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Sample records for quantum control experiment

  1. Automating quantum experiment control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kelly E.; Amini, Jason M.; Doret, S. Charles; Mohler, Greg; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.

    2017-03-01

    The field of quantum information processing is rapidly advancing. As the control of quantum systems approaches the level needed for useful computation, the physical hardware underlying the quantum systems is becoming increasingly complex. It is already becoming impractical to manually code control for the larger hardware implementations. In this chapter, we will employ an approach to the problem of system control that parallels compiler design for a classical computer. We will start with a candidate quantum computing technology, the surface electrode ion trap, and build a system instruction language which can be generated from a simple machine-independent programming language via compilation. We incorporate compile time generation of ion routing that separates the algorithm description from the physical geometry of the hardware. Extending this approach to automatic routing at run time allows for automated initialization of qubit number and placement and additionally allows for automated recovery after catastrophic events such as qubit loss. To show that these systems can handle real hardware, we present a simple demonstration system that routes two ions around a multi-zone ion trap and handles ion loss and ion placement. While we will mainly use examples from transport-based ion trap quantum computing, many of the issues and solutions are applicable to other architectures.

  2. Classical oscillators in the control of quantum tunneling: Numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of a classical anharmonic oscillator is exploited to control the tunneling dynamics of a quantum particle to which the classical oscillator is coupled. The mixed quantum classical problem is investigated at a mean-field like level. The anharmonic strength (λ) , particle mass (Mc) and harmonic stiffness (ωc) of the classical controller are explored as possible control parameters for the tunneling dynamics. The strength, the type of coupling between the quantum system and classical controller and the effective frequency of the controller emerge as crucial factors in shaping the nature and extent of the control. A whole spectrum of possibilities starting from enhancement, suppression to complete destruction of tunneling emerge depending on values assigned to the control parameters, the type of coupling and the control configuration used. When classical controller is replaced by a quantum controller, the control landscape becomes much simpler.

  3. Quantum Gravity Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new quantum gravity experiment is reported with the data confirming the generali- sation of the Schrödinger equation to include the interaction of the wave function with dynamical space. Dynamical space turbulence, via this interaction process, raises and lowers the energy of the electron wave function, which is detected by observing conse- quent variations in the electron quantum barrier tunnelling rate in reverse-biased Zener diodes. This process has previously been reported and enabled the measurement of the speed of the dynamical space flow, which is consistent with numerous other detection experiments. The interaction process is dependent on the angle between the dynamical space flow velocity and the direction of the electron flow in the diode, and this depen- dence is experimentally demonstrated. This interaction process explains gravity as an emergent quantum process, so unifying quantum phenomena and gravity. Gravitational waves are easily detected.

  4. Quantum frequency downconversion experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Takesue, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    We report the first quantum frequency downconversion experiment. Using the difference frequency generation process in a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide, we successfully observed the phase-preserved frequency downconversion of a coherent pulse train with an average photon number per pulse of $<$1, from the 0.7-$\\mu$m visible wavelength band to the 1.3-$\\mu$m telecom band. We expect this technology to become an important tool for flexible photonic quantum networking, including the realization of quantum repeater systems over optical fiber using atom-photon entanglement sources for the visible wavelength bands.

  5. Controlling Quantum Information

    CERN Document Server

    Landahl, A J

    2002-01-01

    Quantum information science explores ways in which quantum physical laws can be harnessed to control the acquisition, transmission, protection, and processing of information. This field has seen explosive growth in the past several years from progress on both theoretical and experimental fronts. Essential to this endeavor are methods for controlling quantum information. In this thesis, I present three new approaches for controlling quantum information. First, I present a new protocol for continuously protecting unknown quantum states from noise. This protocol combines and expands ideas from the theories of quantum error correction and quantum feedback control. The result can outperform either approach by itself. I generalize this protocol to all known quantum stabilizer codes, and study its application to the three-qubit repetition code in detail via Monte Carlo simulations. Next, I present several new protocols for controlling quantum information that are fault-tolerant. These protocols require only local qu...

  6. Controlling Quantum Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Bibek; Pattanayak, Arjendu

    2014-05-01

    We have recently computed Lyapunov exponents describing the chaotic behavior of the quantum trajectories of an open quantum nonlinear oscillator using the Quantum State Diffusion formalism. We have seen several interesting features as a function of changing system parameters. We report on progress towards controlling the observed quantum chaotic behavior using the classical Ott-Grebogi-Yorke protocol.

  7. A quantum delayed choice experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Peruzzo, Alberto; Brunner, Nicolas; Popescu, Sandu; O'Brien, Jeremy L

    2012-01-01

    Quantum systems exhibit particle-like or wave-like behaviour depending on the experimental apparatus they are confronted by. This wave-particle duality is at the heart of quantum mechanics, and is fully captured in Wheeler's famous delayed choice gedanken experiment. In this variant of the double slit experiment, the observer chooses to test either the particle or wave nature of a photon after it has passed through the slits. Here we report on a quantum delayed choice experiment, based on a quantum controlled beam-splitter, in which both particle and wave behaviours can be investigated simultaneously. The genuinely quantum nature of the photon's behaviour is tested via a Bell inequality, which here replaces the delayed choice of the observer. We observe strong Bell inequality violations, thus showing that no model in which the photon knows in advance what type of experiment it will be confronted by, hence behaving either as a particle or as wave, can account for the experimental data.

  8. Realizing Controllable Quantum States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku

    -T[stmbol] superconducting thin films with special arrangements of antidots / R. Wöerdenweber, P. Dymashevski and V. R. Misko. Quantum tunneling of relativistic fluxons / K. Konno et al. -- 6. Quantum information processing in solid states. Qubit decoherence by low-frequency noise / K. Rabenstein, V. A. Sverdlov and D. V. Averin. A critique of two-level approximation / K. Savran and T. Hakioǧlu. Josephson arrays as quantum channels / A. Romito, C. Bruder and R. Fazio. Fighting decoherence in a Josephson qubit circuit / E. Collin et al. Fast switching current detection at low critical currents / J. Walter, S. Corlevi and D. Haviland. Asymmetric flux bias for coupled qubits to observe entangled states / Y. Shimazu. Interaction of Josephson qubits with strong QED cavity modes: dynamical entanglement transfer and navigation / G. Falci et al. Controlling decoherence of transported quantum spin information in semiconductor spintronics / B. Nikolic and S. Souma. Decoherence due to telegraph and 1/f noise in Josephson qubits / E. Paladino et al. Detection of entanglement in NMR quantum information processing / R. Rahimi, K. Takeda and M. Kitagawa. Multiphoton absorption and SQUID switching current behaviors in superconducting flux-qubit experiments / H. Takayanagi et al. -- 7. Quantum information theory. Quantum query complexities / K. Iwama. A construction for non-stabilizer Clifford codes / M. Hagiwara and H. Imai. Quantum pushdown automata that can deterministically solve a certain problem / Y. Murakami et al. Trading classical for quantum computation using indirection / R. van Meter. Intractability of the initial arrangement of input data on qubits / Y. Kawano et al. Reversibility of modular squaring / N. Kunihiro, Y. Takahashi and Y. Kawano. Study of proximity effect at D-wave superconductors in quasiclassical methods / Y. Tanuma, Y. Tanaka and S. Kashiwaya -- 8. Spintronics in band electrons. Triplet superconductors: exploitable basis for scalable quantum computing / K. S. Wood et al. Spin

  9. Controllability of Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schirmer, S G; Solomon, A I

    2003-01-01

    An overview and synthesis of results and criteria for open-loop controllability of Hamiltonian quantum systems obtained using Lie group and Lie algebra techniques is presented. Negative results for open-loop controllability of dissipative systems are discussed, and the superiority of closed-loop (feedback) control for quantum systems is established.

  10. Hybrid Quantum-Classical Approach to Quantum Optimal Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Yang, Xiaodong; Peng, Xinhua; Sun, Chang-Pu

    2017-04-14

    A central challenge in quantum computing is to identify more computational problems for which utilization of quantum resources can offer significant speedup. Here, we propose a hybrid quantum-classical scheme to tackle the quantum optimal control problem. We show that the most computationally demanding part of gradient-based algorithms, namely, computing the fitness function and its gradient for a control input, can be accomplished by the process of evolution and measurement on a quantum simulator. By posing queries to and receiving answers from the quantum simulator, classical computing devices update the control parameters until an optimal control solution is found. To demonstrate the quantum-classical scheme in experiment, we use a seven-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance system, on which we have succeeded in optimizing state preparation without involving classical computation of the large Hilbert space evolution.

  11. Quantum controlled fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, Eduardo; Gruebele, Martin; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2017-09-01

    Quantum-controlled motion of nuclei, starting from the nanometer-size ground state of a molecule, can potentially overcome some of the difficulties of thermonuclear fusion by compression of a fuel pellet or in a bulk plasma. Coherent laser control can manipulate nuclear motion precisely, achieving large phase space densities for the colliding nuclei. We combine quantum wavepacket propagation of D and T nuclei in a field-bound molecule with coherent control by a shaped laser pulse to demonstrate enhancement of nuclear collision rates. Atom-smashers powered by coherent control may become laboratory sources of particle bursts, and even assist muonic fusion.

  12. Controlled quantum evolutions

    CERN Document Server

    Petroni, N C; De Siena, S; Illuminati, F; Petroni, Nicola Cufaro; Martino, Salvatore De; Siena, Silvio De; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the non stationary solutions of the evolution (Fokker-Planck) equations associated to either stationary or non stationary quantum states by the stochastic mechanics. For the excited stationary states of quantum systems with singular velocity fields we explicitely discuss the exact solutions for the HO case. Moreover the possibility of modifying the original potentials in order to implement arbitrary evolutions ruled by these equations is discussed with respect to both possible models for quantum measurements and applications to the control of particle beams in accelerators.

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    2009-10-01

    Control of quantum phenomena has grown from a dream to a burgeoning field encompassing wide-ranging experimental and theoretical activities. Theoretical research in this area primarily concerns identification of the principles for controlling quantum phenomena, the exploration of new experimental applications and the development of associated operational algorithms to guide such experiments. Recent experiments with adaptive feedback control span many applications including selective excitation, wave packet engineering and control in the presence of complex environments. Practical procedures are also being developed to execute real-time feedback control considering the resultant back action on the quantum system. This focus issue includes papers covering many of the latest advances in the field. Focus on Quantum Control Contents Control of quantum phenomena: past, present and future Constantin Brif, Raj Chakrabarti and Herschel Rabitz Biologically inspired molecular machines driven by light. Optimal control of a unidirectional rotor Guillermo Pérez-Hernández, Adam Pelzer, Leticia González and Tamar Seideman Simulating quantum search algorithm using vibronic states of I2 manipulated by optimally designed gate pulses Yukiyoshi Ohtsuki Efficient coherent control by sequences of pulses of finite duration Götz S Uhrig and Stefano Pasini Control by decoherence: weak field control of an excited state objective Gil Katz, Mark A Ratner and Ronnie Kosloff Multi-qubit compensation sequences Y Tomita, J T Merrill and K R Brown Environment-invariant measure of distance between evolutions of an open quantum system Matthew D Grace, Jason Dominy, Robert L Kosut, Constantin Brif and Herschel Rabitz Simplified quantum process tomography M P A Branderhorst, J Nunn, I A Walmsley and R L Kosut Achieving 'perfect' molecular discrimination via coherent control and stimulated emission Stephen D Clow, Uvo C Holscher and Thomas C Weinacht A convenient method to simulate and visually

  14. Approximate Quantum Adders with Genetic Algorithms: An IBM Quantum Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Rui

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been proven that quantum adders are forbidden by the laws of quantum mechanics. We analyze theoretical proposals for the implementation of approximate quantum adders and optimize them by means of genetic algorithms, improving previous protocols in terms of efficiency and fidelity. Furthermore, we experimentally realize a suitable approximate quantum adder with the cloud quantum computing facilities provided by IBM Quantum Experience. The development of approximate quantum adders enhances the toolbox of quantum information protocols, paving the way for novel applications in quantum technologies.

  15. Approximate Quantum Adders with Genetic Algorithms: An IBM Quantum Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Alvarez-Rodriguez, Unai; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique

    2017-07-01

    It has been proven that quantum adders are forbidden by the laws of quantum mechanics. We analyze theoretical proposals for the implementation of approximate quantum adders and optimize them by means of genetic algorithms, improving previous protocols in terms of efficiency and fidelity. Furthermore, we experimentally realize a suitable approximate quantum adder with the cloud quantum computing facilities provided by IBM Quantum Experience. The development of approximate quantum adders enhances the toolbox of quantum information protocols, paving the way for novel applications in quantum technologies.

  16. Experiments towards size and dopant control of germanium quantum dots for solar applications

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    While the literature for the doping of silicon quantum dots (QDs) and nanocrystals (NCs) is extensive, reports of doping their germanium analogs are sparse. We report a range of attempts to dope Ge QDs both during and post-synthesis. The QDs have been characterized by TEM, XPS, and I/V measurements of SiO2 coated QD thin films in test cells using doped Si substrates. The solution synthesis of Ge QDs by the reduction of GeCl4 with LiAlH4 results in Ge QDs with a low level of chlorine atoms on ...

  17. Adiabatic Quantum Computation: Coherent Control Back Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2013-01-01

    Though attractive from scalability aspects, optical approaches to quantum computing are highly prone to decoherence and rapid population loss due to nonradiative processes such as vibrational redistribution. We show that such effects can be reduced by adiabatic coherent control, in which quantum interference between multiple excitation pathways is used to cancel coupling to the unwanted, non-radiative channels. We focus on experimentally demonstrated adiabatic controlled population transfer experiments wherein the details on the coherence aspects are yet to be explored theoretically but are important for quantum computation. Such quantum computing schemes also form a back-action connection to coherent control developments. PMID:23788822

  18. Feedback control of quantum system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Dao-yi; CHEN Zong-hai; ZHANG Chen-bin; CHEN Chun-lin

    2006-01-01

    Feedback is a significant strategy for the control of quantum system.Information acquisition is the greatest difficulty in quantum feedback applications.After discussing several basic methods for information acquisition,we review three kinds of quantum feedback control strategies:quantum feedback control with measurement,coherent quantum feedback,and quantum feedback control based on cloning and recognition.The first feedback strategy can effectively acquire information,but it destroys the coherence in feedback loop.On the contrary,coherent quantum feedback does not destroy the coherence,but the capability of information acquisition is limited.However,the third feedback scheme gives a compromise between information acquisition and measurement disturbance.

  19. Fluxon-controlled quantum computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Matsuo, Shigemasa; Hatakenaka, Noriyuki

    2016-11-01

    We propose a fluxon-controlled quantum computer incorporated with three-qubit quantum error correction using special gate operations, i.e. joint-phase and SWAP gate operations, inherent in capacitively coupled superconducting flux qubits. The proposed quantum computer acts exactly like a knitting machine at home.

  20. CALL FOR PAPERS: Quantum control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Stefano; Wiseman, Howard M.; Man'ko, Vladimir I.

    2004-10-01

    Over the last few decades, the achievements of highly precise technologies for manipulating systems at quantum scales have paved the way for the development of quantum control. Moreover, the proliferation of results in quantum information suggest that control theory might profitably be re-examined from this perspective. Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics will publish a topical issue devoted to quantum control. The Guest Editors invite contributions from researchers working in any area related to quantum control. Topics to be covered include: • Quantum Hamiltonian dynamics and programming controlQuantum decoherence control • Open loop control • Closed loop (feedback) controlQuantum measurement theory • Quantum noise and filtering • Estimation and decision theory • Quantum error correction • Group representation in quantum control • Coherent control in quantum optics and lasers • Coherent control in cavity QED and atom optics • Coherent control in molecular dynamics The topical issue is scheduled for publication in November 2005 and the DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 28 February 2005. All contributions will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Submissions should preferably be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. Enquiries regarding this topical issue may be addressed to the Publisher, Dr Claire Bedrock (claire.bedrock@iop.org). There are no page charges for publication. The corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should preferably be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions

  1. Quantum bouncer: theory and experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Vankov, Anatoli Andrei

    2009-01-01

    The quantum bouncer (QB) concept is a known QM textbook example of confined particle, namely, a solution to the 1D Schroedinger equation for a linear potential (the so-called Airy equation). It would be a great methodological challenge to create such a QM object in laboratory. An attempt of observation of the QB ``running'' in the horizontal direction was recently made by the international team at the Laue-Langevin Institute, Grenoble. The experiment was performed with ultra-cold neutrons. In this paper, the experiment is analyzed in view of the authors' claim that ``neutron quantum states in Earth gravitational field'' are observed. The experimental apparatus is designed for measurements of horizontal flux of neutrons passing through an absorbing wave guide with a variable height of absorber. From our analysis, it follows, however, that in such a layout measured data are not sensitive to quantum probability density in the vertical direction. The overall conclusion is made that the experimental data do not co...

  2. Quantum chemistry simulation on quantum computers: theories and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Boruo; Xu, Nanyang; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-07-14

    It has been claimed that quantum computers can mimic quantum systems efficiently in the polynomial scale. Traditionally, those simulations are carried out numerically on classical computers, which are inevitably confronted with the exponential growth of required resources, with the increasing size of quantum systems. Quantum computers avoid this problem, and thus provide a possible solution for large quantum systems. In this paper, we first discuss the ideas of quantum simulation, the background of quantum simulators, their categories, and the development in both theories and experiments. We then present a brief introduction to quantum chemistry evaluated via classical computers followed by typical procedures of quantum simulation towards quantum chemistry. Reviewed are not only theoretical proposals but also proof-of-principle experimental implementations, via a small quantum computer, which include the evaluation of the static molecular eigenenergy and the simulation of chemical reaction dynamics. Although the experimental development is still behind the theory, we give prospects and suggestions for future experiments. We anticipate that in the near future quantum simulation will become a powerful tool for quantum chemistry over classical computations.

  3. BOOK REVIEW Quantum Measurement and Control Quantum Measurement and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2010-12-01

    In the last two decades there has been an enormous progress in the experimental investigation of single quantum systems. This progress covers fields such as quantum optics, quantum computation, quantum cryptography, and quantum metrology, which are sometimes summarized as `quantum technologies'. A key issue there is entanglement, which can be considered as the characteristic feature of quantum theory. As disparate as these various fields maybe, they all have to deal with a quantum mechanical treatment of the measurement process and, in particular, the control process. Quantum control is, according to the authors, `control for which the design requires knowledge of quantum mechanics'. Quantum control situations in which measurements occur at important steps are called feedback (or feedforward) control of quantum systems and play a central role here. This book presents a comprehensive and accessible treatment of the theoretical tools that are needed to cope with these situations. It also provides the reader with the necessary background information about the experimental developments. The authors are both experts in this field to which they have made significant contributions. After an introduction to quantum measurement theory and a chapter on quantum parameter estimation, the central topic of open quantum systems is treated at some length. This chapter includes a derivation of master equations, the discussion of the Lindblad form, and decoherence - the irreversible emergence of classical properties through interaction with the environment. A separate chapter is devoted to the description of open systems by the method of quantum trajectories. Two chapters then deal with the central topic of quantum feedback control, while the last chapter gives a concise introduction to one of the central applications - quantum information. All sections contain a bunch of exercises which serve as a useful tool in learning the material. Especially helpful are also various separate

  4. Nuclear Spins as Quantum Testbeds: Singlet States, Quantum Correlations, and Delayed-choice Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Soumya Singha

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) forms a natural test-bed to perform quantum information processing (QIP) and has so far proven to be one of the most successful quantum information processors. The nuclear spins in a molecule treated as quantum bits or qubits which are the basic building blocks of a quantum computer. The development of NMR over half a century puts it in a platform where we can utilize its excellent control techniques over an ensemble of spin systems and perform quantum computation in a highly controlled way. Apart from a successful quantum information processor, NMR is also a highly powerful quantum platform where many of the potentially challenging quantum mechanical experiments can be performed.

  5. Controlled quantum evolutions and transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroni, Nicola Cufaro [INFN Sezione di Bari, INFM Unitadi Bari and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica dell' Universitae del Politecnico di Bari, Bari (Italy); De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio [INFM Unitadi Salerno, INFN Sezione di Napoli - Gruppo collegato di Salerno and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitadi Salerno, Baronissi, Salerno (Italy)

    1999-10-29

    We study the nonstationary solutions of Fokker-Planck equations associated to either stationary or non stationary quantum states. In particular, we discuss the stationary states of quantum systems with singular velocity fields. We introduce a technique that allows arbitrary evolutions ruled by these equations to account for controlled quantum transitions. As a first significant application we present a detailed treatment of the transition probabilities and of the controlling time-dependent potentials associated to the transitions between the stationary, the coherent, and the squeezed states of the harmonic oscillator. (author)

  6. Controlled quantum evolutions and transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Petroni, N C; De Siena, S; Illuminati, F

    1999-01-01

    We study the nonstationary solutions of Fokker-Planck equations associated to either stationary or nonstationary quantum states. In particular we discuss the stationary states of quantum systems with singular velocity fields. We introduce a technique that allows to realize arbitrary evolutions ruled by these equations, to account for controlled quantum transitions. The method is illustrated by presenting the detailed treatment of the transition probabilities and of the controlling time-dependent potentials associated to the transitions between the stationary, the coherent, and the squeezed states of the harmonic oscillator. Possible extensions to anharmonic systems and mixed states are briefly discussed and assessed.

  7. Demonstration of Quantum Entanglement Control Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Jing-Yi; ZHANG Jing-Fu; DENG Zhi-Wei; LU Zhi-Heng

    2004-01-01

    @@ With the two forms of the quantum entanglement control, the quantum entanglement swapping and preservation are demonstrated in a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computer. The pseudopure state is prepared to represent the quantum entangled states through macroscopic signals. Entanglement swapping is directly realized by a swap operation. By controlling the interactions between the system and its environment,we can preserve an initial entangled state for a longer time. The experimental results are in agreement with the experiment.

  8. Quantum mechanics theory and experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This textbook presents quantum mechanics at the junior/senior undergraduate level. It is unique in that it describes not only quantum theory, but also presents five laboratories that explore truly modern aspects of quantum mechanics. These laboratories include "proving" that light contains photons, single-photon interference, and tests of local realism. The text begins by presenting the classical theory of polarization, moving on to describe the quantum theory of polarization. Analogies between the two theories minimize conceptual difficulties that students typically have when first presented with quantum mechanics. Furthermore, because the laboratories involve studying photons, using photon polarization as a prototypical quantum system allows the laboratory work to be closely integrated with the coursework. Polarization represents a two-dimensional quantum system, so the introduction to quantum mechanics uses two-dimensional state vectors and operators. This allows students to become comfortable with the mat...

  9. Quantum mechanics: Thought experiments made real

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Elegant experiments performed with X-rays and a double slit formed from molecular oxygen have finally made it possible to realize and test a long-standing and famous gedanken experiment in quantum mechanics.

  10. Performing quantum computing experiments in the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum computing technology has reached a second renaissance in the past five years. Increased interest from both the private and public sector combined with extraordinary theoretical and experimental progress has solidified this technology as a major advancement in the 21st century. As anticipated my many, some of the first realizations of quantum computing technology has occured over the cloud, with users logging onto dedicated hardware over the classical internet. Recently, IBM has released the Quantum Experience, which allows users to access a five-qubit quantum processor. In this paper we take advantage of this online availability of actual quantum hardware and present four quantum information experiments. We utilize the IBM chip to realize protocols in quantum error correction, quantum arithmetic, quantum graph theory, and fault-tolerant quantum computation by accessing the device remotely through the cloud. While the results are subject to significant noise, the correct results are returned from the chip. This demonstrates the power of experimental groups opening up their technology to a wider audience and will hopefully allow for the next stage of development in quantum information technology.

  11. Controllable valley splitting in silicon quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Srijit; Slinker, K. A.; Friesen, Mark; McGuire, L. M.; Truitt, J. L.; Tahan, Charles; Klein, L. J.; Chu, J. O.; Mooney, P. M.; van der Weide, D. W.; Joynt, Robert; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon has many attractive properties for quantum computing, and the quantum-dot architecture is appealing because of its controllability and scalability. However, the multiple valleys in the silicon conduction band are potentially a serious source of decoherence for spin-based quantum-dot qubits. Only when a large energy splits these valleys do we obtain well-defined and long-lived spin states appropriate for quantum computing. Here, we show that the small valley splittings observed in previous experiments on Si-SiGe heterostructures result from atomic steps at the quantum-well interface. Lateral confinement in a quantum point contact limits the electron wavefunctions to several steps, and enhances the valley splitting substantially, up to 1.5meV. The combination of electrostatic and magnetic confinement produces a valley splitting larger than the spin splitting, which is controllable over a wide range. These results improve the outlook for realizing spin qubits with long coherence times in silicon-based devices.

  12. Overview of progress in quantum systems control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG Shuang; ZHENG Yisong; JI Beichen; DAI Yi

    2007-01-01

    The development of the theory on quantum systems control in the last 20 years is reviewed in detail.The research on the controllability of quantum systems is first introduced,then the study on the quantum open-loop control methods often used for controlling simple quantum systems is analyzed briefly.The learning control method and the feedback control method are mainly discussed for they are two important methods in quantum systems control and their advantages and disadvantages are presented.According to the trends in quantum systems control development,the paper predicts the future trends of its development and applications.A complete design procedure necessary for the quantum control system is presented.Finally,several vital problems hindering the advancement of quantum control are pointed out.

  13. Quantum Control of Molecular Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Written by two of the world's leading researchers in the field, this is a systematic introduction to the fundamental principles of coherent control, and to the underlying physics and chemistry.This fully updated second edition is enhanced by 80% and covers the latest techniques and applications, including nanostructures, attosecond processes, optical control of chirality, and weak and strong field quantum control. Developments and challenges in decoherence-sensitive condensed phase control as well as in bimolecular control are clearly described.Indispensable for atomic, molecular and chemical

  14. Optimal control of quantum measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, Daniel; Wilhelm, Frank [Theoretical Physics, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Pulses to steer the time evolution of quantum systems can be designed with optimal control theory. In most cases it is the coherent processes that can be controlled and one optimizes the time evolution towards a target unitary process, sometimes also in the presence of non-controllable incoherent processes. Here we show how to extend the GRAPE algorithm in the case where the incoherent processes are controllable and the target time evolution is a non-unitary quantum channel. We perform a gradient search on a fidelity measure based on Choi matrices. We illustrate our algorithm by optimizing a measurement pulse for superconducting phase qubits. We show how this technique can lead to large measurement contrast close to 99%. We also show, within the validity of our model, that this algorithm can produce short 1.4 ns pulses with 98.2% contrast.

  15. Automated Search for new Quantum Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Mario; Malik, Mehul; Fickler, Robert; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-03-01

    Quantum mechanics predicts a number of, at first sight, counterintuitive phenomena. It therefore remains a question whether our intuition is the best way to find new experiments. Here, we report the development of the computer algorithm Melvin which is able to find new experimental implementations for the creation and manipulation of complex quantum states. Indeed, the discovered experiments extensively use unfamiliar and asymmetric techniques which are challenging to understand intuitively. The results range from the first implementation of a high-dimensional Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state, to a vast variety of experiments for asymmetrically entangled quantum states—a feature that can only exist when both the number of involved parties and dimensions is larger than 2. Additionally, new types of high-dimensional transformations are found that perform cyclic operations. Melvin autonomously learns from solutions for simpler systems, which significantly speeds up the discovery rate of more complex experiments. The ability to automate the design of a quantum experiment can be applied to many quantum systems and allows the physical realization of quantum states previously thought of only on paper.

  16. Automated Search for new Quantum Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Mario; Malik, Mehul; Fickler, Robert; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-03-04

    Quantum mechanics predicts a number of, at first sight, counterintuitive phenomena. It therefore remains a question whether our intuition is the best way to find new experiments. Here, we report the development of the computer algorithm Melvin which is able to find new experimental implementations for the creation and manipulation of complex quantum states. Indeed, the discovered experiments extensively use unfamiliar and asymmetric techniques which are challenging to understand intuitively. The results range from the first implementation of a high-dimensional Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state, to a vast variety of experiments for asymmetrically entangled quantum states-a feature that can only exist when both the number of involved parties and dimensions is larger than 2. Additionally, new types of high-dimensional transformations are found that perform cyclic operations. Melvin autonomously learns from solutions for simpler systems, which significantly speeds up the discovery rate of more complex experiments. The ability to automate the design of a quantum experiment can be applied to many quantum systems and allows the physical realization of quantum states previously thought of only on paper.

  17. Lessons from the quantum control landscape: Robust optimal control of quantum systems and optimal control of nonlinear Schrodinger equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocker, David Lance

    The control of quantum systems occurs across a broad range of length and energy scales in modern science, and efforts have demonstrated that locating suitable controls to perform a range of objectives has been widely successful. The justification for this success arises from a favorable topology of a quantum control landscape, defined as a mapping of the controls to a cost function measuring the success of the operation. This is summarized in the landscape principle that no suboptimal extrema exist on the landscape for well-suited control problems, explaining a trend of successful optimizations in both theory and experiment. This dissertation explores what additional lessons may be gleaned from the quantum control landscape through numerical and theoretical studies. The first topic examines the experimentally relevant problem of assessing and reducing disturbances due to noise. The local curvature of the landscape is found to play an important role on noise effects in the control of targeted quantum unitary operations, and provides a conceptual framework for assessing robustness to noise. Software for assessing noise effects in quantum computing architectures was also developed and applied to survey the performance of current quantum control techniques for quantum computing. A lack of competition between robustness and perfect unitary control operation was discovered to fundamentally limit noise effects, and highlights a renewed focus upon system engineering for reducing noise. This convergent behavior generally arises for any secondary objective in the situation of high primary objective fidelity. The other dissertation topic examines the utility of quantum control for a class of nonlinear Hamiltonians not previously considered under the landscape principle. Nonlinear Schrodinger equations are commonly used to model the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), one of the largest known quantum objects. Optimizations of BEC dynamics were performed in which the

  18. Exploring constrained quantum control landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Katharine W.; Rabitz, Herschel

    2012-10-01

    The broad success of optimally controlling quantum systems with external fields has been attributed to the favorable topology of the underlying control landscape, where the landscape is the physical observable as a function of the controls. The control landscape can be shown to contain no suboptimal trapping extrema upon satisfaction of reasonable physical assumptions, but this topological analysis does not hold when significant constraints are placed on the control resources. This work employs simulations to explore the topology and features of the control landscape for pure-state population transfer with a constrained class of control fields. The fields are parameterized in terms of a set of uniformly spaced spectral frequencies, with the associated phases acting as the controls. This restricted family of fields provides a simple illustration for assessing the impact of constraints upon seeking optimal control. Optimization results reveal that the minimum number of phase controls necessary to assure a high yield in the target state has a special dependence on the number of accessible energy levels in the quantum system, revealed from an analysis of the first- and second-order variation of the yield with respect to the controls. When an insufficient number of controls and/or a weak control fluence are employed, trapping extrema and saddle points are observed on the landscape. When the control resources are sufficiently flexible, solutions producing the globally maximal yield are found to form connected "level sets" of continuously variable control fields that preserve the yield. These optimal yield level sets are found to shrink to isolated points on the top of the landscape as the control field fluence is decreased, and further reduction of the fluence turns these points into suboptimal trapping extrema on the landscape. Although constrained control fields can come in many forms beyond the cases explored here, the behavior found in this paper is illustrative of

  19. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Frank, S.; Bonneau, M.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Hild, S.; Gross, C.; Cheneau, M.; Bloch, I.; Pichler, T.; Negretti, A.; Calarco, T.; Montangero, S.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit – the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations.

  20. Automated Search for new Quantum Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Zeilinger, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics predicts a number of at first sight counterintuitive phenomena. It is therefore a question whether our intuition is the best way to find new experiments. Here we report the development of the computer algorithm Melvin which is able to find new experimental implementations for the creation and manipulation of complex quantum states. And indeed, the discovered experiments extensively use unfamiliar and asymmetric techniques which are challenging to understand intuitively. The results range from the first implementation of a high-dimensional Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state, to a vast variety of experiments for asymmetrically entangled quantum states - a feature that can only exist when both the number of involved parties and dimensions is larger than 2. Additionally, new types of high-dimensional transformations are found that perform cyclic operations. Melvin autonomously learns from solutions for simpler systems, which significantly speeds up the discovery rate of more complex experim...

  1. On the quantum information processing in nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computing experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, E.R. de; Bonk, F.A.; Vidoto, E.L.G.; Bonagamba, T.J. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Sarthour, R.S.; Guimaraes, A.P.; Oliveira, I.S. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freitas, J.C.C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2003-07-01

    Full text: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance appeared in the late nineties to be the most promising candidate to run quantum computing algorithms. An impressive number of experiments demonstrating the implementation of all logic gates and quantum algorithms in systems with a small number of qubits stimulated the general excitement about the technique, and greatly promoted the field. Particularly important were those experiments where entanglement of particles were aimed at. Entanglement is the most fundamental (and weird !) aspect of quantum systems, and is at the basis of quantum teleportation and quantum cryptography, yet impossible to prove in NMR experiments. The hardcore of NMR quantum computing are the so-called pseudo-pure states, upon which radiofrequency (RF) pulses act to implement quantum mechanical unitary transformations, promoting changes in both, Zeeman level populations and coherences in the density matrix. Whereas pseudo-pure states are special non-equilibrium diagonal states, coherences encode information about superposition states. Now, one could safely say that the whole business of quantum computing goes about controlling relative ket phases. In spite of the impossibility to univocally associating a given quantum state to a NMR spectrum, it is possible to demonstrate the phase action of RF pulses over relative ket phases, even if no population changes take place. In this talk these issues will be addressed, and we will show experimental results of our own where this is done in the two-qubit quadrupole nuclei {sup 23}Na in C{sub 10}H{sub 21}NaO{sub 4}S liquid crystal. We demonstrate the reversibility of the Hadamard gate, and of a quantum circuit which generates pseudo-Bell states. The success of the operation reaches almost 100% in the case of the state |01+|10, 80% in the cases of |00> + |01> and |10> + |11>, and 65% for the cat-state |00> + |11>. (author)

  2. Optimal control and quantum simulations in superconducting quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, Daniel J.

    2014-10-31

    Quantum optimal control theory is the science of steering quantum systems. In this thesis we show how to overcome the obstacles in implementing optimal control for superconducting quantum bits, a promising candidate for the creation of a quantum computer. Building such a device will require the tools of optimal control. We develop pulse shapes to solve a frequency crowding problem and create controlled-Z gates. A methodology is developed for the optimisation towards a target non-unitary process. We show how to tune-up control pulses for a generic quantum system in an automated way using a combination of open- and closed-loop optimal control. This will help scaling of quantum technologies since algorithms can calibrate control pulses far more efficiently than humans. Additionally we show how circuit QED can be brought to the novel regime of multi-mode ultrastrong coupling using a left-handed transmission line coupled to a right-handed one. We then propose to use this system as an analogue quantum simulator for the Spin-Boson model to show how dissipation arises in quantum systems.

  3. A LONE code for the sparse control of quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaramella, G.; Borzì, A.

    2016-03-01

    In many applications with quantum spin systems, control functions with a sparse and pulse-shaped structure are often required. These controls can be obtained by solving quantum optimal control problems with L1-penalized cost functionals. In this paper, the MATLAB package LONE is presented aimed to solving L1-penalized optimal control problems governed by unitary-operator quantum spin models. This package implements a new strategy that includes a globalized semi-smooth Krylov-Newton scheme and a continuation procedure. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate the ability of the LONE code in computing accurate sparse optimal control solutions.

