WorldWideScience

Sample records for quantum cryptography network

  1. Quantum Cryptography in Spin Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Hong-Liang; FANG Xi-Ming

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new scheme of long-distance quantum cryptography based on spin networks with qubits stored in electron spins of quantum dots. By conditional Faraday rotation, single photon polarization measurement, and quantum state transfer, maximal-entangled Bell states for quantum cryptography between two long-distance parties are created. Meanwhile, efficient quantum state transfer over arbitrary distances is obtained in a spin chain by a proper choice of coupling strengths and using spin memory technique improved. We also analyse the security of the scheme against the cloning-based attack which can be also implemented in spin network and discover that this spin network cloning coincides with the optimal fidelity achieved by an eavesdropper for entanglement-based cryptography.

  2. Quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, R J; Dyer, P L; Luther, G G; Morgan, G L; Schauer, M M; Hughes, Richard J; Dyer, P; Luther, G G; Morgan, G L; Schauer, M

    1995-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is a new method for secret communications offering the ultimate security assurance of the inviolability of a Law of Nature. In this paper we shall describe the theory of quantum cryptography, its potential relevance and the development of a prototype system at Los Alamos, which utilises the phenomenon of single-photon interference to perform quantum cryptography over an optical fiber communications link.

  3. Quantum cryptography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehr, S.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum cryptography makes use of the quantum-mechanical behavior of nature for the design and analysis of cryptographic schemes. Optimally (but not always), quantum cryptography allows for the design of cryptographic schemes whose security is guaranteed solely by the laws of nature. This is in shar

  4. Integration of Quantum Cryptography through Satellite Networks Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skander Aris

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The security of the telecommunications satellite has become a crucial issue. The telecommunications can be set using the classical cryptography. But this so-called classical cryptography provides cryptographic security. This means that security is based on the difficulty of some mathematics problems. On the other hand, quantum cryptography provides security without conditions based on the law of quantum physics. This method, called the theoretic information security is evidenced using the theory of information. Approach: In this study, we study whether quantum cryptography can be applied in the frame of the satellite telecommunications network. To do this in our project, we present theories regarding the following issues: Telecommunications Station and Satellite Communication Networks, Quantum Key Distribution, Open Space and Satellites, Analyses in different Scenarios between the Satellite and Earth station. Results: Quantum communications offers many advantages for secure data transmission, in our implementation study, we presented different scenarios of quantum key exchange between satellites and ground stations for possible approach to subsystem with quantum communication in space, capable of generating and detecting entangled photons as well as faint laser pulses. Conclusion: The use of satellites to distribute quantum photon provides a unique solution for long-distance. Moreover, quantum cryptography is a satisfactory solution to improve the safety problem. So, the quantum transmissions are the future of telecommunications.

  5. FRAMEWORK FOR WIRELESS NETWORK SECURITY USING QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Bhatia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Data that is transient over an unsecured wireless network is always susceptible to being intercepted by anyone within the range of the wireless signal. Hence providing secure communication to keep the user’s information and devices safe when connected wirelessly has become one of the major concerns. Quantum cryptography provides a solution towards absolute communication security over the network by encoding information as polarized photons, which can be sent through the air. This paper explores on the aspect of application of quantum cryptography in wireless networks. In this paper we present a methodology for integrating quantum cryptography and security of IEEE 802.11 wireless networks in terms of distribution of the encryption keys

  6. Field Experiment on a Robust Hierarchical Metropolitan Quantum Cryptography Network

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Fangxing; Wang, Shuang; Yin, Zhenqiang; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Yun; Zhou, Zheng; Zhao, Yibo; Li, Hongwei; Liu, Dong; Han, Zhengfu; Guo, Guangcan

    2009-01-01

    A hierarchical metropolitan quantum cryptography network upon the inner-city commercial telecom fiber cables is reported in this paper. The seven-user network contains a four-node backbone net with one node acting as the subnet gateway, a two-user subnet and a single-fiber access link, which is realized by the Faraday-Michelson Interferometer set-ups. The techniques of the quantum router, optical switch and trusted relay are assembled here to guarantee the feasibility and expandability of the quantum cryptography network. Five nodes of the network are located in the government departments and the secure keys generated by the quantum key distribution network are utilized to encrypt the instant video, sound, text messages and confidential files transmitting between these bureaus. The whole implementation including the hierarchical quantum cryptographic communication network links and corresponding application software shows a big step toward the practical user-oriented network with high security level.

  7. Quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, Gerald; Hamrick, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a detailed account of the theory and practice of quantum cryptography. Suitable as the basis for a course in the subject at the graduate level, it crosses the disciplines of physics, mathematics, computer science and engineering. The theoretical and experimental aspects of the subject are derived from first principles, and attention is devoted to the practical development of realistic quantum communications systems. The book also includes a comprehensive analysis of practical quantum cryptography systems implemented in actual physical environments via either free-space or fiber-optic cable quantum channels. This book will be a valuable resource for graduate students, as well as professional scientists and engineers, who desire an introduction to the field that will enable them to undertake research in quantum cryptography. It will also be a useful reference for researchers who are already active in the field, and for academic faculty members who are teaching courses in quantum information s...

  8. Quantum cryptography in free space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, B C; Franson, J D

    1996-11-15

    The range of quantum cryptography systems using optical fibers is limited to roughly 30 km because amplifiers cannot be used. A fully operational system for quantum cryptography based on the transmission of single photons in free space under daylight conditions has been demonstrated. The feasibility of a global system for quantum cryptography based on a network of ground stations and satellites is discussed.

  9. Quantum Cryptography in Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, C; Troxel, G; Elliott, Chip; Pearson, David; Troxel, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    BBN, Harvard, and Boston University are building the DARPA Quantum Network, the world's first network that delivers end-to-end network security via high-speed Quantum Key Distribution, and testing that Network against sophisticated eavesdropping attacks. The first network link has been up and steadily operational in our laboratory since December 2002. It provides a Virtual Private Network between private enclaves, with user traffic protected by a weak-coherent implementation of quantum cryptography. This prototype is suitable for deployment in metro-size areas via standard telecom (dark) fiber. In this paper, we introduce quantum cryptography, discuss its relation to modern secure networks, and describe its unusual physical layer, its specialized quantum cryptographic protocol suite (quite interesting in its own right), and our extensions to IPsec to integrate it with quantum cryptography.

  10. Quantum Computational Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Akinori; Koshiba, Takeshi

    As computational approaches to classical cryptography have succeeded in the establishment of the foundation of the network security, computational approaches even to quantum cryptography are promising, since quantum computational cryptography could offer richer applications than the quantum key distribution. Our project focused especially on the quantum one-wayness and quantum public-key cryptosystems. The one-wayness of functions (or permutations) is one of the most important notions in computational cryptography. First, we give an algorithmic characterization of quantum one-way permutations. In other words, we show a necessary and sufficient condition for quantum one-way permutations in terms of reflection operators. Second, we introduce a problem of distinguishing between two quantum states as a new underlying problem that is harder to solve than the graph automorphism problem. The new problem is a natural generalization of the distinguishability problem between two probability distributions, which are commonly used in computational cryptography. We show that the problem has several cryptographic properties and they enable us to construct a quantum publickey cryptosystem, which is likely to withstand any attack of a quantum adversary.

  11. Broadband Quantum Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is a rapidly developing field that draws from a number of disciplines, from quantum optics to information theory to electrical engineering. By combining some fundamental quantum mechanical principles of single photons with various aspects of information theory, quantum cryptography represents a fundamental shift in the basis for security from numerical complexity to the fundamental physical nature of the communications channel. As such, it promises the holy grail of data security: theoretically unbreakable encryption. Of course, implementing quantum cryptography in real br

  12. Quantum cryptography: a view from classical cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, Johannes; Braun, Johannes; Demirel, Denise; Geihs, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    Much of digital data requires long-term protection of confidentiality, for example, medical health records. Cryptography provides such protection. However, currently used cryptographic techniques such as Diffe-Hellman key exchange may not provide long-term security. Such techniques rely on certain computational assumptions, such as the hardness of the discrete logarithm problem that may turn out to be incorrect. On the other hand, quantum cryptography---in particular quantum random number generation and quantum key distribution---offers information theoretic protection. In this paper, we explore the challenge of providing long-term confidentiality and we argue that a combination of quantum cryptography and classical cryptography can provide such protection.

  13. Quantum cryptography communication technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Yu Rak; Jung, Gwang Il; Jung, Jong Eun; Hong, Seok Boong; Koo, In Soo

    2007-09-15

    Quantum cryptography communication based on quantum mechanics provides and unconditional security between two users. Even though huge advance has been done since the 1984, having a complete system is still far away. In the case of real quantum cryptography communication systems, an unconditional security level is lowered by the imperfection of the communication unit. It is important to investigate the unconditional security of quantum communication protocols based on these experimental results and implementation examples for the advanced spread all over the world. The Japanese report, titled, 'Investigation report on the worldwide trends of quantum cryptography communications systems' was translated and summarized in this report. An unconditional security theory of the quantum cryptography and real implementation examples in the domestic area are investigated also. The goal of the report is to make quantum cryptography communication more useful and reliable alternative telecommunication infrastructure as the one of the cyber security program of the class 1-E communication system of nuclear power plant. Also another goal of this report is to provide the quantitative decision basis on the quantum cryptography communication when this secure communication system will be used in class 1-E communication channel of the nuclear power plant.

  14. Field experiment on a robust hierarchical metropolitan quantum cryptography network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU FangXing; CHEN Wei; WANG Shuang; YIN ZhenQiang; ZHANG Yang; LIU Yun; ZHOU Zheng; ZHAO YiBo; LI HongWei; LIU Dong; HAN ZhengFu; GUO GuangCan

    2009-01-01

    these bureaus.The whole implementation including the hierarchical quantum cryptographic communication network links and the corresponding application software shows a big step toward the practical user-oriented network with a high security level.

  15. Post-Quantum Cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauthier Umana, Valérie

    The security of almost all the public-key cryptosystems used in practice depends on the fact that the prime factorization of a number and the discrete logarithm are hard problems to solve. In 1994, Peter Shor found a polynomial-time algorithm which solves these two problems using quantum computers....... The public key cryptosystems that can resist these emerging attacks are called quantum resistant or post-quantum cryptosystems. There are mainly four classes of public-key cryptography that are believed to resist classical and quantum attacks: code-based cryptography, hash-based cryptography, lattice......-cyclic alternant codes and quasi-dyadic codes (joint work with Gregor Leander). We also present a deterministic polynomial-time algorithm to solve the Goppa Code Distinguisher problem for high rate codes (joint work with Jean-Charles Faugere, Ayoub Otmani, Ludovic Perret and Jean-Pierre Tillich). In the second...

  16. Quantum memory in quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Mor, T

    1999-01-01

    [Shortened abstract:] This thesis investigates the importance of quantum memory in quantum cryptography, concentrating on quantum key distribution schemes. In the hands of an eavesdropper -- a quantum memory is a powerful tool, putting in question the security of quantum cryptography; Classical privacy amplification techniques, used to prove security against less powerful eavesdroppers, might not be effective when the eavesdropper can keep quantum states for a long time. In this work we suggest a possible direction for approaching this problem. We define strong attacks of this type, and show security against them, suggesting that quantum cryptography is secure. We start with a complete analysis regarding the information about a parity bit (since parity bits are used for privacy amplification). We use the results regarding the information on parity bits to prove security against very strong eavesdropping attacks, which uses quantum memories and all classical data (including error correction codes) to attack th...

  17. Counterfactual quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Tae-Gon

    2009-12-01

    Quantum cryptography allows one to distribute a secret key between two remote parties using the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. The well-known established paradigm for the quantum key distribution relies on the actual transmission of signal particle through a quantum channel. In this Letter, we show that the task of a secret key distribution can be accomplished even though a particle carrying secret information is not in fact transmitted through the quantum channel. The proposed protocols can be implemented with current technologies and provide practical security advantages by eliminating the possibility that an eavesdropper can directly access the entire quantum system of each signal particle.

  18. 802.11i Encryption Key Distribution Using Quantum Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Mai Trang Nguyen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantum cryptography is a promising solution towards absolute security in long term cryptosystems. While the use of quantum cryptography in fiber optical networks gets significant advances, research on the application of quantum cryptography in mobile wireless network is still premature. In this paper, we analyze the interests of using quantum cryptography in 802.11 wireless networks, and propose a scheme integrating quantum cryptography in 802.11i security mechanisms for the distribution of the encryption keys. The use of an apparatus network to provide alternative line-of-sight paths is also discussed.

  19. QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY: Single Photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, S

    2000-12-22

    Quantum cryptography offers the potential of totally secure transfer of information, but as Benjamin discusses in this Perspective, its practical implementation hinges on being able to generate single photons (rather than two or more) at a time. Michler et al. show how this condition can be met in a quantum dot microdisk structure. Single molecules were also recently shown to allow controlled single-photon emission.

  20. Field test of a practical secure communication network with decoy-state quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Teng-Yun; Liang, Hao; Liu, Yang; Cai, Wen-Qi; Ju, Lei; Liu, Wei-Yue; Wang, Jian; Yin, Hao; Chen, Kai; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2009-04-13

    We present a secure network communication system that operated with decoy-state quantum cryptography in a real-world application scenario. The full key exchange and application protocols were performed in real time among three nodes, in which two adjacent nodes were connected by approximate 20 km of commercial telecom optical fiber. The generated quantum keys were immediately employed and demonstrated for communication applications, including unbreakable real-time voice telephone between any two of the three communication nodes, or a broadcast from one node to the other two nodes by using one-time pad encryption.

  1. On Classical and Quantum Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Volovich, I V; Volovich, Ya.I.

    2001-01-01

    Lectures on classical and quantum cryptography. Contents: Private key cryptosystems. Elements of number theory. Public key cryptography and RSA cryptosystem. Shannon`s entropy and mutual information. Entropic uncertainty relations. The no cloning theorem. The BB84 quantum cryptographic protocol. Security proofs. Bell`s theorem. The EPRBE quantum cryptographic protocol.

  2. Single photon quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Beveratos, A; Gacoin, T; Villing, A; Poizat, J P; Grangier, P; Beveratos, Alexios; Brouri, Rosa; Gacoin, Thierry; Villing, Andre; Poizat, Jean-Philippe; Grangier, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    We report the full implementation of a quantum cryptography protocol using a stream of single photon pulses generated by a stable and efficient source operating at room temperature. The single photon pulses are emitted on demand by a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in a diamond nanocrystal. The quantum bit error rate is less that 4.6% and the secure bit rate is 9500 bits/s. The overall performances of our system reaches a domain where single photons have a measurable advantage over an equivalent system based on attenuated light pulses.

  3. Single photon quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveratos, Alexios; Brouri, Rosa; Gacoin, Thierry; Villing, André; Poizat, Jean-Philippe; Grangier, Philippe

    2002-10-28

    We report the full implementation of a quantum cryptography protocol using a stream of single photon pulses generated by a stable and efficient source operating at room temperature. The single photon pulses are emitted on demand by a single nitrogen-vacancy color center in a diamond nanocrystal. The quantum bit error rate is less that 4.6% and the secure bit rate is 7700 bits/s. The overall performances of our system reaches a domain where single photons have a measurable advantage over an equivalent system based on attenuated light pulses.

  4. Autocompensating Quantum Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Bethune, D S; Bethune, Donald S.; Risk, William P.

    2002-01-01

    Quantum cryptographic key distribution (QKD) uses extremely faint light pulses to carry quantum information between two parties (Alice and Bob), allowing them to generate a shared, secret cryptographic key. Autocompensating QKD systems automatically and passively compensate for uncontrolled time dependent variations of the optical fiber properties by coding the information as a differential phase between orthogonally-polarized components of a light pulse sent on a round trip through the fiber, reflected at mid-course using a Faraday mirror. We have built a prototype system based on standard telecom technology that achieves a privacy-amplified bit generation rate of ~1000 bits/s over a 10-km optical fiber link. Quantum cryptography is an example of an application that, by using quantum states of individual particles to represent information, accomplishes a practical task that is impossible using classical means.

  5. Quantum cryptography: Theoretical protocols for quantum key distribution and tests of selected commercial QKD systems in commercial fiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacak, Monika; Jacak, Janusz; Jóźwiak, Piotr; Jóźwiak, Ireneusz

    2016-06-01

    The overview of the current status of quantum cryptography is given in regard to quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols, implemented both on nonentangled and entangled flying qubits. Two commercial R&D platforms of QKD systems are described (the Clavis II platform by idQuantique implemented on nonentangled photons and the EPR S405 Quelle platform by AIT based on entangled photons) and tested for feasibility of their usage in commercial TELECOM fiber metropolitan networks. The comparison of systems efficiency, stability and resistivity against noise and hacker attacks is given with some suggestion toward system improvement, along with assessment of two models of QKD.

  6. Quantum cryptography using optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J D; Lives, H

    1994-05-10

    Quantum cryptography permits the transmission of secret information whose security is guaranteed by the uncertainty principle. An experimental system for quantum crytography is implemented based on the linear polarization of single photons transmitted by an optical fiber. Polarization-preserving optical fiber and a feedback loop are employed to maintain the state of polarization. Error rates of less than 0.5% are obtained.

  7. High-rate measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Ottaviani, Carlo; Spedalieri, Gaetana

    2015-01-01

    Quantum cryptography achieves a formidable task - the remote distribution of secret keys by exploiting the fundamental laws of physics. Quantum cryptography is now headed towards solving the practical problem of constructing scalable and secure quantum networks. A significant step in this direction...... than those currently achieved. Our protocol could be employed to build high-rate quantum networks where devices securely connect to nearby access points or proxy servers....

  8. QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY WITH PHOTON PAIRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Sharma,

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum cryptographic systems use quantum mechanical concepts that are based on qubit superposition of states, and on the no cloning or no copying theorem to establish unbreakable cipher keys. The basic idea of quantum cryptography is to send the key in the form of photons over a public channel, encoding the zeros and one on quantum states in such a way that any eavesdropping attempt can be detected. Using optical communications the most commonly quantum mechanical property used is the polarization state of photon. However, in most quantum cryptographic algorithms a random polarization state is required. The photons are ideal for low loss transport, either in free space or in optical fibers, i.e. we have the full arsenal of fiber optic technology at our disposal. In this paper we are describing the process of quantum cryptography with photon pairs.

  9. On Simulation of Quantum Cryptography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The simulation of quantum cryptography on classical computers is discussed in this paper. The methods to express the preparation and measurement of quantum states on current computers are given and the basic algorithms for simulating the quantum key distribution protocols are presented. All the simulating results of each protocol are given and compared with the theoretic one. It is shown that the simulation results are completely tallied with the theoretic one.

  10. Quantum cryptography beyond quantum key distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Broadbent (Anne); C. Schaffner (Christian)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractQuantum cryptography is the art and science of exploiting quantum mechanical effects in order to perform cryptographic tasks. While the most well-known example of this discipline is quantum key distribution (QKD), there exist many other applications such as quantum money, randomness

  11. Quantum cryptography beyond quantum key distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broadbent, A.; Schaffner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is the art and science of exploiting quantum mechanical effects in order to perform cryptographic tasks. While the most well-known example of this discipline is quantum key distribution (QKD), there exist many other applications such as quantum money, randomness generation,

  12. Quantum cryptography beyond quantum key distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broadbent, A.; Schaffner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is the art and science of exploiting quantum mechanical effects in order to perform cryptographic tasks. While the most well-known example of this discipline is quantum key distribution (QKD), there exist many other applications such as quantum money, randomness generation, secu

  13. Trusted Certificates in Quantum Cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, William

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the performance of Kak's three stage quantum cryptographic protocol based on public key cryptography against a man-in-the-middle attack. A method for protecting against such an attack is presented using certificates distributed by a trusted third party.

  14. Spectral coherent-state quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotti, Gabriella; Spiekman, Leo; Wada, Naoya; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2008-11-01

    A novel implementation of quantum-noise optical cryptography is proposed, which is based on a simplified architecture that allows long-haul, high-speed transmission in a fiber optical network. By using a single multiport encoder/decoder and 16 phase shifters, this new approach can provide the same confidentiality as other implementations of Yuen's encryption protocol, which use a larger number of phase or polarization coherent states. Data confidentiality and error probability for authorized and unauthorized receivers are carefully analyzed.

  15. Quantum cryptography with entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennewein; Simon; Weihs; Weinfurter; Zeilinger

    2000-05-15

    By realizing a quantum cryptography system based on polarization entangled photon pairs we establish highly secure keys, because a single photon source is approximated and the inherent randomness of quantum measurements is exploited. We implement a novel key distribution scheme using Wigner's inequality to test the security of the quantum channel, and, alternatively, realize a variant of the BB84 protocol. Our system has two completely independent users separated by 360 m, and generates raw keys at rates of 400-800 bits/s with bit error rates around 3%.

  16. Quantum Erasure Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Hatim

    2016-05-01

    The phenomenon of quantum erasure has long intrigued physicists, but has surprisingly found limited practical application. Here, we propose a protocol for quantum key distribution (QKD) based on quantum erasure, promising inherent security against detector attacks. We particularly demonstrate its security against a powerful detector-blinding attack.

  17. Secure communications using quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G. [and others

    1997-08-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as {open_quotes}key{close_quotes} material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). We have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non-orthogonal single-photon states to generate shared key material over multi-kilometer optical fiber paths and over line-of-sight links. In both cases, key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. In our optical fiber experiment we have performed quantum key distribution over 24-km of underground optical fiber using single-photon interference states, demonstrating that secure, real-time key generation over {open_quotes}open{close_quotes} multi-km node-to-node optical fiber communications links is possible. We have also constructed a quantum key distribution system for free-space, line-of-sight transmission using single-photon polarization states, which is currently undergoing laboratory testing. 7 figs.

  18. Quantum cryptography without switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedbrook, Christian; Lance, Andrew M; Bowen, Warwick P; Symul, Thomas; Ralph, Timothy C; Lam, Ping Koy

    2004-10-22

    We propose a new coherent state quantum key distribution protocol that eliminates the need to randomly switch between measurement bases. This protocol provides significantly higher secret key rates with increased bandwidths than previous schemes that only make single quadrature measurements. It also offers the further advantage of simplicity compared to all previous protocols which, to date, have relied on switching.

  19. Protocols and plan of quantum cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milorad S. Markagić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the development of confidentiality of data and resources, there is a need to develop systems that would provide confidentiality. Currently, the most used systems are classical cryptographic systems and encryption public key systems. However, none of these systems provides a solution for the famous 'catch 22' of cryptography. Owing to the intensive development of quantum mechanics, in the last 30 years emerged an entirely new kind of cryptography-quantum cryptography. Its greatest contribution is a possibility to discover an intercepted communication channel from a third party. The question is: is this really true? The question arises: 'If the quantum cryptography is so good, why is not widely used?' The aim of this paper is, on the one hand, to define the basic mechanisms of quantum cryptography IP, and, on the other hand, to point to the shortcomings, as they related to the opportunities of today's devices and flaws in protocols.

  20. IMPROVING TLS SECURITY BY QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elboukhari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum Cryptography or Quantum Key Distribution (QKD solves the key distribution problem byallowing the exchange of a cryptographic key between two remote parties with absolute security,guaranteed by the laws of quantum physics. Extensive studies have been undertaken on QKD since it wasnoted that quantum computers could break public key cryptosystems based on number theory. Actually,the progress of research in this field allows the implementation of QKD outside of laboratories. Effortsare made to exploit this technology in the existing communication networks and to improve theperformance and reliability of the implemented technologies. Some research is in progress for theintegration of QKD with the protocols in different layers of OSI model. The examples of such researcheffort are the integration of QKD in point-to-point protocol (PPP OSI layer 2 and the integration ofQKD with IPSEC at OSI layer-3. All these works are moving towards the utilization of QKD technologyfor enhancing the security of modern computing applications on the internet. In this paper, we present anovel extension of the TLS protocol based on QKD. We introduce a scheme for integrating QuantumCryptography in this protocol. Our approach improves the security of the process of authentication anddata encryption. Also, we describe an example to illustrate the feasibility of our scheme’simplementation.

  1. Classical Cryptography v/s Quantum Cryptography A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minakshi Bhatt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this era of information technology, the need for security has attained paramount importance. As most of our sensitive information is stored in computers the need of data security becomes increasingly important. Protecting this information against unauthorized access is therefore a major concern for both operating systems and users alike. Cryptography is one such method of safeguarding sensitive data from being stolen or intercepted by unwanted third parties. Traditional cryptology is certainly clever, but as with all encoding methods in code-breaking history, it's being phased out. Quantum cryptography uses quantum mechanics to guarantee secure communication. It enables two parties to produce a shared random bit string known only to them, which can be used as a key to encrypt and decrypt messages. By harnessing the unpredictable nature of matter at the quantum level, physicists have figured out a way to exchange information on secret keys. Attaching information to the photons spin is the essence of Quantum Cryptology. In brief, the processes of encoding (cryptography and decoding (crypto analysis information or messages (called plaintext into an otherwise meaningless data (cipher text combined are cryptology. And when the keys used for this process are photons, it’s called Quantum Cryptology.

  2. A Quick Glance at Quantum Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Lomonaco, S J

    1998-01-01

    The recent application of the principles of quantum mechanics to cryptography has led to a remarkable new dimension in secret communication. As a result of these new developments, it is now possible to construct cryptographic communication systems which detect unauthorized eavesdropping should it occur, and which give a guarantee of no eavesdropping should it not occur. CONTENTS P3....Cryptographic systems before quantum cryptography P7....Preamble to quantum cryptography P10..The BB84 quantum cryptographic protocol without noise P16..The BB84 quantum cryptographic protocol with noise P19..The B92 quantum cryptographic protocol P21..EPR quantum cryptographic protocols P25..Other protocols P25..Eavesdropping stategies and counter measures P26..Conclusion P29..Appendix A. The no cloning theorem P30..Appendix B. Proof that an undetectable eavesdropper can obtain no information from the B92 protocol P31..Appendix C. Part of a Rosetta stone for quantum mechanics P44..References

  3. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  4. SECOQC White Paper on Quantum Key Distribution and Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Alleaume, R; Branciard, C; Debuisschert, T; Dianati, M; Gisin, N; Godfrey, M; Grangier, P; Langer, T; Leverrier, A; Lütkenhaus, N; Painchault, P; Peev, M; Poppe, A; Pornin, T; Rarity, J; Renner, R; Ribordy, G; Riguidel, M; Salvail, L; Shields, A; Weinfurter, H; Zeilinger, A; Alleaume, Romain; Bouda, Jan; Branciard, Cyril; Debuisschert, Thierry; Dianati, Mehrdad; Gisin, Nicolas; Godfrey, Mark; Grangier, Philippe; Langer, Thomas; Leverrier, Anthony; Lutkenhaus, Norbert; Painchault, Philippe; Peev, Momtchil; Poppe, Andreas; Pornin, Thomas; Rarity, John; Renner, Renato; Ribordy, Gregoire; Riguidel, Michel; Salvail, Louis; Shields, Andrew; Weinfurter, Harald; Zeilinger, Anton

    2007-01-01

    The SECOQC White Paper on Quantum Key Distribution and Cryptography is the outcome on a thorough consultation and discussion among the participants of the European project SECOQC (www.secoqc.net). This paper is a review article that attempts to position Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) in terms of cryptographic applications. A detailed comparison of QKD with the solutions currently in use to solve the key distribution problem, based on classical cryptography, is provided. We also detail how the work on QKD networks lead within SECOQC will allow the deployment of long-distance secure communication infrastructures based on quantum cryptography. The purpose of the White Paper is finally to promote closer collaboration between classical and quantum cryptographers. We believe that very fruitful research, involving both communities, could emerge in the future years and try to sketch what may be the next challenges in this direction.

  5. Quantum cryptography over underground optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.; Simmons, C.

    1996-05-01

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generated shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light whose security is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics. An adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg`s uncertainty principle. In this paper the authors describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from their experimental system with which they are generating key material over 14-km of underground optical fiber. These results show that optical-fiber based quantum cryptography could allow secure, real-time key generation over ``open`` multi-km node-to-node optical fiber communications links between secure ``islands.``

  6. Quantum asymmetric cryptography with symmetric keys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Wen, Qiaoyan; Qin, Sujuan; Zhu, Fuchen

    2009-12-01

    Based on quantum encryption, we present a new idea for quantum public-key cryptography (QPKC) and construct a whole theoretical framework of a QPKC system. We show that the quantum-mechanical nature renders it feasible and reasonable to use symmetric keys in such a scheme, which is quite different from that in conventional public-key cryptography. The security of our scheme is analyzed and some features are discussed. Furthermore, the state-estimation attack to a prior QPKC scheme is demonstrated.

  7. Quantum asymmetric cryptography with symmetric keys

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Fei; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Qin, Su-Juan; Zhu, Fu-Chen

    2008-01-01

    Based on quantum encryption, we present a new idea for quantum public-key cryptography (QPKC) and construct a whole theoretical framework of a QPKC system. We show that the quantum-mechanical nature renders it feasible and reasonable to use symmetric keys in such a scheme, which is quite different from that in conventional public-key cryptography. The security of our scheme is analyzed and some features are discussed. Furthermore, the state-estimation attack to a prior QPKC scheme is demonstr...

  8. Quantum asymmetric cryptography with symmetric keys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on quantum encryption,we present a new idea for quantum public-key cryptography (QPKC) and construct a whole theoretical framework of a QPKC system. We show that the quantum-mechanical nature renders it feasible and reasonable to use symmetric keys in such a scheme,which is quite different from that in conventional public-key cryptography. The security of our scheme is analyzed and some features are discussed. Furthermore,the state-estimation attack to a prior QPKC scheme is demonstrated.

  9. Quantum asymmetric cryptography with symmetric keys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Fei; WEN QiaoYan; QIN SuJuan; ZHU FuChen

    2009-01-01

    Based on quantum encryption, we present a new idea for quantum public-key cryptography (QPKC) and construct a whole theoretical framework of a QPKC system. We show that the quantum-mechanical nature renders it feasible and reasonable to use symmetric keys in such a scheme, which is quite different from that in conventional public-key cryptography. The security of our scheme is analyzed and some features are discussed. Furthermore, the state-estimation attack to a prior QPKC scheme is demonstrated.

  10. Distinguishability of quantum states and shannon complexity in quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbekov, I. M.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2017-07-01

    The proof of the security of quantum key distribution is a rather complex problem. Security is defined in terms different from the requirements imposed on keys in classical cryptography. In quantum cryptography, the security of keys is expressed in terms of the closeness of the quantum state of an eavesdropper after key distribution to an ideal quantum state that is uncorrelated to the key of legitimate users. A metric of closeness between two quantum states is given by the trace metric. In classical cryptography, the security of keys is understood in terms of, say, the complexity of key search in the presence of side information. In quantum cryptography, side information for the eavesdropper is given by the whole volume of information on keys obtained from both quantum and classical channels. The fact that the mathematical apparatuses used in the proof of key security in classical and quantum cryptography are essentially different leads to misunderstanding and emotional discussions [1]. Therefore, one should be able to answer the question of how different cryptographic robustness criteria are related to each other. In the present study, it is shown that there is a direct relationship between the security criterion in quantum cryptography, which is based on the trace distance determining the distinguishability of quantum states, and the criterion in classical cryptography, which uses guesswork on the determination of a key in the presence of side information.

  11. Twenty Seven Years of Quantum Cryptography!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard

    2011-03-01

    One of the fundamental goals of cryptographic research is to minimize the assumptions underlying the protocols that enable secure communications between pairs or groups of users. In 1984, building on earlier research by Stephen Wiesner, Charles Bennett and Gilles Brassard showed how quantum physics could be harnessed to provide information-theoretic security for protocols such as the distribution of cryptographic keys, which enables two parties to secure their conventional communications. Bennett and Brassard and colleagues performed a proof-of-principle quantum key distribution (QKD) experiment with single-photon quantum state transmission over a 32-cm air path in 1991. This seminal experiment led other researchers to explore QKD in optical fibers and over line-of-sight outdoor atmospheric paths (``free-space''), resulting in dramatic increases in range, bit rate and security. These advances have been enabled by improvements in sources and single-photon detectors. Also in 1991 Artur Ekert showed how the security of QKD could be related to quantum entanglement. This insight led to a deeper understanding and proof of QKD security with practical sources and detectors in the presence of transmission loss and channel noise. Today, QKD has been implemented over ranges much greater than 100km in both fiber and free-space, multi-node network testbeds have been demonstrated, and satellite-based QKD is under study in several countries. ``Quantum hacking'' researchers have shown the importance of extending security considerations to the classical devices that produce and detect the photon quantum states. New quantum cryptographic protocols such as secure identification have been proposed, and others such as quantum secret splitting have been demonstrated. It is now possible to envision quantum cryptography providing a more secure alternative to present-day cryptographic methods for many secure communications functions. My talk will survey these remarkable developments.

  12. Quantum cryptography approaching the classical limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedbrook, Christian; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Ralph, Timothy C

    2010-09-10

    We consider the security of continuous-variable quantum cryptography as we approach the classical limit, i.e., when the unknown preparation noise at the sender's station becomes significantly noisy or thermal (even by as much as 10(4) times greater than the variance of the vacuum mode). We show that, provided the channel transmission losses do not exceed 50%, the security of quantum cryptography is not dependent on the channel transmission, and is therefore incredibly robust against significant amounts of excess preparation noise. We extend these results to consider for the first time quantum cryptography at wavelengths considerably longer than optical and find that regions of security still exist all the way down to the microwave.

  13. A Survey on Recent Security Trends using Quantum Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Rubya

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cryptography is the science of keeping private information from nauthorized access of ensuring data integrity and authentication, and it is the strongest tool for controlling against much kind of security threats. Role of cryptography appears in many secured area like government agencies, large banks, telecommunications companies and other corporations who handle sensitive or military data. Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. This paper onsists of the main aspects of quantum cryptography and it investigates the information about where and all quantum cryptography takes place.

  14. Development of mechanism for enhancing data security in quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Ajit

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays security in communication is increasingly important to the network communication because many categories of data are required restriction on authorization of access, modify, delete and insert. Quantum cryptography is one of the solutions that use property of polarization to ensure that transmitted data is not tampered. The research paper provides the mechanism that enhances the data security in quantum cryptography during exchange of information. In first phase detailed explanation of Quantum key distribution's BB84 protocol is given. BB84 protocol is used as the basis for the mechanism. In next phase the proposed mechanism is explained. The proposed mechanism combines BB84 protocol at two levels, from sender to receiver and then from receiver to sender. Moreover, a logic circuit is used to combine the bits hence to reduce the probability of eavesdropping. The key obtained can be used to exchange the information securely further it can help in encryption and decryption of crucial data. Double level B...

  15. Quantum Cryptography in Existing Telecommunications Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Daniel; Bienfang, Joshua; Mink, Alan; Hershman, Barry; Nakassis, Anastase; Tang, Xiao; Ma, Lijun; Su, David; Williams, Carl; Clark, Charles

    2006-03-01

    Quantum cryptography has shown the potential for ultra-secure communications. However, all systems demonstrated to date operate at speeds that make them impractical for performing continuous one-time-pad encryption of today's broadband communications. By adapting clock and data recovery techniques from modern telecommunications engineering practice, and by designing and implementing expeditious error correction and privacy amplification algorithms, we have demonstrated error-corrected and privacy-amplified key rates up to 1.0 Mbps over a free-space link with a 1.25 Gbps clock. Using new detectors with improved timing resolution, careful wavelength selection and an increased clock speed, we expect to quadruple the transmission rate over a 1.5 km free-space link. We have identified scalable solutions for delivering sustained one-time-pad encryption at 10 Mbps, thus making it possible to integrate quantum cryptography with first-generation Ethernet protocols.

  16. Quantum discord as a resource for quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2014-11-07

    Quantum discord is the minimal bipartite resource which is needed for a secure quantum key distribution, being a cryptographic primitive equivalent to non-orthogonality. Its role becomes crucial in device-dependent quantum cryptography, where the presence of preparation and detection noise (inaccessible to all parties) may be so strong to prevent the distribution and distillation of entanglement. The necessity of entanglement is re-affirmed in the stronger scenario of device-independent quantum cryptography, where all sources of noise are ascribed to the eavesdropper.

  17. Partially Blind Signatures Based on Quantum Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-Qiu; Niu, Hui-Fang

    2012-12-01

    In a partially blind signature scheme, the signer explicitly includes pre-agreed common information in the blind signature, which can improve the availability and performance. We present a new partially blind signature scheme based on fundamental properties of quantum mechanics. In addition, we analyze the security of this scheme, and show it is not possible to forge valid partially blind signatures. Moreover, the comparisons between this scheme and those based on public-key cryptography are also discussed.

  18. Multiphoton entanglement concentration and quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Gabriel A; Simon, Christoph; Bouwmeester, Dik

    2002-05-01

    Multiphoton states from parametric down-conversion can be entangled both in polarization and photon number. Maximal high-dimensional entanglement can be concentrated postselectively from these states via photon counting. This makes them natural candidates for quantum key distribution, where the presence of more than one photon per detection interval has up to now been considered undesirable. We propose a simple multiphoton cryptography protocol for the case of low losses.

  19. Position-based quantum cryptography and catalytic computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, F.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we present several results along two different lines of research. The first part concerns the study of position-based quantum cryptography, a topic in quantum cryptography. By combining quantum mechanics with special relativity theory, new cryptographic tasks can be developed that us

  20. FREE-SPACE QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY IN DAYLIGHT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T. [and others

    2000-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics and information-theoretically secure post-processing methods. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. In this paper we describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from our experimental free-space system with which we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of quantum key generation over a point-to-point outdoor atmospheric path in daylight. We achieved a transmission distance of 0.5 km, which was limited only by the length of the test range. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on orbit. We present a feasibility analysis of surface-to-satellite quantum key generation.

  1. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Cryptography: Theory and Practice FOCUS ON QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY: THEORY AND PRACTICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütkenhaus, N.; Shields, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    Quantum cryptography, and especially quantum key distribution (QKD), is steadily progressing to become a viable tool for cryptographic services. In recent years we have witnessed a dramatic increase in the secure bit rate of QKD, as well as its extension to ever longer fibre- and air-based links and the emergence of metro-scale trusted networks. In the foreseeable future even global-scale communications may be possible using quantum repeaters or Earth-satellite links. A handful of start-ups and some bigger companies are already active in the field. The launch of an initiative to form industrial standards for QKD, under the auspices of the European Telecommunication Standards Institute, described in the paper by Laenger and Lenhart in this Focus Issue, can be taken as a sign of the growing commercial interest. Recent progress has seen an increase in the secure bit rate of QKD links, by orders of magnitude, to over 1 Mb s-1. This has resulted mainly from an improvement in the detection technology. Here changes in the way conventional semiconductor detectors are gated, as well as the development of novel devices based on non-linear processes and superconducting materials, are leading the way. Additional challenges for QKD at GHz clock rates include the design of high speed electronics, remote synchronization and high rate random number generation. Substantial effort is being devoted to increasing the range of individual links, which is limited by attenuation and other losses in optical fibres and air links. An important advance in the past few years has been the introduction of protocols with the same scaling as an ideal single-photon set-up. The good news is that these schemes use standard optical devices, such as weak laser pulses. Thanks to these new protocols and improvements in the detection technology, the range of a single fibre link can exceed a few hundred km. Outstanding issues include proving the unconditional security of some of the schemes. Much of the

  2. Experimental quantum secret sharing and third-man quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Ao; Zhang, An-Ning; Zhao, Zhi; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Lu, Chao-Yang; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Yang, Tao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2005-11-11

    Quantum secret sharing (QSS) and third-man quantum cryptography (TQC) are essential for advanced quantum communication; however, the low intensity and fragility of the multiphoton entanglement source in previous experiments have made their realization an extreme experimental challenge. Here, we develop and exploit an ultrastable high intensity source of four-photon entanglement to report an experimental realization of QSS and TQC. The technology developed in our experiment will be important for future multiparty quantum communication.

  3. On the complexity of search for keys in quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    The trace distance is used as a security criterion in proofs of security of keys in quantum cryptography. Some authors doubted that this criterion can be reduced to criteria used in classical cryptography. The following question has been answered in this work. Let a quantum cryptography system provide an ɛ-secure key such that ½‖ρ XE - ρ U ⊗ ρ E ‖1 cryptography. Bounds for the minimum and maximum numbers of search steps for the determination of the actual key have been presented.

  4. Continuous-variable quantum cryptography with untrusted relays

    CERN Document Server

    Pirandola, Stefano; Spedalieri, Gaetana; Weedbrook, Christian; Braunstein, Samuel L

    2013-01-01

    We extend the field of continuous-variable quantum cryptography to a more robust formulation which can be applied to untrusted networks. We consider two remote parties connected to an untrusted relay by insecure quantum links. To generate correlations, they transmit coherent states to the relay where a continuous-variable Bell detection is performed. Despite the possibility that the working mechanism of the relay could be fully corrupted and the links subject to optimal coherent attacks, the parties are still able to extract a secret key. Furthermore, our analysis shows that very long distances and high rates can be reached when the relay is proximal to one of the parties, configuration typical of a mobile device connecting to a public access point. Thus, using the cheapest possible quantum resources, we show the possibility of long-distance high-rate quantum key distribution in network topologies where direct links are missing between two end-users and intermediate relays cannot be trusted.

  5. Direction Cryptography in Quantum Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Simmons, W; Simmons, Walter; Pakvasa, Sandip

    2003-01-01

    We examine a situation in which an information-carrying signal is sent from two sources to a common receiver. The radiation travels through free space in the presence of noise. The information resides in a relationship between the two beams. We inquire into whether itis possible, in principle, that the locations of the transmitters can be concealed from a party who receives the radiation and decodes the information. Direction finding entails making a set of measurements on asignal and constructing an analytic continuation of the time dependent fields from the results. The fact that this process is generally different in quantum mechanics and in classical electrodynamics is the basis in this investigation. We develop a model based upon encoding information into a microscopic, transverse, non-local quantum image (whose dimensions are of the order of a few wavelengths) and using a detector of a type recently proposed by Strekalov et al. The optical system, which uses SPDC (Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion)...

  6. Quantum cryptography with squeezed states

    CERN Document Server

    Hillery, M

    1999-01-01

    A quantum key distribution scheme based on the use of displaced squeezed vacuum states is presented. The states are squeezed in one of two field quadrature components, and the value of the squeezed component is used to encode a character from an alphabet. The uncertainty relation between quadrature components prevents an eavesdropper from determining both with enough precision to determine the character being sent. Losses degrade the performance of this scheme, but it is possible to use phase-sensitive amplifiers to boost the signal and partially compensate for their effect.

  7. Free-space quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.

    1998-12-31

    An experimental free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system has been tested over an outdoor optical path of {approximately}1 km under nighttime conditions at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system employs the Bennett 92 protocol; here the authors give a brief overview of this protocol, and describe the experimental implementation of it. An analysis of the system efficiency is presented, as well as a description of the error detection protocol, which employs a two-dimensional parity check scheme. Finally, the susceptibility of this system to eavesdropping by various techniques is determined. Possible applications include the rekeying of satellites in low earth orbit.

  8. High Data Rate Quantum Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiat, Paul; Christensen, Bradley; McCusker, Kevin; Kumor, Daniel; Gauthier, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    While quantum key distribution (QKD) systems are now commercially available, the data rate is a limiting factor for some desired applications (e.g., secure video transmission). Most QKD systems receive at most a single random bit per detection event, causing the data rate to be limited by the saturation of the single-photon detectors. Recent experiments have begun to explore using larger degree of freedoms, i.e., temporal or spatial qubits, to optimize the data rate. Here, we continue this exploration using entanglement in multiple degrees of freedom. That is, we use simultaneous temporal and polarization entanglement to reach up to 8.3 bits of randomness per coincident detection. Due to current technology, we are unable to fully secure the temporal degree of freedom against all possible future attacks; however, by assuming a technologically-limited eavesdropper, we are able to obtain 23.4 MB/s secure key rate across an optical table, after error reconciliation and privacy amplification. In this talk, we will describe our high-rate QKD experiment, with a short discussion on our work towards extending this system to ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore communication, aiming to secure the temporal degree of freedom and to implement a 30-km free-space link over a marine environment.

