloidal quantum dots -- have seen rapid advances in recent years. By offering full-spectrum solar harvesting, these cells are poised to address the urgent need for low-cost, high-efficiency photovoltaics.

  1. Polymer-coated quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomczak, Nikodem; Liu, Rongrong; Vancso, Julius G.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with distinct photophysical properties finding applications in biology, biosensing, and optoelectronics. Polymeric coatings of QDs are used primarily to provide long-term colloidal stability to QDs dispersed in solutions and also as a source of addit

  2. Highly Transparent, Visible-Light Photodetector Based on Oxide Semiconductors and Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Won; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Park, Jin-Seong; Kang, Seong Jun

    2015-09-01

    Highly transparent phototransistors that can detect visible light have been fabricated by combining indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) and quantum dots (QDs). A wide-band-gap IGZO film was used as a transparent semiconducting channel, while small-band-gap QDs were adopted to absorb and convert visible light to an electrical signal. Typical IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs) did not show a photocurrent with illumination of visible light. However, IGZO TFTs decorated with QDs showed enhanced photocurrent upon exposure to visible light. The device showed a responsivity of 1.35×10(4) A/W and an external quantum efficiency of 2.59×10(4) under illumination by a 635 nm laser. The origin of the increased photocurrent in the visible light was the small band gap of the QDs combined with the transparent IGZO films. Therefore, transparent phototransistors based on IGZO and QDs were fabricated and characterized in detail. The result is relevant for the development of highly transparent photodetectors that can detect visible light.

  3. Coherent optoelectronics with single quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zrenner, A; Ester, P; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, S; Huebner, M C; Lackmann, L; Stufler, S [Universitaet Paderborn, Department Physik, Warburger Strasse 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany); Bichler, M [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: zrenner@mail.upb.de

    2008-11-12

    The optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots are in many respects similar to those of atoms. Since quantum dots can be defined by state-of-the-art semiconductor technologies, they exhibit long-term stability and allow for well-controlled and efficient interactions with both optical and electrical fields. Resonant ps excitation of single quantum dot photodiodes leads to new classes of coherent optoelectronic functions and devices, which exhibit precise state preparation, phase-sensitive optical manipulations and the control of quantum states by electrical fields.

  4. Coherent optoelectronics with single quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrenner, A.; Ester, P.; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, S.; Hübner, M. C.; Lackmann, L.; Stufler, S.; Bichler, M.

    2008-11-01

    The optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots are in many respects similar to those of atoms. Since quantum dots can be defined by state-of-the-art semiconductor technologies, they exhibit long-term stability and allow for well-controlled and efficient interactions with both optical and electrical fields. Resonant ps excitation of single quantum dot photodiodes leads to new classes of coherent optoelectronic functions and devices, which exhibit precise state preparation, phase-sensitive optical manipulations and the control of quantum states by electrical fields.

  5. Light quenching and dark states in colloidal solutions of semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, V. V.; Panfutova, A. S.; Shilov, V. B.; Belousova, I. M.; Ermolaeva, G. M.; Khrebtov, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    The photodynamics of optical limiting in colloidal solutions of different-size CdSe/ZnS quantum dots is studied. The behavior of the dependences points to a multistage process that includes the bleaching and optical limiting stages. The limiting photodynamics is compared with luminescence dynamics of quantum dots under conditions of high-power excitation. It is shown that the optical limiting efficiency in such media is determined by the position of exciting radiation with respect to the main exciton absorption band of the quantum dot. The roles played by so-called dark states and light quenching in limiting photodynamics are discussed.

  6. Charge Transfer Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Dots Relevant to Solar Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Todd

    Artificial conversion of sunlight to chemical fuels has attracted attention for several decades as a potential source of clean, renewable energy. For example, in light-driven proton reduction to molecular hydrogen, a light-absorbing molecule (the photosensitizer) rapidly transfers a photoexcited electron to a catalyst for reducing protons. We recently found that CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and simple aqueous Ni2+ salts in the presence of a sacrificial electron donor form a highly efficient, active, and robust system for photochemical reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen. To understand why this system has such extraordinary catalytic behavior, ultrafast transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy studies of electron transfer (ET) processes from the QDs to the Ni catalysts were performed. CdSe QDs transfer photoexcited electrons to a Ni-dihydrolipoic acid (Ni-DHLA) catalyst complex extremely fast and with high efficiency. Even under high fluence, the relative fraction of TA signal due to ET remains well over 80%, and depopulation from exciton-exciton annihilation is minimal (6%). We also found that increasing QD size and/or shelling the core CdSe QDs with a shell of CdS slowed the ET rate, in agreement with the relative efficiency of photochemical H2 generation. The extremely fast ET provides a fundamental explanation for the exceptional photocatalytic H2 activity of the CdSe QD/Ni-DHLA system and guides new directions for further improvements.

  7. Metal colloids and semiconductor quantum dots: Linear and nonlinear optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, D. O.; My, R.; Tung, Y.; Ueda, A.; Zhu, J.; Collins, W. E.; Hall, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    One aspect of this project involves a collaborative effort with the Solid State Division of ORNL. The thrust behind this research is to develop ion implantion for synthesizing novel materials (quantum dots wires and wells, and metal colloids) for applications in all optical switching devices, up conversion, and the synthesis of novel refractory materials. In general the host material is typically a glass such as optical grade silica. The ions of interest are Au, Ag, Cd, Se, In, P, Sb, Ga and As. An emphasis is placed on host guest interactions between the matrix and the implanted ion and how the matrix effects and implantation parameters can be used to obtain designer level optical devices tailored for specific applications. The specific materials of interest are: CdSe, CdTe, InAs, GaAs, InP, GaP, InSb, GaSb and InGaAs. A second aspect of this research program involves using porous glass (25-200 A) for fabricating materials of finite size. In this part of the program, we are particularly interested in characterizing the thermodynamic and optical properties of these non-composite materials. We also address how phase diagram of the confined material is altered by the interfacial properties between the confined material and the pore wall.

  8. Magnetism at the Interface of Magnetic Oxide and Nonmagnetic Semiconductor Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Avijit; Viswanatha, Ranjani

    2017-03-28

    Engineering interfaces specifically in quantum dot (QD) heterostructures provide several prospects for developing multifunctional building block materials. Precise control over internal structure by chemical synthesis offers a combination of different properties in QDs and allows us to study their fundamental properties, depending on their structure. Herein, we studied the interface of magnetic/nonmagnetic Fe3O4/CdS QD heterostructures. In this work, we demonstrate the decrease in the size of the magnetic core due to annealing at high temperature by the decrease in saturation magnetization and blocking temperature. Furthermore, surprisingly, in a prominently optically active and magnetically inactive material such as CdS, we observe the presence of substantial exchange bias in spite of the nonmagnetic nature of CdS QDs. The presence of exchange bias was proven by the increase in magnetic anisotropy as well as the presence of exchange bias field (HE) during the field-cooled magnetic measurements. This exchange coupling was eventually traced to the in situ formation of a thin antiferromagnetic FeS layer at the interface. This is verified by the study of Fe local structure using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, demonstrating the importance of interface engineering in QDs.

  9. Probing Electron-Phonon Interaction through Two-Photon Interference in Resonantly Driven Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigue, Antoine; Iles-Smith, Jake; Lux, Fabian; Monniello, Léonard; Bernard, Mathieu; Margaillan, Florent; Lemaitre, Aristide; Martinez, Anthony; McCutcheon, Dara P. S.; Mørk, Jesper; Hostein, Richard; Voliotis, Valia

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the temperature dependence of photon coherence properties through two-photon interference (TPI) measurements from a single quantum dot (QD) under resonant excitation. We show that the loss of indistinguishability is related only to the electron-phonon coupling and is not affected by spectral diffusion. Through these measurements and a complementary microscopic theory, we identify two independent separate decoherence processes, both of which are associated with phonons. Below 10 K, we find that the relaxation of the vibrational lattice is the dominant contribution to the loss of TPI visibility. This process is non-Markovian in nature and corresponds to real phonon transitions resulting in a broad phonon sideband in the QD emission spectra. Above 10 K, virtual phonon transitions to higher lying excited states in the QD become the dominant dephasing mechanism, this leads to a broadening of the zero phonon line, and a corresponding rapid decay in the visibility. The microscopic theory we develop provides analytic expressions for the dephasing rates for both virtual phonon scattering and non-Markovian lattice relaxation.

  10. Metal colloids and semiconductor quantum dots: Linear and nonlinear optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, D. O.; My, R.; Tung, Y.; Ueda, A.; Zhu, J.; Collins, W. E.; Hall, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    One aspect of this project involves a collaborative effort with the Solid State Division of ORNL. The thrust behind this research is to develop ion implantion for synthesizing novel materials (quantum dots wires and wells, and metal colloids) for applications in all optical switching devices, up conversion, and the synthesis of novel refractory materials. In general the host material is typically a glass such as optical grade silica. The ions of interest are Au, Ag, Cd, Se, In, P, Sb, Ga and As. An emphasis is placed on host guest interactions between the matrix and the implanted ion and how the matrix effects and implantation parameters can be used to obtain designer level optical devices tailored for specific applications. The specific materials of interest are: CdSe, CdTe, InAs, GaAs, InP, GaP, InSb, GaSb and InGaAs. A second aspect of this research program involves using porous glass (25-200 A) for fabricating materials of finite size. In this part of the program, we are particularly interested in characterizing the thermodynamic and optical properties of these non-composite materials. We also address how phase diagram of the confined material is altered by the interfacial properties between the confined material and the pore wall.

  11. Synthetic Developments of Nontoxic Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Adita; Snee, Preston T

    2016-03-03

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots (QDs), are candidates for biological sensing, photovoltaics, and catalysis due to their unique photophysical properties. The most studied QDs are composed of heavy metals like cadmium and lead. However, this engenders concerns over heavy metal toxicity. To address this issue, numerous studies have explored the development of nontoxic (or more accurately less toxic) quantum dots. In this Review, we select three major classes of nontoxic quantum dots composed of carbon, silicon and Group I-III-VI elements and discuss the myriad of synthetic strategies and surface modification methods to synthesize quantum dots composed of these material systems.

  12. Error-free 320-to-40-Gbit/s optical demultiplexing based on blueshift filtering in a quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Motoharu; Raz, Oded; Gomez-Agis, Fausto; Calabretta, Nicola; Dorren, Harm J S

    2013-01-15

    We present an ultrahigh-speed optical demultiplexing concept based on optical blue-shift filtering in a quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA). Using a simple scheme, a QD-SOA and an optical bandpass filter, we have successfully achieved error-free operations at 40 Gbit/s on all the extracted tributaries from an aggregated traffic at 320 Gbit/s.

  13. Quantum processes in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Ridley, B K

    2013-01-01

    Aimed at graduate students, this is a guide to quantum processes of importance in the physics and technology of semiconductors. The fifth edition includes new chapters that expand the coverage of semiconductor physics relevant to its accompanying technology.

  14. Colloidal quantum dots as optoelectronic elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudev, Milana; Yamanaka, Takayuki; Sun, Ke; Li, Yang; Yang, Jianyong; Ramadurai, Dinakar; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    2007-02-01

    Novel optoelectronic systems based on ensembles of semiconductor nanocrystals are addressed in this paper. Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots and related quantum-wire structures have been characterized optically; these optical measurements include those made on self-assembled monolayers of DNA molecules terminated on one end with a common substrate and on the other end with TiO II quantum dots. The electronic properties of these structures are modeled and compared with experiment. The characterization and application of ensembles of colloidal quantum dots with molecular interconnects are considered. The chemically-directed assembly of ensembles of colloidal quantum dots with biomolecular interconnects is demonstrated with quantum dot densities in excess of 10 +17 cm -3. A number of novel photodetectors have been designed based on the combined use of double-barrier quantum-well injectors, colloidal quantum dots, and conductive polymers. Optoelectronic devices including photodetectors and solar cells based on threedimensional ensembles of quantum dots are considered along with underlying phenomena such as miniband formation and the robustness of minibands to displacements of quantum dots in the ensemble.

  15. Optically Active 3-Dimensional Semiconductor Quantum Dot Assemblies in Heterogeneous Nanoscale Hosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurmikko, Arto V [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Division of Engineering

    2017-05-07

    Synthesis of semiconductor nanomaterials by low-cost, solution-based methods is shown to lead to new classes of thin film light emitting materials. These materials have been integrated to demonstrative compact laser device testbeds to illustrate their potential for coherent emitters across the visible spectrum to disrupt established photonics technologies, particularly semiconductor lasers?

  16. Interfacing spins in an InGaAs quantum dot to a semiconductor waveguide circuit using emitted photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxmoore, I J; Wasley, N A; Ramsay, A J; Thijssen, A C T; Oulton, R; Hugues, M; Kasture, S; Achanta, V G; Fox, A M; Skolnick, M S

    2013-01-18

    An in-plane spin-photon interface is essential for the integration of quantum dot spins with optical circuits. The optical dipole of a quantum dot lies in the plane and the spin is optically accessed via circularly polarized selection rules. Hence, a single waveguide, which can transport only one in-plane linear polarization component, cannot communicate the spin state between two points on a chip. To overcome this issue, we introduce a spin-photon interface based on two orthogonal waveguides, where the polarization emitted by a quantum dot is mapped to a path-encoded photon. We demonstrate operation by deducing the spin using the interference of in-plane photons. A second device directly maps right and left circular polarizations to antiparallel waveguides, surprising for a nonchiral structure but consistent with an off-center dot.

  17. CuSbS2: a promising semiconductor photo-absorber material for quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhifeng; Huang, Jiajun; Han, Jianhuan; Hong, Tiantian; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Zhihua

    2016-06-22

    A facile, low-cost, simple solution-based process for preparing novel promising chalcostibite CuSbS2 sensitized ZnO nanorod arrays, and the application of these as photoanodes of semiconductor quantum dot sensitized inorganic-organic solar cells (QDSSCs) is reported for the first time. ZnO/CuSbS2 nanofilms were designed and prepared through a simple successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and heat treatment process by employing ZnO nanorods as reactive templates. Novel efficient QDSSCs based on the ZnO/CuSbS2 nanofilms plus a solid electrolyte of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) were formed, and a power conversion efficiency of 1.61% was achieved. The excellent photoelectric performance is attributed to the improved light absorption efficiency, widened light absorption region, ideal band gap value, and high speed electron injection and transportation. The results demonstrate that a novel ternary sensitizer (I-V-VI2) can be synthesized via a low-cost method as described here and has great promising potential as a sensitizer in solar cells.

  18. Monolithically integrated quantum dot optical modulator with semiconductor optical amplifier for thousand and original band optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Akahane, Kouichi; Umezawa, Toshimasa; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    A monolithically integrated quantum dot (QD) optical gain modulator (OGM) with a QD semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was successfully developed with T-band (1.0 µm waveband) and O-band (1.3 µm waveband) QD optical gain materials for Gbps-order, high-speed optical data generation. The insertion loss due to coupling between the device and the optical fiber was effectively compensated for by the SOA section. It was also confirmed that the monolithic QD-OGM/SOA device enabled >4.8 Gbps optical data generation with a clear eye opening in the T-band. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated error-free 4.8 Gbps optical data transmissions in each of the six wavelength channels over a 10-km-long photonic crystal fiber using the monolithic QD-OGM/SOA device in multiple O-band wavelength channels, which were generated by the single QD gain chip. These results suggest that the monolithic QD-OGM/SOA device will be advantageous in ultra-broadband optical frequency systems that utilize the T+O-band for short- and medium-range optical communications.

  19. Mega-nano detection of foodborne pathogens and transgenes using molecular beacon and semiconductor quantum dot technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, Kellie P; Wu, Tsai-Chin; Vasudev, Milana; Stroscio, Michael A; Millwood, Reginald J; Stewart, C Neal

    2013-09-01

    Signature molecules derived from Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Salmonella Typhimurium were detected directly on food substrates (mega) by coupling molecular beacon technology utilizing fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET), luminescent nanoscale semiconductor quantum dots, and nanoscale quenchers. We designed target DNA sequences for detecting hlyA, Bt cry1Ac, and invA genes from L. monocytogenes, B. thuringiensis and Salmonella Typhimurium, respectively, and prepared molecular beacons for specific targets for use in real-time monitoring. We successfully detected increased fluorescence in the presence of signature molecules at molecular beacon (MB) concentrations from 1.17 nM to 40 nM, depending upon system tested in (water, milk or plant leaves), respective target (hlyA, Bt cry1Ac, or invA) and genomic DNA target concentration (50-800 ng). We were able to detect bacterial genomic DNA derived from L. monocytogenes and Salmonella sp. in a food system, 2% milk ( > 20% of total volume). Furthermore, we infiltrated the Bt cry1Ac beacon in the presence of genomic DNA extracted from B. thuringiensis into Arabidopsis thaliana leaves and observed increased fluorescence in the presence of the target, indicating the ability to use these beacons in a plant system.

  20. Modeling of nondestructive method for doped semiconductor layer diagnostics and experimental realization in a colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. M.; Boriskin, A. G.; Dneprovskii, V. S.

    2017-06-01

    The goal of the work is modeling and development of nondestructive method for the doped semiconductor layer diagnostics and measurement of the impurity levels depth relatively to the conduction band. To carry out diagnostics for materials with a high linear absorption there is required a method allows to measure material characteristics on the surface layer. To solve this problem was chosen reflected degenerate four-wave mixing technique. Nonlinear response increases dramatically in the case of the resonant excitation of electron-hole transition. Reflected degenerate four-wave mixing has been discovered in the case of one-photon resonant excitation of the excitons (electron - hole) transition for the atomic-like model structure (highly absorbing colloidal solution of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs)) by powerful beams of mode-locked laser with picosecond pulse duration. Formation of the beams in forward direction can be explained both self-diffraction of the input beams at the induced one-dimensional photonic crystal (induced diffraction grating) and by forward degenerate four-wave mixing. Backward direction beams formation can be explained only by reflected degenerate four-wave mixing.

  1. Size-Dependent Non-FRET Photoluminescence Quenching in Nanocomposites Based on Semiconductor Quantum Dots CdSe/ZnS and Functionalized Porphyrin Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard I. Zenkevich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review recent experimental work to utilize the size dependence of the luminescence quenching of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots induced by functionalized porphyrin molecules attached to the surface to describe a photoluminescence (PL quenching process which is different from usual models of charge transfer (CT or Foerster resonant energy transfer (FRET. Steady-state and picosecond time-resolved measurements were carried out for nanocomposites based on colloidal CdSe/ZnS and CdSe quantum dots (QDs of various sizes and surfacely attached tetra-mesopyridyl-substituted porphyrin molecules (“Quantum Dot-Porphyrin” nanocomposites, in toluene at 295 K. It was found that the major part of the observed strong quenching of QD PL in “QD-Porphyrin” nanocomposites can neither be assigned to FRET nor to photoinduced charge transfer between the QD and the chromophore. This PL quenching depends on QD size and shell and is stronger for smaller quantum dots: QD PL quenching rate constants scale inversely with the QD diameter. Based on the comparison of experimental data and quantum mechanical calculations, it has been concluded that QD PL quenching in “QD-Porphyrin” nanocomposites can be understood in terms of a tunneling of the electron (of the excited electron-hole pair followed by a (self- localization of the electron or formation of trap states. The major contribution to PL quenching is found to be proportional to the calculated quantum-confined exciton wave function at the QD surface. Our findings highlight that single functionalized molecules can be considered as one of the probes for the complex interface physics and dynamics of colloidal semiconductor QD.