  4. Theory of controlled quantum dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo collegato di Salerno, Baronissi (Italy)

    1997-06-07

    We introduce a general formalism to obtain localized quantum wavepackets as dynamically controlled systems, in the framework of Nelson stochastic quantization. We show that in general the control is linear, and it amounts to introducing additional time-dependent terms in the potential. In this way one can construct for general systems either coherent packets following classical motion with constant dispersion, or coherent packets following classical motion whose time-dependent dispersion remains bounded for all times. We show that in the operatorial language our scheme amounts to introducing a suitable generalization to arbitrary potentials of the displacement and scaling operators that generate the coherent and squeezed states of the harmonic oscillator. (author)

  5. Theory of controlled quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    De Martino, S; Illuminati, F; Martino, Salvatore De; Siena, Silvio De; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    1997-01-01

    We introduce a general formalism, based on the stochastic formulation of quantum mechanics, to obtain localized quasi-classical wave packets as dynamically controlled systems, for arbitrary anharmonic potentials. The control is in general linear, and it amounts to introduce additional quadratic and linear time-dependent terms to the given potential. In this way one can construct for general systems either coherent packets moving with constant dispersion, or dynamically squeezed packets whose spreading remains bounded for all times. In the standard operatorial framework our scheme corresponds to a suitable generalization of the displacement and scaling operators that generate the coherent and squeezed states of the harmonic oscillator.

  6. Crucial Experiments in Quantum Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigg, George L.

    The six experiments included in this monography are titled Blackbody Radiation, Collision of Electrons with Atoms, The Photoelectric Effect, Magnetic Properties of Atoms, The Scattering of X-Rays, and Diffraction of Electrons by a Crystal Lattice. The discussion provides historical background by giving description of the original experiments and…

  7. Heuristic explanation of quantum interference experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Guowen, W

    2005-01-01

    A particle is described as a non-spreading wave packet satisfying a linear equation within the framework of special relativity. Young's and other interference experiments are explained with a hypothesis that there is a coupling interaction between the peaked and non-peaked pieces of the wave packet. This explanation of the interference experiments provides a realistic interpretation of quantum mechanics. The interpretation implies that there is physical reality of particles and no wave function collapse. It also implies that neither classical mechanics nor current quantum mechanics is a complete theory for describing physical reality and the Bell inequalities are not the proper touchstones for reality and locality. The problems of the boundary between the macro-world and micro-world and the de-coherence in the transition region (meso-world) between the two are discussed. The present interpretation of quantum mechanics is consistent with the physical aspects of the Copenhagen interpretation, such as, the super...

  8. Towards Quantum Cybernetics:. Optimal Feedback Control in Quantum Bio Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belavkin, V. P.

    2009-02-01

    A brief account of the quantum information dynamics and dynamical programming methods for the purpose of optimal control in quantum cybernetics with convex constraints and cońcave cost and bequest functions of the quantum state is given. Consideration is given to both open loop and feedback control schemes corresponding respectively to deterministic and stochastic semi-Markov dynamics of stable or unstable systems. For the quantum feedback control scheme with continuous observations we exploit the separation theorem of filtering and control aspects for quantum stochastic micro-dynamics of the total system. This allows to start with the Belavkin quantum filtering equation and derive the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation using standard arguments of classical control theory. This is equivalent to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an extra linear dissipative term if the control is restricted to only Hamiltonian terms in the filtering equation. A controlled qubit is considered as an example throughout the development of the formalism. Finally, we discuss optimum observation strategies to obtain a pure quantum qubit state from a mixed one.

  9. Lyapunov control of quantum systems with impulsive control fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Sun, Jitao

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the Lyapunov control of finite-dimensional quantum systems with impulsive control fields, where the studied quantum systems are governed by the Schrödinger equation. By three different Lyapunov functions and the invariant principle of impulsive systems, we study the convergence of quantum systems with impulsive control fields and propose new results for the mentioned quantum systems in the form of sufficient conditions. Two numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  10. Single Photon Experiments and Quantum Complementarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiev D. D.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Single photon experiments have been used as one of the most striking illustrations of the apparently nonclassical nature of the quantum world. In this review we examine the mathematical basis of the principle of complementarity and explain why the Englert-Greenberger duality relation is not violated in the configurations of Unruh and of Afshar.

  11. Feedback control of superconducting quantum circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ristè, D.

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting circuits have recently risen to the forefront of the solid-state prototypes for quantum computing. Reaching the stage of robust quantum computing requires closing the loop between measurement and control of quantum bits (qubits). This thesis presents the realization of feedback contr

  12. Quantum Thought Experiments Can Define Nature

    CERN Document Server

    McCartor, D

    2004-01-01

    One would not think that thought experiments could matter to nature, for they are a humble human device. Yet quantum mechanics very naturally frames thought experiments (as distinct from precisely defining what exists). They exemplify the informing powers of radiation. Though based on wave functions that have time symmetry, these tableaux inevitably tell of irreversible behavior by nature. The paper sketches how John von Neumann's measurement theory fits into this and retells N. David Mermin's baseball story.

  13. The Quantum Gunslinger: A Gedanken Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Presented is the Quantum Gunslinger, a gedanken experiment that explores, in a purely classical setting, the assumptions and conclusions of John Bell's seminal paper ``On the Einstein Podolsky Rosen Paradox.'' The Quantum Gunslinger can be easily implemented as a carnival game. If a player's score violates a CHSH inequality, then the player wins a beable. If the player's score violates a Leggett Inequality, then the player wins a large ball wound from surplus string. Find out why the game operator will either quickly go out of business for giving away prizes too easily, or be forced out of business on charges of fraud.

  14. Information, disturbance and Hamiltonian quantum feedback control

    CERN Document Server

    Doherty, A C; Jungman, G; Doherty, Andrew C.; Jacobs, Kurt; Jungman, Gerard

    2001-01-01

    We consider separating the problem of designing Hamiltonian quantum feedback control algorithms into a measurement (estimation) strategy and a feedback (control) strategy, and consider optimizing desirable properties of each under the minimal constraint that the available strength of both is limited. This motivates concepts of information extraction and disturbance which are distinct from those usually considered in quantum information theory. Using these concepts we identify an information trade-off in quantum feedback control.

  15. Controlled quantum state transfer via parity measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this work,a scheme for controlled quantum state transfer is proposed using parity measurement in a cavity-waveguide system.As two special cases,two schemes of controlled quantum state transfer for one qubit and two qubits are investigated in detail.An important advantage is that controlled quantum state transfer can be completed by single-qubit rotations and the measurement of parity.Therefore,the present scheme might be realized in the scope of current experimental technology.

  16. Controlled quantum state transfer via parity measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Quan; LI JiuHui

    2009-01-01

    In this work, a scheme for controlled quantum state transfer is proposed using parity measurement in a cavity-waveguide system. As two special cases, two schemes of controlled quantum state transfer for one qubit and two qubits are investigated in detail. An important advantage is that controlled quantum state transfer can be completed by single-qubit rotations and the measurement of parity. Therefore, the present scheme might be realized in the scope of current experimental technology.

  17. Controlling the quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relation by quantum-jump-based feedback control in dissipative environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Fang, Mao-Fa

    2017-09-01

    The dynamic properties of the quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relation for a system comprised of a qubit to be measured and a memory qubit are investigated. We explore the behaviors of the entropic uncertainty and its lower bound in three different cases: Only one of the two qubits interacts with an external environment and subjects to quantum-jump-based feedback control, or both of the two qubits independently experience their own environments and local quantum-jump-based feedback control. Our results reveal that the quantum-jump-based feedback control with an appropriate feedback parameter can reduce the entropic uncertainty and its lower bound, and for the three different scenarios, the reduction in the uncertainty relates to different physical quantities. Besides, we find out that the quantum-jump-based feedback control not only can remarkably decrease the entropic uncertainty, but also can make the uncertainty reach its lower bound where the dynamical map becomes unital.

  18. Nonclassical Paths in Quantum Interference Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Rahul; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Aninda; Sinha, Supurna; Sinha, Urbasi

    2014-09-01

    In a double slit interference experiment, the wave function at the screen with both slits open is not exactly equal to the sum of the wave functions with the slits individually open one at a time. The three scenarios represent three different boundary conditions and as such, the superposition principle should not be applicable. However, most well-known text books in quantum mechanics implicitly and/or explicitly use this assumption that is only approximately true. In our present study, we have used the Feynman path integral formalism to quantify contributions from nonclassical paths in quantum interference experiments that provide a measurable deviation from a naive application of the superposition principle. A direct experimental demonstration for the existence of these nonclassical paths is difficult to present. We find that contributions from such paths can be significant and we propose simple three-slit interference experiments to directly confirm their existence.

  19. Quantum Dots: An Experiment for Physical or Materials Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, L. D.; Arceo, J. F.; Hughes, W. C.; DeGraff, B. A.; Augustine, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for obtaining quantum dots for physical or materials chemistry. This experiment serves to both reinforce the basic concept of quantum confinement and providing a useful bridge between the molecular and solid-state world.

  20. Certifying the quantumness of a generalized coherent control scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholak, Torsten; Brumer, Paul

    2014-11-28

    We consider the role of quantum mechanics in a specific coherent control scenario, designing a "coherent control interferometer" as the essential tool that links coherent control to quantum fundamentals. Building upon this allows us to rigorously display the genuinely quantum nature of a generalized weak-field coherent control scenario (utilizing 1 vs. 2 photon excitation) via a Bell-CHSH test. Specifically, we propose an implementation of "quantum delayed-choice" in a bichromatic alkali atom photoionization experiment. The experimenter can choose between two complementary situations, which are characterized by a random photoelectron spin polarization with particle-like behavior on the one hand, and by spin controllability and wave-like nature on the other. Because these two choices are conditioned coherently on states of the driving fields, it becomes physically unknowable, prior to measurement, whether there is control over the spin or not.

  1. Decoherence, Control, and Symmetry in Quantum Computers

    CERN Document Server

    Bacon, D J

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we describe methods for avoiding the detrimental effects of decoherence while at the same time still allowing for computation of the quantum information. The philosophy of the method discussed in the first part of this thesis is to use a symmetry of the decoherence mechanism to find robust encodings of the quantum information. Stability, control, and methods for using decoherence-free information in a quantum computer are presented with a specific emphasis on decoherence due to a collective coupling between the system and its environment. Universal quantum computation on such collective decoherence decoherence-free encodings is demonstrated. Rigorous definitions of control and the use of encoded universality in quantum computers are addressed. Explicit gate constructions for encoded universality on ion trap and exchange based quantum computers are given. In the second part of the thesis we examine physical systems with error correcting properties. We examine systems that can store quantum infor...

  2. Optimal Control of Finite Dimensional Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mendonca, Paulo E M F

    2009-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of developing a quantum counter-part of the well established classical theory of control. We dwell on the fundamental fact that quantum states are generally not perfectly distinguishable, and quantum measurements typically introduce noise in the system being measured. Because of these, it is generally not clear whether the central concept of the classical control theory -- that of observing the system and then applying feedback -- is always useful in the quantum setting. We center our investigations around the problem of transforming the state of a quantum system into a given target state, when the system can be prepared in different ways, and the target state depends on the choice of preparation. We call this the "quantum tracking problem" and show how it can be formulated as an optimization problem that can be approached both numerically and analytically. This problem provides a simple route to the characterization of the quantum trade-off between information gain and distu...

  3. Quantum speed problem: Theoretical hints for control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisboa, Alexandre Coutinho; Piqueira, José Roberto Castilho

    2016-06-01

    The transition time between states plays an important role in designing quantum devices as they are very sensitive to environmental influences. Decoherence phenomenon is responsible for possible destructions of the entanglement that is a fundamental requirement to implement quantum information processing systems. If the time between states is minimized, the decoherence effects can be reduced, thus, it is advantageous to the designer to develop expressions for time performance measures. Quantum speed limit (QSL) problem has been studied from the theoretical point of view, providing general results. Considering the implementation of quantum control systems, as the decoherence phenomenon is unavoidable, it is important to apply these general results to particular cases, developing expressions and performance measures, to assist control engineering designers. Here, a minimum time performance measure is defined for quantum control problems, for time-independent or time-dependent Hamiltonians, and applied to some practical examples, providing hints that may be useful for researchers pursuing optimization strategies for quantum control systems.

  4. Interactive Quantum Mechanics Quantum Experiments on the Computer

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, S; Dahmen, H.D

    2011-01-01

    Extra Materials available on extras.springer.com INTERACTIVE QUANTUM MECHANICS allows students to perform their own quantum-physics experiments on their computer, in vivid 3D color graphics. Topics covered include: •        harmonic waves and wave packets, •        free particles as well as bound states and scattering in various potentials in one and three dimensions (both stationary and time dependent), •        two-particle systems, coupled harmonic oscillators, •        distinguishable and indistinguishable particles, •        coherent and squeezed states in time-dependent motion, •        quantized angular momentum, •        spin and magnetic resonance, •        hybridization. For the present edition the physics scope has been widened appreciably. Moreover, INTERQUANTA can now produce user-defined movies of quantum-mechanical situations. Movies can be viewed directly and also be saved to be shown later in any browser. Sections on spec...

  5. Quantum control using genetic algorithms in quantum communication: superdense coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Serna, Francisco; Rojas, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    We present a physical example model of how Quantum Control with genetic algorithms is applied to implement the quantum superdense code protocol. We studied a model consisting of two quantum dots with an electron with spin, including spin-orbit interaction. The electron and the spin get hybridized with the site acquiring two degrees of freedom, spin and charge. The system has tunneling and site energies as time dependent control parameters that are optimized by means of genetic algorithms to prepare a hybrid Bell-like state used as a transmission channel. This state is transformed to obtain any state of the four Bell basis as required by superdense protocol to transmit two bits of classical information. The control process protocol is equivalent to implement one of the quantum gates in the charge subsystem. Fidelities larger than 99.5% are achieved for the hybrid entangled state preparation and the superdense operations.

  6. Characterization and quantification of the role of coherence in ultrafast quantum biological experiments using quantum master equations, atomistic simulations, and quantum process tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Rebentrost, Patrick; Yuen-Zhou, Joel; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2010-01-01

    Long-lived electronic coherences in various photosynthetic complexes at cryogenic and room temperature have generated vigorous efforts both in theory and experiment to understand their origins and explore their potential role to biological function. The ultrafast signals resulting from the experiments that show evidence for these coherences result from many contributions to the molecular polarization. Quantum process tomography (QPT) was conceived in the context of quantum information processing to characterize and understand general quantum evolution of controllable quantum systems, for example while carrying out quantum computational tasks. We introduce our QPT method for ultrafast experiments, and as an illustrative example, apply it to a simulation of a two-chromophore subsystem of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson photosynthetic complex, which was recently shown to have long-lived quantum coherences. Our Fenna-Matthews-Olson model is constructed using an atomistic approach to extract relevant parameters for the s...

  7. Two-object remote quantum control

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yafei; Liu, Tangkun; Huang, Yanxia; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2002-01-01

    We consider the two-object remote quantum control for a special case in which all the object qubits are in a telecloning state. We propose a scheme which achieves the two-object remote quantum control by using two particular four-particle entangled states.

  8. Single-photon experiments with liquid crystals for quantum science and quantum engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukishova, Svetlana G.; Liapis, Andreas C.; Bissell, Luke J.; Gehring, George M.; Winkler, Justin M.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2015-03-01

    We present here our results on using liquid crystals in experiments with nonclassical light sources: (1) single-photon sources exhibiting antibunching (separation of all photons in time), which are key components for secure quantum communication systems, and (2) entangled photon source with photons exhibiting quantum interference in a Hong-Ou- Mandel interferometer. In the first part, cholesteric liquid crystal hosts were used to create definite circular polarization of antibunched photons emitted by nanocrystal quantum dots. If the photon has unknown polarization, filtering it through a polarizer to produce the desired polarization for quantum key distribution with bits based on polarization states of photons will reduce by half the efficiency of a quantum cryptography system. In the first part, we also provide our results on observation of a circular polarized microcavity resonance in nanocrystal quantum dot fluorescence in a 1-D chiral photonic bandgap cholesteric liquid crystal microcavity. In the second part of this paper with indistinguishable, time-entangled photons, we demonstrate our experimental results on simulating quantum-mechanical barrier tunnelling phenomena. A Hong-Ou-Mandel dip (quantum interference effect) is shifted when a phase change was introduced on the way of one of entangled photons in pair (one arm of the interferometer) by inserting in this arm an electrically controlled planar-aligned nematic liquid crystal layer between two prisms in the conditions close to a frustrated total internal reflection. By applying different AC-voltages to the planar-aligned nematic layer and changing its refractive index, we can obtain various conditions for incident photon propagation - from total reflection to total transmission. Measuring changes of tunnelling times of photon through this structure with femtosecond resolution permitted us to answer some unresolved questions in quantum-mechanical barrier tunnelling phenomena.

  9. Evolutionary algorithms for hard quantum control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedinejad, Ehsan; Schirmer, Sophie; Sanders, Barry C.

    2014-09-01

    Although quantum control typically relies on greedy (local) optimization, traps (irregular critical points) in the control landscape can make optimization hard by foiling local search strategies. We demonstrate the failure of greedy algorithms as well as the (nongreedy) genetic-algorithm method to realize two fast quantum computing gates: a qutrit phase gate and a controlled-not gate. We show that our evolutionary algorithm circumvents the trap to deliver effective quantum control in both instances. Even when greedy algorithms succeed, our evolutionary algorithm can deliver a superior control procedure, for example, reducing the need for high time resolution.

  10. A survey of quantum Lyapunov control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Shuang; Meng, Fangfang

    2013-01-01

    The condition of a quantum Lyapunov-based control which can be well used in a closed quantum system is that the method can make the system convergent but not just stable. In the convergence study of the quantum Lyapunov control, two situations are classified: nondegenerate cases and degenerate cases. For these two situations, respectively, in this paper the target state is divided into four categories: the eigenstate, the mixed state which commutes with the internal Hamiltonian, the superposition state, and the mixed state which does not commute with the internal Hamiltonian. For these four categories, the quantum Lyapunov control methods for the closed quantum systems are summarized and analyzed. Particularly, the convergence of the control system to the different target states is reviewed, and how to make the convergence conditions be satisfied is summarized and analyzed.

  11. Photodissociation of ultracold diatomic strontium molecules with quantum state control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, M; McGuyer, B H; Apfelbeck, F; Lee, C-H; Majewska, I; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2016-07-07

    Chemical reactions at ultracold temperatures are expected to be dominated by quantum mechanical effects. Although progress towards ultracold chemistry has been made through atomic photoassociation, Feshbach resonances and bimolecular collisions, these approaches have been limited by imperfect quantum state selectivity. In particular, attaining complete control of the ground or excited continuum quantum states has remained a challenge. Here we achieve this control using photodissociation, an approach that encodes a wealth of information in the angular distribution of outgoing fragments. By photodissociating ultracold (88)Sr2 molecules with full control of the low-energy continuum, we access the quantum regime of ultracold chemistry, observing resonant and nonresonant barrier tunnelling, matter-wave interference of reaction products and forbidden reaction pathways. Our results illustrate the failure of the traditional quasiclassical model of photodissociation and instead are accurately described by a quantum mechanical model. The experimental ability to produce well-defined quantum continuum states at low energies will enable high-precision studies of long-range molecular potentials for which accurate quantum chemistry models are unavailable, and may serve as a source of entangled states and coherent matter waves for a wide range of experiments in quantum optics.

  12. Photodissociation of ultracold diatomic strontium molecules with quantum state control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, M.; McGuyer, B. H.; Apfelbeck, F.; Lee, C.-H.; Majewska, I.; Moszynski, R.; Zelevinsky, T.

    2016-07-01

    Chemical reactions at ultracold temperatures are expected to be dominated by quantum mechanical effects. Although progress towards ultracold chemistry has been made through atomic photoassociation, Feshbach resonances and bimolecular collisions, these approaches have been limited by imperfect quantum state selectivity. In particular, attaining complete control of the ground or excited continuum quantum states has remained a challenge. Here we achieve this control using photodissociation, an approach that encodes a wealth of information in the angular distribution of outgoing fragments. By photodissociating ultracold 88Sr2 molecules with full control of the low-energy continuum, we access the quantum regime of ultracold chemistry, observing resonant and nonresonant barrier tunnelling, matter-wave interference of reaction products and forbidden reaction pathways. Our results illustrate the failure of the traditional quasiclassical model of photodissociation and instead are accurately described by a quantum mechanical model. The experimental ability to produce well-defined quantum continuum states at low energies will enable high-precision studies of long-range molecular potentials for which accurate quantum chemistry models are unavailable, and may serve as a source of entangled states and coherent matter waves for a wide range of experiments in quantum optics.

  13. Entanglement-assisted quantum feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Mikami, Tomoaki

    2017-07-01

    The main advantage of quantum metrology relies on the effective use of entanglement, which indeed allows us to achieve strictly better estimation performance over the standard quantum limit. In this paper, we propose an analogous method utilizing entanglement for the purpose of feedback control. The system considered is a general linear dynamical quantum system, where the control goal can be systematically formulated as a linear quadratic Gaussian control problem based on the quantum Kalman filtering method; in this setting, an entangled input probe field is effectively used to reduce the estimation error and accordingly the control cost function. In particular, we show that, in the problem of cooling an opto-mechanical oscillator, the entanglement-assisted feedback control can lower the stationary occupation number of the oscillator below the limit attainable by the controller with a coherent probe field and furthermore beats the controller with an optimized squeezed probe field.

  14. Controlling a quantum gas of polar molecules in an optical lattice

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The production of molecules from dual species atomic quantum gases has enabled experiments that employ molecules at nanoKelvin temperatures. As a result, every degree of freedom of these molecules is in a well-defined quantum state and exquisitely controlled. These ultracold molecules open a new world of precision quantum chemistry in which quantum statistics, quantum partial waves, and even many-body correlations can play important roles. Moreover, to investigate the strongly correlated phys...

  15. Controlled quantum teleportation and secure direct communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Ting; Yan Feng-Li; Wang Zhi-Xi

    2005-01-01

    We present a controlled quantum teleportation protocol. In the protocol, quantum information of an unknown state of a 2-level particle is faithfully transmitted from a sender Alice to a remote receiver Bob via an initially shared triplet of entangled particles under the control of the supervisor Charlie. The distributed entangled particles shared by Alice, Bob and Charlie function as a quantum information channel for faithful transmission. We also propose a controlled and secure direct communication scheme by means of this teleportation. After ensuring the security of the quantum channel, Alice encodes the secret message directly on a sequence of particle states and transmits them to Bob supervised by Charlie using this controlled quantum teleportation. Bob can read out the encoded message directly by the measurement on his qubit. In this scheme, the controlled quantum teleportation transmits Alice's message without revealing any information to a potential eavesdropper. Because there is not a transmission of the qubit carrying the secret message between Alice and Bob in the public channel, it is completely secure for controlled and direct secret communication if perfect quantum channel is used. The special feature of this scheme is that the communication between two sides depends on the agreement of a third side to co-operate.

  16. Coherent control of quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Lodahl, Peter; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to the use of semiconductor quantum dotsystems as building blocks for solid-state-based quantum logic devices. One importantparameter for such devices is the coherence time, which determines the number ofpossible quantum operations. From earlier...... measurements the coherence time of the selfassembledquantum dots (QDs) has been reported to be limited by the spontaneousemission rate at cryogenic temperatures1.In this project we propose to alter the coherence time of QDs by taking advantage of arecent technique on modifying spontaneous emission rates...

  17. Coherent control of quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Lodahl, Peter; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to the use of semiconductor quantum dotsystems as building blocks for solid-state-based quantum logic devices. One importantparameter for such devices is the coherence time, which determines the number ofpossible quantum operations. From earlier...... measurements the coherence time of the selfassembledquantum dots (QDs) has been reported to be limited by the spontaneousemission rate at cryogenic temperatures1.In this project we propose to alter the coherence time of QDs by taking advantage of arecent technique on modifying spontaneous emission rates...

  18. Quantum control, quantum information processing, and quantum-limited metrology with trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Wineland, D J; Barrett, M D; Ben-Kish, A; Bergquist, J C; Blakestad, R B; Bollinger, J J; Britton, J L; Chiaverini, J; De Marco, B L; Hume, D; Itano, W M; Jensen, M; Jost, J D; Knill, E; Koelemeij, J C J; Langer, C; Oskay, W; Ozeri, R; Reichle, R; Rosenband, T; Schätz, T; Schmidt, P O; Seidelin, S

    2005-01-01

    We briefly discuss recent experiments on quantum information processing using trapped ions at NIST. A central theme of this work has been to increase our capabilities in terms of quantum computing protocols, but we have also applied the same concepts to improved metrology, particularly in the area of frequency standards and atomic clocks. Such work may eventually shed light on more fundamental issues, such as the quantum measurement problem.

  19. Quantum Internal Model Principle: Decoherence Control

    CERN Document Server

    Ganesan, Narayan; 10.1109/CDC.2007.4434706

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we study the problem of Decoherence Control for quantum systems by employing a novel construction termed "the bait" and with techniques from geometric control theory, in order to successfully and completely decouple an open quantum system from its environment. We re-formulate the problem of Decoherence Control as a disturbance rejection scheme which also leads us to the idea of Internal Model Principle for quantum control systems which is first of its kind in the literature. Classical internal model principle provides the guidelines for designing linear controllers for perfect tracking in the presence of external disturbances, with the help of the internal model of the disturbance generator. The theory of Disturbance Decoupling of the output from external noises is another problem that is well studied for classical systems. The two problems focus on different aspects viz. perfect output tracking and complete decoupling of output in the presence of the noise respectively. However for quantum s...

  20. A noise immunity controlled quantum teleportation protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-fen; Wang, Rui-jin; Zhang, Feng-li; Baagyere, Edward; Qin, Zhen; Xiong, Hu; Zhan, Huayi

    2016-08-01

    With the advent of the Internet and information and communication technology, quantum teleportation has become an important field in information security and its application areas. This is because quantum teleportation has the ability to attain a timely secret information delivery and offers unconditional security. And as such, the field of quantum teleportation has become a hot research topic in recent years. However, noise has serious effect on the safety of quantum teleportation within the aspects of information fidelity, channel capacity and information transfer. Therefore, the main purpose of this paper is to address these problems of quantum teleportation. Firstly, in order to resist collective noise, we construct a decoherence-free subspace under different noise scenarios to establish a two-dimensional fidelity quantum teleportation models. And also create quantum teleportation of multiple degree of freedom, and these models ensure the accuracy and availability of the exchange of information and in multiple degree of freedom. Secondly, for easy preparation, measurement and implementation, we use super dense coding features to build an entangled quantum secret exchange channel. To improve the channel utilization and capacity, an efficient super dense coding method based on ultra-entanglement exchange is used. Thirdly, continuous variables of the controlled quantum key distribution were designed for quantum teleportation; in addition, we perform Bell-basis measurement under the collective noise and also prepare the storage technology of quantum states to achieve one-bit key by three-photon encoding to improve its security and efficiency. We use these two methods because they conceal information, resist a third party attack and can detect eavesdropping. Our proposed methods, according to the security analysis, are able to solve the problems associated with the quantum teleportation under various noise environments.

  1. A noise immunity controlled quantum teleportation protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-fen; Wang, Rui-jin; Zhang, Feng-li; Baagyere, Edward; Qin, Zhen; Xiong, Hu; Zhan, Huayi

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of the Internet and information and communication technology, quantum teleportation has become an important field in information security and its application areas. This is because quantum teleportation has the ability to attain a timely secret information delivery and offers unconditional security. And as such, the field of quantum teleportation has become a hot research topic in recent years. However, noise has serious effect on the safety of quantum teleportation within the aspects of information fidelity, channel capacity and information transfer. Therefore, the main purpose of this paper is to address these problems of quantum teleportation. Firstly, in order to resist collective noise, we construct a decoherence-free subspace under different noise scenarios to establish a two-dimensional fidelity quantum teleportation models. And also create quantum teleportation of multiple degree of freedom, and these models ensure the accuracy and availability of the exchange of information and in multiple degree of freedom. Secondly, for easy preparation, measurement and implementation, we use super dense coding features to build an entangled quantum secret exchange channel. To improve the channel utilization and capacity, an efficient super dense coding method based on ultra-entanglement exchange is used. Thirdly, continuous variables of the controlled quantum key distribution were designed for quantum teleportation; in addition, we perform Bell-basis measurement under the collective noise and also prepare the storage technology of quantum states to achieve one-bit key by three-photon encoding to improve its security and efficiency. We use these two methods because they conceal information, resist a third party attack and can detect eavesdropping. Our proposed methods, according to the security analysis, are able to solve the problems associated with the quantum teleportation under various noise environments.

  2. Controlling the quantum world with light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this presentation the authors discuss the technological relevance of quantum mechanics, and describe how researchers use light to control the atomic and molecular world at its most fundamental level....

  3. Quantum remote control Teleportation of unitary operations

    CERN Document Server

    Huelga, S F; Chefles, A; Plenio, M B

    2001-01-01

    We consider the implementation of an unknown arbitrary unitary operation U upon a distant quantum system. This teleportation of U can be viewed as a quantum remote control. We investigate the protocols which achieve this using local operations, classical communication and shared entanglement (LOCCSE). Lower bounds on the necessary entanglement and classical communication are determined using causality and the linearity of quantum mechanics. We examine in particular detail the resources required if the remote control is to be implemented as a classical black box. Under these circumstances, we prove that the required resources are, necessarily, those needed for implementation by bidirectional state teleportation.

  4. Phase-selective reversible quantum decoherence in cavity QED experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Filip, R

    2001-01-01

    New feasible cavity QED experiment is proposed to analyse reversible quantum decoherence in consequence of quantum complementarity and entanglement. Utilizing the phase selective manipulations with enviroment, it is demonstrated how the complementarity particularly induces a preservation of visibility, whereas quantum decoherence is more progressive due to pronounced entanglement between system and enviroment. This effect can be directly observed using the proposed cavity QED measurements.

  5. Experiments on two-resonator circuit quantum electrodynamics. A superconducting quantum switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Elisabeth Christiane Maria

    2013-05-29

    The field of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) studies the interaction between light and matter on a fundamental level. In typical experiments individual natural atoms are interacting with individual photons trapped in three-dimensional cavities. Within the last decade the prospering new field of circuit QED has been developed. Here, the natural atoms are replaced by artificial solid state quantum circuits offering large dipole moments which are coupled to quasi-onedimensional cavities providing a small mode volume and hence a large vacuum field strength. In our experiments Josephson junction based superconducting quantum bits are coupled to superconducting microwave resonators. In circuit QED the number of parameters that can be varied is increased and regimes that are not accessible using natural atoms can be entered and investigated. Apart from design flexibility and tunability of system parameters a particular advantage of circuit QED is the scalability to larger system size enabled by well developed micro- and nanofabrication tools. When scaling up the resonator-qubit systems beyond a few coupled circuits, the rapidly increasing number of interacting subsystems requires an active control and directed transmission of quantum signals. This can, for example, be achieved by implementing switchable coupling between two microwave resonators. To this end, a superconducting flux qubit is used to realize a suitable coupling between two microwave resonators, all working in the Gigahertz regime. The resulting device is called quantum switch. The flux qubit mediates a second order tunable and switchable coupling between the resonators. Depending on the qubit state, this coupling can compensate for the direct geometric coupling of the two resonators. As the qubit may also be in a quantum superposition state, the switch itself can be ''quantum'': it can be a superposition of ''on'' and ''off''. This work

  6. Tuning quantum measurements to control chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jessica K.; Hope, Joseph J.; Carvalho, André R. R.

    2017-01-01

    Environment-induced decoherence has long been recognised as being of crucial importance in the study of chaos in quantum systems. In particular, the exact form and strength of the system-environment interaction play a major role in the quantum-to-classical transition of chaotic systems. In this work we focus on the effect of varying monitoring strategies, i.e. for a given decoherence model and a fixed environmental coupling, there is still freedom on how to monitor a quantum system. We show here that there is a region between the deep quantum regime and the classical limit where the choice of the monitoring parameter allows one to control the complex behaviour of the system, leading to either the emergence or suppression of chaos. Our work shows that this is a result from the interplay between quantum interference effects induced by the nonlinear dynamics and the effectiveness of the decoherence for different measurement schemes. PMID:28317933

  7. Topology control based on quantum genetic algorithm in sensor networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Lijuan; GUO Jian; LU Kai; WANG Ruchuan

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays,two trends appear in the application of sensor networks in which both multi-service and quality of service (QoS)are supported.In terms of the goal of low energy consumption and high connectivity,the control on topology is crucial.The algorithm of topology control based on quantum genetic algorithm in sensor networks is proposed.An advantage of the quantum genetic algorithm over the conventional genetic algorithm is demonstrated in simulation experiments.The goals of high connectivity and low consumption of energy are reached.

  8. Delayed feedback control in quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emary, Clive

    2013-09-28

    Feedback control in quantum transport has been predicted to give rise to several interesting effects, among them quantum state stabilization and the realization of a mesoscopic Maxwell's daemon. These results were derived under the assumption that control operations on the system are affected instantaneously after the measurement of electronic jumps through it. In this contribution, I describe how to include a delay between detection and control operation in the master equation theory of feedback-controlled quantum transport. I investigate the consequences of delay for the state stabilization and Maxwell's daemon schemes. Furthermore, I describe how delay can be used as a tool to probe coherent oscillations of electrons within a transport system and how this formalism can be used to model finite detector bandwidth.

  9. Controlling charge quantization with quantum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezouin, S.; Iftikhar, Z.; Anthore, A.; Parmentier, F. D.; Gennser, U.; Cavanna, A.; Ouerghi, A.; Levkivskyi, I. P.; Idrisov, E.; Sukhorukov, E. V.; Glazman, L. I.; Pierre, F.

    2016-08-01

    In 1909, Millikan showed that the charge of electrically isolated systems is quantized in units of the elementary electron charge e. Today, the persistence of charge quantization in small, weakly connected conductors allows for circuits in which single electrons are manipulated, with applications in, for example, metrology, detectors and thermometry. However, as the connection strength is increased, the discreteness of charge is progressively reduced by quantum fluctuations. Here we report the full quantum control and characterization of charge quantization. By using semiconductor-based tunable elemental conduction channels to connect a micrometre-scale metallic island to a circuit, we explore the complete evolution of charge quantization while scanning the entire range of connection strengths, from a very weak (tunnel) to a perfect (ballistic) contact. We observe, when approaching the ballistic limit, that charge quantization is destroyed by quantum fluctuations, and scales as the square root of the residual probability for an electron to be reflected across the quantum channel; this scaling also applies beyond the different regimes of connection strength currently accessible to theory. At increased temperatures, the thermal fluctuations result in an exponential suppression of charge quantization and in a universal square-root scaling, valid for all connection strengths, in agreement with expectations. Besides being pertinent for the improvement of single-electron circuits and their applications, and for the metal-semiconductor hybrids relevant to topological quantum computing, knowledge of the quantum laws of electricity will be essential for the quantum engineering of future nanoelectronic devices.

  10. Controlling superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, S; Park, E; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Kim, J N; Shim, J-H; Thompson, J D; Park, Tuson

    2015-03-04

    The heavy fermion compound CeRhIn5 is a rare example where a quantum critical point, hidden by a dome of superconductivity, has been explicitly revealed and found to have a local nature. The lack of additional examples of local types of quantum critical points associated with superconductivity, however, has made it difficult to unravel the role of quantum fluctuations in forming Cooper pairs. Here, we show the precise control of superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points in CeRhIn5. Slight tin-substitution for indium in CeRhIn5 shifts its antiferromagnetic quantum critical point from 2.3 GPa to 1.3 GPa and induces a residual impurity scattering 300 times larger than that of pure CeRhIn5, which should be sufficient to preclude superconductivity. Nevertheless, superconductivity occurs at the quantum critical point of the tin-doped metal. These results underline that fluctuations from the antiferromagnetic quantum criticality promote unconventional superconductivity in CeRhIn5.