  9. Neural Network Approach to Locating Cryptography in Object Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason L. Wright; Milos Manic

    2009-09-01

    Finding and identifying cryptography is a growing concern in the malware analysis community. In this paper, artificial neural networks are used to classify functional blocks from a disassembled program as being either cryptography related or not. The resulting system, referred to as NNLC (Neural Net for Locating Cryptography) is presented and results of applying this system to various libraries are described.

  10. PREFACE: Quantum Information, Communication, Computation and Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, F.; Fannes, M.; Floreanini, R.; Petritis, D.

    2007-07-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to information related fields such as communication, computation and cryptography is a fast growing line of research that has been witnessing an outburst of theoretical and experimental results, with possible practical applications. On the one hand, quantum cryptography with its impact on secrecy of transmission is having its first important actual implementations; on the other hand, the recent advances in quantum optics, ion trapping, BEC manipulation, spin and quantum dot technologies allow us to put to direct test a great deal of theoretical ideas and results. These achievements have stimulated a reborn interest in various aspects of quantum mechanics, creating a unique interplay between physics, both theoretical and experimental, mathematics, information theory and computer science. In view of all these developments, it appeared timely to organize a meeting where graduate students and young researchers could be exposed to the fundamentals of the theory, while senior experts could exchange their latest results. The activity was structured as a school followed by a workshop, and took place at The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and The International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy, from 12-23 June 2006. The meeting was part of the activity of the Joint European Master Curriculum Development Programme in Quantum Information, Communication, Cryptography and Computation, involving the Universities of Cergy-Pontoise (France), Chania (Greece), Leuven (Belgium), Rennes1 (France) and Trieste (Italy). This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical collects 22 contributions from well known experts who took part in the workshop. They summarize the present day status of the research in the manifold aspects of quantum information. The issue is opened by two review articles, the first by G Adesso and F Illuminati discussing entanglement in continuous variable

  11. The Secrecy Capacity of Practical Quantum Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, G

    2001-01-01

    Quantum cryptography has attracted much recent attention due to its potential for providing secret communications that cannot be decrypted by any amount of computational effort. This is the first analysis of the secrecy of a practical implementation of the BB84 protocol that simultaneously takes into account and presents the {\\it full} set of complete analytical expressions for effects due to the presence of pulses containing multiple photons in the attenuated output of the laser, the finite length of individual blocks of key material, losses due to error correction, privacy amplification, continuous authentication, errors in polarization detection, the efficiency of the detectors, and attenuation processes in the transmission medium. The analysis addresses eavesdropping attacks on individual photons rather than collective attacks in general. Of particular importance is the first derivation of the necessary and sufficient amount of privacy amplification compression to ensure secrecy against the loss of key ma...

  12. Optimal eavesdropping in cryptography with three-dimensional quantum states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruss, D; Macchiavello, C

    2002-03-25

    We study optimal eavesdropping in quantum cryptography with three-dimensional systems, and show that this scheme is more secure against symmetric attacks than protocols using two-dimensional states. We generalize the according eavesdropping transformation to arbitrary dimensions, and discuss the connection with optimal quantum cloning.

  13. Phase-modulation transmission system for quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérolla, J M; Mazurenko, Y; Goedgebuer, J P; Porte, H; Rhodes, W T

    1999-01-15

    We describe a new method for quantum key distribution that utilizes phase modulation of sidebands of modulation by use of integrated electro-optic modulators at the transmitting and receiving modules. The system is shown to produce constructive or destructive interference with unity visibility, which should allow quantum cryptography to be carried out with high flexibility by use of conventional devices.

  14. BIOMETRIC CRYPTOGRAPHY AND NETWORK AUTHENTICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonimir Kišasondi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will present some schemes for strengthening network authentification over insecure channels with biometric concepts or how to securely transfer or use biometric characteristics as cryptographic keys. We will show why some current authentification schemes are insufficient and we will present our concepts of biometric hashes and authentification that rely on unimodal and multimodal biometrics. Our concept can be applied on any biometric authentification scheme and is universal for all systems.

  15. Postselection technique for quantum channels with applications to quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christandl, Matthias; König, Robert; Renner, Renato

    2009-01-16

    We propose a general method for studying properties of quantum channels acting on an n-partite system, whose action is invariant under permutations of the subsystems. Our main result is that, in order to prove that a certain property holds for an arbitrary input, it is sufficient to consider the case where the input is a particular de Finetti-type state, i.e., a state which consists of n identical and independent copies of an (unknown) state on a single subsystem. Our technique can be applied to the analysis of information-theoretic problems. For example, in quantum cryptography, we get a simple proof for the fact that security of a discrete-variable quantum key distribution protocol against collective attacks implies security of the protocol against the most general attacks. The resulting security bounds are tighter than previously known bounds obtained with help of the exponential de Finetti theorem.

  16. Entangled state quantum cryptography: eavesdropping on the ekert protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik; Peterson; White; Berglund; Kwiat

    2000-05-15

    Using polarization-entangled photons from spontaneous parametric down-conversion, we have implemented Ekert's quantum cryptography protocol. The near-perfect correlations of the photons allow the sharing of a secret key between two parties. The presence of an eavesdropper is continually checked by measuring Bell's inequalities. We investigated several possible eavesdropper strategies, including pseudo-quantum-nondemolition measurements. In all cases, the eavesdropper's presence was readily apparent. We discuss a procedure to increase her detectability.

  17. Quantum cryptography using coherent states: Randomized encryption and key generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corndorf, Eric

    With the advent of the global optical-telecommunications infrastructure, an increasing number of individuals, companies, and agencies communicate information with one another over public networks or physically-insecure private networks. While the majority of the traffic flowing through these networks requires little or no assurance of secrecy, the same cannot be said for certain communications between banks, between government agencies, within the military, and between corporations. In these arenas, the need to specify some level of secrecy in communications is a high priority. While the current approaches to securing sensitive information (namely the public-key-cryptography infrastructure and deterministic private-key ciphers like AES and 3DES) seem to be cryptographically strong based on empirical evidence, there exist no mathematical proofs of secrecy for any widely deployed cryptosystem. As an example, the ubiquitous public-key cryptosystems infer all of their secrecy from the assumption that factoring of the product of two large primes is necessarily time consuming---something which has not, and perhaps cannot, be proven. Since the 1980s, the possibility of using quantum-mechanical features of light as a physical mechanism for satisfying particular cryptographic objectives has been explored. This research has been fueled by the hopes that cryptosystems based on quantum systems may provide provable levels of secrecy which are at least as valid as quantum mechanics itself. Unfortunately, the most widely considered quantum-cryptographic protocols (BB84 and the Ekert protocol) have serious implementation problems. Specifically, they require quantum-mechanical states which are not readily available, and they rely on unproven relations between intrusion-level detection and the information available to an attacker. As a result, the secrecy level provided by these experimental implementations is entirely unspecified. In an effort to provably satisfy the cryptographic

  18. A Generic Simulation Framework for Non-Entangled based Experimental Quantum Cryptography and Communication: Quantum Cryptography and Communication Simulator (QuCCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhari, Abudhahir; Zukarnain, Zuriati Ahmad; Khalid, Roszelinda; Zakir Dato', Wira Jaafar Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    The applications of quantum information science move towards bigger and better heights for the next generation technology. Especially, in the field of quantum cryptography and quantum computation, the world already witnessed various ground-breaking tangible product and promising results. Quantum cryptography is one of the mature field from quantum mechanics and already available in the markets. The current state of quantum cryptography is still under various researches in order to reach the heights of digital cryptography. The complexity of quantum cryptography is higher due to combination of hardware and software. The lack of effective simulation tool to design and analyze the quantum cryptography experiments delays the reaching distance of the success. In this paper, we propose a framework to achieve an effective non-entanglement based quantum cryptography simulation tool. We applied hybrid simulation technique i.e. discrete event, continuous event and system dynamics. We also highlight the limitations of a commercial photonic simulation tool based experiments. Finally, we discuss ideas for achieving one-stop simulation package for quantum based secure key distribution experiments. All the modules of simulation framework are viewed from the computer science perspective.

  19. Verification of Quantum Cryptography Protocols by Model Checking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elboukhari

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Unlike classical cryptography which is based on mathematical functions, Quantum Cryptography orQuantum Key Distribution (QKD exploits the laws of quantum physics to offer unconditionally securecommunication. The progress of research in this field allows the anticipation of QKD to be availableoutside of laboratories within the next few years and efforts are made to improve the performance andreliability of the implemented technologies. But despite this big progress, several challenges remain. Forexample the task of how to test the devices of QKD did not yet receive enough attention. These apparatusesbecome heterogeneous, complex and so demand a big verification effort. In this paper we propose to studyquantum cryptography protocols by applying the technique of probabilistic model checking. Using PRISMtool, we analyze the security of BB84 protocol and we are focused on the specific security property ofeavesdropper's information gain on the key derived from the implementation of this protocol. We show thatthis property is affected by the parameters of the eavesdropper’s power and the quantum channel.

  20. Nonlinear laser dynamics from quantum dots to cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Lüdge, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    A distinctive discussion of the nonlinear dynamical phenomena of semiconductor lasers. The book combines recent results of quantum dot laser modeling with mathematical details and an analytic understanding of nonlinear phenomena in semiconductor lasers and points out possible applications of lasers in cryptography and chaos control. This interdisciplinary approach makes it a unique and powerful source of knowledge for anyone intending to contribute to this field of research.By presenting both experimental and theoretical results, the distinguished authors consider solitary lase

  1. Authentication in Online Banking Systems through Quantum Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Sharma

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The new information technology is becoming an important factor in the future development of financial services industry, and especially banking industry. Growing international trading and problems in transferring money have motivated researchers to introduce a new structure. Online banking is the newest delivery channel for retail banking services. Online banking facilitated by various Electronic Commerce technologies, has helped commercial banks to stay competitive through productivity gains, transaction cost reduction and customer service improvement. Security for online banking has changed considerably during the relatively short period that online banking has been in use. In particular, authentication in the early implementations was, and sometimes still is, vulnerable to various attacks such as phishing. It is known that the quantum cryptography protocols are able to detect immediately any attempt to attack the key exchange and the authentication process. This paper presentsan introduction of online banking and quantum cryptography. In this paper we are proposing a model for authentication in online banking system with quantum cryptography.

  2. Practical Quantum Cryptography for Secure Free-Space Communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttler, W.T.; Hughes, R.J.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-02-01

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics and information-theoretically secure post-processing methods. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. In this paper we describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from our experimental free-space system with which we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of quantum key generation over a point-to-point outdoor atmospheric path in daylight. We achieved a transmission distance of 0.5 km, which was limited only by the length of the test range. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on orbit. We present a feasibility analysis of surface-to-satellite quantum key generation.

  3. An Online Banking System Based on Quantum Cryptography Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ri-gui; Li, Wei; Huan, Tian-tian; Shen, Chen-yi; Li, Hai-sheng

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, an online banking system has been built. Based on quantum cryptography communication, this system is proved unconditional secure. Two sets of GHZ states are applied, which can ensure the safety of purchase and payment, respectively. In another word, three trading participants in each triplet state group form an interdependent and interactive relationship. In the meantime, trading authorization and blind signature is introduced by means of controllable quantum teleportation. Thus, an effective monitor is practiced on the premise that the privacy of trading partners is guaranteed. If there is a dispute or deceptive behavior, the system will find out the deceiver immediately according to the relationship mentioned above.

  4. Quantum Overloading Cryptography Using Single-Photon Nonlocality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Yong-Gang; CAI Qing-Yu; SHI Ting-Yun

    2007-01-01

    @@ Using the single-photon nonlocality, we propose a quantum novel overloading cryptography scheme, in which a single photon carries two bits information in one-way quantum channel. Two commutative modes of the single photon, the polarization mode and the spatial mode, are used to encode secret information. Strict time windows are set to detect the impersonation attack. The spatial mode which denotes the existence of photons is noncommutative with the phase of the photon, so that our scheme is secure against photon-number-splitting attack. Our protocol may be secure against individual attack.

  5. Cryptography from quantum uncertainty in the presence of quantum side information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Niek Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The thesis starts with a high-level introduction into cryptography and quantum mechanics. Chapter 2 gives a theoretical foundation by introducing probability theory, information theory, functional analysis, quantum mechanics and quantum information theory. Chapter 3, 4 and 5 are editions of work

  6. Cryptography from quantum uncertainty in the presence of quantum side information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Niek Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The thesis starts with a high-level introduction into cryptography and quantum mechanics. Chapter 2 gives a theoretical foundation by introducing probability theory, information theory, functional analysis, quantum mechanics and quantum information theory. Chapter 3, 4 and 5 are editions of work pub

  7. Entropy in quantum information theory - Communication and cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majenz, Christian

    to density matrices, the von Neumann entropy behaves dierently. The latter does not, for example, have the monotonicity property that the latter possesses: When adding another quantum system, the entropy can decrease. A long-standing open question is, whether there are quantum analogues of unconstrained non......Entropies have been immensely useful in information theory. In this Thesis, several results in quantum information theory are collected, most of which use entropy as the main mathematical tool. The rst one concerns the von Neumann entropy. While a direct generalization of the Shannon entropy...... in quantum Shannon theory. While immensely more entanglement-consuming, the variant of port based teleportation is interesting for applications like instantaneous non-local computation and attacks on quantum position-based cryptography. Port based teleportation cannot be implemented perfectly...

  8. 量子密码通信及其研究进展%Quantum Cryptography and Its Research Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林帅; 林雄

    2012-01-01

    2007年4月2日,国际上首个量子密码通信网络由中国科学家在北京测试运行成功。这是迄今为止国际公开报道的唯一无中转,可同时、任意互通的量子密码通信网络,标志着量子保密通信技术从点对点方式向网络化迈出了关键一步。这次实验的成功,为量子因特网的发展奠定了基础。文章阐述量子密码的产生、量子密码学的基本原理、该领域的实验研究及研究成果,最后指出量子密码通信将是保障未来网络通信安全的一种重要技术。%China's first quantum cryptography network has been successfully tested in Beijing, the Chinese Academy of Sciences announced on April 2, 2007. It is the only fully-connected quantum network that could make simultaneous communications without any relay ever reported in the world, according to experts. The feat is a crucial step towards the practical usage of quantum cryptography from the point-to-point network. The success of this experiment, laid the foundation for the development of quantum Internet. This paper describes the generation of quantum cryptography, the basic principle of quantum cryptography in the field of experimental research and research results, and finally pointed out that quantum cryptography will be an important technology to protect the security of network communication.

  9. Encrypting Binary Bits via Quantum Cryptography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENGGuihua

    2004-01-01

    A quantum cryptographic algorithm, which may be exploited to encrypt classic information is investigated theoretically in this paper. The proposed algorithm can prevent quantum attack strategy as well as classic attack strategy. A proof-in-principle of experimental demonstration, which exploits optical fibre communication technology and photon technology, is suggested.

  10. Staging quantum cryptography with chocolate ballsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svozil, Karl

    2006-09-01

    Moderated by a director, laypeople and students assume the role of quanta and enact a quantum cryptographic protocol. The performance is based on a generalized urn model capable of reproducing complementarity even for classical chocolate balls.

  11. Quantum cryptography: Round-robin with photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Bernd; Yuan, Zhiliang

    2015-12-01

    Last year the common notion that signal disturbance has to be monitored in a quantum cryptographic link to guarantee secrecy was challenged by a new protocol. The formidable task of demonstrating it experimentally has now been achieved.

  12. Quantum cryptography for secure free-space communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-03-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as key material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is a new technique for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions: Heisenberg`s uncertainty principle ensures that an adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). The authors have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non-orthogonal photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. The authors have developed and tested a free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system over an outdoor optical path of {approximately}1 km at Los Alamos National Laboratory under nighttime conditions. Results show that free-space QKD can provide secure real-time key distribution between parties who have a need to communicate secretly. Finally, they examine the feasibility of surface to satellite QKD.

  13. Quantum random number generators and their applications in cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipcevic, Mario

    2012-06-01

    Random number generators (RNG) are an important resource in many areas: cryptography (both quantum and classical), probabilistic computation (Monte Carlo methods), numerical simulations, industrial testing and labeling, hazard games, scientific research etc. Because today's computers are deterministic, they can not create random numbers unless complemented with a physical RNG. Randomness of a RNG can be defined and scientifically characterized and measured. Especially valuable is the information-theoretic provable RNG which, at state of the art, seem to be possible only by harvest of randomness inherent to certain (simple) quantum systems and such a generator we call Quantum RNG (QRNG). On the other hand, current industry standards dictate use of RNGs based on free running oscillators (FRO) whose randomness is derived from electronics noise present in logic circuits and which, although quantum in nature, cannot be strictly proven. This approach is currently used in FPGA and ASIC chips. We compare weak and strong aspects of the two approaches for use in cryptography and in general. We also give an alternative definition of randomness, discuss usage of single photon detectors in realization of QRNGs and give several examples where QRNG can significantly improve security of a cryptographic system.

  14. Experimental realization of quantum cryptography communication in free space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Chuan; ZHANG; Jingfu; WANG; Pingxiao; DENG; Fuguo; A

    2005-01-01

    Utilizing linear optical devices, the principle of B92 quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol is demonstrated in free space with a distance of transmission of 2.2 meters. The faint laser pulses with 650 nm wavelength are used as the single photon sources. The experimental results show that the eavesdropping behavior in the signal transmission can be detected. We also discuss the problems and solutions in using the quantum cryptography communication practically. It is pointed out that one of the approaches to increasing the distance of the quantum communication is to overcome the attenuation of the single photon in transmission. This could not be solved by the use of single photon source, and new quantum communication protocols are needed to solve these problems.

  15. A fully efficient secure quantum cryptography protocol

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang Bin Wang

    2001-01-01

    Since Bennett and Brassard suggested their quantum key distribution protocol(BB84 protocol) in 1984, the subject has been extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally. The protocol allows two remote parties Alice and Bob to create and share a secret key using a quantum channel and public authenticated communications. The quantum key created in this way is in principle secure because eavesdroppers have no way to tap the quantum channel without disturb it. In the protocol, two level quantum bits are measured in two basis, $X$ and $Z$ randomly by Bob. So at least half of the measurement results will be discarded because Bob has a half probability taking the measurement in a wrong basis. On the other hand, the security is not the maximum in BB84 protocol. To increase the security, one may straightforwardly increase the number of basis used in the protocol. For example, six state protocol was proposed recently for two level system. However, in this way, it seems to be the case that the higher the secu...

  16. Continuous variable quantum cryptography using coherent states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosshans, Frédéric; Grangier, Philippe

    2002-02-04

    We propose several methods for quantum key distribution (QKD) based on the generation and transmission of random distributions of coherent or squeezed states, and we show that they are secure against individual eavesdropping attacks. These protocols require that the transmission of the optical line between Alice and Bob is larger than 50%, but they do not rely on "sub-shot-noise" features such as squeezing. Their security is a direct consequence of the no-cloning theorem, which limits the signal-to-noise ratio of possible quantum measurements on the transmission line. Our approach can also be used for evaluating various QKD protocols using light with Gaussian statistics.

  17. Continuous variable quantum cryptography using coherent states

    CERN Document Server

    Grosshans, F; Grosshans, Fr\\'ed\\'eric; Grangier, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    We propose several methods for quantum key distribution (QKD), based upon the generation and transmission of random distributions of coherent or squeezed states. We show that these protocols are secure against individual eavesdropping attacks, provided that the transmission of the optical line between Alice and Bob is larger than 50 %. The security of the protocol is related to the no-cloning theorem, that limits the signal to noise ratio of possible quantum measurements on the transmission line, even though the transmitted light has no "non-classical" feature such as squeezing. We show also that our approach can be used for evaluating any QKD protocol using light with gaussian statistics.

  18. Quantum Cryptography with Entangled QuNits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Hong-Liang; FANG Xi-Ming

    2005-01-01

    @@ We propose an extension of quantum key distribution based on encoding the key into quNits, i.e. quantum states in an N-dimensional Hilbert space. In our protocol, we adopt asymmetric measurement scheme resulting in an efficiency higher than previous protocols and a generalized Bell inequality [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 (2004) 130404] is employed to detect the presence of an eavesdropper Eve. We also derive the information gained by a potential eavesdropper Eve applying a cloning-based attack and the maximal error rate which measures the robustness of the protocol. The result shows that the security of our scheme increases with the dimension N.

  19. Quantum cryptography with an ideal local relay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spedalieri, Gaetana; Ottaviani, Carlo; Braunstein, Samuel L.

    2015-01-01

    We consider two remote parties connected to a relay by two quantum channels. To generate a secret key, they transmit coherent states to the relay, where the states are subject to a continuous-variable (CV) Bell detection. We study the ideal case where Alice's channel is lossless, i.e., the relay...

  20. One-way entangled-photon autocompensating quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Zachary D.; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Sergienko, Alexander V.; Saleh, Bahaa E.; Teich, Malvin C.

    2003-06-01

    A quantum cryptography implementation is presented that uses entanglement to combine one-way operation with an autocompensating feature that has hitherto only been available in implementations that require the signal to make a round trip between the users. Using the concept of advanced waves, it is shown that this proposed implementation is related to the round-trip implementation in the same way that Ekert’s two-particle scheme is related to the original one-particle scheme of Bennett and Brassard. The practical advantages and disadvantages of the proposed implementation are discussed in the context of existing schemes.

  1. Finite key analysis in quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, T.

    2007-10-31

    In view of experimental realization of quantum key distribution schemes, the study of their efficiency becomes as important as the proof of their security. The latter is the subject of most of the theoretical work about quantum key distribution, and many important results such as the proof of unconditional security have been obtained. The efficiency and also the robustness of quantum key distribution protocols against noise can be measured by figures of merit such as the secret key rate (the fraction of input signals that make it into the key) and the threshold quantum bit error rate (the maximal error rate such that one can still create a secret key). It is important to determine these quantities because they tell us whether a certain quantum key distribution scheme can be used at all in a given situation and if so, how many secret key bits it can generate in a given time. However, these figures of merit are usually derived under the ''infinite key limit'' assumption, that is, one assumes that an infinite number of quantum states are send and that all sub-protocols of the scheme (in particular privacy amplification) are carried out on these infinitely large blocks. Such an assumption usually eases the analysis, but also leads to (potentially) too optimistic values for the quantities in question. In this thesis, we are explicitly avoiding the infinite key limit for the analysis of the privacy amplification step, which plays the most important role in a quantum key distribution scheme. We still assume that an optimal error correction code is applied and we do not take into account any statistical errors that might occur in the parameter estimation step. Renner and coworkers derived an explicit formula for the obtainable key rate in terms of Renyi entropies of the quantum states describing Alice's, Bob's, and Eve's systems. This results serves as a starting point for our analysis, and we derive an algorithm that efficiently computes

  2. Quantum random number generators and their use in cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Stipcevic, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Random number generators (RNG) are an important resource in many areas: cryptography (both quantum and classical), probabilistic computation (Monte Carlo methods), numerical simulations, industrial testing and labeling, hazard games, scientific research, etc. Because today's computers are deterministic, they can not create random numbers unless complemented with a RNG. Randomness of a RNG can be precisely, scientifically characterized and measured. Especially valuable is the information-theoretic provable RNG (True RNG - TRNG) which, at state of the art, seem to be possible only by use of physical randomness inherent to certain (simple) quantum systems. On the other hand, current industry standard dictates use of RNG's based on free running oscillators (FRO) whose randomness is derived from electronics noise present in logic circuits and which cannot be strictly proven. This approach is currently used in 3-rd and 4-th generation FPGA and ASIC hardware, unsuitable for realization of quantum TRNG. We compare we...

  3. Teleportation-based continuous variable quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiz, F. S.; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2017-03-01

    We present a continuous variable (CV) quantum key distribution (QKD) scheme based on the CV quantum teleportation of coherent states that yields a raw secret key made up of discrete variables for both Alice and Bob. This protocol preserves the efficient detection schemes of current CV technology (no single-photon detection techniques) and, at the same time, has efficient error correction and privacy amplification schemes due to the binary modulation of the key. We show that for a certain type of incoherent attack, it is secure for almost any value of the transmittance of the optical line used by Alice to share entangled two-mode squeezed states with Bob (no 3 dB or 50% loss limitation characteristic of beam splitting attacks). The present CVQKD protocol works deterministically (no postselection needed) with efficient direct reconciliation techniques (no reverse reconciliation) in order to generate a secure key and beyond the 50% loss case at the incoherent attack level.

  4. Practical free-space quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.; Simmons, C.M.

    1998-12-01

    An experimental free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system has been tested over an outdoor optical path of {approx} 1 km under nighttime conditions at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system employs the Bennett 92 protocol; here the authors give a brief overview of this protocol, and describe the experimental implementation of it. An analysis of the system efficiency is presented, as well as a description of the error detection protocol, which employs a two-dimensional parity check scheme. Finally, the susceptibility of this system to eavesdropping by various techniques is determined, and the effectiveness of privacy amplification procedures is discussed. The conclusions are that free-space QKD is both effective and secure; possible applications include the rekeying of satellites in low earth orbit.

  5. Three-Stage Quantum Cryptography Protocol under Collective-Rotation Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsen Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Information security is increasingly important as society migrates to the information age. Classical cryptography widely used nowadays is based on computational complexity, which means that it assumes that solving some particular mathematical problems is hard on a classical computer. With the development of supercomputers and, potentially, quantum computers, classical cryptography has more and more potential risks. Quantum cryptography provides a solution which is based on the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and no-cloning theorem. While BB84-based quantum protocols are only secure when a single photon is used in communication, the three-stage quantum protocol is multi-photon tolerant. However, existing analyses assume perfect noiseless channels. In this paper, a multi-photon analysis is performed for the three-stage quantum protocol under the collective-rotation noise model. The analysis provides insights into the impact of the noise level on a three-stage quantum cryptography system.

  6. Tight finite-key analysis for quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomamichel, Marco; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Gisin, Nicolas; Renner, Renato

    2012-01-17

    Despite enormous theoretical and experimental progress in quantum cryptography, the security of most current implementations of quantum key distribution is still not rigorously established. One significant problem is that the security of the final key strongly depends on the number, M, of signals exchanged between the legitimate parties. Yet, existing security proofs are often only valid asymptotically, for unrealistically large values of M. Another challenge is that most security proofs are very sensitive to small differences between the physical devices used by the protocol and the theoretical model used to describe them. Here we show that these gaps between theory and experiment can be simultaneously overcome by using a recently developed proof technique based on the uncertainty relation for smooth entropies.

  7. Quantum cryptography in real-life applications: Assumptions and security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi

    Quantum cryptography, or quantum key distribution (QKD), provides a means of unconditionally secure communication. The security is in principle based on the fundamental laws of physics. Security proofs show that if quantum cryptography is appropriately implemented, even the most powerful eavesdropper cannot decrypt the message from a cipher. The implementations of quantum crypto-systems in real life may not fully comply with the assumptions made in the security proofs. Such discrepancy between the experiment and the theory can be fatal to the security of a QKD system. In this thesis we address a number of these discrepancies. A perfect single-photon source is often assumed in many security proofs. However, a weak coherent source is widely used in a real-life QKD implementation. Decoy state protocols have been proposed as a novel approach to dramatically improve the performance of a weak coherent source based QKD implementation without jeopardizing its security. Here, we present the first experimental demonstrations of decoy state protocols. Our experimental scheme was later adopted by most decoy state QKD implementations. In the security proof of decoy state protocols as well as many other QKD protocols, it is widely assumed that a sender generates a phase-randomized coherent state. This assumption has been enforced in few implementations. We close this gap in two steps: First, we implement and verify the phase randomization experimentally; second, we prove the security of a QKD implementation without the coherent state assumption. In many security proofs of QKD, it is assumed that all the detectors on the receiver's side have identical detection efficiencies. We show experimentally that this assumption may be violated in a commercial QKD implementation due to an eavesdropper's malicious manipulation. Moreover, we show that the eavesdropper can learn part of the final key shared by the legitimate users as a consequence of this violation of the assumptions.

  8. Anonymous-key quantum cryptography and unconditionally secure quantum bit commitment

    CERN Document Server

    Yuen, H P

    2000-01-01

    A new cryptographic tool, anonymous quantum key technique, is introduced that leads to unconditionally secure key distribution and encryption schemes that can be readily implemented experimentally in a realistic environment. If quantum memory is available, the technique would have many features of public-key cryptography; an identification protocol that does not require a shared secret key is provided as an illustration. The possibility is also indicated for obtaining unconditionally secure quantum bit commitment protocols with this technique.

  9. The DARPA Quantum Network

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, C

    2004-01-01

    A team from BBN Technologies, Boston University, and Harvard University has recently built and begun to operate the world's first Quantum Key Distribution (QKD)network under DARPA sponsorship. The DARPA Quantum Network became fully operational on October 23, 2003 in BBN's laboratories, and in June 2004 was fielded through dark fiber under the streets of Cambridge, Mass., to link our campuses with non-stop quantum cryptography, twenty-four hours per day. As of December 2004, it consists of six nodes. Four are 5 MHz, BBN-built BB84 systems designed for telecommunications fiber and inter-connected by a photonic switch. Two are the electronics subsystems for a high speed free-space system designed and built by NIST. This paper describes the motivation for our work, the current status of the DARPA Quantum Network, its unique optical switching and key relay protocols, and our future plans.

  10. Detection of Eavesdropping in Quantum Cryptography%量子密码的窃听检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凯; 黄晓英; 滕吉红; 李振华

    2012-01-01

    量子密码是密码学与量子力学相结合的产物.它具有得天独厚的优势并逐渐成为下一代密码技术中的重要研究分支.与经典密码相比,量子密码最大的优势就是它的可证明安全性和可检测性.分析了量子密码协议中的窃听检测过程并给出一个新的量子密码协议方案.%Quantum cryptography is the combination of quantum mechanics and cryptography. It has native advantage in the sense of security and is gradually developing into an important branch of next generation of technologies in cryptography. Compared to the classical cryptography, the greatest advantages of quantum cryptography are provable security and detectability. In this paper, the detection of eavesdropping in quantum cryptography schemes is investigated and a new quantum cryptography protocol is presented.

  11. Quantum information. Teleportation - cryptography - quantum computer; Quanteninformation. Teleportation - Kryptografie - Quantencomputer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenneker, Carsten (comp.)

    2012-11-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test facility, quantum teleportation, the reality of quanta, interaction-free quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view in the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  12. Quantum signal processing-based visual cryptography with unexpanded shares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Surya Sarathi; Sharma, Kaushik Das; Chandra, Jayanta K.; Bera, Jitendra Nath

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a visual cryptography scheme (VCS) based on quantum signal processing (QSP). VCS is an image encryption technique that is very simple in formulation and is secure. In (k,n)-VCS, a secret binary image is encoded into n share images and minimum k shares are needed to decrypt the secret image. The efforts to encrypt a grayscale image are few in number and the majority are related to grayscale to binary conversion. Thus, a generalized approach of encryption for all types of images, i.e., binary, gray, and color is needed. Here, a generic VCS is proposed based on QSP where all types of images can be encrypted without pixel expansion along with a smoothing technique to enhance the quality of the decrypted image. The proposed scheme is tested and compared for benchmark images, and the result shows the effectiveness of the scheme.

  13. A Study of Quantum Algorithms and Quantum Cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    小柴, 健史

    2007-01-01

    This report describes properties of basic cryptographic primitives (quantum public-key cryptosystmes and quantum one-way functions) in the quantum world where quantum computers are available. Some quantum public-key cryptosystems have already proposed. However, the security requirements for quantum public-key cryptosystems are not studied well. We propose several security notions for quantum public-key cryptosystems and discuss relation among them. In the classical setting, the notion of one-...

  14. A new spin on quantum cryptography: Avoiding trapdoors and embracing public keys

    CERN Document Server

    Ioannou, Lawrence M

    2011-01-01

    We give new arguments in support of \\emph{signed quantum key establishment}, where quantum cryptography is used in a public-key infrastructure that provides the required authentication. We also analyze more thoroughly than previous works the benefits that quantum key establishment protocols have over certain classical protocols, motivated in part by the various objections to quantum key establishment that are sometimes raised. Previous knowledge of quantum cryptography on the reader's part is not required for this article, as the definition of "quantum key establishment" that we use is an entirely classical and black-box characterization (one need only trust that protocols satisfying the definition exist).

  15. 量子密码体系研究%Study on Quantum Cryptography System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佳

    2013-01-01

    本文主要介绍了量子密码体系中密码算法、密钥管理、密码技术、安全协议、密钥分配等主要内容。得出了量子密码比传统密码更安全的有效结论,最后总结了量子密码广阔的发展前景。%T his paper introduced som e im portantcontenton quantum cryptography system ,such as encryption algorithm , key m anagem ent, encryption technology, secure protocol, key distribution. It pointed out safer com-pared quantum cryptography w ith traditional cryptography and the broad prospects of developm ent on quantum cryptography system atlast.

  16. Topics in quantum cryptography, quantum error correction, and channel simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhicheng

    In this thesis, we mainly investigate four different topics: efficiently implementable codes for quantum key expansion [51], quantum error-correcting codes based on privacy amplification [48], private classical capacity of quantum channels [44], and classical channel simulation with quantum side information [49, 50]. For the first topic, we propose an efficiently implementable quantum key expansion protocol, capable of increasing the size of a pre-shared secret key by a constant factor. Previously, the Shor-Preskill proof [64] of the security of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) [6] quantum key distribution protocol relied on the theoretical existence of good classical error-correcting codes with the "dual-containing" property. But the explicit and efficiently decodable construction of such codes is unknown. We show that we can lift the dual-containing constraint by employing the non-dual-containing codes with excellent performance and efficient decoding algorithms. For the second topic, we propose a construction of Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) [19, 68] quantum error-correcting codes, which are originally based on pairs of mutually dual-containing classical codes, by combining a classical code with a two-universal hash function. We show, using the results of Renner and Koenig [57], that the communication rates of such codes approach the hashing bound on tensor powers of Pauli channels in the limit of large block-length. For the third topic, we prove a regularized formula for the secret key assisted capacity region of a quantum channel for transmitting private classical information. This result parallels the work of Devetak on entanglement assisted quantum communication capacity. This formula provides a new family protocol, the private father protocol, under the resource inequality framework that includes the private classical communication without the assisted secret keys as a child protocol. For the fourth topic, we study and solve the problem of classical channel

  17. QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY SYSTEM WITH A SINGLE PHOTON SOURCE BASED ON THE SPONTANEOUS PARAMETRIC SCATTERING EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Egorov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A scheme of a single photon source for quantum informatics applications based on the spontaneous parametric scattering effect is proposed and a quantum cryptography setup using it is presented. The system is compared to the alternative ones that operate with attenuated classic light.

  18. Fast and simple high-capacity quantum cryptography with error detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hong; Luo, Ming-Xing; Pieprzyk, Josef; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Lei; Li, Shudong; Orgun, Mehmet A.

    2017-04-01

    Quantum cryptography is commonly used to generate fresh secure keys with quantum signal transmission for instant use between two parties. However, research shows that the relatively low key generation rate hinders its practical use where a symmetric cryptography component consumes the shared key. That is, the security of the symmetric cryptography demands frequent rate of key updates, which leads to a higher consumption of the internal one-time-pad communication bandwidth, since it requires the length of the key to be as long as that of the secret. In order to alleviate these issues, we develop a matrix algorithm for fast and simple high-capacity quantum cryptography. Our scheme can achieve secure private communication with fresh keys generated from Fibonacci- and Lucas- valued orbital angular momentum (OAM) states for the seed to construct recursive Fibonacci and Lucas matrices. Moreover, the proposed matrix algorithm for quantum cryptography can ultimately be simplified to matrix multiplication, which is implemented and optimized in modern computers. Most importantly, considerably information capacity can be improved effectively and efficiently by the recursive property of Fibonacci and Lucas matrices, thereby avoiding the restriction of physical conditions, such as the communication bandwidth.

  19. Security proof of counterfactual quantum cryptography against general intercept-resend attacks and its vulnerability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Sheng; Wang Jian; Tang Chao-Jing

    2012-01-01

    Counterfactual quantum cryptography,recently proposed by Noh,is featured with no transmission of signal particles.This exhibits evident security advantages,such as its immunity to the well-known photon-number-splitting attack.In this paper,the theoretical security of counterfactual quantum cryptography protocol against the general interceptresend attacks is proved by bounding the information of an eavesdropper Eve more tightly than in Yin's proposal [Phys.Rev.A 82 042335 (2010)].It is also shown that practical counterfactual quantum cryptography implementations may be vulnerable when equipped with imperfect apparatuses,by proving that a negative key rate can be achieved when Eve launches a time-shift attack based on imperfect detector efficiency.

  20. A Secure Key Distribution System of Quantum Cryptography Based on the Coherent State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guang-Can; Zhang, Xiao-Yu

    1996-01-01

    The cryptographic communication has a lot of important applications, particularly in the magnificent prospects of private communication. As one knows, the security of cryptographic channel depends crucially on the secrecy of the key. The Vernam cipher is the only cipher system which has guaranteed security. In that system the key must be as long as the message and most be used only once. Quantum cryptography is a method whereby key secrecy can be guaranteed by a physical law. So it is impossible, even in principle, to eavesdrop on such channels. Quantum cryptography has been developed in recent years. Up to now, many schemes of quantum cryptography have been proposed. Now one of the main problems in this field is how to increase transmission distance. In order to use quantum nature of light, up to now proposed schemes all use very dim light pulses. The average photon number is about 0.1. Because of the loss of the optical fiber, it is difficult for the quantum cryptography based on one photon level or on dim light to realize quantum key-distribution over long distance. A quantum key distribution based on coherent state is introduced in this paper. Here we discuss the feasibility and security of this scheme.

  1. Quantum Cryptography for Secure Communications to Low-Earth Orbit Satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.; Twyeffort, E.; Simmons, C.M.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1999-06-03

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit. We have developed an experimental quantum cryptography system based on the transmission of non-orthogonal single-photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on in orbit.

  2. Characterization of collective Gaussian attacks and security of coherent-state quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Braunstein, Samuel L; Lloyd, Seth

    2008-11-14

    We provide a simple description of the most general collective Gaussian attack in continuous-variable quantum cryptography. In the scenario of such general attacks, we analyze the asymptotic secret-key rates which are achievable with coherent states, joint measurements of the quadratures and one-way classical communication.

  3. Reduced randomness in quantum cryptography with sequences of qubits encoded in the same basis

    CERN Document Server

    Lamoureux, L P; Cerf, N J; Gisin, Nicolas; Macchiavello, C

    2005-01-01

    We consider the cloning of sequences of qubits prepared in the states used in the BB84 or 6-state quantum cryptography protocol, and show that the single-qubit fidelity is unaffected even if entire sequences of qubits are prepared in the same basis. This result is of great importance for practical quantum cryptosystems because it reduces the need for high-speed random number generation without impairing on the security against finite-size attacks.

  4. Compact transmission system using single-sideband modulation of light for quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraffourg, L; Merolla, J M; Goedgebuer, J P; Mazurenko, Y; Rhodes, W T

    2001-09-15

    We report a new transmission that can be used for quantum key distribution. The system uses single-sideband-modulated light in an implementation of the BB84 quantum cryptography protocol. The system is formed by two integrated unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometers and is based on interference between phase-modulated sidebands in the spectral domain. Experiments show that high interference visibility can be obtained.

  5. Practical Quantum Cryptography: the Q-KeyMaker

    CERN Document Server

    Bovino, Fabio A

    2011-01-01

    In the next years the data transmission connections will constitute one of the principal tools of communication among cities, enterprises and public administration. With their enhanced connectivity, the systems and nets of information are now exposed to an increased vulnerability and new safety problems are emerging. Insofar Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) has matured to real world applications and can enhance the safety of the communication nets. In this paper we present the QKD network designed and implemented by Selex-SI and we give an overview of the obtained results.

  6. Perspectives on Entangled Nuclear Particle Pairs Generation and Manipulation in Quantum Communication and Cryptography Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Dănilă

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Entanglement between two quantum elements is a phenomenon which presents a broad application spectrum, being used largely in quantum cryptography schemes and in physical characterisation of the universe. Commonly known entangled states have been obtained with photons and electrons, but other quantum elements such as quarks, leptons, and neutrinos have shown their informational potential. In this paper, we present the perspective of exploiting the phenomenon of entanglement that appears in nuclear particle interactions as a resource for quantum key distribution protocols.

  7. A neural-network approach for visual cryptography and authorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Tai-Wen; Chiang, Suchen

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a neural-network approach for visual authorization, which is an application of visual cryptography (VC). The scheme contains a key-share and a set of user-shares. The administrator owns the key-share, and each user owns a user-share issued by the administrator from the user-share set. The shares in the user-share set are visually indistinguishable, i.e. they have the same pictorial meaning. However, the stacking of the key-share with different user-shares will reveal significantly different images. Therefore, the administrator (in fact, only the administrator) can visually recognize the authority assigned to a particular user by viewing the information appearing in the superposed image of key-share and user-share. This approach is completely different from traditional VC approaches. The salient features include: (i) the access schemes are described using a set of graytone images, and (ii) the codebooks to fulfil them are not required; and (iii) the size of share images is the same as the size of target image.

  8. Network-Centric Quantum Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Single-photon quantum communications (QC) offers ``future-proof'' cryptographic security rooted in the laws of physics. Today's quantum-secured communications cannot be compromised by unanticipated future technological advances. But to date, QC has only existed in point-to-point instantiations that have limited ability to address the cyber security challenges of our increasingly networked world. In my talk I will describe a fundamentally new paradigm of network-centric quantum communications (NQC) that leverages the network to bring scalable, QC-based security to user groups that may have no direct user-to-user QC connectivity. With QC links only between each of N users and a trusted network node, NQC brings quantum security to N2 user pairs, and to multi-user groups. I will describe a novel integrated photonics quantum smartcard (``QKarD'') and its operation in a multi-node NQC test bed. The QKarDs are used to implement the quantum cryptographic protocols of quantum identification, quantum key distribution and quantum secret splitting. I will explain how these cryptographic primitives are used to provide key management for encryption, authentication, and non-repudiation for user-to-user communications. My talk will conclude with a description of a recent demonstration that QC can meet both the security and quality-of-service (latency) requirements for electric grid control commands and data. These requirements cannot be met simultaneously with present-day cryptography.

  9. Secure Antnet Routing Algorithm for Scalable Adhoc Networks Using Elliptic Curve Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vijayalakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The secure end-to-end route discovery in the decentralized Mobile Adhoc Networks (MANETs should have to meet the requirements of prevention of DoS attacks on data traffic, should be adaptive and fault tolerant and must have high speed, low energy overhead and scalability for future development. In this research a secure routing using antnet mechanism and mutual authentication using Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC has been proposed to meet the above requirements. The common perception of public key cryptography is that it is not well suited for adhoc networks as they are very complex and slow. Against this popular belief, this research implements Elliptic Curve Cryptography -a public key cryptography scheme. ECC provides a similar level of security to conventional integer-based public-key algorithms, but with much shorter keys. Because of the shorter keys ECC algorithms run faster, require less space and consume less energy. These advantages make ECC a better choice of public key cryptography, especially for a resource constrained systems like MANETs. Using the antnet routing algorithm, the highly trustable route will be selected for data transfer and each Mobile Node (MN in MANET maintains the trust value of its one-hop neighbors. The mutual authentication between source and destination is done by master key exchange using Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC. v

  10. The Modeling Library of Eavesdropping Methods in Quantum Cryptography Protocols by Model Checking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Yang, Guowu; Hao, Yujie

    2016-07-01

    The most crucial issue of quantum cryptography protocols is its security. There exists many ways to attack the quantum communication process. In this paper, we present a model checking method for modeling the eavesdropping in quantum information protocols. So when the security properties of a certain protocol are needed to be verified, we can directly use the models which are already built. Here we adopt the probabilistic model checking tool—PRISM to model these attack methods. The verification results show that the detection rate of eavesdropping is approximately close to 1 when enough photons are transmitted.