  2. Structural and optical investigation of semiconductor CdSe/CdS core-shell quantum dot thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A B; Sharma, Sudhir Kumar; Sharma, M; Pandey, R K; Reddy, D S

    2009-03-01

    Highly luminescent CdSe/CdS core-shell nanocrystals have been assembled on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates using a wet synthesis route. The physical properties of the quantum dots (QD) have been investigated using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy techniques. These quantum dots showed a strong enhancement in the near band edge absorption. The in situ luminescence behavior has been interpreted in the light of the quantum confinement effect and induced strain in the core-shell structure.

  3. Coherent control of quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Lodahl, Peter; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to the use of semiconductor quantum dotsystems as building blocks for solid-state-based quantum logic devices. One importantparameter for such devices is the coherence time, which determines the number ofpossible quantum operations. From earlier...... measurements the coherence time of the selfassembledquantum dots (QDs) has been reported to be limited by the spontaneousemission rate at cryogenic temperatures1.In this project we propose to alter the coherence time of QDs by taking advantage of arecent technique on modifying spontaneous emission rates...

  4. Coherent control of quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Lodahl, Peter; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to the use of semiconductor quantum dotsystems as building blocks for solid-state-based quantum logic devices. One importantparameter for such devices is the coherence time, which determines the number ofpossible quantum operations. From earlier...... measurements the coherence time of the selfassembledquantum dots (QDs) has been reported to be limited by the spontaneousemission rate at cryogenic temperatures1.In this project we propose to alter the coherence time of QDs by taking advantage of arecent technique on modifying spontaneous emission rates...

  5. Quantum Dots: Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-11-10

    This review covers the description of the methodologies typically used for the calculation of the electronic structure of self-assembled and colloidal quantum dots. These are illustrated by the results of their application to a selected set of physical effects in quantum dots.

  6. Quantum dot devices for optical communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are often described as "artificial atoms": They are small nanometre-sized structures in which electrons only are allowed to exist at certain discrete levels due to size quantization, thus allowing the engineering of fundamental properties such as the coupling to light....... The main property of semiconductor quantum dots compared to bulk material or even quantum well structures is the discrete nature of the allowed states, which means that inversion of the medium can be obtained for very low electron densities. This has led to the fabrication of quantum dot lasers with record......-low threshold currents and amplifiers with record-high power levels. In this tutorial we will review the basic properties of quantum dots, emphasizing the properties which are important for laser and amplifier applications, as well as devices for all-optical signal processing. The high-speed properties...

  7. Quantum-Information Processing with Semiconductor Macroatoms

    CERN Document Server

    Biolatti, E; Zanardi, P; Rossi, F; Biolatti, Eliana; Iotti, Rita C.; Zanardi, Paolo; Rossi, Fausto

    2000-01-01

    An all optical implementation of quantum information processing with semiconductor macroatoms is proposed. Our quantum hardware consists of an array of semiconductor quantum dots and the computational degrees of freedom are energy-selected interband optical transitions. The proposed quantum-computing strategy exploits exciton-exciton interactions driven by ultrafast sequences of multi-color laser pulses. Contrary to existing proposals based on charge excitations, the present all-optical implementation does not require the application of time-dependent electric fields, thus allowing for a sub-picosecond, i.e. decoherence-free, operation time-scale in realistic state-of-the-art semiconductor nanostructures.

  8. Quantum dot devices for optical communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    . The main property of semiconductor quantum dots compared to bulk material or even quantum well structures is the discrete nature of the allowed states, which means that inversion of the medium can be obtained for very low electron densities. This has led to the fabrication of quantum dot lasers with record......-low threshold currents and amplifiers with record-high power levels. In this tutorial we will review the basic properties of quantum dots, emphasizing the properties which are important for laser and amplifier applications, as well as devices for all-optical signal processing. The high-speed properties...

  9. Quantum dot waveguides: ultrafast dynamics and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we analyze, based on numerical simulations, the dynamics of semiconductor devices incorporating quantum dots (QDs). In particular we emphasize the unique ultrafast carrier dynamics occurring between discrete QD bound states, and its influence on QD semiconductor optical amplifiers...... (SOAs). Also the possibility of realizing an all-optical regenerator by incorporating a QD absorber section in an amplifier structure is discussed....

  10. The pinning effect in a polar semiconductor quantum dot with Gaussian confinement: A study using the improved Wigner–Brillouin perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P J, Monisha, E-mail: pjmonisha@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Soma [Department of Physics, D V R college of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad 502285 (India)

    2015-05-01

    The effect of electron–phonon interaction on a few low-lying energy levels in a polar semiconductor quantum dot with Gaussian confinement is studied by using an improved Wigner–Brillouin perturbation theory (IWBPT). In the absence of the electron–phonon interaction, the electronic ground state plus one phonon state is degenerate with the first excited electronic state plus the zero-phonon state at some value of the confinement length. Similarly, the electronic ground state plus one phonon state is also degenerate with the second excited electronic state plus the zero-phonon state at a larger value of the confinement length. It is shown that the electron–phonon interaction lifts these degeneracies and as a result, the excited state energy levels bend downward and get pinned to the ground state plus one phonon state as the confinement frequency is increased. Our calculations are finally applied to GaAs and InSb quantum dots.

  11. Two-state semiconductor laser self-mixing velocimetry exploiting coupled quantum-dot emission-states: experiment, simulation and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioannini, Mariangela; Dommermuth, Marius; Drzewietzki, Lukas; Krestnikov, Igor; Livshits, Daniil; Krakowski, Michel; Breuer, Stefan

    2014-09-22

    We exploit the coupled emission-states of a single-chip semiconductor InAs/GaAs quantum-dot laser emitting simultaneously on ground-state (λ(GS) = 1245 nm) and excited-state (λ(ES) = 1175 nm) to demonstrate coupled-two-state self-mixing velocimetry for a moving diffuse reflector. A 13 Hz-narrow Doppler beat frequency signal at 317 Hz is obtained for a reflector velocity of 3 mm/s, which exemplifies a 66-fold improvement in width as compared to single-wavelength self-mixing velocimetry. Simulation results reveal the physical origin of this signal, the coupling of excited-state and ground-state photons via the carriers, which is unique for quantum-dot lasers and reproduce the experimental results with excellent agreement.

  12. Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Hepp, Aloysius; Bailey, Sheila G.

    2002-01-01

    We have been investigating the synthesis of quantum dots of CdSe, CuInS2, and CuInSe2 for use in an intermediate bandgap solar cell. We have prepared a variety of quantum dots using the typical organometallic synthesis routes pioneered by Bawendi, et. al., in the early 1990's. However, unlike previous work in this area we have also utilized single-source precursor molecules in the synthesis process. We will present XRD, TEM, SEM and EDS characterization of our initial attempts at fabricating these quantum dots. Investigation of the size distributions of these nanoparticles via laser light scattering and scanning electron microscopy will be presented. Theoretical estimates on appropriate quantum dot composition, size, and inter-dot spacing along with potential scenarios for solar cell fabrication will be discussed.

  13. Monolithically integrated quantum dot optical gain modulator with semiconductor optical amplifier for 10-Gb/s photonic transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Akahane, Kouichi; Umezawa, Toshimasa; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2015-03-01

    Short-range interconnection and/or data center networks require high capacity and a large number of channels in order to support numerous connections. Solutions employed to meet these requirements involve the use of alternative wavebands to increase the usable optical frequency range. We recently proposed the use of the T- and O-bands (Thousand band: 1000-1260 nm, Original band: 1260-1360 nm) as alternative wavebands because large optical frequency resources (>60 THz) can be easily employed. In addition, a simple and compact Gb/s-order high-speed optical modulator is a critical photonic device for short-range communications. Therefore, to develop an optical modulator that acts as a highfunctional photonic device, we focused on the use of self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) as a three-dimensional (3D) confined structure because QD structures are highly suitable for realizing broadband optical gain media in the T+O bands. In this study, we use the high-quality broadband QD optical gain to develop a monolithically integrated QD optical gain modulator (QD-OGM) device that has a semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA) for Gb/s-order highspeed optical data generation in the 1.3-μm waveband. The insertion loss of the device can be compensated through the SOA, and we obtained an optical gain change of up to ~7 dB in the OGM section. Further, we successfully demonstrate a 10-Gb/s clear eye opening using the QD-OGM/SOA device with a clock-data recovery sequence at the receiver end. These results suggest that the monolithic QD-EOM/SOA is suitable for increasing the number of wavelength channels for smart short-range communications.

  14. Energy Transfer with Semiconductor Quantum Dot Bioconjugates: A Versatile Platform for Biosensing, Energy Harvesting, and Other Developing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Niko; Spillmann, Christopher M; Algar, W Russ; Pons, Thomas; Stewart, Michael H; Oh, Eunkeu; Susumu, Kimihiro; Díaz, Sebastian A; Delehanty, James B; Medintz, Igor L

    2017-01-25

    Luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are one of the more popular nanomaterials currently utilized within biological applications. However, what is not widely appreciated is their growing role as versatile energy transfer (ET) donors and acceptors within a similar biological context. The progress made on integrating QDs and ET in biological configurations and applications is reviewed in detail here. The goal is to provide the reader with (1) an appreciation for what QDs are capable of in this context, (2) how this field has grown over a relatively short time span, and, in particular, (3) how QDs are steadily revolutionizing the development of new biosensors along with a myriad of other photonically active nanomaterial-based bioconjugates. An initial discussion of QD materials along with key concepts surrounding their preparation and bioconjugation is provided given the defining role these aspects play in the QDs ability to succeed in subsequent ET applications. The discussion is then divided around the specific roles that QDs provide as either Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) or charge/electron transfer donor and/or acceptor. For each QD-ET mechanism, a working explanation of the appropriate background theory and formalism is articulated before examining their biosensing and related ET utility. Other configurations such as incorporation of QDs into multistep ET processes or use of initial chemical and bioluminescent excitation are treated similarly. ET processes that are still not fully understood such as QD interactions with gold and other metal nanoparticles along with carbon allotropes are also covered. Given their maturity, some specific applications ranging from in vitro sensing assays to cellular imaging are separated and discussed in more detail. Finally a perspective on how this field will continue to evolve is provided.

  15. Spin-Orbit Splitting in Semiconductor Quantum Dots with a Two-Dimensional Ring Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Jun-Sheng; LIU Zheng

    2009-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the energy levels with two-dimensional ring confining potential in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction.The features of some low-lying states in various strengths of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction are investigated.The Rashba spin-orbit splitting can also be influenced by the width of the potential barrier.The computed results show that the spin-polarized electronic states can be more easily achieved in a weakly confined dot when the confinement strength for the Rashba spin-orbit interaction is larger than a critical value.

  16. A study of specific features of the electronic spectrum of quantum dots in CdSe semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, A. I.; Kabanov, V. F.; Gorbachev, I. A.; Glukhovskoi, E. G.

    2016-08-01

    Monolayers of CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) formed on the aqueous subphase and transferred to solid substrates by the Langmuir-Blodgett method have been studied. The samples obtained were examined by transmission electron microscopy, atomic-force microscopy, and scanning tunnel microscopy. The structure of the QD monolayer obtained on the substrate was analyzed. Specific features of the electronic spectrum of the quantum objects formed in the samples under study were determined.

  17. Quantum-dot supercrystals for future nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2013-01-01

    The study of supercrystals made of periodically arranged semiconductor quantum dots is essential for the advancement of emerging nanophotonics technologies. By combining the strong spatial confinement of elementary excitations inside quantum dots and exceptional design flexibility, quantum-dot supercrystals provide broad opportunities for engineering desired optical responses and developing superior light manipulation techniques on the nanoscale. Here we suggest tailoring the energy spectrum and wave functions of the supercrystals' collective excitations through the variation of different structural and material parameters. In particular, by calculating the excitonic spectra of quantum dots assembled in two-dimensional Bravais lattices we demonstrate a wide variety of spectrum transformation scenarios upon alterations in the quantum dot arrangement. This feature offers unprecedented control over the supercrystal's electromagnetic properties and enables the development of new nanophotonics materials and devices.

  18. Biocompatible quantum dots for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Sandra J; Chang, Jerry C; Kovtun, Oleg; McBride, James R; Tomlinson, Ian D

    2011-01-28

    Semiconductor quantum dots are quickly becoming a critical diagnostic tool for discerning cellular function at the molecular level. Their high brightness, long-lasting, size-tunable, and narrow luminescence set them apart from conventional fluorescence dyes. Quantum dots are being developed for a variety of biologically oriented applications, including fluorescent assays for drug discovery, disease detection, single protein tracking, and intracellular reporting. This review introduces the science behind quantum dots and describes how they are made biologically compatible. Several applications are also included, illustrating strategies toward target specificity, and are followed by a discussion on the limitations of quantum dot approaches. The article is concluded with a look at the future direction of quantum dots.

  19. Comparison of electromagnetically induced transparency schemes in semiconductor quantum dot structures: Impact of many-body interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmark-Nielsen, Jakob; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper;

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the impact of many-body interactions on group-velocity slowdown achieved via electromagnetically induced transparency in quantum dots using three different coupling-probe schemes (ladder, V, and Lambda, respectively). We find that for all schemes many-body interactions have...

  20. Auger Processes Mediating the Nonresonant Optical Emission from a Semiconductor Quantum Dot Embedded Inside an Optical Cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settnes, Mikkel; Nielsen, Per Kær; Lund, Anders Mølbjerg;

    2013-01-01

    We show that Auger processes involving wetting layer transitions mediate emission from a cavity that is detuned from a quantum dot by even tens of meV. The wetting layer thus acts as a reservoir, which by Coulomb scattering can supply or absorb the energy difference between emitter and cavity. We...

  1. Investigations of repetition rate stability of a mode-locked quantum dot semiconductor laser in an auxiliary optical fiber cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breuer, Stefan; Elsässer, Wolfgang; McInerney, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated experimentally the pulse train (mode beating) stability of a monolithic mode-locked multi-section quantum-dot laser with an added passive auxiliary optical fiber cavity. Addition of the weakly coupled (¿ -24dB) cavity reduces the current-induced shift d¿/dI of the principal...

  2. Fluorescent Quantum Dots for Biological Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Gene; Nadeau, Jay; Nealson, Kenneth; Storrie-Lomardi, Michael; Bhartia, Rohit

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots that can serve as "on/off" labels for bacteria and other living cells are undergoing development. The "on/off" characterization of these quantum dots refers to the fact that, when properly designed and manufactured, they do not fluoresce until and unless they come into contact with viable cells of biological species that one seeks to detect. In comparison with prior fluorescence-based means of detecting biological species, fluorescent quantum dots show promise for greater speed, less complexity, greater sensitivity, and greater selectivity for species of interest. There are numerous potential applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and detection of bioterrorism.

  3. Charge storage properties of InP quantum dots in GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based nonvolatile flash memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Souvik; Halder, Nripendra N.; Biswas, Pranab; Biswas, D.; Banerji, P.; Mukherjee, Rabibrata; Chakraborty, S.

    2012-11-01

    Metal organic vapor phase epitaxially grown 5 nm InP quantum dots (QDs) were embedded as charge storage elements between high-k control and tunneling dielectric layers in GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based nonvolatile memory devices. The QDs trap more electrons resulting in a large memory window (6.3 V) along with low leakage due to Coulomb blockade effect. 16.5% charge loss was found even after 105 s indicating its good charge storing potential. The programming and erasing operations were discussed with proposed band diagram.

  4. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  5. Quantum Transport in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    SRS i 91 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum Transport in Semiconductors 5. FUNDING NUMBER söMtos-rizk-ooss 6. AUTHOR(S) D. K. Ferry ©fte ELECTE...OF ABSTRACT UL NSN 7540-01-280-5500 O 1 9 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2-89) Presented by ANSI Std «9-18 298-102 Final Report Quantum Transport in... Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Devices This final report describes a program of research investigating quantum effects which become important in

  6. Graphene quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Güçlü, Alev Devrim; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    This book reflects the current status of theoretical and experimental research of graphene based nanostructures, in particular quantum dots, at a level accessible to young researchers, graduate students, experimentalists and theorists. It presents the current state of research of graphene quantum dots, a single or few monolayer thick islands of graphene. It introduces the reader to the electronic and optical properties of graphite, intercalated graphite and graphene, including Dirac fermions, Berry's phase associated with sublattices and valley degeneracy, covers single particle properties of

  7. Transport properties of a single plasmon interacting with a hybrid exciton of a metal nanoparticle-semiconductor quantum dot system coupled to a plasmonic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Chol; Ko, Myong-Chol; Choe, Song-Il; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Zhou, Li; Li, Jian-Bo; Im, Song-Jin; Ko, Yong-Hae; Jo, Chon-Gyu; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-11-01

    The transport properties of a single plasmon interacting with a hybrid system composed of a semiconductor quantum dot (SQD) and a metal nanoparticle (MNP) coupled to a one-dimensional surface plasmonic waveguide are investigated theoretically via the real-space approach. We considered that the MNP-SQD interaction leads to the formation of a hybrid exciton and the transmission and reflection of a single incident plasmon could be controlled by adjusting the frequency of the classical control field applied to the MNP-SQD hybrid nanosystem, the kinds of MNPs and the background media. The transport properties of a single plasmon interacting with such a hybrid nanosystem discussed here could find applications in the design of next-generation quantum devices, such as single-photon switching and nanomirrors, and in quantum information processing.

  8. Transport properties of a single plasmon interacting with a hybrid exciton of a metal nanoparticle-semiconductor quantum dot system coupled to a plasmonic waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Chol; Ko, Myong-Chol; Choe, Song-Il; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Zhou, Li; Li, Jian-Bo; Im, Song-Jin; Ko, Yong-Hae; Jo, Chon-Gyu; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-11-18

    The transport properties of a single plasmon interacting with a hybrid system composed of a semiconductor quantum dot (SQD) and a metal nanoparticle (MNP) coupled to a one-dimensional surface plasmonic waveguide are investigated theoretically via the real-space approach. We considered that the MNP-SQD interaction leads to the formation of a hybrid exciton and the transmission and reflection of a single incident plasmon could be controlled by adjusting the frequency of the classical control field applied to the MNP-SQD hybrid nanosystem, the kinds of MNPs and the background media. The transport properties of a single plasmon interacting with such a hybrid nanosystem discussed here could find applications in the design of next-generation quantum devices, such as single-photon switching and nanomirrors, and in quantum information processing.

  9. Optically active quantum-dot molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlykov, Alexander I; Baimuratov, Anvar S; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V; Rukhlenko, Ivan D

    2017-02-20

    Chiral molecules made of coupled achiral semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as quantum dots, show great promise for photonic applications owing to their prospective uses as configurable building blocks for optically active structures, materials, and devices. Here we present a simple model of optically active quantum-dot molecules, in which each of the quantum dots is assigned a dipole moment associated with the fundamental interband transition between the size-quantized states of its confined charge carriers. This model is used to analytically calculate the rotatory strengths of optical transitions occurring upon the excitation of chiral dimers, trimers, and tetramers of general configurations. The rotatory strengths of such quantum-dot molecules are found to exceed the typical rotatory strengths of chiral molecules by five to six orders of magnitude. We also study how the optical activity of quantum-dot molecules shows up in their circular dichroism spectra when the energy gap between the molecular states is much smaller than the states' lifetime, and maximize the strengths of the circular dichroism peaks by optimizing orientations of the quantum dots in the molecules. Our analytical results provide clear design guidelines for quantum-dot molecules and can prove useful in engineering optically active quantum-dot supercrystals and photonic devices.