  11. A class of symmetric controlled quantum operations

    CERN Document Server

    Vaccaro, J A; Huelga, S F; Vaccaro, John A.

    2001-01-01

    Certain quantum gates, such as the controlled-NOT gate, are symmetric in terms of the operation of the control system upon the target system and vice versa. However, no operational criteria yet exist for establishing whether or not a given quantum gate is symmetrical in this sense. We consider a restricted, yet broad, class of two-party controlled gate operations for which the gate transforms a reference state of the target into one of an orthogonal set of states. We show that for this class of gates it is possible to establish a simple necessary and sufficient condition for the gate operation to be symmetric.

  12. A class of symmetric controlled quantum operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccaro, John A.; Steuernagel, O.; Huelga, S.F. [Division of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield (United Kingdom)

    2001-09-07

    Certain quantum gates, such as the controlled-NOT gate, are symmetric in terms of the operation of the control system upon the target system and vice versa. However, no operational criteria yet exist for establishing whether or not a given quantum gate is symmetrical in this sense. We consider a restricted, yet broad, class of two-party controlled gate operations for which the gate transforms a reference state of the target into one of an orthogonal set of states. We show that for this class of gates it is possible to establish a simple necessary and sufficient condition for the gate operation to be symmetric. (author)

  13. Secure quantum network coding for controlled repeater networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Tao; Li, Jiao; Liu, Jian-wei

    2016-07-01

    To realize efficient quantum communication based on quantum repeater, we propose a secure quantum network coding scheme for controlled repeater networks, which adds a controller as a trusted party and is able to control the process of EPR-pair distribution. As the key operations of quantum repeater, local operations and quantum communication are designed to adopt quantum one-time pad to enhance the function of identity authentication instead of local operations and classical communication. Scheme analysis shows that the proposed scheme can defend against active attacks for quantum communication and realize long-distance quantum communication with minimal resource consumption.

  14. An Atomic Abacus: Trapped ion quantum computing experiments at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Brian

    2003-03-01

    Trapped atomic ions are an ideal system for exploring quantum information science because deterministic state preparation and efficient state detection are possible and coherent manipulation of atomic systems is relatively advanced. In our experiment, a few singly charged Be ions are confined by static and radio-frequency electric fields in a micro-machined linear Paul trap. The internal and motional states of the ions are coherently manipulated using applied laser light. Our current work focuses on demonstrating the necessary ingredients to produce a scalable quantum computing scheme and on simplifying and improving quantum logic gates. I will speak about a new set of experiments that was made possible by recent improvements in trap technology. A novel trap with multiple trapping regions was used to demonstrate the first steps towards a fully scalable quantum computing scheme. Single ions were ``shuttled" between trapping regions without disturbing the ion's motional and internal state, and two ions were separated from a single to two different trapping zones. Improvements in the trap manufacturing process has led to a reduction of nearly two orders of magnitude in the ion's motional heating rate, making possible two new improved logic gates. The first gate utilizes the wave-packet nature of the ions to tune the laser-atom interaction and achieve a controlled-NOT gate between a single ion's spin and motional states. The second, a two-ion phase gate, uses phase-space dynamics to produce a state-sensitive geometric phase. I will end with a quick look at experiments using a Mg ion to sympathetically cool a simultaneously trapped Be ion and a glimpse of the next generation of ions traps currently under construction.

  15. Comparison of time optimal control for two level quantum systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Cong; Jie Wen; Xubo Zou

    2014-01-01

    The time optimal problem for a two level quantum sys-tem is studied. We compare two different control strategies of bang-bang control and the geometric control, respectively, es-pecial y in the case of minimizing the time of steering the state from North Pole to South Pole on the Bloch sphere with bounded control. The time performances are compared for different param-eters by the individual numerical simulation experiments, and the experimental results are analyzed. The results show that the ge-ometric control spends less time than the bang-bang control does.

  16. Ultra-precise holographic beam shaping for microscopic quantum control

    OpenAIRE

    Zupancic, Philip; Preiss, Philipp M.; Ma, Ruichao; Lukin, Alexander; Tai, M. Eric; Rispoli, Matthew; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution addressing of individual ultracold atoms, trapped ions or solid state emitters allows for exquisite control in quantum optics experiments. This becomes possible through large aperture magnifying optics that project microscopic light patterns with diffraction limited performance. We use programmable amplitude holograms generated on a digital micromirror device to create arbitrary microscopic beam shapes with full phase and amplitude control. The system self-corrects for aberrat...

  17. Controller-independent bidirectional quantum direct communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Amit Kumar; Balakrishnan, S.

    2017-06-01

    Recently, Chang et al. (Quantum Inf Process 14:3515-3522, 2015) proposed a controlled bidirectional quantum direct communication protocol using Bell states. In this work, the significance of Bell states, which are being used as initial states in Chang et al. protocol, is elucidated. The possibility of preparing initial state based on the secret message of the communicants is explored. In doing so, the controller-independent bidirectional quantum direct communication protocol has evolved naturally. It is shown that any communicant cannot read the secret message without knowing the initial states generated by the other communicant. Further, intercept-and-resend attack and information leakage can be avoided. The proposed protocol is like a conversion between two persons without the help of any third person with high-level security.

  18. Randomized control of open quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Viola, L

    2006-01-01

    The problem of open-loop dynamical control of generic open quantum systems is addressed. In particular, I focus on the task of effectively switching off environmental couplings responsible for unwanted decoherence and dissipation effects. After revisiting the standard framework for dynamical decoupling via deterministic controls, I describe a different approach whereby the controller intentionally acquires a random component. An explicit error bound on worst-case performance of stochastic decoupling is presented.

  19. Controllability of multi-partite quantum systems and selective excitation of quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirmer, S G [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Pullen, I C H [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computing, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Solomon, A I [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01

    We consider the degrees of controllability of multi-partite quantum systems, as well as necessary and sufficient criteria for each case. The results are applied to the problem of simultaneous control of an ensemble of quantum dots with a single laser pulse. Finally, we apply optimal control techniques to demonstrate selective excitation of individual dots for a simultaneously controllable ensemble of quantum dots.

  20. Precision Quantum Control and Error-Suppressing Quantum Firmware for Robust Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-24

    Dynamical decoupling sequence construction as a filter-design problem, Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, (08 2011... Hamiltonian quantum simulation with bounded-strength controls,”, New Journal of Physics, (04 2014): 0. doi: 3 Number of Papers published in peer...Programmable quantum simulation by dynamic Hamiltonian engineering,”, New Journal of Physics, (08 2014): 0. doi: K.Khodjasteh, J.Sastrawan, D

  1. Quantum Communication Experiments Over Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takesue, Hiroki

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) is expected to be the first application of quantum information to be realized as a practical system. In the last decade, research on QKD made significant progress both in concept and technology. In this chapter, we review the progress of technologies designed to realize high-speed and long-distance quantum communication over optical fiber, focusing on the results obtained by NTT. The first section describes a roadmap towards scalable quantum communications, which is composed of three phases. The second section reviews our effort to realize phase 1 quantum communication systems, namely point-to-point QKD systems based on the differential phase shift QKD (DPS-QKD) protocol. The third section describes entanglement generation and application in the telecom band, which are the key technologies for realizing phase 2 and 3 systems. The final section provides a summary and describes the future outlook.

  2. Teaching Quantum Mechanical Commutation Relations via an Optical Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Billur, A Alper; Bursal, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The quantum mechanical commutation relations, which are directly related to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, have a crucial importance for understanding the quantum mechanics of students. During undergraduate level courses, the operator formalisms are generally given theoretically and it is documented that these abstract formalisms are usually misunderstood by the students. Based on the idea that quantum mechanical phenomena can be investigated via geometric optical tools, this study aims to introduce an experiment, where the quantum mechanical commutation relations are represented in a concrete way to provide students an easy and permanent learning. The experimental tools are chosen to be easily accessible and economic. The experiment introduced in this paper can be done with students or used as a demonstrative experiment in laboratory based or theory based courses requiring quantum physics content; particularly in physics, physics education and science education programs.

  3. Physics of lateral triple quantum-dot molecules with controlled electron numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Shim, Yun-Pil; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2012-11-01

    We review the recent progress in theory and experiments with lateral triple quantum dots with controlled electron numbers down to one electron in each dot. The theory covers electronic and spin properties as a function of topology, number of electrons, gate voltage and external magnetic field. The orbital Hund's rules and Nagaoka ferromagnetism, magnetic frustration and chirality, interplay of quantum interference and electron-electron interactions and geometrical phases are described and related to charging and transport spectroscopy. Fabrication techniques and recent experiments are covered, as well as potential applications of triple quantum-dot molecule in coherent control, spin manipulation and quantum computation.

  4. Local Gate Control of a Carbon Nanotube Double Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-04

    Nanotube Double Quantum Dot N. Mason,*† M. J. Biercuk,* C. M. Marcus† We have measured carbon nanotube quantum dots with multiple electro- static gates and...used the resulting enhanced control to investigate a nano- tube double quantum dot. Transport measurements reveal honeycomb charge stability diagrams...This ability to control electron interactions in the quantum regime in a molecular conductor is important for applications such as quantum

  5. Quantum control of harmonic oscillator networks

    CERN Document Server

    Genoni, Marco G; Kim, M S; Burgarth, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Controllability -- the possibility of performing any target dynamics by applying a set of available operations -- is a fundamental requirement for the practical use of any physical system. For finite-dimensional systems, as for instance spin systems, precise criterions to establish controllability, such as the so called rank criterion, are well known. However most physical systems require a description in terms of an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space whose controllability properties are poorly understood. Here, we investigate infinite-dimensional bosonic quantum systems -- encompassing quantum light, ensembles of bosonic atoms, motional degrees of freedom of ions, and nano-mechanical oscillators -- governed by quadratic Hamiltonians (such that their evolution is analogous to coupled harmonic oscillators). After having highlighted the intimate connection between controllability and recurrence in the Hilbert space, we prove that, for coupled oscillators, a simple extra condition has to be fulfilled to extend t...

  6. Controlled quantum dialogue robust against conspiring users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Shih-Hung; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2016-10-01

    This paper explores a new security problem in controlled quantum dialogue (CQD) protocols, where the communicants may try to conspire to communicate without the controller's permission. According to our survey, all the previous CQD protocols suffer from this attack. In order to resolve this problem, we also present an improvement protocol. The security analyses show that the improved scheme is secure under this and other well-known attacks.

  7. A Scheme of Controlled Quantum State Swapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    查新未; 邹志纯; 祁建霞; 朱海洋

    2012-01-01

    A scheme for controlled quantum state swapping is presented using maximally entangled five-qubit state, i.e., Alice wants to transmit an entangled state of particle a to Bob and at the same time Bob wants to transmit an entangled state of particle b to Alice via the control of the supervisor Charlie. The operations used in this swapping process including C-not operation and a series of single-qubit measurements performed by Alice. Bob. and Charlie.

  8. Homomorphic encryption experiments on IBM's cloud quantum computing platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He-Liang; Zhao, You-Wei; Li, Tan; Li, Feng-Guang; Du, Yu-Tao; Fu, Xiang-Qun; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Xiang; Bao, Wan-Su

    2017-02-01

    Quantum computing has undergone rapid development in recent years. Owing to limitations on scalability, personal quantum computers still seem slightly unrealistic in the near future. The first practical quantum computer for ordinary users is likely to be on the cloud. However, the adoption of cloud computing is possible only if security is ensured. Homomorphic encryption is a cryptographic protocol that allows computation to be performed on encrypted data without decrypting them, so it is well suited to cloud computing. Here, we first applied homomorphic encryption on IBM's cloud quantum computer platform. In our experiments, we successfully implemented a quantum algorithm for linear equations while protecting our privacy. This demonstration opens a feasible path to the next stage of development of cloud quantum information technology.

  9. Controlled quantum secure direct communication using a non-symmetric quantum channel with quantum superdense coding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Yan [School of Physic and Optoelectronic, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)]. E-mail: xia-208@163.com; Song, He-Shan [School of Physic and Optoelectronic, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)]. E-mail: hssong@dlut.edu.cn

    2007-04-23

    We present a controlled quantum secure direct communication protocol that uses a 2-dimensional Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled state and a 3-dimensional Bell-basis state and employs the high-dimensional quantum superdense coding, local collective unitary operations and entanglement swapping. The proposed protocol is secure and of high source capacity. It can effectively protect the communication against a destroying-travel-qubit-type attack. With this protocol, the information transmission is greatly increased. This protocol can also be modified, so that it can be used in a multi-party control system.

  10. Ultra-precise holographic beam shaping for microscopic quantum control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Philip; Preiss, Philipp M; Ma, Ruichao; Lukin, Alexander; Eric Tai, M; Rispoli, Matthew; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2016-06-27

    High-resolution addressing of individual ultracold atoms, trapped ions or solid state emitters allows for exquisite control in quantum optics experiments. This becomes possible through large aperture magnifying optics that project microscopic light patterns with diffraction limited performance. We use programmable amplitude holograms generated on a digital micromirror device to create arbitrary microscopic beam shapes with full phase and amplitude control. The system self-corrects for aberrations of up to several λ and reduces them to λ/50, leading to light patterns with a precision on the 10-4 level. We demonstrate aberration-compensated beam shaping in an optical lattice experiment and perform single-site addressing in a quantum gas microscope for 87Rb.

  11. Ultra-precise holographic beam shaping for microscopic quantum control

    CERN Document Server

    Zupancic, Philip; Ma, Ruichao; Lukin, Alexander; Tai, M Eric; Rispoli, Matthew; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution addressing of single ultracold atoms, trapped ions or solid state emitters allows for exquisite control in quantum optics experiments. This becomes possible through large aperture magnifying optics that project microscopic light patterns with diffraction limited performance. We use programmable amplitude holograms generated on a digital micromirror device to create arbitrary microscopic beam shapes with full phase and amplitude control. The system self-corrects for aberrations of up to several $\\lambda$ and reduces them to $\\lambda/50$, leading to light patterns with a precision on the $10^{-4}$ level. We demonstrate aberration-compensated beam shaping in an optical lattice experiment and perform single-site addressing in a quantum gas microscope for $^{87}$Rb.

  12. Analysing a complementarity experiment on the quantum-classical boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Terra-Cunha, M O

    2002-01-01

    The complementarity experiment reported in Bertet [{\\it{et al.}} (2001), {\\it{Nature}} {\\bf{411}}, 166.] is discussed. The role played by entanglement in reaching the classical limit is pointed out. Dissipative and thermal effects of the cavity are calculated and a simple modification of the experiment is proposed in order to observe the progressive loss of the capacity of ``quantum erasing''as a manifestation of the classical limit of quantum mechanics.

  13. Control of Exciton Dynamics in Nanodots for Quantum Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pochung; Piermarocchi, C.; Sham, L. J.

    2001-08-01

    We present a theory to further a new perspective of proactive control of exciton dynamics in the quantum limit. Circularly polarized optical pulses in a semiconductor nanodot are used to control the dynamics of two interacting excitons of opposite polarizations. Shaping of femtosecond laser pulses keeps the quantum operation within the decoherence time. Computation of the fidelity of the operations and application to the complete solution of a minimal quantum computing algorithm demonstrate in theory the feasibility of quantum control.

  14. Quantum efficiency and oscillator strength of site-controlled InGaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, F.; Schneider, C.; Stobbe, Søren

    2010-01-01

    We report on time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy to determine the oscillator strength (OS) and the quantum efficiency (QE) of site-controlled In(Ga)As quantum dots nucleating on patterned nanoholes. These two quantities are determined by measurements on site-controlled quantum dot (SCQD.......1±2.6 and an encouragingly high QE of (48±14)% for the SCQDs....

  15. Quantum efficiency and oscillator strength of site-controlled InGaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, F.; Schneider, C.; Stobbe, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    We report on time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy to determine the oscillator strength (OS) and the quantum efficiency (QE) of site-controlled In(Ga)As quantum dots nucleating on patterned nanoholes. These two quantities are determined by measurements on site-controlled quantum dot (SCQD...

  16. Notions of controllability for quantum mechanical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Albertini, F

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we define four different notions of controllability of physical interest for multilevel quantum mechanical systems. These notions involve the possibility of driving the evolution operator as well as the state of the system. We establish the connections among these different notions as well as methods to verify controllability. The paper also contains results on the relation between the controllability in arbitrary small time of a system varying on a compact transformation Lie group and the corresponding system on the associated homogeneous space. As an application, we prove that, for the system of two interacting spin 1/2 particles, not every state transfer can be obtained in arbitrary small time.

  17. Efficient Controlled Quantum Secure Direct Communication Protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Patwardhan, Siddharth; Moulick, Subhayan Roy; Prasanta K. Panigrahi

    2015-01-01

    We study controlled quantum secure direct communication (CQSDC), a cryptographic scheme where a sender can send a secret bit-string to an intended recipient, without any secure classical channel, who can obtain the complete bit-string only with the permission of a controller. We report an efficient protocol to realize CQSDC using Cluster state and then go on to construct a (2-3)-CQSDC using Brown state, where a coalition of any two of the three controllers is required to retrieve the complete...

  18. Controlling a quantum gas of polar molecules in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Covey, Jacob P; Ye, Jun; Jin, Deborah S

    2016-01-01

    The production of molecules from dual species atomic quantum gases has enabled experiments that employ molecules at nanoKelvin temperatures. As a result, every degree of freedom of these molecules is in a well-defined quantum state and exquisitely controlled. These ultracold molecules open a new world of precision quantum chemistry in which quantum statistics, quantum partial waves, and even many-body correlations can play important roles. Moreover, to investigate the strongly correlated physics of many interacting molecular dipoles, we can mitigate lossy chemical reactions by controlling the dimensionality of the system using optical lattices formed by interfering laser fields. In a full three-dimensional optical lattice, chemistry can be turned on or off by tuning the lattice depth, which allows us to configure an array of long-range interacting quantum systems with rich internal structure. Such a system represents an excellent platform for gaining fundamental insights to complex materials based on quantum ...

  19. Quantum Codes for Controlling Coherent Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sharf, Y; Cory, D G; Sharf, Yehuda; Havel, Timothy F.; Cory, David G.

    2000-01-01

    Control over spin dynamics has been obtained in NMR via coherent averaging, which is implemented through a sequence of RF pulses, and via quantum codes which can protect against incoherent evolution. Here, we discuss the design and implementation of quantum codes to protect against coherent evolution. A detailed example is given of a quantum code for protecting two data qubits from evolution under a weak coupling (Ising) term in the Hamiltonian, using an ``isolated'' ancilla which does not evolve on the experimental time scale. The code is realized in a three-spin system by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy on 13C-labelled alanine, and tested for two initial states. It is also shown that for coherent evolution and isolated ancillae, codes exist that do not require the ancillae to initially be in a (pseudo-)pure state. Finally, it is shown that even with non-isolated ancillae quantum codes exist which can protect against evolution under weak coupling. An example is presented for a six qubit code that protects two ...

  20. Controlling Atomic, Solid-State and Hybrid Systems for Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullans, Michael John

    Quantum information science involves the use of precise control over quantum systems to explore new technologies. However, as quantum systems are scaled up they require an ever deeper understanding of many-body physics to achieve the required degree of control. Current experiments are entering a regime which requires active control of a mesoscopic number of coupled quantum systems or quantum bits (qubits). This thesis describes several approaches to this goal and shows how mesoscopic quantum systems can be controlled and utilized for quantum information tasks. The first system we consider is the nuclear spin environment of GaAs double quantum dots containing two electrons. We show that the through appropriate control of dynamic nuclear polarization one can prepare the nuclear spin environment in three distinct collective quantum states which are useful for quantum information processing with electron spin qubits. We then investigate a hybrid system in which an optical lattice is formed in the near field scattering off an array of metallic nanoparticles by utilizing the plasmonic resonance of the nanoparticles. We show that such a system would realize new regimes of dense, ultra-cold quantum matter and can be used to create a quantum network of atoms and plasmons. Finally we investigate quantum nonlinear optical systems. We show that the intrinsic nonlinearity for plasmons in graphene can be large enough to make a quantum gate for single photons. We also consider two nonlinear optical systems based on ultracold gases of atoms. In one case, we demonstrate an all-optical single photon switch using cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) and slow light. In the second case, we study few photon physics in strongly interacting Rydberg polariton systems, where we demonstrate the existence of two and three photon bound states and study their properties.

  1. Control through operators for quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Philippe; Salomon, Julien; Turinici, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of operator identification in quantum control. The free Hamiltonian and the dipole moment are searched such that a given target state is reached at a given time. A local existence result is obtained. As a by-product, our works reveals necessary conditions on the laser field to make the identification feasible. In the last part of this work, some algorithms are proposed to compute effectively these operators.

  2. Theory and Experiments on the "Quantum Mind"

    CERN Document Server

    Mershin, A; Mershin, Andreas; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    2005-01-01

    This article is a short summary, in Greek, of work presented in English in the following articles: 1. Mershin et al. "Towards Experimental Tests of Quantum Effects in Cytoskeletal Proteins" (physics/0505080) 2. Mershin et al. "Learning and Memory deficits Upon TAU Accumulation in Drosophila Mushroom Body Neurons", Learning & Memory 11: 277-287 (2004)

  3. Quantum control of ultra-cold atoms: uncovering a novel connection between two paradigms of quantum nonlinear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jiao; Mouritzen, Anders Sørrig; Gong, Jiangbin

    2009-01-01

    .e. the kicked rotor model and the kicked Harper model, is established. In particular, it is shown that Hofstadter's butterfly quasi-energy spectrum in periodically driven quantum systems may soon be realized experimentally, with the effective Planck constant tunable by varying the time delay between two...... sequences of control fields. Extensions of this study are also discussed. The results are intended to open up a new generation of cold-atom experiments of quantum nonlinear dynamics....

  4. Quantum theory as the most robust description of reproducible experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Raedt, Hans, E-mail: h.a.de.raedt@rug.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, NL-9747AG Groningen (Netherlands); Katsnelson, Mikhail I., E-mail: M.Katsnelson@science.ru.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Heyendaalseweg 135, NL-6525AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Michielsen, Kristel, E-mail: k.michielsen@fz-juelich.de [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    It is shown that the basic equations of quantum theory can be obtained from a straightforward application of logical inference to experiments for which there is uncertainty about individual events and for which the frequencies of the observed events are robust with respect to small changes in the conditions under which the experiments are carried out. - Highlights: • It is shown that logical inference, that is, inductive reasoning, provides a rational explanation for the success of quantum theory. • The Schrödinger equation is obtained through logical inference applied to robust experiments. • The singlet and triplet states follow from logical inference applied to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiment. • Robustness also leads to the quantum theoretical description of the Stern-Gerlach experiment.

  5. Young's Double Slit Experiment in Quantum Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kenmoku, Masakatsu

    2011-01-01

    Young's double slit experiment is formulated in the framework of canonical quantum field theory in view of the modern quantum optics. We adopt quantum scalar fields instead of quantum electromagnetic fields ignoring the vector freedom in gauge theory. The double slit state is introduced in Fock space corresponding to experimental setup. As observables, expectation values of energy density and positive frequency part of current with respect to the double slit state are calculated which give the interference term. Classical wave states are realized by coherent double slit states in Fock space which connect quantum particle states with classical wave states systematically. In case of incoherent sources, the interference term vanishes by averaging random phase angles as expected.

  6. Compendium of quantum physics concepts, experiments, history and philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Hentschel, Klaus; Weinert, Friedel

    2009-01-01

    With contributions by many of today's leading quantum physicists, philosophers and historians, including three Nobel laureates, this comprehensive A to Z of quantum physics provides a lucid understanding of the key concepts of quantum theory and experiment. It covers technical and interpretational aspects alike, and includes both traditional topics and newer areas such as quantum information and its relatives. The central concepts that have shaped contemporary understanding of the quantum world are clearly defined, with illustrations where helpful, and discussed at a level suitable for undergraduate and graduate students of physics, history of science, and philosophy of physics. All articles share three main aims: (1) to provide a clear definition and understanding of the term concerned; (2) where possible, to trace the historical origins of the concept; and (3) to provide a small but optimal selection of references to the most relevant literature, including pertinent historical studies. Also discussed are th...

  7. Controlling the quantum state of trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Roos, C

    2000-01-01

    brace quadrupole transition enables the transfer of the ion's motional state into the ground state with up to 99.9 % probability. Different aspects of the cooling process are investigated. In particular, a measurement of the length of time that the ion spends on average in the final state after switching off the cooling lasers (heating time) is made. In contrast to prior experiments, this time is found to be orders of magnitude longer than the time required to manipulate the ion's quantum state. By coherently exciting the ion after preparing it in Fock states of motion, the coherence time is probed and found to be on the order of a millisecond, thus allowing the realization of a few quantum gates. Coherence-limiting processes have been investigated, as well as first steps towards extending the experiments to the case of two trapped ions. In addition to the experiments mentioned above, the possibility of performing cavity-QED experiments with trapped ions is explored. How to efficiently couple the quadrupole t...

  8. Inorganic passivation and doping control in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Hoogland, Sjoerd H.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss strategies to reduce midgap trap state densities in colloidal quantum dot films and requirements to control doping type and magnitude. We demonstrate that these improvements result in colloidal quantum dot solar cells with certified 7.0% efficiency.

  9. Hybrid optimization schemes for quantum control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerz, Michael H.; Koch, Christiane P. [Universitaet Kassel, Theoretische Physik, Kassel (Germany); Whaley, K. Birgitta [University of California, Department of Chemistry, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Optimal control theory is a powerful tool for solving control problems in quantum mechanics, ranging from the control of chemical reactions to the implementation of gates in a quantum computer. Gradient-based optimization methods are able to find high fidelity controls, but require considerable numerical effort and often yield highly complex solutions. We propose here to employ a two-stage optimization scheme to significantly speed up convergence and achieve simpler controls. The control is initially parametrized using only a few free parameters, such that optimization in this pruned search space can be performed with a simplex method. The result, considered now simply as an arbitrary function on a time grid, is the starting point for further optimization with a gradient-based method that can quickly converge to high fidelities. We illustrate the success of this hybrid technique by optimizing a geometric phase gate for two superconducting transmon qubits coupled with a shared transmission line resonator, showing that a combination of Nelder-Mead simplex and Krotov's method yields considerably better results than either one of the two methods alone. (orig.)

  10. Control of two-photon quantum walk in a complex multimode system by wavefront shaping

    CERN Document Server

    Defienne, Hugo; Walmsley, Ian A; Smith, Brian J; Gigan, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Multi-photon interferences in complex multimode structures - quantum walks - are of both funda- mental and technological interest. They rely on the ability to design the complex network where the walk occurs. Here, we demonstrate the control of quantum walks of two indistinguishable photons in a complex linear system - a highly multimode fiber - by means of wavefront shaping techniques. Using the measured transmission matrix of the fiber, we demonstrate the ability to address arbitrary output modes of the two-photon speckle pattern, and simultaneous control of the quantum inter- ferences. This work provides a reconfigurable platform for multi-photon, multimode interference experiments and a route to high-dimensional quantum systems.

  11. Control aspects of quantum computing using pure and mixed states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Herbrüggen, Thomas; Marx, Raimund; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J

    2012-10-13

    Steering quantum dynamics such that the target states solve classically hard problems is paramount to quantum simulation and computation. And beyond, quantum control is also essential to pave the way to quantum technologies. Here, important control techniques are reviewed and presented in a unified frame covering quantum computational gate synthesis and spectroscopic state transfer alike. We emphasize that it does not matter whether the quantum states of interest are pure or not. While pure states underly the design of quantum circuits, ensemble mixtures of quantum states can be exploited in a more recent class of algorithms: it is illustrated by characterizing the Jones polynomial in order to distinguish between different (classes of) knots. Further applications include Josephson elements, cavity grids, ion traps and nitrogen vacancy centres in scenarios of closed as well as open quantum systems.

  12. Quantum Sensing of Noisy and Complex Systems under Dynamical Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gershon Kurizki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We review our unified optimized approach to the dynamical control of quantum-probe interactions with noisy and complex systems viewed as thermal baths. We show that this control, in conjunction with tools of quantum estimation theory, may be used for inferring the spectral and spatial characteristics of such baths with high precision. This approach constitutes a new avenue in quantum sensing, dubbed quantum noise spectroscopy.

  13. Quantum Reflection of Antihydrogen in the GBAR Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Dufour, Gabriel; Lambrecht, Astrid; Nesvizhevsky, Valery; Reynaud, Serge; Voronin, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    In the GBAR experiment, cold antihydrogen atoms will be left to fall on an annihilation plate with the aim of measuring the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Here, we study the quantum reflection of these antiatoms due to the Casimir-Polder potential above the plate. We give realistic estimates of the potential and quantum reflection amplitudes, taking into account the specificities of antihydrogen and the optical properties of the plate. We find that quantum reflection is enhanced for weaker potentials, for example above thin slabs, graphene and nanoporous media.

  14. Pareto-front shape in multiobservable quantum control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiuyang; Wu, Re-Bing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2017-03-01

    Many scenarios in the sciences and engineering require simultaneous optimization of multiple objective functions, which are usually conflicting or competing. In such problems the Pareto front, where none of the individual objectives can be further improved without degrading some others, shows the tradeoff relations between the competing objectives. This paper analyzes the Pareto-front shape for the problem of quantum multiobservable control, i.e., optimizing the expectation values of multiple observables in the same quantum system. Analytic and numerical results demonstrate that with two commuting observables the Pareto front is a convex polygon consisting of flat segments only, while with noncommuting observables the Pareto front includes convexly curved segments. We also assess the capability of a weighted-sum method to continuously capture the points along the Pareto front. Illustrative examples with realistic physical conditions are presented, including NMR control experiments on a 1H-13C two-spin system with two commuting or noncommuting observables.

  15. Three Slit Experiments and the Structure of Quantum Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ududec, Cozmin; Emerson, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    In spite of the interference manifested in the double-slit experiment, quantum theory predicts that a measure of interference defined by Sorkin and involving various outcome probabilities from an experiment with three slits, is identically zero. We adapt Sorkin's measure into a general operational probabilistic framework for physical theories, and then study its relationship to the structure of quantum theory. In particular, we characterize the class of probabilistic theories for which the interference measure is zero as ones in which it is possible to fully determine the state of a system via specific sets of 'two-slit' experiments.

  16. EDITORIAL: Quantum control theory for coherence and information dynamics Quantum control theory for coherence and information dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Lorenza; Tannor, David

    2011-08-01

    , quantum control of chemical reactions or high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy); on the other hand, an unprecedented demand for close coupling between theory and experiment, with theoretical developments becoming more and more attuned to and driven by experimental advances as different quantum technologies continue to evolve at an impressive pace in the laboratory. Altogether, these two trends account for several of the recurrent themes in this volume, as well as in the current quantum control literature as a whole: namely, the quest for control strategies that can attain the highest degree of precision and robustness possible, while striving for efficiency and, ultimately, optimality in achieving the intended control task under realistic operational constraints. From a theory standpoint, this makes it imperative to take into account increasingly more realistic control settings; to assess the quantitative impact of limited control resources and/or system knowledge; and to provide a rigorous and general foundation for existing experimental approaches in order to further enhance applicability and performance. From an experimental standpoint, renewed emphasis is in turn placed on validating theoretical predictions and benchmarking performance, so that the limiting constraints can be singled out for additional theoretical analysis and guidance. This ongoing cross-talk is clearly reflected in this collection, which brings together theoreticians and experimentalists, with a significant fraction of the papers reporting on combined quantum control theory-experiment efforts. While a precise categorization would neither be possible nor desirable, contributions to this volume have been loosely grouped into five broad sections. This grouping has been made in the hope that connections between different problems and/or technical approaches will become more transparent, facilitating the transfer of concepts and methods. The special issue opens with a section devoted to open

  17. Experimentally realizable control fields in quantum Lyapunov control

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, X X; Wu, Chunfeng; Feng, X L; Oh, C H

    2011-01-01

    As a hybrid of techniques from open-loop and feedback control, Lyapunov control has the advantage that it is free from the measurement-induced decoherence but it includes the system's instantaneous message in the control loop. Often, the Lyapunov control is confronted with time delay in the control fields and difficulty in practical implementations of the control. In this paper, we study the effect of time-delay on the Lyapunov control, and explore the possibility of replacing the control field with a pulse train or a bang-bang signal. The efficiency of the Lyapunov control is also presented through examining the convergence time of the controlled system. These results suggest that the Lyapunov control is robust gainst time delay, easy to realize and effective for high-dimensional quantum systems.

  18. Unidirectional Quantum Remote Control:Teleportation of Control-State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yi-Zhuang; GU Yong-Jian; WU Gui-Chu; GUO Guang-Can

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the problem of teleportation of unitary operations by unidirectional control-state telepor-tation and propose a scheme called unidirectional quantum remote control. The scheme is based on the isomorphismbetween operation and state. It allows us to store a unitary operation in a control state, thereby teleportation of theunitary operation can be implemented by unidirectional teleportation of the control-state. We find that the probabilityof success for implementing an arbitrary unitary operation on arbitrary M-qubit state by unidirectional control-stateteleportation is 4-M, and 2M ebits and 4M cbits are consumed in each teleportation.

  19. A Novel Algorithm of Quantum Random Walk in Server Traffic Control and Task Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yumin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantum random walk optimization model and algorithm in network cluster server traffic control and task scheduling is proposed. In order to solve the problem of server load balancing, we research and discuss the distribution theory of energy field in quantum mechanics and apply it to data clustering. We introduce the method of random walk and illuminate what the quantum random walk is. Here, we mainly research the standard model of one-dimensional quantum random walk. For the data clustering problem of high dimensional space, we can decompose one m-dimensional quantum random walk into m one-dimensional quantum random walk. In the end of the paper, we compare the quantum random walk optimization method with GA (genetic algorithm, ACO (ant colony optimization, and SAA (simulated annealing algorithm. In the same time, we prove its validity and rationality by the experiment of analog and simulation.

  20. Linear dynamical quantum systems analysis, synthesis, and control

    CERN Document Server

    Nurdin, Hendra I

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides an in-depth treatment of the class of linear-dynamical quantum systems. The monograph presents a detailed account of the mathematical modeling of these systems using linear algebra and quantum stochastic calculus as the main tools for a treatment that emphasizes a system-theoretic point of view and the control-theoretic formulations of quantum versions of familiar problems from the classical (non-quantum) setting, including estimation and filtering, realization theory, and feedback control. Both measurement-based feedback control (i.e., feedback control by a classical system involving a continuous-time measurement process) and coherent feedback control (i.e., feedback control by another quantum system without the intervention of any measurements in the feedback loop) are treated. Researchers and graduates studying systems and control theory, quantum probability and stochastics or stochastic control whether from backgrounds in mechanical or electrical engineering or applied mathematics ...

  1. Quantum control without access to the controlling interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Janzing, D; Zeier, R; Beth, T; Janzing, Dominik; Armknecht, Frederik; Zeier, Robert; Beth, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    In our model a fixed Hamiltonian acts on the joint Hilbert space of a quantum system and its controller. We show under which conditions measurements, state preparations, and unitary implementations on the system can be performed by quantum operations on the controller only. It turns out that a measurement of the observable A and an implementation of the one-parameter group exp(iAr) can be performed by almost the same sequence of control operations. Furthermore measurement procedures for A+B, for (AB+BA), and for i[A,B] can be constructed from measurements of A and B. This shows that the algebraic structure of the set of observables can be explained by the Lie group structure of the unitary evolutions on the joint Hilbert space of the measuring device and the measured system. A spin chain model with nearest neighborhood coupling shows that the border line between controller and system can be shifted consistently.