  11. Bounds for reference-frame independent protocols in quantum cryptography using generalized uncertainty relations

    CERN Document Server

    Le, Thinh Phuc; Scarani, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    We define a family of reference-frame-independent quantum cryptography protocols for arbitrary dimensional signals. The generalized entropic uncertainty relations [M. Tomamichel and R. Renner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 110506 (2011)] are used for the first time to derive security bounds for protocols which use more than two measurements and combine the statistics in a non-linear parameter. This shows the power and versatility of this technique compared to the heavier, though usually tighter, conventional techniques.

  12. Active stabilization of the optical part in fiber optic quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balygin, K. A.; Klimov, A. N.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    The method of active stabilization of the polarization and other parameters of the optical part of a two-pass fiber optic quantum cryptography has been proposed and implemented. The method allows the completely automated maintenance of the visibility of interference close to an ideal value ( V ≥ 0.99) and the reduction of the instrumental contribution to the error in primary keys (QBER) to 0.5%.

  13. Free space relativistic quantum cryptography with faint laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molotkov, S. N.; Potapova, T. A.

    2013-07-01

    A new protocol for quantum key distribution through empty space is proposed. Apart from the quantum mechanical restrictions on distinguishability of non-orthogonal states, the protocol employs additional restrictions imposed by special relativity. The protocol ensures generation of a secure key even for the source generating non-strictly single-photon quantum states and for arbitrary losses in quantum communication channel.

  14. Elliptic Curve Cryptography with Security System in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu; Sharma, Dharmendra

    2010-10-01

    The rapid progress of wireless communications and embedded micro-electro-system technologies has made wireless sensor networks (WSN) very popular and even become part of our daily life. WSNs design are generally application driven, namely a particular application's requirements will determine how the network behaves. However, the natures of WSN have attracted increasing attention in recent years due to its linear scalability, a small software footprint, low hardware implementation cost, low bandwidth requirement, and high device performance. It is noted that today's software applications are mainly characterized by their component-based structures which are usually heterogeneous and distributed, including the WSNs. But WSNs typically need to configure themselves automatically and support as hoc routing. Agent technology provides a method for handling increasing software complexity and supporting rapid and accurate decision making. This paper based on our previous works [1, 2], three contributions have made, namely (a) fuzzy controller for dynamic slide window size to improve the performance of running ECC (b) first presented a hidden generation point for protection from man-in-the middle attack and (c) we first investigates multi-agent applying for key exchange together. Security systems have been drawing great attentions as cryptographic algorithms have gained popularity due to the natures that make them suitable for use in constrained environment such as mobile sensor information applications, where computing resources and power availability are limited. Elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) is one of high potential candidates for WSNs, which requires less computational power, communication bandwidth, and memory in comparison with other cryptosystem. For saving pre-computing storages recently there is a trend for the sensor networks that the sensor group leaders rather than sensors communicate to the end database, which highlighted the needs to prevent from the man

  15. Post-selection technique for quantum channels with applications to quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christandl, Matthias [University of Munich (Germany); Koenig, Robert [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Renner, Renato [ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    We propose a general method for studying properties of quantum channels acting on an n-partite system, whose action is invariant under permutations of the subsystems. Our main result is that, in order to prove that a certain property holds for any arbitrary input, it is sufficient to consider the special case where the input is a particular de Finetti-type state, i.e., a state which consists of n identical and independent copies of an (unknown) state on a single subsystem. A similar statement holds for more general channels which are covariant with respect to the action of an arbitrary finite or locally compact group. Our technique can be applied to the analysis of information-theoretic problems. For example, in quantum cryptography, we get a simple proof for the fact that security of a discrete-variable quantum key distribution protocol against collective attacks implies security of the protocol against the most general attacks. The resulting security bounds are tighter than previously known bounds obtained by proofs relying on the exponential de Finetti theorem.

  16. Quantum Advantage in Communication Networks

    CERN Document Server

    De, Aditi Sen

    2011-01-01

    Quantum channels are known to provide qualitatively better information transfer capacities over their classical counterparts. Examples include quantum cryptography, quantum dense coding, and quantum teleportation. This is a short review on paradigmatic quantum communication protocols in both bipartite as well as multipartite scenarios.

  17. Current status of the DARPA Quantum Network

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, C; Pearson, D; Pikalo, O; Schlafer, J; Yeh, H; Elliott, Chip; Colvin, Alexander; Pearson, David; Pikalo, Oleksiy; Schlafer, John; Yeh, Henry

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the current status of the DARPA Quantum Network, which became fully operational in BBN's laboratory in October 2003, and has been continuously running in 6 nodes operating through telecommunications fiber between Harvard University, Boston University, and BBN since June 2004. The DARPA Quantum Network is the world's first quantum cryptography network, and perhaps also the first QKD systems providing continuous operation across a metropolitan area. Four more nodes are now being added to bring the total to 10 QKD nodes. This network supports a variety of QKD technologies, including phase-modulated lasers through fiber, entanglement through fiber, and freespace QKD. We provide a basic introduction and rational for this network, discuss the February 2005 status of the various QKD hardware suites and software systems in the network, and describe our operational experience with the DARPA Quantum Network to date. We conclude with a discussion of our ongoing work.

  18. Practical limitation for continuous-variable quantum cryptography using coherent States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiki, Ryo; Hirano, Takuya

    2004-03-19

    In this Letter, first, we investigate the security of a continuous-variable quantum cryptographic scheme with a postselection process against individual beam splitting attack. It is shown that the scheme can be secure in the presence of the transmission loss owing to the postselection. Second, we provide a loss limit for continuous-variable quantum cryptography using coherent states taking into account excess Gaussian noise on quadrature distribution. Since the excess noise is reduced by the loss mechanism, a realistic intercept-resend attack which makes a Gaussian mixture of coherent states gives a loss limit in the presence of any excess Gaussian noise.

  19. Security Notions for Quantum Public-Key Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Koshiba, T

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that Shor's quantum algorithm for integer factorization can break down the RSA public-key cryptosystem, which is widely used in many cryptographic applications. Thus, public-key cryptosystems in the quantum computational setting are longed for cryptology. In order to define the security notions of public-key cryptosystems, we have to model the power of the sender, receiver, adversary and channel. While we may consider a setting where quantum computers are available only to adversaries, we generally discuss what are the right security notions for (quantum) public-key cryptosystems in the quantum computational setting. Moreover, we consider the security of quantum public-key cryptosystems known so far.

  20. Security Notions for Quantum Public-Key Cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    Koshiba, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that Shor's quantum algorithm for integer factorization can break down the RSA public-key cryptosystem, which is widely used in many cryptographic applications. Thus, public-key cryptosystems in the quantum computational setting are longed for cryptology. In order to define the security notions of public-key cryptosystems, we have to model the power of the sender, receiver, adversary and channel. While we may consider a setting where quantum computers are available only to ad...

  1. Reverse reconciliation protocols for quantum cryptography with continuous variables

    CERN Document Server

    Grosshans, F; Grosshans, Fr\\'ed\\'eric; Grangier, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    We introduce new quantum key distribution protocols using quantum continuous variables, that are secure against individual attacks for any transmission of the optical line between Alice and Bob. In particular, it is not required that this transmission is larger than 50 %. Though squeezing or entanglement may be helpful, they are not required, and there is no need for quantum memories or entanglement purification. These protocols can thus be implemented using coherent states and homodyne detection, and they may be more efficient than usual protocols using quantum discrete variables.

  2. Information complementarity in multipartite quantum states and security in cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Anindita; Kumar, Asutosh; Rakshit, Debraj; Prabhu, R.; SenDe, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2016-03-01

    We derive complementarity relations for arbitrary quantum states of multiparty systems of any number of parties and dimensions between the purity of a part of the system and several correlation quantities, including entanglement and other quantum correlations as well as classical and total correlations, of that part with the remainder of the system. We subsequently use such a complementarity relation between purity and quantum mutual information in the tripartite scenario to provide a bound on the secret key rate for individual attacks on a quantum key distribution protocol.

  3. Cryptography in the Bounded Quantum-Storage Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Serge, Fehr; Schaffner, Christian;

    2008-01-01

    We initiate the study of two-party cryptographic primitives with unconditional security, assuming that the adversary's quantum memory is of bounded size. We show that oblivious transfer and bit commitment can be implemented in this model using protocols where honest parties need no quantum memory...

  4. Cryptography In The Bounded Quantum-Storage Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Salvail, Louis; Schaffner, Christian;

    2005-01-01

    We initiate the study of two-party cryptographic primitives with unconditional security, assuming that the adversary's quantum memory is of bounded size. We show that oblivious transfer and bit commitment can be implemented in this model using protocols where honest parties need no quantum memory...

  5. Direct Use of Secret Key in Quantum Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Yuen, H P

    2006-01-01

    For single-photon quantum key generation between two users, it is shown that for collective attacks the use of a shared secret key extended via a pseudo-random number generator may simultaneously enhance the security and efficiency of the cryptosystem. This effect arises from the intrinsic performance difference between quantum detectors with versus without knowledge of the key, a purely quantum effect and a new principle for key generation. No intrusion level estimation is needed and the method is directly applicable to realistic systems involving multi-photon sources, losses, noises, and finite-sequence statistical fluctuations. It is suggested that such use of a secret key be routinely incorporated in a quantum key generation system. The use of a secret key in quantum direct encryption is also indicated.

  6. A key distribution scheme using elliptic curve cryptography in wireless sensor networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Louw, J

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Conference on Industrial Informatics (INDIN), 19-21 July 2016, Futuroscope-Poitiers, France A key distribution scheme using elliptic curve cryptography in wireless sensor networks J. Louw ; G. Niezen ; T. D. Ramotsoela ; A. M. Abu-Mahfouz Abstract...

  7. A weak blind signature scheme based on quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaojun; Niu, Xiamu; Ji, Liping; Tian, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present a weak blind signature scheme based on the correlation of EPR (Einstein-Padolsky-Rosen) pairs. Different from classical blind signature schemes and current quantum signature schemes, our quantum blind signature scheme could guarantee not only the unconditionally security but also the anonymity of the message owner. To achieve that, quantum key distribution and one-time pad are adopted in our scheme. Experimental analysis proved that our scheme have the characteristics of non-counterfeit, non-disavowal, blindness and traceability. It has a wide application to E-payment system, E-government, E-business, and etc.

  8. Public-key cryptography based on bounded quantum reference frames

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannou, Lawrence M.; Mosca, Michele

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that the framework of bounded quantum reference frames has application to building quantum-public-key cryptographic protocols and proving their security. Thus, the framework we introduce can be seen as a public-key analogue of the framework of Bartlett et al. (Phys. Rev. A 70, 032307), where a private shared reference frame is shown to have cryptographic application. The protocol we present in this paper is an identification scheme, which, like a digital signature scheme, is a ...

  9. Role of causality in ensuring unconditional security of relativistic quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Molotkov, S N

    2001-01-01

    The problem of unconditional security of quantum cryptography (i.e. the security which is guaranteed by the fundamental laws of nature rather than by technical limitations) is one of the central points in quantum information theory. We propose a relativistic quantum cryptosystem and prove its unconditional security against any eavesdropping attempts. Relativistic causality arguments allow to demonstrate the security of the system in a simple way. Since the proposed protocol does not employ collective measurements and quantum codes, the cryptosystem can be experimentally realized with the present state-of-art in fiber optics technologies. The proposed cryptosystem employs only the individual measurements and classical codes and, in addition, the key distribution problem allows to postpone the choice of the state encoding scheme until after the states are already received instead of choosing it before sending the states into the communication channel (i.e. to employ a sort of ``antedate'' coding).

  10. New field of cryptography: DNA cryptography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Guozhen; LU Mingxin; QIN Lei; LAI Xuejia

    2006-01-01

    DNA cryptography is a new born cryptographic field emerged with the research of DNA computing, in which DNA is used as information carrier and the modern biological technology is used as implementation tool. The vast parallelism and extraordinary information density inherent in DNA molecules are explored for cryptographic purposes such as encryption, authentication, signature, and so on. In this paper, we briefly introduce the biological background of DNA cryptography and the principle of DNA computing, summarize the progress of DNA cryptographic research and several key problems, discuss the trend of DNA cryptography, and compare the status, security and application fields of DNA cryptography with those of traditional cryptography and quantum cryptography. It is pointed out that all the three kinds of cryptography have their own advantages and disadvantages and complement each other in future practical application. The current main difficulties of DNA cryptography are the absence of effective secure theory and simple realizable method. The main goal of the research of DNA cryptography is exploring characteristics of DNA molecule and reaction, establishing corresponding theories, discovering possible development directions, searching for simple methods of realizing DNA cryptography, and laying the basis for future development.

  11. Hacking commercial quantum cryptography systems by tailored bright illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydersen, Lars; Wiechers, Carlos; Wittmann, Christoffer; Elser, Dominique; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim

    2010-10-01

    The peculiar properties of quantum mechanics allow two remote parties to communicate a private, secret key, which is protected from eavesdropping by the laws of physics. So-called quantum key distribution (QKD) implementations always rely on detectors to measure the relevant quantum property of single photons. Here we demonstrate experimentally that the detectors in two commercially available QKD systems can be fully remote-controlled using specially tailored bright illumination. This makes it possible to tracelessly acquire the full secret key; we propose an eavesdropping apparatus built from off-the-shelf components. The loophole is likely to be present in most QKD systems using avalanche photodiodes to detect single photons. We believe that our findings are crucial for strengthening the security of practical QKD, by identifying and patching technological deficiencies.

  12. Entropy in quantum information theory - Communication and cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majenz, Christian

    Entropies have been immensely useful in information theory. In this Thesis, several results in quantum information theory are collected, most of which use entropy as the main mathematical tool. The rst one concerns the von Neumann entropy. While a direct generalization of the Shannon entropy......-Shannon type inequalities. Here, a new constrained non-von-Neumann type inequality is proven, a step towards a conjectured unconstrained inequality by Linden and Winter. Like many other information-theoretic tasks, quantum source coding problems such as coherent state merging have recently been analyzed...... in the one-shot setting. While the case of many independent, identically distributed quantum states has been treated using the decoupling technique, the essentially optimal one-shot results in terms of the max-mutual information by Berta et al. and Anshu at al. had to bring in additional mathematical...

  13. Quantum Cryptography Based on the Deutsch-Jozsa Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Koji; Nakamura, Tadao; Farouk, Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    Recently, secure quantum key distribution based on Deutsch's algorithm using the Bell state is reported (Nagata and Nakamura, Int. J. Theor. Phys. doi: 10.1007/s10773-017-3352-4, 2017). Our aim is of extending the result to a multipartite system. In this paper, we propose a highly speedy key distribution protocol. We present sequre quantum key distribution based on a special Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm using Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states. Bob has promised to use a function f which is of one of two kinds; either the value of f( x) is constant for all values of x, or else the value of f( x) is balanced, that is, equal to 1 for exactly half of the possible x, and 0 for the other half. Here, we introduce an additional condition to the function when it is balanced. Our quantum key distribution overcomes a classical counterpart by a factor O(2 N ).

  14. Gaps between equations and experiments in quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, John M [Gordon McKay Laboratory, Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Madjid, F Hadi [82 Powers Road, Concord, MA 01742 (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Traditional methods of cryptographic key distribution rest on judgments about an attacker. With the advent of quantum key distribution (QKD) came proofs of security for the mathematical models that define the protocols BB84 and B92; however, applying such proofs to actual transmitting and receiving devices has been questioned. Proofs of QKD security are propositions about models written in the mathematical language of quantum mechanics, and the issue is the linking of such models to actual devices in an experiment on security. To explore this issue, we adapt Wittgenstein's method of language games to view quantum language in its application to experimental activity involving transmitting and receiving devices. We sketch concepts with which to think about models in relation to experiments, without assuming the experiments accord with any model; included is a concept of one quantum mechanical model enveloping another. For any model that agrees with given experimental results and implies the security of a key, there is an enveloping model that agrees with the same results while denying that security. As a result there is a gap between equations and the behaviour recorded from devices in an experiment, a gap bridged only by resort to something beyond the reach of logic and measured data, well named by the word guesswork. While this recognition of guesswork encourages eavesdropping, a related recognition of guesswork in the design of feedback loops can help a transmitter and receiver to reduce their vulnerability to eavesdropping.

  15. Invisible transmission in quantum cryptography using continuous variables: A proof of Eve's vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navez, Patrick; Gatti, Alessandra; Lugiato, Luigi A.

    2002-03-01

    By analogy to classical cryptography, we develop a quantum cryptographic scheme in which the two public and private keys consist in each of two entangled beams of squeezed light. An analog secret information is encrypted by modulating the phase of the beam sent in public. The knowledge of the degree of nonclassical correlation between the beam quadratures measured in private and in public allows only the receiver to decrypt the secret information. Finally, in a view towards absolute security, we formally prove that any external intervention of an eavesdropper makes him vulnerable to any subsequent detection.

  16. Quantum Cryptography using entangled photons in energy-time Bell states

    OpenAIRE

    Tittel, Wolfgang; Brendel, Jurgen; Zbinden, Hugo; Gisin, Nicolas

    1999-01-01

    We present a setup for quantum cryptography based on photon pairs in energy-time Bell states and show its feasibility in a laboratory experiment. Our scheme combines the advantages of using photon pairs instead of faint laser pulses and the possibility to preserve energy-time entanglement over long distances. Moreover, using four-dimensional energy-time states, no fast random change of bases is required in our setup: Nature itself decides whether to measure in the energy or in the time base, ...

  17. General Theory of Decoy-State Quantum Cryptography with Dark Count Rate Fluctuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xiang; SUN Shi-Hai; LIANG Lin-Mei

    2009-01-01

    The existing theory of decoy-state quantum cryptography assumes that the dark count rate is a constant, but in practice there exists fluctuation. We develop a new scheme of the decoy state, achieve a more practical key generation rate in the presence of fluctuation of the dark count rate, and compare the result with the result of the decoy-state without fluctuation.It is found that the key generation rate and maximal secure distance will be decreased under the influence of the fluctuation of the dark count rate.

  18. Quantum cryptography using entangled photons in energy-time bell states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittel; Brendel; Zbinden; Gisin

    2000-05-15

    We present a setup for quantum cryptography based on photon pairs in energy-time Bell states and show its feasibility in a laboratory experiment. Our scheme combines the advantages of using photon pairs instead of faint laser pulses and the possibility to preserve energy-time entanglement over long distances. Moreover, using four-dimensional energy-time states, no fast random change of bases is required in our setup: Nature itself decides whether to measure in the energy or in the time base, thus rendering eavesdropper attacks based on "photon number splitting" less efficient.

  19. Full-field implementation of a perfect eavesdropper on a quantum cryptography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Ilja; Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Skaar, Johannes; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Makarov, Vadim

    2011-06-14

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows two remote parties to grow a shared secret key. Its security is founded on the principles of quantum mechanics, but in reality it significantly relies on the physical implementation. Technological imperfections of QKD systems have been previously explored, but no attack on an established QKD connection has been realized so far. Here we show the first full-field implementation of a complete attack on a running QKD connection. An installed eavesdropper obtains the entire 'secret' key, while none of the parameters monitored by the legitimate parties indicate a security breach. This confirms that non-idealities in physical implementations of QKD can be fully practically exploitable, and must be given increased scrutiny if quantum cryptography is to become highly secure.

  20. On protection against a bright-pulse attack in the two-pass quantum cryptography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balygin, K. A.; Klimov, A. N.; Korol'kov, A. V.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-06-01

    The security of keys in quantum cryptography systems, in contrast to mathematical cryptographic algorithms, is guaranteed by fundamental quantum-mechanical laws. However, the cryptographic resistance of such systems, which are distributed physical devices, fundamentally depends on the method of their implementation and particularly on the calibration and control of critical parameters. The most important parameter is the number of photons in quasi-single-photon information states in a communication channel. The sensitivity to a bright-pulse attack has been demonstrated in an explicit form for a number of systems. A method guaranteeing the resistance to such attacks has been proposed and implemented. Furthermore, the relation of physical observables used and obtained at the control of quantum states to the length of final secret keys has been obtained for the first time.

  1. A sessional blind signature based on quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodambashi, Siavash; Zakerolhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a sessional blind signature protocol whose security is guaranteed by fundamental principles of quantum physics. It allows a message owner to get his message signed by an authorized signatory. However, the signatory is not capable of reading the message contents and everyone can verify authenticity of the message. For this purpose, we took advantage of a sessional signature as well as quantum entangled pairs which are generated with respect to it in our proposed protocol. We describe our proposed blind signature through an example and briefly discuss about its unconditional security. Due to the feasibility of the protocol, it can be widely employed for e-payment, e-government, e-business and etc.

  2. High-dimensional quantum cryptography with twisted light

    CERN Document Server

    Mirhosseini, Mohammad; O'Sullivan, Malcolm N; Rodenburg, Brandon; Malik, Mehul; Gauthier, Daniel J; Boyd, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) systems have conventionally relied on the polarization of light for encoding. This limits the amount of information that can be sent per photon and puts a tight bound on the error such a system can tolerate. Here we show an experimental realization of a multilevel QKD system that uses the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons. Through the use of a 7-dimensional alphabet encoded in OAM, we achieve a channel capacity of 2.1 bits per sifted photon which is more than double the maximum allowed capacity of polarization-based QKD systems. Our experiment uses a digital micro-mirror device for the rapid generation of OAM modes at 4 kHz, and a mode sorter capable of sorting single photons based on OAM with a separation efficiency of 93%. Further, our scheme provides an increased tolerance to errors, leading to a quantum communication channel that is more robust against eavesdropping.

  3. Thermal blinding of gated detectors in quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydersen, Lars; Wiechers, Carlos; Wittmann, Christoffer; Elser, Dominique; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim

    2010-12-20

    It has previously been shown that the gated detectors of two commercially available quantum key distribution (QKD) systems are blindable and controllable by an eavesdropper using continuous-wave illumination and short bright trigger pulses, manipulating voltages in the circuit [Nat. Photonics 4, 686 (2010)]. This allows for an attack eavesdropping the full raw and secret key without increasing the quantum bit error rate (QBER). Here we show how thermal effects in detectors under bright illumination can lead to the same outcome. We demonstrate that the detectors in a commercial QKD system Clavis2 can be blinded by heating the avalanche photo diodes (APDs) using bright illumination, so-called thermal blinding. Further, the detectors can be triggered using short bright pulses once they are blind. For systems with pauses between packet transmission such as the plug-and-play systems, thermal inertia enables Eve to apply the bright blinding illumination before eavesdropping, making her more difficult to catch.

  4. High-Rate Strong-Signal Quantum Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Horace P.

    1996-01-01

    Several quantum cryptosystems utilizing different kinds of nonclassical lights, which can accommodate high intensity fields and high data rate, are described. However, they are all sensitive to loss and both the high rate and the strong-signal character rapidly disappear. A squeezed light homodyne detection scheme is proposed which, with present-day technology, leads to more than two orders of magnitude data rate improvement over other current experimental systems for moderate loss.

  5. Unconditionally secure commitment in position-based quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Muhammad

    2014-10-27

    A new commitment scheme based on position-verification and non-local quantum correlations is presented here for the first time in literature. The only credential for unconditional security is the position of committer and non-local correlations generated; neither receiver has any pre-shared data with the committer nor does receiver require trusted and authenticated quantum/classical channels between him and the committer. In the proposed scheme, receiver trusts the commitment only if the scheme itself verifies position of the committer and validates her commitment through non-local quantum correlations in a single round. The position-based commitment scheme bounds committer to reveal valid commitment within allocated time and guarantees that the receiver will not be able to get information about commitment unless committer reveals. The scheme works for the commitment of both bits and qubits and is equally secure against committer/receiver as well as against any third party who may have interests in destroying the commitment. Our proposed scheme is unconditionally secure in general and evades Mayers and Lo-Chau attacks in particular.

  6. Public channel cryptography by synchronization of neural networks and chaotic maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislovaty, Rachel; Klein, Einat; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2003-09-12

    Two different kinds of synchronization have been applied to cryptography: synchronization of chaotic maps by one common external signal and synchronization of neural networks by mutual learning. By combining these two mechanisms, where the external signal to the chaotic maps is synchronized by the nets, we construct a hybrid network which allows a secure generation of secret encryption keys over a public channel. The security with respect to attacks, recently proposed by Shamir et al., is increased by chaotic synchronization.

  7. Laser damage helps the eavesdropper in quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Bugge, Audun N; Ghazali, Aina M M; Skaar, Johannes; Lydersen, Lars; Makarov, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    By destructive laser illumination, an eavesdropper may turn a perfect quantum key distribution (QKD) system into a completely insecure system. We demonstrate this by illuminating avalanche photodiodes with increasingly intense radiation, and monitoring their parameters. After about 1 W illumination, the detectors' dark count rate drops by a factor of 2 to 5, permanently improving their single-photon counting performance. After about 1.5 W, the dark current rises, switching the detectors permanently into the linear photodetection mode and making them completely insecure for QKD applications. Illumination power higher than 2 W destroys all photosensitivity. This shows that an eavesdropper can engineer loopholes in QKD via laser damage.

  8. Laser Damage Helps the Eavesdropper in Quantum Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugge, Audun Nystad; Sauge, Sebastien; Ghazali, Aina Mardhiyah M.; Skaar, Johannes; Lydersen, Lars; Makarov, Vadim

    2014-02-01

    We propose a class of attacks on quantum key distribution (QKD) systems where an eavesdropper actively engineers new loopholes by using damaging laser illumination to permanently change properties of system components. This can turn a perfect QKD system into a completely insecure system. A proof-of-principle experiment performed on an avalanche photodiode-based detector shows that laser damage can be used to create loopholes. After ˜1 W illumination, the detectors' dark count rate reduces 2-5 times, permanently improving single-photon counting performance. After ˜1.5 W, the detectors switch permanently into the linear photodetection mode and become completely insecure for QKD applications.

  9. Memory attacks on device-independent quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jonathan; Colbeck, Roger; Kent, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Device-independent quantum cryptographic schemes aim to guarantee security to users based only on the output statistics of any components used, and without the need to verify their internal functionality. Since this would protect users against untrustworthy or incompetent manufacturers, sabotage, or device degradation, this idea has excited much interest, and many device-independent schemes have been proposed. Here we identify a critical weakness of device-independent protocols that rely on public communication between secure laboratories. Untrusted devices may record their inputs and outputs and reveal information about them via publicly discussed outputs during later runs. Reusing devices thus compromises the security of a protocol and risks leaking secret data. Possible defenses include securely destroying or isolating used devices. However, these are costly and often impractical. We propose other more practical partial defenses as well as a new protocol structure for device-independent quantum key distribution that aims to achieve composable security in the case of two parties using a small number of devices to repeatedly share keys with each other (and no other party).

  10. Bridging the gap between theory and practice in quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curty, Marcos; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Xu, Feihu; Mizutani, Akihiro; Lim, Charles C. W.; Qi, Bing; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-10-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) needs to close the big gap between theory and practice to be a suitable technology for achieving information-theoretic secure communications. Indeed, recent studies on side-channel attacks have exposed the vulnerabilities of QKD implementations against an eavesdropper who may try to attack both the source and the measurement device. Here, we review two potential approaches that, combined, could bring this goal closer: measurement-device-independent QKD and the loss-tolerant QKD protocol. The former removes all possible side-channels from the measurement apparatus and guarantees a high performance over long distances. The latter appears as a robust solution against typical source flaws and it offers similar key rates as those of standard QKD systems. Most importantly, the feasibility of both solutions has already been demonstrated in several lab and field-test experiments.

  11. Laser damage helps the eavesdropper in quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugge, Audun Nystad; Sauge, Sebastien; Ghazali, Aina Mardhiyah M; Skaar, Johannes; Lydersen, Lars; Makarov, Vadim

    2014-02-21

    We propose a class of attacks on quantum key distribution (QKD) systems where an eavesdropper actively engineers new loopholes by using damaging laser illumination to permanently change properties of system components. This can turn a perfect QKD system into a completely insecure system. A proof-of-principle experiment performed on an avalanche photodiode-based detector shows that laser damage can be used to create loopholes. After ∼1  W illumination, the detectors' dark count rate reduces 2-5 times, permanently improving single-photon counting performance. After ∼1.5  W, the detectors switch permanently into the linear photodetection mode and become completely insecure for QKD applications.

  12. Coherent pulse implementations of quantum cryptography protocols resistant to photon number splitting attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Acin, A; Scarani, V; Acin, Antonio; Gisin, Nicolas; Scarani, Valerio

    2004-01-01

    A new class of quantum cryptography (QC) protocols that are robust against the most general photon number splitting attacks in a weak coherent pulse implementation has been recently proposed. In this article we give a quite exhaustive analysis of several eavesdropping attacks on these schemes. The eavesdropper (Eve) is supposed to have unlimited technological power while the honest parties (Alice and Bob) use present day technology, in particular an attenuated laser as an approximation of a single-photon source. They exploit the nonorthogonality of quantum states for decreasing the information accessible to Eve in the multi-photon pulses accidentally produced by the imperfect source. An implementation of some of these protocols using present day technology allow for a secure key distribution up to distances of $\\sim$ 150 km. We also show that strong-pulse implementations, where a strong pulse is included as a reference, allow for key distribution robust against photon number splitting attacks.

  13. AUTHENTICATION ARCHITECTURE USING THRESHOLD CRYPTOGRAPHY IN KERBEROS FOR MOBILE AD HOC NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadj Gharib

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of wireless technologies is gradually increasing and risks related to the use of these technologies are considerable. Due to their dynamically changing topology and open environment without a centralized policy control of a traditional network, a mobile ad hoc network (MANET is vulnerable to the presence of malicious nodes and attacks. The ideal solution to overcome a myriad of security concerns in MANET’s is the use of reliable authentication architecture. In this paper we propose a new key management scheme based on threshold cryptography in kerberos for MANET’s, the proposed scheme uses the elliptic curve cryptography method that consumes fewer resources well adapted to the wireless environment. Our approach shows a strength and effectiveness against attacks.

  14. A Practical Trojan Horse for Bell-inequality-based Quantum Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Larsson, J A

    2002-01-01

    Quantum Cryptography, or more accurately, Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) is based on using an unconditionally secure ``quantum channel'' to share a secret key among two users. A manufacturer of QKD devices could, intentionally or not, use a (semi-)classical channel instead of the quantum channel, which would remove the supposedly unconditional security. One example is the BB84 protocol, where the quantum channel can be implemented in polarization of single photons. Here, use of several photons instead of one to encode each bit of the key provides a similar but insecure system. For protocols based on violation of a Bell inequality (e.g., the Ekert protocol), such a modification is generally thought to be impossible. However, a counterexample will be given here using an identical physical setup as is used in photon-polarization Ekert QKD. Since the physical implementation is identical, a manufacturer may include this modification as a Trojan Horse in manufactured systems, to be activated at will by an eavesdrop...

  15. Wigner representation for experiments on quantum cryptography using two-photon polarization entanglement produced in parametric down-conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casado, A [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Guerra, S [Centro Asociado de la Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Placido, J [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)], E-mail: acasado@us.es

    2008-02-28

    In this paper, the theory of parametric down-conversion in the Wigner representation is applied to Ekert's quantum cryptography protocol. We analyse the relation between two-photon entanglement and (non-secure) quantum key distribution within the Wigner framework in the Heisenberg picture. Experiments using two-qubit polarization entanglement generated in nonlinear crystals are analysed in this formalism, along with the effects of eavesdropping attacks in the case of projective measurements.

  16. Disorder generated by interacting neural networks: application to econophysics and cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzel, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Kanter, Ido [Department of Physics, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan (Israel)

    2003-10-31

    When neural networks are trained on their own output signals they generate disordered time series. In particular, when two neural networks are trained on their mutual output they can synchronize; they relax to a time-dependent state with identical synaptic weights. Two applications of this phenomenon are discussed for (a) econophysics and (b) cryptography. (a) When agents competing in a closed market (minority game) are using neural networks to make their decisions, the total system relaxes to a state of good performance. (b) Two partners communicating over a public channel can find a common secret key.

  17. Which optical processes are suitable to make probabilistic single photon sources for quantum cryptography?

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Amit

    2009-01-01

    Single photon sources to be used in quantum cryptography must show higher order antibunching (HOA). HOA is reported by us in several many wave mixing processes. In the present work we have investigated the possibility of observing HOA in multiwave mixing processes in general. The generalized Hamiltonian is solved for several particular cases in Heisenberg picture and possibility of observing HOA is investigated with the help of criterion of Pathak and Garcia. Several particular cases of the generalized Hamiltonian are solved with the help of short time approximation technique and HOA is reported for pump modes of different multiwave mixing processes. It is also found that HOA can not be observed for the signal and stokes modes in of the cases studied here.

  18. Quantum Information, computation and cryptography. An introductory survey of theory, technology and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benatti, Fabio [Trieste Univ., Miramare (Italy). Dipt. Fisica Teorica; Fannes, Mark [Leuven Univ. (Belgium). Inst. voor Theoretische Fysica; Floreanini, Roberto [INFN, Trieste (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica; Petritis, Dimitri (eds.) [Rennes 1 Univ., 35 (France). Inst. de Recherche Mathematique de Rennes

    2010-07-01

    This multi-authored textbook addresses graduate students with a background in physics, mathematics or computer science. No research experience is necessary. Consequently, rather than comprehensively reviewing the vast body of knowledge and literature gathered in the past twenty years, this book concentrates on a number of carefully selected aspects of quantum information theory and technology. Given the highly interdisciplinary nature of the subject, the multi-authored approach brings together different points of view from various renowned experts, providing a coherent picture of the subject matter. The book consists of ten chapters and includes examples, problems, and exercises. The first five present the mathematical tools required for a full comprehension of various aspects of quantum mechanics, classical information, and coding theory. Chapter 6 deals with the manipulation and transmission of information in the quantum realm. Chapters 7 and 8 discuss experimental implementations of quantum information ideas using photons and atoms. Finally, chapters 9 and 10 address ground-breaking applications in cryptography and computation. (orig.)

  19. Quantum Cryptography, Quantum Communication, and Quantum Computer in a Noisy Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Koji; Nakamura, Tadao

    2017-07-01

    First, we study several information theories based on quantum computing in a desirable noiseless situation. (1) We present quantum key distribution based on Deutsch's algorithm using an entangled state. (2) We discuss the fact that the Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm can be used for quantum communication including an error correction. Finally, we discuss the main result. We study the Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm in a noisy environment. The original algorithm determines a noiseless function. Here we consider the case that the function has an environmental noise. We introduce a noise term into the function f( x). So we have another noisy function g( x). The relation between them is g( x) = f( x) ± O( 𝜖). Here O( 𝜖) ≪ 1 is the noise term. The goal is to determine the noisy function g( x) with a success probability. The algorithm overcomes classical counterpart by a factor of N in a noisy environment.

  20. Quantum photonic network and physical layer security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masahide; Endo, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Kitamura, Mitsuo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Toyoshima, Morio

    2017-08-06

    Quantum communication and quantum cryptography are expected to enhance the transmission rate and the security (confidentiality of data transmission), respectively. We study a new scheme which can potentially bridge an intermediate region covered by these two schemes, which is referred to as quantum photonic network. The basic framework is information theoretically secure communications in a free space optical (FSO) wiretap channel, in which an eavesdropper has physically limited access to the main channel between the legitimate sender and receiver. We first review a theoretical framework to quantify the optimal balance of the transmission efficiency and the security level under power constraint and at finite code length. We then present experimental results on channel characterization based on 10 MHz on-off keying transmission in a 7.8 km terrestrial FSO wiretap channel.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Quantum photonic network and physical layer security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masahide; Endo, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Kitamura, Mitsuo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Toyoshima, Morio

    2017-06-01

    Quantum communication and quantum cryptography are expected to enhance the transmission rate and the security (confidentiality of data transmission), respectively. We study a new scheme which can potentially bridge an intermediate region covered by these two schemes, which is referred to as quantum photonic network. The basic framework is information theoretically secure communications in a free space optical (FSO) wiretap channel, in which an eavesdropper has physically limited access to the main channel between the legitimate sender and receiver. We first review a theoretical framework to quantify the optimal balance of the transmission efficiency and the security level under power constraint and at finite code length. We then present experimental results on channel characterization based on 10 MHz on-off keying transmission in a 7.8 km terrestrial FSO wiretap channel. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  2. Network security with openSSL cryptography for secure communications

    CERN Document Server

    Viega, John; Chandra, Pravir

    2002-01-01

    Most applications these days are at least somewhat network aware, but how do you protect those applications against common network security threats? Many developers are turning to OpenSSL, an open source version of SSL/TLS, which is the most widely used protocol for secure network communications.The OpenSSL library is seeing widespread adoption for web sites that require cryptographic functions to protect a broad range of sensitive information, such as credit card numbers and other financial transactions. The library is the only free, full-featured SSL implementation for C and C++, and it can be used programmatically or from the command line to secure most TCP-based network protocols.Network Security with OpenSSL enables developers to use this protocol much more effectively. Traditionally, getting something simple done in OpenSSL could easily take weeks. This concise book gives you the guidance you need to avoid pitfalls, while allowing you to take advantage of the library?s advanced features. And, inst...

  3. APPLIED CRYPTOGRAPHY IN PASSWORD ENCRYPTION USING NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Karthik Gullapalli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Today the world depends on computers and information systems for processing information in various fields. These systems must be developed in such a way that they are less vulnerable to attacks and more reliable and secured. These systems are more vulnerable to technical issues and many cases of data trawling have been reported as a result of password breaches. Encryption and decryption plays a major role in the modern era as the rate of data flow increased tremendously. Social networking sites such as Facebook and Google stores the most important and private data of people electronically in the servers. Artificial intelligence took over many functions of computer systems in different fields including data security. Neural networks process information with care and certainty like human mind does. This paper proposes a methodology to implement encryption and decryption using the feed forward neural networks and to improve the security of information systems.

  4. ECG-cryptography and authentication in body area networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Wang, Honggang; Vasilakos, Athanasios V; Fang, Hua

    2012-11-01

    Wireless body area networks (BANs) have drawn much attention from research community and industry in recent years. Multimedia healthcare services provided by BANs can be available to anyone, anywhere, and anytime seamlessly. A critical issue in BANs is how to preserve the integrity and privacy of a person's medical data over wireless environments in a resource efficient manner. This paper presents a novel key agreement scheme that allows neighboring nodes in BANs to share a common key generated by electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. The improved Jules Sudan (IJS) algorithm is proposed to set up the key agreement for the message authentication. The proposed ECG-IJS key agreement can secure data communications over BANs in a plug-n-play manner without any key distribution overheads. Both the simulation and experimental results are presented, which demonstrate that the proposed ECG-IJS scheme can achieve better security performance in terms of serval performance metrics such as false acceptance rate (FAR) and false rejection rate (FRR) than other existing approaches. In addition, the power consumption analysis also shows that the proposed ECG-IJS scheme can achieve energy efficiency for BANs.

  5. A User Authentication Scheme Based on Elliptic Curves Cryptography for Wireless Ad Hoc Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huifang; Ge, Linlin; Xie, Lei

    2015-07-14

    The feature of non-infrastructure support in a wireless ad hoc network (WANET) makes it suffer from various attacks. Moreover, user authentication is the first safety barrier in a network. A mutual trust is achieved by a protocol which enables communicating parties to authenticate each other at the same time and to exchange session keys. For the resource-constrained WANET, an efficient and lightweight user authentication scheme is necessary. In this paper, we propose a user authentication scheme based on the self-certified public key system and elliptic curves cryptography for a WANET. Using the proposed scheme, an efficient two-way user authentication and secure session key agreement can be achieved. Security analysis shows that our proposed scheme is resilient to common known attacks. In addition, the performance analysis shows that our proposed scheme performs similar or better compared with some existing user authentication schemes.

  6. Theoretical Study of Quantum Bit Rate in Free-Space Quantum Cryptography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jing; ZHANG Guang-Yu; TAN Li-Ying

    2006-01-01

    The quantum bit rate is an important operating parameter in free-space quantum key distribution. We introduce the measuring factor and the sifting factor, and present the expressions of the quantum bit rate based on the ideal single-photon sources and the single-photon sources with Poisson distribution. The quantum bit rate is studied in the numerical simulation for the laser links between a ground station and a satellite in a low earth orbit. The results show that it is feasible to implement quantum key distribution between a ground station and a satellite in a low earth orbit.

  7. de Finetti Representation Theorem for Infinite-Dimensional Quantum Systems and Applications to Quantum Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, R.; Cirac, J. I.

    2009-03-01

    We show that the quantum de Finetti theorem holds for states on infinite-dimensional systems, provided they satisfy certain experimentally verifiable conditions. This result can be applied to prove the security of quantum key distribution based on weak coherent states or other continuous variable states against general attacks.

  8. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  9. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  10. A quantum computer network

    CERN Document Server

    Kesidis, George

    2009-01-01

    Wong's diffusion network is a stochastic, zero-input Hopfield network with a Gibbs stationary distribution over a bounded, connected continuum. Previously, logarithmic thermal annealing was demonstrated for the diffusion network and digital versions of it were studied and applied to imaging. Recently, "quantum" annealed Markov chains have garnered significant attention because of their improved performance over "pure" thermal annealing. In this note, a joint quantum and thermal version of Wong's diffusion network is described and its convergence properties are studied. Different choices for "auxiliary" functions are discussed, including those of the kinetic type previously associated with quantum annealing.

  11. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  12. Calculator Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Uses cryptography to demonstrate the importance of algebra and the use of technology as an effective real application of mathematics. Explains simple encoding and decoding of messages for student learning of modular arithmetic. This elementary encounter with cryptography along with its historical and modern background serves to motivate student…

  13. Network-based Arbitrated Quantum Signature Scheme with Graph State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongling; Li, Fei; Mao, Ningyi; Wang, Yijun; Guo, Ying

    2017-08-01

    Implementing an arbitrated quantum signature(QAS) through complex networks is an interesting cryptography technology in the literature. In this paper, we propose an arbitrated quantum signature for the multi-user-involved networks, whose topological structures are established by the encoded graph state. The determinative transmission of the shared keys, is enabled by the appropriate stabilizers performed on the graph state. The implementation of this scheme depends on the deterministic distribution of the multi-user-shared graph state on which the encoded message can be processed in signing and verifying phases. There are four parties involved, the signatory Alice, the verifier Bob, the arbitrator Trent and Dealer who assists the legal participants in the signature generation and verification. The security is guaranteed by the entanglement of the encoded graph state which is cooperatively prepared by legal participants in complex quantum networks.

  14. Quantum Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, S; Gupta, Sanjay

    2002-01-01

    This paper initiates the study of quantum computing within the constraints of using a polylogarithmic ($O(\\log^k n), k\\geq 1$) number of qubits and a polylogarithmic number of computation steps. The current research in the literature has focussed on using a polynomial number of qubits. A new mathematical model of computation called \\emph{Quantum Neural Networks (QNNs)} is defined, building on Deutsch's model of quantum computational network. The model introduces a nonlinear and irreversible gate, similar to the speculative operator defined by Abrams and Lloyd. The precise dynamics of this operator are defined and while giving examples in which nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger's equations are applied, we speculate on its possible implementation. The many practical problems associated with the current model of quantum computing are alleviated in the new model. It is shown that QNNs of logarithmic size and constant depth have the same computational power as threshold circuits, which are used for modeling neural network...

  15. Subcarrier Wave Quantum Key Distribution in Telecommunication Network with Bitrate 800 kbit/s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleim A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the course of work on creating the first quantum communication network in Russia we demonstrated quantum key distribution in metropolitan optical network infrastructure. A single-pass subcarrier wave quantum cryptography scheme was used in the experiments. BB84 protocol with strong reference was chosen for performing key distribution. The registered sifted key rate in an optical cable with 1.5 dB loss was 800 Kbit/s. Signal visibility exceeded 98%, and quantum bit error rate value was 1%. The achieved result is a record for this type of systems.