  10. Optical resonators and quantum dots: An excursion into quantum optics, quantum information and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianucci, Pablo

    Modern communications technology has encouraged an intimate connection between Semiconductor Physics and Optics, and this connection shows best in the combination of electron-confining structures with light-confining structures. Semiconductor quantum dots are systems engineered to trap electrons in a mesoscopic scale (the are composed of ≈ 10000 atoms), resulting in a behavior resembling that of atoms, but much richer. Optical microresonators are engineered to confine light, increasing its intensity and enabling a much stronger interaction with matter. Their combination opens a myriad of new directions, both in fundamental Physics and in possible applications. This dissertation explores both semiconductor quantum dots and microresonators, through experimental work done with semiconductor quantum dots and microsphere resonators spanning the fields of Quantum Optics, Quantum Information and Photonics; from quantum algorithms to polarization converters. Quantum Optics leads the way, allowing us to understand how to manipulate and measure quantum dots with light and to elucidate the interactions between them and microresonators. In the Quantum Information area, we present a detailed study of the feasibility of excitons in quantum dots to perform quantum computations, including an experimental demonstration of the single-qubit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm performedin a single semiconductor quantum dot. Our studies in Photonics involve applications of microsphere resonators, which we have learned to fabricate and characterize. We present an elaborate description of the experimental techniques needed to study microspheres, including studies and proof of concept experiments on both ultra-sensitive microsphere sensors and whispering gallery mode polarization converters.

  11. Temperature-dependent properties of semiconductor quantum dots in coherent regime; Temperaturabhaengige Eigenschaften einzelner Halbleiter-Quantenpunkte im Kohaerenten Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, Marc C.

    2009-10-15

    Recently, the public has become aware of keywords like ''Quantum computer'' or ''Quantum cryptography''. Regarding their potential application in solid state based quantum information processing and their overall benefit in fundamental research quantum dots have gained more and more public interest. In this context, quantum dots are often referred to as ''artificial atoms'', a term subsuming their physical properties quite nicely and emphasizing the huge potential for further investigations. The basic mechanism to be considered is the theoretical model of a two-level system. A quantum dot itself represents this kind of system quite nicely, provided that only the presence or absence of a single exciton in the ground state of that structure is regarded. This concept can also be expanded to the presence of two excitons (bi-exciton). Transitions between the relevant levels can be induced by optical stimulation. When integrating quantum dots in diode like structures measurements of this phenomena can be accomplished regarding photo currents. This means of detection is highly sensitive and allows for tuning of the energy levels with respect to the energy of an exciting laser utilizing the Stark effect (via an external electric field). The photo current then shows narrow resonances representing those transitions. By this, the system can be used as a highly sensitive nano-spectrometer. The examination of coherent interactions between quantum dots and an electromagnetic field uses laser pulses that are much shorter than the dephasing time of the system (2 ps). The basic study to be done on two level systems is the measurement of Rabi oscillations allowing for the selection of an arbitrary superposition of states. In this work, the existing setup was improved regarding the possibility to control the temperature of the sample. Up to now, only investigations at 4,2 K have been possible. Even at 70 K Rabi oscillations

  12. Modeling of growth and prediction of properties of electronic nanomaterials: Silicon thin films and compound semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sumeet C.

    The enhanced functionality and tunability of electronic nanomaterials enables the development of next-generation photovoltaic, optoelectronic, and electronic devices, as well as biomolecular tags. Design and efficient synthesis of such semiconductor nanomaterials require a fundamental understanding of the underlying process-structure/composition-property-function relationships. To this end, this thesis focuses on a systematic, comprehensive analysis of the physical and chemical phenomena that determine the composition and properties of semiconductor nanomaterials. Through synergistic combination of computational modeling and experimental studies, the thesis addresses the thermodynamics and kinetics that are relevant during synthesis and processing and their resulting impact on the properties of silicon thin films and ternary quantum dots (TQDs) of compound semiconductors. The thesis presents a computational study of the growth mechanisms of plasma deposited a-Si:H thin films based on kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations according to a transition probability database constructed by first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Based on the results, a comprehensive model is proposed for a-Si:H thin-film growth by plasma deposition under conditions that make the silyl (SiH3) radical the dominant deposition precursor. It is found that the relative roles of surface coordination defects are crucial in determining the surface composition of plasma deposited a-Si:H films and should be properly accounted for. The KMC predictions for the temperature dependence (over the range from 300 K to 700 K) of the surface concentration of SiHx(s) (x = 1,2,3) surface hydride species, the surface hydrogen content, and the surface dangling-bond coverage are in agreement with experimental measurements. In addition, the thesis details a systematic analysis of equilibrium compositional distribution in TQDs and their effects on the electronic and optoelectronic properties

  13. Photoluminescence studies of single InGaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are considered a promising material system for future optical devices and quantum computers. We have studied the low-temperature photoluminescence properties of single InGaAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs. The high spatial resolution required for resolving single dots...... to resolve luminescence lines from individual quantum dots, revealing an atomic-like spectrum of sharp transition lines. A parameter of fundamental importance is the intrinsic linewidth of these transitions. Using high-resolution spectroscopy we have determined the linewidth and investigated its dependence...... on temperature, which gives information about how the exciton confined to the quantum dot interacts with the surrounding lattice....

  14. Large quantum dots with small oscillator strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Schlereth, T.W.; Höfling, S.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the oscillator strength and quantum efficiency of excitons confined in large InGaAs quantum dots by recording the spontaneous emission decay rate while systematically varying the distance between the quantum dots and a semiconductor-air interface. The size of the quantum dots...... is measured by in-plane transmission electron microscopy and we find average in-plane diameters of 40 nm. We have calculated the oscillator strength of excitons of that size assuming a quantum-dot confinement given by a parabolic in-plane potential and a hard-wall vertical potential and predict a very large...... oscillator strength due to Coulomb effects. This is in stark contrast to the measured oscillator strength, which turns out to be so small that it can be described by excitons in the strong confinement regime. We attribute these findings to exciton localization in local potential minima arising from alloy...

  15. Competition between Förster resonance energy transfer and electron transfer in stoichiometrically assembled semiconductor quantum dot-fullerene conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Michael H; Huston, Alan L; Scott, Amy M; Oh, Eunkeu; Algar, W Russ; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Susumu, Kimihiro; Jain, Vaibhav; Prasuhn, Duane E; Blanco-Canosa, Juan; Dawson, Philip E; Medintz, Igor L

    2013-10-22

    Understanding how semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) engage in photoinduced energy transfer with carbon allotropes is necessary for enhanced performance in solar cells and other optoelectronic devices along with the potential to create new types of (bio)sensors. Here, we systematically investigate energy transfer interactions between C60 fullerenes and four different QDs, composed of CdSe/ZnS (type I) and CdSe/CdS/ZnS (quasi type II), with emission maxima ranging from 530 to 630 nm. C60-pyrrolidine tris-acid was first coupled to the N-terminus of a hexahistidine-terminated peptide via carbodiimide chemistry to yield a C60-labeled peptide (pepC60). This peptide provided the critical means to achieve ratiometric self-assembly of the QD-(pepC60) nanoheterostructures by exploiting metal affinity coordination to the QD surface. Controlled QD-(pepC60)N bioconjugates were prepared by discretely increasing the ratio (N) of pepC60 assembled per QD in mixtures of dimethyl sulfoxide and buffer; this mixed organic/aqueous approach helped alleviate issues of C60 solubility. An extensive set of control experiments were initially performed to verify the specific and ratiometric nature of QD-(pepC60)N assembly. Photoinitiated energy transfer in these hybrid organic-inorganic systems was then interrogated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence along with ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. Coordination of pepC60 to the QD results in QD PL quenching that directly tracks with the number of peptides displayed around the QD. A detailed photophysical analysis suggests a competition between electron transfer and Förster resonance energy transfer from the QD to the C60 that is dependent upon a complex interplay of pepC60 ratio per QD, the presence of underlying spectral overlap, and contributions from QD size. These results highlight several important factors that must be considered when designing QD-donor/C60-acceptor systems for potential optoelectronic and biosensing

  16. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-05-07

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  17. Sandwich-like singled-walled titania nanotube as a novel semiconductor electrode for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Cunku; Li, Xin; Fan, Xiujuan [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Qi, Jingyao [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2012-06-15

    A novel sandwich-like singled-walled titania nanotube is designed as a photoanode in quantum dot-sensitized solar cells. It acts as a hollow coaxial nanocable, in which the injected electron is confined in the conducting layer for transport, guarded from electron recombination by the protective layers. An ultrafast interfacial electron transfer is also expected in this photoelectric system due to the unique nanoarchitecture. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. High resolution STEM of quantum dots and quantum wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadkhodazadeh, Shima

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the application of high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and quantum wires (QWRs). Different imaging and analytical techniques in STEM are introduced and key examples of their application to QDs and QWRs...

  19. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  20. 10  GHz pulse repetition rate Er:Yb:glass laser modelocked with quantum dot semiconductor saturable absorber mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resan, B; Kurmulis, S; Zhang, Z Y; Oehler, A E H; Markovic, V; Mangold, M; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U; Hogg, R A; Weingarten, K J

    2016-05-10

    Semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) modelocked high pulse repetition rate (≥10  GHz) diode-pumped solid-state lasers are proven as an enabling technology for high data rate coherent communication systems owing to their low noise and high pulse-to-pulse optical phase-coherence. Compared to quantum well, quantum dot (QD)-based SESAMs offer potential advantages to such laser systems in terms of reduced saturation fluence, broader bandwidth, and wavelength flexibility. Here, we describe the first 10 GHz pulse repetition rate QD-SESAM modelocked laser at 1.55 μm, exhibiting 2 ps pulse width from an Er-doped glass oscillator (ERGO). The 10 GHz ERGO laser is modelocked with InAs/GaAs QD-SESAM with saturation fluence as low as 9  μJ/cm2.

  1. Quantum dots with single-atom precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fölsch, Stefan; Martínez-Blanco, Jesús; Yang, Jianshu; Kanisawa, Kiyoshi; Erwin, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    Quantum dots are often called artificial atoms because, like real atoms, they confine electrons to quantized states with discrete energies. However, although real atoms are identical, most quantum dots comprise hundreds or thousands of atoms, with inevitable variations in size and shape and, consequently, unavoidable variability in their wavefunctions and energies. Electrostatic gates can be used to mitigate these variations by adjusting the electron energy levels, but the more ambitious goal of creating quantum dots with intrinsically digital fidelity by eliminating statistical variations in their size, shape and arrangement remains elusive. We used a scanning tunnelling microscope to create quantum dots with identical, deterministic sizes. By using the lattice of a reconstructed semiconductor surface to fix the position of each atom, we controlled the shape and location of the dots with effectively zero error. This allowed us to construct quantum dot molecules whose coupling has no intrinsic variation but could nonetheless be tuned with arbitrary precision over a wide range. Digital fidelity opens the door to quantum dot architectures free of intrinsic broadening-an important goal for technologies from nanophotonics to quantum information processing as well as for fundamental studies of confined electrons.

  2. A Quantum Dot with Spin-Orbit Interaction--Analytical Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, B.; Roy, B.

    2009-01-01

    The practical applicability of a semiconductor quantum dot with spin-orbit interaction gives an impetus to study analytical solutions to one- and two-electron quantum dots with or without a magnetic field.

  3. A Quantum Dot with Spin-Orbit Interaction--Analytical Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, B.; Roy, B.

    2009-01-01

    The practical applicability of a semiconductor quantum dot with spin-orbit interaction gives an impetus to study analytical solutions to one- and two-electron quantum dots with or without a magnetic field.

  4. Quantum theory of electroabsorption in semiconductor nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepliakov, Nikita V; Leonov, Mikhail Yu; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V; Rukhlenko, Ivan D

    2016-01-25

    We develop a simple quantum-mechanical theory of interband absorption by semiconductor nanocrystals exposed to a dc electric field. The theory is based on the model of noninteracting electrons and holes in an infinitely deep quantum well and describes all the major features of electroabsorption, including the Stark effect, the Franz-Keldysh effect, and the field-induced spectral broadening. It is applicable to nanocrystals of different shapes and dimensions (quantum dots, nanorods, and nanoplatelets), and will prove useful in modeling and design of electrooptical devices based on ensembles of semiconductor nanocrystals.

  5. Research Progress of Photoanodes for Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zhi-min

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development status and tendency of quantum dot sensitized solar cells. Photoanode research progress and its related technologies are analyzed in detail from the three ways of semiconductor thin films, quantum dot co-sensitization and quantum dot doping, deriving from the approach that the conversion efficiency can be improved by photoanode modification for quantum dot sensitized solar cells. According to the key factors which restrict the cell efficiency, the promising future development of quantum dot sensitized solar cells is proposed,for example,optimizing further the compositions and structures of semiconductor thin films for the photoanodes, exploring new quantum dots with broadband absorption and developing high efficient techniques of interface modification.

  6. Hexagonal graphene quantum dots

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, S.

    2016-12-05

    We study hexagonal graphene quantum dots, using density functional theory, to obtain a quantitative description of the electronic properties and their size dependence, considering disk and ring geometries with both armchair and zigzag edges. We show that the electronic properties of quantum dots with armchair edges are more sensitive to structural details than those with zigzag edges. As functions of the inner and outer radii, we find in the case of armchair edges that the size of the band gap follows distinct branches, while in the case of zigzag edges it changes monotonically. This behaviour is further analyzed by studying the ground state wave function and explained in terms of its localisation.

  7. Spin polarization of electrons in a magnetic impurity doped semiconductor quantum dot – The effect of electron–phonon interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Misra Deepanjali; Tripathy Sukanta Kumar

    2016-03-01

    A theoretical model is presented in this paper for degree of spin polarization in alight emitting diode (LED) whose epitaxial region contains quantum dots doped with magnetic impurity. The model is then used to investigate the effect of electron–phonon interaction on degree of spin polarization at different temperatures and magnetic fields. It is found that magnetic impurityincreases the degree of spin polarization irrespective of temperature, while the electron–phonon interaction decreases the degree of spin polarization. Results are found to be in better agreement with experiments.

  8. Charge-controlled assembling of bacteriorhodopsin and semiconductor quantum dots for fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based nanophotonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Sukhanova, Alyona; Artemyev, Mikhail; Oleinikov, Vladimir A.; Troyon, Michel; Nabiev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and photochromic protein bacteriorhodopsin within its natural purple membrane (PM) is explored to monitor their assembling. It is shown that the efficiency of FRET may be controlled by variation of the surface charge and thickness of QD organic coating. Atomic force microscopy imaging revealed correlation between the surface charge of QDs and degree of their ordering on the surface of PM. The most FRET-efficient QD-PM complexes have the highest level of QDs ordering, and their assembling design may be further optimized to engineer hybrid materials with advanced biophotonic and photovoltaic properties.

  9. Quantum Wigner molecules in semiconductor quantum dots and cold-atom optical traps and their mathematical symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Yannouleas, Constantine

    2016-01-01

    Strong repelling interactions between a few fermions or bosons confined in two-dimensional circular traps lead to particle localization and formation of quantum Wigner molecules (QWMs) possessing definite point-group space symmetries. These point-group symmetries are "hidden" (or emergent), namely they cannot be traced in the circular single-particle densities (SPDs) associated with the exact many-body wave functions, but they are manifested as characteristic signatures in the ro-vibrational spectra. An example, among many, are the few-body QWM states under a high magnetic field or at fast rotation, which are precursor states for the fractional quantum Hall effect. The hidden geometric symmetries can be directly revealed by using spin-resolved conditional probability distributions, which are extracted from configuration-interaction (CI), exact-diagonalization wave functions. The hidden symmetries can also be revealed in the CI SPDs by reducing the symmetry of the trap (from circular to elliptic to quasi-linea...

  10. Electron States of Few-Electron Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴振宏; 孙金祚; 张立德; 李作宏; 黄士勇; 隋鹏飞

    2002-01-01

    We study few-electron semiconductor quantum dots using the unrestricted Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method based on the Gaussian basis. Our emphasis is on the energy level calculation for quantum dots. The confinement potential in a quantum dot is assumed to be in a form of three-dimensional spherical finite potential well. Some valuable results, such as the rearrangement of the energy level, have been obtained.

  11. Optical Properties of Quantum-Dot-Doped Liquid Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Aberle, C; Weiss, S; Winslow, L

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) were studied in the context of liquid scintillator development for upcoming neutrino experiments. The unique optical and chemical properties of quantum dots are particularly promising for the use in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. Liquid scintillators for large scale neutrino detectors have to meet specific requirements which are reviewed, highlighting the peculiarities of quantum-dot-doping. In this paper, we report results on laboratory-scale measurements of the attenuation length and the fluorescence properties of three commercial quantum dot samples. The results include absorbance and emission stability measurements, improvement in transparency due to filtering of the quantum dot samples, precipitation tests to isolate the quantum dots from solution and energy transfer studies with quantum dots and the fluorophore PPO.

  12. Optical properties of quantum-dot-doped liquid scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, C.; Li, J. J.; Weiss, S.; Winslow, L.

    2013-10-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) were studied in the context of liquid scintillator development for upcoming neutrino experiments. The unique optical and chemical properties of quantum dots are particularly promising for the use in neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Liquid scintillators for large scale neutrino detectors have to meet specific requirements which are reviewed, highlighting the peculiarities of quantum-dot-doping. In this paper, we report results on laboratory-scale measurements of the attenuation length and the fluorescence properties of three commercial quantum dot samples. The results include absorbance and emission stability measurements, improvement in transparency due to filtering of the quantum dot samples, precipitation tests to isolate the quantum dots from solution and energy transfer studies with quantum dots and the fluorophore PPO.

  13. Enabling biomedical research with designer quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomczak, N.; Janczewski, D.; Dorokhin, D.V.; Han, M-Y; Vancso, G.J.; Navarro, Melba; Planell, Josep A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are a new class of semiconductor nanoparticulate luminophores, which are actively researched for novel applications in biology and nanomedicine. In this review, the recent progress in the design and applications of QD labels for in vitro and in vivo imaging of cells is presented.

  14. Single Molecule Applications of Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Elmelund; Jauffred, Liselotte; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanocrystals composed of semiconductor materials were first introduced for biological applications in the late 1990s. The focus of this review is to give a brief survey of biological applications of quantum dots (QDs) at the single QD sensitivity level. These are described as follows: 1...