  2. Can quantum gravity be exposed in the laboratory?: A tabletop experiment to reveal the quantum foam

    CERN Document Server

    Bekenstein, Jacob D

    2013-01-01

    I propose an experiment that may be performed, with present low temperature and cryogenic technology, to reveal Wheeler's quantum foam. It involves coupling an optical photon's momentum to the center of mass motion of a macroscopic transparent block with parameters such that the latter is displaced in space by approximately a Planck length. I argue that such displacement is sensitive to quantum foam and will react back on the photon's probability of transiting the block. This might allow determination of the precise scale at which quantum fluctuations of space-time become large, and so differentiate between the brane-world and the traditional scenarios of spacetime.

  3. A Quantum Proxy Weak Blind Signature Scheme Based on Controlled Quantum Teleportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Yu, Yao-Feng; Song, Qin; Gao, Lan-Xiang

    2015-04-01

    Proxy blind signature is applied to the electronic paying system, electronic voting system, mobile agent system, security of internet, etc. A quantum proxy weak blind signature scheme is proposed in this paper. It is based on controlled quantum teleportation. Five-qubit entangled state functions as quantum channel. The scheme uses the physical characteristics of quantum mechanics to implement message blinding, so it could guarantee not only the unconditional security of the scheme but also the anonymity of the messages owner.

  4. Thermodynamics of quantum-jump-conditioned feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasberg, Philipp; Schaller, Gernot; Brandes, Tobias; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2013-12-01

    We consider open quantum systems weakly coupled to thermal reservoirs and subjected to quantum feedback operations triggered with or without delay by monitored quantum jumps. We establish a thermodynamic description of such systems and analyze how the first and second law of thermodynamics are modified by the feedback. We apply our formalism to study the efficiency of a qubit subjected to a quantum feedback control and operating as a heat pump between two reservoirs. We also demonstrate that quantum feedbacks can be used to stabilize coherences in nonequilibrium stationary states which in some cases may even become pure quantum states.

  5. Quantum Ensemble Classification: A Sampling-Based Learning Control Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Dong, Daoyi; Qi, Bo; Petersen, Ian R; Rabitz, Herschel

    2017-06-01

    Quantum ensemble classification (QEC) has significant applications in discrimination of atoms (or molecules), separation of isotopes, and quantum information extraction. However, quantum mechanics forbids deterministic discrimination among nonorthogonal states. The classification of inhomogeneous quantum ensembles is very challenging, since there exist variations in the parameters characterizing the members within different classes. In this paper, we recast QEC as a supervised quantum learning problem. A systematic classification methodology is presented by using a sampling-based learning control (SLC) approach for quantum discrimination. The classification task is accomplished via simultaneously steering members belonging to different classes to their corresponding target states (e.g., mutually orthogonal states). First, a new discrimination method is proposed for two similar quantum systems. Then, an SLC method is presented for QEC. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for the binary classification of two-level quantum ensembles and the multiclass classification of multilevel quantum ensembles.

  6. Flux qubits in a planar circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture: Quantum control and decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgiazzi, J.-L.; Deng, C.; Layden, D.; Marchildon, R.; Kitapli, F.; Shen, F.; Bal, M.; Ong, F. R.; Lupascu, A.

    2016-03-01

    We report experiments on superconducting flux qubits in a circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) setup. Two qubits, independently biased and controlled, are coupled to a coplanar waveguide resonator. Dispersive qubit state readout reaches a maximum contrast of 72%. We measure energy relaxation times at the symmetry point of 5 and 10 μ s , corresponding to 7 and 20 μ s when relaxation through the resonator due to Purcell effect is subtracted out, and levels of flux noise of 2.6 and 2.7 μ Φ0/√{Hz} at 1 Hz for the two qubits. We discuss the origin of decoherence in the measured devices. The strong coupling between the qubits and the cavity leads to a large, cavity-mediated, qubit-qubit coupling. This coupling, which is characterized spectroscopically, reaches 38 MHz. These results demonstrate the potential of cQED as a platform for fundamental investigations of decoherence and quantum dynamics of flux qubits.

  7. Complete Coherent Control of a Quantum Dot Strongly Coupled to a Nanocavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dory, Constantin; Fischer, Kevin A.; Müller, Kai; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G.; Sarmiento, Tomas; Rundquist, Armand; Zhang, Jingyuan L.; Kelaita, Yousif; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Strongly coupled quantum dot-cavity systems provide a non-linear configuration of hybridized light-matter states with promising quantum-optical applications. Here, we investigate the coherent interaction between strong laser pulses and quantum dot-cavity polaritons. Resonant excitation of polaritonic states and their interaction with phonons allow us to observe coherent Rabi oscillations and Ramsey fringes. Furthermore, we demonstrate complete coherent control of a quantum dot-photonic crystal cavity based quantum-bit. By controlling the excitation power and phase in a two-pulse excitation scheme we achieve access to the full Bloch sphere. Quantum-optical simulations are in good agreement with our experiments and provide insight into the decoherence mechanisms. PMID:27112420

  8. An experiment using mid and thermal infrared in quantum remote sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI; Siwen; HAN; Jixia

    2006-01-01

    The concept of quantum remote sensing and the differences between quantum remote sensing and remote sensing is introduced, an experiment about the uses of mid and thermal infrared in quantum remote sensing is described and results are analyzed.

  9. Quantum control for initiation and detection of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Margo T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Grane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R. Jason [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We employ quantum control methods towards detection and quantum controlled initiation (QCI) of energetic materials. Ultrafast pulse shaping of broadband Infrared ({approx}750 nm to 850 run) and ultraviolet (266 nm, 400 nm) light is utilized for control. The underlying principals behind optimal control can be utilized to both detect and initiate explosives. In each case, time dependent phase shaped electric fields drive the chemical systems towards a desired state. For optimal dynamic detection of explosives (ODD-Ex) a phase specific broadband infrared pulse is created which increases not only the sensitivity of detection but also the selectivity of an explosive's spectral signatures in a background of interferents. QCI on the other hand, seeks to initiate explosives by employing shaped ultraviolet light. QCI is ideal for use with explosive detonators as it removes the possibility of unintentional initiation from an electrical source while adding an additional safety feature, initiation only with the proper pulse shape. Quantum control experiments require: (1) the ability to phase and amplitude shape the laser pulse and (2) the ability to effectively search for the pulse shape which controls the reaction. In these adaptive experiments we utilize both global and local optimization search routines such as genetic algorithm, differential evolution, and downhill simplex. Pulse shaping the broadband IR light, produced by focusing 800 nm light through a pressurized tube of Argon, is straightforward as commercial pulse shapers are available at and around 800 nm. Pulse shaping in the UV requires a home built shaper. Our system is an acoustic optical modulator (AOM) pulse shaper in which consists of a fused silica AOM crystal placed in the Fourier plane of a 4-f zero dispersion compressor.

  10. Efficient Controlled Quantum Secure Direct Communication Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Siddharth; Moulick, Subhayan Roy; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-07-01

    We study controlled quantum secure direct communication (CQSDC), a cryptographic scheme where a sender can send a secret bit-string to an intended recipient, without any secure classical channel, who can obtain the complete bit-string only with the permission of a controller. We report an efficient protocol to realize CQSDC using Cluster state and then go on to construct a (2-3)-CQSDC using Brown state, where a coalition of any two of the three controllers is required to retrieve the complete message. We argue both protocols to be unconditionally secure and analyze the efficiency of the protocols to show it to outperform the existing schemes while maintaining the same security specifications.

  11. Approximation of reachable sets for coherently controlled open quantum systems: Application to quantum state engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Lu, Dawei; Luo, Zhihuang; Laflamme, Raymond; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    Precisely characterizing and controlling realistic quantum systems under noises is a challenging frontier in quantum sciences and technologies. In developing reliable controls for open quantum systems, one is often confronted with the problem of the lack of knowledge on the system controllability. The purpose of this paper is to give a numerical approach to this problem, that is, to approximately compute the reachable set of states for coherently controlled quantum Markovian systems. The approximation consists of setting both upper and lower bounds for system's reachable region of states. Furthermore, we apply our reachability analysis to the control of the relaxation dynamics of a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance spin system. We implement some experimental tasks of quantum state engineering in this open system at a near optimal performance in view of purity: e.g., increasing polarization and preparing pseudopure states. These results demonstrate the usefulness of our theory and show interesting and promising applications of environment-assisted quantum dynamics.

  12. Integrated Quantum Optics: Experiments towards integrated quantum-light sources and quantum-enhanced sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Ulrich Busk

    The work presented in this thesis is focused on experimental application and generation of continuous variable quantum correlated states of light in integrated dielectric structures. Squeezed states are among the most exploited continuous variable optical states for free-space quantum-enhanced se......The work presented in this thesis is focused on experimental application and generation of continuous variable quantum correlated states of light in integrated dielectric structures. Squeezed states are among the most exploited continuous variable optical states for free-space quantum...... in this thesis: Firstly, we present proof-of-principle demonstration of interfacing squeezed light with an on-chip optomechanical resonator, demonstrating a quantum-enhanced sensitivity to the vibrations of the micromechanical object. Secondly, work on developing an integrated source of squeezed light...

  13. Closed-loop and robust control of quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Lin-Cheng; Wang, Yuanlong

    2013-01-01

    For most practical quantum control systems, it is important and difficult to attain robustness and reliability due to unavoidable uncertainties in the system dynamics or models. Three kinds of typical approaches (e.g., closed-loop learning control, feedback control, and robust control) have been proved to be effective to solve these problems. This work presents a self-contained survey on the closed-loop and robust control of quantum systems, as well as a brief introduction to a selection of basic theories and methods in this research area, to provide interested readers with a general idea for further studies. In the area of closed-loop learning control of quantum systems, we survey and introduce such learning control methods as gradient-based methods, genetic algorithms (GA), and reinforcement learning (RL) methods from a unified point of view of exploring the quantum control landscapes. For the feedback control approach, the paper surveys three control strategies including Lyapunov control, measurement-based control, and coherent-feedback control. Then such topics in the field of quantum robust control as H(∞) control, sliding mode control, quantum risk-sensitive control, and quantum ensemble control are reviewed. The paper concludes with a perspective of future research directions that are likely to attract more attention.

  14. Closed-Loop and Robust Control of Quantum Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For most practical quantum control systems, it is important and difficult to attain robustness and reliability due to unavoidable uncertainties in the system dynamics or models. Three kinds of typical approaches (e.g., closed-loop learning control, feedback control, and robust control have been proved to be effective to solve these problems. This work presents a self-contained survey on the closed-loop and robust control of quantum systems, as well as a brief introduction to a selection of basic theories and methods in this research area, to provide interested readers with a general idea for further studies. In the area of closed-loop learning control of quantum systems, we survey and introduce such learning control methods as gradient-based methods, genetic algorithms (GA, and reinforcement learning (RL methods from a unified point of view of exploring the quantum control landscapes. For the feedback control approach, the paper surveys three control strategies including Lyapunov control, measurement-based control, and coherent-feedback control. Then such topics in the field of quantum robust control as H∞ control, sliding mode control, quantum risk-sensitive control, and quantum ensemble control are reviewed. The paper concludes with a perspective of future research directions that are likely to attract more attention.

  15. Gaps between equations and experiments in quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, John M [Gordon McKay Laboratory, Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Madjid, F Hadi [82 Powers Road, Concord, MA 01742 (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Traditional methods of cryptographic key distribution rest on judgments about an attacker. With the advent of quantum key distribution (QKD) came proofs of security for the mathematical models that define the protocols BB84 and B92; however, applying such proofs to actual transmitting and receiving devices has been questioned. Proofs of QKD security are propositions about models written in the mathematical language of quantum mechanics, and the issue is the linking of such models to actual devices in an experiment on security. To explore this issue, we adapt Wittgenstein's method of language games to view quantum language in its application to experimental activity involving transmitting and receiving devices. We sketch concepts with which to think about models in relation to experiments, without assuming the experiments accord with any model; included is a concept of one quantum mechanical model enveloping another. For any model that agrees with given experimental results and implies the security of a key, there is an enveloping model that agrees with the same results while denying that security. As a result there is a gap between equations and the behaviour recorded from devices in an experiment, a gap bridged only by resort to something beyond the reach of logic and measured data, well named by the word guesswork. While this recognition of guesswork encourages eavesdropping, a related recognition of guesswork in the design of feedback loops can help a transmitter and receiver to reduce their vulnerability to eavesdropping.

  16. The Problem of Representation and Experience in Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronde, Christian De

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we discuss the problem of representation and experience in quantum mechanics. We analyze the importance of metaphysics in physical thought and its relation to empiricism and analytic philosophy. We argue against both instrumentalism and scientific realism and claim that both perspectives tend to bypass the problem of representation and justify a "common sense" type experience. Finally, we present our expressionist conception of physics.

  17. An Experiment on the Limits of Quantum Electro-dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, W. C.; Richter, B.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; O'Neill, G. K.; Gittelman, B.

    1959-06-01

    The limitations of previously performed or suggested electrodynamic cutoff experiments are reviewed, and an electron-electron scattering experiment to be performed with storage rings to investigate further the limits of the validity of quantum electrodynamics is described. The foreseen experimental problems are discussed, and the results of the associated calculations are given. The parameters and status of the equipment are summarized. (D.C.W.)

  18. Threshold resonance and controlled filtering in quantum star graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Turek, Ondřej

    2011-01-01

    We design two simple quantum devices applicable as an adjustable quantum spectral filter and as a flux controller. Their function is based upon the threshold resonance in a F\\"ul\\"op-Tsutsui type star graph with an external potential added on one of the lines. Adjustment of the potential strength directly controls the quantum flow from the input to the output line. This is the first example to date in which the quantum flow control is achieved by addition of an external field not on the channel itself, but on other lines connected to the channel at a vertex.

  19. Closed Loop Quantum Control and Quantum Information Sciences: Concepts and Laboratory Implementations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-30

    Ohtsuki, K. Nakagami , W. Zhu, and H. Rabitz, Chem. Phys., 287, 197-216 (2003). Quantum Control via Adaptive Tracking, W. Zhu and H. Rabitz, J. Chem...dynamics under the influence of dissipation, Y. Ohtsuki, K. Nakagami , W. Zhu, and H. Rabitz, Chem. Phys., 287, 197-216 (2003). 22. Quantum Control via

  20. Quantum control by means of hamiltonian structure manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, A; Beltrani, V; Rabitz, H

    2011-04-28

    A traditional quantum optimal control experiment begins with a specific physical system and seeks an optimal time-dependent field to steer the evolution towards a target observable value. In a more general framework, the Hamiltonian structure may also be manipulated when the material or molecular 'stockroom' is accessible as a part of the controls. The current work takes a step in this direction by considering the converse of the normal perspective to now start with a specific fixed field and employ the system's time-independent Hamiltonian structure as the control to identify an optimal form. The Hamiltonian structure control variables are taken as the system energies and transition dipole matrix elements. An analysis is presented of the Hamiltonian structure control landscape, defined by the observable as a function of the Hamiltonian structure. A proof of system controllability is provided, showing the existence of a Hamiltonian structure that yields an arbitrary unitary transformation when working with virtually any field. The landscape analysis shows that there are no suboptimal traps (i.e., local extrema) for controllable quantum systems when unconstrained structural controls are utilized to optimize a state-to-state transition probability. This analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on model multilevel systems. The search effort to reach the top of the Hamiltonian structure landscape is found to be nearly invariant to system dimension. A control mechanism analysis is performed, showing a wide variety of behavior for different systems at the top of the Hamiltonian structure landscape. It is also shown that reducing the number of available Hamiltonian structure controls, thus constraining the system, does not always prevent reaching the landscape top. The results from this work lay a foundation for considering the laboratory implementation of optimal Hamiltonian structure manipulation for seeking the best control performance, especially with limited

  1. Colloqium: Experiments with atomic quantum bits - essential numerical tools

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, Kilian; Murphy, Michael; Ivanov, Peter; Ziesel, Frank; Calarco, Tommaso; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2009-01-01

    Trapped, laser-cooled atoms and ions exemplify quantum systems which can be prepared and controlled with an unmatched degree of precision. Due to the control of the motion of the particles and of the internal degrees of freedom these system present a clean quantum system which can be adequately described by a Hamiltonian. Analytic expressions are commonly derived under assumption of several proximations. To fully describe the system we present powerful numerical tools. After starting with the design of a segmented ion trap and describing the methods for the calculation of the electrical fields used for trapping the ions, we provide the reader with integrators for the trajectories of a classical particle in dynamic potentials thus visualizing the mode of operation of an ion trap. The description is complemented by a quantum mechanical treatment of the wave packet dynamics of an ion inside the trapping potential. We then delve into solving the important class of ill-conditioned inverse problems, exemplified wit...

  2. Cybernetical Physics From Control of Chaos to Quantum Control

    CERN Document Server

    Fradkov, Alexander L

    2007-01-01

    The control of complex systems is one of the most important aspects in dealing with systems exhibiting nonlinear behaviour or similar features that defy traditional control techniques. This specific subject is gradually becoming known as cybernetical physics, borrowing methods from both theoretical physics and control engineering. This book is, perhaps, the first attempt to present a unified exposition of the subject and methodology of cybernetical physics as well as solutions to some of its problems. Emphasis of the book is on the examination of fundamental limits on energy transformation by means of control procedures in both conservative and dissipative systems. A survey of application in physics includes the control of chaos, synchronisation of coupled oscillators, pendulum chains, reactions in physical chemistry and of quantum systems such as the dissociation of diatomic molecules. This book has been written having researchers from various backgrounds in physics, mathematics and engineering in mind and i...

  3. Cavity quantum electrodynamics of a quantum dot in a micropillar cavity: comparison between experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Høeg; Ates, Serkan; Reitzenstein, S.;

    2010-01-01

    The coupling between a quantum dot (QD) and a micropillar cavity is experimentally investigated by performing time-resolved, correlation, and two-photon interference measurements. The Jaynes-Cummings model including dissipative Lindblad terms and dephasing is analyzed, and all the parameters...... for the model are experimentally determined allowing for a complete comparison between experiment and theory....

  4. A geometric approach to quantum control in projective hilbert spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorello, Davide

    2017-02-01

    A quantum theory in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space can be formulated as a proper geometric Hamiltonian theory as explained in [2, 3, 7, 9]. From this point of view a quantum system can be described within a classical-like framework where quantum dynamics is represented by a Hamiltonian flow in the phase space given by a projective Hilbert space. This paper is devoted to investigating how the notion of an accessibility algebra from classical control theory can be applied within the geometric Hamiltonian formulation of quantum mechanics to study controllability of a quantum system. A new characterization of quantum controllability in terms of Killing vector fields w.r.t. the Fubini-Study metric on projective space is also discussed.

  5. Experiments testing macroscopic quantum superpositions must be slow

    CERN Document Server

    Mari, Andrea; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    We consider a thought experiment where the preparation of a macroscopically massive or charged particle in a quantum superposition and the associated dynamics of a distant test particle apparently allow for superluminal communication. We give a solution to the paradox which is based on the following fundamental principle: any local experiment, discriminating a coherent superposition from an incoherent statistical mixture, necessarily requires a minimum time proportional to the mass (or charge) of the system. For a charged particle, we consider two examples of such experiments, and show that they are both consistent with the previous limitation. In the first, the measurement requires to accelerate the charge, that can entangle with the emitted photons. In the second, the limitation can be ascribed to the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. On the other hand, when applied to massive particles our result provides an indirect evidence for the existence of gravitational vacuum fluctuations an...

  6. Controlling the polarization eigenstate of a quantum dot exciton with light

    CERN Document Server

    Belhadj, Thomas; Amand, Thierry; Renucci, Pierre; Krebs, Olivier; Lemaitre, Aristide; Voisin, Paul; Marie, Xavier; Urbaszek, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate optical control of the polarization eigenstates of a neutral quantum dot exciton without any external fields. By varying the excitation power of a circularly polarized laser in micro-photoluminescence experiments on individual InGaAs quantum dots we control the magnitude and direction of an effective internal magnetic field created via optical pumping of nuclear spins. The adjustable nuclear magnetic field allows us to tune the linear and circular polarization degree of the neutral exciton emission. The quantum dot can thus act as a tunable light polarization converter.

  7. Manipulating quantum information on the controllable systems or subspaces

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ming

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we explore how to constructively manipulate quantum information on the controllable systems or subspaces. It is revealed that one can make full use of distinguished properties of Pauli operators to design control Hamiltonian based on the geometric parametrization of quantum states. It is demonstrated in this research that Bang-Bang controls, triangle-function controls and square-function control can be utilized to manipulate controllable qubits or encoded qubits on controllable subspace for both open quantum dynamical systems and uncontrollable closed quantum dynamical systems. Furthermore, we propose a new kind of time-energy performance index to trade-off time and energy resource cost, and comprehensively discuss how to design control magnitude to minimize a kind of time-energy performance. A comparison has been made among these three kind of optimal control. It is underlined in this research that the optimal time performance can be always expressed as J^{*} =\\lamda{\\cdot}t^{*}_{f} +E^{*} for...

  8. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  9. Wavefunction controllability for finite-dimensional bilinear quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turinici, Gabriel [INRIA Rocquencourt, Domaine de Voluceau, Rocquencourt, BP 105, 78153 Le Chesnay Cedex (France); Rabitz, Herschel [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1009 (United States)

    2003-03-14

    We present controllability results for quantum systems interacting with lasers. Exact controllability for the wavefunction in these bilinear systems is proved in the finite-dimensional case under very natural hypotheses.

  10. Randomized Dynamical Decoupling Techniques for Coherent Quantum Control

    CERN Document Server

    Viola, L; Viola, Lorenza; Santos, Lea F.

    2006-01-01

    The need for strategies able to accurately manipulate quantum dynamics is ubiquitous in quantum control and quantum information processing. We investigate two scenarios where randomized dynamical decoupling techniques become more advantageous with respect to standard deterministic methods in switching off unwanted dynamical evolution in a closed quantum system: when dealing with decoupling cycles which involve a large number of control actions and/or when seeking long-time quantum information storage. Highly effective hybrid decoupling schemes, which combine deterministic and stochastic features are discussed, as well as the benefits of sequentially implementing a concatenated method, applied at short times, followed by a hybrid protocol, employed at longer times. A quantum register consisting of a chain of spin-1/2 particles interacting via the Heisenberg interaction is used as a model for the analysis throughout.

  11. Ultrastable, Zerodur-based optical benches for quantum gas experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Hannes; Hellmig, Ortwin; Wenzlawski, André; Grote, Alexander; Rafipoor, Amir Jones; Rafipoor, Mona; Sengstock, Klaus; Windpassinger, Patrick

    2014-07-10

    Operating ultracold quantum gas experiments outside of a laboratory environment has so far been a challenging goal, largely due to the lack of sufficiently stable optical systems. In order to increase the thermal stability of free-space laser systems, the application of nonstandard materials such as glass ceramics is required. Here, we report on Zerodur-based optical systems which include single-mode fiber couplers consisting of multiple components jointed by light-curing adhesives. The thermal stability is thoroughly investigated, revealing excellent fiber-coupling efficiencies between 0.85 and 0.92 in the temperature range from 17°C to 36°C. In conjunction with successfully performed vibration tests, these findings qualify our highly compact systems for atom interferometry experiments aboard a sounding rocket as well as various other quantum information and sensing applications.

  12. Towards quantum controlled initiation of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Marge T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Grane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R Jason [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    As a first step toward understanding and controlling excited state dynamics in explosives, transient absorption spectra of Hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB) in acetone, Trinitroaniline (TNA) in acetone and Diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) were investigated in an ultrafast shaped pump/supercontinuum probe experiment for their dependence on single parameter control schemes. Two single parameter control methods, second order spectral phase (linear chirp) and the effect of pump energy on the amount of transmitted pump light were investigated. Novel transient absorption spectra were obtained for the three explosives. The spectral features found in the HNAB and TNA solutions had evidence of more complex control possibilities, while the spectral features of DAAF were dominated by intensity control.

  13. Quantum Logic Networks for Probabilistic and Controlled Teleportation of Unknown Quantum States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ting

    2004-01-01

    We present simplification schemes for probabilistic and controlled teleportation of the unknown quantum states of both one particle and two particles and construct efficient quantum logic networks for implementing the new schemes by means of the primitive operations consisting of single-qubit gates, two-qubit controlled-not gates, Von Neumann measurement, and classically controlled operations. In these schemes the teleportation are not always successful but with certain probability.

  14. Experiments testing macroscopic quantum superpositions must be slow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Andrea; de Palma, Giacomo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-03-01

    We consider a thought experiment where the preparation of a macroscopically massive or charged particle in a quantum superposition and the associated dynamics of a distant test particle apparently allow for superluminal communication. We give a solution to the paradox which is based on the following fundamental principle: any local experiment, discriminating a coherent superposition from an incoherent statistical mixture, necessarily requires a minimum time proportional to the mass (or charge) of the system. For a charged particle, we consider two examples of such experiments, and show that they are both consistent with the previous limitation. In the first, the measurement requires to accelerate the charge, that can entangle with the emitted photons. In the second, the limitation can be ascribed to the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. On the other hand, when applied to massive particles our result provides an indirect evidence for the existence of gravitational vacuum fluctuations and for the possibility of entangling a particle with quantum gravitational radiation.

  15. Optimal control of single flux quantum (SFQ) pulse sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebermann, Per; Wilhelm, Frank

    Single flux quantum (SFQ) pulses are a natural candidate for on-chip control of superconducting qubits. High accuracy quantum gates are accessible with quantum optimal control methods. We apply trains of SFQ pulses to operate single qubit gates, under the constraint of fixed amplitude and duration of each pulse. Timing of the control pulses is optimized using genetic algorithms and simulated annealing, decreasing the average fidelity errorby several orders of magnitude. Furthermore we are able to reduce the gate time to the quantum speed limit. Leakage out of the qubit subspace as well as timing errors of the pulses are considered, exploring the robustness of our optimized sequence.This takes usone step further to a scalable quantum processor

  16. Controlling open quantum systems: tools, achievements, and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-06-01

    The advent of quantum devices, which exploit the two essential elements of quantum physics, coherence and entanglement, has sparked renewed interest in the control of open quantum systems. Successful implementations face the challenge of preserving relevant nonclassical features at the level of device operation. A major obstacle is decoherence, which is caused by interaction with the environment. Optimal control theory is a tool that can be used to identify control strategies in the presence of decoherence. Here we review recent advances in optimal control methodology that allow typical tasks in device operation for open quantum systems to be tackled and discuss examples of relaxation-optimized dynamics. Optimal control theory is also a useful tool to exploit the environment for control. We discuss examples and point out possible future extensions.

  17. Fundamental Principles of Coherent-Feedback Quantum Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-08

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0009 FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF COHERENT-FEEDBACK QUANTUM CONTROL Hideo Mabuchi LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV CA Final Report 12/08...robustness in autonomous quantum memories" we have continued our group’s long-term research program in the architectural principles of autonomous

  18. Experimental bath engineering for quantitative studies of quantum control

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Soare, A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We develop and demonstrate a technique to engineer universal unitary baths in quantum systems. Using the correspondence between unitary decoherence due to ambient environmental noise and errors in a control system for quantum bits, we show how a...

  19. Computer science approach to quantum control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzing, D.

    2006-07-01

    Whereas it is obvious that every computation process is a physical process it has hardly been recognized that many complex physical processes bear similarities to computation processes. This is in particular true for the control of physical systems on the nanoscopic level: usually the system can only be accessed via a rather limited set of elementary control operations and for many purposes only a concatenation of a large number of these basic operations will implement the desired process. This concatenation is in many cases quite similar to building complex programs from elementary steps and principles for designing algorithm may thus be a paradigm for designing control processes. For instance, one can decrease the temperature of one part of a molecule by transferring its heat to the remaining part where it is then dissipated to the environment. But the implementation of such a process involves a complex sequence of electromagnetic pulses. This work considers several hypothetical control processes on the nanoscopic level and show their analogy to computation processes. We show that measuring certain types of quantum observables is such a complex task that every instrument that is able to perform it would necessarily be an extremely powerful computer. Likewise, the implementation of a heat engine on the nanoscale requires to process the heat in a way that is similar to information processing and it can be shown that heat engines with maximal efficiency would be powerful computers, too. In the same way as problems in computer science can be classified by complexity classes we can also classify control problems according to their complexity. Moreover, we directly relate these complexity classes for control problems to the classes in computer science. Unifying notions of complexity in computer science and physics has therefore two aspects: on the one hand, computer science methods help to analyze the complexity of physical processes. On the other hand, reasonable

  20. Efficient Quantum Private Communication Based on Dynamic Control Code Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zheng-Wen; Feng, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Jin-Ye; Zeng, Gui-Hua; Qi, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Based on chaos and quantum properties, we propose a quantum private communication scheme with dynamic control code sequence. The initial sequence is obtained via chaotic systems, and the control code sequence is derived by grouping, XOR and extracting. A shift cycle algorithm is designed to enable the dynamic change of control code sequence. Analysis shows that transmission efficiency could reach 100 % with high dynamics and security.

  1. Efficient Quantum Private Communication Based on Dynamic Control Code Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zheng-Wen; Feng, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Jin-Ye; Zeng, Gui-Hua; Qi, Jin

    2017-04-01

    Based on chaos and quantum properties, we propose a quantum private communication scheme with dynamic control code sequence. The initial sequence is obtained via chaotic systems, and the control code sequence is derived by grouping, XOR and extracting. A shift cycle algorithm is designed to enable the dynamic change of control code sequence. Analysis shows that transmission efficiency could reach 100 % with high dynamics and security.

  2. Experiments on Quantum Hall Topological Phases in Ultra Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Rui-Rui [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2015-02-14

    This project is to cool electrons in semiconductors to extremely low temperatures and to study new states of matter formed by low-dimensional electrons (or holes). At such low temperatures (and with an intense magnetic field), electronic behavior differs completely from ordinary ones observed at room temperatures or regular low temperature. Studies of electrons at such low temperatures would open the door for fundamental discoveries in condensed matter physics. Present studies have been focus on topological phases in the fractional quantum Hall effect in GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor heterostructures, and the newly discovered (by this group) quantum spin Hall effect in InAs/GaSb materials. This project consists of the following components: 1) Development of efficient sample cooling techniques and electron thermometry: Our goal is to reach 1 mK electron temperature and reasonable determination of electron temperature; 2) Experiments at ultra-low temperatures: Our goal is to understand the energy scale of competing quantum phases, by measuring the temperature-dependence of transport features. Focus will be placed on such issues as the energy gap of the 5/2 state, and those of 12/5 (and possible 13/5); resistive signature of instability near 1/2 at ultra-low temperatures; 3) Measurement of the 5/2 gaps in the limit of small or large Zeeman energies: Our goal is to gain physics insight of 5/2 state at limiting experimental parameters, especially those properties concerning the spin polarization; 4) Experiments on tuning the electron-electron interaction in a screened quantum Hall system: Our goal is to gain understanding of the formation of paired fractional quantum Hall state as the interaction pseudo-potential is being modified by a nearby screening electron layer; 5) Experiments on the quantized helical edge states under a strong magnetic field and ultralow temperatures: our goal is to investigate both the bulk and edge states in a quantum spin Hall insulator under time

  3. Quantum Computation and Information From Theory to Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Imai, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the field of quantum computation and information has been developing through a fusion of results from various research fields in theoretical and practical areas. This book consists of the reviews of selected topics charterized by great progress and cover the field from theoretical areas to experimental ones. It contains fundamental areas, quantum query complexity, quantum statistical inference, quantum cloning, quantum entanglement, additivity. It treats three types of quantum security system, quantum public key cryptography, quantum key distribution, and quantum steganography. A photonic system is highlighted for the realization of quantum information processing.

  4. Survey of control performance in quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocker, David; Zheng, Yicong; Kosut, Robert; Brun, Todd; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-11-01

    There is a rich variety of physics underlying the fundamental gating operations for quantum information processing (QIP). A key aspect of a QIP system is how noise may enter during quantum operations and how suppressing or correcting its effects can best be addressed. Quantum control techniques have been developed to specifically address this effort, although a detailed classification of the compatibility of controls schemes with noise sources found in common quantum systems has not yet been performed. This work numerically examines the performance of modern control methods for suppressing decoherence in the presence of noise forms found in viable quantum systems. The noise-averaged process matrix for controlled one-qubit and two-qubit operations are calculated across noise found in systems driven by Markovian open quantum dynamics. Rather than aiming to describe the absolute best control scheme for a given physical circumstance, this work serves instead to classify quantum control behavior across a large class of noise forms so that opportunities for improving QIP performance may be identified.

  5. Survey of control performance in quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocker, David; Zheng, Yicong; Kosut, Robert; Brun, Todd; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-08-01

    There is a rich variety of physics underlying the fundamental gating operations for quantum information processing (QIP). A key aspect of a QIP system is how noise may enter during quantum operations and how suppressing or correcting its effects can best be addressed. Quantum control techniques have been developed to specifically address this effort, although a detailed classification of the compatibility of controls schemes with noise sources found in common quantum systems has not yet been performed. This work numerically examines the performance of modern control methods for suppressing decoherence in the presence of noise forms found in viable quantum systems. The noise-averaged process matrix for controlled one-qubit and two-qubit operations are calculated across noise found in systems driven by Markovian open quantum dynamics. Rather than aiming to describe the absolute best control scheme for a given physical circumstance, this work serves instead to classify quantum control behavior across a large class of noise forms so that opportunities for improving QIP performance may be identified.

  6. Control of quantum phenomena: Past, present, and future

    CERN Document Server

    Brif, Constantin; Rabitz, Herschel

    2009-01-01

    Quantum control is concerned with active manipulation of physical and chemical processes on the atomic and molecular scale. This work presents a perspective of progress in the field of control over quantum phenomena, tracing the evolution of theoretical concepts and experimental methods from early developments to the most recent advances. The current experimental successes would be impossible without the development of intense femtosecond laser sources and pulse shapers. The two most critical theoretical insights were (1) realizing that ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics can be controlled via manipulation of quantum interferences and (2) understanding that optimally shaped ultrafast laser pulses are the most effective means for producing the desired quantum interference patterns in the controlled system. Finally, these theoretical and experimental advances were brought together by the crucial concept of adaptive feedback control, which is a laboratory procedure employing measurement-driven, closed-loop o...

  7. Advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J. P.; Brennan, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment on the Applications Technology Satellite (ATS-F) will evaluate, for the first time in a space environment, the performance of a feedback-controlled variable conductance heat pipe and a heat pipe thermal diode. In addition, the temperature control aspects of a phase-change material (PCM) will be demonstrated. The methanol/stainless steel feedback-controlled heat pipe uses helium control gas that is stored in a wicked reservoir. This reservoir is electrically heated through a solid state controller that senses the temperature of the heat source directly. The ammonia/stainless steel diode heat pipe uses excess liquid to block heat transfer in the reverse direction. The PCM is octadecane. Design tradeoffs, fabrication problems, and performance during qualification and flight acceptance tests are discussed.