  16. Subcarrier Wave Quantum Key Distribution in Telecommunication Network with Bitrate 800 kbit/s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleim, A. V.; Nazarov, Yu. V.; Egorov, V. I.; Smirnov, S. V.; Bannik, O. I.; Chistyakov, V. V.; Kynev, S. M.; Anisimov, A. A.; Kozlov, S. A.; Vasiliev, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    In the course of work on creating the first quantum communication network in Russia we demonstrated quantum key distribution in metropolitan optical network infrastructure. A single-pass subcarrier wave quantum cryptography scheme was used in the experiments. BB84 protocol with strong reference was chosen for performing key distribution. The registered sifted key rate in an optical cable with 1.5 dB loss was 800 Kbit/s. Signal visibility exceeded 98%, and quantum bit error rate value was 1%. The achieved result is a record for this type of systems.

  17. Security Enhanced User Authentication Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks Using Elliptic Curves Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younsung Choi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs consist of sensors, gateways and users. Sensors are widely distributed to monitor various conditions, such as temperature, sound, speed and pressure but they have limited computational ability and energy. To reduce the resource use of sensors and enhance the security of WSNs, various user authentication protocols have been proposed. In 2011, Yeh et al. first proposed a user authentication protocol based on elliptic curve cryptography (ECC for WSNs. However, it turned out that Yeh et al.’s protocol does not provide mutual authentication, perfect forward secrecy, and key agreement between the user and sensor. Later in 2013, Shi et al. proposed a new user authentication protocol that improves both security and efficiency of Yeh et al.’s protocol. However, Shi et al.’s improvement introduces other security weaknesses. In this paper, we show that Shi et al.’s improved protocol is vulnerable to session key attack, stolen smart card attack, and sensor energy exhausting attack. In addition, we propose a new, security-enhanced user authentication protocol using ECC for WSNs.

  18. Security enhanced user authentication protocol for wireless sensor networks using elliptic curves cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Younsung; Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Jiye; Jung, Jaewook; Nam, Junghyun; Won, Dongho

    2014-06-10

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) consist of sensors, gateways and users. Sensors are widely distributed to monitor various conditions, such as temperature, sound, speed and pressure but they have limited computational ability and energy. To reduce the resource use of sensors and enhance the security of WSNs, various user authentication protocols have been proposed. In 2011, Yeh et al. first proposed a user authentication protocol based on elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) for WSNs. However, it turned out that Yeh et al.'s protocol does not provide mutual authentication, perfect forward secrecy, and key agreement between the user and sensor. Later in 2013, Shi et al. proposed a new user authentication protocol that improves both security and efficiency of Yeh et al.'s protocol. However, Shi et al.'s improvement introduces other security weaknesses. In this paper, we show that Shi et al.'s improved protocol is vulnerable to session key attack, stolen smart card attack, and sensor energy exhausting attack. In addition, we propose a new, security-enhanced user authentication protocol using ECC for WSNs.

  19. Contemporary cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Oppliger, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Whether you're new to the field or looking to broaden your knowledge of contemporary cryptography, this newly revised edition of an Artech House classic puts all aspects of this important topic into perspective. Delivering an accurate introduction to the current state-of-the-art in modern cryptography, the book offers you an in-depth understanding of essential tools and applications to help you with your daily work. The second edition has been reorganized and expanded, providing mathematical fundamentals and important cryptography principles in the appropriate appendixes, rather than summarize

  20. Conventional Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Marie A.

    1993-01-01

    Cryptography is the science that renders data unintelligible to prevent its unauthorized disclosure or modification. Presents an application of matrices used in linear transformations to illustrate a cryptographic system. An example is provided. (17 references) (MDH)

  1. Basic concepts in quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Ekert, A K; Inamori, H; Ekert, Artur; Hayden, Patrick; Inamori, Hitoshi

    2000-01-01

    Section headings: 1 Qubits, gates and networks 2 Quantum arithmetic and function evaluations 3 Algorithms and their complexity 4 From interferometers to computers 5 The first quantum algorithms 6 Quantum search 7 Optimal phase estimation 8 Periodicity and quantum factoring 9 Cryptography 10 Conditional quantum dynamics 11 Decoherence and recoherence 12 Concluding remarks

  2. Quantum Small-world Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Zong-Wen; Han, Xiao-Pu

    2011-01-01

    Quantum networks are critical to quantum communication and distributed quantum computing. Here we propose a small-world model of large-scale quantum repeater networks, where "small-world" is a fundamental concept rooted in complex networks, which describe a broad range of real systems. The core of the model is to relate the hierarchical fashion of measurements to coarse-graining process, when quantum repeater protocols are implemented. We demonstrate that quantum repeater networks with fractal structure can be enlarged with certain length scale in geographic space, while preserving topology by performing renormalization. Actually, renormalization here serves as an organizing principle determining the distribution of long-range entangled links over quantum networks, which gives rise to fractal to small-world transition. Furthermore, by iterative implementation of renormalization on the former coarse-grained network, we eventually obtain an onion-like, hierarchical quantum small-world network, where the distanc...

  3. On the number of entangled qubits in quantum wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Amit Kumar; Balakrishnan, S.

    2016-08-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) can take the advantages by utilizing the security schemes based on the concepts of quantum computation and cryptography. However, quantum wireless sensor networks (QWSNs) are shown to have many practical constraints. One of the constraints is the number of entangled qubits which is very high in the quantum security scheme proposed by [Nagy et al., Nat. Comput. 9 (2010) 819]. In this work, we propose a modification of the security scheme introduced by Nagy et al. and hence the reduction in the number of entangled qubits is shown. Further, the modified scheme can overcome some of the constraints in the QWSNs.

  4. Quantum social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cabello, Adan; Lopez-Tarrida, Antonio J; Portillo, Jose R

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a physical approach to social networks (SNs) in which each actor is characterized by a yes-no test on a physical system. This is used to measure whether the interactions originating a SN obey pre-existing properties, as in a classical social network (CSN). As an example of SNs beyond CSNs, we introduce quantum social networks (QSNs) as those in which actor $i$ is characterized by a test of whether or not the system is in a quantum state $|\\psi_i>$. We show that QSNs outperform CSNs for a certain task and some graphs. We identify the simplest of these graphs and show that graphs in which QSNs outperform CSNs are increasingly frequent as the number of vertices increases. We also discuss more general SNs and identify the simplest graphs in which QSNs cannot be outperformed.

  5. Structural complexity of quantum networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siomau, Michael [Physics Department, Jazan University, P.O.Box 114, 45142 Jazan (Saudi Arabia); Network Dynamics, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPIDS), 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-06-10

    Quantum network is a set of nodes connected with channels, through which the nodes communicate photons and classical information. Classical structural complexity of a quantum network may be defined through its physical structure, i.e. mutual position of nodes and channels connecting them. We show here that the classical structural complexity of a quantum network does not restrict the structural complexity of entanglement graphs, which may be created in the quantum network with local operations and classical communication. We show, in particular, that 1D quantum network can simulate both simple entanglement graphs such as lattices and random graphs and complex small-world graphs.

  6. Programmable Multimode Quantum Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Armstrong, Seiji; Janousek, Jiri; Hage, Boris; Treps, Nicolas; Lam, Ping Koy; Bachor, Hans-A

    2012-01-01

    Entanglement between large numbers of quantum modes is the quintessential resource for quantum information processing and future applications such as the quantum internet. Conventionally the generation of multimode entanglement in optics requires complex layouts of beam-splitters and phase shifters in order to transform the input modes in to entangled modes. These networks need substantial modification for every new set of entangled modes to be generated. Further, the complexity grows rapidly with the number of entangled modes as the number of detectors, phase locks and optical components needs to be increased. Here we report on the highly efficient and versatile generation of various multimode entangled states within one optical beam. By defining our modes to be combinations of different spatial regions of the beam, we may use just one pair of multi-pixel detectors and one local oscillator to measure an orthogonal set of modes. The transformation of this set into a desired set of entangled modes is calculate...

  7. The research of european quantum confidential communications network%欧洲量子保密通信网络研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂; 蒋天炜; 喻松; 顾畹仪

    2011-01-01

    Compared with classical networks, Quantum Key distribution (QKD) network provides unconditionally secure keys for data communication over public networks. The European project Secoqc (Secoqc Communication Based on Quantum Cryptography) aims at developing widely used secure communication network. This paper specifies the architecture and the protocols of the Secoqc QKD network, as well as the trial network in Vienna.%与经典网络相比,QKD(Quantum Key Distribution)网络利用量子密钥分发技术能在公共网络中为数据通信提供无条件安全的密钥.欧洲Secoqc (Secure Communication Based on Quantum Cryptography)项目研究可大范围应用于绝对安全性通信网络.详细介绍Secoqc QKD网络的结构及协议,及其在维也纳的实验网络.

  8. Gossip algorithms in quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomau, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Gossip algorithms is a common term to describe protocols for unreliable information dissemination in natural networks, which are not optimally designed for efficient communication between network entities. We consider application of gossip algorithms to quantum networks and show that any quantum network can be updated to optimal configuration with local operations and classical communication. This allows to speed-up - in the best case exponentially - the quantum information dissemination. Irrespective of the initial configuration of the quantum network, the update requiters at most polynomial number of local operations and classical communication.

  9. Everyday cryptography fundamental principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Keith M

    2012-01-01

    Cryptography is a vital technology that underpins the security of information in computer networks. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the role that cryptography plays in providing information security for technologies such as the Internet, mobile phones, payment cards, and wireless local area networks. Focusing on the fundamental principles that ground modern cryptography as they arise in modern applications, it avoids both an over-reliance on transient currenttechnologies and over-whelming theoretical research.Everyday Cryptography is a self-contained and widely accessible in

  10. Applications of single-qubit rotations in quantum public-key cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss cryptographic applications of single-qubit rotations from the perspective of trapdoor one-way functions and public-key encryption. In particular, we present an asymmetric cryptosystem whose security relies on fundamental principles of quantum physics. A quantum public key is used for the encryption of messages while decryption is possible by means of a classical private key only. The trapdoor one-way function underlying the proposed cryptosystem maps integer numbers to quantum stat...

  11. Cryptography Basics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Förster, Klaus-Tycho

    2017-01-01

    Public-key cryptography is one of the biggest scientific achievements of the last century. Two people that never met before can establish a common secret in plain sight? Sounds like pure magic! The idea of this chapter is to reveal some of the tricks of this “crypto magic”. This chapter...

  12. Faint laser pulses versus a single-photon source in free space quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molotkov, S. N.; Potapova, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this letter we present estimates for the distance of secret key transmission through free space for three different protocols of quantum key distribution: for BB84 and phase time-coding protocols in the case of a strictly single-photon source, and for the relativistic quantum key distribution protocol in the case of faint laser pulses.

  13. Randomized dynamical decoupling strategies and improved one-way key rates for quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, Oliver

    2009-05-25

    The present thesis deals with various methods of quantum error correction. It is divided into two parts. In the first part, dynamical decoupling methods are considered which have the task of suppressing the influence of residual imperfections in a quantum memory. Such imperfections might be given by couplings between the finite dimensional quantum systems (qudits) constituting the quantum memory, for instance. The suppression is achieved by altering the dynamics of an imperfect quantum memory with the help of a sequence of local unitary operations applied to the qudits. Whereas up to now the operations of such decoupling sequences have been constructed in a deterministic fashion, strategies are developed in this thesis which construct the operations by random selection from a suitable set. Formulas are derived which estimate the average performance of such strategies. As it turns out, randomized decoupling strategies offer advantages and disadvantages over deterministic ones. It is possible to benefit from the advantages of both kind of strategies by designing combined strategies. Furthermore, it is investigated if and how the discussed decoupling strategies can be employed to protect a quantum computation running on the quantum memory. It is shown that a purely randomized decoupling strategy may be used by applying the decoupling operations and adjusted gates of the quantum algorithm in an alternating fashion. Again this method can be enhanced by the means of deterministic methods in order to obtain a combined decoupling method for quantum computations analogously to the combining strategies for quantum memories. The second part of the thesis deals with quantum error-correcting codes and protocols for quantum key distribution. The focus is on the BB84 and the 6-state protocol making use of only one-way communication during the error correction and privacy amplification steps. It is shown that by adding additional errors to the preliminary key (a process called

  14. Expected number of quantum channels in quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Wang, He-Ming; Ji, Dan-Tong; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2015-07-01

    Quantum communication between nodes in quantum networks plays an important role in quantum information processing. Here, we proposed the use of the expected number of quantum channels as a measure of the efficiency of quantum communication for quantum networks. This measure quantified the amount of quantum information that can be teleported between nodes in a quantum network, which differs from classical case in that the quantum channels will be consumed if teleportation is performed. We further demonstrated that the expected number of quantum channels represents local correlations depicted by effective circles. Significantly, capacity of quantum communication of quantum networks quantified by ENQC is independent of distance for the communicating nodes, if the effective circles of communication nodes are not overlapped. The expected number of quantum channels can be enhanced through transformations of the lattice configurations of quantum networks via entanglement swapping. Our results can shed lights on the study of quantum communication in quantum networks.

  15. Quantum information density and network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao BI; Jin-qing FANG; Gui-ping LIU

    2009-01-01

    We present a quantum information network in which quantum information density is used for per- forming quantum computing or teleportation. The pho- tons are entangled in quantum channels and play a role of flying ebit to transmit interaction among the nodes. A particular quantum Gaussian channel is constructed; it permits photon-encoded information to transmit quan- tum signals with certain quantum parallelism. The cor- responding quantum dynamical mutual information is discussed, and the controlling nodes connectivity by driv- ing the network is studied. With regard to different driving functions, the connectivity distribution of the network is complicated. They obey positive or negative power law, and also influence the assortativity coefficient or the dynamical property of the network.

  16. Applications of single-qubit rotations in quantum public-key cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M.

    2008-03-01

    We discuss cryptographic applications of single-qubit rotations from the perspective of trapdoor one-way functions and public-key encryption. In particular, we present an asymmetric cryptosystem whose security relies on fundamental principles of quantum physics. A quantum public key is used for the encryption of messages while decryption is possible by means of a classical private key only. The trapdoor one-way function underlying the proposed cryptosystem maps integer numbers to quantum states of a qubit and its inversion can be infeasible by virtue of the Holevo’s theorem.

  17. Private classical capacity with a symmetric side channel and its application to quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graeme

    2008-08-01

    We study the symmetric-side-channel-assisted private capacity of a quantum channel, for which we provide a single-letter formula. This capacity is additive, convex, and, for degradable channels, equal to the unassisted private capacity. While a channel’s (unassisted) capacity for private classical communication may be strictly larger than its quantum capacity, we will show that these capacities are equal for degradable channels, thus demonstrating the equivalence of privacy and quantum coherence in this context. We use these ideas to find new bounds on the key rate of quantum key distribution protocols with one-way classical post-processing. For the Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol, our results demonstrate that collective attacks are strictly stronger than individual attacks.

  18. Dynamics of neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-01

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  19. Virtual Entanglement and Reconciliation Protocols for Quantum Cryptography with Continuous Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Grosshans, F; Wenger, J; Tualle-Brouri, R; Grangier, P; Grangier, Ph.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss quantum key distribution protocols using quantum continuous variables. We show that such protocols can be made secure against individual gaussian attacks regardless the transmission of the optical line between Alice and Bob. This is achieved by reversing the reconciliation procedure subsequent to the quantum transmission, that is, using Bob's instead of Alice's data to build the key. Although squeezing or entanglement may be helpful to improve the resistance to noise, they are not required for the protocols to remain secure with high losses. Therefore, these protocols can be implemented very simply by transmitting coherent states and performing homodyne detection. Here, we show that entanglement nevertheless plays a crucial role in the security analysis of coherent state protocols. Every cryptographic protocol based on displaced gaussian states turns out to be equivalent to an entanglement-based protocol, even though no entanglement is actually present. This equivalence even holds in the absence of...

  20. Stability assessment of QKD procedures in commercial quantum cryptography systems versus quality of dark channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacak, Monika; Melniczuk, Damian; Jacak, Janusz; Jóźwiak, Ireneusz; Gruber, Jacek; Jóźwiak, Piotr

    2015-02-01

    In order to assess the susceptibility of the quantum key distribution (QKD) systems to the hacking attack including simultaneous and frequent system self-decalibrations, we analyze the stability of the QKD transmission organized in two commercially available systems. The first one employs non-entangled photons as flying qubits in the dark quantum channel for communication whereas the second one utilizes the entangled photon pairs to secretly share the cryptographic key. Applying standard methods of the statistical data analysis to the characteristic indicators of the quality of the QKD communication (the raw key exchange rate [RKER] and the quantum bit error rate [QBER]), we have estimated the pace of the self-decalibration of both systems and the repeatability rate in the case of controlled worsening of the dark channel quality.

  1. Network technologies for O-band quantum telecommunications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew A.

    We have developed and characterized the preliminary network components necessary to realize practical quantum telecommunications in the 1310-nm O-band of the existing fiber optic infrastructure. Quantum network components available, at classical-telecommunicationsspeed, in the O-band would allow single-photon-level quantum data to be multiplexed with the bright 1550-nm C-band data that the telecommunications infrastructure already supports, therefore enabling quantum information---be it for quantum computing, cryptography, games or other purposes---to be easily distributed to remote parties. Two necessary network components are presented: a high-quality source of O-band entangled photon pairs and a switch capable of routing single photons while preserving the entanglement between the photon and its partner. The pairs are created in standard optical fiber, allowing for near-lossless coupling to the existing telecommunications infrastructure. The method used is also scalable, both in creating future identical sources and operating at much higher repetition rates. Such higher rates will ensure that a meaningful number of entangled photon pairs survive distribution, which is inherently lossy (though fiber optics minimize this loss over long distances). The other component required to establish a network more advanced than a point-to-point link is a single-photon switch. In order to successfully implement such a switch for the quantum data of interest, the design must be able to switch single-photon level signals with very low loss and near unity probability of success. It is capable of operating at network speeds while preserving the photon's quantum state.

  2. A quantum network of clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kómár, P.; Kessler, E. M.; Bishof, M.; Jiang, L.; Sørensen, A. S.; Ye, J.; Lukin, M. D.

    2014-08-01

    The development of precise atomic clocks plays an increasingly important role in modern society. Shared timing information constitutes a key resource for navigation with a direct correspondence between timing accuracy and precision in applications such as the Global Positioning System. By combining precision metrology and quantum networks, we propose a quantum, cooperative protocol for operating a network of geographically remote optical atomic clocks. Using nonlocal entangled states, we demonstrate an optimal utilization of global resources, and show that such a network can be operated near the fundamental precision limit set by quantum theory. Furthermore, the internal structure of the network, combined with quantum communication techniques, guarantees security both from internal and external threats. Realization of such a global quantum network of clocks may allow construction of a real-time single international time scale (world clock) with unprecedented stability and accuracy.

  3. Spin network quantum simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzuoli, Annalisa; Rasetti, Mario

    2002-12-30

    We propose a general setting for a universal representation of the quantum structure on which quantum information stands, whose dynamical evolution (information manipulation) is based on angular momentum recoupling theory. Such scheme complies with the notion of 'quantum simulator' in the sense of Feynman, and is shown to be related with the topological quantum field theoretical approach to quantum computation.

  4. Trojan-horse attacks threaten the security of practical quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitin; Anisimova, Elena; Khan, Imran; Makarov, Vadim; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2014-12-01

    A quantum key distribution (QKD) system may be probed by an eavesdropper Eve by sending in bright light from the quantum channel and analyzing the back-reflections. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a setup for mounting such a Trojan-horse attack. We show it in operation against the quantum cryptosystem Clavis2 from ID Quantique, as a proof-of-principle. With just a few back-reflected photons, Eve discerns Bob's (secret) basis choice, and thus the raw key bit in the Scarani-Acín-Ribordy-Gisin 2004 protocol, with higher than 90% probability. This would clearly breach the security of the cryptosystem. Unfortunately, Eve's bright pulses have a side effect of causing a high level of afterpulsing in Bob's single-photon detectors, resulting in a large quantum bit error rate that effectively protects this system from our attack. However, in a Clavis2-like system equipped with detectors with less-noisy but realistic characteristics, an attack strategy with positive leakage of the key would exist. We confirm this by a numerical simulation. Both the eavesdropping setup and strategy can be generalized to attack most of the current QKD systems, especially if they lack proper safeguards. We also propose countermeasures to prevent such attacks.

  5. Hybrid ququart-encoded quantum cryptography protected by Kochen-Specker contextuality

    CERN Document Server

    Cabello, Adan; Nagali, Eleonora; Sciarrino, Fabio; 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.030302

    2011-01-01

    Quantum cryptographic protocols based on complementarity are nonsecure against attacks in which complementarity is imitated with classical resources. The Kochen-Specker (KS) theorem provides protection against these attacks, without requiring entanglement or spatially separated composite systems. We analyze the maximum tolerated noise to guarantee the security of a KS-protected cryptographic scheme against these attacks, and describe a photonic realization of this scheme using hybrid ququarts defined by the polarization and orbital angular momentum of single photons.

  6. Hybrid ququart-encoded quantum cryptography protected by Kochen-Specker contextuality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabello, Adan [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41012 Sevilla (Spain); Department of Physics, Stockholm University, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); D' Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Nagali, Eleonora [Dipartimento di Fisica della ' ' Sapienza' ' Universita di Roma, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Sciarrino, Fabio [Dipartimento di Fisica della ' ' Sapienza' ' Universita di Roma, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (INO-CNR), I-50125 Florence (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    Quantum cryptographic protocols based on complementarity are not secure against attacks in which complementarity is imitated with classical resources. The Kochen-Specker (KS) theorem provides protection against these attacks, without requiring entanglement or spatially separated composite systems. We analyze the maximum tolerated noise to guarantee the security of a KS-protected cryptographic scheme against these attacks and describe a photonic realization of this scheme using hybrid ququarts defined by the polarization and orbital angular momentum of single photons.

  7. Advanced techniques for free-space optical quantum cryptography over water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Alexander D.; Christensen, Bradley; Kwiat, Paul G.

    2016-03-01

    Free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) over water (e.g., ship to ship) may be limited by ship motion and atmospheric effects, such as mode distortion and beam wander due to turbulence. We report on a technique which reduces noise by excluding spatial modes which are less likely to contain QKD signal photons and experimentally demonstrate an improvement in QKD key generation rates in various noise and turbulence regimes.

  8. General immunity and superadditivity of two-way Gaussian quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Carlo; Pirandola, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    We consider two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution, studying its security against general eavesdropping strategies. Assuming the asymptotic limit of many signals exchanged, we prove that two-way Gaussian protocols are immune to coherent attacks. More precisely we show the general superadditivity of the two-way security thresholds, which are proven to be higher than the corresponding one-way counterparts in all cases. We perform the security analysis first reducing the general eavesdropping to a two-mode coherent Gaussian attack, and then showing that the superadditivity is achieved by exploiting the random on/off switching of the two-way quantum communication. This allows the parties to choose the appropriate communication instances to prepare the key, accordingly to the tomography of the quantum channel. The random opening and closing of the circuit represents, in fact, an additional degree of freedom allowing the parties to convert, a posteriori, the two-mode correlations of the eavesdropping into noise. The eavesdropper is assumed to have no access to the on/off switching and, indeed, cannot adapt her attack. We explicitly prove that this mechanism enhances the security performance, no matter if the eavesdropper performs collective or coherent attacks.

  9. General immunity and superadditivity of two-way Gaussian quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Carlo; Pirandola, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    We consider two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution, studying its security against general eavesdropping strategies. Assuming the asymptotic limit of many signals exchanged, we prove that two-way Gaussian protocols are immune to coherent attacks. More precisely we show the general superadditivity of the two-way security thresholds, which are proven to be higher than the corresponding one-way counterparts in all cases. We perform the security analysis first reducing the general eavesdropping to a two-mode coherent Gaussian attack, and then showing that the superadditivity is achieved by exploiting the random on/off switching of the two-way quantum communication. This allows the parties to choose the appropriate communication instances to prepare the key, accordingly to the tomography of the quantum channel. The random opening and closing of the circuit represents, in fact, an additional degree of freedom allowing the parties to convert, a posteriori, the two-mode correlations of the eavesdropping into noise. The eavesdropper is assumed to have no access to the on/off switching and, indeed, cannot adapt her attack. We explicitly prove that this mechanism enhances the security performance, no matter if the eavesdropper performs collective or coherent attacks.

  10. A simple coherent attack and practical security of differential phase shift quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, D. A.

    2014-02-01

    The differential phase shift quantum key distribution protocol reveals good security against such powerful attacks as unambiguous state discrimination and beam splitting attacks. Its complete security analysis is complex due to high dimensions of the supposed spaces and density operators. In this paper, we consider a particular and conceptually simple coherent attack, available in practical implementations. The main condition for this attack is the length of used coherent state tuples of order 8-12. We show that under this condition, no high level of practical distance between legitimate users can be achieved.

  11. A Generic Evolution of Key Using Quantum Cryptography Management for Transcript

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BASANT DHAKAD

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Network Security is play very important role in Network system, Because in networked systems, the major security risks occur while conducting business on the Net; The following are some of the security risks occur: unauthorized access, Eavesdropping, Password sniffing, spoofing-spoofing, Denial of Service, virus attack, System modification, Data modification, Repudiation, E-mail bombing. Not With data storage and processing snowballing into a necessity from being an efficient part of any business process or organization, the need for securing storage at various degrees of granularity is gaining considerable interest. The challenge in designing an encrypted file system stems from balancing performance, security perception, ease of usage and enterprise level deploy ability. Often, the most secure solutions may not even be the best solution either due to hit on performance or due to decreased usability. Further, narrowing the trust circle to exclude even hitherto trusted system administrators makes creating an encrypted file system a huge engineering exercise.

  12. Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution over Untrustful Metropolitan Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Lin Tang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantum cryptography holds the promise to establish an information-theoretically secure global network. All field tests of metropolitan-scale quantum networks to date are based on trusted relays. The security critically relies on the accountability of the trusted relays, which will break down if the relay is dishonest or compromised. Here, we construct a measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDIQKD network in a star topology over a 200-square-kilometer metropolitan area, which is secure against untrustful relays and against all detection attacks. In the field test, our system continuously runs through one week with a secure key rate 10 times larger than previous results. Our results demonstrate that the MDIQKD network, combining the best of both worlds—security and practicality, constitutes an appealing solution to secure metropolitan communications.

  13. A Universal Quantum Network Quantum Central Processing Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG An-Min

    2001-01-01

    A new construction scheme of a universal quantum network which is compatible with the known quantum gate- assembly schemes is proposed. Our quantum network is standard, easy-assemble, reusable, scalable and even potentially programmable. Moreover, we can construct a whole quantum network to implement the generalquantum algorithm and quantum simulation procedure. In the above senses, it is a realization of the quantum central processing unit.

  14. A decoy-state protocol for quantum cryptography with 4 intensities of coherent states

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X B

    2004-01-01

    In order to beat any type of photon-number-splitting attack, we In order to beat any type of photon-number-splitting attack, we propose a protocol for quantum key distributoin (QKD) using 4 different intensities of pulses. They are vacuum and coherent states with mean photon number $\\mu,\\mu'$ and $\\mu_s$. $\\mu_s$ is around 0.55 and this class of pulses are used as the main signal states. The other two classes of coherent states are used for both decoy and signal. We have shown that, given the typical set-up in practice, the key rate from the main signal pulses is more than 77% to 88% of the theoretically allowed maximal rate in the case of overall transmittance of $10^{-4}$ and $10^{-3}$.

  15. On a simple attack, limiting the range transmission of secret keys in a system of quantum cryptography based on coding in a sub-carrier frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, A. N.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.; Potapova, T. A.

    2017-03-01

    In the paper by Gleim et al (2016 Opt. Express 24 2619), it was declared that the system of quantum cryptography, exploiting quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol BB84 with the additional reference state and encoding in a sub-carrier, is able to distribute secret keys at a distance of 210 km. The following shows that a simple attack realized with a beam splitter results in a loss of privacy of the keys over substantially smaller distances. It turns out that the actual length of the secret key transmission for the QKD system encoding in the sub-carrier frequency is ten times less than that declared in Gleim et al (2016 Opt. Express 24 2619). Therefore it is impossible to safely use the keys when distributed at a larger length of the communication channel than shown below. The maximum communication distance does not exceed 22 km, even in the most optimistic scenario.

  16. Universality in random quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, Jaroslav; Alber, Gernot; Jex, Igor

    2015-12-01

    Networks constitute efficient tools for assessing universal features of complex systems. In physical contexts, classical as well as quantum networks are used to describe a wide range of phenomena, such as phase transitions, intricate aspects of many-body quantum systems, or even characteristic features of a future quantum internet. Random quantum networks and their associated directed graphs are employed for capturing statistically dominant features of complex quantum systems. Here, we develop an efficient iterative method capable of evaluating the probability of a graph being strongly connected. It is proven that random directed graphs with constant edge-establishing probability are typically strongly connected, i.e., any ordered pair of vertices is connected by a directed path. This typical topological property of directed random graphs is exploited to demonstrate universal features of the asymptotic evolution of large random qubit networks. These results are independent of our knowledge of the details of the network topology. These findings suggest that other highly complex networks, such as a future quantum internet, may also exhibit similar universal properties.

  17. Quantum computing in neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gralewicz, P

    2004-01-01

    According to the statistical interpretation of quantum theory, quantum computers form a distinguished class of probabilistic machines (PMs) by encoding n qubits in 2n pbits. This raises the possibility of a large-scale quantum computing using PMs, especially with neural networks which have the innate capability for probabilistic information processing. Restricting ourselves to a particular model, we construct and numerically examine the performance of neural circuits implementing universal quantum gates. A discussion on the physiological plausibility of proposed coding scheme is also provided.

  18. Modern Quantum Technologies of Information Security

    CERN Document Server

    Korchenko, Oleksandr; Gnatyuk, Sergiy

    2010-01-01

    In the paper systematization and classification of modern quantum technologies of the information security against cyber-terrorist attack are carried out. The characteristic of the basic directions of quantum cryptography from the viewpoint of used quantum technologies is given. The qualitative analysis of advantages and disadvantages of concrete quantum protocols is made. The current status of a problem of practical quantum cryptography using in telecommunication networks is considered. In particular, the short review of existing commercial systems of quantum key distribution is given.

  19. Google in a Quantum Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparo, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    In we introduce the characterization of a class of quantum PageRank algorithms in a scenario in which some kind of quantum network is realizable out of the current classical internet web, but no quantum computer is yet available. This class of algorithms represents a quantization of the PageRank protocol currently employed to list web pages according to their importance. The PageRank algorithm's ranking ability has been instrumental to give structure to the web. This class of algorithms may be able to rank nodes in a quantum network. Furthermore, in this class, we have found an instance of this class of quantum protocols that outperforms its classical counterpart and may break the classical hierarchy of web pages depending on the topology of the web.

  20. Tensor Network Quantum Virtual Machine (TNQVM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-11-18

    There is a lack of state-of-the-art quantum computing simulation software that scales on heterogeneous systems like Titan. Tensor Network Quantum Virtual Machine (TNQVM) provides a quantum simulator that leverages a distributed network of GPUs to simulate quantum circuits in a manner that leverages recent results from tensor network theory.

  1. A quantum network for implementation of the optimal quantum cloning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Jie-Lin; Zhang Wen-Hai

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a quantum network to implement the optimal 1→2 quantum cloning in 2 dimensions, including the optimal asymmetric universal, the optimal symmetric phase-covariant, and the asymmetric real state cloning. By only choosing different angles of the single-qubit rotations, the quantum network can implement three optimal quantum cloning.

  2. Special Issue on Entropy-Based Applied Cryptography and Enhanced Security for Ubiquitous Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James (Jong Hyuk Park

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Entropy is a basic and important concept in information theory. It is also often used as a measure of the unpredictability of a cryptographic key in cryptography research areas. Ubiquitous computing (Ubi-comp has emerged rapidly as an exciting new paradigm. In this special issue, we mainly selected and discussed papers related with ore theories based on the graph theory to solve computational problems on cryptography and security, practical technologies; applications and services for Ubi-comp including secure encryption techniques, identity and authentication; credential cloning attacks and countermeasures; switching generator with resistance against the algebraic and side channel attacks; entropy-based network anomaly detection; applied cryptography using chaos function, information hiding and watermark, secret sharing, message authentication, detection and modeling of cyber attacks with Petri Nets, and quantum flows for secret key distribution, etc.

  3. Review of Lattice-based Public key Cryptography(Russian)

    OpenAIRE

    Usatyuk, V. S.

    2010-01-01

    This article presets a review of the achievements rapidly developing field of cryptography - public-key cryptography based on the lattice theory. Paper contains the necessary basic concepts and the major problems of the lattice theory, as well as together with the description on the benefits of this cryptography class - the properties of the reliability to quantum computers and full homomorphism, the shortcomings of specific implementations.

  4. Holographic Software for Quantum Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Jaffe, Arthur; Wozniakowski, Alex

    2016-01-01

    We introduce diagrammatic protocols and holographic software for quantum information. We give a dictionary to translate between diagrammatic protocols and the usual algebraic protocols. In particular we describe the intuitive diagrammatic protocol for teleportation. We introduce the string Fourier transform $\\mathfrak{F}_{s}$ in quantum information, which gives a topological quantum computer. We explain why the string Fourier transform maps the zero particle state to the multiple-qudit resource state, which maximizes the entanglement entropy. We give a protocol to construct this $n$-qudit resource state $|Max \\rangle$, which uses minimal cost. We study Pauli $X,Y,Z$ matrices, and their relation with diagrammatic protocols. This work provides bridges between the new theory of planar para algebras and quantum information, especially in questions involving communication in quantum networks.

  5. Computing on Anonymous Quantum Network

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Hirotada; Tani, Seiichiro

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers distributed computing on an anonymous quantum network, a network in which no party has a unique identifier and quantum communication and computation are available. It is proved that the leader election problem can exactly (i.e., without error in bounded time) be solved with at most the same complexity up to a constant factor as that of exactly computing symmetric functions (without intermediate measurements for a distributed and superposed input), if the number of parties is given to every party. A corollary of this result is a more efficient quantum leader election algorithm than existing ones: the new quantum algorithm runs in O(n) rounds with bit complexity O(mn^2), on an anonymous quantum network with n parties and m communication links. Another corollary is the first quantum algorithm that exactly computes any computable Boolean function with round complexity O(n) and with smaller bit complexity than that of existing classical algorithms in the worst case over all (computable) Boolea...

  6. Chocolate Key Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Dale J.; Brown, Ezra A.; Norton, Anderson H.

    2010-01-01

    Cryptography is the science of hidden or secret writing. More generally, cryptography refers to the science of safeguarding information. Cryptography allows people to use a public medium such as the Internet to transmit private information securely, thus enabling a whole range of conveniences, from online shopping to personally printed movie…

  7. Chocolate Key Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Dale J.; Brown, Ezra A.; Norton, Anderson H.

    2010-01-01

    Cryptography is the science of hidden or secret writing. More generally, cryptography refers to the science of safeguarding information. Cryptography allows people to use a public medium such as the Internet to transmit private information securely, thus enabling a whole range of conveniences, from online shopping to personally printed movie…

  8. Quantum Key Distribution in a Multi-User Network at Gigahertz Clock rates

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, V; Collins, R J; Townsend, P D; Cova, S D; Rech, I; Buller, G S; Fernandez, Veronica; Gordon, Karen J.; Collins, Robert J.; Townsend, Paul D.; Cova, Sergio D.; Rech, Ivan; Buller, Gerald S.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years quantum information research has lead to the discovery of a number of remarkable new paradigms for information processing and communication. These developments include quantum cryptography schemes that offer unconditionally secure information transport guaranteed by quantum-mechanical laws. Such potentially disruptive security technologies could be of high strategic and economic value in the future. Two major issues confronting researchers in this field are the transmission range (typically <100km) and the key exchange rate, which can be as low as a few bits per second at long optical fiber distances. This paper describes further research of an approach to significantly enhance the key exchange rate in an optical fiber system at distances in the range of 1-20km. We will present results on a number of application scenarios, including point-to-point links and multi-user networks. Quantum key distribution systems have been developed, which use standard telecommunications optical fiber, and whi...

  9. Entanglement distribution in quantum networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perseguers, Sebastien

    2010-04-15

    This Thesis contributes to the theory of entanglement distribution in quantum networks, analyzing the generation of long-distance entanglement in particular. We consider that neighboring stations share one partially entangled pair of qubits, which emphasizes the difficulty of creating remote entanglement in realistic settings. The task is then to design local quantum operations at the stations, such that the entanglement present in the links of the whole network gets concentrated between few parties only, regardless of their spatial arrangement. First, we study quantum networks with a two-dimensional lattice structure, where quantum connections between the stations (nodes) are described by non-maximally entangled pure states (links). We show that the generation of a perfectly entangled pair of qubits over an arbitrarily long distance is possible if the initial entanglement of the links is larger than a threshold. This critical value highly depends on the geometry of the lattice, in particular on the connectivity of the nodes, and is related to a classical percolation problem. We then develop a genuine quantum strategy based on multipartite entanglement, improving both the threshold and the success probability of the generation of long-distance entanglement. Second, we consider a mixed-state definition of the connections of the quantum networks. This formalism is well-adapted for a more realistic description of systems in which noise (random errors) inevitably occurs. New techniques are required to create remote entanglement in this setting, and we show how to locally extract and globally process some error syndromes in order to create useful long-distance quantum correlations. Finally, we turn to networks that have a complex topology, which is the case for most real-world communication networks such as the Internet for instance. Besides many other characteristics, these systems have in common the small-world feature, stating that any two nodes are separated by a

  10. Quantum Networks for Generating Arbitrary Quantum States

    OpenAIRE

    Kaye, Phillip; Mosca, Michele

    2004-01-01

    Quantum protocols often require the generation of specific quantum states. We describe a quantum algorithm for generating any prescribed quantum state. For an important subclass of states, including pure symmetric states, this algorithm is efficient.

  11. Quantum networks based on cavity QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Stephan; Bochmann, Joerg; Figueroa, Eden; Hahn, Carolin; Kalb, Norbert; Muecke, Martin; Neuzner, Andreas; Noelleke, Christian; Reiserer, Andreas; Uphoff, Manuel; Rempe, Gerhard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Quantum repeaters require an efficient interface between stationary quantum memories and flying photons. Single atoms in optical cavities are ideally suited as universal quantum network nodes that are capable of sending, storing, retrieving, and even processing quantum information. We demonstrate this by presenting an elementary version of a quantum network based on two identical nodes in remote, independent laboratories. The reversible exchange of quantum information and the creation of remote entanglement are achieved by exchange of a single photon. Quantum teleportation is implemented using a time-resolved photonic Bell-state measurement. Quantum control over all degrees of freedom of the single atom also allows for the nondestructive detection of flying photons and the implementation of a quantum gate between the spin state of the atom and the polarization of a photon upon its reflection from the cavity. Our approach to quantum networking offers a clear perspective for scalability and provides the essential components for the realization of a quantum repeater.

  12. Secure quantum network coding for controlled repeater networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Tao; Li, Jiao; Liu, Jian-wei

    2016-07-01

    To realize efficient quantum communication based on quantum repeater, we propose a secure quantum network coding scheme for controlled repeater networks, which adds a controller as a trusted party and is able to control the process of EPR-pair distribution. As the key operations of quantum repeater, local operations and quantum communication are designed to adopt quantum one-time pad to enhance the function of identity authentication instead of local operations and classical communication. Scheme analysis shows that the proposed scheme can defend against active attacks for quantum communication and realize long-distance quantum communication with minimal resource consumption.

  13. High-speed quantum networking by ship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J.; Greentree, Andrew D.; Stephens, Ashley M.; van Meter, Rodney

    2016-11-01

    Networked entanglement is an essential component for a plethora of quantum computation and communication protocols. Direct transmission of quantum signals over long distances is prevented by fibre attenuation and the no-cloning theorem, motivating the development of quantum repeaters, designed to purify entanglement, extending its range. Quantum repeaters have been demonstrated over short distances, but error-corrected, global repeater networks with high bandwidth require new technology. Here we show that error corrected quantum memories installed in cargo containers and carried by ship can provide a exible connection between local networks, enabling low-latency, high-fidelity quantum communication across global distances at higher bandwidths than previously proposed. With demonstrations of technology with sufficient fidelity to enable topological error-correction, implementation of the quantum memories is within reach, and bandwidth increases with improvements in fabrication. Our approach to quantum networking avoids technological restrictions of repeater deployment, providing an alternate path to a worldwide Quantum Internet.

  14. High-speed quantum networking by ship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J; Greentree, Andrew D; Stephens, Ashley M; Van Meter, Rodney

    2016-11-02

    Networked entanglement is an essential component for a plethora of quantum computation and communication protocols. Direct transmission of quantum signals over long distances is prevented by fibre attenuation and the no-cloning theorem, motivating the development of quantum repeaters, designed to purify entanglement, extending its range. Quantum repeaters have been demonstrated over short distances, but error-corrected, global repeater networks with high bandwidth require new technology. Here we show that error corrected quantum memories installed in cargo containers and carried by ship can provide a exible connection between local networks, enabling low-latency, high-fidelity quantum communication across global distances at higher bandwidths than previously proposed. With demonstrations of technology with sufficient fidelity to enable topological error-correction, implementation of the quantum memories is within reach, and bandwidth increases with improvements in fabrication. Our approach to quantum networking avoids technological restrictions of repeater deployment, providing an alternate path to a worldwide Quantum Internet.

  15. Asymptotic correctability of Bell-diagonal qudit states and lower bounds on tolerable error probabilities in quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Ranade, K S; Alber, Gernot; Ranade, Kedar S.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of asymptotic correctability of Bell-diagonal quantum states is generalised to elementary quantum systems of higher dimensions. Based on these results basic properties of quantum state purification protocols are investigated which are capable of purifying tensor products of Bell-diagonal states and which are based on $B$-steps of the Gottesman-Lo-type with the subsequent application of a Calderbank-Shor-Steane quantum code. Consequences for maximum tolerable error rates of quantum cryptographic protocols are discussed.

  16. A secured authentication protocol for wireless sensor networks using elliptic curves cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsiu-Lien; Chen, Tien-Ho; Liu, Pin-Chuan; Kim, Tai-Hoo; Wei, Hsin-Wen

    2011-01-01

    User authentication is a crucial service in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) that is becoming increasingly common in WSNs because wireless sensor nodes are typically deployed in an unattended environment, leaving them open to possible hostile network attack. Because wireless sensor nodes are limited in computing power, data storage and communication capabilities, any user authentication protocol must be designed to operate efficiently in a resource constrained environment. In this paper, we review several proposed WSN user authentication protocols, with a detailed review of the M.L Das protocol and a cryptanalysis of Das' protocol that shows several security weaknesses. Furthermore, this paper proposes an ECC-based user authentication protocol that resolves these weaknesses. According to our analysis of security of the ECC-based protocol, it is suitable for applications with higher security requirements. Finally, we present a comparison of security, computation, and communication costs and performances for the proposed protocols. The ECC-based protocol is shown to be suitable for higher security WSNs.

  17. Enhanced sensing and communication via quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James F.

    2017-05-01

    A network based on quantum information has been developed to improve sensing and communications capabilities. Quantum teleportation offers features for communicating information not found in classical procedures. It is fundamental to the quantum network approach. A version of quantum teleportation based on hyper-entanglement is used to bring about these improvements. Recently invented methods of improving sensing and communication via quantum information based on hyper-entanglement are discussed. These techniques offer huge improvements in the SNR, signal to interference ratio, and time-on-target of various sensors including RADAR and LADAR. Hyper-entanglement refers to quantum entanglement in more than one degree of freedom, e.g. polarization, energy-time, orbital angular momentum (OAM), etc. The quantum network makes use of quantum memory located in each node of the network, thus the network forms a quantum repeater. The quantum repeater facilitates the use of quantum teleportation, and superdense coding. Superdense coding refers to the ability to incorporate more than one classical bit into each transmitted qubit. The network of sensors and/or communication devices has an enhanced resistance to interference sources. The repeater has the potential for greatly reducing loss in communications and sensor systems related to the effect of the atmosphere on fragile quantum states. Measures of effectiveness (MOEs) are discussed that show the utility of the network for improving sensing and communications in the presence of loss and noise. The quantum repeater will reduce overall size, weight, power and cost (SWAPC) of fielded components of systems.