  15. Chiral Graphene Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nozomu; Wang, Yichun; Elvati, Paolo; Qu, Zhi-Bei; Kim, Kyoungwon; Jiang, Shuang; Baumeister, Elizabeth; Lee, Jaewook; Yeom, Bongjun; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Lee, Jaebeom; Violi, Angela; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2016-02-23

    Chiral nanostructures from metals and semiconductors attract wide interest as components for polarization-enabled optoelectronic devices. Similarly to other fields of nanotechnology, graphene-based materials can greatly enrich physical and chemical phenomena associated with optical and electronic properties of chiral nanostructures and facilitate their applications in biology as well as other areas. Here, we report that covalent attachment of l/d-cysteine moieties to the edges of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) leads to their helical buckling due to chiral interactions at the "crowded" edges. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the GQDs revealed bands at ca. 210-220 and 250-265 nm that changed their signs for different chirality of the cysteine edge ligands. The high-energy chiroptical peaks at 210-220 nm correspond to the hybridized molecular orbitals involving the chiral center of amino acids and atoms of graphene edges. Diverse experimental and modeling data, including density functional theory calculations of CD spectra with probabilistic distribution of GQD isomers, indicate that the band at 250-265 nm originates from the three-dimensional twisting of the graphene sheet and can be attributed to the chiral excitonic transitions. The positive and negative low-energy CD bands correspond to the left and right helicity of GQDs, respectively. Exposure of liver HepG2 cells to L/D-GQDs reveals their general biocompatibility and a noticeable difference in the toxicity of the stereoisomers. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that d-GQDs have a stronger tendency to accumulate within the cellular membrane than L-GQDs. Emergence of nanoscale chirality in GQDs decorated with biomolecules is expected to be a general stereochemical phenomenon for flexible sheets of nanomaterials.

  16. Computational study of power conversion and luminous efficiency performance for semiconductor quantum dot nanophosphors on light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Talha; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2012-01-30

    We present power conversion efficiency (PCE) and luminous efficiency (LE) performance levels of high photometric quality white LEDs integrated with quantum dots (QDs) achieving an averaged color rendering index of ≥90 (with R9 at least 70), a luminous efficacy of optical radiation of ≥380 lm/W(opt) a correlated color temperature of ≤4000 K, and a chromaticity difference dC quantum efficiency of 43%, 61%, and 80% in film, respectively, using state-of-the-art blue LED chips (81.3% PCE). Furthermore, our computational analyses suggest that QD-LEDs can be both photometrically and electrically more efficient than phosphor based LEDs when state-of-the-art QDs are used.

  17. Electric Field Modulation of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Photoluminescence: Insights Into the Design of Robust Voltage-Sensitive Cellular Imaging Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Clare E; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H; Oh, Eunkeu; Mäkinen, Antti J; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J; Kushto, Gary; Wolak, Mason A; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Efros, Alexander L; Huston, Alan L; Delehanty, James B

    2015-10-14

    The intrinsic properties of quantum dots (QDs) and the growing ability to interface them controllably with living cells has far-reaching potential applications in probing cellular processes such as membrane action potential. We demonstrate that an electric field typical of those found in neuronal membranes results in suppression of the QD photoluminescence (PL) and, for the first time, that QD PL is able to track the action potential profile of a firing neuron with millisecond time resolution. This effect is shown to be connected with electric-field-driven QD ionization and consequent QD PL quenching, in contradiction with conventional wisdom that suppression of the QD PL is attributable to the quantum confined Stark effect.

  18. Reconfigurable quadruple quantum dots in a silicon nanowire transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betz, A. C., E-mail: ab2106@cam.ac.uk; Broström, M.; Gonzalez-Zalba, M. F. [Hitachi Cambridge Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Tagliaferri, M. L. V. [Laboratorio MDM, CNR-IMM, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universit di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Vinet, M. [CEA/LETI-MINATEC, CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Sanquer, M. [SPSMS, UMR-E CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Ferguson, A. J. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-16

    We present a reconfigurable metal-oxide-semiconductor multi-gate transistor that can host a quadruple quantum dot in silicon. The device consists of an industrial quadruple-gate silicon nanowire field-effect transistor. Exploiting the corner effect, we study the versatility of the structure in the single quantum dot and the serial double quantum dot regimes and extract the relevant capacitance parameters. We address the fabrication variability of the quadruple-gate approach which, paired with improved silicon fabrication techniques, makes the corner state quantum dot approach a promising candidate for a scalable quantum information architecture.

  19. The Electronic Structure of Coupled Semiconductor Quantum Dots Arranged as a Graphene Hexagonal Lattice under a Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Juan; LI Shu-Shen

    2012-01-01

    We study the electronic spectrum of coupled quantum dots (QDs) arranged as a graphene hexagonal lattice in the presence of an external perpendicular magnetic Geld. In our tight-binding model, the effect of the magnetic field is included in both the Peierls phase of the Hamiltonian and the tight-binding basis Wannier function. The energy of the system is analyzed when the magnetic flux through the lattice unit cell is a rational fraction of the quantum flux. The calculated spectrum has recursive properties, similar to those of the classical Hofstadter butterfly. However, unlike the ideal Hofstadter butterfly structure, our result is asymmetric since the impacts of the specific material and the magnetic field on the wavefunctions are included, making the results more realistic.%We study the electronic spectrum of coupled quantum dots (QDs) arranged as a graphene hexagonal lattice in the presence of an external perpendicular magnetic field.In our tight-binding model,the effect of the magnetic field is included in both the Peierls phase of the Hamiltonian and the tight-binding basis Wannier function.The energy of the system is analyzed when the magnetic flux through the lattice unit cell is a rational fraction of the quantum flux.The calculated spectrum has recursive properties,similar to those of the classical Hofstadter butterfly.However,unlike the ideal Hofstadter butterfly structure,our result is asymmetric since the impacts of the specific material and the magnetic field on the wavefunctions are included,making the results more realistic.

  20. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small

  1. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  2. Advancements in the Field of Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sambeet; Tripathy, Pratyasha; Sinha, Swami Prasad.

    2012-08-01

    Quantum dots are defined as very small semiconductor crystals of size varying from nanometer scale to a few micron i.e. so small that they are considered dimensionless and are capable of showing many chemical properties by virtue of which they tend to be lead at one minute and gold at the second minute.Quantum dots house the electrons just the way the electrons would have been present in an atom, by applying a voltage. And therefore they are very judiciously given the name of being called as the artificial atoms. This application of voltage may also lead to the modification of the chemical nature of the material anytime it is desired, resulting in lead at one minute to gold at the other minute. But this method is quite beyond our reach. A quantum dot is basically a semiconductor of very tiny size and this special phenomenon of quantum dot, causes the band of energies to change into discrete energy levels. Band gaps and the related energy depend on the relationship between the size of the crystal and the exciton radius. The height and energy between different energy levels varies inversely with the size of the quantum dot. The smaller the quantum dot, the higher is the energy possessed by it.There are many applications of the quantum dots e.g. they are very wisely applied to:Light emitting diodes: LEDs eg. White LEDs, Photovoltaic devices: solar cells, Memory elements, Biology : =biosensors, imaging, Lasers, Quantum computation, Flat-panel displays, Photodetectors, Life sciences and so on and so forth.The nanometer sized particles are able to display any chosen colour in the entire ultraviolet visible spectrum through a small change in their size or composition.

  3. Dissipative tunneling in structures with quantum dots and quantum molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Dahnovsky, Yu. I.; Krevchik, V. D.; Semenov, M. B.; Yamamoto, K.; Zhukovsky, V. Ch.; Aringazin, A. K.; Kudryashov, E. I.; Mayorov, V. G.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of tunneling control in systems "quantum dot - quantum well" (as well as "quantum dot - quantum dot" or quantum molecule) and "quantum dot - bulk contact" is studied as a quantum tunneling with dissipation process in the semiclassical (instanton) approximation. For these systems temperature and correlation between a quantum dot radius and a quantum well width (or another quantum dot radius) are considered to be control parameters. The condition for a single electron blockade is fo...

  4. Quantum coherence in semiconductor nanostructures for improved lasers and detectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Weng Wah Dr. (; .); Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Modine, Normand Arthur; Biefeld, Robert Malcolm

    2006-02-01

    The potential for implementing quantum coherence in semiconductor self-assembled quantum dots has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical modeling suggests that coherent dynamics should be possible in self-assembled quantum dots. Our experimental efforts have optimized InGaAs and InAs self-assembled quantum dots on GaAs for demonstrating coherent phenomena. Optical investigations have indicated the appropriate geometries for observing quantum coherence and the type of experiments for observing quantum coherence have been outlined. The optical investigation targeted electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in order to demonstrate an all optical delay line.

  5. Fast and high-fidelity optical initialization of spin state of an electron in a semiconductor quantum dot using light-hole-trion states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parvendra; Nakajima, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically show that under the Faraday geometry fast and high-fidelity optical initialization of electron spin (ES) state in a semiconductor quantum dot (SQD) can be realized by utilizing the light-hole (LH)-trion states. Initialization is completed within the time scale of ten nanoseconds with high fidelity, and the initialization laser pulse can be linearly, right-circularly, or left-circularly polarized. Moreover, we demonstrate that the time required for initialization can be further shortened down to a few hundreds of picoseconds if we introduce a pillar-microcavity to promote the relaxation of a LH-trion state towards the desired ES state through the Purcell effect. We also clarify the role of heavy-hole and light-hole mixing induced transitions on the fidelity of ES state initialization.

  6. Gain recovery in a quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier and corresponding pattern effects in amplified optical signals at 1.5 μm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J; Jang, Y D; Baek, J S; Kim, N J; Yee, K J; Lee, H; Lee, D; Pyun, S H; Jeong, W G; Kim, J

    2012-03-12

    Fast gain recovery observed in quantum-dot semiconductor-optical-amplifiers (QDSOAs) is useful for amplifying high-speed optical signals. The small but finite slow recovery component can deteriorate the signal amplification due to the accumulation of gain saturation during 10 Gb/s operation. A study of the gain recoveries and pattern effects in signals amplified using a 1.5 μm InAs/InGaAsP QDSOA reveals that the gain recovery is always fast, and pattern-effect-free amplification is observed at the ground state. However, at the excited state, the slow component increases with the current, and significant pattern effects are observed. Simulations of the pattern effects agreed with the observed experimental trends.

  7. Simultaneous multichannel wavelength multicasting and XOR logic gate multicasting for three DPSK signals based on four-wave mixing in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jun; Lu, Guo-Wei; Sakamoto, Takahide; Akahane, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Wang, Danshi; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Hongxiang; Zhang, Min; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Ji, Yuefeng

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate simultaneous multichannel wavelength multicasting (MWM) and exclusive-OR logic gate multicasting (XOR-LGM) for three 10Gbps non-return-to-zero differential phase-shift-keying (NRZ-DPSK) signals in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA) by exploiting the four-wave mixing (FWM) process. No additional pump is needed in the scheme. Through the interaction of the input three 10Gbps DPSK signal lights in QD-SOA, each channel is successfully multicasted to three wavelengths (1-to-3 for each), totally 3-to-9 MWM, and at the same time, three-output XOR-LGM is obtained at three different wavelengths. All the new generated channels are with a power penalty less than 1.2dB at a BER of 10(-9). Degenerate and non-degenerate FWM components are fully used in the experiment for data and logic multicasting.

  8. Efficient charge transfer and field-induced tunneling transport in hybrid composite device of organic semiconductor and cadmium telluride quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varade, Vaibhav, E-mail: vaibhav.tvarade@gmail.com; Jagtap, Amardeep M.; Koteswara Rao, K. S. R.; Ramesh, K. P.; Menon, R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Anjaneyulu, P. [Department of Physics, Gitam University, Hyderabad 502329 (India)

    2015-06-07

    Temperature and photo-dependent current–voltage characteristics are investigated in thin film devices of a hybrid-composite comprising of organic semiconductor poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) and cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs). A detailed study of the charge injection mechanism in ITO/PEDOT:PSS-CdTe QDs/Al device exhibits a transition from direct tunneling to Fowler–Nordheim tunneling with increasing electric field due to formation of high barrier at the QD interface. In addition, the hybrid-composite exhibits a huge photoluminescence quenching compared to aboriginal CdTe QDs and high increment in photoconductivity (∼ 400%), which is attributed to the charge transfer phenomena. The effective barrier height (Φ{sub B} ≈ 0.68 eV) is estimated from the transition voltage and the possible origin of its variation with temperature and photo-illumination is discussed.

  9. Tailoring Magnetism in Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutic, Igor; Abolfath, Ramin; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2007-03-01

    We study magnetism in magnetically doped quantum dots as a function of particle numbers, temperature, confining potential, and the strength of Coulomb interaction screening. We show that magnetism can be tailored by controlling the electron-electron Coulomb interaction, even without changing the number of particles. The interplay of strong Coulomb interactions and quantum confinement leads to enhanced inhomogeneous magnetization which persists at substantially higher temperatures than in the non-interacting case or in the bulk-like dilute magnetic semiconductors. We predict a series of electronic spin transitions which arise from the competition between the many-body gap and magnetic thermal fluctuations. Cond-mat/0612489. [1] R. Abolfath, P. Hawrylak, I. Zuti'c, preprint.

  10. Heterovalent cation substitutional doping for quantum dot homojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrinadis, Alexandros; Rath, Arup K.; de Arquer, F. Pelayo García; Diedenhofen, Silke L.; Magén, César; Martinez, Luis; So, David; Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2013-12-01

    Colloidal quantum dots have emerged as a material platform for low-cost high-performance optoelectronics. At the heart of optoelectronic devices lies the formation of a junction, which requires the intimate contact of n-type and p-type semiconductors. Doping in bulk semiconductors has been largely deployed for many decades, yet electronically active doping in quantum dots has remained a challenge and the demonstration of robust functional optoelectronic devices had thus far been elusive. Here we report an optoelectronic device, a quantum dot homojunction solar cell, based on heterovalent cation substitution. We used PbS quantum dots as a reference material, which is a p-type semiconductor, and we employed Bi-doping to transform it into an n-type semiconductor. We then combined the two layers into a homojunction device operating as a solar cell robustly under ambient air conditions with power conversion efficiency of 2.7%.

  11. Nanodiamond-based nanostructures for coupling nitrogen-vacancy centres to metal nanoparticles and semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianxiao; Steinsultz, Nat; Ouyang, Min

    2016-06-01

    The ability to control the interaction between nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond and photonic and/or broadband plasmonic nanostructures is crucial for the development of solid-state quantum devices with optimum performance. However, existing methods typically employ top-down fabrication, which restrict scalable and feasible manipulation of nitrogen-vacancy centres. Here, we develop a general bottom-up approach to fabricate an emerging class of freestanding nanodiamond-based hybrid nanostructures with external functional units of either plasmonic nanoparticles or excitonic quantum dots. Precise control of the structural parameters (including size, composition, coverage and spacing of the external functional units) is achieved, representing a pre-requisite for exploring the underlying physics. Fine tuning of the emission characteristics through structural regulation is demonstrated by performing single-particle optical studies. This study opens a rich toolbox to tailor properties of quantum emitters, which can facilitate design guidelines for devices based on nitrogen-vacancy centres that use these freestanding hybrid nanostructures as building blocks.

  12. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole-dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon

  13. Single quantum dots fundamentals, applications, and new concepts

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapid growing field of semiconductor quantum dots by contributions from some of the most prominent researchers in the field. Special focus is given to the optical and electronic properties of single quantum dots due to their potential applications in devices operating with single electrons and/or single photons. This includes quantum dots in electric and magnetic fields, cavity-quantum electrodynamics, nonclassical light generation, and coherent optical control of excitons. Single Quantum Dots also addresses various growth techniques as well as potential device applications such as quantum dot lasers, and new concepts like a single-photon source, and a single quantum dot laser.

  14. SU(4) Kondo entanglement in double quantum dot devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonazzola, Rodrigo; Andrade, J. A.; Facio, Jorge I.; García, D. J.; Cornaglia, Pablo S.

    2017-08-01

    We analyze, from a quantum information theory perspective, the possibility of realizing an SU(4) entangled Kondo regime in semiconductor double quantum dot devices. We focus our analysis on the ground-state properties and consider the general experimental situation where the coupling parameters of the two quantum dots differ. We model each quantum dot with an Anderson-type Hamiltonian including an interdot Coulomb repulsion and tunnel couplings for each quantum dot to independent fermionic baths. We find that the spin and pseudospin entanglements can be made equal, and the SU(4) symmetry recovered, if the gate voltages are chosen in such a way that the average charge occupancies of the two quantum dots are equal, and the double occupancy on the double quantum dot is suppressed. We present density matrix renormalization group numerical results for the spin and pseudospin entanglement entropies, and analytical results for a simplified model that captures the main physics of the problem.

  15. A Self-Consistent Scheme for Optical Response of large Hybrid Networks of Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Plasmonic Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiellini, Bernardo; Hayati, L.; Lane, C.; Bansil, A.; Mosallaei, H.

    We discuss a self-consistent scheme for treating the optical response of large, hybrid networks of semiconducting quantum dots (SQDs) and plasmonic metallic nanoparticles (MNPs). Our method is efficient and scalable and becomes exact in the limiting case of weakly interacting SQDs. The self-consistent equations obtained for the steady state are analogous to the Heisenberg equations of motion for the density matrix of a SQD placed in an effective electric field computed within the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). Illustrative applications of the theory to square and honeycomb SQD, MNP and hybrid SDQ/MNP lattices as well as SQD-MNP dimers are presented. Our results demonstrate that hybrid SQD-MNP lattices can provide flexible platforms for light manipulation with tunable resonant characteristics.

  16. Self-consistent scheme for optical response of large hybrid networks of semiconductor quantum dots and plasmonic metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, L.; Lane, C.; Barbiellini, B.; Bansil, A.; Mosallaei, H.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss a self-consistent scheme for treating the optical response of large, hybrid networks of semiconducting quantum dots (SQDs) and plasmonic metallic nanoparticles (MNPs). Our method is efficient and scalable and becomes exact in the limiting case of weakly interacting SQDs. The self-consistent equations obtained for the steady state are analogous to the von Neumann equations of motion for the density matrix of a SQD placed in an effective electric field computed within the discrete dipole approximation. Illustrative applications of the theory to square and honeycomb SQD, MNP, and hybrid SDQ-MNP lattices as well as SQD-MNP dimers are presented. Our results demonstrate that hybrid SQD-MNP lattices can provide flexible platforms for light manipulation with tunable resonant characteristics.

  17. Spontaneous emission of semiconductor quantum dots in inverse opal SiO2 photonic crystals at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Yang, Yingshu; Wang, Yinghui; Gao, Jiechao; Sui, Ning; Chi, Xiaochun; Zou, Lu; Zhang, Han-Zhuang

    2016-02-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) infiltrated into inverse opal SiO2 photonic crystals (PCs) are systemically studied. The special porous structure of inverse opal PCs enhanced the thermal exchange rate between the CdSe QDs and their surrounding environment. Finally, inverse opal SiO2 PCs suppressed the nonlinear PL enhancement of CdSe QDs in PCs excited by a continuum laser and effectively modulated the PL characteristics of CdSe QDs in PCs at high temperatures in comparison with that of CdSe QDs out of PCs. The final results are of benefit in further understanding the role of inverse opal PCs on the PL characteristics of QDs.

  18. Cadmium telluride quantum dots advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Donegan, John

    2013-01-01

    Optical Properties of Bulk and Nanocrystalline Cadmium Telluride, Núñez Fernández and M.I. VasilevskiyAqueous Synthesis of Colloidal CdTe Nanocrystals, V. Lesnyak, N. Gaponik, and A. EychmüllerAssemblies of Thiol-Capped CdTe Nanocrystals, N. GaponikFörster Resonant Energy Transfer in CdTe Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Structures, M. Lunz and A.L. BradleyEmission of CdTe Nanocrystals Coupled to Microcavities, Y.P. Rakovich and J.F. DoneganBiological Applications of Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Quantum Dots, A. Le Cign

  19. Quantum theory of the optical and electronic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    This invaluable textbook presents the basic elements needed to understand and research into semiconductor physics. It deals with elementary excitations in bulk and low-dimensional semiconductors, including quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots. The basic principles underlying optical nonlinearities are developed, including excitonic and many-body plasma effects. Fundamentals of optical bistability, semiconductor lasers, femtosecond excitation, the optical Stark effect, the semiconductor photon echo, magneto-optic effects, as well as bulk and quantum-confined Franz-Keldysh effects, are covered. The material is presented in sufficient detail for graduate students and researchers with a general background in quantum mechanics.This fifth edition includes an additional chapter on 'Quantum Optical Effects' where the theory of quantum optical effects in semiconductors is detailed. Besides deriving the 'semiconductor luminescence equations' and the expression for the stationary luminescence spectrum, the resu...