  8. Quantum control study of ultrafast optical responses in semiconductor quantum dot devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jung Y; Lin, Chien Y; Liu, Wei-Sheng; Chyi, Jen-Inn

    2014-12-15

    Two quantum control spectroscopic techniques were applied to study InAs quantum dot (QD) devices, which contain different strain-reducing layers. By adaptively control light matter interaction, a delayed resonant response from the InAs QDs was found to be encoded into the optimal phase profile of ultrafast optical pulse used. We verified the delayed resonant response to originate from excitons coupled to acoustic phonons of InAs QDs with two-dimensional coherent spectroscopy. Our study yields valuable dynamical information that can deepen our understanding of the coherent coupling process of exciton in the quantum-confined systems.

  9. Quantum efficiency and oscillator strength of site-controlled InAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, F.; Stobbe, Søren; Schneider, C.

    2010-01-01

    We report on time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy to determine the oscillator strength (OS) and the quantum efficiency (QE) of site-controlled InAs quantum dots nucleating on patterned nanoholes. These two quantities are determined by measurements on site-controlled quantum dot (SCQD......) samples with varying thickness of the capping layer. We determine radiative and nonradiative decay rates, from which we calculate an OS of 10.1+/-2.6 and an encouragingly high QE of (47+/-14)% for the SCQDs. The nonideal QE is attributed to nonradiative recombination at the etched nanohole interface...

  10. Phase-controlled entanglement in a quantum-beat laser: application to quantum lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sete, Eyob A.; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2011-11-01

    We study entanglement generation and control in a quantum-beat laser coupled to a two-mode squeezed vacuum reservoir. We show that the generated entanglement is robust against cavity losses and environmental decoherence and can be controlled by tuning the phases of the microwave and the squeezed input fields. Moreover, we discuss two-photon correlations, absorption and implementations in quantum optical lithography.

  11. Tests of quantum-gravity-induced nonlocality via optomechanical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenchia, Alessio; Benincasa, Dionigi M. T.; Liberati, Stefano; Marin, Francesco; Marino, Francesco; Ortolan, Antonello

    2017-01-01

    The nonrelativistic limit of nonlocal modifications to the Klein-Gordon operator is studied, and the experimental possibilities of casting stringent constraints on the nonlocality scale via planned and/or current optomechanical experiments are discussed. Details of the perturbative analysis and semianalytical simulations leading to the dynamic evolution of a quantum harmonic oscillator in the presence of nonlocality reported in [A. Belenchia, D. M. T. Benincasa, S. Liberati, F. Marin, F. Marino, and A. Ortolan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 161303 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.161303] are given, together with a comprehensive account of the experimental methodology with particular regard to sensitivity limitations related to thermal decoherence time and active cooling of the oscillator. Finally, a strategy for detecting nonlocality scales of the order of 10-22÷10-26 m by means of the spontaneous time-periodic squeezing of quantum-coherent states is provided.

  12. Ultrafast universal quantum control of a quantum-dot charge qubit using Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Li, Hai-Ou; Tu, Tao; Wang, Li; Zhou, Cheng; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    A basic requirement for quantum information processing is the ability to universally control the state of a single qubit on timescales much shorter than the coherence time. Although ultrafast optical control of a single spin has been achieved in quantum dots, scaling up such methods remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate complete control of the quantum-dot charge qubit on the picosecond scale [corrected], orders of magnitude faster than the previously measured electrically controlled charge- or spin-based qubits. We observe tunable qubit dynamics in a charge-stability diagram, in a time domain, and in a pulse amplitude space of the driven pulse. The observations are well described by Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interference. These results establish the feasibility of a full set of all-electrical single-qubit operations. Although our experiment is carried out in a solid-state architecture, the technique is independent of the physical encoding of the quantum information and has the potential for wider applications.

  13. Ultrafast universal quantum control of a quantum-dot charge qubit using Landau–Zener–Stückelberg interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Li, Hai-Ou; Tu, Tao; Wang, Li; Zhou, Cheng; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    A basic requirement for quantum information processing is the ability to universally control the state of a single qubit on timescales much shorter than the coherence time. Although ultrafast optical control of a single spin has been achieved in quantum dots, scaling up such methods remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate complete control of the quantum-dot charge qubit on the picosecond scale, orders of magnitude faster than the previously measured electrically controlled charge- or spin-based qubits. We observe tunable qubit dynamics in a charge-stability diagram, in a time domain, and in a pulse amplitude space of the driven pulse. The observations are well described by Landau–Zener–Stückelberg interference. These results establish the feasibility of a full set of all-electrical single-qubit operations. Although our experiment is carried out in a solid-state architecture, the technique is independent of the physical encoding of the quantum information and has the potential for wider applications. PMID:23360992

  14. Network Coding-Based Communications via the Controlled Quantum Teleportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Guo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the structure of the network coding over the butterfly network, a framework of quantum network coding scheme is investigated, which transmits two unknown quantum states crossly over the butterfly quantum system with the multi-photon non-maximally entangled GHZ states. In this scheme, it contains certain number of entanglement-qubit source nodes that teleport unknown quantum states to other nodes on the small-scale network where each intermediate node can pass on its received quantum states to others via superdense coding. In order to transmit the unknown states in a deterministic way, the controlled quantum teleportation is adopted on the intermediate node. It makes legal nodes more convenient than any other previous teleportation schemes to transmit unknown quantum states to unknown participants in applications. It shows that the intrinsic efficiency of transmissions approaches 100% in principle. This scheme is secure based on the securely-shared quantum channels between all nodes and the quantum mechanical impossibility of local unitary transformations between non-maximally entangled GHZ states. Moreover, the generalized scheme is proposed for transmitting two multipartite entangled states.

  15. Quantum interference and control of the optical response in quantum dot molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, H. S.; Sanz, L.; Villas-Boas, J. M.; Alcalde, A. M. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38400-902 Uberlândia-MG (Brazil)

    2013-11-25

    We discuss the optical response of a quantum molecule under the action of two lasers fields. Using a realistic model and parameters, we map the physical conditions to find three different phenomena reported in the literature: the tunneling induced transparency, the formation of Autler-Townes doublets, and the creation of a Mollow-like triplet. We found that the electron tunneling between quantum dots is responsible for the different optical regime. Our results not only explain the experimental results in the literature but also give insights for future experiments and applications in optics using quantum dots molecules.

  16. Topology of the quantum control landscape for observables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Michael; Wu, Rebing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2009-03-14

    A broad class of quantum control problems entails optimizing the expectation value of an observable operator through tailored unitary propagation of the system density matrix. Such optimization processes can be viewed as a directed search over a quantum control landscape. The attainment of the global extrema of this landscape is the goal of quantum control. Local optima will generally exist, and their enumeration is shown to scale factorially with the system's effective Hilbert space dimension. A Hessian analysis reveals that these local optima have saddlepoint topology and cannot behave as suboptimal extrema traps. The implications of the landscape topology for practical quantum control efforts are discussed, including in the context of nonideal operating conditions.

  17. Quantum interferences and their classical limit in laser driven coherent control scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Ignacio, E-mail: ifranco@chem.northwestern.edu [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6 (Canada); Spanner, Michael; Brumer, Paul [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2010-05-12

    Graphical abstract: The analogy between Young's double-slit experiment with matter and laser driven coherent control schemes is investigated, and shown to be limited. To do so, a general decomposition of observables in the Heisenberg picture into direct terms and interference contributions is introduced, and formal quantum-classical correspondence arguments in the Heisenberg picture are employed to define classical analogs of quantum interference terms. While the classical interference contributions in the double-slit experiment are shown to be zero, they can be nonzero in laser driven coherent control schemes and lead to laser control in the classical limit. This classical limit is interpreted in terms of nonlinear response theory arguments. - Abstract: The analogy between Young's double-slit experiment with matter and laser driven coherent control schemes is investigated, and shown to be limited. To do so, a general decomposition of observables in the Heisenberg picture into direct terms and interference contributions is introduced, and formal quantum-classical correspondence arguments in the Heisenberg picture are employed to define classical analogs of quantum interference terms. While the classical interference contributions in the double-slit experiment are shown to be zero, they can be nonzero in laser driven coherent control schemes and lead to laser control in the classical limit. This classical limit is interpreted in terms of nonlinear response theory arguments.

  18. Local Gate Control in Carbon Nanotube Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biercuk, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit many properties which make them ideal candidates for applications in coherent electronic devices for quantum computation.We have made significant technological advancements in device fabrication,for the creation of multiple spatially localized electrostatic gates on a single nanotube device. These advancements permit a previously unattainable level of device control in the quantum regime, essential forelectronic logic operations. Our measurements have demonstrated independent gate control in nanotube double quantum dots defined by naturally occurring tunnel barriers [1], as well as the controllable formation of intratube quantum point contacts [2]. In these devices conductance quantization is evident in units of e2/h, suggesting that both band and spin degeneracies may be lifted at zero magnetic field. Local gating has also permitted the fabrication of fully gate-defined intratube quantum dots with gate-tunable tunnel barriers. Multiple quantum dots with independent control over charge number and tunneling rates have been demonstrated [3], raising the functionality of carbon nanotube devices to match that of standard semiconductor heterostructures. New devices incorporating integrated RF-SETs, and microwave studies of gate-defined intratube quantum dots will be discussed.[1] Science 303 p.655, 20042] PRL in press, cond-mat/04066523] To be published

  19. Quantum computing by optical control of electron spins

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ren-Bao; Sham, L J

    2010-01-01

    We review the progress and main challenges in implementing large-scale quantum computing by optical control of electron spins in quantum dots (QDs). Relevant systems include self-assembled QDs of III-V or II-VI compound semiconductors (such as InGaAs and CdSe), monolayer fluctuation QDs in compound semiconductor quantum wells, and impurity centers in solids such as P-donors in silicon and nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. The decoherence of the electron spin qubits is discussed and various schemes for countering the decoherence problem are reviewed. We put forward designs of local nodes consisting of a few qubits which can be individually addressed and controlled. Remotely separated local nodes are connected by photonic structures (microcavities and waveguides) to form a large-scale distributed quantum system or a quantum network. The operation of the quantum network consists of optical control of a single electron spin, coupling of two spins in a local nodes, optically controlled quantum interfacing betwe...

  20. Optimal quantum circuit synthesis from Controlled-U gates

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J; Sastry, S; Whaley, K B; Zhang, Jun; Vala, Jiri; Sastry, Shankar

    2003-01-01

    From a geometric approach, we derive the minimum number of applications needed for an arbitrary Controlled-Unitary gate to construct a universal quantum circuit. A new analytic construction procedure is presented and shown to be either optimal or close to optimal. This result can be extended to improve the efficiency of universal quantum circuit construction from any entangling gate. Specifically, for both the Controlled-NOT and Double-CNOT gates, we develop simple analytic ways to construct universal quantum circuits with three applications, which is the least possible.

  1. The quantum coherent mechanism for singlet fission: experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wai-Lun; Berkelbach, Timothy C; Provorse, Makenzie R; Monahan, Nicholas R; Tritsch, John R; Hybertsen, Mark S; Reichman, David R; Gao, Jiali; Zhu, X-Y

    2013-06-18

    The absorption of one photon by a semiconductor material usually creates one electron-hole pair. However, this general rule breaks down in a few organic semiconductors, such as pentacene and tetracene, where one photon absorption may result in two electron-hole pairs. This process, where a singlet exciton transforms to two triplet excitons, can have quantum yields as high as 200%. Singlet fission may be useful to solar cell technologies to increase the power conversion efficiency beyond the so-called Shockley-Queisser limit. Through time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PPE) spectroscopy in crystalline pentacene and tetracene, our lab has recently provided the first spectroscopic signatures in singlet fission of a critical intermediate known as the multiexciton state (also called a correlated triplet pair). More importantly, we found that population of the multiexciton state rises at the same time as the singlet state on the ultrafast time scale upon photoexcitation. This observation does not fit with the traditional view of singlet fission involving the incoherent conversion of a singlet to a triplet pair. However, it provides an experimental foundation for a quantum coherent mechanism in which the electronic coupling creates a quantum superposition of the singlet and the multiexciton state immediately after optical excitation. In this Account, we review key experimental findings from TR-2PPE experiments and present a theoretical analysis of the quantum coherent mechanism based on electronic structural and density matrix calculations for crystalline tetracene lattices. Using multistate density functional theory, we find that the direct electronic coupling between singlet and multiexciton states is too weak to explain the experimental observation. Instead, indirect coupling via charge transfer intermediate states is two orders of magnitude stronger, and dominates the dynamics for ultrafast multiexciton formation. Density matrix calculation for the crystalline

  2. Event-based Corpuscular Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Michielsen, K; De Raedt, H

    2010-01-01

    A corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one is presented. The event-based corpuscular model is shown to give a unified description of multiple-beam fringes of a plane parallel plate, single-photon Mach-Zehnder interferometer, Wheeler's delayed choice, photon tunneling, quantum erasers, two-beam interference, double-slit, and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm and Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiments.

  3. A Monolithic Filter Cavity for Experiments in Quantum Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Palittapongarnpim, Pantita; Lvovsky, A I

    2012-01-01

    By applying a high-reflectivity dielectric coating on both sides of a commercial plano-convex lens, we produce a stable monolithic Fabry-Perot cavity suitable for use as a narrow band filter in quantum optics experiments. The resonant frequency is selected by means of thermal expansion. Owing to the long term mechanical stability, no optical locking techniques are required. We characterize the cavity performance as an optical filter, obtaining a 45 dB suppression of unwanted modes while maintaining a transmission of 60%.

  4. Delayed choice experiments, the arrow of time, and quantum measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, L. S.

    2011-11-01

    By a radical modification of statistical mechanics the measurement process of quantum mechanics can be described in terms of pure, unitary time evolution, with no wave function collapse or many-world ideas. The key notion is "special states," rare microscopic states of a complex system. Recovering the standard probabilities requires of this theory the appearance of Cauchy-distributed noise in some measurement processes. This article treats experimental situations where such noise might be detected and correlated with the need or absence of need for special states. Included in this possibility are "delayed choice" experiments, in which the correlation contravenes conventional ideas on causality. Background material on all topics is provided.

  5. Steering quantum dynamics via bang-bang control: Implementing optimal fixed-point quantum search algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhole, Gaurav; Anjusha, V. S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2016-04-01

    A robust control over quantum dynamics is of paramount importance for quantum technologies. Many of the existing control techniques are based on smooth Hamiltonian modulations involving repeated calculations of basic unitaries resulting in time complexities scaling rapidly with the length of the control sequence. Here we show that bang-bang controls need one-time calculation of basic unitaries and hence scale much more efficiently. By employing a global optimization routine such as the genetic algorithm, it is possible to synthesize not only highly intricate unitaries, but also certain nonunitary operations. We demonstrate the unitary control through the implementation of the optimal fixed-point quantum search algorithm in a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system. Moreover, by combining the bang-bang pulses with the crusher gradients, we also demonstrate nonunitary transformations of thermal equilibrium states into effective pure states in three- as well as five-qubit NMR systems.

  6. Hamiltonian identification through enhanced observability utilizing quantum control

    CERN Document Server

    Leghtas, Zaki; Rabitz, Herschel; Rouchon, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers Hamiltonian identification for a controllable quantum system with non-degenerate transitions and a known initial state. We assume to have at our disposal a single scalar control input and the population measure of only one state at an (arbitrarily large) final time T. We prove that the quantum dipole moment matrix is locally observable in the following sense: for any two close but distinct dipole moment matrices, we construct discriminating controls giving two different measurements. Such discriminating controls are constructed to have three well defined temporal components, as inspired by Ramsey interferometry. This result suggests that what may appear at first to be very restrictive measurements are actually rich for identification, when combined with well designed discriminating controls, to uniquely identify the complete dipole moment of such systems. The assessment supports the employment of quantum control as a promising means to achieve high quality identification of a Hamiltonian.

  7. Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial on the Double-Slit Experiment to Improve Student Understanding of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Ryan; Maries, Alexandru; Singh, Chandralekha

    2017-01-01

    Learning quantum mechanics is challenging, even for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students. Research-validated interactive tutorials that build on students' prior knowledge can be useful tools to enhance student learning. We have been investigating student difficulties with quantum mechanics pertaining to the double-slit experiment in…

  8. Discrete-Time Controllability for Feedback Quantum Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Albertini, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Controllability properties for discrete-time, Markovian quantum dynamics are investigated. We find that, while in general the controlled system is not finite-time controllable, feedback control allows for arbitrary asymptotic state-to-state transitions. Under further assumption on the form of the measurement, we show that finite-time controllability can be achieved in a time that scales linearly with the dimension of the system, and we provide an iterative procedure to design the unitary control actions.

  9. Optimal control of quantum systems by chirped pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstrup, Bjarne; Doll, J. D.; Sauerbrey, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    Research on optimal control of quantum systems has been severely restricted by the lack of experimentally feasible control pulses. Here, to overcome this obstacle, optimal control is considered with the help of chirped pulses. Simulated annealing is used as the optimizing procedure. The examples ...

  10. Controlled remote implementation of partially unknown quantum operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN QiuBo; LIU DongDong

    2008-01-01

    A protocol for controlled remote implementation of a partially unknown operation on an arbitrary quantum state is proposed. In this protocol, a task can be performed using a GHZ state shared among three distant parties: Alice, Bob and the controller Charlie. This protocol is also generalized to the multi-party control system based on sharing an N-qubit GHZ state.

  11. Coherent control in room-temperature quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers using shaped pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Karni, Ouri; Eisenstein, Gadi; Ivanov, Vitalii; Reithmaier, Johann Peter

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability to control quantum coherent Rabi-oscillations in a room-temperature quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) by shaping the light pulses that trigger them. The experiments described here show that when the excitation is resonant with the short wavelength slope of the SOA gain spectrum, a linear frequency chirp affects its ability to trigger Rabi-oscillations within the SOA: A negative chirp inhibits Rabi-oscillations whereas a positive chirp can enhance them, relative to the interaction of a transform limited pulse. The experiments are confirmed by a numerical calculation that models the propagation of the experimentally shaped pulses through the SOA.

  12. Realizing quantum controlled phase flip through cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun-Feng; Lin, Xiu-Min; Gao, Jie; Yang, Yong; Han, Zheng-Fu; Guo, Guang-Can

    2004-10-01

    We propose a scheme to realize quantum controlled phase flip (CPF) between two rare-earth ions embedded in the respective microsphere cavity via interacting with a single-photon pulse in sequence. The numerical simulations illuminate that the CPF gate between ions is robust and scalable with extremely high fidelity and low error rate. Our scheme is more applicable than other schemes presented before based on current laboratory cavity-QED technology, and it is possible to be used as an applied unit gate in future quantum computation and quantum communication.

  13. Realizing Quantum Controlled Phase Flip through Cavity-QED

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Y F; Gao, J; Yang, Y; Han, Z F; Guo, G C; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Lin, Xiu-Min; Gao, Jie; Yang, Yong; Han, Zheng-Fu; Guo, Guang-Can

    2004-01-01

    We propose a scheme to realize quantum controlled phase flip (CPF) between two rare earth ions embedded in respective microsphere cavity via interacting with a single-photon pulse in sequence. The numerical simulations illuminate that the CPF gate between ions is robust and scalable with extremely high fidelity and low error rate. Our scheme is more applicable than other schemes presented before based on current laboratory cavity-QED technology, and it is possible to be used as an applied unit gate in future quantum computation and quantum communication.

  14. Controlled Teleportation of Multi-Qudit Quantum Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Hua; ZHAN Xiao-Gui; ZENG Hao-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    We present a controlled teleportation scheme for teleporting an arbitrary superposition state of an M-qudit quantum system. The scheme employs only one entangled state as quantum channel, which consists of the qudits from Alice, Bob and every agent. The quantum operations used in the teleportation process are a series of qudit Bell measurements, single-qudit projective measurements, qudit H-gates, qudit-Pauli gates and qudit phase gates. It is shown that the original state can be restored by the receiver only on the condition that all the agents collaborate. If any agent does not cooperate, the original state can not be fully recovered.

  15. Quantum synchronization in an optomechanical system based on Lyapunov control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-06-01

    We extend the concepts of quantum complete synchronization and phase synchronization, which were proposed in A. Mari et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 103605 (2013)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.111.103605, to more widespread quantum generalized synchronization. Generalized synchronization can be considered a necessary condition or a more flexible derivative of complete synchronization, and its criterion and synchronization measure are proposed and analyzed in this paper. As examples, we consider two typical generalized synchronizations in a designed optomechanical system. Unlike the effort to construct a special coupling synchronization system, we purposefully design extra control fields based on Lyapunov control theory. We find that the Lyapunov function can adapt to more flexible control objectives, which is more suitable for generalized synchronization control, and the control fields can be achieved simply with a time-variant voltage. Finally, the existence of quantum entanglement in different generalized synchronizations is also discussed.

  16. Proposed experiment for the quantum "Guess my number" protocol

    CERN Document Server

    Cabello, A; Cabello, Adan; Lopez-Tarrida, Antonio J.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental realization of the entanglement-assisted "Guess my number" protocol for the reduction of communication complexity, introduced by Steane and van Dam, would require producing and detecting three-qubit GHZ states with an efficiency eta > 0.70, which would require single photon detectors of efficiency sigma > 0.89. We propose a modification of the protocol which can be translated into a real experiment using present-day technology. In the proposed experiment, the quantum reduction of the multi-party communication complexity would require an efficiency eta > 0.05, achievable with detectors of sigma > 0.47, for four parties, and eta > 0.17 (sigma > 0.55) for three parties.

  17. Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching of semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Wang, George T.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical (QSC-PEC) etching provides a new route to the precision fabrication of epitaxial semiconductor nanostructures in the sub-10-nm size regime. For example, quantum dots (QDs) can be QSC-PEC-etched from epitaxial InGaN thin films using narrowband laser photoexcitation, and the QD sizes (and hence bandgaps and photoluminescence wavelengths) are determined by the photoexcitation wavelength.

  18. Gates controlled parallel-coupled bilayer graphene double quantum dot

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lin-Jun; Wei, Da; Cao, Gang; Tu, Tao; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Chang, A M

    2011-01-01

    Here we report the fabrication and quantum transport measurements of gates controlled parallel-coupled bilayer graphene double quantum dot. It is shown that the interdot coupling strength of the parallel double dots can be effectively tuned from weak to strong regime by both the in-plane plunger gates and back gate. All the relevant energy scales and parameters of the bilayer graphene parallel-coupled double dot can be extracted from the honeycomb charge stability diagrams revealed through the transport measurements.

  19. Quantum Control nd Measurement of Spins in Cold Atomic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    Spins are natural carriers of quantum information given their long coherence time and our ability to precisely control and measure them with magneto-optical fields. Spins in cold atomic gases provide a pristine environment for such quantum control and measurement, and thus this system can act as a test-bed for the development of quantum simulators. I will discuss the progress my group has made in collaboration with Prof. Jessen, University of Arizona, to develop the toolbox for this test-bed. Through its interactions with rf and microwave magnetic fields, whose waveforms are designed through optimal control techniques, we can implement arbitrary unitary control on the internal hyperfine spins of cesium atoms, a 16 dimensional Hilbert space (isomorphic to 4 qubits). Control of the collective spin of the ensemble of many atoms is performed via the mutual coupling of the atomic ensemble to a mode of the electromagnetic field that acts as a quantum data bus for entangling atoms with one another. Internal spin control can be used to enhance the entangling power of the atom-photon interface. Finally, both projective and weak-continuous measurements can be performed to tomograhically reconstruct quantum states and processes.

  20. Quantum Dots in a Polymer Composite: A Convenient Particle-in-a-Box Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Charles V.; Giffin, Guinevere A.

    2008-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are at the forefront of materials science chemistry with applications in biological imaging and photovoltaic technologies. We have developed a simple laboratory experiment to measure the quantum-dot size from fluorescence spectra. A major roadblock of quantum-dot based exercises is the particle synthesis and handling;…

  1. Quantum control and process tomography of a semiconductor quantum dot hybrid qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohun; Shi, Zhan; Simmons, C B; Ward, D R; Prance, J R; Koh, Teck Seng; Gamble, John King; Savage, D E; Lagally, M G; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S N; Eriksson, Mark A

    2014-07-03

    The similarities between gated quantum dots and the transistors in modern microelectronics--in fabrication methods, physical structure and voltage scales for manipulation--have led to great interest in the development of quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor quantum dots. Although quantum dot spin qubits have demonstrated long coherence times, their manipulation is often slower than desired for important future applications, such as factoring. Furthermore, scalability and manufacturability are enhanced when qubits are as simple as possible. Previous work has increased the speed of spin qubit rotations by making use of integrated micromagnets, dynamic pumping of nuclear spins or the addition of a third quantum dot. Here we demonstrate a qubit that is a hybrid of spin and charge. It is simple, requiring neither nuclear-state preparation nor micromagnets. Unlike previous double-dot qubits, the hybrid qubit enables fast rotations about two axes of the Bloch sphere. We demonstrate full control on the Bloch sphere with π-rotation times of less than 100 picoseconds in two orthogonal directions, which is more than an order of magnitude faster than any other double-dot qubit. The speed arises from the qubit's charge-like characteristics, and its spin-like features result in resistance to decoherence over a wide range of gate voltages. We achieve full process tomography in our electrically controlled semiconductor quantum dot qubit, extracting high fidelities of 85 per cent for X rotations (transitions between qubit states) and 94 per cent for Z rotations (phase accumulation between qubit states).

  2. Adaptive Controller Design for Faulty UAVs via Quantum Information Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyang Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an adaptive controller is designed for a UAV flight control system against faults and parametric uncertainties based on quantum information technology and the Popov hyperstability theory. First, considering the bounded control input, the state feedback controller is designed to make the system stable. The model of adaptive control is introduced to eliminate the impact by the uncertainties of system parameters via quantum information technology. Then, according to the model reference adaptive principle, an adaptive control law based on the Popov hyperstability theory is designed. This law enable better robustness of the flight control system and tracking control performances. The closed-loop system's stability is guaranteed by the Popov hyperstability theory. The simulation results demonstrate that a better dynamic performance of the UAV flight control system with faults and parametric uncertainties can be maintained with the proposed method.

  3. Adaptive Controller Design for Faulty UAVs via Quantum Information Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyang Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an adaptive controller is designed for a UAV flight control system against faults and parametric uncertainties based on quantum information technology and the Popov hyperstability theory. First, considering the bounded control input, the state feedback controller is designed to make the system stable. The model of adaptive control is introduced to eliminate the impact by the uncertainties of system parameters via quantum information technology. Then, according to the model reference adaptive principle, an adaptive control law based on the Popov hyperstability theory is designed. This law enable better robustness of the flight control system and tracking control performances. The closed‐loop system’s stability is guaranteed by the Popov hyperstability theory. The simulation results demonstrate that a better dynamic performance of the UAV flight control system with faults and parametric uncertainties can be maintained with the proposed method.

  4. Strain-optic active control for quantum integrated photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Humphreys, Peter C; Spring, Justin B; Moore, Merritt; Salter, Patrick S; Booth, Martin J; Kolthammer, W Steven; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-01-01

    We present a practical method for active phase control on a photonic chip that has immediate applications in quantum photonics. Our approach uses strain-optic modification of the refractive index of individual waveguides, effected by a millimeter-scale mechanical actuator. The resulting phase change of propagating optical fields is rapid and polarization-dependent, enabling quantum applications that require active control and polarization encoding. We demonstrate strain-optic control of non-classical states of light in silica, showing the generation of 2-photon polarisation N00N states by manipulating Hong-Ou-Mandel interference. We also demonstrate switching times of a few microseconds, which are sufficient for silica-based feed-forward control of photonic quantum states.

  5. Control of quantum transverse correlations on a four-photon system

    CERN Document Server

    de Assis, P -L; Berruezo, L P; Ferraz, J; Santos, I F; Sciarrino, F; Pádua, S; 10.1364/OE.19.003715

    2011-01-01

    Control of spatial quantum correlations in bi-photons is one of the fundamental principles of Quantum Imaging. Up to now, experiments have been restricted to controlling the state of a single bi-photon, by using linear optical elements. In this work we demonstrate experimental control of quantum correlations in a four-photon state comprised of two pairs of photons. Our scheme is based on a high-efficiency parametric downconversion source coupled to a double slit by a variable linear optical setup, in order to obtain spatially encoded qubits. Both entangled and separable pairs have been obtained, by altering experimental parameters. We show how the correlations influence both the interference and diffraction on the double slit.

  6. Crystal Phase Quantum Well Emission with Digital Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assali, S; Lähnemann, J; Vu, T T T; Jöns, K D; Gagliano, L; Verheijen, M A; Akopian, N; Bakkers, E P A M; Haverkort, J E M

    2017-09-18

    One of the major challenges in the growth of quantum well and quantum dot heterostructures is the realization of atomically sharp interfaces. Nanowires provide a new opportunity to engineer the band structure as they facilitate the controlled switching of the crystal structure between the zinc-blende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) phases. Such a crystal phase switching results in the formation of crystal phase quantum wells (CPQWs) and quantum dots (CPQDs). For GaP CPQWs, the inherent electric fields due to the discontinuity of the spontaneous polarization at the WZ/ZB junctions lead to the confinement of both types of charge carriers at the opposite interfaces of the WZ/ZB/WZ structure. This confinement leads to a novel type of transition across a ZB flat plate barrier. Here, we show digital tuning of the visible emission of WZ/ZB/WZ CPQWs in a GaP nanowire by changing the thickness of the ZB barrier. The energy spacing between the sharp emission lines is uniform and is defined by the addition of single ZB monolayers. The controlled growth of identical quantum wells with atomically flat interfaces at predefined positions featuring digitally tunable discrete emission energies may provide a new route to further advance entangled photons in solid state quantum systems.

  7. Quantum optical circulator controlled by a single chirally coupled atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheucher, Michael; Hilico, Adèle; Will, Elisa; Volz, Jürgen; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2016-12-01

    Integrated nonreciprocal optical components, which have an inherent asymmetry between their forward and backward propagation direction, are key for routing signals in photonic circuits. Here, we demonstrate a fiber-integrated quantum optical circulator operated by a single atom. Its nonreciprocal behavior arises from the chiral interaction between the atom and the transversally confined light. We demonstrate that the internal quantum state of the atom controls the operation direction of the circulator and that it features a strongly nonlinear response at the single-photon level. This enables, for example, photon number–dependent routing and novel quantum simulation protocols. Furthermore, such a circulator can in principle be prepared in a coherent superposition of its operational states and may become a key element for quantum information processing in scalable integrated optical circuits.

  8. Controllable multiple-quantum transitions in a T-shaped small quantum dot-ring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiongwen, E-mail: hnsxw617@163.com [Department of Physics, Huaihua University, Huaihua 418008 (China); Chen, Baoju; Song, Kehui [Department of Physics, Huaihua University, Huaihua 418008 (China); Zhou, Guanghui [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory for Low-Dimensional Quantum Structures and Manipulation (Ministry of Education), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2016-05-01

    Based on the tight-binding model and the slave boson mean field approximation, we investigate the electron transport properties in a small quantum dot (QD)-ring system. Namely, a strongly correlated QD not only attaches directly to two normal metallic electrodes, but also forms a magnetic control Aharonov–Bohm quantum ring with a few noninteracting QDs. We show that the parity effect, the Kondo effect, and the multiple Fano effects coexist in our system. Moreover, the parities, defined by the odd- and even-numbered energy levels in this system, can be switched by adjusting magnetic flux phase ϕ located at the center of the quantum ring, which induces multiple controllable Fano-interference energy pathways. Therefore, the constructive and destructive multi-Fano interference transition, the Kondo and Fano resonance transition at the Fermi level, the Fano resonance and ani-resonance transition are realized in the even parity system. They can also be observed in the odd parity system when one adjusts the phase ϕ and the gate voltage V{sub g} applied to the noninteracting QDs. The multi-quantum transitions determine some interesting transport properties such as the current switch and its multi-flatsteps, the differential conductance switch at zero bias voltage and its oscillation or quantization at the low bias voltage. These results may be useful for the observation of multiple quantum effect interplays experimentally and the design of controllable QD-based device.

  9. Controllable multiple-quantum transitions in a T-shaped small quantum dot-ring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiongwen; Chen, Baoju; Song, Kehui; Zhou, Guanghui

    2016-05-01

    Based on the tight-binding model and the slave boson mean field approximation, we investigate the electron transport properties in a small quantum dot (QD)-ring system. Namely, a strongly correlated QD not only attaches directly to two normal metallic electrodes, but also forms a magnetic control Aharonov-Bohm quantum ring with a few noninteracting QDs. We show that the parity effect, the Kondo effect, and the multiple Fano effects coexist in our system. Moreover, the parities, defined by the odd- and even-numbered energy levels in this system, can be switched by adjusting magnetic flux phase ϕ located at the center of the quantum ring, which induces multiple controllable Fano-interference energy pathways. Therefore, the constructive and destructive multi-Fano interference transition, the Kondo and Fano resonance transition at the Fermi level, the Fano resonance and ani-resonance transition are realized in the even parity system. They can also be observed in the odd parity system when one adjusts the phase ϕ and the gate voltage Vg applied to the noninteracting QDs. The multi-quantum transitions determine some interesting transport properties such as the current switch and its multi-flatsteps, the differential conductance switch at zero bias voltage and its oscillation or quantization at the low bias voltage. These results may be useful for the observation of multiple quantum effect interplays experimentally and the design of controllable QD-based device.

  10. Coherent control of quantum systems as a resource theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matera, J. M.; Egloff, D.; Killoran, N.; Plenio, M. B.

    2016-08-01

    Control at the interface between the classical and the quantum world is fundamental in quantum physics. In particular, how classical control is enhanced by coherence effects is an important question both from a theoretical as well as from a technological point of view. In this work, we establish a resource theory describing this setting and explore relations to the theory of coherence, entanglement and information processing. Specifically, for the coherent control of quantum systems, the relevant resources of entanglement and coherence are found to be equivalent and closely related to a measure of discord. The results are then applied to the DQC1 protocol and the precision of the final measurement is expressed in terms of the available resources.

  11. The Foundations of Quantum Information and Feasible Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, C

    2000-01-01

    This thesis consists of four parts. In the first part it is shown that optimal universal cloning of photons can be realized with the help of stimulated emission. Possible schemes based on three-level systems and on parametric down-conversion are analyzed in detail. The second part shows that the dynamical rules of quantum physics can be derived from its static properties and the condition that superluminal communication is forbidden. In the third part a very simple form of the Kochen-Specker theorem is presented, which leads to a proposal for a simple experimental test of non-contextual hidden variables. The fourth part shows how hidden-variable theorems can be derived in a completely operational way. In particular a Kochen-Specker theorem is derived that applies to experiments with finite precision.

  12. Yes-no experiments and ordered structures in quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garola, C.; Solombrino, L. (Lecce Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica)

    1983-09-11

    We consider the set E of all the yes-no experiments that can be performed on a given physical system and the related posets (E,<=) of the ''effects'' and (L,<=) of the ''propositions'', illustrate by means of examples the relations <= and <= and give counter examples for properties that one might suspect to hold in (E,<=); in particular, we show that Mackey's axiom V does not usually hold either in (E,<=) or in its greatest subposet (E/sub 0/,<=) which can be orthocomplemented with standard methods in quantum logic. Following on the suggestions arising from the examples, we associate with every observable T, by means of the concept of ''efficiency'', a family Esub(T) of yes-no experiments, hence a family Esub(T) of effects parameterized by the Borel fuzzy sets on the real line, and show that the description of the effects by means of operators, which is usual in some axiomatic approaches, can be recovered in standard Hilbert-space quantum theory as an immediate consequence of simple, ''intuitive'' assumptions on E. This description is used in order to explicitly display (possibly in the presence of superselection rules) some properties of the representations of (E,<=) and (L,<=), and the links between some different axiomatic approaches (in particular, Mackey and Piron). Finally, we point out some mathematical properties of the lattice of the operators that describe Esub(T).