  18. Entangled network and quantum communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metwally, Nasser, E-mail: Nmetwally@gmail.com [Math. Dept., Faculty of Science, South Valley University, Aswan (Egypt); Math. Dept., College of Science, University of Bahrain, P.O. Box 32038 (Bahrain)

    2011-11-21

    A theoretical scheme is introduced to generate entangled network via Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya (DM) interaction. The dynamics of entanglement between different nodes, which is generated by direct or indirect interaction, is investigated. It is shown that, the direction of (DM) interaction and the locations of the nodes have a sensational effect on the degree of entanglement. The minimum entanglement generated between all the nodes is quantified. The upper and lower bounds of the entanglement depend on the direction of DM interaction, and the repetition of the behavior depends on the strength of DM. The generated entangled nodes are used as quantum channel to perform quantum teleportation, where it is shown that the fidelity of teleporting unknown information between the network members depends on the locations of the members.

  19. Introduction to modern cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition:""This book is a comprehensive, rigorous introduction to what the authors name 'modern' cryptography. … a novel approach to how cryptography is taught, replacing the older, construction-based approach. … The concepts are clearly stated, both in an intuitive fashion and formally. … I would heartily recommend this book to anyone who is interested in cryptography. … The exercises are challenging and interesting, and can benefit readers of all academic levels.""-IACR Book Reviews, January 2010""Over the past 30 years, cryptography has been transformed from a mysterious

  20. Novel quantum inspired binary neural network algorithm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    OM PRAKASH PATEL; ARUNA TIWARI

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a quantum based binary neural network algorithm is proposed, named as novel quantum binary neural network algorithm (NQ-BNN). It forms a neural network structure by deciding weights and separability parameter in quantum based manner. Quantum computing concept represents solution probabilistically and gives large search space to find optimal value of required parameters using Gaussian random number generator. The neural network structure forms constructively having three number of layers input layer: hidden layer and output layer. A constructive way of deciding the network eliminates the unnecessary training of neural network. A new parameter that is a quantum separability parameter (QSP) is introduced here, which finds an optimal separability plane to classify input samples. During learning, it searches for an optimal separability plane. This parameter is taken as the threshold of neuron for learning of neural network. This algorithm is tested with three benchmark datasets and produces improved results than existing quantum inspired and other classification approaches.

  1. Delayed Commutation in Quantum Computer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Escartín, Juan Carlos; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro

    2006-09-01

    In the same way that classical computer networks connect and enhance the capabilities of classical computers, quantum networks can combine the advantages of quantum information and communication. We propose a nonclassical network element, a delayed commutation switch, that can solve the problem of switching time in packet switching networks. With the help of some local ancillary qubits and superdense codes, we can route a qubit packet after part of it has left the network node.

  2. Delayed commutation in quantum computer networks

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Escartin, J C; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2005-01-01

    In the same way that classical computer networks connect and enhance the capabilities of classical computers, quantum networks can combine the advantages of quantum information and communications. We propose a non-classical network element, a delayed commutation switch, that can solve the problem of switching time in packet switching networks. With the help of some local ancillary qubits and superdense codes we can route the information after part of it has left the network node.

  3. Opportunistic quantum network coding based on quantum teleportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Tao; Du, Gang; Liu, Jian-wei

    2016-04-01

    It seems impossible to endow opportunistic characteristic to quantum network on the basis that quantum channel cannot be overheard without disturbance. In this paper, we propose an opportunistic quantum network coding scheme by taking full advantage of channel characteristic of quantum teleportation. Concretely, it utilizes quantum channel for secure transmission of quantum states and can detect eavesdroppers by means of quantum channel verification. What is more, it utilizes classical channel for both opportunistic listening to neighbor states and opportunistic coding by broadcasting measurement outcome. Analysis results show that our scheme can reduce the times of transmissions over classical channels for relay nodes and can effectively defend against classical passive attack and quantum active attack.

  4. Experimental entanglement distillation of mesoscopic quantum states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Ruifang; Lassen, Mikael Østergaard; Heersink, Joel

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of entangled states between distant parties in an optical network is crucial for the successful implementation of various quantum communication protocols such as quantum cryptography, teleportation and dense coding(1-3). However, owing to the unavoidable loss in any real optical...

  5. Selected areas in cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Oorschot, Paul

    1997-01-01

    Selected Areas in Cryptography brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this fast moving area. Selected Areas in Cryptography serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most challenging research issues in the field.

  6. A quantum-implementable neural network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jialin; Wang, Lingli; Charbon, Edoardo

    2017-10-01

    A quantum-implementable neural network, namely quantum probability neural network (QPNN) model, is proposed in this paper. QPNN can use quantum parallelism to trace all possible network states to improve the result. Due to its unique quantum nature, this model is robust to several quantum noises under certain conditions, which can be efficiently implemented by the qubus quantum computer. Another advantage is that QPNN can be used as memory to retrieve the most relevant data and even to generate new data. The MATLAB experimental results of Iris data classification and MNIST handwriting recognition show that much less neuron resources are required in QPNN to obtain a good result than the classical feedforward neural network. The proposed QPNN model indicates that quantum effects are useful for real-life classification tasks.

  7. Quantum Navigation and Ranking in Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Burillo, Eduardo; Duch, Jordi; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Zueco, David

    2012-08-01

    Complex networks are formal frameworks capturing the interdependencies between the elements of large systems and databases. This formalism allows to use network navigation methods to rank the importance that each constituent has on the global organization of the system. A key example is Pagerank navigation which is at the core of the most used search engine of the World Wide Web. Inspired in this classical algorithm, we define a quantum navigation method providing a unique ranking of the elements of a network. We analyze the convergence of quantum navigation to the stationary rank of networks and show that quantumness decreases the number of navigation steps before convergence. In addition, we show that quantum navigation allows to solve degeneracies found in classical ranks. By implementing the quantum algorithm in real networks, we confirm these improvements and show that quantum coherence unveils new hierarchical features about the global organization of complex systems.

  8. Network-topology-adaptive quantum conference protocols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Sheng; Wang Jian; Tang Chao-Jing; Zhang Quan

    2011-01-01

    As an important application of the quantum network communication,quantum multiparty conference has made multiparty secret communication possible.Previous quantum multiparty conference schemes based on quantum data encryption are insensitive to network topology.However,the topology of the quantum network significantly affects the communication efficiency,e.g.,parallel transmission in a channel with limited bandwidth.We have proposed two distinctive protocols,which work in two basic network topologies with efficiency higher than the existing ones.We first present a protocol which works in the reticulate network using Greeberger-Horne-Zeilinger states and entanglement swapping.Another protocol,based on quantum multicasting with quantum data compression,which can improve the efficiency of the network,works in the star-like network.The security of our protocols is guaranteed by quantum key distribution and one-time-pad encryption.In general,the two protocols can be applied to any quantum network where the topology can be equivalently transformed to one of the two structures we propose in our protocols.

  9. Quantum Prisoner's Dilemma game on hypergraph networks

    CERN Document Server

    Pawela, Ł

    2012-01-01

    We study the beneficialness of quantum strategies in multi-player evolutionary games. We base our study on the three-player Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) game. In order to model the simultaneous interaction between three agents we use hypergraphs and hypergraph networks. In particular, we study two types of networks: a random network and a SF-like network. The obtained results show that in the case of a three player game on a hypergraph network, quantum strategies not necessarily are Evolutionary Stable Strategies. In some cases, the defection strategy can be as good as a quantum one.

  10. Symmetry and Quantum Transport on Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Salimi, S; Soltanzadeh, M M

    2011-01-01

    We study the classical and quantum transport processes on some finite networks and model them by continuous-time random walks (CTRW) and continuous-time quantum walks (CTQW), respectively. We calculate the classical and quantum transition probabilities between two nodes of the network. We numerically show that there is a high probability to find the walker at the initial node for CTQWs on the underlying networks due to the interference phenomenon, even for long times. To get global information (independent of the starting node) about the transport efficiency, we average the return probability over all nodes of the network. We apply the decay rate and the asymptotic value of the average of the return probability to evaluate the transport efficiency. Our numerical results prove that the existence of the symmetry in the underlying networks makes quantum transport less efficient than the classical one. In addition, we find that the increasing of the symmetry of these networks decreases the efficiency of quantum t...

  11. Feedback network models for quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, John

    2014-12-01

    Quantum feedback networks have been introduced in quantum optics as a framework for constructing arbitrary networks of quantum mechanical systems connected by unidirectional quantum optical fields, and has allowed for a system theoretic approach to open quantum optics systems. Our aim here is to establish a network theory for quantum transport systems where typically the mediating fields between systems are bidirectional. Mathematically, this leads us to study quantum feedback networks where fields arrive at ports in input-output pairs, making it a special case of the unidirectional theory where inputs and outputs are paired. However, it is conceptually important to develop this theory in the context of quantum transport theory-the resulting theory extends traditional approaches which tend to view the components in quantum transport as scatterers for the various fields, in the process allowing us to consider emission and absorption of field quanta by these components. The quantum feedback network theory is applicable to both Bose and Fermi fields, moreover, it applies to nonlinear dynamics for the component systems. We advance the general theory, but study the case of linear passive quantum components in some detail.

  12. Robust entanglement distribution via quantum network coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epping, Michael; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruß, Dagmar

    2016-10-01

    Many protocols of quantum information processing, like quantum key distribution or measurement-based quantum computation, ‘consume’ entangled quantum states during their execution. When participants are located at distant sites, these resource states need to be distributed. Due to transmission losses quantum repeater become necessary for large distances (e.g. ≳ 300 {{km}}). Here we generalize the concept of the graph state repeater to D-dimensional graph states and to repeaters that can perform basic measurement-based quantum computations, which we call quantum routers. This processing of data at intermediate network nodes is called quantum network coding. We describe how a scheme to distribute general two-colourable graph states via quantum routers with network coding can be constructed from classical linear network codes. The robustness of the distribution of graph states against outages of network nodes is analysed by establishing a link to stabilizer error correction codes. Furthermore we show, that for any stabilizer error correction code there exists a corresponding quantum network code with similar error correcting capabilities.

  13. The SECOQC quantum key distribution network in Vienna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peev, M; Pacher, C; Boxleitner, W; Happe, A; Hasani, Y [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH (formerly Austrian Research Centers GmbH-ARC), Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Alleaume, R; Diamanti, E [Telecom ParisTech and LTCI-CNRS, 37/39 rue Dareau, 75014 Paris (France); Barreiro, C; Fasel, S; Gautier, J-D; Gisin, N [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva, 1211, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Bouda, J [Faculty of Informatics, Masaryk University, Botanicka 68a, 602 00, Brno (Czech Republic); Debuisschert, T; Fossier, S [Thales Research and Technology France, RD 128, 91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Dianati, M [University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Dynes, J F [Toshiba Research Europe Ltd, 208 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Fuerst, M [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, 80799 Muenchen (Germany); Gay, O [id Quantique SA, Chemin de la Marberie 3, 1227 Carouge/Geneva (Switzerland); Grangier, P [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique - CNRS - University Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Hentschel, M [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: Momtchil.Peev@ait.ac.at (and others)

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, we present the quantum key distribution (QKD) network designed and implemented by the European project SEcure COmmunication based on Quantum Cryptography (SECOQC) (2004-2008), unifying the efforts of 41 research and industrial organizations. The paper summarizes the SECOQC approach to QKD networks with a focus on the trusted repeater paradigm. It discusses the architecture and functionality of the SECOQC trusted repeater prototype, which has been put into operation in Vienna in 2008 and publicly demonstrated in the framework of a SECOQC QKD conference held from October 8 to 10, 2008. The demonstration involved one-time pad encrypted telephone communication, a secure (AES encryption protected) video-conference with all deployed nodes and a number of rerouting experiments, highlighting basic mechanisms of the SECOQC network functionality. The paper gives an overview of the eight point-to-point network links in the prototype and their underlying technology: three plug and play systems by id Quantique, a one way weak pulse system from Toshiba Research in the UK, a coherent one-way system by GAP Optique with the participation of id Quantique and the AIT Austrian Institute of Technology (formerly ARC ), an entangled photons system by University of Vienna and the AIT, a continuous-variables system by Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and THALES Research and Technology with the participation of Universite Libre de Bruxelles, and a free space link by the Ludwig Maximillians University in Munich connecting two nodes situated in adjacent buildings (line of sight 80 m). The average link length is between 20 and 30 km, the longest link being 83 km. The paper presents the architecture and functionality of the principal networking agent-the SECOQC node module, which enables the authentic classical communication required for key distillation, manages the generated key material, determines a communication path between any destinations in the network

  14. The SECOQC quantum key distribution network in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, M.; Pacher, C.; Alléaume, R.; Barreiro, C.; Bouda, J.; Boxleitner, W.; Debuisschert, T.; Diamanti, E.; Dianati, M.; Dynes, J. F.; Fasel, S.; Fossier, S.; Fürst, M.; Gautier, J.-D.; Gay, O.; Gisin, N.; Grangier, P.; Happe, A.; Hasani, Y.; Hentschel, M.; Hübel, H.; Humer, G.; Länger, T.; Legré, M.; Lieger, R.; Lodewyck, J.; Lorünser, T.; Lütkenhaus, N.; Marhold, A.; Matyus, T.; Maurhart, O.; Monat, L.; Nauerth, S.; Page, J.-B.; Poppe, A.; Querasser, E.; Ribordy, G.; Robyr, S.; Salvail, L.; Sharpe, A. W.; Shields, A. J.; Stucki, D.; Suda, M.; Tamas, C.; Themel, T.; Thew, R. T.; Thoma, Y.; Treiber, A.; Trinkler, P.; Tualle-Brouri, R.; Vannel, F.; Walenta, N.; Weier, H.; Weinfurter, H.; Wimberger, I.; Yuan, Z. L.; Zbinden, H.; Zeilinger, A.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we present the quantum key distribution (QKD) network designed and implemented by the European project SEcure COmmunication based on Quantum Cryptography (SECOQC) (2004-2008), unifying the efforts of 41 research and industrial organizations. The paper summarizes the SECOQC approach to QKD networks with a focus on the trusted repeater paradigm. It discusses the architecture and functionality of the SECOQC trusted repeater prototype, which has been put into operation in Vienna in 2008 and publicly demonstrated in the framework of a SECOQC QKD conference held from October 8 to 10, 2008. The demonstration involved one-time pad encrypted telephone communication, a secure (AES encryption protected) video-conference with all deployed nodes and a number of rerouting experiments, highlighting basic mechanisms of the SECOQC network functionality. The paper gives an overview of the eight point-to-point network links in the prototype and their underlying technology: three plug and play systems by id Quantique, a one way weak pulse system from Toshiba Research in the UK, a coherent one-way system by GAP Optique with the participation of id Quantique and the AIT Austrian Institute of Technology (formerly ARCAustrian Research Centers GmbH—ARC is now operating under the new name AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH following a restructuring initiative.), an entangled photons system by the University of Vienna and the AIT, a continuous-variables system by Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and THALES Research and Technology with the participation of Université Libre de Bruxelles, and a free space link by the Ludwig Maximillians University in Munich connecting two nodes situated in adjacent buildings (line of sight 80 m). The average link length is between 20 and 30 km, the longest link being 83 km. The paper presents the architecture and functionality of the principal networking agent—the SECOQC node module, which enables the authentic

  15. Quantum network communication -- the butterfly and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, D; Winter, A; Leung, Debbie; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Winter, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    We study the communication of quantum information in networks of (directed) quantum channels. We consider the asymptotic rates of high fidelity quantum communication between specific sender-receiver pairs, and obtain outer and inner bounds of the achievable rate regions. All four scenarios of classical communication assistance (none, forward, backward, and two-way) are considered. For networks in which (1) the receivers are information sinks, (2) the maximum distance from senders to receivers is small, and without further constraints on the networks (such as the number of intermediate parties), we prove that rerouting of quantum information is optimal. Furthermore, the optimal use of the free assisting classical communication is simply to modify the directions of quantum channels in the network. Consequently, the achievable rate regions are given by counting edge avoiding paths, and precise achievable rate regions in all four assisting scenarios can be obtained. These complete solutions apply to many networks...

  16. Generation of a superposition of odd photon number states for quantum information networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard-Nielsen, Jonas Schou; Nielsen, B.; Hettich, C.

    2006-01-01

    Quantum information networks, quantum memories, quantum repeaters, linear optics quantum computers Udgivelsesdato: 25 August......Quantum information networks, quantum memories, quantum repeaters, linear optics quantum computers Udgivelsesdato: 25 August...

  17. Quantum networks: where should we be heading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masahide

    2017-06-01

    Quantum key distribution network has become a reality in practical environment. Quantum repeaters have been explored in various physical systems and their combinations. For practical use of them, these new paradigms must be combined with existing or emerging infrastructures of communication and security systems. In this article, we discussed how quantum network can be combined with modern cryptographic technologies in fibre network and with emerging mobile terminals in wireless network, creating new solutions for the future cryptographic and communication systems. Our discussions are summarised in a roadmap.

  18. Quantum complexity: Quantum mutual information, complex networks, and emergent phenomena in quantum cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, David L.

    Emerging quantum simulator technologies provide a new challenge to quantum many body theory. Quantifying the emergent order in and predicting the dynamics of such complex quantum systems requires a new approach. We develop such an approach based on complex network analysis of quantum mutual information. First, we establish the usefulness of quantum mutual information complex networks by reproducing the phase diagrams of transverse Ising and Bose-Hubbard models. By quantifying the complexity of quantum cellular automata we then demonstrate the applicability of complex network theory to non-equilibrium quantum dynamics. We conclude with a study of student collaboration networks, correlating a student's role in a collaboration network with their grades. This work thus initiates a quantitative theory of quantum complexity and provides a new tool for physics education research. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  19. Public Key Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapson, Frank

    1996-01-01

    Describes public key cryptography, also known as RSA, which is a system using two keys, one used to put a message into cipher and another used to decipher the message. Presents examples using small prime numbers. (MKR)

  20. Security of Quantum Repeater Network Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-03

    enumerating differences from classical networks. Quantum networks, of course, depend upon successful creation of high-fidelity entanglement at the link...is equivalent to the classical Internet silently corrupting data somewhere along a network path without the benefit of hop-by-hop error detection...for nodes intended to form a future Quantum Internet be required to support two classes of physically distinct qubits inside the DISTRIBUTION A

  1. Community Detection in Quantum Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Faccin, Mauro; Johnson, Tomi; Biamonte, Jacob; Bergholm, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Determining community structure in interacting systems, ranging from technological to social, from biological to chemical, is a topic of central importance in the study of networks. Extending this concept to apply to quantum systems represents an open challenge and a crucial missing component towards a theory of complex networks based on quantum mechanics. Here we accomplish this goal by introducing methods for identifying the community structure of a network governed by quantum dynamics. To illustrate our approach we turn to a host of examples, including a naturally occurring light-harvesting network, where from first principles we determine a consistent community structure. In certain regimes the communities we determine agree with a partitioning currently done by hand in the quantum chemistry literature. In other regimes, we uncover a new community structure. The difference stems from defining measures to determine distances between nodes in quantum systems, and then determining optimal modularity. Merging...

  2. Halftone visual cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Arce, Gonzalo R; Di Crescenzo, Giovanni

    2006-08-01

    Visual cryptography encodes a secret binary image (SI) into n shares of random binary patterns. If the shares are xeroxed onto transparencies, the secret image can be visually decoded by superimposing a qualified subset of transparencies, but no secret information can be obtained from the superposition of a forbidden subset. The binary patterns of the n shares, however, have no visual meaning and hinder the objectives of visual cryptography. Extended visual cryptography [1] was proposed recently to construct meaningful binary images as shares using hypergraph colourings, but the visual quality is poor. In this paper, a novel technique named halftone visual cryptography is proposed to achieve visual cryptography via halftoning. Based on the blue-noise dithering principles, the proposed method utilizes the void and cluster algorithm [2] to encode a secret binary image into n halftone shares (images) carrying significant visual information. The simulation shows that the visual quality of the obtained halftone shares are observably better than that attained by any available visual cryptography method known to date.

  3. Quantum state transfer and network engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M

    2013-01-01

    Faithful communication is a necessary precondition for large-scale quantum information processing and networking, irrespective of the physical platform. Thus, the problems of quantum-state transfer and quantum-network engineering have attracted enormous interest over the last years, and constitute one of the most active areas of research in quantum information processing. The present volume introduces the reader to fundamental concepts and various aspects of this exciting research area, including links to other related areas and problems. The implementation of state-transfer schemes and the en

  4. Cooperating attackers in neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacham, Lanir N; Klein, Einat; Mislovaty, Rachel; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2004-06-01

    A successful attack strategy in neural cryptography is presented. The neural cryptosystem, based on synchronization of neural networks by mutual learning, has been recently shown to be secure under different attack strategies. The success of the advanced attacker presented here, called the "majority-flipping attacker," does not decay with the parameters of the model. This attacker's outstanding success is due to its using a group of attackers which cooperate throughout the synchronization process, unlike any other attack strategy known. An analytical description of this attack is also presented, and fits the results of simulations.

  5. Optimal Performance of a Quantum Network

    CERN Document Server

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We show that the most general protocol of quantum communication between two end-points of a quantum network with arbitrary topology can be reduced to an ensemble of Choi matrices subject to local operations and classical communication. This is found by using a teleportation-based technique which applies to a wide range of quantum channels both in discrete- and continuous-variable settings, including lossy channels, quantum-limited amplifiers, dephasing and erasure channels. Thanks to this reduction, we compute the optimal rates (capacities) at which two end-points of a quantum network can transmit quantum information, distil entanglement, or distribute secret keys. These capacities are all bounded or equal to a single quantity, that we call the entanglement flux of the quantum network. As a particular case, we derive these optimal rates for the basic paradigm of a linear chain of quantum repeaters. Thus our results establish the ultimate rates for repeater-based and network-assisted quantum communications und...

  6. Quantum state transfer and network engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (Greece); Jex, Igor (ed.) [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering

    2014-03-01

    Presents the basics of large-scale quantum information processing and networking. Covers most aspects of the problems of state transfer and quantum network engineering. Reflects the interdisciplinary nature of the field. Presents various theoretical approaches as well as possible implementations and related experiments. Faithful communication is a necessary precondition for large-scale quantum information processing and networking, irrespective of the physical platform. Thus, the problems of quantum-state transfer and quantum-network engineering have attracted enormous interest over the last years, and constitute one of the most active areas of research in quantum information processing. The present volume introduces the reader to fundamental concepts and various aspects of this exciting research area, including links to other related areas and problems. The implementation of state-transfer schemes and the engineering of quantum networks are discussed in the framework of various quantum optical and condensed matter systems, emphasizing the interdisciplinary character of the research area. Each chapter is a review of theoretical or experimental achievements on a particular topic, written by leading scientists in the field. The volume aims at both newcomers as well as experienced researchers.

  7. Information sharing in Quantum Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cardillo, Alessio; Zueco, David; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the use of entanglement entropy as a tool for studying the amount of information shared between the nodes of quantum complex networks. By considering the ground state of a network of coupled quantum harmonic oscillators, we compute the information that each node has on the rest of the system. We show that the nodes storing the largest amount of information are not the ones with the highest connectivity, but those with intermediate connectivity thus breaking down the usual hierarchical picture of classical networks. We show both numerically and analytically that the mutual information characterizes the network topology. As a byproduct, our results point out that the amount of information available for an external node connecting to a quantum network allows to determine the network topology.

  8. Quantum games on evolving random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawela, Łukasz

    2016-09-01

    We study the advantages of quantum strategies in evolutionary social dilemmas on evolving random networks. We focus our study on the two-player games: prisoner's dilemma, snowdrift and stag-hunt games. The obtained result show the benefits of quantum strategies for the prisoner's dilemma game. For the other two games, we obtain regions of parameters where the quantum strategies dominate, as well as regions where the classical strategies coexist.

  9. Quantum games on evolving random networks

    CERN Document Server

    Pawela, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    We study the advantages of quantum strategies in evolutionary social dilemmas on evolving random networks. We focus our study on the two-player games: prisoner's dilemma, snowdrift and stag-hunt games. The obtained result show the benefits of quantum strategies for the prisoner's dilemma game. For the other two games, we obtain regions of parameters where the quantum strategies dominate, as well as regions where the classical strategies coexist.

  10. Community Detection in Quantum Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccin, Mauro; Migdał, Piotr; Johnson, Tomi H.; Bergholm, Ville; Biamonte, Jacob D.

    2014-10-01

    Determining community structure is a central topic in the study of complex networks, be it technological, social, biological or chemical, static or in interacting systems. In this paper, we extend the concept of community detection from classical to quantum systems—a crucial missing component of a theory of complex networks based on quantum mechanics. We demonstrate that certain quantum mechanical effects cannot be captured using current classical complex network tools and provide new methods that overcome these problems. Our approaches are based on defining closeness measures between nodes, and then maximizing modularity with hierarchical clustering. Our closeness functions are based on quantum transport probability and state fidelity, two important quantities in quantum information theory. To illustrate the effectiveness of our approach in detecting community structure in quantum systems, we provide several examples, including a naturally occurring light-harvesting complex, LHCII. The prediction of our simplest algorithm, semiclassical in nature, mostly agrees with a proposed partitioning for the LHCII found in quantum chemistry literature, whereas our fully quantum treatment of the problem uncovers a new, consistent, and appropriately quantum community structure.

  11. Quantum-classical transitions in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javarone, Marco Alberto; Armano, Giuliano

    2013-04-01

    The inherent properties of specific physical systems can be used as metaphors for investigation of the behavior of complex networks. This insight has already been put into practice in previous work, e.g., studying the network evolution in terms of phase transitions of quantum gases or representing distances among nodes as if they were particle energies. This paper shows that the emergence of different structures in complex networks, such as the scale-free and the winner-takes-all networks, can be represented in terms of a quantum-classical transition for quantum gases. In particular, we propose a model of fermionic networks that allows us to investigate the network evolution and its dependence on the system temperature. Simulations, performed in accordance with the cited model, clearly highlight the separation between classical random and winner-takes-all networks, in full correspondence with the separation between classical and quantum regions for quantum gases. We deem this model useful for the analysis of synthetic and real complex networks.

  12. Chaos Cryptography with Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert; Morse, Jack; Schimmrigk, Rolf

    2001-11-01

    Cryptography is a subject that draws strength from an amazing variety of different mathematical fields, including such deep results as the Weil-Dwork-Deligne theorem on the zeta function. Physical theories have recently entered the subject as well, an example being the subject of quantum cryptography, motivated in part by Shor's insight into the vulnerability of prime number factorization based crypto systems. In this contribution we describe a cryptographic algorithm which is based on the dynamics of a class of physical models that exhibit chaotic behavior. More precisely, we consider dissipative systems which are described by nonlinear three-dimensional systems of differential equations with strange attractor surfaces of non-integer Lyapunov dimension. The time evolution of such systems in part of the moduli space shows unpredictable behavior, which suggests that they might be useful as pseudorandom number generators. We will show that this is indeed the case and illustrate our procedure mainly with the Lorenz attractor, though we also briefly mention the Rössler system. We use this class of nonlinear models to construct an extremely fast stream cipher with a large keyspace, which we test with Marsaglia's battery of DieHard tests.

  13. Synchronization effect for uncertain quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlin; Gebremariam, Tesfay; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel technique for investigating the synchronization effect for uncertain networks with quantum chaotic behaviors in this paper. Through designing a special function to construct Lyapunov function of network and the adaptive laws of uncertain parameters, the synchronization between the uncertain network and the synchronization target can be realized, and the uncertain parameters in state equations of the network nodes are perfectly identified. All the theoretical results are verified by numerical simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed synchronization technique.

  14. Genetic attack on neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-03-01

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size.

  15. Quantum Cryptography II: How to re-use a one-time pad safely even if P=NP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles H; Brassard, Gilles; Breidbart, Seth

    2014-01-01

    When elementary quantum systems, such as polarized photons, are used to transmit digital information, the uncertainty principle gives rise to novel cryptographic phenomena unachievable with traditional transmission media, e.g. a communications channel on which it is impossible in principle to eavesdrop without a high probability of being detected. With such a channel, a one-time pad can safely be reused many times as long as no eavesdrop is detected, and, planning ahead, part of the capacity of these uncompromised transmissions can be used to send fresh random bits with which to replace the one-time pad when an eavesdrop finally is detected. Unlike other schemes for stretching a one-time pad, this scheme does not depend on complexity-theoretic assumptions such as the difficulty of factoring.

  16. Quantum logic networks for probabilistic teleportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金明; 张永生; 郭光灿

    2003-01-01

    By means of the primitive operations consisting of single-qubit gates, two-qubit controlled-not gates, Von Neuman measurement and classically controlled operations, we construct efficient quantum logic networks for implementing probabilistic teleportation of a single qubit, atwo-particle entangled state, and an N-particle entanglement. Based on the quantum networks, we show that after the partially entangled states are concentrated into maximal entanglement,the above three kinds of probabilistic teleportation are the same as the standard teleportation using the corresponding maximally entangled states as the quantum channels.

  17. Quantum logic networks for probabilistic teleportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金明; 张永生; 等

    2003-01-01

    By eans of the primitive operations consisting of single-qubit gates.two-qubit controlled-not gates,Von Neuman measurement and classically controlled operations.,we construct efficient quantum logic networks for implementing probabilistic teleportation of a single qubit,a two-particle entangled state,and an N-particle entanglement.Based on the quantum networks,we show that after the partially entangled states are concentrated into maximal entanglement,the above three kinds of probabilistic teleportation are the same as the standard teleportation using the corresponding maximally entangled states as the quantum channels.

  18. Intracity Quantum Communication via Thermal Microwave Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Liang Xiang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Communication over proven-secure quantum channels is potentially one of the most wide-ranging applications of currently developed quantum technologies. It is generally envisioned that in future quantum networks, separated nodes containing stationary solid-state or atomic qubits are connected via the exchange of optical photons over large distances. In this work, we explore an intriguing alternative for quantum communication via all-microwave networks. To make this possible, we describe a general protocol for sending quantum states through thermal channels, even when the number of thermal photons in the channel is much larger than 1. The protocol can be implemented with state-of-the-art superconducting circuits and enables the transfer of quantum states over distances of about 100 m via microwave transmission lines cooled to only T=4  K. This opens up new possibilities for quantum communication within and across buildings and, consequently, for the implementation of intracity quantum networks based on microwave technology only.

  19. Software-defined network abstractions and configuration interfaces for building programmable quantum networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasari, Venkat [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD; Sadlier, Ronald J [ORNL; Geerhart, Mr. Billy [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD; Snow, Nikolai [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD; Williams, Brian P [ORNL; Humble, Travis S [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Well-defined and stable quantum networks are essential to realize functional quantum applications. Quantum networks are complex and must use both quantum and classical channels to support quantum applications like QKD, teleportation, and superdense coding. In particular, the no-cloning theorem prevents the reliable copying of quantum signals such that the quantum and classical channels must be highly coordinated using robust and extensible methods. We develop new network abstractions and interfaces for building programmable quantum networks. Our approach leverages new OpenFlow data structures and table type patterns to build programmable quantum networks and to support quantum applications.

  20. Software-defined network abstractions and configuration interfaces for building programmable quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Venkat R.; Sadlier, Ronald J.; Geerhart, Billy E.; Snow, Nikolai A.; Williams, Brian P.; Humble, Travis S.

    2017-05-01

    Well-defined and stable quantum networks are essential to realize functional quantum communication applications. Quantum networks are complex and must use both quantum and classical channels to support quantum applications like QKD, teleportation, and superdense coding. In particular, the no-cloning theorem prevents the reliable copying of quantum signals such that the quantum and classical channels must be highly coordinated using robust and extensible methods. In this paper, we describe new network abstractions and interfaces for building programmable quantum networks. Our approach leverages new OpenFlow data structures and table type patterns to build programmable quantum networks and to support quantum applications.

  1. Quantum key distribution network for multiple applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, A.; Kondoh, T.; Ochi, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Yoshino, K.; Iizuka, H.; Sakamoto, T.; Tomita, A.; Shimamura, E.; Asami, S.; Sasaki, M.

    2017-09-01

    The fundamental architecture and functions of secure key management in a quantum key distribution (QKD) network with enhanced universal interfaces for smooth key sharing between arbitrary two nodes and enabling multiple secure communication applications are proposed. The proposed architecture consists of three layers: a quantum layer, key management layer and key supply layer. We explain the functions of each layer, the key formats in each layer and the key lifecycle for enabling a practical QKD network. A quantum key distribution-advanced encryption standard (QKD-AES) hybrid system and an encrypted smartphone system were developed as secure communication applications on our QKD network. The validity and usefulness of these systems were demonstrated on the Tokyo QKD Network testbed.

  2. Communication via an entangled coherent quantum network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Allati, A; Hassouni, Y [Faculte des Sciences, Departement de Physique, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique URAC 13, Universite Mohammed V Agdal Rabat, Avenue Ibn Battouta, B.P. 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Metwally, N, E-mail: Nmetwally@gmail.com [Mathematics Department, College of Science, University of Bahrain, PO Box 32038 (Bahrain)

    2011-06-01

    A quantum network (QN) is constructed via maximum entangled coherent states. The possibility of using this network to achieve quantum communication between multi-participants is investigated. We showed that the probability of the successful teleportation of an unknown state depends on the size of the used network. As the number of participants increases, the success probability does not depend on the intensity of the field. Implementing a quantum teleportation protocol via a noisy QN is discussed. The unknown state can be teleported perfectly with small values of the field intensity and larger values of the noise strength. The success probability of this suggested protocol increases abruptly for larger values of the noise strength and gradually for small values. For small-size QNs, the fidelity of the teleported state decreases smoothly, whereas it decreases abruptly for larger-sized networks.

  3. Implementation of diffie-Hellman key exchange on wireless sensor using elliptic curve cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajuria, Samant; Tange, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    This work describes a low-cost public key cryptography (PKC) based solution for security services such as authentication as required for wireless sensor networks. We have implemented a software approach using elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) over GF (2m) in order to obtain stronger cryptography....... from Crossbow. Results has shown that the point calculation can be done fairly amount of time with relatively small space consumption......This work describes a low-cost public key cryptography (PKC) based solution for security services such as authentication as required for wireless sensor networks. We have implemented a software approach using elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) over GF (2m) in order to obtain stronger cryptography...

  4. Network realization of triplet-type quantum stochastic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaosheng; Fu, Shizhou; Chen, Yuping

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on a problem of network synthesis for a class of quantum stochastic systems. The systems under consideration are of triplet-type form and stem from linear quantum optics and linear quantum circuits. A new quantum network realization approach is proposed by generalizing the scattering operator from the scalar form to a unitary matrix in network components. It shows that the triplet-type quantum stochastic system can be approximated by a quantum network which consists of some one-degree-of-freedom generalized open-quantum harmonic oscillators (1DGQHOs) via series, concatenation and feedback connections.

  5. Problems and solutions in quantum computing and quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Steeb, Willi-Hans

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computing and quantum information are two of the fastest growing and most exciting research fields in physics. Entanglement, teleportation and the possibility of using the non-local behavior of quantum mechanics to factor integers in random polynomial time have also added to this new interest. This book supplies a huge collection of problems in quantum computing and quantum information together with their detailed solutions, which will prove to be invaluable to students as well as researchers in these fields. All the important concepts and topics such as quantum gates and quantum circuits, product Hilbert spaces, entanglement and entanglement measures, deportation, Bell states, Bell inequality, Schmidt decomposition, quantum Fourier transform, magic gate, von Neumann entropy, quantum cryptography, quantum error corrections, number states and Bose operators, coherent states, squeezed states, Gaussian states, POVM measurement, quantum optics networks, beam splitter, phase shifter and Kerr Hamilton opera...

  6. Multiple-Access Quantum Key Distribution Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Razavi, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses multi-user quantum key distribution networks, in which any two users can mutually exchange a secret key without trusting any other nodes. The same network also supports conventional classical communications by assigning two different wavelength bands to quantum and classical signals. Time and code division multiple access (CDMA) techniques, within a passive star network, are considered. In the case of CDMA, it turns out that the optimal performance is achieved at a unity code weight. A listen-before-send protocol is then proposed to improve secret key generation rates in this case. Finally, a hybrid setup with wavelength routers and passive optical networks, which can support a large number of users, is considered and analyzed.

  7. An elementary quantum network of single atoms in optical cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Stephan; Nölleke, Christian; Hahn, Carolin; Reiserer, Andreas; Neuzner, Andreas; Uphoff, Manuel; Mücke, Martin; Figueroa, Eden; Bochmann, Joerg; Rempe, Gerhard

    2012-04-11

    Quantum networks are distributed quantum many-body systems with tailored topology and controlled information exchange. They are the backbone of distributed quantum computing architectures and quantum communication. Here we present a prototype of such a quantum network based on single atoms embedded in optical cavities. We show that atom-cavity systems form universal nodes capable of sending, receiving, storing and releasing photonic quantum information. Quantum connectivity between nodes is achieved in the conceptually most fundamental way-by the coherent exchange of a single photon. We demonstrate the faithful transfer of an atomic quantum state and the creation of entanglement between two identical nodes in separate laboratories. The non-local state that is created is manipulated by local quantum bit (qubit) rotation. This efficient cavity-based approach to quantum networking is particularly promising because it offers a clear perspective for scalability, thus paving the way towards large-scale quantum networks and their applications.

  8. Quantum photonic networks in diamond

    KAUST Repository

    Lončar, Marko

    2013-02-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have enabled the opportunity to fabricate nanoscale optical devices and chip-scale systems in diamond that can generate, manipulate, and store optical signals at the single-photon level. In particular, nanophotonics has emerged as a powerful interface between optical elements such as optical fibers and lenses, and solid-state quantum objects such as luminescent color centers in diamond that can be used effectively to manipulate quantum information. While quantum science and technology has been the main driving force behind recent interest in diamond nanophotonics, such a platform would have many applications that go well beyond the quantum realm. For example, diamond\\'s transparency over a wide wavelength range, large third-order nonlinearity, and excellent thermal properties are of great interest for the implementation of frequency combs and integrated Raman lasers. Diamond is also an inert material that makes it well suited for biological applications and for devices that must operate in harsh environments. Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013.

  9. Photonic Quantum Networks formed from NV− centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Kae; Trupke, Michael; Devitt, Simon J.; Scharfenberger, Burkhard; Buczak, Kathrin; Schmiedmayer, Jörg; Munro, William J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we present a simple repeater scheme based on the negatively-charged nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. Each repeater node is built from modules comprising an optical cavity containing a single NV−, with one nuclear spin from 15N as quantum memory. The module uses only deterministic processes and interactions to achieve high fidelity operations (>99%), and modules are connected by optical fiber. In the repeater node architecture, the processes between modules by photons can be in principle deterministic, however current limitations on optical components lead the processes to be probabilistic but heralded. Our resource-modest repeater architecture contains two modules at each node, and the repeater nodes are then connected by entangled photon pairs. We discuss the performance of such a quantum repeater network with modest resources and then incorporate more resource-intense strategies step by step. Our architecture should allow large-scale quantum information networks with existing or near future technology. PMID:27215433

  10. Photonic Quantum Networks formed from NV(-) centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Kae; Trupke, Michael; Devitt, Simon J; Scharfenberger, Burkhard; Buczak, Kathrin; Schmiedmayer, Jörg; Munro, William J

    2016-05-24

    In this article we present a simple repeater scheme based on the negatively-charged nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. Each repeater node is built from modules comprising an optical cavity containing a single NV(-), with one nuclear spin from (15)N as quantum memory. The module uses only deterministic processes and interactions to achieve high fidelity operations (>99%), and modules are connected by optical fiber. In the repeater node architecture, the processes between modules by photons can be in principle deterministic, however current limitations on optical components lead the processes to be probabilistic but heralded. Our resource-modest repeater architecture contains two modules at each node, and the repeater nodes are then connected by entangled photon pairs. We discuss the performance of such a quantum repeater network with modest resources and then incorporate more resource-intense strategies step by step. Our architecture should allow large-scale quantum information networks with existing or near future technology.

  11. Quantum computation over the butterfly network

    CERN Document Server

    Kinjo, Yoshiyuki; Soeda, Akihito; Turner, Peter S

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate distributed quantum computation under restricted network resources, we introduce a quantum computation task over the butterfly network where both quantum and classical communications are limited. We consider performing a two qubit global unitary operation on two unknown inputs given at different nodes, with outputs at two distinct nodes. By using a particular resource scenario introduced by Hayashi, which is capable of performing a swap operation by adding two maximally entangled qubits (ebits) between the two input nodes, we show that any controlled unitary operation can be performed without adding any entanglement resource. We also construct protocols for performing controlled traceless unitary operations with a 1-ebit resource and for performing global Clifford operations with a 2-ebit resource.

  12. Quantum Transport Theory for Photonic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Chan U

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a quantum transport theory to describe photonic transport in photonic networks. The photonic networks concerned in the paper consist of all-optical circuits incorporating photonic bandgap waveguides and driven resonators. The photoncurrents flowing through waveguides are entirely determined from the exact master equation of the driven resonators. The master equation of the driven resonators is obtained by explicitly eliminating all the waveguide degrees of freedom while the back-reactions between resonators and waveguides are fully taken into account. The relations between the driven photonic dynamics and photoncurrents are obtained. The quantum dissipation and quantum noise effects in photonic transport are also fully addressed. As an illustration, the theory is applied to the transport phenomena of a driven nanocavity coupled to two waveguides in photonic crystals. The controllability of photonic transport through the driven resonator is demonstrated.

  13. Software-defined Quantum Networking Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    The software enables a user to perform modeling and simulation of software-defined quantum networks. The software addresses the problem of how to synchronize transmission of quantum and classical signals through multi-node networks and to demonstrate quantum information protocols such as quantum teleportation. The software approaches this problem by generating a graphical model of the underlying network and attributing properties to each node and link in the graph. The graphical model is then simulated using a combination of discrete-event simulators to calculate the expected state of each node and link in the graph at a future time. A user interacts with the software by providing an initial network model and instantiating methods for the nodes to transmit information with each other. This includes writing application scripts in python that make use of the software library interfaces. A user then initiates the application scripts, which invokes the software simulation. The user then uses the built-in diagnostic tools to query the state of the simulation and to collect statistics on synchronization.

  14. Optimally designed quantum transport across disordered networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walschaers, Mattia; Diaz, Jorge Fernandez-de-Cossio; Mulet, Roberto; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    We establish a general mechanism for highly efficient quantum transport through finite, disordered 3D networks. It relies on the interplay of disorder with centrosymmetry and a dominant doublet spectral structure and can be controlled by the proper tuning of only coarse-grained quantities. Photosynthetic light harvesting complexes are discussed as potential biological incarnations of this design principle.

  15. Simulating Physical Phenomena by Quantum Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Somma, R D; Gubernatis, J E; Knill, E H; Laflamme, R

    2002-01-01

    Physical systems, characterized by an ensemble of interacting elementary constituents, can be represented and studied by different algebras of observables or operators. For example, a fully polarized electronic system can be investigated by means of the algebra generated by the usual fermionic creation and annihilation operators, or by using the algebra of Pauli (spin-1/2) operators. The correspondence between the two algebras is given by the Jordan-Wigner isomorphism. As we previously noted similar one-to-one mappings enable one to represent any physical system in a quantum computer. In this paper we evolve and exploit this fundamental concept in quantum information processing to simulate generic physical phenomena by quantum networks. We give quantum circuits useful for the efficient evaluation of the physical properties (e.g, spectrum of observables or relevant correlation functions) of an arbitrary system with Hamiltonian $H$.

  16. Device-independence for two-party cryptography and position verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, Jeremy; Thinh, Le Phuc; Kaniewski, Jedrzej;

    Quantum communication has demonstrated its usefulness for quantum cryptography far beyond quantum key distribution. One domain is two-party cryptography, whose goal is to allow two parties who may not trust each other to solve joint tasks. Another interesting application is position......-based cryptography whose goal is to use the geographical location of an entity as its only identifying credential. Unfortunately, security of these protocols is not possible against an all powerful adversary. However, if we impose some realistic physical constraints on the adversary, there exist protocols for which...... security can be proven, but these so far relied on the knowledge of the quantum operations performed during the protocols. In this work we give device-independent security proofs of two-party cryptography and Position Verification for memoryless devices under different physical constraints on the adversary...