  20. Free spin quantum computation with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, W M; Soo, C; Zhang, Wei-Min; Wu, Yin-Zhong; Soo, Chopin

    2005-01-01

    Taking the excess electron spin in a unit cell of semiconductor multiple quantum-dot structure as a qubit, we can implement scalable quantum computation without resorting to spin-spin interactions. The technique of single electron tunnelings and the structure of quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) are used to create a charge entangled state of two electrons which is then converted into spin entanglement states by using single spin rotations. Deterministic two-qubit quantum gates can also be manipulated using only single spin rotations with help of QCA. A single-short read-out of spin states can be realized by coupling the unit cell to a quantum point contact.

  1. Single quantum dot nanowire photodetectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kouwen, M.P.; Van Weert, M.H.M.; Reimer, M.E.; Akopian, N.; Perinetti, U.; Algra, R.E.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Zwiller, V.

    2010-01-01

    We report InP nanowire photodetectors with a single InAsP quantum dot as light absorbing element. With excitation above the InP band gap, the nanowire photodetectors are efficient (quantum efficiency of 4%). Under resonant excitation of the quantum dot, the photocurrent amplitude depends on the line

  2. Single quantum dot nanowire photodetectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kouwen, M.P.; Van Weert, M.H.M.; Reimer, M.E.; Akopian, N.; Perinetti, U.; Algra, R.E.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Zwiller, V.

    2010-01-01

    We report InP nanowire photodetectors with a single InAsP quantum dot as light absorbing element. With excitation above the InP band gap, the nanowire photodetectors are efficient (quantum efficiency of 4%). Under resonant excitation of the quantum dot, the photocurrent amplitude depends on the

  3. Nonlinear optical spectra having characteristics of Fano interferences in coherently coupled lowest exciton biexciton states in semiconductor quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Gotoh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Optical nonlinear effects are examined using a two-color micro-photoluminescence (micro-PL method in a coherently coupled exciton-biexciton system in a single quantum dot (QD. PL and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (PLE are employed to measure the absorption spectra of the exciton and biexciton states. PLE for Stokes and anti-Stokes PL enables us to clarify the nonlinear optical absorption properties in the lowest exciton and biexciton states. The nonlinear absorption spectra for excitons exhibit asymmetric shapes with peak and dip structures, and provide a distinct contrast to the symmetric dip structures of conventional nonlinear spectra. Theoretical analyses with a density matrix method indicate that the nonlinear spectra are caused not by a simple coherent interaction between the exciton and biexciton states but by coupling effects among exciton, biexciton and continuum states. These results indicate that Fano quantum interference effects appear in exciton-biexciton systems at QDs and offer important insights into their physics.

  4. A brief overview of some physical studies on the relaxation dynamics and Förster resonance energy transfer of semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Suparna; Patra, Amitava

    2013-08-26

    This article highlights some physical studies on the relaxation dynamics and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and the way these phenomena change with size, shape, and composition of the QDs. The understanding of the excited-state dynamics of photoexcited QDs is essential for technological applications such as efficient solar energy conversion, light-emitting diodes, and photovoltaic cells. Here, our emphasis is directed at describing the influence of size, shape, and composition of the QDs on their different relaxation processes, that is, radiative relaxation rate, nonradiative relaxation rate, and number of trap states. A stochastic model of carrier relaxation dynamics in semiconductor QDs was proposed to correlate with the experimental results. Many recent studies reveal that the energy transfer between the QDs and a dye is a FRET process, as established from 1/d(6) distance dependence. QD-based energy-transfer processes have been used in applications such as luminescence tagging, imaging, sensors, and light harvesting. Thus, the understanding of the interaction between the excited state of the QD and the dye molecule and quantitative estimation of the number of dye molecules attached to the surface of the QD by using a kinetic model is important. Here, we highlight the influence of size, shape, and composition of QDs on the kinetics of energy transfer. Interesting findings reveal that QD-based energy-transfer processes offer exciting opportunities for future applications. Finally, a tentative outlook on future developments in this research field is given.

  5. High performance polarization-independent Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifier with 22 dB fiber to fiber gain using Mode Propagation Tuning without additional polarization controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmani, Ali; Farhang, Mahmoud; Sheikhi, Mohammad H.

    2017-08-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of polarization-independent quantum dot InAs/GaAs semiconductor optical amplifier (PIQS) based on a technique called mode propagation tuning (MPT) without the need for the polarization controller (PC) is reported, which can solve the limitation caused by polarization sensitivity in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Our calculations show that by a suitable tuning of the thickness of the active layer, only the TE0 and TM0 modes can propagate. Moreover, the gain saturation behavior of this SOA was measured at 1.55 μ m and found to be polarization-independent (PI). At active layer thickness of 1.7 μ m, the confinement factor was 0.75 and 0.7 for TE0 and TM0 modes, respectively, which leads to a gain difference up to 0.1 dB. The rate equations of the QD-SOA were also solved and a fiber to fiber gain of 22 dB was obtained. Additionally, a numerical simulation is presented which shows that the residual gain ripple and polarization sensitivity are sufficiently reduced when residual facet reflectivities of the SOA are in the range below 10-4 . In addition, the full-width at half-maximum of the horizontal and vertical far-field patterns (FFPs) are measured as 30° × 30°. The proposed structure can be used for logical applications.

  6. Electrostatically defined silicon quantum dots with counted antimony donor implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M., E-mail: msingh@sandia.gov; Luhman, D. R.; Lilly, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87175 (United States); Pacheco, J. L.; Perry, D.; Garratt, E.; Ten Eyck, G.; Bishop, N. C.; Wendt, J. R.; Manginell, R. P.; Dominguez, J.; Pluym, T.; Bielejec, E.; Carroll, M. S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2016-02-08

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is crucial to donor spin quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor based quantum computing. In this work, a focused ion beam is used to implant antimony donors in 100 nm × 150 nm windows straddling quantum dots. Ion detectors are integrated next to the quantum dots to sense the implants. The numbers of donors implanted can be counted to a precision of a single ion. In low-temperature transport measurements, regular Coulomb blockade is observed from the quantum dots. Charge offsets indicative of donor ionization are also observed in devices with counted donor implants.

  7. Room-temperature dephasing in InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher;

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are receiving increasing attention for fundamental studies on zero-dimensional confinement and for device applications. Quantum-dot lasers are expected to show superior performances, like high material gain, low and temperature...... stacked layers of InAs-InGaAs-GaAs quantum dots....

  8. Quantum Dots in a Polymer Composite: A Convenient Particle-in-a-Box Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Charles V.; Giffin, Guinevere A.

    2008-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are at the forefront of materials science chemistry with applications in biological imaging and photovoltaic technologies. We have developed a simple laboratory experiment to measure the quantum-dot size from fluorescence spectra. A major roadblock of quantum-dot based exercises is the particle synthesis and handling;…

  9. Single-electron Spin Resonance in a Quadruple Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Amaha, Shinichi; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Allison, Giles; Ito, Takumi; Sugawara, Retsu; Noiri, Akito; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2016-08-01

    Electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots are good candidates of quantum bits for quantum information processing. Basic operations of the qubit have been realized in recent years: initialization, manipulation of single spins, two qubit entanglement operations, and readout. Now it becomes crucial to demonstrate scalability of this architecture by conducting spin operations on a scaled up system. Here, we demonstrate single-electron spin resonance in a quadruple quantum dot. A few-electron quadruple quantum dot is formed within a magnetic field gradient created by a micro-magnet. We oscillate the wave functions of the electrons in the quantum dots by applying microwave voltages and this induces electron spin resonance. The resonance energies of the four quantum dots are slightly different because of the stray field created by the micro-magnet and therefore frequency-resolved addressable control of each electron spin resonance is possible.

  10. Quantum dots for next-generation photovoltaics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavi E. Semonin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal quantum-confined semiconductor nanostructures are an emerging class of functional material that are being developed for novel solar energy conversion strategies. One of the largest losses in a bulk or thin film solar cell occurs within a few picoseconds after the photon is absorbed, as photons with energy larger than the semiconductor bandgap produce charge-carriers with excess kinetic energy, which is then dissipated via phonon emission. Semiconductor nanostructures, where at least one dimension is small enough to produce quantum confinement effects, provide new pathways for controlling energy flow and therefore have the potential to increase the efficiency of the primary photoconversion step. In this review, we provide the current status of research efforts towards utilizing the unique properties of colloidal quantum dots (nanocrystals confined in three dimensions in prototype solar cells and demonstrate that these unique systems have the potential to bypass the Shockley-Queisser single-junction limit for solar photon conversion.

  11. GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based non-volatile flash memory devices with InAs quantum dots as charge storage nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Sk Masiul, E-mail: masiulelt@gmail.com; Chowdhury, Sisir; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Nagabhushan, B.; Banerji, P. [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Chakraborty, S. [Applied Materials Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Sector-I, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Mukherjee, Rabibrata [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Ultra-thin InP passivated GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based non-volatile flash memory devices were fabricated using InAs quantum dots (QDs) as charge storing elements by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique to study the efficacy of the QDs as charge storage elements. The grown QDs were embedded between two high-k dielectric such as HfO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}, which were used for tunneling and control oxide layers, respectively. The size and density of the QDs were found to be 5 nm and 1.8×10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}, respectively. The device with a structure Metal/ZrO{sub 2}/InAs QDs/HfO{sub 2}/GaAs/Metal shows maximum memory window equivalent to 6.87 V. The device also exhibits low leakage current density of the order of 10{sup −6} A/cm{sup 2} and reasonably good charge retention characteristics. The low value of leakage current in the fabricated memory device is attributed to the Coulomb blockade effect influenced by quantum confinement as well as reduction of interface trap states by ultra-thin InP passivation on GaAs prior to HfO{sub 2} deposition.

  12. An Exciton Bound to a Neutral Donor in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解文方

    2002-01-01

    The binding energies for an exciton (X) trapped in a two-dimensional quantum dot by a neutral donor have been calculated using the method of few-body physics for the heavy hole (σ= 0.196) and the light hole (σr = 0.707).We find that the (D0, X) complex confined in a quantum dot has in general a larger binding energy than those in a two-dimensional quantum well and a three-dimensional bulk semiconductor, and the binding energy increases with the decrease of the dot radius. At dot radius R →∞, we compare our calculated result with the previous results.

  13. Single-photon superradiance from a quantum dot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tighineanu, Petru; Daveau, Raphaël Sura; Lehmann, Tau Bernstorff

    2016-01-01

    We report on the observation of single-photon superradiance from an exciton in a semiconductor quantum dot. The confinement by the quantum dot is strong enough for it to mimic a two-level atom, yet sufficiently weak to ensure superradiance. The electrostatic interaction between the electron...... temperature of our cryostat and may lead to oscillator strengths above 1000 from a single quantum emitter at optical frequencies....

  14. Theoretical analysis of four wave mixing in quantum dot optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    The four wave mixing properties of semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers have been investigated. The combination of strong non-equilibrium depletion of dot levels and a small linewidth enhancement factor results in efficient and symmetric four wave mixing....

  15. Manipulation of spin states in single II-VI-semiconductor quantum dots; Manipulation von Spinzustaenden in einzelnen II-VI-Halbleiter-Quantenpunkten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hundt, Andreas

    2007-10-09

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QD) are objects on the nanometer scale, where charge carriers are confined in all three dimensions. This leads to a reduced interaction with the semiconductor lattice and to a discrete density of states. The spin state of a particle defines the polarisation of the emitted light when relaxating to an energetically lower state. Spin exchange and optical transition selection rules (conservation law for spin) define the optical control of spin states. In the examined QD in II-VI seminconductor systems the large polar character of the bindings enables to observe particle interactions by spectroscopy of the photo-luminescence (PL), making QD attractive for basic research. This work subjects in its first part single negatively charged non-magnetic QD. The odd number of carriers allows to study the latter in an unpaired state. By using polarization-resolved micro-PL spectroscopy, the spin-states of single, isolated QD can be studied reproducibly. Of special interest are exchange interactions in this few-particle system named trion. By excitation spectroscopy energetically higher states can be identified and characterized. The exchange interactions appearing here lead to state mixing and fine structure patterns in the spectra. Couplings in excited hole states show the way to the optical orientation of the resident electron spin. The spin configuration of the trion triplet state can be used to optically control the resident electron spin. Semimagnetic QD are focused in the second part of this work. The interaction with a paramagnetic environment of manganese spins leads to new magneto-optical properties of the QD. They reveal on a single dot level by line broadening due to spin fluctuations and by the giant Zeeman effect of the dot ensemble. Of special interest in this context is the influence of the reduced system dimension and the relatively larger surface of the system on the exchange mechanisms. The strong temperature dependence of the spin

  16. Charge-tunnelling and self-trapping: common origins for blinking, grey-state emission and photoluminescence enhancement in semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, M. A.; Fisher, A. A. E.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding instabilities in the photoluminescence (PL) from light emitting materials is crucial to optimizing their performance for different applications. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer bright, size tunable emission, properties that are now being exploited in a broad range of developing technologies from displays and solar cells to biomaging and optical storage. However, instabilities such as photoluminescence intermittency, enhancement and bleaching of emission in these materials can be detrimental to their utility. Here, we report dielectric dependent blinking, intensity-``spikes'' and low-level, ``grey''-state emission, as well as PL enhancement in ZnS capped CdSe QDs; observations that we found consistent with a charge-tunnelling and self-trapping (CTST) description of exciton-dynamics on the QD-host system. In particular, modulation of PL in grey-states and PL enhancement are found to have a common origin in the equilibrium between exciton charge carrier core and surface-states within the CTST framework. Parameterized in terms of size and electrostatic properties of the QD and its nanoenvironment, the CTST offers predictive insight into exciton-dynamics in these nanomaterials.Understanding instabilities in the photoluminescence (PL) from light emitting materials is crucial to optimizing their performance for different applications. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer bright, size tunable emission, properties that are now being exploited in a broad range of developing technologies from displays and solar cells to biomaging and optical storage. However, instabilities such as photoluminescence intermittency, enhancement and bleaching of emission in these materials can be detrimental to their utility. Here, we report dielectric dependent blinking, intensity-``spikes'' and low-level, ``grey''-state emission, as well as PL enhancement in ZnS capped CdSe QDs; observations that we found consistent with a charge-tunnelling and self-trapping (CTST

  17. Colloidal quantum dot photodetectors

    KAUST Repository

    Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2011-05-01

    We review recent progress in light sensors based on solution-processed materials. Spin-coated semiconductors can readily be integrated with many substrates including as a post-process atop CMOS silicon and flexible electronics. We focus in particular on visible-, near-infrared, and short-wavelength infrared photodetectors based on size-effect-tuned semiconductor nanoparticles made using quantum-confined PbS, PbSe, Bi 2S3, and In2S3. These devices have in recent years achieved room-temperature D values above 1013 Jones, while fully-depleted photodiodes based on these same materials have achieved MHz response combined with 1012 Jones sensitivities. We discuss the nanoparticle synthesis, the materials processing, integrability, temperature stability, physical operation, and applied performance of this class of devices. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiation Effects in Nanostructures: Comparison of Proton Irradiation Induced Changes on Quantum Dots and Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, R.; Swift, G.; Magness, B.; Taylor, W.; Tang, Y.; Wang, K.; Dowd, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Successful implementation of technology using self-forming semiconductor Quantum Dots (QDs) has already demonstrated that temperature independent Dirac-delta density of states can be exploited in low current threshold QD lasers and QD infrared photodetectors.

  19. Fluorescence energy transfer in quantum dot/azo dye complexes in polymer track membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromova, Yulia A.; Orlova, Anna O.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2013-10-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in complexes of semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with molecules of heterocyclic azo dyes, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol and 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol, formed at high quantum dot concentration in the polymer pore track membranes were studied by steady-state and transient PL spectroscopy. The effect of interaction between the complexes and free quantum dots on the efficiency of the fluorescence energy transfer and quantum dot luminescence quenching was found and discussed.

  20. Quantum dot/glycol chitosan fluorescent nanoconjugates

    OpenAIRE

    Mansur, Alexandra AP; Herman S. Mansur

    2015-01-01

    In this study, novel carbohydrate-based nanoconjugates combining chemically modified chitosan with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) were designed and synthesised via single-step aqueous route at room temperature. Glycol chitosan (G-CHI) was used as the capping ligand aiming to improve the water solubility of the nanoconjugates to produce stable and biocompatible colloidal systems. UV-visible (UV–vis) spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spec...

  1. The Silicon:Colloidal Quantum Dot Heterojunction

    KAUST Repository

    Masala, Silvia

    2015-10-13

    A heterojunction between crystalline silicon and colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) is realized. A special interface modification is developed to overcome an inherent energetic band mismatch between the two semiconductors, and realize the efficient collection of infrared photocarriers generated in the CQD film. This junction is used to produce a sensitive near infrared photodetector. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. "Darker-than-black" PbS quantum dots: enhancing optical absorption of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals via short conjugated ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansante, Carlo; Infante, Ivan; Fabiano, Eduardo; Grisorio, Roberto; Suranna, Gian Paolo; Gigli, Giuseppe

    2015-02-11

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) stand among the most attractive light-harvesting materials to be exploited for solution-processed optoelectronic applications. To this aim, quantitative replacement of the bulky electrically insulating ligands at the QD surface coming from the synthetic procedure is mandatory. Here we present a conceptually novel approach to design light-harvesting nanomaterials demonstrating that QD surface modification with suitable short conjugated organic molecules permits us to drastically enhance light absorption of QDs, while preserving good long-term colloidal stability. Indeed, rational design of the pendant and anchoring moieties, which constitute the replacing ligand framework leads to a broadband increase of the optical absorbance larger than 300% for colloidal PbS QDs also at high energies (>3.1 eV), which could not be predicted by using formalisms derived from effective medium theory. We attribute such a drastic absorbance increase to ground-state ligand/QD orbital mixing, as inferred by density functional theory calculations; in addition, our findings suggest that the optical band gap reduction commonly observed for PbS QD solids treated with thiol-terminating ligands can be prevalently ascribed to 3p orbitals localized on anchoring sulfur atoms, which mix with the highest occupied states of the QDs. More broadly, we provide evidence that organic ligands and inorganic cores are inherently electronically coupled materials thus yielding peculiar chemical species (the colloidal QDs themselves), which display arising (opto)electronic properties that cannot be merely described as the sum of those of the ligand and core components.