  13. Yes-no experiments and ordered structures in quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garola, C.; Solombrino, L. (Lecce Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica)

    1983-09-11

    The set E of all the yes-no experiments that can be performed on a given physical system and the related posets (E, <=) of the 'effects' and (L, '<=') of the propositions are considered. The relations <= and '<=' are illustrated by means of examples, and counterexamples for properties that one might suspect to hold in (E, '<=') are given. In particular it is shown that Mackey's axiom V does not usually hold either in (E, <=) or in its greatest subposet (E/sub 0/, <=) which can be orthocomplemented with standard methods in quantum logic. Following on the suggestions arising from the examples, it is associated with every observable T, by means of the concept of 'efficiency', a family Esub(T) of yes-no experiments, hence a family Esub(T) of effects parametrized by the Borel fuzzy sets on the real line, and it is shown that the description of the effects by means of operators, which is usual in some axiomatic approaches, can be recovered in standard Hilbert-space quantum theory as an immediate consequence of simple, 'intuitive' assumptions on E. This description is used in order to explicitly display (possibly in the presence of superselection rules) some properties of the representations of (E, <=) and (L, '<='), and the links between some different axiomatic approaches (in particular, Mackey and Piron). Finally, some mathematical properties of the lattice of the operators that describe Esub(T) are pointed out.

  14. Blind Quantum Signature with Controlled Four-Particle Cluster States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Jinjing; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2017-08-01

    A novel blind quantum signature scheme based on cluster states is introduced. Cluster states are a type of multi-qubit entangled states and it is more immune to decoherence than other entangled states. The controlled four-particle cluster states are created by acting controlled-Z gate on particles of four-particle cluster states. The presented scheme utilizes the above entangled states and simplifies the measurement basis to generate and verify the signature. Security analysis demonstrates that the scheme is unconditional secure. It can be employed to E-commerce systems in quantum scenario.

  15. Optical generation and control of quantum coherence in semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Slavcheva, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented control of coherence that can be exercised in quantum optics of atoms and molecules has stimulated increasing efforts in extending it to solid-state systems. One motivation to exploit the coherent phenomena comes from the emergence of the quantum information paradigm, however many more potential device applications ranging from novel lasers to spintronics are all bound up with issues in coherence. The book focuses on recent advances in the optical control of coherence in excitonic and polaritonic systems as model systems for the complex semiconductor dynamics towards the goal

  16. Benchmarking quantum control methods on a 12-qubit system

    CERN Document Server

    Negrevergne, C; Ryan, C A; Ditty, M; Cyr-Racine, F; Power, W; Boulant, N; Havel, T; Cory, D G; Laflamme, R

    2006-01-01

    In this letter, we present an experimental benchmark of operational control methods in quantum information processors extended up to 12 qubits. We implement universal control of this large Hilbert space using two complementary approaches and discuss their accuracy and scalability. Despite decoherence, we were able to reach a 12-coherence state (or 12-qubits pseudo-pure cat state), and decode it into an 11 qubit plus one qutrit labeled observable pseudo-pure state using liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processors.

  17. Manipulating atom and photon entanglement from 'thought experiments' to quantum information processing

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2002-01-01

    Composite quantum systems cannot generally be analysed as a juxtaposition of separate entities, each described by its own wave function. They are described instead by a global entangled state. Entanglement appears thus as an essential concept, lying at the heart of quantum physics. At a fundamental level it is closely related to non-locality, quantum measurement, complementarity and decoherence, concepts that the founding fathers of quantum physics have analysed in various 'thought experiments'. At a more applied level, the engineering of entanglement in systems of increasing complexity could in principle open the way to various kinds of fascinating quantum information processing applications (quantum cryptography, teleportation, quantum computation). The study of entanglement has recently evolved as a very competitive field of research, both theoretical and experimental. In quantum optics, entanglement has been studied with twin-photon beams, trapped ions and with atoms and photons in cavities. After a gener...

  18. Feedback control in quantum optics: an overview of experimental breakthroughs and areas of application

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, Alessio

    2012-01-01

    We present a broad summary of research involving the application of quantum feedback control techniques to optical set-ups, from the early enhancement of optical amplitude squeezing to the recent stabilisation of photon number states in a microwave cavity, dwelling mostly on the latest experimental advances. Feedback control of quantum optical continuous variables, quantum non-demolition memories, feedback cooling, quantum state control, adaptive quantum measurements and coherent feedback strategies will all be touched upon in our discussion.

  19. Feedback control in quantum optics: an overview of experimental breakthroughs and areas of application

    OpenAIRE

    Alessio Serafini

    2012-01-01

    We present a broad summary of research involving the application of quantum feedback control techniques to optical set-ups, from the early enhancement of optical amplitude squeezing to the recent stabilisation of photon number states in a microwave cavity, dwelling mostly on the latest experimental advances. Feedback control of quantum optical continuous variables, quantum non-demolition memories, feedback cooling, quantum state control, adaptive quantum measurements and coherent feedback str...

  20. Quantum optimal control theory applied to transitions in diatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysebo, Marius; Veseth, Leif

    2014-12-01

    Quantum optimal control theory is applied to control electric dipole transitions in a real multilevel system. The specific system studied in the present work is comprised of a multitude of hyperfine levels in the electronic ground state of the OH molecule. Spectroscopic constants are used to obtain accurate energy eigenstates and electric dipole matrix elements. The goal is to calculate the optimal time-dependent electric field that yields a maximum of the transition probability for a specified initial and final state. A further important objective was to study the detailed quantum processes that take place during such a prescribed transition in a multilevel system. Two specific transitions are studied in detail. The computed optimal electric fields as well as the paths taken through the multitude of levels reveal quite interesting quantum phenomena.

  1. Control of quantum magnets by atomic exchange bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shichao; Choi, Deung-Jang; Burgess, Jacob A J; Rolf-Pissarczyk, Steffen; Loth, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Mixing of discretized states in quantum magnets has a radical impact on their properties. Managing this effect is key for spintronics in the quantum limit. Magnetic fields can modify state mixing and, for example, mitigate destabilizing effects in single-molecule magnets. The exchange bias field has been proposed as a mechanism for localized control of individual nanomagnets. Here, we demonstrate that exchange coupling with the magnetic tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope provides continuous tuning of spin state mixing in an individual nanomagnet. By directly measuring spin relaxation time with electronic pump-probe spectroscopy, we find that the exchange interaction acts analogously to a local magnetic field that can be applied to a specific atom. It can be tuned in strength by up to several tesla and cancel external magnetic fields, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of complete control over individual quantum magnets with atomically localized exchange coupling.

  2. Globally controlled artificial semiconducting molecules as quantum computers

    CERN Document Server

    Tribollet, J

    2005-01-01

    Quantum computers are expected to be considerably more efficient than classical computers for the execution of some specific tasks. The difficulty in the practical implementation of thoose computers is to build a microscopic quantum system that can be controlled at a larger mesoscopic scale. Here I show that vertical lines of donor atoms embedded in an appropriate Zinc Oxide semiconductor structure can constitute artificial molecules that are as many copy of the same quantum computer. In this scalable architecture, each unit of information is encoded onto the electronic spin of a donor. Contrary to most existing practical proposals, here the logical operations only require a global control of the spins by electromagnetic pulses. Ensemble measurements simplify the readout. With appropriate improvement of its growth and doping methods, Zinc Oxide could be a good semiconductor for the next generation of computers.

  3. Controlled teleportation of multi-qudit quantum information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for realizing a controlled teleportation of random M-qudit quantum information under the control of N agents. The resource consumption includes a prearranged (2M + N + 1)-qudit entangled quantum channel and (2M + N + 1) log2 d-bit classical communication. And the quantum operations used in the teleportation process are a series of generalized Bell-state measurements, single-qudit measurements, qudit H-gates, qudit-Pauli gates and qudit phase gates. It is shown that the original state can be restored by the receiver only on condition that all the agents work in collaboration with each others. If one agent does not cooperate with the other, the original state cannot be fully recovered.

  4. Nano Electronics on Atomically Controlled van der Waals Quantum Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-30

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 14 Aug 13 to 13 Feb 15 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nano Electronics on Atomically Controlled van der Waals...OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 14 MAY 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 14-08-2013 to 13-02-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nano ...AOARD Grant 134122 “ Nano Electronics on Atomically Controlled van der Waals Quantum Heterostructures” 3/30/2015 Name of Principal

  5. Interference control of nonlinear excitation in a multi-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guoqing; Tan, Zheng; Zou, Bichen; Zhu, Yifu

    2014-12-01

    We show that by manipulating quantum interference in a multi-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system, the nonlinear excitation of the cavity-atom polariton can be resonantly enhanced while the linear excitation is suppressed. Under the appropriate conditions, it is possible to selectively enhance or suppress the polariton excitation with two free-pace laser fields. We report on an experiment with cold Rb atoms in an optical cavity and present experimental results that demonstrate such interference control of the CQED excitation and its direct application to studies of all-optical switching and cross-phase modulation of the cavity-transmitted light.

  6. Optical control of electron spin qubit in InAs self-assembled quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emary, Clive [TU Berlin, Sekr. PN 7-1, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Hardenbergstr. 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Sham, Lu Jeu [Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The spin of an electron trapped in a self-assembled quantum dot is viewed as a promising quantum bit. We present here a theory of the control of such qubits using short laser pulses to excite virtual trion states within the dots. We describe mechanisms for qubit initialisation and for performing universal one and two qubit operations. We show that, for InAs dots, initialisation can be achieved on the nanosecond time-scale, and that coherent operations can performed with laser pulses with durations of tens of picoseconds. These results are of direct relevance to current experiments.

  7. Controllable Quantum States Mesoscopic Superconductivity and Spintronics (MS+S2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku; Nakano, Hayato

    2008-10-01

    Josephson effect in diffusive d-wave junctions / T. Yokoyama. Quantum dissipation due to the zero energy bound states in high-T[symbol] superconductor junctions / Shiro Kawabata. Spin-polarized heat transport in ferromagnet/unconventional superconductor junctions / T. Yokoyama. Little-Parks oscillations in chiral p-wave superconducting rings / Mitsuaki Takigawa. Theoretical study of synergy effect between proximity effect and Andreev interface resonant states in triplet p-wave superconductors / Yasunari Tanuma. Theory of proximity effect in unconventional superconductor junctions / Y. Tanaka -- Quantum information. Analyzing the effectiveness of the quantum repeater / Kenichiro Furuta. Architecture-dependent execution time of Shor's algorithm / Rodney Van Meter -- Quantum dots and Kondo effects. Coulomb blockade properties of 4-gated quantum dot / Shinichi Amaha. Order-N electronic structure calculation of n-type GaAs quantum dots / Shintaro Nomura. Transport through double-dots coupled to normal and superconducting leads / Yoichi Tanaka. A study of the quantum dot in application to terahertz single photon counting / Vladimir Antonov. Electron transport through laterally coupled double quantum dots / T. Kubo. Dephasing in Kondo systems: comparison between theory and experiment / F. Mallet. Kondo effect in quantum dots coupled with noncollinear ferromagnetic leads / Daisuke Matsubayashi. Non-crossing approximation study of multi-orbital Kondo effect in quantum dot systems / Tomoko Kita. Theoretical study of electronic states and spin operation in coupled quantum dots / Mikio Eto. Spin correlation in a double quantum dot-quantum wire coupled system / S. Sasaki. Kondo-assisted transport through a multiorbital quantum dot / Rui Sakano. Spin decay in a quantum dot coupled to a quantum point contact / Massoud Borhani -- Quantum wires, low-dimensional electrons. Control of the electron density and electric field with front and back gates / Masumi Yamaguchi. Effect of the array

  8. Quantum Control of Open Systems and Dense Atomic Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, Christopher

    Controlling the dynamics of open quantum systems; i.e. quantum systems that decohere because of interactions with the environment, is an active area of research with many applications in quantum optics and quantum computation. My thesis expands the scope of this inquiry by seeking to control open systems in proximity to an additional system. The latter could be a classical system such as metal nanoparticles, or a quantum system such as a cluster of similar atoms. By modelling the interactions between the systems, we are able to expand the accessible state space of the quantum system in question. For a single, three-level quantum system, I examine isolated systems that have only normal spontaneous emission. I then show that intensity-intensity correlation spectra, which depend directly on the density matrix of the system, can be used detect whether transitions share a common energy level. This detection is possible due to the presence of quantum interference effects between two transitions if they are connected. This effect allows one to asses energy level structure diagrams in complex atoms/molecules. By placing an open quantum system near a nanoparticle dimer, I show that the spontaneous emission rate of the system can be changed "on demand" by changing the polarization of an incident, driving field. In a three-level, Lambda system, this allows a qubit to both retain high qubit fidelity when it is operating, and to be rapidly initialized to a pure state once it is rendered unusable by decoherence. This type of behaviour is not possible in a single open quantum system; therefore adding a classical system nearby extends the overall control space of the quantum system. An open quantum system near identical neighbours in a dense ensemble is another example of how the accessible state space can be expanded. I show that a dense ensemble of atoms rapidly becomes disordered with states that are not directly excited by an incident field becoming significantly populated

  9. Non-Markovian quantum feedback networks II: Controlled flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, John E.

    2017-06-01

    The concept of a controlled flow of a dynamical system, especially when the controlling process feeds information back about the system, is of central importance in control engineering. In this paper, we build on the ideas presented by Bouten and van Handel [Quantum Stochastics and Information: Statistics, Filtering and Control (World Scientific, 2008)] and develop a general theory of quantum feedback. We elucidate the relationship between the controlling processes, Z, and the measured processes, Y, and to this end we make a distinction between what we call the input picture and the output picture. We should note that the input-output relations for the noise fields have additional terms not present in the standard theory but that the relationship between the control processes and measured processes themselves is internally consistent—we do this for the two main cases of quadrature measurement and photon-counting measurement. The theory is general enough to include a modulating filter which post-processes the measurement readout Y before returning to the system. This opens up the prospect of applying very general engineering feedback control techniques to open quantum systems in a systematic manner, and we consider a number of specific modulating filter problems. Finally, we give a brief argument as to why most of the rules for making instantaneous feedback connections [J. Gough and M. R. James, Commun. Math. Phys. 287, 1109 (2009)] ought to apply for controlled dynamical networks as well.

  10. Site-controlled quantum dots coupled to photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigal, B.; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Jarlov, C.;

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate selective optical coupling of multiple, site controlled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) to photonic crystal waveguide structures. The impact of the exact position and emission spectrum of the QDs on the coupling efficiency is elucidated. The influence of optical disorder and end...

  11. Quantum control and entanglement in a chemical compass

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Jianming; Briegel, Hans J

    2009-01-01

    The radical pair mechanism is one of the two main hypotheses to explain the navigability of animals in weak magnetic fields, enabling e.g. birds to see the Earth's magnetic field. We show how quantum control can be used to either enhance or reduce the performance of such a chemical compass, providing a route to further test this hypothesis experimentally. We investigate the dynamics of quantum entanglement in this model, and demonstrate intriguing connections between radical-pair entanglement and the magnetic field sensitivity of the compass. The nature of the nuclear-spin environment plays an essential role for the observed effects.

  12. Strong field quantum control by selective population of dressed states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollenhaupt, M; Praekelt, A; Sarpe-Tudoran, C; Liese, D; Baumert, T [University of Kassel, Institute of Physics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), Heinrich-Plett-Strasse 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    We study the dynamics of potassium atoms in intense laser fields using femtosecond phase-locked pulse pairs in order to extract physical mechanisms of strong field quantum control. The structure of the Autler-Townes (AT) doublet in the photoelectron spectra is measured to analyse transient processes. The analysis shows that the physical mechanism is based on the selective population of dressed states (SPODS). Experimental results of closed loop optimization of SPODS are presented in addition. Applications to decoherence measurements with implications for quantum information are also proposed.

  13. Controllable coherent population transfers in superconducting qubits for quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, L F; Johansson, J R; Cen, L X; Ashhab, S; Nori, Franco

    2008-03-21

    We propose an approach to coherently transfer populations between selected quantum states in one- and two-qubit systems by using controllable Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passages. These evolution-time insensitive transfers, assisted by easily implementable single-qubit phase-shift operations, could serve as elementary logic gates for quantum computing. Specifically, this proposal could be conveniently demonstrated with existing Josephson phase qubits. Our proposal can find an immediate application in the readout of these qubits. Indeed, the broken parity symmetries of the bound states in these artificial atoms provide an efficient approach to design the required adiabatic pulses.

  14. Quantum State Control of Trapped Atomic and Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seck, Christopher M.

    Full quantum control of a molecule would have a significant impact in molecular coherent control (alignment and orientation) and ultracold and quantum chemistry, quantum computing and simulation as well as hybrid quantum devices, and precision spectroscopy of importance to fundamental physics research. Precision spectroscopy of even simple diatomic molecules offers the possibility of uncovering physics beyond the standard model, specifically time variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, which is currently constrained by astronomical molecular observations at the 10-16 1/yr level and laboratory atomic measurements at the 10-17 1/yr level. To achieve this level of measurement and to avoid the complications of diatomic structure on traditional spectroscopy methods, molecular quantum logic spectroscopy (mQLS) will be the spectroscopy technique of choice. We discuss development of in-house external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) systems and improvements to the Libbrecht-Hall circuit, which is a well-known, low-noise current driver for narrow-linewidth diode lasers. However, as the current approaches the maximum set limit, the noise in the laser current increases dramatically. This behavior is documented and simple circuit modifications to alleviate this issue are explored. We cool trapped AlH+ molecules to their ground rotational-vibrational quantum state using an electronically-exciting broadband laser to simultaneously drive cooling resonances from many different rotational levels. We demonstrate rotational cooling on the 140(20) ms timescale from room temperature to 3.8 K, with the ground state population increasing from 3% to 95.4%. Since QLS does not require the high gate fidelities usually associated with quantum computation and quantum simulation, it is possible to make simplifying choices in ion species and quantum protocols at the expense of some fidelity. We demonstrate sideband cooling and motional state detection protocols for 138Ba+ of sufficient fidelity

  15. Potential-controlled filtering in quantum star graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turek, Ondrej, E-mail: ondrej.turek@kochi-tech.ac.jp; Cheon, Taksu, E-mail: taksu.cheon@kochi-tech.ac.jp

    2013-03-15

    We study the scattering in a quantum star graph with a Fueloep-Tsutsui coupling in its vertex and with external potentials on the lines. We find certain special couplings for which the probability of the transmission between two given lines of the graph is strongly influenced by the potential applied on another line. On the basis of this phenomenon we design a tunable quantum band-pass spectral filter. The transmission from the input to the output line is governed by a potential added on the controlling line. The strength of the potential directly determines the passband position, which allows to control the filter in a macroscopic manner. Generalization of this concept to quantum devices with multiple controlling lines proves possible. It enables the construction of spectral filters with more controllable parameters or with more operation modes. In particular, we design a band-pass filter with independently adjustable multiple passbands. We also address the problem of the physical realization of Fueloep-Tsutsui couplings and demonstrate that the couplings needed for the construction of the proposed quantum devices can be approximated by simple graphs carrying only {delta} potentials. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectral filtering devices based on quantum graphs are designed theoretically. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The passband is controlled by the application of macroscopic potentials on lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The filters are built upon special Fulop-Tsutsui type couplings at graph vertices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method of construction of Fulop-Tsutsui vertices from delta potentials is devised.

  16. Controllability of open quantum systems with Kraus-map dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Rong; Pechen, Alexander; Brif, Constantin; Rabitz, Herschel [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2007-05-25

    This paper presents a constructive proof of complete kinematic state controllability of finite-dimensional open quantum systems whose dynamics are represented by Kraus maps. For any pair of states (pure or mixed) on the Hilbert space of the system, we explicitly show how to construct a Kraus map that transforms one state into another. Moreover, we prove by construction the existence of a Kraus map that transforms all initial states into a predefined target state (such a process may be used, for example, in quantum information dilution). Thus, in sharp contrast to unitary control, Kraus-map dynamics allows for the design of controls which are robust to variations in the initial state of the system. The capabilities of non-unitary control for population transfer between pure states illustrated for an example of a two-level system by constructing a family of non-unitary Kraus maps to transform one pure state into another. The problem of dynamic state controllability of open quantum systems (i.e., controllability of state-to-state transformations, given a set of available dynamical resources such as coherent controls, incoherent interactions with the environment, and measurements) is also discussed.

  17. Revisiting Controlled Quantum Secure Direct Communication Using a Non-symmetric Quantum Channel with Quantum Superdense Coding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Li-Yun; LIU Jun; FAN Hong-Yi; LIU Yi-Min; XIA Yan; ZHANG Zhan-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Recently Xia and Song [Phys. Left. A 364 (2007) 117] have proposed a controlled quantum secure direct communication (CQSDC) protocol. They claimed that in their protocol only with the help of the controller Charlie,the receiver Alice can succeasfully extract the secret message from the sender Bob. In this letter, first we will show that within their protocol the controller Charlie's role could have been excluded if it were not for their unreasonable design.We then revise the Xia-Song CQSDC protocol such that its original advantages are retained and the CQSDC can be really realized.

  18. Proposed experiment to test the bounds of quantum correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Cabello, A

    2004-01-01

    The combination of quantum correlations appearing in the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality can give values between the classical bound, 2, and Cirel'son's bound, 2\\sqrt 2. However, for a given set of local observables, there are values in this range which no quantum state can attained. For a given parametrization of the local observables, we provide the analytical expression for the bounds of quantum correlations and describe how to experimentally trace it using a source of singlet states.

  19. Experiments on the thermoelectric properties of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilans, Artis; Leijnse, Martin; Linke, Heiner

    2016-12-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are good model systems for fundamental studies of mesoscopic transport phenomena using thermoelectric effects because of their small size, electrostatically tunable properties and thermoelectric response characteristics that are very sensitive to small thermal biases. Here we provide a review of experimental studies on thermoelectric properties of single QDs realized in two-dimensional electron gases, single-walled carbon nanotubes and semiconductor nanowires. A key requirement for such experiments is to have some methods for nanoscale thermal biasing at one's disposal. We briefly review the main techniques used in the field, namely, heating of the QD contacts, side heating and top heating, and touch upon their relative advantages. The thermoelectric response of a QD as a function of gate potential has a characteristic oscillatory behavior with the same period as is observed for conductance peaks. Much of the existing literature focuses on the agreement between experiments and theory, particularly for amplitude and line-shape of the thermovoltage Vth. A general observation is that the widely used single-electron tunneling approximation for QDs has limited success in reproducing measured Vth. Landauer-type calculations are often found to describe measurement results better, despite the large electron-electron interactions in QDs. More recently, nonlinear thermoelectric effects have moved into the focus of attention, and we offer a brief overview of the experiments done so far. We conclude by discussing open questions and avenues for future work, including the role of asymmetries in tunnel- and capacitive couplings in the thermoelectric behavior of QDs. xml:lang="fr"

  20. Notions of local controllability and optimal feedforward control for quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarti, Raj, E-mail: rchakra@purdue.edu [School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2011-05-06

    Local controllability is an essential concept for regulation and control of time-varying nonlinear dynamical systems; in the classical control logic it is at the foundation of neighboring optimal feedback and feedforward control. We introduce notions of local controllability suited to feedforward control of classical input disturbances in bilinear quantum systems evolving on projective spaces and Lie groups. Tests for local controllability based on a Gramian matrix analogous to the nonlinear local controllability Gramian, which allow assessment of which trajectories can be regulated by perturbative feedforward in the presence of classical input noise, are presented. These notions explicitly incorporate system bilinearity and the geometry of quantum states into the definition of local controllability of quantum systems. Associated feedforward strategies are described.

  1. Analysis of Lyapunov Method for Control of Quantum States

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoting; Schirmer, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    The natural trajectory tracking problem is studied for generic quantum states represented by density operators. A control design based on the Hilbert-Schmidt distance as a Lyapunov function is considered. The control dynamics is redefined on an extended space where the LaSalle invariance principle can be correctly applied even for non-stationary target states. LaSalle's invariance principle is used to derive a general characterization of the invariant set, which is shown to always contain the...

  2. Quantum logic via optimal control in holographic dipole traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorner, U [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Calarco, T [ECT, I-38050 Villazzano, TN (Italy); Zoller, P [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Browaeys, A [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique, Centre Universitaire, Batiment 503, F-91403 Orsay (France); Grangier, P [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique, Centre Universitaire, Batiment 503, F-91403 Orsay (France)

    2005-10-01

    We propose a scheme for quantum logic with neutral atoms stored in an array of holographic dipole traps where the positions of the atoms can be rearranged by using holographic optical tweezers. In particular, this allows for the transport of two atoms to the same well where an external control field is used to perform gate operations via the molecular interaction between the atoms. We show that optimal control techniques allow for the fast implementation of the gates with high fidelity.

  3. Quantum logic via optimal control in holographic dipole traps

    CERN Document Server

    Dorner, U; Zoller, P; Browaeys, A; Grangier, P

    2005-01-01

    We propose a scheme for quantum logic with neutral atoms stored in an array of holographic dipole traps where the positions of the atoms can be rearranged by using holographic optical tweezers. In particular, this allows for the transport of two atoms to the same well where an external control field is used to perform gate operations via the molecular interaction between the atoms. We show that optimal control techniques allow for the fast implementation of the gates with high fidelity.

  4. Fermionic quantum systems: controllability and the parity superselection rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeier, Robert; Schulte-Herbrueggen, Thomas [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, 85747 Garching (Germany); Zimboras, Zoltan; Keyl, Michael [Institute for Scientific Interchange Foundation, Villa Gualino, Viale Settimio Severo 75, 10131 Torino (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    We study controllability and simulability of fermionic quantum systems which observe the parity superselection rule. Superselection rules describe the existence of non-trivial symmetries (e.g., the parity operator) that commute with all physical observables. We present examples of fermionic sytems such as quasifree and translation-invariant ones and develop readily applicable conditions for the controllability of fermionic systems by studying their symmetries. As an application, we discuss under which conditions fermionic and spin systems can simulate each other.

  5. Group Theoretical Approach for Controlled Quantum Mechanical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-06

    evolution equation with Hamiltonians which may possess discrete , continuous, and mixed spectrum. For such a quantum system, the Hamiltonian operator...study of classical linear and nonlinear systems, which proves to be very useful in understanding the design problems such as disturbance decoupling...developed by Kunita can then be implemented to establish controllability conditions for the original time-dependent Schrodinger control problem. The end

  6. Optimal discrimination of multiple quantum systems: controllability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turinici, Gabriel [INRIA Rocquencourt, BP 105, 78153 Le Chesnay Cedex (France); Ramakhrishna, Viswanath [Department of Mathematical Sciences and Center for Signals, Systems and Communications, University of Texas at Dallas, PO Box 830688, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Li Baiqing [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Rabitz, Herschel [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2004-01-09

    A theoretical study is presented concerning the ability to dynamically discriminate between members of a set of different (but possibly similar) quantum systems. This discrimination is analysed in terms of independently and simultaneously steering about the wavefunction of each component system to a target state of interest using a tailored control (i.e. laser) field. Controllability criteria are revealed and their applicability is demonstrated in simple cases. Discussion is also presented in some uncontrollable cases.

  7. Real time digital control and controlled structures experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Michael J.; Knowles, Gareth J.; Rauch, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs covering the following topics are given: controlled structures technology at Grumman Corporate Research Center, active and passive control technology, experiment plans, and vacuum chamber test experiment objectives and setup.

  8. Emission energy control of semiconductor quantum dots using phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Shohei; Sato, Yu; Yamamura, Ariyoshi; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have paid much attention as it is a promising candidate for quantum, optical devices, such as quantum computer and quantum dot laser. We propose a local emission energy control method of semiconductor quantum dots using applying strain by volume expansion of phase change material. Phase change material can change its phase crystalline to amorphous, and the volume expand by its phase change. This method can control energy shift direction and amount by amorphous religion and depth. Using this method, we matched emission energy of two InAs/InP quantum dots. This achievement can connect to observing superradiance phenomenon and quantum dot coupling effect.

  9. Quantum Galileo's experiments and mass estimation in a gravitational field

    CERN Document Server

    Seveso, Luigi; Paris, Matteo G A

    2016-01-01

    We address the problem of estimating the mass of a (quantum) particle interacting with a classical gravitational field. In particular, we analyze in details the ultimate bounds to precision imposed by quantum mechanics and study the effects of gravity in a variety of settings. Our results show that the presence of a gravitational field generally leads to a precision gain, which can be significant in a regime half-way between the quantum and classical domains. We also address quantum enhancement to precision, i.e. the advantages coming from taking into account the quantum nature of the probe particle, and show that non-classicality is indeed a relevant resource for mass estimation. In particular, we suggest schemes for mass-sensing measurements using quantum probes and show that upon employing non-classical states like quantum coherent superpositions one may improve precisions by orders of magnitude. In addition, we discuss the compatibility of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) within the quantum regime usi...

  10. Experimenting with Quantum Fields in Curved Spacetime in the Lab

    CERN Document Server

    Prémont-Schwarz, Isabeau

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we will investigate how one can create emergent curved spacetimes by locally tuning the coupling constants of condensed matter systems. In the continuum limit we thus obtain continuous effective quantum fields living on curved spacetimes. In particular, using Stingnet condensates we can obtain effective electromagnetism. We will show for example how we obtain quantum electrodynamics in a blackhole (Schwarzschild) spacetime.

  11. Controlling Carrier Dynamics using Quantum-Confined Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beard, Matthew C.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2016-06-01

    The articles included in this special issue of Chemical Physics explore the use of quantum-confined semiconductor nanocrystals to control the flow of energy and/or charge. Colloidal quantum-confined semiconductor nanostructures are an emerging class of functional materials being developed for novel opto-electronic applications. In the last few years numerous examples in the literature have emerged where novel nanostructures have been tailored such as to achieve a specific function thus moving the field from the stage of discovery of novel behaviors to that of control of nanostructure properties. In addition to the internal structure of the NCs their assemblies can be tailored to achieve emergent properties and add additional control parameters that determine the final opto-electronic properties. These principles are explored via variations in shape, size, surface ligands, heterostructuring, morphology, composition, and assemblies and are demonstrated through measurements of excited state processes, such as Auger recombination; photoluminescence; charge separation and charge transport.

  12. Geometric control theory for quantum back-action evasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokotera, Yu; Yamamoto, Naoki [Keio University, Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Yokohama (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Engineering a sensor system for detecting an extremely tiny signal such as the gravitational-wave force is a very important subject in quantum physics. A major obstacle to this goal is that, in a simple detection setup, the measurement noise is lower bounded by the so-called standard quantum limit (SQL), which is originated from the intrinsic mechanical back-action noise. Hence, the sensor system has to be carefully engineered so that it evades the back-action noise and eventually beats the SQL. In this paper, based on the well-developed geometric control theory for classical disturbance decoupling problem, we provide a general method for designing an auxiliary (coherent feedback or direct interaction) controller for the sensor system to achieve the above-mentioned goal. This general theory is applied to a typical opto-mechanical sensor system. Also, we demonstrate a controller design for a practical situation where several experimental imperfections are present. (orig.)

  13. A twofold quantum delayed-choice experiment in a superconducting circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Weiting; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Roy, Tanay; Kundu, Suman; Chand, Madhavi; Ranadive, Arpit; Vijay, Rajamani; Song, Yipu; Duan, Luming; Sun, Luyan

    2017-05-01

    Wave-particle complementarity lies at the heart of quantum mechanics. To illustrate this mysterious feature, Wheeler proposed the delayed-choice experiment, where a quantum system manifests the wave- or particle-like attribute, depending on the experimental arrangement, which is made after the system has entered the interferometer. In recent quantum delayed-choice experiments, these two complementary behaviors were simultaneously observed with a quantum interferometer in a superposition of being closed and open. We suggest and implement a conceptually different quantum delayed-choice experiment by introducing a which-path detector (WPD) that can simultaneously record and neglect the system's path information, but where the interferometer itself is classical. Our experiment is realized with a superconducting circuit, where a cavity acts as the WPD for an interfering qubit. Using this setup, we implement the first twofold delayed-choice experiment, which demonstrates that the system's behavior depends not only on the measuring device's configuration that can be chosen even after the system has been detected but also on whether we a posteriori erase or mark the which-path information, the latter of which cannot be revealed by previous quantum delayed-choice experiments. Our results represent the first demonstration of both counterintuitive features with the same experimental setup, significantly extending the concept of quantum delayed-choice experiment.

  14. Field Experiment on a Robust Hierarchical Metropolitan Quantum Cryptography Network

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Fangxing; Wang, Shuang; Yin, Zhenqiang; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Yun; Zhou, Zheng; Zhao, Yibo; Li, Hongwei; Liu, Dong; Han, Zhengfu; Guo, Guangcan

    2009-01-01

    A hierarchical metropolitan quantum cryptography network upon the inner-city commercial telecom fiber cables is reported in this paper. The seven-user network contains a four-node backbone net with one node acting as the subnet gateway, a two-user subnet and a single-fiber access link, which is realized by the Faraday-Michelson Interferometer set-ups. The techniques of the quantum router, optical switch and trusted relay are assembled here to guarantee the feasibility and expandability of the quantum cryptography network. Five nodes of the network are located in the government departments and the secure keys generated by the quantum key distribution network are utilized to encrypt the instant video, sound, text messages and confidential files transmitting between these bureaus. The whole implementation including the hierarchical quantum cryptographic communication network links and corresponding application software shows a big step toward the practical user-oriented network with high security level.

  15. Remote interactions between two d-dimensional distributed quantum systems: nonlocal generalized quantum control-NOT gate and entanglement swapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Li-Bing; Lu Hong; Jin Rui-Bo

    2007-01-01

    We present a systematic simple method to implement a generalized quantum control-NOT (CNOT) gate on two d-dimensional distributed systems. First, we show how the nonlocal generalized quantum CNOT gate can be implemented with unity fidelity and unity probability by using a maximally entangled pair of qudits as a quantum channel. We also put forward a scheme for probabilistically implementing the nonlocal operation with unity fidelity by employing a partially entangled qudit pair as a quantum channel. Analysis of the scheme indicates that the use of partially entangled quantum channel for implementing the nonlocal generalized quantum CNOT gate leads to the CNOT gate can be used in the entanglement swapping between particles belonging to distant users in a communication network and distributed quantum computer.

  16. Quantum state transfer and controlled-phase gate on one-dimensional superconducting resonators assisted by a quantum bus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-02-24

    We propose a quantum processor for the scalable quantum computation on microwave photons in distant one-dimensional superconducting resonators. It is composed of a common resonator R acting as a quantum bus and some distant resonators rj coupled to the bus in different positions assisted by superconducting quantum interferometer devices (SQUID), different from previous processors. R is coupled to one transmon qutrit, and the coupling strengths between rj and R can be fully tuned by the external flux through the SQUID. To show the processor can be used to achieve universal quantum computation effectively, we present a scheme to complete the high-fidelity quantum state transfer between two distant microwave-photon resonators and another one for the high-fidelity controlled-phase gate on them. By using the technique for catching and releasing the microwave photons from resonators, our processor may play an important role in quantum communication as well.

  17. Will recently proposed experiments be able to demonstrate quantum behavior of entire living organisms?

    CERN Document Server

    Herzenberg, C L

    2009-01-01

    Recently proposed experiments consider creating and observing the quantum superposition of small living organisms. Those proposed experiments are examined here for feasibility on the basis of results of earlier studies identifying a boundary separating obligatory classical behavior from quantum behavior. It appears that the proposed experiments may be expected to succeed for the case of viruses, but most probably fail for the case of the appreciably larger organisms that are also considered.