  17. Quantum typicality in spin network states of quantum geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Anzà, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    In this letter we extend the so-called typicality approach, originally formulated in statistical mechanics contexts, to SU(2) invariant spin network states. Our results do not depend on the physical interpretation of the spin-network, however they are mainly motivated by the fact that spin-network states can describe states of quantum geometry, providing a gauge-invariant basis for the kinematical Hilbert space of several background independent approaches to quantum gravity. The first result is, by itself, the existence of a regime in which we show the emergence of a typical state. We interpret this as the prove that, in that regime there are certain (local) properties of quantum geometry which are "universal". Such set of properties is heralded by the typical state, of which we give the explicit form. This is our second result. In the end, we study some interesting properties of the typical state, proving that the area-law for the entropy of a surface must be satisfied at the local level, up to logarithmic c...

  18. Home and Clinical Cardiovascular Care Center (H4C: a Framework for Integrating Body Sensor Networks and QTRU Cryptography System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zakerolhosseini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Quick responds to heart attack patients before arriving to hospital is a very important factor. In this paper, a combined model of Body Sensor Network and Personal Digital Access using QTRU cipher algorithm in Wifi networks is presented to efficiently overcome these life threatening attacks. The algorithm for optimizing the routing paths between sensor nodes and an algorithm for reducing the power consumption are also applied for achieving the best performance by this model. This system is consumes low power and has encrypting and decrypting processes. It also has an efficient routing path in a fast manner

  19. Home and Clinical Cardiovascular Care Center (H4C): a Framework for Integrating Body Sensor Networks and QTRU Cryptography System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakerolhosseini, Ali; Sokouti, Massoud; Pezeshkian, Massoud

    2013-01-01

    Quick responds to heart attack patients before arriving to hospital is a very important factor. In this paper, a combined model of Body Sensor Network and Personal Digital Access using QTRU cipher algorithm in Wifi networks is presented to efficiently overcome these life threatening attacks. The algorithm for optimizing the routing paths between sensor nodes and an algorithm for reducing the power consumption are also applied for achieving the best performance by this model. This system is consumes low power and has encrypting and decrypting processes. It also has an efficient routing path in a fast manner.

  20. An Elementary Quantum Network of Single Atoms in Optical Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Stephan; Hahn, Carolin; Reiserer, Andreas; Neuzner, Andreas; Uphoff, Manuel; Mücke, Martin; Figueroa, Eden; Bochmann, Jörg; Rempe, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Quantum networks are distributed quantum many-body systems with tailored topology and controlled information exchange. They are the backbone of distributed quantum computing architectures and quantum communication. Here we present a prototype of such a quantum network based on single atoms embedded in optical cavities. We show that atom-cavity systems form universal nodes capable of sending, receiving, storing and releasing photonic quantum information. Quantum connectivity between nodes is achieved in the conceptually most fundamental way: by the coherent exchange of a single photon. We demonstrate the faithful transfer of an atomic quantum state and the creation of entanglement between two identical nodes in independent laboratories. The created nonlocal state is manipulated by local qubit rotation. This efficient cavity-based approach to quantum networking is particularly promising as it offers a clear perspective for scalability, thus paving the way towards large-scale quantum networks and their applicati...

  1. A universal quantum information processor for scalable quantum communication and networks

    OpenAIRE

    Xihua Yang; Bolin Xue; Junxiang Zhang; Shiyao Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum networks. How to conveniently and efficiently realize the generation, distribution, storage, retrieval, and control of multipartite entanglement is the basic requirement for realistic quantum information processing. Here, we present a theoretical proposal to efficiently and conveniently achieve a universal quantum information processor (QIP) via atomic coherence in an atomic ensemble. The a...

  2. Programmable multi-node quantum network design and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Venkat R.; Sadlier, Ronald J.; Prout, Ryan; Williams, Brian P.; Humble, Travis S.

    2016-05-01

    Software-defined networking offers a device-agnostic programmable framework to encode new network functions. Externally centralized control plane intelligence allows programmers to write network applications and to build functional network designs. OpenFlow is a key protocol widely adopted to build programmable networks because of its programmability, flexibility and ability to interconnect heterogeneous network devices. We simulate the functional topology of a multi-node quantum network that uses programmable network principles to manage quantum metadata for protocols such as teleportation, superdense coding, and quantum key distribution. We first show how the OpenFlow protocol can manage the quantum metadata needed to control the quantum channel. We then use numerical simulation to demonstrate robust programmability of a quantum switch via the OpenFlow network controller while executing an application of superdense coding. We describe the software framework implemented to carry out these simulations and we discuss near-term efforts to realize these applications.

  3. Quantum teleportation over the Swisscom telecommunication network

    CERN Document Server

    Landry, O; Beveratos, A; Zbinden, H; Gisin, Nicolas; Landry, Olivier; Beveratos, Alexios; Zbinden, Hugo; Gisin, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    We present a quantum teleportation experiment in the quantum relay configuration using the installed telecommunication network of Swisscom. In this experiment, the Bell state measurement occurs well after the entanglement has been distributed, at a point where the photon upon which data is teleported is already far away, and the entangled qubits are photons created from a different crystal and laser pulse than the teleported qubit. A raw fidelity of 0.93+/-0.04 has been achieved using a heralded single-photon source.

  4. Integrated diamond networks for quantum nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Hausmann, Birgit J M; Quan, Qimin; Maletinsky, Patrick; McCutcheon, Murray; Choy, Jennifer T; Babinec, Tom M; Kubanek, Alexander; Yacoby, Amir; Lukin, Mikhail D; Loncar, Marko

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is a unique material with exceptional physical and chemical properties that offers potential for the realization of high-performance devices with novel functionalities. For example diamond's high refractive index, transparency over wide wavelength range, and large Raman gain are of interest for the implementation of novel photonic devices. Recently, atom-like impurities in diamond emerged as an exceptional system for quantum information processing, quantum sensing and quantum networks. For these and other applications, it is essential to develop an integrated nanophotonic platform based on diamond. Here, we report on the realization of such an integrated diamond photonic platform, diamond on insulator (DOI), consisting of a thin single crystal diamond film on top of an insulating silicon dioxide/silicon substrate. Using this approach, we demonstrate diamond ring resonators that operate in a wide wavelength range, including the visible (630nm) and near-infrared (1,550nm). Finally, we demonstrate an int...

  5. Data Authentication Using Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Chouksey

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel approach using cryptographyfor data authentication. The key idea is to provide aencoded quantized data projection as authenticationdata. This can be correctly decoded with the help ofan authentic data using as side information.Cryptography source coding provides the desiredrobustness against legitimate variations whiledetecting illegitimate modification. Additionaladjustments might not change the meaning of thecontent, but could be misclassified as tampering.Users might also beinterested in localizingtampered regions. Distinguishing legitimateencodings with possible adjustments fromtampering and localizing tampering are thechallenges addressed in this paper. We applycryptography source coding and statistical methodsto solve the data authentication problem.Experimental results have been presented for dataauthentication.

  6. Cryptography cracking codes

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    While cracking a code might seem like something few of us would encounter in our daily lives, it is actually far more prevalent than we may realize. Anyone who has had personal information taken because of a hacked email account can understand the need for cryptography and the importance of encryption-essentially the need to code information to keep it safe. This detailed volume examines the logic and science behind various ciphers, their real world uses, how codes can be broken, and the use of technology in this oft-overlooked field.

  7. A Fuzzy Quantum Neural Network and Its Application in Pattern Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAOFuyou; XIONGYan; CHENHuanhuan; WANGXingfu

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a fuzzy quantum neural network model combining quantum neural network and fuzzy logic, which applies the fuzzy logic to design the collapse rules of the quantum neural network, and solves the character recognition problem. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that fuzzy quantum neural network improves recognizing veracity than the traditional neural network and quantum neural network.

  8. Spatial quantum search in a triangular network

    CERN Document Server

    Abal, G; Forets, M; Portugal, R

    2010-01-01

    The spatial search problem consists in minimizing the number of steps required to find a given site in a network, under the restriction that only oracle queries or translations to neighboring sites are allowed. We propose a quantum algorithm for the spatial search problem on a triangular lattice with N sites and torus-like boundary conditions. The proposed algortithm is a special case of the general framework for abstract search proposed by Ambainis, Kempe and Rivosh [AKR05] (AKR) and Tulsi [Tulsi08], applied to a triangular network. The AKR-Tulsi formalism was employed to show that the time complexity of the quantum search on the triangular lattice is O(sqrt(N logN)).

  9. Criterion of Quantum Entanglement and the Covariance Correlation Tensor in the Theory of Quantum Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Shang-Wu; GU Zhi-Yu

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the covariance correlation tensor (CCT) in quantum network theory for four Bell bases in detail. Furthermore, it gives the expression of the density operator in terms of CCT for a quantum network of three nodes, thus gives the criterion of entanglement for this case, i.e. the conditions of complete separability and partial separability for a given quantum state of three bodies. Finally it discusses the general case for the quantum network of m≥3 nodes.

  10. Quantum computer for dummies (in Russian)

    OpenAIRE

    Grozin, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    An introduction (in Russian) to quantum computers, quantum cryptography, and quantum teleportation for students who have no previous knowledge of these subjects, but know quantum mechanics. Several simple examples are considered in detail using the quantum computer emulator QCL.

  11. Quantum Entanglement in Neural Network States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong-Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Das Sarma, S.

    2017-04-01

    Machine learning, one of today's most rapidly growing interdisciplinary fields, promises an unprecedented perspective for solving intricate quantum many-body problems. Understanding the physical aspects of the representative artificial neural-network states has recently become highly desirable in the applications of machine-learning techniques to quantum many-body physics. In this paper, we explore the data structures that encode the physical features in the network states by studying the quantum entanglement properties, with a focus on the restricted-Boltzmann-machine (RBM) architecture. We prove that the entanglement entropy of all short-range RBM states satisfies an area law for arbitrary dimensions and bipartition geometry. For long-range RBM states, we show by using an exact construction that such states could exhibit volume-law entanglement, implying a notable capability of RBM in representing quantum states with massive entanglement. Strikingly, the neural-network representation for these states is remarkably efficient, in the sense that the number of nonzero parameters scales only linearly with the system size. We further examine the entanglement properties of generic RBM states by randomly sampling the weight parameters of the RBM. We find that their averaged entanglement entropy obeys volume-law scaling, and the meantime strongly deviates from the Page entropy of the completely random pure states. We show that their entanglement spectrum has no universal part associated with random matrix theory and bears a Poisson-type level statistics. Using reinforcement learning, we demonstrate that RBM is capable of finding the ground state (with power-law entanglement) of a model Hamiltonian with a long-range interaction. In addition, we show, through a concrete example of the one-dimensional symmetry-protected topological cluster states, that the RBM representation may also be used as a tool to analytically compute the entanglement spectrum. Our results uncover the

  12. Quantum optics and cavity QED Quantum network with individual atoms and photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rempe G.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantum physics allows a new approach to information processing. A grand challenge is the realization of a quantum network for long-distance quantum communication and large-scale quantum simulation. This paper highlights a first implementation of an elementary quantum network with two fibre-linked high-finesse optical resonators, each containing a single quasi-permanently trapped atom as a stationary quantum node. Reversible quantum state transfer between the two atoms and entanglement of the two atoms are achieved by the controlled exchange of a time-symmetric single photon. This approach to quantum networking is efficient and offers a clear perspective for scalability. It allows for arbitrary topologies and features controlled connectivity as well as, in principle, infinite-range interactions. Our system constitutes the largest man-made material quantum system to date and is an ideal test bed for fundamental investigations, e.g. quantum non-locality.

  13. Practical quantum key distribution over a 48-km optical fiber network

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, R J; Peterson, C G; Hughes, Richard J.; Morgan, George L.

    1999-01-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as "key" material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is a new technique for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions: Heisenberg's uncertainty principle ensures that an adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). We have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non-orthogonal photon states to generate shared key material over multi-kilometer optical fiber paths and over line-of-sight links. In both cases, key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. Here we report the most recent results...

  14. Performance of the SwissQuantum network over 21 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, Damien; Legré, Matthieu; Monat, Laurent; Robyr, Samuel; Trinkler, Patrick; Ribordy, Grégoire; Thew, Rob; Walenta, Nino; Gisin, Nicolas; Buntschu, François; Perroud, Didier; Litzistorf, Gerald; Tavares, Jose; Ventura, Stefano; Junod, Pascal; Voirol, Raphael; Monbaron, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we present the architecture and results of the SwissQuantum quantum key distribution (QKD) network. This three nodes triangular quantum network was running from March 2009 to January 2011 in the Geneva metropolitan area. The three trusted nodes were located at the University of Geneva (Unige), the CERN and the University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland in Geneva (hepia Geneva). This quantum network was deployed to prove reliability of QKD in telecommunication network over a long period. To facilitate integration of QKD in telecommunication network, this quantum network was composed of three layers: a quantum layer, a key management layer, and an application layer. The keys are distributed in the first layer; they are handled in the second layer; and they are used in the third layer.

  15. Narrowband Photon Pair Source for Quantum Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Monteiro, F; Sanguinetti, B; Zbinden, H; Thew, R T

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact photon pair source based on a periodically poled lithium niobate nonlinear crystal in a cavity. The cavity parameters are chosen such that the emitted photon pair modes can be matched in the region of telecom ultra dense wavelength division multiplexing (U-DWDM) channel spacings. This approach provides efficient, low-loss, mode selection that is compatible with standard telecommunication networks. Photons with a coherence time of 8.6 ns (116 MHz) are produced and their purity is demonstrated. A source brightness of 134 pairs(s.mW.MHz)$^{-1}$ is reported. The high level of purity and compatibility with standard telecom networks is of great importance for complex quantum communication networks.

  16. Quantum teleportation across a metropolitan fibre network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valivarthi, Raju; Puigibert, Marcel. Li Grimau; Zhou, Qiang; Aguilar, Gabriel H.; Verma, Varun B.; Marsili, Francesco; Shaw, Matthew D.; Nam, Sae Woo; Oblak, Daniel; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    If a photon interacts with a member of an entangled photon pair via a Bell-state measurement (BSM), its state is teleported over principally arbitrary distances onto the pair's second member. Since 1997, this puzzling prediction of quantum mechanics has been demonstrated many times. However, with two exceptions, only the photon that received the teleported state, if any, travelled far, while the photons partaking in the BSM were always measured close to where they were created. Here, using the Calgary fibre network, we report quantum teleportation from a telecom photon at 1,532 nm wavelength, interacting with another telecom photon after both have travelled several kilometres and over a combined beeline distance of 8.2 km, onto a photon at 795 nm wavelength. This improves the distance over which teleportation takes place to 6.2 km. Our demonstration establishes an important requirement for quantum repeater-based communications and constitutes a milestone towards a global quantum internet.

  17. The one-way quantum computer - a non-network model of quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Raussendorf, R; Briegel, H J; Raussendorf, Robert; Browne, Daniel E.; Briegel, Hans J.

    2001-01-01

    A one-way quantum computer works by only performing a sequence of one-qubit measurements on a particular entangled multi-qubit state, the cluster state. No non-local operations are required in the process of computation. Any quantum logic network can be simulated on the one-way quantum computer. On the other hand, the network model of quantum computation cannot explain all ways of processing quantum information possible with the one-way quantum computer. In this paper, two examples of the non-network character of the one-way quantum computer are given. First, circuits in the Clifford group can be performed in a single time step. Second, the realisation of a particular circuit --the bit-reversal gate-- on the one-way quantum computer has no network interpretation. (Submitted to J. Mod. Opt, Gdansk ESF QIT conference issue.)

  18. Introduction to cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Buchmann, Johannes A

    2004-01-01

    Cryptography is a key technology in electronic key systems. It is used to keep data secret, digitally sign documents, access control, etc. Therefore, users should not only know how its techniques work, but they must also be able to estimate their efficiency and security. For this new edition, the author has updated the discussion of the security of encryption and signature schemes and recent advances in factoring and computing discrete logarithms. He has also added descriptions of time-memory trade of attacks and algebraic attacks on block ciphers, the Advanced Encryption Standard, the Secure Hash Algorithm, secret sharing schemes, and undeniable and blind signatures. Johannes A. Buchmann is a Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics at the Technical University of Darmstadt, and the Associate Editor of the Journal of Cryptology. In 1985, he received the Feodor Lynen Fellowship of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. Furthermore, he has received the most prestigious award in science in Germany, the Leib...

  19. Estimators in Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CONSTANTINESCU Nicolae

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems in cryptography is to give criteria to provide good comparators of cipher systems. The security of a cipher system must include the security of the algorithm, the security of the key generator and management module (see [BM94], [CM97],[Mau92a] and the security of the cryptographic key agreement protocol (see [Mau93a],[MC94],[Mau93b],[Mau92b]. This paper gives show the necessary mathematical background to estimate the most important cryptographic measures of the key generators and of the unconditionally key agreement protocols. These cryptographic measures are the Shannon entropy (for the key generator module and Renyi entropy of order  for the key agreement protocol.

  20. Research of Image Compression Based on Quantum BP Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-yu Zhou

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum Neural Network (QNN, which integrates the characteristics of Artificial Neural Network (ANN with quantum theory, is a new study field. It takes advantages of ANN and quantum computing and has a high theoretical value and potential applications. Based on quantum neuron model with a quantum input and output quantum and artificial neural network theory, at the same time, QBP algorithm is proposed on the basis of the complex BP algorithm, the network of a 3-layer quantum BP which implements image compression and image reconstruction is built. The simulation results show that QBP can obtain the reconstructed images with better quantity compared with BP in spite of the less learning iterations.  

  1. Efficient quantum transmission in multiple-source networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Xu, Gang; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Yang, Yi-Xian; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-04-02

    A difficult problem in quantum network communications is how to efficiently transmit quantum information over large-scale networks with common channels. We propose a solution by developing a quantum encoding approach. Different quantum states are encoded into a coherent superposition state using quantum linear optics. The transmission congestion in the common channel may be avoided by transmitting the superposition state. For further decoding and continued transmission, special phase transformations are applied to incoming quantum states using phase shifters such that decoders can distinguish outgoing quantum states. These phase shifters may be precisely controlled using classical chaos synchronization via additional classical channels. Based on this design and the reduction of multiple-source network under the assumption of restricted maximum-flow, the optimal scheme is proposed for specially quantized multiple-source network. In comparison with previous schemes, our scheme can greatly increase the transmission efficiency.

  2. Large-scale quantum networks based on graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epping, Michael; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruß, Dagmar

    2016-05-01

    Society relies and depends increasingly on information exchange and communication. In the quantum world, security and privacy is a built-in feature for information processing. The essential ingredient for exploiting these quantum advantages is the resource of entanglement, which can be shared between two or more parties. The distribution of entanglement over large distances constitutes a key challenge for current research and development. Due to losses of the transmitted quantum particles, which typically scale exponentially with the distance, intermediate quantum repeater stations are needed. Here we show how to generalise the quantum repeater concept to the multipartite case, by describing large-scale quantum networks, i.e. network nodes and their long-distance links, consistently in the language of graphs and graph states. This unifying approach comprises both the distribution of multipartite entanglement across the network, and the protection against errors via encoding. The correspondence to graph states also provides a tool for optimising the architecture of quantum networks.

  3. An Algorithm of Quantum Restricted Boltzmann Machine Network Based on Quantum Gates and Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peilin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an algorithm of quantum restricted Boltzmann machine network based on quantum gates. The algorithm is used to initialize the procedure that adjusts the qubit and weights. After adjusting, the network forms an unsupervised generative model that gives better classification performance than other discriminative models. In addition, we show how the algorithm can be constructed with quantum circuit for quantum computer.

  4. A New Visual Cryptography Scheme for Color Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.SaiChandana,

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Visual cryptography is a method for protecting image-based secrets that has a computation-free decoding process. In this paper, we proposed a visual cryptographic system which can be used to hide the original image information from an intruder or an unwanted user. The images can be in any standard format. The encrypted image is sent to the destination through the network and then the image is decrypted. We used symmetric key cryptography. Experimental results indicate the proposed method is a simple, practical and effective cryptographicsystem.

  5. Cryptography Engineering Design Principles and Practical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, Niels; Kohno, Tadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate guide to cryptography, updated from an author team of the world's top cryptography experts. Cryptography is vital to keeping information safe, in an era when the formula to do so becomes more and more challenging. Written by a team of world-renowned cryptography experts, this essential guide is the definitive introduction to all major areas of cryptography: message security, key negotiation, and key management. You'll learn how to think like a cryptographer. You'll discover techniques for building cryptography into products from the start and you'll examine the many technical chan

  6. Understanding and applying cryptography and data security

    CERN Document Server

    Elbirt, Adam J

    2009-01-01

    Introduction A Brief History of Cryptography and Data Security Cryptography and Data Security in the Modern World Existing Texts Book Organization Symmetric-Key Cryptography Cryptosystem Overview The Modulo Operator Greatest Common Divisor The Ring ZmHomework ProblemsSymmetric-Key Cryptography: Substitution Ciphers Basic Cryptanalysis Shift Ciphers Affine Ciphers Homework ProblemsSymmetric-Key Cryptography: Stream Ciphers Random Numbers The One-Time Pad Key Stream GeneratorsReal-World ApplicationsHomework ProblemsSymmetric-Key Cryptography: Block Ciphers The Data Encryption StandardThe Advance

  7. Quantum synchronization and quantum state sharing in an irregular complex network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the quantum synchronization phenomenon of the complex network constituted by coupled optomechanical systems and prove that the unknown identical quantum states can be shared or distributed in the quantum network even though the topology is varying. Considering a channel constructed by quantum correlation, we show that quantum synchronization can sustain and maintain high levels in Markovian dissipation for a long time. We also analyze the state-sharing process between two typical complex networks, and the results predict that linked nodes can be directly synchronized, but the whole network will be synchronized only if some specific synchronization conditions are satisfied. Furthermore, we give the synchronization conditions analytically through analyzing network dynamics. This proposal paves the way for studying multi-interaction synchronization and achieving effective quantum information processing in a complex network.

  8. Quantum synchronization and quantum state sharing in an irregular complex network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the quantum synchronization phenomenon of the complex network constituted by coupled optomechanical systems and prove that the unknown identical quantum states can be shared or distributed in the quantum network even though the topology is varying. Considering a channel constructed by quantum correlation, we show that quantum synchronization can sustain and maintain high levels in Markovian dissipation for a long time. We also analyze the state-sharing process between two typical complex networks, and the results predict that linked nodes can be directly synchronized, but the whole network will be synchronized only if some specific synchronization conditions are satisfied. Furthermore, we give the synchronization conditions analytically through analyzing network dynamics. This proposal paves the way for studying multi-interaction synchronization and achieving effective quantum information processing in a complex network.

  9. Computation, cryptography, and network security

    CERN Document Server

    Rassias, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Analysis, assessment, and data management are core competencies for operation research analysts. This volume addresses a number of issues and developed methods for improving those skills. It is an outgrowth of a conference held in April 2013 at the Hellenic Military Academy, and brings together a broad variety of mathematical methods and theories with several applications. It discusses directions and pursuits of scientists that pertain to engineering sciences. It is also presents the theoretical background required for algorithms and techniques applied to a large variety of concrete problems. A number of open questions as well as new future areas are also highlighted.   This book will appeal to operations research analysts, engineers, community decision makers, academics, the military community, practitioners sharing the current “state-of-the-art,” and analysts from coalition partners. Topics covered include Operations Research, Games and Control Theory, Computational Number Theory and Information Securi...

  10. Dialable Cryptography for Wireless Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    www.ansi.org/. 3. Bandera , C., et al., Wireless Just-in-Time Training of Mobile Skilled Support Personnel. Proc. of SPIE, 2006. (62500R-1). 4. Basagni, S...where she stood up the Information Assurance Office for JSTARS. She later transferred to Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico to work with AFOTEC in

  11. A Quantum Network with Atoms and Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    ARL‐TR‐7786 ● SEP 2016  US Army Research Laboratory  A Quantum Network with  Atoms  and Photons by Ronald E Meyers, Keith S Deacon, Arnold D Tunick... Atoms  and Photons  by   Ronald E Meyers, Keith S Deacon, and Arnold D Tunick  Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL  Qudsia Quraishi...

  12. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-05-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity.

  13. Security of quantum key distribution source

    OpenAIRE

    Simonsen, Eivind Sjøtun

    2010-01-01

    Cryptography has begun its journey into the field of quantum information theory. Classical cryptography has shown weaknesses, which may be exploited in the future, either by development in mathematics, or by quantum computers. Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a promising path for cryptography to enable secure communication in the future. Although the theory of QKD promises absolute security, the reality is that current quantum crypto systems have flaws in them, as perfect devices have proven...

  14. Nonequilibrium functional bosonization of quantum wire networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo Dinh, Stephane, E-mail: stephane.ngodinh@kit.edu [Institut fuer Theorie der Kondensierten Materie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bagrets, Dmitry A. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Mirlin, Alexander D. [Institut fuer Theorie der Kondensierten Materie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-15

    We develop a general approach to nonequilibrium nanostructures formed by one-dimensional channels coupled by tunnel junctions and/or by impurity scattering. The formalism is based on nonequilibrium version of functional bosonization. A central role in this approach is played by the Keldysh action that has a form reminiscent of the theory of full counting statistics. To proceed with evaluation of physical observables, we assume the weak-tunneling regime and develop a real-time instanton method. A detailed exposition of the formalism is supplemented by two important applications: (i) tunneling into a biased Luttinger liquid with an impurity, and (ii) quantum Hall Fabry-Perot interferometry. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A nonequilibrium functional bosonization framework for quantum wire networks is developed Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the study of observables in the weak tunneling regime a real-time instanton method is elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We consider tunneling into a biased Luttinger liquid with an impurity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze electronic Fabry-Perot interferometers in the integer quantum Hall regime.

  15. Quantum walks on graphs representing the firing patterns of a quantum neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuld, Maria; Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Quantum walks have been shown to be fruitful tools in analyzing the dynamic properties of quantum systems. This article proposes using quantum walks as an approach to quantum neural networks (QNNs). QNNs replace binary McCulloch-Pitts neurons with a qubit in order to use the advantages of quantum computing in neural networks. A quantum walk on the firing states of such a QNN is supposed to simulate the central properties of the dynamics of classical neural networks, such as associative memory. It is shown that a biased discrete Hadamard walk derived from the updating process of a biological neuron does not lead to a unitary walk. However, a stochastic quantum walk between the global firing states of a QNN can be constructed, and it is shown that it contains the feature of associative memory. The quantum contribution to the walk accounts for a modest speedup in some regimes.

  16. Block-free optical quantum Banyan network based on quantum state fusion and fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang-Hua; Meng, Yan-Hong; Quan, Dong-Xiao; Zhao, Nan; Pei, Chang-Xing

    2014-12-01

    Optical switch fabric plays an important role in building multiple-user optical quantum communication networks. Owing to its self-routing property and low complexity, a banyan network is widely used for building switch fabric. While, there is no efficient way to remove internal blocking in a banyan network in a classical way, quantum state fusion, by which the two-dimensional internal quantum states of two photons could be combined into a four-dimensional internal state of a single photon, makes it possible to solve this problem. In this paper, we convert the output mode of quantum state fusion from spatial-polarization mode into time-polarization mode. By combining modified quantum state fusion and quantum state fission with quantum Fredkin gate, we propose a practical scheme to build an optical quantum switch unit which is block free. The scheme can be extended to building more complex units, four of which are shown in this paper.

  17. Noise-enhanced classical and quantum capacities in communication networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Filippo; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2010-11-05

    The unavoidable presence of noise is thought to be one of the major problems to solve in order to pave the way for implementing quantum information technologies in realistic physical platforms. However, here we show a clear example in which noise, in terms of dephasing, may enhance the capability of transmitting not only classical but also quantum information, encoded in quantum systems, through communication networks. In particular, we find analytically and numerically the quantum and classical capacities for a large family of quantum channels and show that these information transmission rates can be strongly enhanced by introducing dephasing noise in the complex network dynamics.

  18. Noise-enhanced classical and quantum capacities in communication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Caruso, Filippo; Plenio, Martin B

    2010-01-01

    The unavoidable presence of noise is thought to be one of the major problems to solve in order to pave the way for implementing quantum information technologies in realistic physical platforms. However, here we show a clear example in which noise, in terms of dephasing, may enhance the capability of transmitting not only classical but also quantum information, encoded in quantum systems, through communication networks. In particular, we find analytically and numerically the quantum and classical capacities for a large family of quantum channels and show that these information transmission rates can be strongly enhanced by introducing dephasing noise in the complex network dynamics.

  19. The Stratonovich formulation of quantum feedback network rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, John E.

    2016-12-01

    We express the rules for forming quantum feedback networks using the Stratonovich form of quantum stochastic calculus rather than the Itō or SLH (J. E. Gough and M. R. James, "Quantum feedback networks: Hamiltonian formulation," Commun. Math. Phys. 287, 1109 (2009), J. E. Gough and M. R. James, "The Series product and its application to quantum feedforward and feedback networks," IEEE Trans. Autom. Control 54, 2530 (2009)) form. Remarkably the feedback reduction rule implies that we obtain the Schur complement of the matrix of Stratonovich coupling operators where we short out the internal input/output coefficients.

  20. Coding Theory, Cryptography and Related Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchmann, Johannes; Stichtenoth, Henning; Tapia-Recillas, Horacio

    Proceedings of anInternational Conference on Coding Theory, Cryptography and Related Areas, held in Guanajuato, Mexico. in april 1998......Proceedings of anInternational Conference on Coding Theory, Cryptography and Related Areas, held in Guanajuato, Mexico. in april 1998...

  1. Quantum Neural Networks%量子神经网络

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解光军; 庄镇泉

    2001-01-01

    In recent years,the researches on combination of quantum theory and neural networks have attracted much attention. This paper reviews the development and status about this field. Some quantum neural networks(QNN)models are discussed,the applications and prospects are also given,which show that QNN have great competence and potential in the computational intelligence field.

  2. Theory and practice of chaotic cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amigo, J.M. [Centro de Investigacion Operativa, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Avda. de la Universidad, 03202 Elche (Spain)]. E-mail: jm.amigo@umh.es; Kocarev, L. [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0402 (United States)]. E-mail: lkocarev@ucsd.edu; Szczepanski, J. [Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Science, Swietokrzyska 21, 00-049 Warsaw (Poland)]. E-mail: jszczepa@ippt.gov.pl

    2007-06-25

    In this Letter we address some basic questions about chaotic cryptography, not least the very definition of chaos in discrete systems. We propose a conceptual framework and illustrate it with different examples from private and public key cryptography. We elaborate also on possible limits of chaotic cryptography.

  3. Coding, cryptography and combinatorics

    CERN Document Server

    Niederreiter, Harald; Xing, Chaoping

    2004-01-01

    It has long been recognized that there are fascinating connections between cod­ ing theory, cryptology, and combinatorics. Therefore it seemed desirable to us to organize a conference that brings together experts from these three areas for a fruitful exchange of ideas. We decided on a venue in the Huang Shan (Yellow Mountain) region, one of the most scenic areas of China, so as to provide the additional inducement of an attractive location. The conference was planned for June 2003 with the official title Workshop on Coding, Cryptography and Combi­ natorics (CCC 2003). Those who are familiar with events in East Asia in the first half of 2003 can guess what happened in the end, namely the conference had to be cancelled in the interest of the health of the participants. The SARS epidemic posed too serious a threat. At the time of the cancellation, the organization of the conference was at an advanced stage: all invited speakers had been selected and all abstracts of contributed talks had been screened by the p...

  4. Quantum perceptron over a field and neural network architecture selection in a quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Adenilton José; Ludermir, Teresa Bernarda; de Oliveira, Wilson Rosa

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose a quantum neural network named quantum perceptron over a field (QPF). Quantum computers are not yet a reality and the models and algorithms proposed in this work cannot be simulated in actual (or classical) computers. QPF is a direct generalization of a classical perceptron and solves some drawbacks found in previous models of quantum perceptrons. We also present a learning algorithm named Superposition based Architecture Learning algorithm (SAL) that optimizes the neural network weights and architectures. SAL searches for the best architecture in a finite set of neural network architectures with linear time over the number of patterns in the training set. SAL is the first learning algorithm to determine neural network architectures in polynomial time. This speedup is obtained by the use of quantum parallelism and a non-linear quantum operator.

  5. Fractional quantum mechanics on networks: Long-range dynamics and quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riascos, A P; Mateos, José L

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we study the quantum transport on networks with a temporal evolution governed by the fractional Schrödinger equation. We generalize the dynamics based on continuous-time quantum walks, with transitions to nearest neighbors on the network, to the fractional case that allows long-range displacements. By using the fractional Laplacian matrix of a network, we establish a formalism that combines a long-range dynamics with the quantum superposition of states; this general approach applies to any type of connected undirected networks, including regular, random, and complex networks, and can be implemented from the spectral properties of the Laplacian matrix. We study the fractional dynamics and its capacity to explore the network by means of the transition probability, the average probability of return, and global quantities that characterize the efficiency of this quantum process. As a particular case, we explore analytically these quantities for circulant networks such as rings, interacting cycles, and complete graphs.

  6. Diamond NV centers for quantum computing and quantum networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Childress, L.; Hanson, R.

    2013-01-01

    The exotic features of quantum mechanics have the potential to revolutionize information technologies. Using superposition and entanglement, a quantum processor could efficiently tackle problems inaccessible to current-day computers. Nonlocal correlations may be exploited for intrinsically secure co

  7. An introduction to mathematical cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffstein, Jeffrey; Silverman, Joseph H

    2014-01-01

    This self-contained introduction to modern cryptography emphasizes the mathematics behind the theory of public key cryptosystems and digital signature schemes. The book focuses on these key topics while developing the mathematical tools needed for the construction and security analysis of diverse cryptosystems. Only basic linear algebra is required of the reader; techniques from algebra, number theory, and probability are introduced and developed as required. This text provides an ideal introduction for mathematics and computer science students to the mathematical foundations of modern cryptography. The book includes an extensive bibliography and index; supplementary materials are available online. The book covers a variety of topics that are considered central to mathematical cryptography. Key topics include: classical cryptographic constructions, such as Diffie–Hellmann key exchange, discrete logarithm-based cryptosystems, the RSA cryptosystem, and digital signatures; fundamental mathematical tools for cr...

  8. A quantum symmetric key cipher(Y-00) and key generation (Quantum stream cipher-Part II)

    CERN Document Server

    Hirota, O; Sohma, M; Fuse, M; Hirota, Osamu; Kato, Kentaro; Sohma, Masaki; Fuse, Masaru

    2004-01-01

    What obstructs the realization of useful quantum cryptography is single photon scheme, or entanglement which is not applicable to the current infrastructure of optical communication network. We are concerned with the following question: Can we realize the information theoretically secure symmetric key cipher under "the finite secret key" based on quantum-optical communications? A role of quantum information theory is to give an answer for such a question. As an answer for the question, a new quantum cryptography was proposed by H.P.Yuen, which can realize a secure symmetric key cipher with high speeds(Gbps) and for long distance(1000 Km). Although some researchers claim that Yuen protocol(Y-00) is equivalent to the classical cryptography, they are all mistaken. Indeed it has no classical analogue, and also provides a generalization even in the conventional cryptography. At present, it is proved that a basic model of Y-00 has at least the security such as $H(X|Y_E)=H(K|Y_E)=H(K)$, $H(K|Y_E,X)\\sim 0$ under the ...

  9. Multiplexed entangled photon sources for all fiber quantum networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Yin-Hai Li Zhi-Yuan; Xu, Li-Xin; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of quantum information science is to build a global quantum network, which enables quantum resources to be distributed and shared between remote parties. Such quantum network can be realized by all fiber elements, which takes advantage of low transmission loss,low cost, scalable and mutual fiber communication techniques such as dense wavelength division multiplexing. Therefore high quality entangled photon sources based on fibers are on demanding for building up such kind of quantum network. Here we report multiplexed polarization and timebin entanglement photon sources based on dispersion shifted fiber operating at room temperature. High qualities of entanglement are characterized by using interference, Bell inequality and quantum state tomography. Simultaneous presence of entanglements in multichannel pairs of a 100GHz DWDM shows the great capacity for entanglements distribution over multi-users. Our research provides a versatile platform and moves a first step toward constructing an all f...

  10. Quantum logic networks for cloning a quantum state near a given state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yan-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Two quantum logic networks are proposed to simulate a cloning machine that copies the states near a given one.Probabilistic cloning based on the first network is realized and the cloning probability of success based on the second network is 100%.Therefore,the second network is more motivative than the first one.

  11. Cavity quantum networks for quantum information processing in decoherence-free subspace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua WEI; Zhi-jiao DENG; Wan-li YANG; Fei ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    We give a brief review on the quantum infor- mation processing in decoherence-free subspace (DFS). We show how to realize the initialization of the entangled quantum states, information transfer and teleportation of quantum states, two-qubit Grover search and how to construct the quantum network in DFS, within the cav- ity QED regime based on a cavity-assisted interaction by single-photon pulses.

  12. Entanglement distillation between solid-state quantum network nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, N.; Reiserer, A. A.; Humphreys, P. C.; Bakermans, J. J. W.; Kamerling, S. J.; Nickerson, N. H.; Benjamin, S. C.; Twitchen, D. J.; Markham, M.; Hanson, R.

    2017-06-01

    The impact of future quantum networks hinges on high-quality quantum entanglement shared between network nodes. Unavoidable imperfections necessitate a means to improve remote entanglement by local quantum operations. We realize entanglement distillation on a quantum network primitive of distant electron-nuclear two-qubit nodes. The heralded generation of two copies of a remote entangled state is demonstrated through single-photon-mediated entangling of the electrons and robust storage in the nuclear spins. After applying local two-qubit gates, single-shot measurements herald the distillation of an entangled state with increased fidelity that is available for further use. The key combination of generating, storing, and processing entangled states should enable the exploration of multiparticle entanglement on an extended quantum network.

  13. Use of Cryptography in communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    University Junior Assistant Ioana-Julieta Vasile

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This work envisages the presentation and analysis of important cryptographic systems in the field as well as the way these systems have been applied during the course of time. The work presents the advantages and disadvantages that derive from the use of cryptography while also emphasizing the importance cryptography has had along the way. Not least, the present article shall analyze the "“Pretty Good Privacy"” model - –a widely used system nowadays, whose decryption key has yet to be found.

  14. Synchronization between uncertain nonidentical networks with quantum chaotic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-11-01

    Synchronization between uncertain nonidentical networks with quantum chaotic behavior is researched. The identification laws of unknown parameters in state equations of network nodes, the adaptive laws of configuration matrix elements and outer coupling strengths are determined based on Lyapunov theorem. The conditions of realizing synchronization between uncertain nonidentical networks are discussed and obtained. Further, Jaynes-Cummings model in physics are taken as the nodes of two networks and simulation results show that the synchronization performance between networks is very stable.

  15. Mixed-state quantum transport in correlated spin networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ajoy, Ashok; 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.042305

    2012-01-01

    Quantum spin networks can be used to transport information between separated registers in a quantum information processor. To find a practical implementation, the strict requirements of ideal models for perfect state transfer need to be relaxed, allowing for complex coupling topologies and general initial states. Here we analyze transport in complex quantum spin networks in the maximally mixed state and derive explicit conditions that should be satisfied by propagators for perfect state transport. Using a description of the transport process as a quantum walk over the network, we show that it is necessary to phase correlate the transport processes occurring along all the possible paths in the network. We provide a Hamiltonian that achieves this correlation, and use it in a constructive method to derive engineered couplings for perfect transport in complicated network topologies.

  16. Appliance of Neuron Networks in Cryptographic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Maitah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is dedicated to the examination of a problem of postquantum encryption algorithms which are connected with a potential crisis in modern cryptography that is caused by appearance of quantum computers. General problem formulation is given as well as an example of danger from the quantum algorithms against classical cryptosystems. Existing postquantum systems are analyzed and the complication of their realization and cryptosecurity are estimated. Among the others algorithms on the basis of neural networks are chosen as a starting point. The study demonstrates neuro cryptographic protocol based on a three-level neural network of the direct propagation. There was evaluated it’s cryptosecurity and analyzed three types of this algorithm attack to show the reality of the hypothesis that neuro cryptography is currently one of the most promising post quantum cryptographic systems.

  17. Modeling Transmission Line Networks Using Quantum Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Trystan; Antonsen, Thomas

    Quantum graphs--one dimensional edges, connecting nodes, that support propagating Schrödinger wavefunctions--have been studied extensively as tractable models of wave chaotic behavior (Smilansky and Gnutzmann 2006, Berkolaiko and Kuchment 2013). Here we consider the electrical analog, in which the graph represents an electrical network where the edges are transmission lines (Hul et. al. 2004) and the nodes contain either discrete circuit elements or intricate circuit elements best represented by arbitrary scattering matrices. Including these extra degrees of freedom at the nodes leads to phenomena that do not arise in simpler graph models. We investigate the properties of eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions on these graphs, and relate these to the statistical description of voltages on the transmission lines when driving the network externally. The study of electromagnetic compatibility, the effect of external radiation on complicated systems with numerous interconnected cables, motivates our research into this extension of the graph model. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research (N0014130474) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  18. NEURAL NETWORK FOR THE QUANTUM CORRECTION OF NANOSCALE SOI MOSFETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zunchao; Jiang Yaolin; Zhang Lili

    2006-01-01

    The quantum effect of carrier distribution in nanoscale SOI MOSFETs is evident and must be taken into consideration in device modeling and simulation. In this paper, a backpropagation neural network was applied to predict the quantum density of carriers from the classical density, and the influence of the network structure on training speed and accuracy was studied. It was concluded that a carefully trained neural network with two hidden layers using the Levenberg-Marquardt learning algorithm could predict the carrier quantum density of SOI MOSFETs in very good agreement with Schrdinger Poisson equations.

  19. Network Coding-Based Communications via the Controlled Quantum Teleportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Guo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the structure of the network coding over the butterfly network, a framework of quantum network coding scheme is investigated, which transmits two unknown quantum states crossly over the butterfly quantum system with the multi-photon non-maximally entangled GHZ states. In this scheme, it contains certain number of entanglement-qubit source nodes that teleport unknown quantum states to other nodes on the small-scale network where each intermediate node can pass on its received quantum states to others via superdense coding. In order to transmit the unknown states in a deterministic way, the controlled quantum teleportation is adopted on the intermediate node. It makes legal nodes more convenient than any other previous teleportation schemes to transmit unknown quantum states to unknown participants in applications. It shows that the intrinsic efficiency of transmissions approaches 100% in principle. This scheme is secure based on the securely-shared quantum channels between all nodes and the quantum mechanical impossibility of local unitary transformations between non-maximally entangled GHZ states. Moreover, the generalized scheme is proposed for transmitting two multipartite entangled states.

  20. Recognition of Continuous Digits by Quantum Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a new kind of neural network-Quantum Neural Network (QNN) and its application to recognition of continuous digits. QNN combines the advantages of neural modeling and fuzzy theoretic principles. Experiment results show that more than 15 percent error reduction is achieved on a speaker-independent continuous digits recognition task compared with BP networks.

  1. Trapped modes in linear quantum stochastic networks with delays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabak, Gil [Stanford University, Department of Applied Physics, Stanford, CA (United States); Mabuchi, Hideo

    2016-12-15

    Networks of open quantum systems with feedback have become an active area of research for applications such as quantum control, quantum communication and coherent information processing. A canonical formalism for the interconnection of open quantum systems using quantum stochastic differential equations (QSDEs) has been developed by Gough, James and co-workers and has been used to develop practical modeling approaches for complex quantum optical, microwave and optomechanical circuits/networks. In this paper we fill a significant gap in existing methodology by showing how trapped modes resulting from feedback via coupled channels with finite propagation delays can be identified systematically in a given passive linear network. Our method is based on the Blaschke-Potapov multiplicative factorization theorem for inner matrix-valued functions, which has been applied in the past to analog electronic networks. Our results provide a basis for extending the Quantum Hardware Description Language (QHDL) framework for automated quantum network model construction (Tezak et al. in Philos. Trans. R. Soc. A, Math. Phys. Eng. Sci. 370(1979):5270-5290, 2012) to efficiently treat scenarios in which each interconnection of components has an associated signal propagation time delay. (orig.)