  3. Quantum dots for terahertz generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H C; Aslan, B; Gupta, J A; Wasilewski, Z R; Aers, G C; SpringThorpe, A J; Buchanan, M [Institute for Microstructural Sciences, National Research Council, Ottawa, K1A 0R6 (Canada)], E-mail: h.c.liu@nrc.ca

    2008-09-24

    Nanostructures made of semiconductors, such as quantum wells and quantum dots (QD), are well known, and some have been incorporated in practical devices. Here we focus on novel structures made of QDs and related devices for terahertz (THz) generation. Their potential advantages, such as low threshold current density, high characteristic temperature, increased differential gain, etc, make QDs promising candidates for light emitting applications in the THz region. Our idea of using resonant tunneling through QDs is presented, and initial results on devices consisting of self-assembled InAs QDs in an undoped GaAs matrix, with a design incorporating a GaInNAs/GaAs short period superlattice, are discussed. Moreover, shallow impurities are also being explored for possible THz emission: the idea is based on the tunneling through bound states of individual donor or acceptor impurities in the quantum well. Initial results on devices having an AlGaAs/GaAs double-barrier resonant tunneling structure are discussed.

  4. Comparison of the noise performance of 10 GHz repetition rate quantum-dot and quantum well monolithic mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpintero, G.; Thompson, M. G.; Yvind, Kresten

    2011-01-01

    Mode-locked lasers are commonly used in carrier-wave signal generation systems because of their excellent phase noise performance. Owing to the importance of this key parameter, this study presents a like-for-like comparison of the noise performance of the passive mode-locked regime of two devices...... and the shape of the noise pedestals, both depending on the passive mode-locked bias conditions. Nevertheless, the dominant contribution of the RF linewidth to the phase noise, which is significantly narrower for the QD laser, makes this material more suitable for optical generation of low-noise millimetre...... fabricated with different material gain systems, one quantum well and the other quantum dot (QD), both with a monolithic all-active two-section mode-locked structure. Two important factors are identified as having a significant effect on the noise performance, the RF linewidth of the first harmonic...

  5. Charged-Exciton Complexes in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2001-01-01

    It is known experimentally that stable charged-exciton complexes can exist in low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures. Much less is known about the properties of such charged-exciton complexes since three-body problems are very difficult to be solved, even numerically. Here we introduce the correlated hyperspherical harmonics as basis functions to solve the hyperangular equation for negatively and positively charged excitons (trions) in a harmonic quantum dot. By using this method, we have calculated the energy spectra of the low-lying states of a charged exciton as a function of the radius of quantum dot. Based on symmetry analysis, the level crossover as the dot radius increases can be fully explained as the results of symmetry constraint.``

  6. Quadra-Quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules: Basic Nanostructures for Quantum Dot Cellular Automata Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called 'Droplet Epitaxy' has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390'C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7'8'10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200'C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or, which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  7. Quantum-Dot-Based Telecommunication-Wavelength Quantum Relay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwer, J.; Stevenson, R. M.; Skiba-Szymanska, J.; Ward, M. B.; Shields, A. J.; Felle, M.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Penty, R. V.

    2017-08-01

    The development of quantum relays for long-haul and attack-proof quantum communication networks operating with weak coherent laser pulses requires entangled photon sources at telecommunication wavelengths with intrinsic single-photon emission for most practical implementations. Using a semiconductor quantum dot emitting entangled photon pairs in the telecommunication O band, we demonstrate a quantum relay fulfilling both of these conditions. The system achieves a maximum fidelity of 94.5% for implementation of a standard four-state protocol with input states generated by a laser. We further investigate robustness against frequency detuning of the narrow-band input and perform process tomography of the teleporter, revealing operation for arbitrary pure input states, with an average gate fidelity of 83.6%. The results highlight the potential of semiconductor light sources for compact and robust quantum-relay technology that is compatible with existing communication infrastructures.

  8. Quantum Entanglement and Teleportation of Quantum-Dot States in Microcavities

    CERN Document Server

    Miranowicz, A; Liu, Yu-xi; Chimczak, G; Koashi, M; Imoto, N; 10.1380/ejssnt.2007.51

    2009-01-01

    Generation and control of quantum entanglement are studied in an equivalent-neighbor system of spatially-separated semiconductor quantum dots coupled by a single-mode cavity field. Generation of genuinely multipartite entanglement of qubit states realized by conduction-band electron-spin states in quantum dots is discussed. A protocol for quantum teleportation of electron-spin states via cavity decay is briefly described.

  9. Integrated superconducting detectors on semiconductors for quantum optics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniber, M.; Flassig, F.; Reithmaier, G.; Gross, R.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum photonic circuits can be used to efficiently generate, manipulate, route and exploit nonclassical states of light for distributed photon-based quantum information technologies. In this article, we review our recent achievements on the growth, nanofabrication and integration of high-quality, superconducting niobium nitride thin films on optically active, semiconducting GaAs substrates and their patterning to realize highly efficient and ultra-fast superconducting detectors on semiconductor nanomaterials containing quantum dots. Our state-of-the-art detectors reach external detection quantum efficiencies up to 20 % for ~4 nm thin films and single-photon timing resolutions <72 ps. We discuss the integration of such detectors into quantum dot-loaded, semiconductor ridge waveguides, resulting in the on-chip, time-resolved detection of quantum dot luminescence. Furthermore, a prototype quantum optical circuit is demonstrated that enabled the on-chip generation of resonance fluorescence from an individual InGaAs quantum dot, with a linewidth <15 μeV displaced by 1 mm from the superconducting detector on the very same semiconductor chip. Thus, all key components required for prototype quantum photonic circuits with sources, optical components and detectors on the same chip are reported.

  10. Semiconductor Quantum Rods as Single Molecule FluorescentBiological Labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Boussert, Benjamine; Koski, Kristie; Gerion, Daniele; Manna, Liberato; Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-05-29

    In recent years, semiconductor quantum dots have beenapplied with great advantage in a wide range of biological imagingapplications. The continuing developments in the synthesis of nanoscalematerials and specifically in the area of colloidal semiconductornanocrystals have created an opportunity to generate a next generation ofbiological labels with complementary or in some cases enhanced propertiescompared to colloidal quantum dots. In this paper, we report thedevelopment of rod shaped semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum rods) asnew fluorescent biological labels. We have engineered biocompatiblequantum rods by surface silanization and have applied them fornon-specific cell tracking as well as specific cellular targeting. Theproperties of quantum rods as demonstrated here are enhanced sensitivityand greater resistance for degradation as compared to quantum dots.Quantum rods have many potential applications as biological labels insituations where their properties offer advantages over quantumdots.

  11. Theoretical investigations of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier enabled intensity modulation of adaptively modulated optical OFDM signals in IMDD PON systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamié, A; Hamze, M; Wei, J L; Sharaiha, A; Tang, J M

    2011-12-05

    Extensive explorations are undertaken, for the first time, of the feasibility of utilizing quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier intensity modulators (QD-SOA-IMs) in cost-sensitive intensity-modulation and direct-detection (IMDD) passive optical network (PON) systems based on adaptively modulated optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (AMOOFDM). A theoretical QD-SOA-IM model is developed, based on which optimum QD-SOA-IM operating conditions are identified together with major physical mechanism considerably affecting the system performance. It is shown that, in comparison with previously reported SOA-IMs in similar transmission systems, QD-SOA-IMs cannot only considerably improve the AMOOFDM transmission performance but also broaden the dynamic range of optimum operating conditions. In particular, for achieving signal bit rates of >30Gb/s over >60km single mode fiber (SMF), QD-SOA-IMs offer a 10dB reduction in CW optical input powers injected into the modulators. In addition, QD-SOA-IMs can also be employed to compensate the chromatic dispersion effect.

  12. A method to form semiconductor quantum dot (QD) thin films by igniting a flame at air-liquid interface: CdS and WO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Aarti H; Patil, Sagar H; Sathaye, Shivaram D; Patil, Kashinath R

    2015-02-01

    We reveal an easy, inexpensive, efficient one stepflame synthesis of semiconductor/metal oxide thin films at air-liquid interface, subsequently, transferred on suitable substrate. The method has been illustrated by the formation of CdS and WO3 QDs thin films. The features of the present method are (1) Growth of thin films consisting of0.5-2.0nm sized Quantum Dots (QDs)/(ultra-small nanoparticles) in a short time, at the air-liquid interface which can be suitably transferred by a well-known Blodgett technique to an appropriate substrate, (2) The method is suitable to apply layer by layer (LbL) technique to increase the film thickness as well as forming various compositions as revealed by AFM measurements. The films are characterized for their structure (SAED), morphology (TEM), optical properties (UV-Vis.) and photoluminescence (PL). Possible mechanism of formation of QDs thin film and effect of capping in case of CdS QDs is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Semiconductor Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells Based on Ferricyanide/Ferrocyanide Redox Electrolyte Reaching an Open Circuit Photovoltage of 0.8 V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Rosemarie M; Makuta, Satoshi; Yonezu, Shota; Andrews, John; Tachibana, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-08

    Semiconductor quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) have rapidly been developed, and their efficiency has recently exceeded 9%. Their performances have mainly been achieved by focusing on improving short circuit photocurrent employing polysulfide electrolytes. However, the increase of open circuit photovoltage (VOC) cannot be expected with QDSSCs based on the polysulfide electrolytes owing to their relatively negative redox potential (around -0.65 V vs Ag/AgCl). Here, we demonstrate enhancement of the open circuit voltage by employing an alternative electrolyte, ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox couple. The solar cell performance was optimized by investigating the influence of ferricyanide and ferrocyanide concentration on their interfacial charge transfer and transport kinetics. The optimized ferricyanide/ferrocyanide species concentrations (0.01/0.2 M) result in solar energy conversion efficiency of 2% with VOC of 0.8 V. Since the potential difference between the TiO2 conduction band edge at pH 7 and the electrolyte redox potential is about 0.79 V, although the conduction band edge shifts negatively under the negative bias application into the TiO2 electrode, the solar cell with the optimized electrolyte composition has nearly reached the theoretical maximum voltage. This study suggests a promising method to optimize an electrolyte composition for maximizing solar energy conversion efficiency.

  14. Selective detection of luminescence from semiconductor quantum dots by nanosecond time-gated imaging with a colour-masked CCD detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A C; Dad, S; Morgan, C G

    2008-05-01

    Quantum dots are of considerable interest as highly detectable labels with broad absorption, narrow spectral emission and good quantum yields. The luminescence emission has a longer decay time than that of the most common fluorophores, leading to facile rejection of much background emission (such as autofluorescence from biological samples) by means of gated detection. Here, it is shown that a new technique, true-colour nanosecond time-gated luminescence imaging, can be used for selective detection of quantum dot luminescence and should prove valuable for multiplexed detection on the basis of both spectral emission profile and luminescence decay time.

  15. Light emission from Si quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe M. Fauchet

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Si quantum dots (QDs as small as ∼2 nm in diameter have been synthesized by a variety of techniques. Because of quantum confinement and the elimination of bulk or surface defects, these dots can emit light from the near infrared throughout the visible with quantum efficiencies in excess of 10%. The luminescence wavelength range has been extended to longer wavelengths by the addition of light-emitting rare earths such as erbium (Er. Light-emitting devices (LEDs have been fabricated and their performances are starting to approach those of direct band gap semiconductor or organic LEDs. A search for a Si QD-based laser is even under way. The state-of-the-art in the materials science, physics, and device development of luminescent Si QDs is reviewed and areas of future research are pointed out.

  16. Non-blinking quantum dot with a plasmonic nanoshell resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Botao; Giovanelli, Emerson; Habert, Benjamin; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Nasilowski, Michel; Xu, Xiangzhen; Lequeux, Nicolas; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Marquier, Francois; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Dubertret, Benoit

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are fluorescent nanocrystals exhibiting exceptional optical properties, but their emission intensity strongly depends on their charging state and local environment. This leads to blinking at the single-particle level or even complete fluorescence quenching, and limits the applications of quantum dots as fluorescent particles. Here, we show that a single quantum dot encapsulated in a silica shell coated with a continuous gold nanoshell provides a system with a stable and Poissonian emission at room temperature that is preserved regardless of drastic changes in the local environment. This novel hybrid quantum dot/silica/gold structure behaves as a plasmonic resonator with a strong Purcell factor, in very good agreement with simulations. The gold nanoshell also acts as a shield that protects the quantum dot fluorescence and enhances its resistance to high-power photoexcitation or high-energy electron beams. This plasmonic fluorescent resonator opens the way to a new family of plasmonic nanoemitters with robust optical properties.

  17. Quantum dots in diagnostics and detection: principles and paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanic, T R; Zhang, Y; Wang, T H

    2014-06-21

    Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that exhibit exceptional optical and electrical behaviors not found in their bulk counterparts. Following seminal work in the development of water-soluble quantum dots in the late 1990's, researchers have sought to develop interesting and novel ways of exploiting the extraordinary properties of quantum dots for biomedical applications. Since that time, over 10,000 articles have been published related to the use of quantum dots in biomedicine, many of which regard their use in detection and diagnostic bioassays. This review presents a didactic overview of fundamental physical phenomena associated with quantum dots and paradigm examples of how these phenomena can and have been readily exploited for manifold uses in nanobiotechnology with a specific focus on their implementation in in vitro diagnostic assays and biodetection.

  18. Semiconductor quantum optics with tailored photonic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laucht, Arne

    2011-06-15

    This thesis describes detailed investigations of the effects of photonic nanostructures on the light emission properties of self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots. Nanoscale optical cavities and waveguides are employed to enhance the interaction between light and matter, i.e. photons and excitons, up to the point where optical non-linearities appear at the quantum (single photon) level. Such non-linearities are an essential component for the realization of hardware for photon based quantum computing since they can be used for the creation and detection of non-classical states of light and may open the way to new genres of quantum optoelectronic devices such as optical modulators and optical transistors. For single semiconductor quantum dots in photonic crystal nanocavities we investigate the coupling between excitonic transitions and the highly localized mode of the optical cavity. We explore the non-resonant coupling mechanisms which allow excitons to couple to the cavity mode, even when they are not spectrally in resonance. This effect is not observed for atomic cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments and its origin is traced to phonon-assisted scattering for small detunings ({delta}E<{proportional_to}5 meV) and a multi-exciton-based, Auger-like process for larger detunings ({delta}E >{proportional_to}5 meV). For quantum dots in high-Q cavities we observe the coherent coupling between exciton and cavity mode in the strong coupling regime of light-matter interaction, probe the influence of pure dephasing on the coherent interaction at high excitation levels and high lattice temperatures, and examine the coupling of two spatially separated quantum dots via the exchange of real and virtual photons mediated by the cavity mode. Furthermore, we study the spontaneous emission properties of quantum dots in photonic crystal waveguide structures, estimate the fraction of all photons emitted into the propagating waveguide mode, and demonstrate the on-chip generation of

  19. Quantum dots as biophotonics tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar, Carlos L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of quantum dots (QDs) physics, applications, and perspectives. The main advantage of QDs over bulk semiconductors is the fact that the size became a control parameter to tailor the optical properties of new materials. Size changes the confinement energy which alters the optical properties of the material, such as absorption, refractive index, and emission bands. Therefore, by using QDs one can make several kinds of optical devices. One of these devices transforms electrons into photons to apply them as active optical components in illumination and displays. Other devices enable the transformation of photons into electrons to produce QDs solar cells or photodetectors. At the biomedical interface, the application of QDs, which is the most important aspect in this book, is based on fluorescence, which essentially transforms photons into photons of different wavelengths. This chapter introduces important parameters for QDs' biophotonic applications such as photostability, excitation and emission profiles, and quantum efficiency. We also present the perspectives for the use of QDs in fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), so useful in modern microscopy, and how to take advantage of the usually unwanted blinking effect to perform super-resolution microscopy.

  20. Controlling light-matter interaction with mesoscopic quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Lodahl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) enable efficient coupling between light and matter, which is useful in applications such as light-harvesting and all-solid-state quantum information processing. This coupling can be increased by placing QDs in nanostructured optical environments such as photonic...

  1. On-chip generation and guiding of quantum light from a site-controlled quantum dot

    CERN Document Server

    Jamil, Ayesha; Kalliakos, Sokratis; Schwagmann, Andre; Ward, Martin B; Brody, Yarden; Ellis, David J P; Farrer, Ian; Griffiths, Jonathan P; Jones, Geb A C; Ritchie, David A; Shields, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the emission and routing of single photons along a semiconductor chip originating from carrier recombination in an actively positioned InAs quantum dot. Device scale arrays of quantum dots are formed by a two step regrowth process. We precisely locate the propagating region of a unidirectional photonic crystal waveguide with respect to the quantum dot nucleation site. Under pulsed optical excitation, the multiphoton emission probability from the exit of the waveguide is 12 \\pm 5 % before any background correction. Our results are a major step towards the deterministic integration of a quantum emitter with the waveguiding components of photonic quantum circuits.

  2. On-chip generation and guiding of quantum light from a site-controlled quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, Ayesha; Farrer, Ian; Griffiths, Jonathan P.; Jones, Geb A. C.; Ritchie, David A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Skiba-Szymanska, Joanna; Kalliakos, Sokratis; Ward, Martin B.; Ellis, David J. P.; Shields, Andrew J., E-mail: andrew.shields@crl.toshiba.co.uk [Cambridge Research Laboratory, Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge, CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Schwagmann, Andre; Brody, Yarden [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Cambridge Research Laboratory, Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge, CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-10

    We demonstrate the emission and routing of single photons along a semiconductor chip originating from carrier recombination in an actively positioned InAs quantum dot. Device–scale arrays of quantum dots are formed by a two–step regrowth process. We precisely locate the propagating region of a unidirectional photonic crystal waveguide with respect to the quantum dot nucleation site. Under pulsed optical excitation, the multiphoton emission probability from the waveguide's exit is 12% ± 5% before any background correction. Our results are a major step towards the deterministic integration of a quantum emitter with the waveguiding components of photonic quantum circuits.

  3. Photoluminescence studies of single InGaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are considered a promising material system for future optical devices and quantum computers. We have studied the low-temperature photoluminescence properties of single InGaAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs. The high spatial resolution required for resolving single dots...... is obtained by exciting and detecting the photoluminescence through a microscope objective which is located inside the cryostat. Furthermore, e-beam lithography and mesa etching have been used to reduce the size of the detection area to a few hundred nanometers in diameter. These techniques allow us...

  4. Many-particle theory of optical properties in low-dimensional nanostructures. Dynamics in single-walled carbon nanotubes and semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malic, Ermin

    2008-09-02

    This work focuses on the theoretical investigation of optical properties of low-dimensional nanostructures, specifically single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs). The density-matrix formalism is applied to explain recent experimental results and to give insight into the underlying physics. A microscopic calculation of the absorption coefficient and the Rayleigh scattering cross section is performed by a novel approach combining the density-matrix formalism with the tight-binding wave functions. The calculated spectra of metallic nanotubes show a double-peaked structure resulting from the trigonal warping effect. The intensity ratios of the four lowest-lying transitions in both absorption and Rayleigh spectra can be explained by the different behavior of the optical matrix elements along the high-symmetry lines K-{gamma} and K-M. The Rayleigh line shape is predicted to be asymmetric, with an enhanced cross section for lower photon energies arising from non-resonant contributions of the optical susceptibility. Furthermore, the Coulomb interaction is shown to be maximal when the momentum transfer is low. For intersubband processes with a perpendicular momentum transfer, the coupling strength is reduced to less than 5%. The chirality and diameter dependence of the excitonic binding energy and the transition frequency are presented in Kataura plots. Furthermore, the influence of the surrounding environment on the optical properties of CNTs is investigated. Extending the confinement to all three spatial dimensions, semiconductor Bloch equation are derived to describe the dynamics in QD semiconductor lasers and amplifiers. A detailed microscopic analysis of the nonlinear turn-on dynamics of electrically pumped InAs/GaAs QD lasers is performed, showing the generation of relaxation oscillations on a nanosecond time scale in both the photon and charge carrier density. The theory predicts a strong damping of relaxation oscillations

  5. Optically induced phase transition of excitons in coupled quantum dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zi-Dong

    2008-01-01

    The weak classical light excitations in many semiconductor quantum dots have been chosen as important solidstate quantum systems for processing quantum information and implementing quantum computing. For strong classical light we predict theoretically a novel phase transition as a function of magnitude of this classical light from the deformed to the normal phases in resonance case, and the essential features of criticality such as the scaling behaviour, critical exponent and universality are also present in this paper.