  18. Quantum control of multi-wave mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2013-01-01

    Multi-wave mixing gives rise to new frequency components due to the interaction of light signals with a suitable nonlinear medium. In this book a systematic framework for the control of these processes is used to lead readers through a plethora of related effects and techniques.

  19. Demonstration of sufficient control for two rounds of quantum error correction in a solid state ensemble quantum information processor

    CERN Document Server

    Moussa, Osama; Ryan, Colm A; Laflamme, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    We report the implementation of a 3-qubit quantum error correction code (QECC) on a quantum information processor realized by the magnetic resonance of Carbon nuclei in a single crystal of Malonic Acid. The code corrects for phase errors induced on the qubits due to imperfect decoupling of the magnetic environment represented by nearby spins, as well as unwanted evolution under the internal Hamiltonian. We also experimentally demonstrate sufficiently high fidelity control to implement two rounds of quantum error correction. This is a demonstration of state-of-the-art control in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, a leading test-bed for the implementation of quantum algorithms.

  20. Demonstration of sufficient control for two rounds of quantum error correction in a solid state ensemble quantum information processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Osama; Baugh, Jonathan; Ryan, Colm A; Laflamme, Raymond

    2011-10-14

    We report the implementation of a 3-qubit quantum error-correction code on a quantum information processor realized by the magnetic resonance of carbon nuclei in a single crystal of malonic acid. The code corrects for phase errors induced on the qubits due to imperfect decoupling of the magnetic environment represented by nearby spins, as well as unwanted evolution under the internal Hamiltonian. We also experimentally demonstrate sufficiently high-fidelity control to implement two rounds of quantum error correction. This is a demonstration of state-of-the-art control in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, a leading test bed for the implementation of quantum algorithms.

  1. Indirect Controllability of Quantum Systems; A Study of Two Interacting Quantum Bits

    CERN Document Server

    D'Alessandro, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    A quantum mechanical system S is indirectly controlled when the control affects an ancillary system A and the evolution of S is modified through the interaction with A only. A study of indirect controllability gives a description of the set of states that can be obtained for S with this scheme. In this paper, we study the indirect controllability of quantum systems in the finite dimensional case. After discussing the relevant definitions, we give a general necessary condition for controllability in Lie algebraic terms. We present a detailed treatment of the case where both systems, S and A, are two-dimensional (qubits). In particular, we characterize the dynamical Lie algebra associated with S+A, extending previous results, and prove that complete controllability of S+A and an appropriate notion of indirect controllability are equivalent properties for this system. We also prove several further indirect controllability properties for the system of two qubits, and illustrate the role of the Lie algebraic analy...

  2. Exploring the top and bottom of the quantum control landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrani, Vincent; Dominy, Jason; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-05-21

    A controlled quantum system possesses a search landscape defined by the target physical objective as a function of the controls. This paper focuses on the landscape for the transition probability P(i → f) between the states of a finite level quantum system. Traditionally, the controls are applied fields; here, we extend the notion of control to also include the Hamiltonian structure, in the form of time independent matrix elements. Level sets of controls that produce the same transition probability value are shown to exist at the bottom P(i → f)=0.0 and top P(i → f)=1.0 of the landscape with the field and/or Hamiltonian structure as controls. We present an algorithm to continuously explore these level sets starting from an initial point residing at either extreme value of P(i → f). The technique can also identify control solutions that exhibit the desirable properties of (a) robustness at the top and (b) the ability to rapidly rise towards an optimal control from the bottom. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the varied control behavior at the top and bottom of the landscape for several simple model systems.

  3. The Heteronuclear Single-Quantum Correlation (HSQC) Experiment: Vectors versus Product Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Vega-Herna´ndez, Karen; Antuch, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A vectorial representation of the full sequence of events occurring during the 2D-NMR heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) experiment is presented. The proposed vectorial representation conveys an understanding of the magnetization evolution during the HSQC pulse sequence for those who have little or no quantum mechanical background.…

  4. Optimal control for perfect state transfer in linear quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2017-03-01

    A quantum memory is a system that enables transfer, storage, and retrieval of optical quantum states by ON/OFF switching of the control signal in each stage of the memory. In particular, it is known that, for perfect transfer of a single-photon state, appropriate shaping of the input pulse is required. However, in general, such a desirable pulse shape has a complicated form, which would be hard to generate in practice. In this paper, for a wide class of linear quantum memory systems, we develop a method that reduces the complexity of the input pulse shape of a single photon while maintaining the perfect state transfer. The key idea is twofold; (i) the control signal is allowed to vary continuously in time to introduce an additional degree of freedom, and then (ii) an optimal control problem is formulated to design a simple-formed input pulse and the corresponding control signal. Numerical simulations are conducted for Λ-type atomic media and networked atomic ensembles, to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Generation of entanglement in quantum parametric oscillators using phase control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Henao, J C; Pugliese, E; Euzzor, S; Abdalah, S F; Meucci, R; Roversi, J A

    2015-08-19

    The control of quantum entanglement in systems in contact with environment plays an important role in information processing, cryptography and quantum computing. However, interactions with the environment, even when very weak, entail decoherence in the system with consequent loss of entanglement. Here we consider a system of two coupled oscillators in contact with a common heat bath and with a time dependent oscillation frequency. The possibility to control the entanglement of the oscillators by means of an external sinusoidal perturbation applied to the oscillation frequency has been theoretically explored. We demonstrate that the oscillators become entangled exactly in the region where the classical counterpart is unstable, otherwise when the classical system is stable, entanglement is not possible. Therefore, we can control the entanglement swapping from stable to unstable regions by adjusting amplitude and phase of our external controller. We also show that the entanglement rate is approximately proportional to the real part of the Floquet coefficient of the classical counterpart of the oscillators. Our results have the intriguing peculiarity of manipulating quantum information operating on a classical system.

  6. Some remarks on an experiment suggesting quantum-like behavior of cognitive entities and formulation of an abstract quantum mechanical formalism to describe cognitive entity and its dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte, Elio [Department of Pharmacology and Human Physiology, TIRES-Center for Innovative Technologies for Signal Detection and Processing, University of Bari (Italy); Todarello, Orlando [Department of Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences, University of Bari (Italy); Federici, Antonio [Department of Pharmacology and Human Physiology, TIRES-Center for Innovative Technologies for Signal Detection and Processing, University of Bari (Italy)]. E-mail: fisio2@fisiol.uniba.it; Vitiello, Francesco [Department of Pharmacology and Human Physiology, TIRES-Center for Innovative Technologies for Signal Detection and Processing, University of Bari (Italy); Lopane, Michele [Department of Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences, University of Bari (Italy); Khrennikov, Andrei [International Center for Mathematical Modeling in Physics and Cognitive Sciences, MSI, University of Vaexjoe, S-35195 (Sweden); Zbilut, Joseph P. [Department of Molecular Biophysics and Physiology, Rush University Medical Center, 1653W, Congress, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    We have executed for the first time an experiment on mental observables concluding that there exists equivalence (that is to say, quantum-like behavior) between quantum and cognitive entities. Such result has enabled us to formulate an abstract quantum mechanical formalism that is able to describe cognitive entities and their time dynamics.

  7. Control of magnetotransport in quantum billiards theory, computation and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Morfonios, Christian V

    2017-01-01

    In this book the coherent quantum transport of electrons through two-dimensional mesoscopic structures is explored in dependence of the interplay between the confining geometry and the impact of applied magnetic fields, aiming at conductance controllability. After a top-down, insightful presentation of the elements of mesoscopic devices and transport theory, a computational technique which treats multiterminal structures of arbitrary geometry and topology is developed. The method relies on the modular assembly of the electronic propagators of subsystems which are inter- or intra-connected providing large flexibility in system setups combined with high computational efficiency. Conductance control is first demonstrated for elongated quantum billiards and arrays thereof where a weak magnetic field tunes the current by phase modulation of interfering lead-coupled states geometrically separated from confined states. Soft-wall potentials are then employed for efficient and robust conductance switching by isolating...

  8. Quantum Harmonic Oscillator State Control in a Squeezed Fock Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienzler, D.; Lo, H.-Y.; Negnevitsky, V.; Flühmann, C.; Marinelli, M.; Home, J. P.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate control of a trapped-ion quantum harmonic oscillator in a squeezed Fock state basis, using engineered Hamiltonians analogous to the Jaynes-Cummings and anti-Jaynes-Cummings forms. We demonstrate that for squeezed Fock states with low n the engineered Hamiltonians reproduce the √{n } scaling of the matrix elements which is typical of Jaynes-Cummings physics, and also examine deviations due to the finite wavelength of our control fields. Starting from a squeezed vacuum state, we apply sequences of alternating transfer pulses which allow us to climb the squeezed Fock state ladder, creating states up to excitations of n =6 with up to 8.7 dB of squeezing, as well as demonstrating superpositions of these states. These techniques offer access to new sets of states of the harmonic oscillator which may be applicable for precision metrology or quantum information science.

  9. Ultraefficient Cooling of Resonators: Beating Sideband Cooling with Quantum Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Strauch, Frederick; Jacobs, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    There is presently a great deal of interest in cooling high-frequency micro- and nano-mechanical oscillators to their ground states. The present state of the art in cooling mechanical resonators is a version of sideband cooling, which was originally developed in the context of cooling trapped ions. Here we present a method based on quantum control that uses the same configuration as sideband cooling--coupling the resonator to be cooled to a second microwave (or optical) auxiliary resonator--but will cool significantly colder. This is achieved by applying optimal control and varying the strength of the coupling between the two resonators over a time on the order of the period of the mechanical resonator. As part of our analysis, we also obtain a method for fast, high-fidelity quantum information transfer between resonators.

  10. Control and measurement of electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Elzerman, J.M.; Hanson, R.; Willems van Beveren, L.H.; Vandersypen, L.M.K. [ERATO Mesoscopic Correlation Project, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft (Netherlands)

    2006-11-15

    We present an overview of experimental steps taken towards using the spin of a single electron trapped in a semiconductor quantum dot as a spin qubit [Loss and DiVincenzo, Phys. Rev. A 57, 120 (1998)]. Fabrication and characterization of a double quantum dot containing two coupled spins has been achieved, as well as initialization and single-shot read-out of the spin state. The relaxation time T {sub 1} of single-spin and two-spin states was found to be on the order of a millisecond, dominated by spin-orbit interactions. The time-averaged dephasing time T{sub 2}{sup *}, due to fluctuations in the ensemble of nuclear spins in the host semiconductor, was determined to be on the order of several tens of nanoseconds. Coherent manipulation of single-spin states can be performed using a microfabricated wire located close to the quantum dot, while two-spin interactions rely on controlling the tunnel barrier connecting the respective quantum dots [Petta et al., Science 309, 2180 (2005)]. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Noise suppression by quantum control before and after the noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamura, Hiroaki; Kawakubo, Ryûitirô; Koike, Tatsuhiko

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the possibility of protecting the state of a quantum system that goes through noise by measurements and operations before and after the noise process. The aim is to seek the optimal protocol that makes the input and output states as close as possible and to clarify the role of the measurements therein. We consider two cases: one can perform quantum measurements and operations (i) only after the noise process and (ii) both before and after. We prove in a two-dimensional Hilbert space that, in case (i), the noise suppression is essentially impossible for all types of noise and, in case (ii), the optimal protocol for the depolarizing noise is either the "do nothing" protocol or the "discriminate and reprepare" protocol. These protocols are not "truly quantum" and can be considered as classical. They involve no measurement or only use the measurement outcomes. These results describe the fundamental limitations in quantum mechanics from the viewpoint of control theory. Finally, we conjecture that a statement similar to case (ii) holds for higher-dimensional Hilbert spaces and present some numerical evidence.

  12. Field experiment on a robust hierarchical metropolitan quantum cryptography network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU FangXing; CHEN Wei; WANG Shuang; YIN ZhenQiang; ZHANG Yang; LIU Yun; ZHOU Zheng; ZHAO YiBo; LI HongWei; LIU Dong; HAN ZhengFu; GUO GuangCan

    2009-01-01

    these bureaus.The whole implementation including the hierarchical quantum cryptographic communication network links and the corresponding application software shows a big step toward the practical user-oriented network with a high security level.

  13. Efficient algorithms for the laboratory discovery of optimal quantum controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinici, Gabriel; Le Bris, Claude; Rabitz, Herschel

    2004-01-01

    The laboratory closed-loop optimal control of quantum phenomena, expressed as minimizing a suitable cost functional, is currently implemented through an optimization algorithm coupled to the experimental apparatus. In practice, the most commonly used search algorithms are variants of genetic algorithms. As an alternative choice, a direct search deterministic algorithm is proposed in this paper. For the simple simulations studied here, it outperforms the existing approaches. An additional algorithm is introduced in order to reveal some properties of the cost functional landscape.

  14. Voltage controlled optics of a monolayer semiconductor quantum emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Goodfellow, Kenneth; Kinnischtzke, Laura; Vamivakas, Nick; University of Rochester Team

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional atomically thin materials are being actively investigated for next generation optoelectronic devices. Particularly exciting are transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) since these materials exhibit a band gap, and support valley specific exciton mediated optical transitions. In this work we report the observation of single photon emission in the TMDC tungsten diselenide. We present magneto-optical spectroscopy results and demonstrate voltage controlled photoluminescence of these localized quantum emitters.

  15. Generalized control of quantum systems in the frame of vector treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sen KUANG; Shuang CONG

    2009-01-01

    For the state control problem in finite-dimensional quantum systems With any initial state and a goal eigenstate, this paper studies the design method of control laws via the Lyapunov technology and in the vector frame, which ensures the convergence of any initial state toward the goal state. The stability of the closed-loop system in the goal eigenstate is analyzed and proven via the invariance principle. The simulation experiment on a spin-1/2 system shows the effectiveness of the designed control laws.

  16. Controllable Synthesis of Highly Luminescent Boron Nitride Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongling; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Tsang, Siu Hon; Zhen, Xu; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2015-12-22

    Boron nitride quantum dots (BNQDs), as a new member of heavy metal-free quantum dots, have aroused great interest in fundamental research and practical application due to their unique physical/chemical properties. However, it is still a challenge to controllably synthesize high-quality BNQDs with high quantum yield (QY), uniform size and strong fluorescent. In this work, BNQDs have been successfully fabricated by the liquid exfoliation and the subsequent solvothermal process with respect to its facileness and easy large scale up. Importantly, BNQDs with high-quality can be controllably obtained by adjusting the synthetic parameters involved in the solvothermal process including filling factor, synthesis temperature, and duration time. Encouragingly, the as-prepared BNQDs possess strong blue luminescence with QY as high as 19.5%, which can be attributed to the synergetic effect of size, surface chemistry and edge defects. In addition, this strategy presented here provides a new reference for the controllable synthesis of other heavy metal-free QDs. Furthermore, the as-prepared BNQDs are non-toxic to cells and exhibit nanosecond-scaled lifetimes, suggesting they have great potential biological and optoelectronic applications.

  17. Large array of single, site-controlled InAs quantum dots fabricated by UV-nanoimprint lithography and molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, A; Tommila, J; Strelow, C; Hakkarainen, T V; Tukiainen, A; Dumitrescu, M; Mews, A; Kipp, T; Guina, M

    2012-05-04

    We present the growth of single, site-controlled InAs quantum dots on GaAs templates using UV-nanoimprint lithography and molecular beam epitaxy. A large quantum dot array with a period of 1.5 µm was achieved. Single quantum dots were studied by steady-state and time-resolved micro-photoluminescence experiments. We obtained single exciton emission with a linewidth of 45 µeV. In time-resolved experiments, we observed decay times of about 670 ps. Our results underline the potential of nanoimprint lithography and molecular beam epitaxy to create large-scale, single quantum dot arrays.

  18. Field Experiments in Litter Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnie, William C.

    1973-01-01

    A series of urban and highway litter experiments in Richmond (Virginia), St. Louis, and Philadelphia indicated well-designed litter cans reduced littering about 15 percent along city streets and nearly 30 percent along highways. Also, the propensity to litter is critically affected by the characteristics of the individual and environmental…

  19. Quantum interactive learning tutorial on the double-slit experiment to improve student understanding of quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Sayer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Learning quantum mechanics is challenging, even for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students. Research-validated interactive tutorials that build on students’ prior knowledge can be useful tools to enhance student learning. We have been investigating student difficulties with quantum mechanics pertaining to the double-slit experiment in various situations that appear to be counterintuitive and contradict classical notions of particles and waves. For example, if we send single electrons through the slits, they may behave as a “wave” in part of the experiment and as a “particle” in another part of the same experiment. Here we discuss the development and evaluation of a research-validated Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT which makes use of an interactive simulation to improve student understanding of the double-slit experiment and strives to help students develop a good grasp of foundational issues in quantum mechanics. We discuss common student difficulties identified during the development and evaluation of the QuILT and analyze the data from the pretest and post test administered to the upper-level undergraduate and first-year physics graduate students before and after they worked on the QuILT to assess its effectiveness. These data suggest that on average, the QuILT was effective in helping students develop a more robust understanding of foundational concepts in quantum mechanics that defy classical intuition using the context of the double-slit experiment. Moreover, upper-level undergraduates outperformed physics graduate students on the post test. One possible reason for this difference in performance may be the level of student engagement with the QuILT due to the grade incentive. In the undergraduate course, the post test was graded for correctness while in the graduate course, it was only graded for completeness.

  20. Establishing formal state space models via quantization for quantum control systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Daoyi; Chen Zonghai

    2005-01-01

    Formal state space models of quantum control systems are deduced and a scheme to establish formal state space models via quantization could been obtained for quantum control systems is proposed. State evolution of quantum control systems must accord with Schrodinger equations, so it is foremost to obtain Hamiltonian operators of systems. There are corresponding relations between operators of quantum systems and corresponding physical quantities of classical systems,such as momentum, energy and Hamiltonian, so Schrodinger equation models of corresponding quantum control systems via quantization could been obtained from classical control systems, and then establish formal state space models through the suitable transformation from Schrodinger equations for these quantum control systems. This method provides a new kind of path for modeling in quantum control.

  1. The Quantum Spin Hall Effect: Theory and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konig, Markus; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens W.; /Wurzburg U.; Hughes, Taylor L.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Liu, Chao-Xing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Recently, a new class of topological insulators has been proposed. These topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the helical edge states give rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect, in the absence of any external magnetic field. Here we review a recent theory which predicts that the QSH state can be realized in HgTe/CdTe semiconductor quantum wells. By varying the thickness of the quantum well, the band structure changes from a normal to an 'inverted' type at a critical thickness d{sub c}. We present an analytical solution of the helical edge states and explicitly demonstrate their topological stability. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QSH state in HgTe/(Hg,Cd)Te quantum wells. We review both the fabrication of the sample and the experimental setup. For thin quantum wells with well width d{sub QW} < 6.3 nm, the insulating regime shows the conventional behavior of vanishingly small conductance at low temperature. However, for thicker quantum wells (d{sub QW} > 6.3 nm), the nominally insulating regime shows a plateau of residual conductance close to 2e{sup 2}/h. The residual conductance is independent of the sample width, indicating that it is caused by edge states. Furthermore, the residual conductance is destroyed by a small external magnetic field. The quantum phase transition at the critical thickness, d{sub c} = 6.3 nm, is also independently determined from the occurrence of a magnetic field induced insulator to metal transition.

  2. Polarization control of single photon quantum orbital angular momentum states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagali, E; Sciarrino, F; De Martini, F; Piccirillo, B; Karimi, E; Marrucci, L; Santamato, E

    2009-10-12

    The orbital angular momentum of photons, being defined in an infinite-dimensional discrete Hilbert space, offers a promising resource for high-dimensional quantum information protocols in quantum optics. The biggest obstacle to its wider use is presently represented by the limited set of tools available for its control and manipulation. Here, we introduce and test experimentally a series of simple optical schemes for the coherent transfer of quantum information from the polarization to the orbital angular momentum of single photons and vice versa. All our schemes exploit a newly developed optical device, the so-called "q-plate", which enables the manipulation of the photon orbital angular momentum driven by the polarization degree of freedom. By stacking several q-plates in a suitable sequence, one can also have access to higher-order angular momentum subspaces. In particular, we demonstrate the control of the orbital angular momentum m degree of freedom within the subspaces of |m| = 2h and |m| = 4h per photon.

  3. Boundary-controlled spin chains for robust quantum state transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Zwick, Analia; Stolze, Joachim; Osenda, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Quantum state transfer in the presence of noise is one of the main challenges for building quantum computers. We compare the quantum state transfer properties for two classes of qubit chains under the influence of static randomness. In fully engineered chains all nearest-neighbor couplings are tuned in such a way that a single-qubit state can be transferred perfectly between the ends of the chain, while in boundary-controlled chains only the two couplings between the transmitting and receiving qubits and the remainder of the chain can be optimized. We study how the noise in the couplings affects the state transfer fidelity depending on the noise model and strength as well as the chain type and length. We show that the desired level of fidelity and transfer time are important factors in designing a chain. In particular we demonstrate that transfer efficiency comparable or better than that of the most robust engineered systems can also be reached in boundary-controlled chains without the demanding engineering o...

  4. Causality, relativity and quantum correlation experiments with moving reference frames

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Zbinden; J Brendel; W Tittel; N Gisin

    2001-02-01

    Entanglement, one of the most important features of quantum mechanics, is at the core of the famous Einstein–Bohr philosophical debate [1] and is the principal resource for quantum information processing [2]. We report on new experimental investigations of the properties of entangled photon pairs with emphasis on the tension between quantum mechanics and relativity [3,4]. Entangled photons are sent via an optical fiber network to two villages near Geneva, separated by more than 10 km where they are analyzed by interferometers [5]. The photon pair source is set as precisely as possible in the center so that the two photons arrive at the detectors within a time interval of less than 5 ps (corresponding to a path length difference of less than 1 mm). This sets a lower bound on the ‘speed of quantum information’ to 107 times the speed of light. Next, one detector is set in motion [6] so that both detectors, each in its own inertial reference frame, are first to do the measurement! The data always reproduces the quantum correlations.

  5. Single-atom quantum control of macroscopic mechanical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariani, F.; Otterbach, J.; Tan, Huatang; Meystre, P.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a hybrid electromechanical system consisting of a pair of charged macroscopic mechanical oscillators coupled to a small ensemble of Rydberg atoms. The resonant dipole-dipole coupling between an internal atomic Rydberg transition and the mechanics allows cooling to its motional ground state with a single atom despite the considerable mass imbalance between the two subsystems. We show that the rich electronic spectrum of Rydberg atoms, combined with their high degree of optical control, paves the way towards implementing various quantum-control protocols for the mechanical oscillators.

  6. Coherent feedback control of multipartite quantum entanglement for optical fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhihui; Jia, Xiaojun; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Opto-Electronics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, 030006 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Coherent feedback control (CFC) of multipartite optical entangled states produced by a nondegenerate optical parametric amplifier is theoretically studied. The features of the quantum correlations of amplitude and phase quadratures among more than two entangled optical modes can be controlled by tuning the transmissivity of the optical beam splitter in the CFC loop. The physical conditions to enhance continuous variable multipartite entanglement of optical fields utilizing the CFC loop are obtained. The numeric calculations based on feasible physical parameters of realistic systems provide direct references for the design of experimental devices.

  7. Design of control sequence of pulses for the population transfer of high dimensional spin 1/2 quantum systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the relationship between the Hamiltonian of spin 1/2 quantum system under control and the energy level structure and transitions, a radio frequency pulse sequence is designed using intuitive and half counter-intuitive sequences of pulse to transfer the population of the 3-qubit system coherently. The effectiveness of the designed control sequence is verified through the system simulation experiment of the evolution of state. In principle, the design method of the control pulse sequence proposed can be generalized to use in the quantum systems of higher dimension.

  8. Dispersion-enabled quantum state control in integrated photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Marchildon, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    Integrated optics has brought unprecedented levels of stability and performance to quantum photonic circuits. However, integrated devices are not merely micron-scale equivalents of their bulk-optics counterparts. By exploiting the inherently dispersive characteristics of the integrated setting, such devices can play a remarkably more versatile role in quantum circuit architectures. We show this by examining the implications of linear dispersion in an ordinary directional coupler. Dispersion unlocks several novel capabilities for this device, including in-situ control over photon spectral and polarization entanglement, tunable photon time-ordering, and entanglement-sensitive two-photon coincidence generation. Also revealed is an ability to maintain perfect two-photon anti-coalescence while tuning the interference visibility, which has no equivalent in bulk-optics. The outcome of this work adds to a suite of state engineering and characterization tools that benefit from the advantages of integration. It also pa...

  9. Remote Control of Experiments via Matlab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Sedlak

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates two possibilities of remote control of real experiments using Matlab software environment. We introduced basic approaches to Matlab remote access using Matlab Web Server, COM and Virtual Reality Toolbox. The proposed concepts were used and tested for control of magnetic levitation system. The gained experience was also discussed in the paper.

  10. Quantum optical feedback control for creating strong correlations in many-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Ivanov, Denis A; Mekhov, Igor B

    2016-01-01

    Light enables manipulating many-body states of matter, and atoms trapped in optical lattices is a prominent example. However, quantum properties of light are completely neglected in all quantum gas experiments. Extending methods of quantum optics to many-body physics will enable phenomena unobtainable in classical optical setups. We show how using the quantum optical feedback creates strong correlations in bosonic and fermionic systems. It balances two competing processes, originating from different fields: quantum backaction of weak optical measurement and many-body dynamics, resulting in stabilized density waves, antiferromagnetic and NOON states. Our approach is extendable to other systems promising for quantum technologies.

  11. Time-delay effects and simplified control fields in quantum Lyapunov control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, X X; Wu, S L [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wu, Chunfeng; Feng, X L; Oh, C H, E-mail: yixx@dlut.edu.cn, E-mail: phyohch@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Quantum Technologies and Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 117543 (Singapore)

    2011-10-14

    Lyapunov-based quantum control has the advantage that it is free from the measurement-induced decoherence and it includes the instantaneous information of the system in the control. The Lyapunov control is often confronted with time delay in the control fields and difficulty in practical implementations of the control. In this paper, we study the effect of time delay on the Lyapunov control and explore the possibility of replacing the control field with a pulse train or a bang-bang signal. The efficiency of the Lyapunov control is also presented through examining the convergence time of the system. These results suggest that the Lyapunov control is robust against time delay, easy to realize and effective for high-dimensional quantum systems.

  12. Speedup for quantum optimal control from automatic differentiation based on graphics processing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Nelson; Abdelhafez, Mohamed; Koch, Jens; Schuster, David

    2017-04-01

    We implement a quantum optimal control algorithm based on automatic differentiation and harness the acceleration afforded by graphics processing units (GPUs). Automatic differentiation allows us to specify advanced optimization criteria and incorporate them in the optimization process with ease. We show that the use of GPUs can speedup calculations by more than an order of magnitude. Our strategy facilitates efficient numerical simulations on affordable desktop computers and exploration of a host of optimization constraints and system parameters relevant to real-life experiments. We demonstrate optimization of quantum evolution based on fine-grained evaluation of performance at each intermediate time step, thus enabling more intricate control on the evolution path, suppression of departures from the truncated model subspace, as well as minimization of the physical time needed to perform high-fidelity state preparation and unitary gates.

  13. Reaching Quantum Supremacy with a Boson Sampling Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Latmiral, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Boson Sampling represents a promising witness of the supremacy of quantum systems as a resource for the solution of computational problems. The classical hardness of Boson Sampling has been related to the so called Permanent-of-Gaussians Conjecture and has been extended to some generalizations such as scattershot Boson Sampling, approximate and lossy sampling under some reasonable constraints. However, it is still unclear how demanding these bounds are for a quantum experimental sampler. Starting from a state of the art analysis and focusing on the foreseeable practical conditions needed to reach quantum supremacy, we look at different techniques and present a more general and effective solution. We apply our approach to both the experimental suggestions presented to date and we eventually find in both cases a new threshold that is less error sensitive and experimentally more feasible.

  14. Semiconductor Quantum Dash Broadband Emitters: Modeling and Experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2013-10-01

    Broadband light emitters operation, which covers multiple wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum, has been established as an indispensable element to the human kind, continuously advancing the living standard by serving as sources in important multi-disciplinary field applications such as biomedical imaging and sensing, general lighting and internet and mobile phone connectivity. In general, most commercial broadband light sources relies on complex systems for broadband light generation which are bulky, and energy hungry. \\tRecent demonstration of ultra-broadband emission from semiconductor light sources in the form of superluminescent light emitting diodes (SLDs) has paved way in realization of broadband emitters on a completely novel platform, which offered compactness, cost effectiveness, and comparatively energy efficient, and are already serving as a key component in medical imaging systems. The low power-bandwidth product is inherent in SLDs operating in the amplified spontaneous emission regime. A quantum leap in the advancement of broadband emitters, in which high power and large bandwidth (in tens of nm) are in demand. Recently, the birth of a new class of broadband semiconductor laser diode (LDs) producing multiple wavelength light in stimulated emission regime was demonstrated. This very recent manifestation of a high power-bandwidth-product semiconductor broadband LDs relies on interband optical transitions via quantum confined dot/dash nanostructures and exploiting the natural inhomogeneity of the self-assembled growth technology. This concept is highly interesting and extending the broad spectrum of stimulated emission by novel device design forms the central focus of this dissertation. \\tIn this work, a simple rate equation numerical technique for modeling InAs/InP quantum dash laser incorporating the properties of inhomogeneous broadening effect on lasing spectra was developed and discussed, followed by a comprehensive experimental analysis

  15. A review of progress in the physics of open quantum systems: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, I; Bird, J P

    2015-11-01

    addition to discussing experiments on mesoscopic quantum point contacts that provide evidence of the environmentally-mediated coupling of quantum states, we also review manifestations of DPTs in mesoscopic devices and other systems. These experiments include observations of resonance-trapping behavior in microwave cavities and open quantum dots, phase lapses in tunneling through single-electron transistors, and spin swapping in atomic ensembles. Other possible manifestations of this phenomenon are presented, including various superradiant phenomena in low-dimensional semiconductors. From these discussions a generic picture of OQSs emerges in which the environmentally-mediated coupling between different quantum states plays a critical role in governing the system behavior. The ability to control or manipulate this interaction may even lead to new applications in photonics and electronics.

  16. A review of progress in the physics of open quantum systems: theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, I.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    addition to discussing experiments on mesoscopic quantum point contacts that provide evidence of the environmentally-mediated coupling of quantum states, we also review manifestations of DPTs in mesoscopic devices and other systems. These experiments include observations of resonance-trapping behavior in microwave cavities and open quantum dots, phase lapses in tunneling through single-electron transistors, and spin swapping in atomic ensembles. Other possible manifestations of this phenomenon are presented, including various superradiant phenomena in low-dimensional semiconductors. From these discussions a generic picture of OQSs emerges in which the environmentally-mediated coupling between different quantum states plays a critical role in governing the system behavior. The ability to control or manipulate this interaction may even lead to new applications in photonics and electronics.

  17. Dynamical Recurrence and the Quantum Control of Coupled Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Serafini, Alessio; Kim, M. S.; Burgarth, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Controllability—the possibility of performing any target dynamics by applying a set of available operations—is a fundamental requirement for the practical use of any physical system. For finite-dimensional systems, such as spin systems, precise criteria to establish controllability, such as the so-called rank criterion, are well known. However, most physical systems require a description in terms of an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space whose controllability properties are poorly understood. Here, we investigate infinite-dimensional bosonic quantum systems—encompassing quantum light, ensembles of bosonic atoms, motional degrees of freedom of ions, and nanomechanical oscillators—governed by quadratic Hamiltonians (such that their evolution is analogous to coupled harmonic oscillators). After having highlighted the intimate connection between controllability and recurrence in the Hilbert space, we prove that, for coupled oscillators, a simple extra condition has to be fulfilled to extend the rank criterion to infinite-dimensional quadratic systems. Further, we present a useful application of our finding, by proving indirect controllability of a chain of harmonic oscillators.

  18. Myoelectric control of artificial limb inspired by quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomau, Michael; Jiang, Ning

    2015-03-01

    Precise and elegant coordination of a prosthesis across many degrees of freedom represents a significant challenge to efficient rehabilitation of people with limb deficiency. Processing the electrical neural signals collected from the surface of the remnant muscles of the stump is a common way to initiate and control the different movements available to the artificial limb. Based on the assumption that there are distinguishable and repeatable signal patterns among different types of muscular activation, the problem of prosthesis control reduces to one of pattern recognition. Widely accepted classical methods for pattern recognition, however, cannot provide simultaneous and proportional control of the artificial limb. Here we show that, in principle, quantum information processing of the neural signals allows us to overcome the above-mentioned difficulties, suggesting a very simple scheme for myoelectric control of artificial limb with advanced functionalities.

  19. Qudi: a modular python suite for experiment control and data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Binder, Jan M; Tomek, Nikolas; Scheuer, Jochen; Frank, Florian; Jahnke, Kay D; Müller, Christoph; Schmitt, Simon; Metsch, Mathias H; Unden, Thomas; Gehring, Tobias; Andersen, Ulrik L; Rogers, Lachlan J; Jelezko, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    Qudi is a general, modular, multi-operating system suite written in Python 3 for controlling laboratory experiments. It provides a structured environment by separating functionality into hardware abstraction, experiment logic and user interface layers. The core feature set comprises a graphical user interface, live data visualization, distributed execution over networks, rapid prototyping via Jupyter notebooks, configuration management, and data recording. Currently, the included modules are focused on confocal microscopy, quantum optics and quantum information experiments, but an expansion into other fields is possible and encouraged. Qudi is available from https://github.com/Ulm-IQO/qudi and is freely useable under the GNU General Public Licence.

  20. Quantum correlation control for two semiconductor microcavities connected by an optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, A.-B. A.; Eleuch, H.

    2017-06-01

    We explore the quantum correlations for two coupled quantum wells. Each quantum well is inside a semiconductor microcavity. The two cavities are connected by an optical fiber. The study of quantum correlations, namely the geometric quantum discord, measurement-induced non-locality and negativity, reveals sudden death and sudden birth phenomena. These effects depend not only on the initial states, coupling strengths of the cavity-fiber and cavity-exciton constants, but also on the dissipation rates of the semiconductor microcavities. We show that the coupling constants control the quantum correlations.

  1. Microcontroller-based Feedback Control Laboratory Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Choi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available this paper is a result of the implementation of the recommendations on enhancing hands-on experience of control engineering education using single chip, small scale computers such as microcontrollers. A set of microcontroller-based feedback control experiments was developed for the Electrical Engineering curriculum at the University of North Florida. These experiments provided hands-on techniques that students can utilize in the development of complete solutions for a number of servo control problems. Significant effort was devoted to software development of feedback controllers and the associated signal conditioning circuits interfacing between the microcontroller and the physical plant. These experiments have stimulated the interest of our students in control engineering.

  2. Quantum control and coherence of interacting spins in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, G.

    2012-01-01

    The field of quantum science and technology has generated many ideas for new revolutionary devices that exploit the quantum mechanical properties of small-scale systems. Isolated solid state spins play a large role in quantum technologies. They can be used as basic building blocks for a quantum comp

  3. Quantum control and coherence of interacting spins in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, G.

    2012-01-01

    The field of quantum science and technology has generated many ideas for new revolutionary devices that exploit the quantum mechanical properties of small-scale systems. Isolated solid state spins play a large role in quantum technologies. They can be used as basic building blocks for a quantum comp

  4. Quantum coherent control of ultra short laser pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU JianYing; ZENG JianHua; LI JunTao

    2008-01-01

    The effective photonic control is one of the key issues in photo-physics. Significant advancement in photonic crystals, quantum optics, ultrafast optics as well as micro-nano-optics gives rise to new op-portunities to manipulate the emission and propagation in optical fields, leading to a number of new and interesting discoveries, e.g., ultrashort light pulse storage and efficient energy conversion. This paper reviews the latest research progress in storage, release and energy conversion for ultrashort laser pulses in periodical arrays of absorbing medium. Techniques to fabricate such devices are also presented.