  2. Continuous-variable quantum network coding for coherent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Tao; Li, Ke; Liu, Jian-wei

    2017-04-01

    As far as the spectral characteristic of quantum information is concerned, the existing quantum network coding schemes can be looked on as the discrete-variable quantum network coding schemes. Considering the practical advantage of continuous variables, in this paper, we explore two feasible continuous-variable quantum network coding (CVQNC) schemes. Basic operations and CVQNC schemes are both provided. The first scheme is based on Gaussian cloning and ADD/SUB operators and can transmit two coherent states across with a fidelity of 1/2, while the second scheme utilizes continuous-variable quantum teleportation and can transmit two coherent states perfectly. By encoding classical information on quantum states, quantum network coding schemes can be utilized to transmit classical information. Scheme analysis shows that compared with the discrete-variable paradigms, the proposed CVQNC schemes provide better network throughput from the viewpoint of classical information transmission. By modulating the amplitude and phase quadratures of coherent states with classical characters, the first scheme and the second scheme can transmit 4{log _2}N and 2{log _2}N bits of information by a single network use, respectively.

  3. Introduction to computer networking

    CERN Document Server

    Robertazzi, Thomas G

    2017-01-01

    This book gives a broad look at both fundamental networking technology and new areas that support it and use it. It is a concise introduction to the most prominent, recent technological topics in computer networking. Topics include network technology such as wired and wireless networks, enabling technologies such as data centers, software defined networking, cloud and grid computing and applications such as networks on chips, space networking and network security. The accessible writing style and non-mathematical treatment makes this a useful book for the student, network and communications engineer, computer scientist and IT professional. • Features a concise, accessible treatment of computer networking, focusing on new technological topics; • Provides non-mathematical introduction to networks in their most common forms today;< • Includes new developments in switching, optical networks, WiFi, Bluetooth, LTE, 5G, and quantum cryptography.

  4. Finding Cryptography in Object Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason L. Wright

    2008-10-01

    Finding and identifying Cryptography is a growing concern in the malware analysis community. In this paper, a heuristic method for determining the likelihood that a given function contains a cryptographic algorithm is discussed and the results of applying this method in various environments is shown. The algorithm is based on frequency analysis of opcodes that make up each function within a binary.

  5. Lightweight cryptography for constrained devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alippi, Cesare; Bogdanov, Andrey; Regazzoni, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Lightweight cryptography is a rapidly evolving research field that responds to the request for security in resource constrained devices. This need arises from crucial pervasive IT applications, such as those based on RFID tags where cost and energy constraints drastically limit the solution...

  6. Cryptography as a Pedagogical Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manmohan

    2008-01-01

    In order to get undergraduates interested in mathematics, it is necessary to motivate them, give them good reasons to spend time on a subject that requires hard work, and, if possible, involve them in undergraduate research. This article discusses how cryptography can be used for all these purposes. In particular, a special topics course on…

  7. Experimental violation of local causality in a quantum network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvacho, Gonzalo; Andreoli, Francesco; Santodonato, Luca; Bentivegna, Marco; Chaves, Rafael; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    Bell's theorem plays a crucial role in quantum information processing and thus several experimental investigations of Bell inequalities violations have been carried out over the years. Despite their fundamental relevance, however, previous experiments did not consider an ingredient of relevance for quantum networks: the fact that correlations between distant parties are mediated by several, typically independent sources. Here, using a photonic setup, we investigate a quantum network consisting of three spatially separated nodes whose correlations are mediated by two distinct sources. This scenario allows for the emergence of the so-called non-bilocal correlations, incompatible with any local model involving two independent hidden variables. We experimentally witness the emergence of this kind of quantum correlations by violating a Bell-like inequality under the fair-sampling assumption. Our results provide a proof-of-principle experiment of generalizations of Bell's theorem for networks, which could represent a potential resource for quantum communication protocols.

  8. Experimental violation of local causality in a quantum network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvacho, Gonzalo; Andreoli, Francesco; Santodonato, Luca; Bentivegna, Marco; Chaves, Rafael; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2017-03-16

    Bell's theorem plays a crucial role in quantum information processing and thus several experimental investigations of Bell inequalities violations have been carried out over the years. Despite their fundamental relevance, however, previous experiments did not consider an ingredient of relevance for quantum networks: the fact that correlations between distant parties are mediated by several, typically independent sources. Here, using a photonic setup, we investigate a quantum network consisting of three spatially separated nodes whose correlations are mediated by two distinct sources. This scenario allows for the emergence of the so-called non-bilocal correlations, incompatible with any local model involving two independent hidden variables. We experimentally witness the emergence of this kind of quantum correlations by violating a Bell-like inequality under the fair-sampling assumption. Our results provide a proof-of-principle experiment of generalizations of Bell's theorem for networks, which could represent a potential resource for quantum communication protocols.

  9. Towards a feasible implementation of quantum neural networks using quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaisky, Mikhail V.; Zolnikova, Nadezhda N.; Kaputkina, Natalia E.; Krylov, Victor A.; Lozovik, Yurii E.; Dattani, Nikesh S.

    2016-03-01

    We propose an implementation of quantum neural networks using an array of quantum dots with dipole-dipole interactions. We demonstrate that this implementation is both feasible and versatile by studying it within the framework of GaAs based quantum dot qubits coupled to a reservoir of acoustic phonons. Using numerically exact Feynman integral calculations, we have found that the quantum coherence in our neural networks survive for over a hundred ps even at liquid nitrogen temperatures (77 K), which is three orders of magnitude higher than current implementations, which are based on SQUID-based systems operating at temperatures in the mK range.

  10. Towards a feasible implementation of quantum neural networks using quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altaisky, Mikhail V., E-mail: altaisky@mx.iki.rssi.ru, E-mail: nzolnik@iki.rssi.ru; Zolnikova, Nadezhda N., E-mail: altaisky@mx.iki.rssi.ru, E-mail: nzolnik@iki.rssi.ru [Space Research Institute RAS, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Kaputkina, Natalia E., E-mail: nataly@misis.ru [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS,” Leninsky prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Krylov, Victor A., E-mail: kryman@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot Curie 6, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Lozovik, Yurii E., E-mail: lozovik@isan.troitsk.ru [Institute of Spectroscopy, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Electronics and Mathematics, National Research University – Higher School of Economics, Moscow 109028 (Russian Federation); Dattani, Nikesh S., E-mail: dattani.nike@gmail.com [Quantum Chemistry Laboratory, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Chemistry, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-07

    We propose an implementation of quantum neural networks using an array of quantum dots with dipole-dipole interactions. We demonstrate that this implementation is both feasible and versatile by studying it within the framework of GaAs based quantum dot qubits coupled to a reservoir of acoustic phonons. Using numerically exact Feynman integral calculations, we have found that the quantum coherence in our neural networks survive for over a hundred ps even at liquid nitrogen temperatures (77 K), which is three orders of magnitude higher than current implementations, which are based on SQUID-based systems operating at temperatures in the mK range.

  11. A universal quantum information processor for scalable quantum communication and networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xihua; Xue, Bolin; Zhang, Junxiang; Zhu, Shiyao

    2014-10-15

    Entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum networks. How to conveniently and efficiently realize the generation, distribution, storage, retrieval, and control of multipartite entanglement is the basic requirement for realistic quantum information processing. Here, we present a theoretical proposal to efficiently and conveniently achieve a universal quantum information processor (QIP) via atomic coherence in an atomic ensemble. The atomic coherence, produced through electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the Λ-type configuration, acts as the QIP and has full functions of quantum beam splitter, quantum frequency converter, quantum entangler, and quantum repeater. By employing EIT-based nondegenerate four-wave mixing processes, the generation, exchange, distribution, and manipulation of light-light, atom-light, and atom-atom multipartite entanglement can be efficiently and flexibly achieved in a deterministic way with only coherent light fields. This method greatly facilitates the operations in quantum information processing, and holds promising applications in realistic scalable quantum communication and quantum networks.

  12. Optimal quantum networks and one-shot entropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiribella, Giulio; Ebler, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    We develop a semidefinite programming method for the optimization of quantum networks, including both causal networks and networks with indefinite causal structure. Our method applies to a broad class of performance measures, defined operationally in terms of interative tests set up by a verifier. We show that the optimal performance is equal to a max relative entropy, which quantifies the informativeness of the test. Building on this result, we extend the notion of conditional min-entropy from quantum states to quantum causal networks. The optimization method is illustrated in a number of applications, including the inversion, charge conjugation, and controlization of an unknown unitary dynamics. In the non-causal setting, we show a proof-of-principle application to the maximization of the winning probability in a non-causal quantum game.

  13. Quantum Key Distribution Network Based on Differential Phase Shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wan-Ying; WANG Chuan; WEN Kai; LONG Gui-Lu

    2007-01-01

    Using a series of quantum correlated photon pairs, we propose a theoretical scheme for any-to-any multi-user quantum key distribution network based on differential phase shift. The differential phase shift and the different detection time slots ensure the security of our scheme against eavesdropping. We discuss the security under the intercept-resend attack and the source replacement attack.

  14. Long-distance quantum networks using ultra-cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmeyer, Neal; Li, Xiao; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2016-05-01

    The generation of entanglement between distantly located quantum memories via frequency converted single photons could enable many applications in quantum networking, including quantum teleportation, distributed quantum computing and potentially distributed precision timing. A quantum network with three or more nodes has yet to be demonstrated and moreover hybrid networks leverage advantages of different platforms. With an existing memory at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), based on weak Raman scattering in a Rb magneto-optical trap, we are building a second node at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), connected to ARL by a 13 km optical fiber. The second node will be a higher photon-rate node based on Rydberg excitations of a Rb ensemble in an optical dipole trap (N. Solmeyer et al., arXiv:1511.00025) and the first node will be upgraded to a Rydberg system soon. In the near term, we plan to generate entanglement between the second and a third node, based on a similar experimental setup, 100 m away at the JQI. For the ARL-JQI link we are presently working on quantum frequency conversion from IR photons to telecom wavelengths. Separately, we are pursuing frequency conversion from 493 nm photons to 780 nm to be used in a hybrid quantum network between ions and neutral atoms.

  15. Quantum-Like Bayesian Networks for Modeling Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina eMoreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we explore an alternative quantum structure to perform quantum probabilistic inferences to accommodate the paradoxical findings of the Sure Thing Principle. We propose a Quantum-Like Bayesian Network, which consists in replacing classical probabilities by quantum probability amplitudes. However, since this approach suffers from the problem of exponential growth of quantum parameters, we also propose a similarity heuristic that automatically fits quantum parameters through vector similarities. This makes the proposed model general and predictive in contrast to the current state of the art models, which cannot be generalized for more complex decision scenarios and that only provide an explanatory nature for the observed paradoxes. In the end, the model that we propose consists in a nonparametric method for estimating inference effects from a statistical point of view. It is a statistical model that is simpler than the previous quantum dynamic and quantum-like models proposed in the literature. We tested the proposed network with several empirical data from the literature, mainly from the Prisoner's Dilemma game and the Two Stage Gambling game. The results obtained show that the proposed quantum Bayesian Network is a general method that can accommodate violations of the laws of classical probability theory and make accurate predictions regarding human decision-making in these scenarios.

  16. Quantum-Like Bayesian Networks for Modeling Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Catarina; Wichert, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we explore an alternative quantum structure to perform quantum probabilistic inferences to accommodate the paradoxical findings of the Sure Thing Principle. We propose a Quantum-Like Bayesian Network, which consists in replacing classical probabilities by quantum probability amplitudes. However, since this approach suffers from the problem of exponential growth of quantum parameters, we also propose a similarity heuristic that automatically fits quantum parameters through vector similarities. This makes the proposed model general and predictive in contrast to the current state of the art models, which cannot be generalized for more complex decision scenarios and that only provide an explanatory nature for the observed paradoxes. In the end, the model that we propose consists in a nonparametric method for estimating inference effects from a statistical point of view. It is a statistical model that is simpler than the previous quantum dynamic and quantum-like models proposed in the literature. We tested the proposed network with several empirical data from the literature, mainly from the Prisoner's Dilemma game and the Two Stage Gambling game. The results obtained show that the proposed quantum Bayesian Network is a general method that can accommodate violations of the laws of classical probability theory and make accurate predictions regarding human decision-making in these scenarios.

  17. OpenFlow Extensions for Programmable Quantum Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-19

    protocol to be used for detecting and correcting errors. 3.2 Switch In an SDN, switches function as fast-forwarding devices with no internal ...release; distribution is unlimited. 8 6. References 1. Dasari VR, Humble TS. OpenFlow arbitrated programmable network channels for managing quantum...Dasari VR, Humble TS. OpenFlow arbitrated programmable network channels for managing quantum metadata. Journal of Defense Modeling and Simulations

  18. Quantum entanglement between an optical photon and a solid-state spin qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togan, E; Chu, Y; Trifonov, A S; Jiang, L; Maze, J; Childress, L; Dutt, M V G; Sørensen, A S; Hemmer, P R; Zibrov, A S; Lukin, M D

    2010-08-01

    Quantum entanglement is among the most fascinating aspects of quantum theory. Entangled optical photons are now widely used for fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and applications such as quantum cryptography. Several recent experiments demonstrated entanglement of optical photons with trapped ions, atoms and atomic ensembles, which are then used to connect remote long-term memory nodes in distributed quantum networks. Here we realize quantum entanglement between the polarization of a single optical photon and a solid-state qubit associated with the single electronic spin of a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. Our experimental entanglement verification uses the quantum eraser technique, and demonstrates that a high degree of control over interactions between a solid-state qubit and the quantum light field can be achieved. The reported entanglement source can be used in studies of fundamental quantum phenomena and provides a key building block for the solid-state realization of quantum optical networks.

  19. Complex Quantum Networks: From Universal Breakdown to Optimal Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Muelken, Oliver; Galiceanu, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    We show that all sequentially growing networks yield the same universal behavior at the breakdown of single-particle quantum transport. For this, we study the global time-averaged transport efficiency of excitations on complex quantum networks. Further, we observe the transition to optimal transport by starting from a network with complete-graph-like sequential subgraphs and systematically reducing the number of loops. These effects are explained on the basis of the spectral properties of the network's Hamiltonian. Our theoretical considerations are supported by numerical Monte-Carlo simulations for complex quantum networks with a scale-free size distribution of sequential subgraphs and a small-world-type transition to optimal transport.

  20. Non-classical state engineering for quantum networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, Christina E.

    2014-01-24

    The wide field of quantum information processing and quantum networks has developed very fast in the last two decades. Besides the regime of discrete variables, which was developed first, the regime of continuous variables represents an alternative approach to realize many quantum applications. Non-classical states of light, like squeezed or entangled states, are a fundamental resource for quantum applications like quantum repeaters, quantum memories, quantum key distribution, quantum spectroscopy, and quantum metrology. These states can be generated successfully in the infrared wavelength regime. However, for some tasks other wavelengths, especially in the visible wavelength regime, are desirable. To generate non-classical states of light in this wavelength regime frequency up-conversion can be used, since all quantum properties are maintained in this process. The first part of this thesis deals with the experimental frequency up-conversion of quantum states. Squeezed vacuum states of light at 1550 nm were up-converted to 532 nm and a noise reduction of -1.5 dB at 532 nm was achieved. These states can be used for increasing the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors or spectroscopic measurements. Furthermore, one part of an entangled state at 1550 nm was up-converted to 532 nm and, thus, entanglement between these two wavelengths was generated and characterized to -1.4 dB following Duan et al. With such a quantum link it is possible to establish a quantum network, which takes advantage of the low optical loss at 1550 nm for information transmission and of atomic transitions around 532 nm for a quantum memory in a quantum repeater. For quantum networks the distribution of entanglement and especially of a quantum key is essential. In the second part of this thesis the experimental distribution of entanglement by separable states is demonstrated. The underlying protocol requires a special three-mode state, which is separable in two of the three splittings. With

  1. Numerical simulation of the optimal two-mode attacks for two-way continuous-variable quantum cryptography in reverse reconciliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yichen; Li, Zhengyu; Zhao, Yijia; Yu, Song; Guo, Hong

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the security of the two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution protocol in reverse reconciliation against general two-mode attacks, which represent all accessible attacks at fixed channel parameters. Rather than against one specific attack model, the expression of secret key rates of the two-way protocol are derived against all accessible attack models. It is found that there is an optimal two-mode attack to minimize the performance of the protocol in terms of both secret key rates and maximal transmission distances. We identify the optimal two-mode attack, give the specific attack model of the optimal two-mode attack and show the performance of the two-way protocol against the optimal two-mode attack. Even under the optimal two-mode attack, the performances of two-way protocol are still better than the corresponding one-way protocol, which shows the advantage of making double use of the quantum channel and the potential of long-distance secure communication using a two-way protocol.

  2. Quantum Secure Direct Communication Network with Two-Step Protocol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xi-Han; ZHOU Ping; LIANG Yu-Jie; LI Chun-Yan; ZHOU Hong-Yu; DENG Fu-Guo

    2006-01-01

    @@ An efficient quantum secure direct communication network protocol with the two-step scheme is proposed by using the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pair block as the quantum information carrier. The server, say Alice,prepares and measures the EPR pairs in the quantum communication and the users perform the four local unitary operations to encode their message. Anyone of the legitimate users can communicate another one on the network securely. Since almost all of the instances in this scheme are useful and each EPR pair can carry two bits of information, the efficiency for qubits and the source capacity both approach the maximal values.

  3. Optimal path for a quantum teleportation protocol in entangled networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Franco, C.; Ballester, D.

    2012-01-01

    Bellman's optimality principle has been of enormous importance in the development of whole branches of applied mathematics, computer science, optimal control theory, economics, decision making, and classical physics. Examples are numerous: dynamic programming, Markov chains, stochastic dynamics, calculus of variations, and the brachistochrone problem. Here we show that Bellman's optimality principle is violated in a teleportation problem on a quantum network. This implies that finding the optimal fidelity route for teleporting a quantum state between two distant nodes on a quantum network with bipartite entanglement will be a tough problem and will require further investigation.

  4. Continuous-time quantum walks on multilayer dendrimer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiceanu, Mircea; Strunz, Walter T.

    2016-08-01

    We consider continuous-time quantum walks (CTQWs) on multilayer dendrimer networks (MDs) and their application to quantum transport. A detailed study of properties of CTQWs is presented and transport efficiency is determined in terms of the exact and average return probabilities. The latter depends only on the eigenvalues of the connectivity matrix, which even for very large structures allows a complete analytical solution for this particular choice of network. In the case of MDs we observe an interplay between strong localization effects, due to the dendrimer topology, and good efficiency from the linear segments. We show that quantum transport is enhanced by interconnecting more layers of dendrimers.

  5. Complete multiple round quantum dense coding with quantum logical network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChunYan; LI XiHan; DENG FuGuo; ZHOU Ping; ZHOU HongYu

    2007-01-01

    We present a complete multiple round quantum dense coding scheme for improving the source capacity of that introduced recently by Zhang et al. The receiver resorts to two qubits for storing the four local unitary operations in each round.

  6. Quantum networks with chiral light--matter interaction in waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Mahmoodian, Sahand; Sørensen, Anders S

    2016-01-01

    We design and analyze a simple on-chip photonic circuit that can form a universal building block of a quantum network. The circuit consists of a single-photon source, and two quantum emitters positioned in two arms of an on-chip Mach-Zehnder interferometer composed of waveguides with chiral light--matter interfaces. The efficient chiral light--matter interaction allows the emitters to act as photon sources to herald internode entanglement, and to perform high-fidelity intranode two-qubit gates within a single chip without any need for reconfiguration. We show that by connecting multiple circuits of this kind into a quantum network, it is possible to perform universal quantum computation with heralded two-qubit gate fidelities ${\\cal F} \\sim 0.998$ achievable in state-of-the-art quantum dot systems.

  7. Quantum Networks with Chiral-Light-Matter Interaction in Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodian, Sahand; Lodahl, Peter; Sørensen, Anders S.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a scalable architecture for a quantum network based on a simple on-chip photonic circuit that performs loss-tolerant two-qubit measurements. The circuit consists of two quantum emitters positioned in the arms of an on-chip Mach-Zehnder interferometer composed of waveguides with chiral-light-matter interfaces. The efficient chiral-light-matter interaction allows the emitters to perform high-fidelity intranode two-qubit parity measurements within a single chip and to emit photons to generate internode entanglement, without any need for reconfiguration. We show that, by connecting multiple circuits of this kind into a quantum network, it is possible to perform universal quantum computation with heralded two-qubit gate fidelities F ˜0.998 achievable in state-of-the-art quantum dot systems.

  8. Optimal architectures for long distance quantum communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Sreraman; Li, Linshu; Kim, Jungsang; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lukin, Mikhail D; Jiang, Liang

    2016-02-15

    Despite the tremendous progress of quantum cryptography, efficient quantum communication over long distances (≥ 1000 km) remains an outstanding challenge due to fiber attenuation and operation errors accumulated over the entire communication distance. Quantum repeaters (QRs), as a promising approach, can overcome both photon loss and operation errors, and hence significantly speedup the communication rate. Depending on the methods used to correct loss and operation errors, all the proposed QR schemes can be classified into three categories (generations). Here we present the first systematic comparison of three generations of quantum repeaters by evaluating the cost of both temporal and physical resources, and identify the optimized quantum repeater architecture for a given set of experimental parameters for use in quantum key distribution. Our work provides a roadmap for the experimental realizations of highly efficient quantum networks over transcontinental distances.

  9. Optimal architectures for long distance quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Sreraman; Li, Linshu; Kim, Jungsang; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-02-01

    Despite the tremendous progress of quantum cryptography, efficient quantum communication over long distances (≥1000 km) remains an outstanding challenge due to fiber attenuation and operation errors accumulated over the entire communication distance. Quantum repeaters (QRs), as a promising approach, can overcome both photon loss and operation errors, and hence significantly speedup the communication rate. Depending on the methods used to correct loss and operation errors, all the proposed QR schemes can be classified into three categories (generations). Here we present the first systematic comparison of three generations of quantum repeaters by evaluating the cost of both temporal and physical resources, and identify the optimized quantum repeater architecture for a given set of experimental parameters for use in quantum key distribution. Our work provides a roadmap for the experimental realizations of highly efficient quantum networks over transcontinental distances.

  10. Complex Rotation Quantum Dynamic Neural Networks (CRQDNN) using Complex Quantum Neuron (CQN): Applications to time series prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yiqian; Shi, Junyou; Wang, Zili

    2015-11-01

    Quantum Neural Networks (QNN) models have attracted great attention since it innovates a new neural computing manner based on quantum entanglement. However, the existing QNN models are mainly based on the real quantum operations, and the potential of quantum entanglement is not fully exploited. In this paper, we proposes a novel quantum neuron model called Complex Quantum Neuron (CQN) that realizes a deep quantum entanglement. Also, a novel hybrid networks model Complex Rotation Quantum Dynamic Neural Networks (CRQDNN) is proposed based on Complex Quantum Neuron (CQN). CRQDNN is a three layer model with both CQN and classical neurons. An infinite impulse response (IIR) filter is embedded in the Networks model to enable the memory function to process time series inputs. The Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm is used for fast parameter learning. The networks model is developed to conduct time series predictions. Two application studies are done in this paper, including the chaotic time series prediction and electronic remaining useful life (RUL) prediction.

  11. Generating three-qubit quantum circuits with neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaddle, Michael; Noakes, Lyle; Smallbone, Harry; Salter, Liam; Wang, Jingbo

    2017-10-01

    A new method for compiling quantum algorithms is proposed and tested for a three qubit system. The proposed method is to decompose a unitary matrix U, into a product of simpler Uj via a neural network. These Uj can then be decomposed into product of known quantum gates. Key to the effectiveness of this approach is the restriction of the set of training data generated to paths which approximate minimal normal subRiemannian geodesics, as this removes unnecessary redundancy and ensures the products are unique. The two neural networks are shown to work effectively, each individually returning low loss values on validation data after relatively short training periods. The two networks are able to return coefficients that are sufficiently close to the true coefficient values to validate this method as an approach for generating quantum circuits. There is scope for more work in scaling this approach for larger quantum systems.

  12. Quantum cloning

    OpenAIRE

    Scarani, Valerio; Iblisdir, Sofyan; Gisin, Nicolas; Acin, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The impossibility of perfectly copying (or cloning) an arbitrary quantum state is one of the basic rules governing the physics of quantum systems. The processes that perform the optimal approximate cloning have been found in many cases. These "quantum cloning machines" are important tools for studying a wide variety of tasks, e.g. state estimation and eavesdropping on quantum cryptography. This paper provides a comprehensive review of quantum cloning machines (both for discrete-dimensional an...

  13. Cryptography with DNA binary strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leier, A; Richter, C; Banzhaf, W; Rauhe, H

    2000-06-01

    Biotechnological methods can be used for cryptography. Here two different cryptographic approaches based on DNA binary strands are shown. The first approach shows how DNA binary strands can be used for steganography, a technique of encryption by information hiding, to provide rapid encryption and decryption. It is shown that DNA steganography based on DNA binary strands is secure under the assumption that an interceptor has the same technological capabilities as sender and receiver of encrypted messages. The second approach shown here is based on steganography and a method of graphical subtraction of binary gel-images. It can be used to constitute a molecular checksum and can be combined with the first approach to support encryption. DNA cryptography might become of practical relevance in the context of labelling organic and inorganic materials with DNA 'barcodes'.

  14. A potential application in quantum networks—Deterministic quantum operation sharing schemes with Bell states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, KeJia; Zhang, Long; Song, TingTing; Yang, YingHui

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose certain different design ideas on a novel topic in quantum cryptographyquantum operation sharing (QOS). Following these unique ideas, three QOS schemes, the "HIEC" (The scheme whose messages are hidden in the entanglement correlation), "HIAO" (The scheme whose messages are hidden with the assistant operations) and "HIMB" (The scheme whose messages are hidden in the selected measurement basis), have been presented to share the single-qubit operations determinately on target states in a remote node. These schemes only require Bell states as quantum resources. Therefore, they can be directly applied in quantum networks, since Bell states are considered the basic quantum channels in quantum networks. Furthermore, after analyse on the security and resource consumptions, the task of QOS can be achieved securely and effectively in these schemes.

  15. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d -dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s =-1 ,0 ,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d . In d =1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d >1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t . Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but

  16. Quantum copying and simplification of the quantum Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chi-Sheng

    Theoretical studies of quantum computation and quantum information theory are presented in this thesis. Three topics are considered: simplification of the quantum Fourier transform in Shor's algorithm, optimal eavesdropping in the BB84 quantum cryptographic protocol, and quantum copying of one qubit. The quantum Fourier transform preceding the final measurement in Shor's algorithm is simplified by replacing a network of quantum gates with one that has fewer and simpler gates controlled by classical signals. This simplification results from an analysis of the network using the consistent history approach to quantum mechanics. The optimal amount of information which an eavesdropper can gain, for a given level of noise in the communication channel, is worked out for the BB84 quantum cryptographic protocol. The optimal eavesdropping strategy is expressed in terms of various quantum networks. A consistent history analysis of these networks using two conjugate quantum bases shows how the information gain in one basis influences the noise level in the conjugate basis. The no-cloning property of quantum systems, which is the physics behind quantum cryptography, is studied by considering copying machines that generate two imperfect copies of one qubit. The best qualities these copies can have are worked out with the help of the Bloch sphere representation for one qubit, and a quantum network is worked out for an optimal copying machine. If the copying machine does not have additional ancillary qubits, the copying process can be viewed using a 2-dimensional subspace in a product space of two qubits. A special representation of such a two-dimensional subspace makes possible a complete characterization of this type of copying. This characterization in turn leads to simplified eavesdropping strategies in the BB84 and the B92 quantum cryptographic protocols.

  17. Hybrid cryptography key management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draelos, Timothy John; Torgerson, Mark Dolan; Neumann, William Douglas; Gallup, Donald R.; Collins, Michael Joseph; Beaver, Cheryl Lynn

    2003-11-01

    Wireless communication networks are highly resource-constrained; thus many security protocols which work in other settings may not be efficient enough for use in wireless environments. This report considers a variety of cryptographic techniques which enable secure, authenticated communication when resources such as processor speed, battery power, memory, and bandwidth are tightly limited.

  18. Hybrid cryptography key management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draelos, Timothy John; Torgerson, Mark Dolan; Neumann, William Douglas; Gallup, Donald R.; Collins, Michael Joseph; Beaver, Cheryl Lynn

    2003-11-01

    Wireless communication networks are highly resource-constrained; thus many security protocols which work in other settings may not be efficient enough for use in wireless environments. This report considers a variety of cryptographic techniques which enable secure, authenticated communication when resources such as processor speed, battery power, memory, and bandwidth are tightly limited.

  19. Quantum phase transition of the transverse-field quantum Ising model on scale-free networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hangmo

    2015-01-01

    I investigate the quantum phase transition of the transverse-field quantum Ising model in which nearest neighbors are defined according to the connectivity of scale-free networks. Using a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo simulation method and the finite-size scaling analysis, I identify the quantum critical point and study its scaling characteristics. For the degree exponent λ=6, I obtain results that are consistent with the mean-field theory. For λ=4.5 and 4, however, the results suggest that the quantum critical point belongs to a non-mean-field universality class. Further simulations indicate that the quantum critical point remains mean-field-like if λ>5, but it continuously deviates from the mean-field theory as λ becomes smaller.

  20. Quantum phase transition of the transverse-field quantum Ising model on scale-free networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hangmo

    2015-01-01

    I investigate the quantum phase transition of the transverse-field quantum Ising model in which nearest neighbors are defined according to the connectivity of scale-free networks. Using a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo simulation method and the finite-size scaling analysis, I identify the quantum critical point and study its scaling characteristics. For the degree exponent λ =6 , I obtain results that are consistent with the mean-field theory. For λ =4.5 and 4, however, the results suggest that the quantum critical point belongs to a non-mean-field universality class. Further simulations indicate that the quantum critical point remains mean-field-like if λ >5 , but it continuously deviates from the mean-field theory as λ becomes smaller.

  1. Block Based Symmetry Key Visual Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyendra Nath Mandal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Visual cryptography is a method for protecting image-based secrets that has a computation-free decoding process. In this technique, numbers of shares have been generated from one image. The shares are sent through any channel to the receiver and the receiver can again produce original image by stacking all the shares in proper order. But, this method wastes a lot of bandwidth of the network. The techniques of generating shares have been used in several existing methods which are not unique. The different methods have been used in different types of images like binary, gray and color images. In this paper, a block based symmetry key visual cryptography algorithm has been proposed to convert image in encrypted form and decrypt the encrypted image into original form. The symmetric key has been generated from a real number. The encryption and decryption algorithm have been designed based on symmetry key. The algorithm with key has been used to encrypt image into single share and decrypt the single share into original image. The real number has been used to form the key may be predefined or may be sent by secure channel to the receiver. The proposed algorithm can be applied to any type images i.e. binary, gray scale and color images. A comparison has been made of the proposed algorithm with different existing algorithms like Ceaser cipher, transpose of matrix, bit comp, and transposition cipher based on the performance. The pixels distributed in original and share images have also been tested. Finally, it has shown that breaking of security level of proposed algorithm i.e. to guess the real number is huge time consuming.

  2. Security, Privacy, and Applied Cryptography Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Second International Conference on Security, Privacy and Applied Cryptography Engineering held in Chennai, India, in November 2012. The 11 papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 61 submissions. The papers are organized...... and applications, high-performance computing in cryptology and cryptography in ubiquitous devices....

  3. Report of the Public Cryptography Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    Concerns of the National Security Agency (NSA) that information contained in some articles about cryptography in learned and professional journals and in monographs might be inimical to the national security are addressed. The Public Cryptography Study Group, with one dissenting opinion, recommends that a voluntary system of prior review of…

  4. Quantum key distribution in 50-km optic fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Chunyuan; WU Guang; CHEN Xiuliang; LI Hexiang; ZENG Heping

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we report our recent experiment of long-distance fiber-optic "plug and play" quantum cryptography system wherein a Faraday-Mirror was used to compensate for the polarization mode dispersion and phase drifts. The pulse-biased coincident gate single-photon detection technique was used to effectively reduce the noises from the detrimental Rayleigh backscattering. We have achieved a quantum key distribution system with the working distance of 50 km, which was tested to be stable in more than 6 hours' continuous work. And we also demonstrated the practical quantum communication in a local area network using the TCP protocol.

  5. Excitation transfer through open quantum networks: a few basic mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Venuti, Lorenzo Campos

    2011-01-01

    A variety of open quantum networks are currently under intense examination to model energy transport in photosynthetic systems. Here we study the coherent transfer of a quantum excitation over a network incoherently coupled with a structured and small environment that effectively models the photosynthetic reaction center. Our goal is to distill a few basic, possibly universal, mechanisms or "effects" that are featured in simple energy-transfer models. In particular, we identify three different phenomena: the congestion effect, the asymptotic unitarity and the staircase effects. We begin with few-site models, in which these effects can be fully understood, and then proceed to study more complex networks similar to those employed to model energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes. Our numerical studies on such networks seem to suggest that some of the effects observed in simple networks may be of relevance for biological systems, or artificial analogues of them as well.

  6. Phase transition of light on complex quantum networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halu, Arda; Garnerone, Silvano; Vezzani, Alessandro; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2013-02-01

    Recent advances in quantum optics and atomic physics allow for an unprecedented level of control over light-matter interactions, which can be exploited to investigate new physical phenomena. In this work we are interested in the role played by the topology of quantum networks describing coupled optical cavities and local atomic degrees of freedom. In particular, using a mean-field approximation, we study the phase diagram of the Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model on complex networks topologies, and we characterize the transition between a Mott-like phase of localized polaritons and a superfluid phase. We found that, for complex topologies, the phase diagram is nontrivial and well defined in the thermodynamic limit only if the hopping coefficient scales like the inverse of the maximal eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix of the network. Furthermore we provide numerical evidences that, for some complex network topologies, this scaling implies an asymptotically vanishing hopping coefficient in the limit of large network sizes. The latter result suggests the interesting possibility of observing quantum phase transitions of light on complex quantum networks even with very small couplings between the optical cavities.

  7. The Fock Space of Loopy Spin Networks for Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the coarse-graining of loop quantum gravity, we introduce loopy and tagged spin networks, which generalize the standard spin network states to account explicitly for non-trivial curvature and torsion. Both structures relax the closure constraints imposed at the spin network vertices. While tagged spin networks merely carry an extra spin at every vertex encoding the overall closure defect, loopy spin networks allow for an arbitrary number of loops attached to each vertex. These little loops can be interpreted as local excitations of the quantum gravitational field and we discuss the statistics to endow them with. The resulting Fock space of loopy spin networks realizes new truncation of loop quantum gravity, allowing to formulate its graph-changing dynamics on a fixed background graph plus local degrees of freedom attached to the graph nodes. This provides a framework for re-introducing a non-trivial background quantum geometry around which we would study the effective dynamics of perturbatio...

  8. Optical Telecom Networks as Weak Quantum Measurements with Postselection

    OpenAIRE

    Brunner, Nicolas; Acin, Antonio; Collins, Daniel Geoffrey; Gisin, Nicolas; Scarani, Valerio

    2003-01-01

    We show that weak measurements with post-selection, proposed in the context of the quantum theory of measurement, naturally appear in the everyday physics of fiber optics telecom networks through polarization-mode dispersion (PMD) and polarization-dependent losses (PDL). Specifically, the PMD leads to a time-resolved discrimination of polarization; the post-selection is done in the most natural way: one post-selects those photons that have not been lost because of the PDL. The quantum formali...

  9. Complex Chemical Reaction Networks from Heuristics-Aided Quantum Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Galvin, Cooper J.; Zubarev, Dmitry; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2014-01-01

    While structures and reactivities of many small molecules can be computed efficiently and accurately using quantum chemical methods, heuristic approaches remain essential for modeling complex structures and large-scale chemical systems. Here, we present a heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology applicable to complex chemical reaction networks such as those arising in cell metabolism and prebiotic chemistry. Chemical heuristics offer an expedient way of traversing high-dimensional reacti...

  10. Transfers of entanglement qudit states in quantum networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sawerwain, Marek

    2013-01-01

    The issue of quantum states' transfer -- in particular, for so-called Perfect State Transfer (PST) -- in the networks represented by the spin chains seems to be one of the major concerns in quantum computing. Especially, in the context of future communication methods that can be used in broadly defined computer science. The chapter presents a definition of Hamiltonian describing the dynamics of quantum data transfer in one-dimensional spin chain, which is able to transfer the state of unknown qudits. The main part of the chapter is the discussion about possibility of entangled states' perfect transfer, in particular, for the generalized Bell states for qudits. One of the sections also contains the results of numerical experiments for the transmission of quantum entangled state in a noisy quantum channel.

  11. Disorder overtakes Order in Information Concentration over Quantum Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Prabhu, R; De, Aditi Sen; Sen, Ujjwal

    2011-01-01

    We consider different classes of quenched disordered quantum XY spin chains, including quantum XY spin glass and quantum XY model with a random transverse field, and investigate the behavior of genuine multiparty entanglement in the ground states of these models. We find that there are distinct ranges of the disorder parameter that gives rise to a higher genuine multiparty entanglement than in the corresponding systems without disorder -- an order-from-disorder in genuine multiparty entanglement. Moreover, we show that such a disorder-induced advantage in the genuine multiparty entanglement is useful -- it is almost certainly accompanied by a order-from-disorder for a multiport quantum dense coding capacity with the same ground state used as a multiport quantum network.

  12. Experimental verification of multipartite entanglement in quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, W.; Pappa, A.; Bell, B. A.; McMillan, A.; Chailloux, A.; Lawson, T.; Mafu, M.; Markham, D.; Diamanti, E.; Kerenidis, I.; Rarity, J. G.; Tame, M. S.

    2016-11-01

    Multipartite entangled states are a fundamental resource for a wide range of quantum information processing tasks. In particular, in quantum networks, it is essential for the parties involved to be able to verify if entanglement is present before they carry out a given distributed task. Here we design and experimentally demonstrate a protocol that allows any party in a network to check if a source is distributing a genuinely multipartite entangled state, even in the presence of untrusted parties. The protocol remains secure against dishonest behaviour of the source and other parties, including the use of system imperfections to their advantage. We demonstrate the verification protocol in a three- and four-party setting using polarization-entangled photons, highlighting its potential for realistic photonic quantum communication and networking applications.

  13. Experimental realization of an entanglement access network and secure multi-party computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, X.-Y.; Deng, D.-L.; Yuan, X.-X.; Hou, P.-Y.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Duan, L.-M.

    2016-07-01

    To construct a quantum network with many end users, it is critical to have a cost-efficient way to distribute entanglement over different network ends. We demonstrate an entanglement access network, where the expensive resource, the entangled photon source at the telecom wavelength and the core communication channel, is shared by many end users. Using this cost-efficient entanglement access network, we report experimental demonstration of a secure multiparty computation protocol, the privacy-preserving secure sum problem, based on the network quantum cryptography.

  14. Experimental realization of secure multi-party computation in an entanglement access to network

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, X Y; Yuan, X X; Hou, P Y; Huang, Y Y; Duan, L M

    2015-01-01

    To construct a quantum network with many end users, it is critical to have a cost-efficient way to distribute entanglement over different network ends. We demonstrate an entanglement access network, where the expensive resource, the entangled photon source at the telecom wavelength and the core communication channel, is shared by many end users. Using this cost-efficient entanglement access network, we report experimental demonstration of a secure multiparty computation protocol, the privacy-preserving secure sum problem, based on the network quantum cryptography.

  15. Experimental realization of an entanglement access network and secure multi-party computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, X.-Y.; Deng, D.-L.; Yuan, X.-X.; Hou, P.-Y.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Duan, L.-M.

    2016-01-01

    To construct a quantum network with many end users, it is critical to have a cost-efficient way to distribute entanglement over different network ends. We demonstrate an entanglement access network, where the expensive resource, the entangled photon source at the telecom wavelength and the core communication channel, is shared by many end users. Using this cost-efficient entanglement access network, we report experimental demonstration of a secure multiparty computation protocol, the privacy-preserving secure sum problem, based on the network quantum cryptography. PMID:27404561

  16. Quantum cloning disturbed by thermal Davies environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajka, Jerzy; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    A network of quantum gates designed to implement universal quantum cloning machine is studied. We analyze how thermal environment coupled to auxiliary qubits, `blank paper' and `toner' required at the preparation stage of copying, modifies an output fidelity of the cloner. Thermal environment is described in terms of the Markovian Davies theory. We show that such a cloning machine is not universal any more but its output is independent of at least a part of parameters of the environment. As a case study, we consider cloning of states in a six-state cryptography's protocol. We also briefly discuss cloning of arbitrary input states.

  17. Rossler Nonlinear Dynamical Machine for Cryptography Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, Sunil; Shrivastava, Dr S C

    2009-01-01

    In many of the cryptography applications like password or IP address encryption schemes, symmetric cryptography is useful. In these relatively simpler applications of cryptography, asymmetric cryptography is difficult to justify on account of the computational and implementation complexities associated with asymmetric cryptography. Symmetric schemes make use of a single shared key known only between the two communicating hosts. This shared key is used both for the encryption as well as the decryption of data. This key has to be small in size besides being a subset of a potentially large keyspace making it convenient for the communicating hosts while at the same time making cryptanalysis difficult for the potential attackers. In the present work, an abstract Rossler nonlinear dynamical machine has been described first. The Rossler system exhibits chaotic dynamics for certain values of system parameters and initial conditions. The chaotic dynamics of the Rossler system with its apparently erratic and irregular ...

  18. Two-way quantum communication: Generalization of secure quantum information exchange to quantum network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maurya Ajay K; Mishra Manoj K; Prakash Hari

    2016-03-01

    The idea of secure quantum information exchange (SQIE) [{\\it J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys.} 44, 115504 (2011)] is introduced for the secure exchange of single qubit information states between two legitimate users, Alice and Bob. In the present paper, we extend this original SQIE protocol by presenting a scheme, which enables the secure exchange of n-single qubit information states among the n nodes of a quantum network, with the aid of a special kind of 4$n$-qubit entangled state and the classical assistance of an extra participant Charlie. For experimental realization of our extended SQIE protocol, we suggest an efficient scheme for the generation of a special kind of 4n-qubit entangled state using the interaction between highly detuned $\\Lambda$-type three-level atoms and optical coherent field. Further, by discussing the various experimental parameters, we show that the special kind 4$n$-qubit entangled state can be generated with the presently available technology.

  19. Renormalization and small-world model of fractal quantum repeater networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong; Han, Xiao-Pu

    2013-01-01

    Quantum networks provide access to exchange of quantum information. The primary task of quantum networks is to distribute entanglement between remote nodes. Although quantum repeater protocol enables long distance entanglement distribution, it has been restricted to one-dimensional linear network. Here we develop a general framework that allows application of quantum repeater protocol to arbitrary quantum repeater networks with fractal structure. Entanglement distribution across such networks is mapped to renormalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that logarithmical times of recursive such renormalization transformations can trigger fractal to small-world transition, where a scalable quantum small-world network is achieved. Our result provides new insight into quantum repeater theory towards realistic construction of large-scale quantum networks. PMID:23386977

  20. Renormalization and small-world model of fractal quantum repeater networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong; Han, Xiao-Pu

    2013-01-01

    Quantum networks provide access to exchange of quantum information. The primary task of quantum networks is to distribute entanglement between remote nodes. Although quantum repeater protocol enables long distance entanglement distribution, it has been restricted to one-dimensional linear network. Here we develop a general framework that allows application of quantum repeater protocol to arbitrary quantum repeater networks with fractal structure. Entanglement distribution across such networks is mapped to renormalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that logarithmical times of recursive such renormalization transformations can trigger fractal to small-world transition, where a scalable quantum small-world network is achieved. Our result provides new insight into quantum repeater theory towards realistic construction of large-scale quantum networks.