  6. Universal Quantum Gates Based on Both Geometric and Dynamic Phases in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨开宇; 朱诗亮; 汪子丹

    2003-01-01

    A large-scalable quantum computer model, whose qubits are represented by the subspace subtended by the ground state and the single exciton state on semiconductor quantum dots, is proposed. A universal set of quantum gates in this system may be achieved by a mixed approach, composed of dynamic evolution and nonadiabatic geometric phase.

  7. Hydrophobin-Encapsulated Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Shohei; Sandiford, Lydia; Cooper, Maggie; Rosca, Elena V; Ahmad Khanbeigi, Raha; Fairclough, Simon M; Thanou, Maya; Dailey, Lea Ann; Wohlleben, Wendel; von Vacano, Bernhard; de Rosales, Rafael T M; Dobson, Peter J; Owen, Dylan M; Green, Mark

    2016-02-01

    The phase transfer of quantum dots to water is an important aspect of preparing nanomaterials that are suitable for biological applications, and although numerous reports describe ligand exchange, very few describe efficient ligand encapsulation techniques. In this report, we not only report a new method of phase transferring quantum dots (QDs) using an amphiphilic protein (hydrophobin) but also describe the advantages of using a biological molecule with available functional groups and their use in imaging cancer cells in vivo and other imaging applications.

  8. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.

    2008-08-19

    A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

  9. Quantum Dot Devices for Optical Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui

    . Additional to the static linear amplication properties, we focus on exploring the gain dynamics on the time scale ranging from sub-picosecond to nanosecond. In terms of optical signals that have been investigated, one is the simple sinusoidally modulated optical carrier with a typical modulation frequency...... range of 1-100 gigahertz. Our simulations reveal the role of ultrafast intradot carrier dynamics in enhancing modulation bandwidth of quantum dot semiconductor optical ampliers. Moreover, the corresponding coherent gain response also provides rich dispersion contents over a broad bandwidth. One...... important implementation is recently boosted by the research in slow light. The idea is to migrate such dynamical gain knowledge for the investigation of microwave phase shifter based on semiconductor optical waveguide. Our study reveals that phase shifting based on the conventional semiconductor optical...

  10. Efficient controlled-phase gate for single-spin qubits in quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meunier, T.; Calado, V.E.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Two-qubit interactions are at the heart of quantum information processing. For single-spin qubits in semiconductor quantum dots, the exchange gate has always been considered the natural two-qubit gate. The recent integration of a magnetic field or g-factor gradients in coupled quantum dot systems

  11. Quantum confined laser devices optical gain and recombination in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Blood, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The semiconductor laser, invented over 50 years ago, has had an enormous impact on the digital technologies that now dominate so many applications in business, commerce and the home. The laser is used in all types of optical fibre communication networks that enable the operation of the internet, e-mail, voice and skype transmission. Approximately one billion are produced each year for a market valued at around $5 billion. Nearly all semiconductor lasers now use extremely thin layers of light emitting materials (quantum well lasers). Increasingly smaller nanostructures are used in the form of quantum dots. The impact of the semiconductor laser is surprising in the light of the complexity of the physical processes that determine the operation of every device. This text takes the reader from the fundamental optical gain and carrier recombination processes in quantum wells and quantum dots, through descriptions of common device structures to an understanding of their operating characteristics. It has a consistent...

  12. Silicon quantum dots for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Chen, Song; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (or quantum dots, QDs) exhibit unique optical and electronic properties such as size-controlled fluorescence, high quantum yields, and stability against photobleaching. These properties allow QDs to be used as optical labels for multiplexed imaging and in drug delivery detection systems. Luminescent silicon QDs and surface-modified silicon QDs have also been developed as potential minimally toxic fluorescent probes for bioapplications. Silicon, a well-known power electronic semiconductor material, is considered an extremely biocompatible material, in particular with respect to blood. This review article summarizes existing knowledge related to and recent research progress made in the methods for synthesizing silicon QDs, as well as their optical properties and surface-modification processes. In addition, drug delivery systems and in vitro and in vivo imaging applications that use silicon QDs are also discussed.

  13. The Effect of Fatty Amine Chain Length on Synthesis Process of Inp/Zns Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining narrow size distribution through conventional methods used for quantum dots of group II-VI semiconductors is impractical in the case of III-V semiconductors speciallyInP/ZnS quantum dots because of molecular precursors depletion and growth stage continuation through Ostwald ripening process. Using fatty amines as activator along with precursors can lead to more monodispersed quantum dots. In this work, the effect of fatty amine chain length on InP/ZnS quantum dots synthesis was inve...

  14. Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Based on Blends of Conjugated Polymers with II–VI and IV–VI Inorganic Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Kisslinger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bulk heterojunction solar cells based on blends of quantum dots and conjugated polymers are a promising configuration for obtaining high-efficiency, cheaply fabricated solution-processed photovoltaic devices. Such devices are of significant interest as they have the potential to leverage the advantages of both types of materials, such as the high mobility, band gap tunability and possibility of multiple exciton generation in quantum dots together with the high mechanical flexibility and large molar extinction coefficient of conjugated polymers. Despite these advantages, the power conversion efficiency (PCE of these hybrid devices has remained relatively low at around 6%, well behind that of all-organic or all-inorganic solar cells. This is attributed to major challenges that still need to be overcome before conjugated polymer–quantum dot blends can be considered viable for commercial application, such as controlling the film morphology and interfacial structure to ensure efficient charge transfer and charge transport. In this work, we present our findings with respect to the recent development of bulk heterojunctions made from conjugated polymer–quantum dot blends, list the ongoing strategies being attempted to improve performance, and highlight the key areas of research that need to be pursued to further develop this technology.

  15. Optically active quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, Valerie; Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2015-10-01

    The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important optically active quantum dot (QD) based materials, study their properties and explore their biological applications. For the first time chiral II-VI QDs have been prepared by us using microwave induced heating with the racemic (Rac), D- and L-enantiomeric forms of penicillamine as stabilisers. Circular dichroism (CD) studies of these QDs have shown that D- and L-penicillamine stabilised particles produced mirror image CD spectra, while the particles prepared with a Rac mixture showed only a weak signal. It was also demonstrated that these QDs show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. These QDs have demonstrated highly specific chiral recognition of various biological species including aminoacids. The utilisation of chiral stabilisers also allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS nano-tetrapods, which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. Biological testing of chiral CdS nanotetrapods displayed a chiral bias for an uptake of the D- penicillamine stabilised nano-tetrapods by cancer cells. It is expected that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in nanobiotechnology, medicine and optical chemo- and bio-sensing.

  16. Fluorescence detection of the pathogenic bacteria Vibrio harveyi in solution and animal cells using semiconductor quantum dots

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Arshad, E.; Anas, A.; Aparna, A.; Jasmin, C.; Pai, S.S.; BrightSingh, I.S.; Mohandas, A.; Biju, V.

    millimetres under the skin owing to their NIR photoluminescence (PL), high-PL quantum yields, broadband absorption of light extending in the UV-Vis-NIR regions, large Stokes-shift, exceptional photostability, and large cross-section for one and two...

  17. Phonons in Quantum-Dot Quantum Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QINGuo-Yi

    2004-01-01

    Phonon modes of A1As/GaAs/A1As and GaAs/A1As/metal Pb quantum-dot quantum wells (QDQW's) with the whole scale up to 90 AО are calculated by using valence force field model (VFFM) based on group theory.Their optical frequency spectra are divided into two nonoverlapping bands, the AlAs-like band and the GaAs-like band,originated from and having frequency interval inside the bulk AlAs optical band and bulk GaAs optical band, respectively.The GaAs-LO (Г)-like modes of QDQW's that have maximum bulk GaAs-LO (Г) parentages in all modes covering thewhole frequency region and all symmetries have always A1 symmetry. Its frequency is controllable by adjusting thestructure parameters. In A1As/GaAs/A1As, it may be controlled to meet any designed frequency in GaAs-like band.The results on GaAs/A1As/metal Pb QDQW's show the same effect of reducing in interface optical phonons by using the metal/semiconductor interface revealed ever by macroscopic model The frequency spectra in both GaAs-like andAlAs-like optical phonon bands are independent of the thickness of Pb shell as long as the thickness of Pb shell is no less than 5 AО Defects at metal/A1As interface have significant influence to AlAs-like optical modes but have only minor influence to GaAs-like optical modes. All these results are important for the studying of the e-ph interaction in QD structures.

  18. Phonons in Quantum-Dot Quantum Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Guo-Yi

    2004-01-01

    Phonon modes of AlAs/GaAs/AlAs and GaAs/AlAs/metal Pb quantum-dot quantum wells (QDQW's)with the whole scale up to 90 A are calculated by using valence force field model (VFFM) based on group theory.Their optical frequency spectra are divided into two nonoverlapping bands, the AMs-like band and the GaAs-like band,originated from and having frequency interval inside the bulk AlAs optical band and bulk GaAs optical band, respectively.The GaAs-LO (F)-like modes of QDQW's that have maximum bulk GaAs-LO (F) parentages in all modes covering the whole frequency region and all symmetries have always A1 symmetry. Its frequency is controllable by adjusting the structure parameters. In AlAs/GaAs/AlAs, it may be controlled to meet any designed frequency in GaAs-like band.The results on GaAs/AMs/metal Pb QDQW's show the same effect of reducing in interface optical phonons by using the metal/semiconductor interface revealed ever by macroscopic model. The frequency spectra in both GaAs-like and AlAs-like optical phonon bands are independent of the thickness of Pb shell as long as the thickness of Pb shell is no less than 5 A. Defects at metal/AlAs interface have significant influence to AMs-like optical modes but have only minor influence to GaAs-like optical modes. All these results are important for the studying of the e-ph interaction in QD structures.

  19. Self-polarization in spherical quantum dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Dušanka P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The electronic structures of CdS quantum dot (QD with dielectric mismatch are calculated. Poisson equation is solved analitically in case of point charge placed inside semiconductor sphere embeded in dielectric matrix in case of different values of the dielectric permittivity of QD and matrix. The validity of the effective mass approximation for the conduction band is assumed. Schrödinger equation for one electron is solved analitically. On the basis of the Poisson equation solution self potential is examined and used as perturbation to calculate the self-polarization effect.

  20. 微腔增强发射的半导体量子点单光子源%Microcavity enhanced single-photon emission from single semiconductor quantum dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹硕; 许秀来

    2014-01-01

    单光子源是实现量子密匙分配、线性光学量子计算的基本单元。作者回顾了单光子源在量子信息科学发展中的作用,讨论了光子的统计特性,分析了具有类似原子二能级结构的半导体量子点作为单光子发射源的特点,介绍了微腔与二能级系统的耦合以及微腔量子电动力学基本原理。在弱耦合区,Purcell效应导致微腔中量子点激子复合寿命降低,因此可用微腔来改善量子点单光子发射效率。文章总结了近年来在半导体微腔增强量子点单光子发射领域的进展,探讨了分布式布拉格反射微腔、柱状微腔和光子晶体微腔等结构对改善半导体量子点单光子发射和收集效率、光子极化以及光子全同性等方面的作用,并对未来半导体量子点单光子源的发展进行了展望。%Single-photon sources are a basic resource for the implementation of quantum key distribution and linear optical-quantum computation. In this article, we review the photon statistical properties of light, in particular, single photons and their applications in quantum information science, semiconductor quantum dot based single-photon sources, and the principles of cavity quantum electrodynamics including the coupling between a two-level emitter and an optical cavity in the strong or weak coupling regime. In the weak coupling regime, the spontaneous emission rate can be enhanced by the cavity due to the Purcell effect. We then review the recent development of single-photon sources using single self-assembled quantum dots coupled with optical cavities. Semiconductor cavities employing distributed Bragg reflectors, micropillars and photonic crystals are used to enhance the repetition rate, collection efficiency, polarization and indistinguishability of single photons. Finally, future prospects of semiconductor quantum dot based single-photon sources are discussed.

  1. Mesoscopic Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics with Quantum Dots

    CERN Document Server

    Childress, L I; Lukin, M D

    2003-01-01

    We describe an electrodynamic mechanism for coherent, quantum mechanical coupling between spacially separated quantum dots on a microchip. The technique is based on capacitive interactions between the electron charge and a superconducting transmission line resonator, and is closely related to atomic cavity quantum electrodynamics. We investigate several potential applications of this technique which have varying degrees of complexity. In particular, we demonstrate that this mechanism allows design and investigation of an on-chip double-dot microscopic maser. Moreover, the interaction may be extended to couple spatially separated electron spin states while only virtually populating fast-decaying superpositions of charge states. This represents an effective, controllable long-range interaction, which may facilitate implementation of quantum information processing with electron spin qubits and potentially allow coupling to other quantum systems such as atomic or superconducting qubits.

  2. Approximate calculation of electronic energy levels of axially symmetric quantum dot and quantum ring by using energy dependent effective mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yu-Min; Yu Zhong-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of electronic structures about the semiconductor quantum dot and the semiconductor quantum ring are presented in this paper. To reduce the calculation costs, for the quantum dot and the quantum ring, their simplified axially symmetric shapes are utilized in our analysis. The energy dependent effective mass is taken into account in solving the Schrodinger equations in the single band effective mass approximation. The calculated results show that the energy dependent effective mass should be considered only for relatively small volume quantum dots or small quantum rings. For large size quantum materials, both the energy dependent effective mass and the parabolic effective mass can give the same results. The energy states and the effective masses of the quantum dot and the quantum ring as a function of geometric parameters are also discussed in detail.

  3. Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-30

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS " Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Devices" 6. AUTHOR(S) ,DftftLo3-91-6-oo 7 David K. Ferry 7. PERFORMING...OF ABSTRACT UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UL NZIN 1540-01-280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev 2-89) PrinCrlt>• oy ANSI SIC Z39-18 QUANTUM ... TRANSPORT IN SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Final Report on DAAL03-91-G-0067 (28461-EL) David K. Ferry, Principal Investigator Department of Electrical Engineering

  4. Nanoscale quantum-dot supercrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Turkov, Vadim K.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2013-09-01

    We develop a theory allowing one to calculate the energy spectra and wave functions of collective excitations in twoand three-dimensional quantum-dot supercrystals. We derive analytical expressions for the energy spectra of twodimensional supercrystals with different Bravias lattices, and use them to analyze the possibility of engineering the supercrystals' band structure. We demonstrate that the variation of the supercrystal's parameters (such as the symmetry of the periodic lattice and the properties of the quantum dots or their environment) enables an unprecedented control over its optical properties, thus paving a way towards the development of new nanophotonics materials.

  5. Generation of heralded entanglement between distant quantum dot hole spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delteil, Aymeric

    Entanglement plays a central role in fundamental tests of quantum mechanics as well as in the burgeoning field of quantum information processing. Particularly in the context of quantum networks and communication, some of the major challenges are the efficient generation of entanglement between stationary (spin) and propagating (photon) qubits, the transfer of information from flying to stationary qubits, and the efficient generation of entanglement between distant stationary (spin) qubits. In this talk, I will present such experimental implementations achieved in our team with semiconductor self-assembled quantum dots.Not only are self-assembled quantum dots good single-photon emitters, but they can host an electron or a hole whose spin serves as a quantum memory, and then present spin-dependent optical selection rules leading to an efficient spin-photon quantum interface. Moreover InGaAs quantum dots grown on GaAs substrate can profit from the maturity of III-V semiconductor technology and can be embedded in semiconductor structures like photonic cavities and Schottky diodes.I will report on the realization of heralded quantum entanglement between two semiconductor quantum dot hole spins separated by more than five meters. The entanglement generation scheme relies on single photon interference of Raman scattered light from both dots. A single photon detection projects the system into a maximally entangled state. We developed a delayed two-photon interference scheme that allows for efficient verification of quantum correlations. Moreover the efficient spin-photon interface provided by self-assembled quantum dots allows us to reach an unprecedented rate of 2300 entangled spin pairs per second, which represents an improvement of four orders of magnitude as compared to prior experiments carried out in other systems.Our results extend previous demonstrations in single trapped ions or neutral atoms, in atom ensembles and nitrogen vacancy centers to the domain of

  6. Dynamics of Entanglement between a Quantum Dot Spin Qubit and a Photon Qubit inside a Semiconductor High-Q Nanocavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Pascal Seigneur

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate in this paper the dynamics of entanglement between a QD spin qubit and a single photon qubit inside a quantum network node, as well as its robustness against various decoherence processes. First, the entanglement dynamics is considered without decoherence. In the small detuning regime (Δ=78 μeV, there are three different conditions for maximum entanglement, which occur after 71, 93, and 116 picoseconds of interaction time. In the large detuning regime (Δ=1.5 meV, there is only one peak for maximum entanglement occurring at 625 picoseconds. Second, the entanglement dynamics is considered with decoherence by including the effects of spin-nucleus and hole-nucleus hyperfine interactions. In the small detuning regime, a decent amount of entanglement (35% entanglement can only be obtained within 200 picoseconds of interaction. Afterward, all entanglement is lost. In the large detuning regime, a smaller amount of entanglement is realized, namely, 25%. And, it lasts only within the first 300 picoseconds.

  7. Hyperbolic metamaterials based on quantum-dot plasmon-resonator nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Ozel, T.; Mutlugun, E.

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate that nanocomposites made of colloidal semiconductor quantum dot monolayers placed between metal nanoparticle monolayers can function as multilayer hyperbolic metamaterials. Depending on the thickness of the spacer between the quantum dot and nanoparticle layers...... metamaterials are capable of increasing the radiative decay rate of emission centers inside them. The proposed theoretical framework can also be used to design quantum-dot/nanoplasmonic composites with optimized luminescence enhancement....

  8. Dynamically controlled charge sensing of a few-electron silicon quantum dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Yang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report charge sensing measurements of a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor quantum dot using a single-electron transistor as a charge sensor with dynamic feedback control. Using digitally-controlled feedback, the sensor exhibits sensitive and robust detection of the charge state of the quantum dot, even in the presence of charge drifts and random charge upset events. The sensor enables the occupancy of the quantum dot to be probed down to the single electron level.

  9. Quantum Dots Based Rad-Hard Computing and Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, A.; Klimeck, G.; Leon, R.; Qiu, Y.; Toomarian, N.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are solid-state structures made of semiconductors or metals that confine a small number of electrons into a small space. The confinement of electrons is achieved by the placement of some insulating material(s) around a central, well-conducting region. Thus, they can be viewed as artificial atoms. They therefore represent the ultimate limit of the semiconductor device scaling. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Nonlinear laser dynamics from quantum dots to cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Lüdge, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    A distinctive discussion of the nonlinear dynamical phenomena of semiconductor lasers. The book combines recent results of quantum dot laser modeling with mathematical details and an analytic understanding of nonlinear phenomena in semiconductor lasers and points out possible applications of lasers in cryptography and chaos control. This interdisciplinary approach makes it a unique and powerful source of knowledge for anyone intending to contribute to this field of research.By presenting both experimental and theoretical results, the distinguished authors consider solitary lase

  11. Spontaneous emission of quantum dots in disordered photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapienza, Luca; Nielsen, Henri Thyrrestrup; Stobbe, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    We report on the enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of single semiconductor quantum dots embedded in a photonic crystal waveguide with engineered disorder. Random high-Q cavities, that are signature of Anderson localization, are measured in photoluminescence experiments and appear...

  12. Slow light in quantum dot photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Roland; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of pulse propagation in a semiconductor quantum dot photonic crystal waveguide in the regime of electromagnetically induced transparency is presented. The slow light mechanism considered here is based on both material and waveguide dispersion. The group index n...

  13. Quantum dot amplifiers with high output power and low noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    Quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers have been theoretically investigated and are predicted to achieve high saturated output power, large gain, and low noise figure. We discuss the device dynamics and, in particular, show that the presence of highly inverted barrier states does not limit ...

  14. Site-controlled quantum dots coupled to photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigal, B.; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Jarlov, C.;

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate selective optical coupling of multiple, site controlled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) to photonic crystal waveguide structures. The impact of the exact position and emission spectrum of the QDs on the coupling efficiency is elucidated. The influence of optical disorder and end...

  15. Imaging dynamic cellular events with quantum dots The bright future

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Andrew M.; Wen, Mary M.; Nie, Shuming

    2010-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are tiny light-emitting particles that have emerged as a new class of fluorescent labels for biology and medicine. Compared with traditional fluorescent probes, QDs have unique optical and electronic properties such as size-tuneable light emission, narrow and symmetric emission spectra, and broad absorption spectra that enable the simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colours.

  16. Quantum dot display enhances activity of a phosphotriesterase trimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, Joyce C; Walper, Scott A; Oh, Eunkeu; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-04-14

    Phosphotriesterase was engineered into a spontaneously forming trimer by appending it to a synthetic collagen-like triple-helix motif. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the insecticide and organophosphate nerve agent simulant paraoxon was then examined. Assembling the phosphotriesterase trimer onto semiconductor quantum dots increased the enzyme's catalytic rate and efficiency.

  17. Single-Photon Superradiance from a Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighineanu, Petru; Daveau, Raphaël S.; Lehmann, Tau B.; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.; Lodahl, Peter; Stobbe, Søren

    2016-04-01

    We report on the observation of single-photon superradiance from an exciton in a semiconductor quantum dot. The confinement by the quantum dot is strong enough for it to mimic a two-level atom, yet sufficiently weak to ensure superradiance. The electrostatic interaction between the electron and the hole comprising the exciton gives rise to an anharmonic spectrum, which we exploit to prepare the superradiant quantum state deterministically with a laser pulse. We observe a fivefold enhancement of the oscillator strength compared to conventional quantum dots. The enhancement is limited by the base temperature of our cryostat and may lead to oscillator strengths above 1000 from a single quantum emitter at optical frequencies.

  18. A Complete Physical Germanium-on-Silicon Quantum Dot Self-Assembly Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhatib, Amro; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2013-06-01

    Achieving quantum dot self-assembly at precise pre-defined locations is of vital interest. In this work, a novel physical method for producing germanium quantum dots on silicon using nanoindentation to pre-define nucleation sites is described. Self-assembly of ordered ~10 nm height germanium quantum dot arrays on silicon substrates is achieved. Due to the inherent simplicity and elegance of the proposed method, the results describe an attractive technique to manufacture semiconductor quantum dot structures for future quantum electronic and photonic applications.

  19. Spin storage in quantum dot ensembles and single quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, Dominik

    2009-10-15

    This thesis deals with the investigation of spin relaxation of electrons and holes in small ensembles of self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques. Furthermore, a method to detect the spin orientation in a single quantum dot was developed in the framework of this thesis. A spin storage device was used to optically generate oriented electron spins in small frequency selected quantum dot ensembles using circularly polarized optical excitation. The spin orientation can be determined by the polarization of the time delayed electroluminescence signal generated by the device after a continuously variable storage time. The degree of spin polarized initialization was found to be limited to 0.6 at high magnetic fields, where anisotropic effects are compensated. The spin relaxation was directly measured as a function of magnetic field, lattice temperature and s-shell transition energy of the quantum dot by varying the spin storage time up to 30 ms. Very long spin lifetimes are obtained with a lower limit of T{sub 1}=20 ms at B=4 T and T=1 K. A strong magnetic field dependence T{sub 1}{proportional_to}B{sup -5} has been observed for low temperatures of T=1 K which weakens as the temperature is increased. In addition, the temperature dependence has been determined with T{sub 1}{proportional_to}T{sup -1}. The characteristic dependencies on magnetic field and temperature lead to the identification of the spin relaxation mechanism, which is governed by spin-orbit coupling and mediated by single phonon scattering. This finding is qualitatively supported by the energy dependent measurements. The investigations were extended to a modified device design that enabled studying the spin relaxation dynamics of heavy holes in self-assembled quantum dots. The measurements show a polarization memory effect for holes with up to 0.1 degree of polarization. Furthermore, investigations of the time dynamics of the hole spin relaxation reveal surprisingly long lifetimes T{sub 1}{sup h

  20. Nuclear Spins in Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erlingsson, S.I.

    2003-01-01

    The main theme of this thesis is the hyperfine interaction between the many lattice nuclear spins and electron spins localized in GaAs quantum dots. This interaction is an intrinsic property of the material. Despite the fact that this interaction is rather weak, it can, as shown in this thesis, stro

  1. Semiconductor nanoparticles for quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, Victor; Carrara, Sandro; Amenitch, H.; Bernstorff, S.; Nicolini, Claudio

    1998-09-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles were synthesized by exposing fatty acid salt Langmuir-Blodgett films to the atmosphere of 0957-4484/9/3/004/img8. The particle sizes were characterized by small-angle x-ray scattering of their solutions using synchrotron radiation source at higher resolution, as it was impossible previously to study it with usual laboratory x-ray sources. The particle sizes were found to correspond with the demands of single-electron and quantum junctions. Semiconductor heterostructures were grown by self-aggregation of these particles of different types. Electrical properties of these nanostructures were studied by using STM. Voltage-current characteristics revealed the presence of differential negative resistance. Measurements confirmed the formation of semiconductor superlattices directed towards a development of new nanodevices, such as tunnelling diodes and semiconductor lasers.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of an undoped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming, E-mail: maaxiao@ustc.edu.cn; You, Jie; Wei, Da; Tu, Tao; Guo, Guang-Can; Guo, Guo-Ping, E-mail: gpguo@ustc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, CAS, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Jiang, Hong-Wen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    We demonstrate the development of a double quantum dot with an integrated charge sensor fabricated in undoped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures using a double top-gated design. Based on the evaluation of the integrated charge sensor, the double quantum dot can be tuned to a few-electron region. Additionally, the inter-dot coupling of the double quantum dot can be tuned to a large extent according to the voltage on the middle gate. The quantum dot is shown to be tunable from a single dot to a well-isolated double dot. To assess the stability of such design, the potential fluctuation induced by 1/f noise was measured. Based on the findings herein, the quantum dot design developed in the undoped GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor shows potential for the future exploitation of nano-devices.

  3. Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching of semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Wang, George T.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical (QSC-PEC) etching provides a new route to the precision fabrication of epitaxial semiconductor nanostructures in the sub-10-nm size regime. For example, quantum dots (QDs) can be QSC-PEC-etched from epitaxial InGaN thin films using narrowband laser photoexcitation, and the QD sizes (and hence bandgaps and photoluminescence wavelengths) are determined by the photoexcitation wavelength.

  4. Brightness-equalized quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sung Jun; Zahid, Mohammad U.; Le, Phuong; Ma, Liang; Entenberg, David; Harney, Allison S.; Condeelis, John; Smith, Andrew M.

    2015-10-01

    As molecular labels for cells and tissues, fluorescent probes have shaped our understanding of biological structures and processes. However, their capacity for quantitative analysis is limited because photon emission rates from multicolour fluorophores are dissimilar, unstable and often unpredictable, which obscures correlations between measured fluorescence and molecular concentration. Here we introduce a new class of light-emitting quantum dots with tunable and equalized fluorescence brightness across a broad range of colours. The key feature is independent tunability of emission wavelength, extinction coefficient and quantum yield through distinct structural domains in the nanocrystal. Precise tuning eliminates a 100-fold red-to-green brightness mismatch of size-tuned quantum dots at the ensemble and single-particle levels, which substantially improves quantitative imaging accuracy in biological tissue. We anticipate that these materials engineering principles will vastly expand the optical engineering landscape of fluorescent probes, facilitate quantitative multicolour imaging in living tissue and improve colour tuning in light-emitting devices.

  5. Detection and correction of blinking bias in image correlation transport measurements of quantum dot tagged macromolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durisic, Nela; Bachir, Alexia I; Kolin, David L;

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are becoming widely used as fluorescent labels for biological applications. Here we demonstrate that fluorescence fluctuation analysis of their diffusional mobility using temporal image correlation spectroscopy is highly susceptible to systematic e...

  6. An integrated approach to realizing high-performance liquid-junction quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDaniel, Hunter; Fuke, Nobuhiro; Makarov, Nikolay S; Pietryga, Jeffrey M; Klimov, Victor I

    2013-01-01

    Solution-processed semiconductor quantum dot solar cells offer a path towards both reduced fabrication cost and higher efficiency enabled by novel processes such as hot-electron extraction and carrier multiplication...

  7. Rapid adiabatic passage in quantum dots: Influence of scattering and dephasing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuh, K.; Jahnke, F.; Lorke, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical investigations for the realization of population inversion of semiconductor quantum dot ground-state transitions by means of adiabatic passage with chirped optical pulses are presented. While the inversion due to Rabi oscillations depends sensitively on the resonance condition...

  8. Carrier multiplication and exciton behavior in PbSe quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuan Trinh, M.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of excited electronic states in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is of fundamental scientific interest and is important for application in lasers, optical detectors, LEDs, solar cells, photocatalysis, biomedical imaging, photodynamic therapy etc. In the past few years, carrier multiplicati

  9. A single-electron probe for buried optically active quantum dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nakaoka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple method that enables both single electron transport through a self-assembled quantum dot and photon emission from the dot. The quantum dot buried in a semiconductor matrix is electrically connected with nanogap electrodes through tunneling junctions formed by a localized diffusion of the nanogap electrode metals. Coulomb blockade stability diagrams for the optically-active dot are clearly resolved at 4.2 K. The position of the quantum dot energy levels with respect to the contact Fermi level is controlled by the kind of metal atoms diffused from the nanogap electrodes.

  10. Colloidal quantum dots: synthesis, properties and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brichkin, S. B.; Razumov, V. F.

    2016-12-01

    Key recent results obtained in studies of a new class of luminophores, colloidal quantum dots, are analyzed. Modern methods for the synthesis and post-synthetic treatment of colloidal quantum dots that make it possible to achieve record high quantum yield of luminescence and to modify their characteristics for specific applications are considered. Currently important avenues of research on colloidal quantum dots and the problems in and prospects for their practical applications in various fields are discussed. The bibliography includes 272 references.

  11. Bright infrared quantum-dot light-emitting diodes through inter-dot spacing control

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng

    2012-05-06

    Infrared light-emitting diodes are currently fabricated from direct-gap semiconductors using epitaxy, which makes them expensive and difficult to integrate with other materials. Light-emitting diodes based on colloidal semiconductor quantum dots, on the other hand, can be solution-processed at low cost, and can be directly integrated with silicon. However, so far, exciton dissociation and recombination have not been well controlled in these devices, and this has limited their performance. Here, by tuning the distance between adjacent PbS quantum dots, we fabricate thin-film quantum-dot light-emitting diodes that operate at infrared wavelengths with radiances (6.4 W sr \\'1 m \\'2) eight times higher and external quantum efficiencies (2.0%) two times higher than the highest values previously reported. The distance between adjacent dots is tuned over a range of 1.3 nm by varying the lengths of the linker molecules from three to eight CH 2 groups, which allows us to achieve the optimum balance between charge injection and radiative exciton recombination. The electroluminescent powers of the best devices are comparable to those produced by commercial InGaAsP light-emitting diodes. By varying the size of the quantum dots, we can tune the emission wavelengths between 800 and 1,850 nm.© 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  12. Bright infrared quantum-dot light-emitting diodes through inter-dot spacing control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liangfeng; Choi, Joshua J; Stachnik, David; Bartnik, Adam C; Hyun, Byung-Ryool; Malliaras, George G; Hanrath, Tobias; Wise, Frank W

    2012-05-06

    Infrared light-emitting diodes are currently fabricated from direct-gap semiconductors using epitaxy, which makes them expensive and difficult to integrate with other materials. Light-emitting diodes based on colloidal semiconductor quantum dots, on the other hand, can be solution-processed at low cost, and can be directly integrated with silicon. However, so far, exciton dissociation and recombination have not been well controlled in these devices, and this has limited their performance. Here, by tuning the distance between adjacent PbS quantum dots, we fabricate thin-film quantum-dot light-emitting diodes that operate at infrared wavelengths with radiances (6.4 W sr(-1) m(-2)) eight times higher and external quantum efficiencies (2.0%) two times higher than the highest values previously reported. The distance between adjacent dots is tuned over a range of 1.3 nm by varying the lengths of the linker molecules from three to eight CH(2) groups, which allows us to achieve the optimum balance between charge injection and radiative exciton recombination. The electroluminescent powers of the best devices are comparable to those produced by commercial InGaAsP light-emitting diodes. By varying the size of the quantum dots, we can tune the emission wavelengths between 800 and 1,850 nm.

  13. Quantum Computer Using Coupled Quantum Dot Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, N J; Natori, A; Yasunaga, H; Wu*, Nan-Jian

    1999-01-01

    We propose a method for implementation of a quantum computer using artificial molecules. The artificial molecule consists of two coupled quantum dots stacked along z direction and one single electron. One-qubit and two-qubit gates are constructed by one molecule and two coupled molecules, respectively.The ground state and the first excited state of the molecule are used to encode the |0> and |1> states of a qubit. The qubit is manipulated by a resonant electromagnetic wave that is applied directly to the qubit through a microstrip line. The coupling between two qubits in a quantum controlled NOT gate is switched on (off) by floating (grounding) the metal film electrodes. We study the operations of the gates by using a box-shaped quantum dot model and numerically solving a time-dependent Schridinger equation, and demonstrate that the quantum gates can perform the quantum computation. The operating speed of the gates is about one operation per 4ps. The reading operation of the output of the quantum computer can...

  14. Quantum Confined Semiconductors for High Efficiency Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures, where at least one dimension is small enough to produce quantum confinement effects, provide new pathways for controlling energy flow and therefore have the potential to increase the efficiency of the primary photon-to-free energy conversion step. In this discussion, I will present the current status of research efforts towards utilizing the unique properties of colloidal quantum dots (NCs confined in three dimensions) in prototype solar cells and demonstrate that these unique systems have the potential to bypass the Shockley-Queisser single-junction limit for solar photon conversion. The solar cells are constructed using a low temperature solution based deposition of PbS or PbSe QDs as the absorber layer. Different chemical treatments of the QD layer are employed in order to obtain good electrical communication while maintaining the quantum-confined properties of the QDs. We have characterized the transport and carrier dynamics using a transient absorption, time-resolved THz, and temperature-dependent photoluminescence. I will discuss the interplay between carrier generation, recombination, and mobility within the QD layers. A unique aspect of our devices is that the QDs exhibit multiple exciton generation with an efficiency that is ~ 2 to 3 times greater than the parental bulk semiconductor.

  15. Guest Editorial: Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-24

    cost of infrared imaging systems by enabling cryogenic dewars and Stirling cooling systems to be replaced by thermo-electric coolers . The QDIP...and moderate to high bandwidth semiconductor lasers in the 0.85- to 1.5-mm wavelength range mainly based on the InGaAs system . Advances such as

  16. Breakdown of the dipole approximation for large quantum dot emitters coupled to an interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Johansen, Jeppe; Löffler, A.

    2008-01-01

    We measured time-resolved photoluminescence from large quantum dots near a semiconductor-air interface. Far from the interface our data are consistent with dipole theory, but near the interface they question the validity of the dipole approximation.......We measured time-resolved photoluminescence from large quantum dots near a semiconductor-air interface. Far from the interface our data are consistent with dipole theory, but near the interface they question the validity of the dipole approximation....

  17. Theoretical analysis of quantum dot amplifiers with high saturation power and low noise figure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers are predicted to exhibit superior characteristics such as high gain, and output power and low noise. The analysis provides criteria and design guidelines for the realization of high quality amplifiers.......Semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers are predicted to exhibit superior characteristics such as high gain, and output power and low noise. The analysis provides criteria and design guidelines for the realization of high quality amplifiers....

  18. Thermoelectric energy harvesting with quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sothmann, Björn; Sánchez, Rafael; Jordan, Andrew N

    2015-01-21

    We review recent theoretical work on thermoelectric energy harvesting in multi-terminal quantum-dot setups. We first discuss several examples of nanoscale heat engines based on Coulomb-coupled conductors. In particular, we focus on quantum dots in the Coulomb-blockade regime, chaotic cavities and resonant tunneling through quantum dots and wells. We then turn toward quantum-dot heat engines that are driven by bosonic degrees of freedom such as phonons, magnons and microwave photons. These systems provide interesting connections to spin caloritronics and circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  19. Quantum dots – a versatile tool in plant science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Frank; Houben, Andreas; Barker, Peter E; Xiao, Yan; Käs, Josef A; Melzer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    An optically stable, novel class of fluorophores (quantum dots) for in situ hybridisation analysis was tested to investigate their signal stability and intensity in plant chromosome analyses. Detection of hybridisation sites in situ was based on fluorescence from streptavidin-linked inorganic crystals of cadmium selenide. Comparison of quantum dots (QDs) with conventional detection systems (Alexa 488) in immunolabeling experiments demonstrated greater sensitivity than the conventional system. In contrast, detection of QDs in in situ hybridisation of several plant chromosomes, using several high-copy sequences, was less sensitve than Alexa 488. Thus, semiconductor nanocrystal fluorophores are more suitable for immunostaining but not for in situ hybridisation of plant chromosomes. PMID:16776835

  20. Reentrant formation of magnetic polarons in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pientka, J. M.; Oszwałdowski, R.; Petukhov, A. G.; Han, J. E.; Žutić, Igor

    2012-10-01

    We propose a model of magnetic polaron formation in semiconductor quantum dots doped with magnetic ions. A wetting layer serves as a reservoir of photogenerated holes, which can be trapped by the adjacent quantum dots. For certain hole densities, the temperature dependence of the magnetization induced by the trapped holes is reentrant: it disappears for some temperature range and reappears at higher temperatures. We demonstrate that this peculiar effect is not an artifact of the mean-field approximation and persists after statistical spin fluctuations are accounted for. We predict fingerprints of reentrant magnetic polarons in photoluminescence spectra.