  1. Complete and Partial Separability Conditions of Mixed State for a Quantum Network of Any Nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Shang-Wu; GU Zhi-Yu

    2004-01-01

    By using the block division method in matrix calculus, this article successfully calculate the expectationvalues of the generating operators and the correlation tensors for quantum network of any nodes. Thence, by meansof the criterion of entanglement in terms of the covariance correlation tensor in quantum network theory, this articlediscusses the complete and partial separability conditions of the mixed quantum state for a quantum network of anynodes and judge the separability of a quantum state in the generalcase of any nodes for two examples.

  2. Topology control based on quantum genetic algorithm in sensor networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Lijuan; GUO Jian; LU Kai; WANG Ruchuan

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays,two trends appear in the application of sensor networks in which both multi-service and quality of service (QoS)are supported.In terms of the goal of low energy consumption and high connectivity,the control on topology is crucial.The algorithm of topology control based on quantum genetic algorithm in sensor networks is proposed.An advantage of the quantum genetic algorithm over the conventional genetic algorithm is demonstrated in simulation experiments.The goals of high connectivity and low consumption of energy are reached.

  3. Optical telecom networks as weak quantum measurements with post- selection

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, N; Collins, D; Gisin, Nicolas; Scarani, V; Acin, Antonio; Brunner, Nicolas; Collins, Daniel; Gisin, Nicolas; Scarani, Valerio

    2003-01-01

    We show that weak measurements with post-selection, proposed in the context of the quantum theory of measurement, naturally appear in the everyday physics of fiber optics telecom networks through polarization-mode dispersion (PMD) and polarization-dependent losses (PDL). Specifically, the PMD leads to a time-resolved discrimination of polarization; the post-selection is done in the most natural way: one post-selects those photons that have not been lost because of the PDL. The quantum formalism is shown to simplify the calculation of optical networks in the telecom limit of weak PMD.

  4. Optical telecom networks as weak quantum measurements with postselection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Nicolas; Acín, Antonio; Collins, Daniel; Gisin, Nicolas; Scarani, Valerio

    2003-10-31

    We show that weak measurements with postselection, proposed in the context of the quantum theory of measurement, naturally appear in the everyday physics of fiber optics telecom networks through polarization-mode dispersion (PMD) and polarization-dependent losses (PDL). Specifically, the PMD leads to a time-resolved discrimination of polarization; the postselection is done in the most natural way: one postselects those photons that have not been lost because of the PDL. The quantum formalism is shown to simplify the calculation of optical networks in the telecom limit of weak PMD.

  5. Toward Designing a Quantum Key Distribution Network Simulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miralem Mehic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As research in quantum key distribution network technologies grows larger and more complex, the need for highly accurate and scalable simulation technologies becomes important to assess the practical feasibility and foresee difficulties in the practical implementation of theoretical achievements. In this paper, we described the design of simplified simulation environment of the quantum key distribution network with multiple links and nodes. In such simulation environment, we analyzed several routing protocols in terms of the number of sent routing packets, goodput and Packet Delivery Ratio of data traffic flow using NS-3 simulator.

  6. Separability of Pure and Mixed States of the Quantum Network of Four Nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANShang-Wu; GUZhi-Yu

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the separability of the pure and mixed states of the quantum network of four nodes by means of the criterion of entanglement in terms of the covariance correlation tensor in quantum network theory.

  7. Separability of Pure States of the Quantum Network of Three Nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUZhi-Yu; QIANShang-Wu

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the complete separability and partial separability of the pure states of the quantum network of three nodes by means of the criterion of entanglement in terms of the covariance correlation tensor in quantum network theory.

  8. Separability of Pure and Mixed States of the Quantum Network of Four Nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Shang-Wu; GU Zhi-Yu

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the separability of the pure and mixed states of the quantum network of four nodesby means of the criterion of entanglement in terms of the covariance correlation tensor in quantum network theory.

  9. Cryptography in constant parallel time

    CERN Document Server

    Applebaum, Benny

    2013-01-01

    Locally computable (NC0) functions are 'simple' functions for which every bit of the output can be computed by reading a small number of bits of their input. The study of locally computable cryptography attempts to construct cryptographic functions that achieve this strong notion of simplicity and simultaneously provide a high level of security. Such constructions are highly parallelizable and they can be realized by Boolean circuits of constant depth.This book establishes, for the first time, the possibility of local implementations for many basic cryptographic primitives such as one-way func

  10. Quantum Processes and Dynamic Networks in Physical and Biological Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudziak, Martin Joseph

    Quantum theory since its earliest formulations in the Copenhagen Interpretation has been difficult to integrate with general relativity and with classical Newtonian physics. There has been traditionally a regard for quantum phenomena as being a limiting case for a natural order that is fundamentally classical except for microscopic extrema where quantum mechanics must be applied, more as a mathematical reconciliation rather than as a description and explanation. Macroscopic sciences including the study of biological neural networks, cellular energy transports and the broad field of non-linear and chaotic systems point to a quantum dimension extending across all scales of measurement and encompassing all of Nature as a fundamentally quantum universe. Theory and observation lead to a number of hypotheses all of which point to dynamic, evolving networks of fundamental or elementary processes as the underlying logico-physical structure (manifestation) in Nature and a strongly quantized dimension to macroscalar processes such as are found in biological, ecological and social systems. The fundamental thesis advanced and presented herein is that quantum phenomena may be the direct consequence of a universe built not from objects and substance but from interacting, interdependent processes collectively operating as sets and networks, giving rise to systems that on microcosmic or macroscopic scales function wholistically and organically, exhibiting non-locality and other non -classical phenomena. The argument is made that such effects as non-locality are not aberrations or departures from the norm but ordinary consequences of the process-network dynamics of Nature. Quantum processes are taken to be the fundamental action-events within Nature; rather than being the exception quantum theory is the rule. The argument is also presented that the study of quantum physics could benefit from the study of selective higher-scale complex systems, such as neural processes in the brain

  11. Survey paper on different approaches of Threshold Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Gupta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A traditional key management service is based on a Certificate Authority or a Trusted Third party. Security solutions for traditional network are not suitable for Mobile ad hoc network. The characteristics of MANET presence a number of challenges to security such as self-configuring, wireless links, infrastructure less nature. Threshold cryptography has proved to be an effective technique for key distribution and management. In this paper we highlight the different approaches used for certificate generation, discovering and authentication of public keys.

  12. Advanced quantum communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Evan Robert

    Quantum communication provides several examples of communication protocols which cannot be implemented securely using only classical communication. Currently, the most widely known of these is quantum cryptography, which allows secure key exchange between parties sharing a quantum channel subject to an eavesdropper. This thesis explores and extends the realm of quantum communication. Two new quantum communication protocols are described. The first is a new form of quantum cryptography---relativistic quantum cryptography---which increases communication efficiency by exploiting a relativistic bound on the power of an eavesdropper, in addition to the usual quantum mechanical restrictions intrinsic to quantum cryptography. By doing so, we have observed over 170% improvement in communication efficiency over a similar protocol not utilizing relativity. A second protocol, Quantum Orienteering, allows two cooperating parties to communicate a specific direction in space. This application shows the possibility of using joint measurements, or projections onto an entangled state, in order to extract the maximum useful information from quantum bits. For two-qubit communication, the maximal fidelity of communication using only separable operations is 73.6%, while joint measurements can improve the efficiency to 78.9%. In addition to implementing these protocols, we have improved several resources for quantum communication and quantum computing. Specifically, we have developed improved sources of polarization-entangled photons, a low-loss quantum memory for polarization qubits, and a quantum random number generator. These tools may be applied to a wide variety of future quantum and classical information systems.

  13. Quantum Logic Networks for Probabilistic and Controlled Teleportation of Unknown Quantum States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ting

    2004-01-01

    We present simplification schemes for probabilistic and controlled teleportation of the unknown quantum states of both one particle and two particles and construct efficient quantum logic networks for implementing the new schemes by means of the primitive operations consisting of single-qubit gates, two-qubit controlled-not gates, Von Neumann measurement, and classically controlled operations. In these schemes the teleportation are not always successful but with certain probability.

  14. Device-independent two-party cryptography secure against sequential attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaniewski, Jedrzej; Wehner, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The goal of two-party cryptography is to enable two parties, Alice and Bob, to solve common tasks without the need for mutual trust. Examples of such tasks are private access to a database, and secure identification. Quantum communication enables security for all of these problems in the noisy......-storage model by sending more signals than the adversary can store in a certain time frame. Here, we initiate the study of device-independent (DI) protocols for two-party cryptography in the noisy-storage model. Specifically, we present a relatively easy to implement protocol for a cryptographic building block...... known as weak string erasure and prove its security even if the devices used in the protocol are prepared by the dishonest party. DI two-party cryptography is made challenging by the fact that Alice and Bob do not trust each other, which requires new techniques to establish security. We fully analyse...

  15. Device-independent two-party cryptography secure against sequential attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaniewski, Jedrzej; Wehner, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The goal of two-party cryptography is to enable two parties, Alice and Bob, to solve common tasks without the need for mutual trust. Examples of such tasks are private access to a database, and secure identification. Quantum communication enables security for all of these problems in the noisy......-storage model by sending more signals than the adversary can store in a certain time frame. Here, we initiate the study of device-independent (DI) protocols for two-party cryptography in the noisy-storage model. Specifically, we present a relatively easy to implement protocol for a cryptographic building block...... known as weak string erasure and prove its security even if the devices used in the protocol are prepared by the dishonest party. DI two-party cryptography is made challenging by the fact that Alice and Bob do not trust each other, which requires new techniques to establish security. We fully analyse...

  16. Quantum information transmission in the quantum wireless multihop network based on Werner state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li-Hui; Yu, Xu-Tao; Cai, Xiao-Fei; Gong, Yan-Xiao; Zhang, Zai-Chen

    2015-05-01

    Many previous studies about teleportation are based on pure state. Study of quantum channel as mixed state is more realistic but complicated as pure states degenerate into mixed states by interaction with environment, and the Werner state plays an important role in the study of the mixed state. In this paper, the quantum wireless multihop network is proposed and the information is transmitted hop by hop through teleportation. We deduce a specific expression of the recovered state not only after one-hop teleportation but also across multiple intermediate nodes based on Werner state in a quantum wireless multihop network. We also obtain the fidelity of multihop teleportation. Project supported by the Prospective Future Network Project of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BY2013095-1-18) and the Independent Project of State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves (Grant No. Z201504).

  17. Quantum stochastic walks on networks for decision-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martínez, Ismael; Sánchez-Burillo, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Recent experiments report violations of the classical law of total probability and incompatibility of certain mental representations when humans process and react to information. Evidence shows promise of a more general quantum theory providing a better explanation of the dynamics and structure of real decision-making processes than classical probability theory. Inspired by this, we show how the behavioral choice-probabilities can arise as the unique stationary distribution of quantum stochastic walkers on the classical network defined from Luce’s response probabilities. This work is relevant because (i) we provide a very general framework integrating the positive characteristics of both quantum and classical approaches previously in confrontation, and (ii) we define a cognitive network which can be used to bring other connectivist approaches to decision-making into the quantum stochastic realm. We model the decision-maker as an open system in contact with her surrounding environment, and the time-length of the decision-making process reveals to be also a measure of the process’ degree of interplay between the unitary and irreversible dynamics. Implementing quantum coherence on classical networks may be a door to better integrate human-like reasoning biases in stochastic models for decision-making.

  18. Design and analysis of communication protocols for quantum repeater networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cody; Kim, Danny; Rakher, Matthew T.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Ladd, Thaddeus D.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze how the performance of a quantum-repeater network depends on the protocol employed to distribute entanglement, and we find that the choice of repeater-to-repeater link protocol has a profound impact on entanglement-distribution rate as a function of hardware parameters. We develop numerical simulations of quantum networks using different protocols, where the repeater hardware is modeled in terms of key performance parameters, such as photon generation rate and collection efficiency. These parameters are motivated by recent experimental demonstrations in quantum dots, trapped ions, and nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. We find that a quantum-dot repeater with the newest protocol (‘MidpointSource’) delivers the highest entanglement-distribution rate for typical cases where there is low probability of establishing entanglement per transmission, and in some cases the rate is orders of magnitude higher than other schemes. Our simulation tools can be used to evaluate communication protocols as part of designing a large-scale quantum network.

  19. Security of Quantum Repeater Network Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-03

    15.  SUBJECT TERMS Quantum Architecture 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17.  LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18.  NUMBER OF PAGES  5   19a.  NAME OF...22 Rodney Van Meter Associate Professor, Faculty of Environment and Information Studies Keio University, Japan +81-90-8012-3643 rdv@sfc.keio.ac.jp

  20. AUDIO CRYPTANALYSIS- AN APPLICATION OF SYMMETRIC KEY CRYPTOGRAPHY AND AUDIO STEGANOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Paira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the recent trend of network and technology, “Cryptography” and “Steganography” have emerged out as the essential elements of providing network security. Although Cryptography plays a major role in the fabrication and modification of the secret message into an encrypted version yet it has certain drawbacks. Steganography is the art that meets one of the basic limitations of Cryptography. In this paper, a new algorithm has been proposed based on both Symmetric Key Cryptography and Audio Steganography. The combination of a randomly generated Symmetric Key along with LSB technique of Audio Steganography sends a secret message unrecognizable through an insecure medium. The Stego File generated is almost lossless giving a 100 percent recovery of the original message. This paper also presents a detailed experimental analysis of the algorithm with a brief comparison with other existing algorithms and a future scope. The experimental verification and security issues are promising.

  1. Cryptography and computational number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Shparlinski, Igor; Wang, Huaxiong; Xing, Chaoping; Workshop on Cryptography and Computational Number Theory, CCNT'99

    2001-01-01

    This volume contains the refereed proceedings of the Workshop on Cryptography and Computational Number Theory, CCNT'99, which has been held in Singapore during the week of November 22-26, 1999. The workshop was organized by the Centre for Systems Security of the Na­ tional University of Singapore. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the Singapore National Science and Technology Board under the grant num­ ber RP960668/M. The idea for this workshop grew out of the recognition of the recent, rapid development in various areas of cryptography and computational number the­ ory. The event followed the concept of the research programs at such well-known research institutions as the Newton Institute (UK), Oberwolfach and Dagstuhl (Germany), and Luminy (France). Accordingly, there were only invited lectures at the workshop with plenty of time for informal discussions. It was hoped and successfully achieved that the meeting would encourage and stimulate further research in information and computer s...

  2. Approach to design neural cryptography: a generalized architecture and a heuristic rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Nankun; Liao, Xiaofeng; Huang, Tingwen

    2013-06-01

    Neural cryptography, a type of public key exchange protocol, is widely considered as an effective method for sharing a common secret key between two neural networks on public channels. How to design neural cryptography remains a great challenge. In this paper, in order to provide an approach to solve this challenge, a generalized network architecture and a significant heuristic rule are designed. The proposed generic framework is named as tree state classification machine (TSCM), which extends and unifies the existing structures, i.e., tree parity machine (TPM) and tree committee machine (TCM). Furthermore, we carefully study and find that the heuristic rule can improve the security of TSCM-based neural cryptography. Therefore, TSCM and the heuristic rule can guide us to designing a great deal of effective neural cryptography candidates, in which it is possible to achieve the more secure instances. Significantly, in the light of TSCM and the heuristic rule, we further expound that our designed neural cryptography outperforms TPM (the most secure model at present) on security. Finally, a series of numerical simulation experiments are provided to verify validity and applicability of our results.

  3. Silicon nanophotonics for scalable quantum coherent feedback networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sarovar, Mohan; Cox, Jonathan; Brif, Constantin; DeRose, Christopher T; Camacho, Ryan; Davids, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of coherent quantum feedback control (CQFC) as a new paradigm for precise manipulation of dynamics of complex quantum systems has led to the development of efficient theoretical modeling and simulation tools and opened avenues for new practical implementations. This work explores the applicability of the integrated silicon photonics platform for implementing scalable CQFC networks. If proven successful, on-chip implementations of these networks would provide scalable and efficient nanophotonic components for autonomous quantum information processing devices and ultra-low-power optical processing systems at telecommunications wavelengths. We analyze the strengths of the silicon photonics platform for CQFC applications and identify the key challenges to both the theoretical formalism and experimental implementations. In particular, we determine specific extensions to the theoretical CQFC framework (which was originally developed with bulk-optics implementations in mind), required to make it fully ...

  4. Complex Chemical Reaction Networks from Heuristics-Aided Quantum Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Galvin, Cooper J; Zubarev, Dmitry Yu; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-03-11

    While structures and reactivities of many small molecules can be computed efficiently and accurately using quantum chemical methods, heuristic approaches remain essential for modeling complex structures and large-scale chemical systems. Here, we present a heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology applicable to complex chemical reaction networks such as those arising in cell metabolism and prebiotic chemistry. Chemical heuristics offer an expedient way of traversing high-dimensional reactive potential energy surfaces and are combined here with quantum chemical structure optimizations, which yield the structures and energies of the reaction intermediates and products. Application of heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology to the formose reaction reproduces the experimentally observed reaction products, major reaction pathways, and autocatalytic cycles.

  5. Room-temperature spin-photon interface for quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Fang-Yu; Fu, Jing-Li; Wu, Yan; Zhu, Zhi-Yan

    2017-02-01

    Although remarkable progress has been achieved recently, to construct an optical cavity where a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centre in diamond is coupled to an optical field in the strong coupling regime is rather difficult. We propose an architecture for a scalable quantum interface capable of interconverting photonic and NV spin qubits, which can work well without the strong coupling requirement. The dynamics of the interface applies an adiabatic passage to sufficiently reduce the decoherence from an excited state of a NV colour centre in diamond. This quantum interface can accomplish many quantum network operations like state transfer and entanglement distribution between qubits at distant nodes. Exact numerical simulations show that high-fidelity quantum interface operations can be achieved under room-temperature and realistic experimental conditions.

  6. Asynchronous reference frame agreement in a quantum network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Tanvirul; Wehner, Stephanie

    2016-03-01

    An efficient implementation of many multiparty protocols for quantum networks requires that all the nodes in the network share a common reference frame. Establishing such a reference frame from scratch is especially challenging in an asynchronous network where network links might have arbitrary delays and the nodes do not share synchronised clocks. In this work, we study the problem of establishing a common reference frame in an asynchronous network of n nodes of which at most t are affected by arbitrary unknown error, and the identities of the faulty nodes are not known. We present a protocol that allows all the correctly functioning nodes to agree on a common reference frame as long as the network graph is complete and not more than t\\lt n/4 nodes are faulty. As the protocol is asynchronous, it can be used with some assumptions to synchronise clocks over a network. Also, the protocol has the appealing property that it allows any existing two-node asynchronous protocol for reference frame agreement to be lifted to a robust protocol for an asynchronous quantum network.

  7. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-02-22

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence.

  8. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence.

  9. Ensemble Averaging in Metallic Quantum Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, François; Schopfer, Félicien; Ericsson, Jerry; Saminadayar, Laurent; Bäuerle, Christopher; Mailly, Dominique; Texier, Christophe; Montambaux, Gilles

    2008-10-01

    We report on the size dependence of the amplitudes of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) as well as Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) magnetoconductance oscillations in silver networks with anisotropic aspect ratio and for various sizes ranging from 10 to 106 plaquettes. We show that the amplitude of both AB and AAS oscillations exhibit an unexpected dependence as a function of number of plaquettes N when the smallest dimension of the network becomes smaller than the phase coherence length: in this case, the network can be considered as a fully coherent object (mesoscopic) in one direction, whereas macroscopic in the other.

  10. Quantum control of harmonic oscillator networks

    CERN Document Server

    Genoni, Marco G; Kim, M S; Burgarth, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Controllability -- the possibility of performing any target dynamics by applying a set of available operations -- is a fundamental requirement for the practical use of any physical system. For finite-dimensional systems, as for instance spin systems, precise criterions to establish controllability, such as the so called rank criterion, are well known. However most physical systems require a description in terms of an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space whose controllability properties are poorly understood. Here, we investigate infinite-dimensional bosonic quantum systems -- encompassing quantum light, ensembles of bosonic atoms, motional degrees of freedom of ions, and nano-mechanical oscillators -- governed by quadratic Hamiltonians (such that their evolution is analogous to coupled harmonic oscillators). After having highlighted the intimate connection between controllability and recurrence in the Hilbert space, we prove that, for coupled oscillators, a simple extra condition has to be fulfilled to extend t...

  11. Economical quantum secure direct communication network with single photons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Fu-Guo; Li Xi-Han; Li Chun-Yan; Zhou Ping; Zhou Hong-Yu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a scheme for quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) network is proposed with a sequence of polarized single photons. The single photons are prepared originally in the same state |0> by the servers on the network,which will reduce the difficulty for the legitimate users to check eavesdropping largely. The users code the information on the single photons with two unitary operations which do not change their measuring bases. Some decoy photons,which are produced by operating the sample photons with a Hadamard, are used for preventing a potentially dishonest server from eavesdropping the quantum lines freely. This scheme is an economical one as it is the easiest way for QSDC network communication securely.

  12. Learning algorithm and application of quantum BP neural networks based on universal quantum gates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A quantum BP neural networks model with learning algorithm is proposed.First,based on the universality of single qubit rotation gate and two-qubit controlled-NOT gate,a quantum neuron model is constructed,which is composed of input,phase rotation,aggregation,reversal rotation and output.In this model,the input is described by qubits,and the output is given by the probability of the state in which |1> is observed.The phase rotation and the reversal rotation are performed by the universal quantum gates.Secondly,the quantum BP neural networks model is constructed,in which the output layer and the hide layer are quantum neurons.With the application of the gradient descent algorithm,a learning algorithm of the model is proposed,and the continuity of the model is proved.It is shown that this model and algorithm are superior to the conventional BP networks in three aspects: convergence speed,convergence rate and robustness,by two application examples of pattern recognition and function approximation.

  13. Continuous-variable quantum homomorphic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Shang, Tao; Liu, Jian-wei

    2017-10-01

    Quantum cryptography is believed to be unconditionally secure because its security is ensured by physical laws rather than computational complexity. According to spectrum characteristic, quantum information can be classified into two categories, namely discrete variables and continuous variables. Continuous-variable quantum protocols have gained much attention for their ability to transmit more information with lower cost. To verify the identities of different data sources in a quantum network, we propose a continuous-variable quantum homomorphic signature scheme. It is based on continuous-variable entanglement swapping and provides additive and subtractive homomorphism. Security analysis shows the proposed scheme is secure against replay, forgery and repudiation. Even under nonideal conditions, it supports effective verification within a certain verification threshold.

  14. New Dynamical Scaling Universality for Quantum Networks Across Adiabatic Quantum Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Oscar L.; Rodriguez, Ferney J.; Quiroga, Luis; Johnson, Neil F.; Rey, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    We reveal universal dynamical scaling behavior across adiabatic quantum phase transitions in networks ranging from traditional spatial systems (Ising model) to fully connected ones (Dicke and Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick models). Our findings, which lie beyond traditional critical exponent analysis and adiabatic perturbation approximations, are applicable even where excitations have not yet stabilized and, hence, provide a time-resolved understanding of quantum phase transitions encompassing a wide range of adiabatic regimes. We show explicitly that even though two systems may traditionally belong to the same universality class, they can have very different adiabatic evolutions. This implies that more stringent conditions need to be imposed than at present, both for quantum simulations where one system is used to simulate the other and for adiabatic quantum computing schemes.

  15. A contribution to quantum cryptography in finite-dimensional systems including further results from the field of quantum information theory; Ein Beitrag zur Quantenkryptographie in endlichdimensionalen Systemen nebst weiteren Ergebnissen aus dem Gebiet der Quanteninformationstheorie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranade, Kedar S.

    2009-02-04

    This PhD thesis deals with quantum-cryptographic protocols which allow general finite-dimensional quantum systems (qudits) as carriers of information in contrast to the predominantly used two-dimensional quantum systems (qubits). The main focus of investigations is the maximum tolerable error rate of such protocols and its behaviour as a function of the dimension of the information carriers. For this purpose, several concepts are introduced which allow the treatment of this problem. In particular, protocols are presented which work up to a maximum tolerate error rate, and it is shown that a wide class of protocols cannot be used for higher error rates. Among other things, it turns out that the maximum tolerable error rate for two-basis protocols increases up to 50% for high dimensions. Apart from the above-mentioned main subjects of this thesis, some other results from the field of quantum information theory are given, which were achieved during this PhD project. (orig.)

  16. Universality at Breakdown of Quantum Transport on Complex Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulvelis, Nikolaj; Dolgushev, Maxim; Mülken, Oliver

    2015-09-18

    We consider single-particle quantum transport on parametrized complex networks. Based on general arguments regarding the spectrum of the corresponding Hamiltonian, we derive bounds for a measure of the global transport efficiency defined by the time-averaged return probability. For treelike networks, we show analytically that a transition from efficient to inefficient transport occurs depending on the (average) functionality of the nodes of the network. In the infinite system size limit, this transition can be characterized by an exponent which is universal for all treelike networks. Our findings are corroborated by analytic results for specific deterministic networks, dendrimers and Vicsek fractals, and by Monte Carlo simulations of iteratively built scale-free trees.

  17. Cryptographie quantique à variables continues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, K.; Jankovic, A.; Symul, T.; Levenson, J. A.

    2002-06-01

    Nous avons élaboré un protocole de cryptographie quantique qui permet de générer et de distribuer une clé secrète aléatoire. Le protocole repose sur l'utilisation de paires de champs électromagnétiques dont les quadratures présentent des corrélations quantiques de type Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen. Les fluctuations quantiques instantanése constituent les bits aléatoires de la clé secrète, et la dégradation irréversible des corrélations quantiques des quadratures causée par une tierce personne permet de la détecter et de garantir la sécurité d'échange.

  18. Cheating prevention in visual cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chih-Ming; Tzeng, Wen-Guey

    2007-01-01

    Visual cryptography (VC) is a method of encrypting a secret image into shares such that stacking a sufficient number of shares reveals the secret image. Shares are usually presented in transparencies. Each participant holds a transparency. Most of the previous research work on VC focuses on improving two parameters: pixel expansion and contrast. In this paper, we studied the cheating problem in VC and extended VC. We considered the attacks of malicious adversaries who may deviate from the scheme in any way. We presented three cheating methods and applied them on attacking existent VC or extended VC schemes. We improved one cheat-preventing scheme. We proposed a generic method that converts a VCS to another VCS that has the property of cheating prevention. The overhead of the conversion is near optimal in both contrast degression and pixel expansion.

  19. Bent functions results and applications to cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Tokareva, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Bent Functions: Results and Applications to Cryptography offers a unique survey of the objects of discrete mathematics known as Boolean bent functions. As these maximal, nonlinear Boolean functions and their generalizations have many theoretical and practical applications in combinatorics, coding theory, and cryptography, the text provides a detailed survey of their main results, presenting a systematic overview of their generalizations and applications, and considering open problems in classification and systematization of bent functions. The text is appropriate for novices and advanced

  20. Cryptography with chaos using Chua's system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C. H.; Pizolato, J. C., Jr.

    2011-03-01

    In the last years, chaotic systems have been applied in information security. These systems have a complex and unpredictable behavior, what makes them more attractive for data cryptography applications. In this work, the chaotic behavior of signals generated by Chua's system is combined with the original information in order to obtain a safe cryptographic method. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can be used in data cryptography applications.

  1. Classical introduction to cryptography exercise book

    CERN Document Server

    Baigneres, Thomas; Lu, Yi

    2007-01-01

    This is a companion exercise and solution book to A Classical Introduction to Cryptography: Applications for Communications Security (0-387-25464-1). Coverage includes symmetric or public-key cryptography, cryptographic protocols, design, cryptanalysis, and implementation of cryptosystems. Readers should be comfortable with basic facts of discrete probability theory, discrete mathematics, calculus, algebra, and computer science. However, the exercises do not require an extensive background in mathematics, since the most important notions are introduced and discussed in many of them. Exercises

  2. Mathematical Background of Public Key Cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Gerhard; Lange, Tanja

    2005-01-01

    The two main systems used for public key cryptography are RSA and protocols based on the discrete logarithm problem in some cyclic group. We focus on the latter problem and state cryptographic protocols and mathematical background material.......The two main systems used for public key cryptography are RSA and protocols based on the discrete logarithm problem in some cyclic group. We focus on the latter problem and state cryptographic protocols and mathematical background material....

  3. Quantum-based algorithm for optimizing artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzyy-Chyang Lu; Gwo-Ruey Yu; Jyh-Ching Juang

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a quantum-based algorithm for evolving artificial neural networks (ANNs). The aim is to design an ANN with few connections and high classification performance by simultaneously optimizing the network structure and the connection weights. Unlike most previous studies, the proposed algorithm uses quantum bit representation to codify the network. As a result, the connectivity bits do not indicate the actual links but the probability of the existence of the connections, thus alleviating mapping problems and reducing the risk of throwing away a potential candidate. In addition, in the proposed model, each weight space is decomposed into subspaces in terms of quantum bits. Thus, the algorithm performs a region by region exploration, and evolves gradually to find promising subspaces for further exploitation. This is helpful to provide a set of appropriate weights when evolving the network structure and to alleviate the noisy fitness evaluation problem. The proposed model is tested on four benchmark problems, namely breast cancer and iris, heart, and diabetes problems. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can produce compact ANN structures with good generalization ability compared to other algorithms.

  4. Coevolution of quantum and classical strategies on evolving random networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Li

    Full Text Available We study the coevolution of quantum and classical strategies on weighted and directed random networks in the realm of the prisoner's dilemma game. During the evolution, agents can break and rewire their links with the aim of maximizing payoffs, and they can also adjust the weights to indicate preferences, either positive or negative, towards their neighbors. The network structure itself is thus also subject to evolution. Importantly, the directionality of links does not affect the accumulation of payoffs nor the strategy transfers, but serves only to designate the owner of each particular link and with it the right to adjust the link as needed. We show that quantum strategies outperform classical strategies, and that the critical temptation to defect at which cooperative behavior can be maintained rises, if the network structure is updated frequently. Punishing neighbors by reducing the weights of their links also plays an important role in maintaining cooperation under adverse conditions. We find that the self-organization of the initially random network structure, driven by the evolutionary competition between quantum and classical strategies, leads to the spontaneous emergence of small average path length and a large clustering coefficient.

  5. Silicon nanophotonics for scalable quantum coherent feedback networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarovar, Mohan; Brif, Constantin [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Soh, Daniel B.S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Stanford University, Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford, CA (United States); Cox, Jonathan; DeRose, Christopher T.; Camacho, Ryan; Davids, Paul [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The emergence of coherent quantum feedback control (CQFC) as a new paradigm for precise manipulation of dynamics of complex quantum systems has led to the development of efficient theoretical modeling and simulation tools and opened avenues for new practical implementations. This work explores the applicability of the integrated silicon photonics platform for implementing scalable CQFC networks. If proven successful, on-chip implementations of these networks would provide scalable and efficient nanophotonic components for autonomous quantum information processing devices and ultra-low-power optical processing systems at telecommunications wavelengths. We analyze the strengths of the silicon photonics platform for CQFC applications and identify the key challenges to both the theoretical formalism and experimental implementations. In particular, we determine specific extensions to the theoretical CQFC framework (which was originally developed with bulk-optics implementations in mind), required to make it fully applicable to modeling of linear and nonlinear integrated optics networks. We also report the results of a preliminary experiment that studied the performance of an in situ controllable silicon nanophotonic network of two coupled cavities and analyze the properties of this device using the CQFC formalism. (orig.)

  6. Research on Applications of Cryptography for Multi-Mobile Agent System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hai-ping; WANG Ru-chuan; XU Xiao-long

    2004-01-01

    With the development of information network and agent technology, Multi-Mobile Agents' Cooperation can not only improve the computing efficiency, but also have a comprehensive applicative value in solving the security issues of mobile agent system. Aiming at the security and flexibility, this paper proposes a kind of basic architecture and the design pattern of Multi-Mobile Agent System (MMAS). Combined with cryptography, it builds the security mechanism on keys' distribution and management and Coalition Signature of MMAS. Through the analysis of security and validity, the introduction and application of cryptography can improve the performance of MMAS.

  7. Experimental simulation of quantum graphs by microwave networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hul, Oleh; Bauch, Szymon; Pakoński, Prot; Savytskyy, Nazar; Zyczkowski, Karol; Sirko, Leszek

    2004-05-01

    We present the results of experimental and theoretical study of irregular, tetrahedral microwave networks consisting of coaxial cables (annular waveguides) connected by T joints. The spectra of the networks were measured in the frequency range 0.0001-16 GHz in order to obtain their statistical properties such as the integrated nearest neighbor spacing distribution and the spectral rigidity Delta(3) (L). The comparison of our experimental and theoretical results shows that microwave networks can simulate quantum graphs with time reversal symmetry. In particular, we use the spectra of the microwave networks to study the periodic orbits of the simulated quantum graphs. We also present experimental study of directional microwave networks consisting of coaxial cables and Faraday isolators for which the time reversal symmetry is broken. In this case our experimental results indicate that spectral statistics of directional microwave networks deviate from predictions of Gaussian orthogonal ensembles in random matrix theory approaching, especially for small eigenfrequency spacing s, results for Gaussian unitary ensembles. Experimental results are supported by the theoretical analysis of directional graphs.

  8. An application of different dioids in public key cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durcheva, Mariana I., E-mail: mdurcheva66@gmail.com [Technical University of Sofia, Faculty of Applied Mathematics and Informatics, 8 Kliment Ohridski St., Sofia 1000 (Bulgaria)

    2014-11-18

    Dioids provide a natural framework for analyzing a broad class of discrete event dynamical systems such as the design and analysis of bus and railway timetables, scheduling of high-throughput industrial processes, solution of combinatorial optimization problems, the analysis and improvement of flow systems in communication networks. They have appeared in several branches of mathematics such as functional analysis, optimization, stochastic systems and dynamic programming, tropical geometry, fuzzy logic. In this paper we show how to involve dioids in public key cryptography. The main goal is to create key – exchange protocols based on dioids. Additionally the digital signature scheme is presented.

  9. Implementing SSL/TLS using cryptography and PKI

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Hands-on, practical guide to implementing SSL and TLS protocols for Internet security If you are a network professional who knows C programming, this practical book is for you.  Focused on how to implement Secure Socket Layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS), this book guides you through all necessary steps, whether or not you have a working knowledge of cryptography. The book covers SSLv2, TLS 1.0, and TLS 1.2, including implementations of the relevant cryptographic protocols, secure hashing, certificate parsing, certificate generation, and more.  Coverage includes: Underst

  10. Formalization of Quantum Protocols using Coq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap Boender

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantum Information Processing, which is an exciting area of research at the intersection of physics and computer science, has great potential for influencing the future development of information processing systems. The building of practical, general purpose Quantum Computers may be some years into the future. However, Quantum Communication and Quantum Cryptography are well developed. Commercial Quantum Key Distribution systems are easily available and several QKD networks have been built in various parts of the world. The security of the protocols used in these implementations rely on information-theoretic proofs, which may or may not reflect actual system behaviour. Moreover, testing of implementations cannot guarantee the absence of bugs and errors. This paper presents a novel framework for modelling and verifying quantum protocols and their implementations using the proof assistant Coq. We provide a Coq library for quantum bits (qubits, quantum gates, and quantum measurement. As a step towards verifying practical quantum communication and security protocols such as Quantum Key Distribution, we support multiple qubits, communication and entanglement. We illustrate these concepts by modelling the Quantum Teleportation Protocol, which communicates the state of an unknown quantum bit using only a classical channel.

  11. Chern-Simons states in spin-network quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gambini, R; Pullin, J; Gambini, Rodolfo; Griego, Jorge; Pullin, Jorge

    1997-01-01

    In the context of canonical quantum gravity in terms of Ashtekar's new variables, it is known that there exists a state that is annihilated by all the quantum constraints and that is given by the exponential of the Chern--Simons form constructed with the Asthekar connection. We make a first exploration of the transform of this state into the spin-network representation of quantum gravity. The discussion is limited to trivalent nets with planar intersections. We adapt an invariant of tangles to construct the transform and study the action of the Hamiltonian constraint on it. We show that the first two coefficients of the expansion of the invariant in terms of the inverse cosmological constant are annihilated by the Hamiltonian constraint. We also discuss issues of framing that arise in the construction.

  12. Quantum-chemical insights from deep tensor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Kristof T.; Arbabzadah, Farhad; Chmiela, Stefan; Müller, Klaus R.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Learning from data has led to paradigm shifts in a multitude of disciplines, including web, text and image search, speech recognition, as well as bioinformatics. Can machine learning enable similar breakthroughs in understanding quantum many-body systems? Here we develop an efficient deep learning approach that enables spatially and chemically resolved insights into quantum-mechanical observables of molecular systems. We unify concepts from many-body Hamiltonians with purpose-designed deep tensor neural networks, which leads to size-extensive and uniformly accurate (1 kcal mol-1) predictions in compositional and configurational chemical space for molecules of intermediate size. As an example of chemical relevance, the model reveals a classification of aromatic rings with respect to their stability. Further applications of our model for predicting atomic energies and local chemical potentials in molecules, reliable isomer energies, and molecules with peculiar electronic structure demonstrate the potential of machine learning for revealing insights into complex quantum-chemical systems.

  13. Quantum Holonomies from Spectral Networks and Framed BPS States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabella, Maxime

    2017-04-01

    We propose a method for determining the spins of BPS states supported on line defects in 4d N=2 theories of class S. Via the 2d-4d correspondence, this translates to the construction of quantum holonomies on a punctured Riemann surface C. Our approach combines the technology of spectral networks, which decomposes flat {GL(K,C)-connections on C in terms of flat abelian connections on a K-fold cover of C, and the skein algebra in the 3-manifold C × [0,1]}, which expresses the representation theory of the quantum group U q ( gl K ). With any path on C, the quantum holonomy associates a positive Laurent polynomial in the quantized Fock-Goncharov coordinates of higher Teichmüller space. This confirms various positivity conjectures in physics and mathematics.

  14. SPECTRAL CALCULATIONS OF HAMILTONIAN FOR A QUANTUM FRACTAL NETWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A general formulation for the spectral calculations of the Hamiltonian operator of a Quantum Fractal Network(QFN) is presented. The QFN can be constructed by placing artificial neurons on each site of the fractal lattice. An artificial neuron may consist of a cell of a quantum cellular automaton or a quantum dot, which confines a single electron. The Coulomb interaction or the spin-spin interaction between neurons can be used to transmit signals and perform logic operations.The recursive formulas of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors between sub-lattices are obtained explicitly. As the application of the formulations,the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Hamiltonian operator for the Sierpinski gasket are calculated.

  15. Electron nuclear spin transfer in quantum-dot networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, M.; Toonen, R. C.; Blick, R. H.; Harrison, P.

    2005-05-01

    We investigate the conductance spectra of coupled quantum dots to study systematically the nuclear spin relaxation of different geometries of a two-dimensional network of quantum dots and observe spin blockade dependence on the electronic configurations. We derive the conductance using the Beenakker approach generalized to an array of quantum dots where we consider the nuclear spin transfer to electrons by hyperfine coupling. This allows us to predict the relevant memory effects on the different electronic states by studying the evolution of the single electron resonances in the presence of nuclear spin relaxation. We find that the gradual depolarization of the nuclear system is imprinted in the conductance spectra of the multidot system. Our calculations of the temporal evolution of the conductance resonance reveal that spin blockade can be lifted by hyperfine coupling.

  16. Quantum behavior of terahertz photoconductivity in silicon nanocrystals networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkarev, V.; Ostatnický, T.; Němec, H.; Chlouba, T.; Trojánek, F.; Malý, P.; Zacharias, M.; Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Kužel, P.

    2017-03-01

    Quantum-size effects are essential for understanding the terahertz conductivity of semiconductor nanocrystals, particularly at low temperatures. We derived a quantum mechanical expression for the linear terahertz response of nanocrystals; its introduction into an appropriate effective medium model provides a comprehensive microscopic approach for the analysis of terahertz conductivity spectra as a function of frequency, temperature, and excitation fluence. We performed optical pump-terahertz probe experiments in multilayer Si quantum dot networks with various degrees of percolation at 300 and 20 K and with variable pump fluence (initial carrier density) over nearly three orders of magnitude. Our theoretical approach was successfully applied to quantitatively interpret all the measured data within a single model. A careful data analysis made it possible to assess the distribution of sizes of nanocrystals participating to the photoconduction. We show and justify that such conductivity-weighted distribution may differ from the size distribution obtained by standard analysis of transmission electron microscopy images.

  17. A telecom-wavelength atomic quantum memory in optical fiber for heralded polarization qubits

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Jeongwan; Puigibert, Marcel li Grimau; Verma, Varun B; Marsili, Francesco; Nam, Sae Woo; Oblak, Daniel; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Photon-based quantum information processing promises new technologies including optical quantum computing, quantum cryptography, and distributed quantum networks. Polarization-encoded photons at telecommunication wavelengths provide a compelling platform for practical realization of these technologies. However, despite important success towards building elementary components compatible with this platform, including sources of entangled photons, efficient single photon detectors, and on-chip quantum circuits, a missing element has been atomic quantum memory that directly allows for reversible mapping of quantum states encoded in the polarization degree of a telecom-wavelength photon. Here we demonstrate the quantum storage and retrieval of polarization states of heralded single-photons at telecom-wavelength by implementing the atomic frequency comb protocol in an ensemble of erbium atoms doped into an optical fiber. Despite remaining limitations in our proof-of-principle demonstration such as small storage eff...

  18. Free-Space Quantum Key Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Denisenko, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Based on the firm laws of physics rather than unproven foundations of mathematical complexity, quantum cryptography provides a radically different solution for encryption and promises unconditional security. Quantum cryptography systems are typically built between two nodes connected to each other through fiber optic. This chapter focuses on quantum cryptography systems operating over free-space optical channels as a cost-effective and license-free alternative to fiber optic counterparts. It provides an overview of the different parts of an experimental free-space quantum communication link developed in the Spanish National Research Council (Madrid, Spain).

  19. Complex Quantum Network Manifolds in Dimension $d>2$ are Scale-Free

    CERN Document Server

    Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-01-01

    In quantum gravity, several approaches have been proposed until now for the quantum description of discrete geometries. These theoretical frameworks include loop quantum gravity, causal dynamical triangulations, causal sets, quantum graphity, and energetic spin networks. Most of these approaches describe discrete spaces as homogeneous network manifolds. Here we define Complex Quantum Network Manifolds (CQNM) describing the evolution of quantum network states, and constructed from growing simplicial complexes of dimension $d$. We show that in $d=2$ CQNM are homogeneous networks while for $d>2$ they are scale-free i.e. they are characterized by large inhomogeneities of degrees like most complex networks. From the self-organized evolution of CQNM quantum statistics emerge spontaneously. Here we define the generalized degrees associated with the $\\delta$-faces of the $d$-dimensional CQNMs, and we show that the statistics of these generalized degrees can either follow Fermi-Dirac, Boltzmann or Bose-Einstein distri...

  20. Complex Quantum Network Manifolds in Dimension d > 2 are Scale-Free

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    In quantum gravity, several approaches have been proposed until now for the quantum description of discrete geometries. These theoretical frameworks include loop quantum gravity, causal dynamical triangulations, causal sets, quantum graphity, and energetic spin networks. Most of these approaches describe discrete spaces as homogeneous network manifolds. Here we define Complex Quantum Network Manifolds (CQNM) describing the evolution of quantum network states, and constructed from growing simplicial complexes of dimension . We show that in d = 2 CQNM are homogeneous networks while for d > 2 they are scale-free i.e. they are characterized by large inhomogeneities of degrees like most complex networks. From the self-organized evolution of CQNM quantum statistics emerge spontaneously. Here we define the generalized degrees associated with the -faces of the -dimensional CQNMs, and we show that the statistics of these generalized degrees can either follow Fermi-Dirac, Boltzmann or Bose-Einstein distributions depending on the dimension of the -faces.