  5. Controlling group velocity in a superconductive quantum circuit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Tian-Hui; Yang Guo-Jian

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the controllable group velocity of a microwave probe field in a superconductive quantum circuit (SQC) pumped by microwave fields,and the use of such a SQC function as an artificial A-type three-level atom.The exchange between the subluminal and the superluminal states of the probe field can be realized simply by sweeping the pumping intensity,and the superluminal state is usually realized with a lower absorption.This work is one of the efforts to extend the study of electromagnetically induced transparency and its related properties from the lightwave band to the microwave band.

  6. Acceleration of quantum optimal control theory algorithms with mixing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Alberto; Gross, E K U

    2009-05-01

    We propose the use of mixing strategies to accelerate the convergence of the common iterative algorithms utilized in quantum optimal control theory (QOCT). We show how the nonlinear equations of QOCT can be viewed as a "fixed-point" nonlinear problem. The iterative algorithms for this class of problems may benefit from mixing strategies, as it happens, e.g., in the quest for the ground-state density in Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. We demonstrate, with some numerical examples, how the same mixing schemes utilized in this latter nonlinear problem may significantly accelerate the QOCT iterative procedures.

  7. Novel Plasmonic and Hyberbolic Optical Materials for Control of Quantum Nanoemitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-13

    properties, metal ion implantation techniques, and multi- physics modeling to produce hyperbolic quantum nanoemitters. 15. SUBJECT TERMS nanotechnology 16...techniques, and multi- physics modeling to produce hyperbolic quantum nanoemitters. During the course of this project we studied plasmonic...AFRL-AFOSR-CL-TR-2017-0001 Novel Plasmonic and Hyberbolic Optical Materials for control of Quantum Nanoemitters Paras Prasad RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF

  8. Comparison and control of the robustness between quantum entanglement and quantum correlation in an open quantum system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Ying-Hua; Hu Ju-Ju; Hu Yan

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the influence of environmental decoherence on the dynamics of a coupled qubit system and quantum correlation.We analyse the relationship between concurrence and the degree of initial entanglement or the purity of initial quantum state,and also their relationship with quantum discord.The results show that the decrease of the purity of an initial quantum state can induce the attenuation of concurrence or quantum discord,but the attenuation of quantum discord is obviously slower than the concurrence's,correspondingly the survival time of quantum discord is longer.Further investigation reveals that the robustness of quantum discord and concurrence relies on the entanglement degree of the initial quantum state.The higher the degree of entanglement,the more robust the quantum discord is than concurrence.And the reverse is equally true.Birth and death happen to quantum discord periodically and a newborn quantum discord comes into being under a certain condition,so does the concurrence.

  9. High-fidelity quantum driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bason, Mark George; Viteau, Matthieu; Malossi, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Accurately controlling a quantum system is a fundamental requirement in quantum information processing and the coherent manipulation of molecular systems. The ultimate goal in quantum control is to prepare a desired state with the highest fidelity allowed by the available resources and the experi......Accurately controlling a quantum system is a fundamental requirement in quantum information processing and the coherent manipulation of molecular systems. The ultimate goal in quantum control is to prepare a desired state with the highest fidelity allowed by the available resources...

  10. Cavity quantum electrodynamics studies with site-controlled InGaAs quantum dots integrated into high quality microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reitzenstein, S.; Schneider, C.; Albert, F.

    2011-01-01

    , e.g., the large scale fabrication of quantum light sources. As a result, large efforts focus on the growth and the device integration of site-controlled QDs. We present the growth of low density arrays of site-controlled In(Ga)As QDs where shallow etched nanoholes act as nucleation sites......Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are fascinating nanoscopic structures for photonics and future quantum information technology. However, the random position of self-organized QDs inhibits a deterministic coupling in devices relying on cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) effects which complicates....... The nanoholes are located relative to cross markers which allows for a precise spatial alignment of the site-controlled QDs (SCQDs) and the photonic modes of high quality microcavites with an accuracy better than 50 nm. We also address the optical quality of the SCQDs in terms of the single SCQD emission mode...

  11. Myoelectric Control of Artificial Limb by Quantum Information Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Siomau, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Precise and elegant coordination of a prosthesis across many degrees of freedom is highly desired for rehabilitation of people with limb deficiency. Processing the electrical neural signals, collected from the surface of the remnant muscles of the stump, is a common way to activate certain function of the artificial limb. Based on the assumption that there are distinguishable and repeatable signal patterns among different types of muscular activation, the problem of the prosthesis control reduces to the pattern recognition. Widely accepted classical methods for pattern recognition, however, can not provide simultaneous and proportional control of the artificial limb. Here we show that quantum information processing of the neural signals allows us to overcome above difficulties suggesting a very simple scheme for myoelectric control of artificial limb with advanced functionalities.

  12. Second law of thermodynamics with discrete quantum feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagawa, Takahiro; Ueda, Masahito

    2008-02-29

    A new thermodynamic inequality is derived which leads to the maximum work that can be extracted from multi-heat-baths with the assistance of discrete quantum feedback control. The maximum work is determined by the free-energy difference and a generalized mutual information content between the thermodynamic system and the feedback controller. This maximum work can exceed that in conventional thermodynamics and, in the case of a heat cycle with two heat baths, the heat efficiency can be greater than that of the Carnot cycle. The consistency of our results with the second law of thermodynamics is ensured by the fact that work is needed for information processing of the feedback controller.

  13. Cavity quantum electrodynamics of a quantum dot in a micropillar cavity: comparison between experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Høeg; Ates, Serkan; Reitzenstein, S.

    2010-01-01

    The coupling between a quantum dot (QD) and a micropillar cavity is experimentally investigated by performing time-resolved, correlation, and two-photon interference measurements. The Jaynes-Cummings model including dissipative Lindblad terms and dephasing is analyzed, and all the parameters...

  14. Does the Peres experiment using photons test for hyper-complex (quaternionic) quantum theories?

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    Assuming the standard axioms for quaternionic quantum theory and a spatially localized scattering interaction, the $S$-matrix in quaternionic quantum theory is complex valued, not quaternionic. Using the standard connections between the $S$-matrix, the forward scattering amplitude for electromagnetic wave scattering, and the index of refraction, we show that the index of refraction is necessarily complex, not quaternionic. This implies that the recent optical experiment of Procopio et al. based on the Peres proposal does not test for hyper-complex or quaternionic quantum effects arising within the standard Hilbert space framework. Such a test requires looking at near zone fields, not radiation zone fields.

  15. Hierarchical Control of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Barriuso-Poy, Alex; Llobet-Valero, E

    2007-01-01

    Control systems at High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments are becoming increasingly complex mainly due to the size, complexity and data volume associated to the front-end instrumentation. In particular, this becomes visible for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN. ATLAS will be the largest particle detector ever built, result of an international collaboration of more than 150 institutes. The experiment is composed of 9 different specialized sub-detectors that perform different tasks and have different requirements for operation. The system in charge of the safe and coherent operation of the whole experiment is called Detector Control System (DCS). This thesis presents the integration of the ATLAS DCS into a global control tree following the natural segmentation of the experiment into sub-detectors and smaller sub-systems. The integration of the many different systems composing the DCS includes issues such as: back-end organization, process model identification, fault detection, synchronization ...

  16. Hierarchical Control of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Barriuso-Poy, Alex; Llobet-Valero, E

    2007-01-01

    Control systems at High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments are becoming increasingly complex mainly due to the size, complexity and data volume associated to the front-end instrumentation. In particular, this becomes visible for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN. ATLAS will be the largest particle detector ever built, result of an international collaboration of more than 150 institutes. The experiment is composed of 9 different specialized sub-detectors that perform different tasks and have different requirements for operation. The system in charge of the safe and coherent operation of the whole experiment is called Detector Control System (DCS). This thesis presents the integration of the ATLAS DCS into a global control tree following the natural segmentation of the experiment into sub-detectors and smaller sub-systems. The integration of the many different systems composing the DCS includes issues such as: back-end organization, process model identification, fault detection, synchronization ...

  17. One Lyapunov control for quantum systems and its application to entanglement generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Sun, Jitao

    2013-05-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the control of finite dimensional ideal quantum systems in which the quantum states are represented by the density operators. A new Lyapunov function based on the Hilbert-Schmidt distance and mechanical quantity of the quantum system is given. We present a theoretical convergence result using LaSalle invariance principle. Applying the proposed Lyapunov method, the generation of the maximally entangled quantum states of two qubits is obtained.

  18. One Lyapunov control for quantum systems and its application to entanglement generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wei, E-mail: 09yw@tongji.edu.cn [Department of Mathematics, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Sun, Jitao, E-mail: sunjt@sh163.net [Department of Mathematics, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China)

    2013-05-03

    In this Letter, we investigate the control of finite dimensional ideal quantum systems in which the quantum states are represented by the density operators. A new Lyapunov function based on the Hilbert–Schmidt distance and mechanical quantity of the quantum system is given. We present a theoretical convergence result using LaSalle invariance principle. Applying the proposed Lyapunov method, the generation of the maximally entangled quantum states of two qubits is obtained.

  19. Quantum theory as a description of robust experiments: application to Stern-Gerlach and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar; Kracklauer, Al F.; De Raedt, Hans

    2015-09-01

    We propose and develop the thesis that the quantum theoretical description of experiments emerges from the desire to organize experimental data such that the description of the system under scrutiny and the one used to acquire the data are separated as much as possible. Application to the Stern-Gerlach and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiments are shown to support this thesis. General principles of logical inference which have been shown to lead to the Schr\\"odinger and Pauli equation and the probabilistic descriptions of the Stern-Gerlach and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiments, are used to demonstrate that the condition for the separation procedure to yield the quantum theoretical description is intimately related to the assumptions that the observed events are independent and that the data generated by these experiments is robust with respect to small changes of the conditions under which the experiment is carried out.

  20. Quantum theory as plausible reasoning applied to data obtained by robust experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Raedt, H; Katsnelson, M I; Michielsen, K

    2016-05-28

    We review recent work that employs the framework of logical inference to establish a bridge between data gathered through experiments and their objective description in terms of human-made concepts. It is shown that logical inference applied to experiments for which the observed events are independent and for which the frequency distribution of these events is robust with respect to small changes of the conditions under which the experiments are carried out yields, without introducing any concept of quantum theory, the quantum theoretical description in terms of the Schrödinger or the Pauli equation, the Stern-Gerlach or Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiments. The extraordinary descriptive power of quantum theory then follows from the fact that it is plausible reasoning, that is common sense, applied to reproducible and robust experimental data.

  1. Multiple-quantum HCN-CCH-TOCSY experiment for 13C/15N labeled RNA oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Weidong; Jiang Licong [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (United States)

    1999-12-15

    A multiple-quantum 3D HCN-CCH-TOCSY experiment is presented for the assignment of RNA ribose resonances. The experiment makes use of the chemical shift dispersion of N1 of pyrimidine and N9 of purine to distinguish the ribose spin systems. It provides an alternative approach for the assignment of ribose resonances to the currently used COSY- and TOCSY-type experiments in which either {sup 13}C or {sup 1}H is utilized to distinguish the different spin systems. Compared to the single-quantum version, the sensitivity of the multiple-quantum HCN-CCH-TOCSY experiment is enhanced on average by a factor of 2 for a 23-mer RNA aptamer complexed with neomycin.

  2. Electron counting capacitance standard and quantum metrology triangle experiments at PTB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, H.; Schurr, J.; Ahlers, F. J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper summarizes the final results of the electron counting capacitance standard experiment at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) achieved since the publication of a preliminary result in 2012. All systematic uncertainty contributions were experimentally quantified and are discussed. Frequency-dependent measurements on the 1 pF cryogenic capacitor were performed using a high-precision transformer-based capacitance bridge with a relative uncertainty of 0.03 µF F-1. The results revealed a crucial problem related to the capacitor, which hampered realizing the quantum metrology triangle with an accuracy corresponding to a combined total uncertainty of better than a few parts per million and eventually caused the discontinuation of the experiment at PTB. This paper provides a conclusion on the implications for future quantum metrology triangle experiments from the latest CODATA adjustment of fundamental constants, and summarizes perspectives and outlooks on future quantum metrology triangle experiments based on topical developments in small-current metrology.

  3. Meltdown in quantum computers needs not occur: Nuclear experiments show a way out

    CERN Document Server

    Flores, J; Seligman, T H

    2005-01-01

    We show that phase memory can be much longer than energy relaxation in systems with exponentially large dimensions of Hilbert space; this finding is documented by fifty years of nuclear experiments, though the information is somewhat hidden. For quantum computers Hilbert spaces of dimension $2^{100}$ or larger will be typical and therefore this effect may contribute significantly to reduce the problems of scaling of quantum computers to a useful number of qubits.

  4. A Dynamic Programming Approach to Finite-horizon Coherent Quantum LQG Control

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, Igor G

    2011-01-01

    The paper considers the coherent quantum Linear Quadratic Gaussian (CQLQG) control problem for time-varying quantum plants governed by linear quantum stochastic differential equations over a bounded time interval. A controller is sought among quantum linear systems satisfying physical realizability (PR) conditions. The latter describe the dynamic equivalence of the system to an open quantum harmonic oscillator and relate its state-space matrices to the free Hamiltonian, coupling and scattering operators of the oscillator. Using the Hamiltonian parameterization of PR controllers, the CQLQG problem is recast into an optimal control problem for a deterministic system governed by a differential Lyapunov equation. The state of this subsidiary system is the symmetric part of the quantum covariance matrix of the plant-controller state vector. The resulting covariance control problem is treated using dynamic programming and Pontryagin's minimum principle. The associated Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation for the minimu...

  5. Single quantum path control by a fundamental chirped pulse combined with a subharmonic control pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Liqiang [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Chu, Tianshu, E-mail: tschu008@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Institute for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Laboratory of New Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HHG spectra and attosecond pulse generation from a model He atom. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two-color laser field of a chirped fundamental pulse and a subharmonics control pulse. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single quantum path selection by {beta} = 4.55 chirp pulse and the zero-phase 2000 nm control pulse. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of 337 eV supercontinuum region and generation of 39 as pulse. -- Abstract: In this paper, we study the issue of single quantum path control and its role in attosecond pulse generation. By carrying out the time-dependent Schroedinger equation analysis for the harmonic emission from a single He atom irradiated by the two-color laser field, consisting of a short 800 fundamental chirped pulse and a subharmonic 800-2400 nm control pulse, we find that the most favorable condition for attosecond generation is at the fundamental chirp parameter {beta} = 4.55 together with the zero-phase 2000 nm control pulse, in which the single quantum path (short quantum path) is selected to contribute to the harmonic spectrum exhibiting an ultrabroad supercontinuum of a 337 eV bandwidth. Finally, an isolated attosecond pulse as short as 39 as is thus generated directly.

  6. Analysis of a recent experiment seemingly favouring local realism against quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, E.

    2008-03-01

    A recent experiment by Brida et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 44, 547 (2007)] is analyzed with the conclusion that the results disagree with standard quantum predictions but fit a simple local hidden variables model. New experiments are proposed which might throw new light on the anomaly.

  7. Time-delayed quantum coherent Pyragas feedback control of photon squeezing in a degenerate parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Manuel; Hein, Sven M.; Lehnert, Judith; Schöll, Eckehard; Hughes, Stephen; Knorr, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Quantum coherent feedback control is a measurement-free control method fully preserving quantum coherence. In this paper we show how time-delayed quantum coherent feedback can be used to control the degree of squeezing in the output field of a cavity containing a degenerate parametric oscillator. We focus on the specific situation of Pyragas-type feedback control where time-delayed signals are fed back directly into the quantum system. Our results show how time-delayed feedback can enhance or decrease the degree of squeezing as a function of time delay and feedback strength.

  8. Calibrating and Controlling the Quantum Efficiency Distribution of Inhomogeneously Broadened Quantum Rods Using a Mirror Ball

    CERN Document Server

    Lunnemann, Per; van Dijk-Moes, Relinde J A; Pietra, Francesca; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël; Koenderink, A Femius

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that a simple silver coated ball lens can be used to accurately measure the entire distribution of radiative transition rates of quantum dot nanocrystals. This simple and cost-effective implementation of Drexhage's method that uses nanometer-controlled optical mode density variations near a mirror, not only allows to extract calibrated ensemble-averaged rates, but for the first time also to quantify the full inhomogeneous dispersion of radiative and non radiative decay rates across thousands of nanocrystals. We apply the technique to novel ultra-stable CdSe/CdS dot-in-rod emitters. The emitters are of large current interest due to their improved stability and reduced blinking. We retrieve a room-temperature ensemble average quantum efficiency of 0.87+-0.08 at a mean lifetime around 20 ns. We confirm a log-normal distribution of decay rates as often assumed in literature and we show that the rate distribution-width, that amounts to about 30% of the mean decay rate, is strongly dependent on the l...

  9. Quantum phase transition of light as a control of the entanglement between interacting quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barragan, Angela; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Mondragon-Shem, Ian

    We study coupled quantum dots arranged in a photonic crystal, interacting with light which undergoes a quantum phase transition. At the mean-field level for the infinite lattice, we compute the concurrence of the quantum dots as a measure of their entanglement. We find that this quantity smoothly

  10. Optimal Qubit Control Using Single-Flux Quantum Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebermann, Per J.; Wilhelm, Frank K.

    2016-08-01

    Single-flux quantum pulses are a natural candidate for on-chip control of superconducting qubits. We show that they can drive high-fidelity single-qubit rotations—even in leaky transmon qubits—if the pulse sequence is suitably optimized. We achieve this objective by showing that, for these restricted all-digital pulses, genetic algorithms can be made to converge to arbitrarily low error, verified up to a reduction in gate error by 2 orders of magnitude compared to an evenly spaced pulse train. Timing jitter of the pulses is taken into account, exploring the robustness of our optimized sequence. This approach takes us one step further towards on-chip qubit controls.

  11. Microwave quantum logic spectroscopy and control of molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, M.; F. Herskind, P.; Drewsen, M.;

    2013-01-01

    A general method for rotational microwave spectroscopy and control of polar molecular ions via direct microwave addressing is considered. Our method makes use of spatially varying AC Stark shifts, induced by far off-resonant, focused laser beams to achieve an effective coupling between the rotati......A general method for rotational microwave spectroscopy and control of polar molecular ions via direct microwave addressing is considered. Our method makes use of spatially varying AC Stark shifts, induced by far off-resonant, focused laser beams to achieve an effective coupling between...... the rotational state of a molecular ion and the electronic state of an atomic ion. In this setting, the atomic ion is used for read-out of the molecular ion state, in a manner analogous to quantum logic spectroscopy based on Raman transitions. In addition to high-precision spectroscopy, this setting allows...

  12. Quantum optimal control of photoelectron spectra and angular distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Goetz, R Esteban; Santra, Robin; Koch, Christiane P

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distributions obtained in photoionization reveal important information on e.g. charge transfer or hole coherence in the parent ion. Here we show that optimal control of the underlying quantum dynamics can be used to enhance desired features in the photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. To this end, we combine Krotov's method for optimal control theory with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles formalism and a splitting approach to calculate photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. The optimization target can account for specific desired properties in the photoelectron angular distribution alone, in the photoelectron spectrum, or in both. We demonstrate the method for hydrogen and then apply it to argon under strong XUV radiation, maximizing the difference of emission into the upper and lower hemispheres, in order to realize directed electron emission in the XUV regime.

  13. Microwave quantum logic spectroscopy and control of molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, M.; F. Herskind, P.; Drewsen, M.

    2013-01-01

    A general method for rotational microwave spectroscopy and control of polar molecular ions via direct microwave addressing is considered. Our method makes use of spatially varying AC Stark shifts, induced by far off-resonant, focused laser beams to achieve an effective coupling between the rotati......A general method for rotational microwave spectroscopy and control of polar molecular ions via direct microwave addressing is considered. Our method makes use of spatially varying AC Stark shifts, induced by far off-resonant, focused laser beams to achieve an effective coupling between...... for rotational ground state cooling, and can be considered as a candidate for the quantum information processing with polar molecular ions. All elements of our proposal can be realized with currently available technology....

  14. Polarization-Sensitive Quantum Optical Coherence Tomography: Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, Mark C; Teich, Malvin Carl

    2010-01-01

    Polarization-sensitive quantum optical coherence tomography (PS-QOCT) makes use of a Type-II twin-photon light source for carrying out optical sectioning with polarization sensitivity. A BBO nonlinear optical crystal pumped by a Ti:sapphire psec-pulsed laser is used to confirm the theoretical underpinnings of this imaging paradigm. PS-QOCT offers even-order dispersion cancellation with simultaneous access to the group-velocity dispersion characteristics of the interstitial medium between the reflecting surfaces of the sample.

  15. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, David J. [The George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) measurements are significantly, and increasingly reproducible. Practical control of the production of energy or materials by LENR has yet to be demonstrated. Minimization of costly inputs and maximization of desired outputs of LENR remain for future developments. The paper concludes by underlying that it is now clearly that demands for reproducible experiments in the early years of LENR experiments were premature. In fact, one can argue that irreproducibility should be expected for early experiments in a complex new field. As emphasized in the paper and as often happened in the history of science, experimental and theoretical progress can take even decades. It is likely to be many years before investments in LENR experiments will yield significant returns, even for successful research programs. However, it is clearly that a fundamental understanding of the anomalous effects observed in numerous experiments will significantly increase reproducibility, improve controllability, enable optimization of processes, and accelerate the economic viability of LENR.

  16. Interference control of perfect photon absorption in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Liyong; Zhu, Yifu; Agarwal, G S

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyze a scheme for controlling coherent photon transmission and reflection in a cavity-quantum-electrodynamics (CQED) system consisting of an optical resonator coupled with three-level atoms coherently prepared by a control laser from free space. When the control laser is off and the cavity is excited by two identical light fields from two ends of the cavity, the two input light fields can be completely absorbed by the CQED system and the light energy is converted into the excitation of the polariton states, but no light can escape from the cavity. Two distinct cases of controlling the perfect photon absorption are analyzed: (a) when the control laser is tuned to the atomic resonance and creates electromagnetically induced transparency, the prefect photon absorption is suppressed and the input light fields are nearly completely transmitted through the cavity; (b) when the control laser is tuned to the polariton state resonance and inhibits the polariton state excitation, the perfect photon ab...

  17. The Backwards-Time Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics Revisited With Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Werbos, P J; Werbos, Paul J.; Dolmatova, Ludmila

    2000-01-01

    The classic paper of Clauser et al proved that Bell's Theorem experiments rule out all theories of physics which assume locality, time-forwards causality and the existence of an objective real world. The Backwards-Time Interpretation (BTI) tries to recover realism and locality by permitting backwards time causality. BTI should permit dramatic simplification of the assumptions or axioms of physics, but requires new work in fundamental mathematics, such as new tools for the "closure of turbulence," the derivation of statistics generated by ODE or PDE. Recent events like the Delayed Choice Quantum Eraser experiment of Kim, Shih et al have increased mainstream interest in the possibility of backwards causality. The Backwards Time Quantum Teleportation (BTQT) experiment will take this further. True backwards time communication channels (BTCC) are absolutely impossible in most formulations of quantum theory but only almost impossible in the BTI formulation. This paper discusses BTQT, the issue of backwards causalit...

  18. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian Günther

    2015-01-01

    even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes...... place between different classical paths with precise amplitude and phase relations. In the double-slit experiment with walking droplets, these relations are lost since one of the paths is singled out by the droplet. To support our conclusions, we have carried out our own double-slit experiment, and our...... results, in particular the long and variable slit passage times of the droplets, cast strong doubt on the feasibility of the interference claimed by Couder and Fort. To understand theoretically the limitations of wave-driven particle systems as analogs to quantum mechanics, we introduce a Schro...

  19. Photocurrent Control in a Magnetic Field through Quantum Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Murti

    Quantum-mechanical interference between excitation pathways can be used to inject photocurrents optically in semiconductors, the properties of which can be coherently controlled through the phases and polarizations of the optical pulses. In this thesis, coherent photocurrent control is investigated theoretically for two-dimensional semiconductor systems in a perpendicular magnetic field. The semiconductor systems are subjected to optical pulses with centre frequencies o 0 and 2o0, which excite interband transitions through one- and two-photon processes, selection rules for which are determined from envelope wave functions. It is shown using time-dependent perturbation theory that the interference between one- and two-photon pathways connecting a particular valence Landau level to two different but adjacent conduction Landau levels manifests itself as electron currents that rotate counterclockwise, while interference between pathways connecting two adjacent valence Landau levels to a particular conduction Landau level manifests itself as hole currents that rotate clockwise. The initial directions of the currents can be controlled by adjusting the polarizations and a relative phase parameter of the pulses. The analysis is performed for a GaAs quantum well, monolayer graphene and bilayer graphene. For GaAs, the equally spaced Landau levels in each band lead to electron currents rotating at a single frequency and hole currents rotating at a different frequency. Monolayer and bilayer graphene allow currents with multiple frequency components as well as other peculiarities resulting from additional interference processes not present for GaAs. The photocurrents in all of these systems radiate in the terahertz regime. This radiation is calculated for realistic experimental conditions, with scattering and relaxation processes accounted for phenomenologically. Finally, the effect of Coulomb interactions on the coherent control process is considered for an undoped Ga

  20. On-chip generation and guiding of quantum light from a site-controlled quantum dot

    CERN Document Server

    Jamil, Ayesha; Kalliakos, Sokratis; Schwagmann, Andre; Ward, Martin B; Brody, Yarden; Ellis, David J P; Farrer, Ian; Griffiths, Jonathan P; Jones, Geb A C; Ritchie, David A; Shields, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the emission and routing of single photons along a semiconductor chip originating from carrier recombination in an actively positioned InAs quantum dot. Device scale arrays of quantum dots are formed by a two step regrowth process. We precisely locate the propagating region of a unidirectional photonic crystal waveguide with respect to the quantum dot nucleation site. Under pulsed optical excitation, the multiphoton emission probability from the exit of the waveguide is 12 \\pm 5 % before any background correction. Our results are a major step towards the deterministic integration of a quantum emitter with the waveguiding components of photonic quantum circuits.

  1. On-chip generation and guiding of quantum light from a site-controlled quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, Ayesha; Farrer, Ian; Griffiths, Jonathan P.; Jones, Geb A. C.; Ritchie, David A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Skiba-Szymanska, Joanna; Kalliakos, Sokratis; Ward, Martin B.; Ellis, David J. P.; Shields, Andrew J., E-mail: andrew.shields@crl.toshiba.co.uk [Cambridge Research Laboratory, Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge, CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Schwagmann, Andre; Brody, Yarden [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Cambridge Research Laboratory, Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge, CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-10

    We demonstrate the emission and routing of single photons along a semiconductor chip originating from carrier recombination in an actively positioned InAs quantum dot. Device–scale arrays of quantum dots are formed by a two–step regrowth process. We precisely locate the propagating region of a unidirectional photonic crystal waveguide with respect to the quantum dot nucleation site. Under pulsed optical excitation, the multiphoton emission probability from the waveguide's exit is 12% ± 5% before any background correction. Our results are a major step towards the deterministic integration of a quantum emitter with the waveguiding components of photonic quantum circuits.

  2. Chemical physics: Quantum control of light-induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, David W.

    2016-07-01

    An investigation of how ultracold molecules are broken apart by light reveals surprising, previously unobserved quantum effects. The work opens up avenues of research in quantum optics. See Letter p.122

  3. Comment on "Peres experiment using photons: No test for hypercomplex (quaternionic) quantum theories"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopio, Lorenzo M.; Rozema, Lee A.; Dakić, Borivoje; Walther, Philip

    2017-09-01

    In his recent article [Phys. Rev. A 95, 060101(R) (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevA.95.060101], Adler questions the usefulness of the bound found in our experimental search for genuine effects of hypercomplex quantum mechanics [Nat. Commun. 8, 15044 (2017), 10.1038/ncomms15044]. Our experiment was performed using a black-box (instrumentalist) approach to generalized probabilistic theories; therefore, it does not assume a priori any particular underlying mechanism. From that point of view our experimental results do indeed place meaningful bounds on the possible effects of "postquantum theories," including quaternionic quantum mechanics. In his article, Adler compares our experiment to nonrelativistic and Möller formal scattering theories within quaternionic quantum mechanics. With a particular set of assumptions, he finds that quaternionic effects would likely not manifest themselves in general. Although these assumptions are justified in the nonrelativistic case, a proper calculation for relativistic particles is still missing. Here, we provide a concrete relativistic example of Klein-Gordon scattering wherein the quaternionic effects persist. We note that when the Klein-Gordon equation is formulated using a Hamiltonian formalism it displays a so-called "indefinite metric," a characteristic feature of relativistic quantum wave equations. In Adler's example this is directly forbidden by his assumptions, and therefore our present example is not in contradiction to his work. In complex quantum mechanics this problem of an indefinite metric is solved in a second quantization. Unfortunately, there is no known algorithm for canonical field quantization in quaternionic quantum mechanics.

  4. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Rosenlund Ahl, Sonja; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens T; Bohr, Tomas

    2015-07-01

    In a thought-provoking paper, Couder and Fort [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 154101 (2006)] describe a version of the famous double-slit experiment performed with droplets bouncing on a vertically vibrated fluid surface. In the experiment, an interference pattern in the single-particle statistics is found even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes place between different classical paths with precise amplitude and phase relations. In the double-slit experiment with walking droplets, these relations are lost since one of the paths is singled out by the droplet. To support our conclusions, we have carried out our own double-slit experiment, and our results, in particular the long and variable slit passage times of the droplets, cast strong doubt on the feasibility of the interference claimed by Couder and Fort. To understand theoretically the limitations of wave-driven particle systems as analogs to quantum mechanics, we introduce a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localized particle that generates a wave while being simultaneously guided by it. We show that the ensuing particle-wave dynamics can capture some characteristics of quantum mechanics such as orbital quantization. However, the particle-wave dynamics can not reproduce quantum mechanics in general, and we show that the single-particle statistics for our model in a double-slit experiment with an additional splitter plate differs qualitatively from that of quantum mechanics.

  5. Quantum control of single spins and single photons in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Sar, T.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments on the control of the optical properties of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond, and on control of the electron and nuclear spin states associated with the NV center. The NV center is a fluorescing atomic defect center in diamond, consisting of a

  6. Quantum control of single spins and single photons in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Sar, T.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments on the control of the optical properties of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond, and on control of the electron and nuclear spin states associated with the NV center. The NV center is a fluorescing atomic defect center in diamond, consisting of a

  7. Open-Loop Control in Quantum Optics: Two-Level Atom in Modulated Optical Field

    CERN Document Server

    Saifullah, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    The methods of mathematical control theory are widely used in the modern physics, but still they are less popular in quantum science. We will discuss the aspects of control theory, which are the most useful in applications to the real problems of quantum optics. We apply this technique to control the behavior of the two-level quantum particles (atoms) in the modulated external optical field in the frame of the so called "semi classical model", where quantum two-level atomic system (all other levels are neglected) interacts with classical electromagnetic field. In this paper we propose a simple model of feedforward (open-loop) control for the quantum particle system, which is a basement for further investigation of two-level quantum particle in the external one-dimensional optical field.

  8. Phase-controlled coherent population trapping in superconducting quantum circuits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程广玲; 王一平; 陈爱喜

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influences of the-applied-field phases and amplitudes on the coherent population trapping behavior in superconducting quantum circuits. Based on the interactions of the microwave fields with a single∆-type three-level fluxonium qubit, the coherent population trapping could be obtainable and it is very sensitive to the relative phase and amplitudes of the applied fields. When the relative phase is tuned to 0 orπ, the maximal atomic coherence is present and coherent population trapping occurs. While for the choice ofπ/2, the atomic coherence becomes weak. Meanwhile, for the fixed relative phaseπ/2, the value of coherence would decrease with the increase of Rabi frequency of the external field coupled with two lower levels. The responsible physical mechanism is quantum interference induced by the control fields, which is indicated in the dressed-state representation. The microwave coherent phenomenon is present in our scheme, which will have potential applications in optical communication and nonlinear optics in solid-state devices.

  9. Quantum information and coherence

    CERN Document Server

    Öhberg, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    This book offers an introduction to ten key topics in quantum information science and quantum coherent phenomena, aimed at graduate-student level. The chapters cover some of the most recent developments in this dynamic research field where theoretical and experimental physics, combined with computer science, provide a fascinating arena for groundbreaking new concepts in information processing. The book addresses both the theoretical and experimental aspects of the subject, and clearly demonstrates how progress in experimental techniques has stimulated a great deal of theoretical effort and vice versa. Experiments are shifting from simply preparing and measuring quantum states to controlling and manipulating them, and the book outlines how the first real applications, notably quantum key distribution for secure communication, are starting to emerge. The chapters cover quantum retrodiction, ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices, optomechanics, quantum algorithms, quantum key distribution, quantum cont...

  10. Charging dynamics of a floating gate transistor with site-controlled quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, P., E-mail: patrick.maier@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Hartmann, F.; Emmerling, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Worschech, L. [Technische Physik, Physikalisches Institut, Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany)

    2014-08-04

    A quantum dot memory based on a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wire with site-controlled InAs quantum dots was realized by means of molecular beam epitaxy and etching techniques. By sampling of different gate voltage sweeps for the determination of charging and discharging thresholds, it was found that discharging takes place at short time scales of μs, whereas several seconds of waiting times within a distinct negative gate voltage range were needed to charge the quantum dots. Such quantum dot structures have thus the potential to implement logic functions comprising charge and time dependent ingredients such as counting of signals or learning rules.

  11. Demonstration of a quantum controlled-NOT gate in the telecommunications band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Altepeter, Joseph B; Medic, Milja; Lee, Kim Fook; Gokden, Burc; Hadfield, Robert H; Nam, Sae Woo; Kumar, Prem

    2008-04-04

    We present the first quantum controlled-not (cnot) gate realized using a fiber-based indistinguishable photon-pair source in the 1.55 microm telecommunications band. Using this free-space cnot gate, all four Bell states are produced and fully characterized by performing quantum-state tomography, demonstrating the gate's unambiguous entangling capability and high fidelity. Telecom-band operation makes this cnot gate particularly suitable for quantum-information-processing tasks that are at the interface of quantum communication and linear optical quantum computing.

  12. Dynamically controlled charge sensing of a few-electron silicon quantum dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Yang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report charge sensing measurements of a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor quantum dot using a single-electron transistor as a charge sensor with dynamic feedback control. Using digitally-controlled feedback, the sensor exhibits sensitive and robust detection of the charge state of the quantum dot, even in the presence of charge drifts and random charge upset events. The sensor enables the occupancy of the quantum dot to be probed down to the single electron level.

  13. Bloch-wave engineering of quantum dot-micropillars for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Lermer, Matthias; Dunzer, Florian; Reitzenstein, Stephan; Höfling, Sven; Mørk, Jesper; Worschech, Lukas; Kamp, Martin; Forchel, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    We have employed Bloch-wave engineering to realize submicron diameter ultra-high quality factor GaAs/AlAs micropillars (MPs). The design features a tapered cavity in which the fundamental Bloch mode is subject to an adiabatic transition to match the Bragg mirror Bloch mode. The resulting reduced scattering loss leads to record-high visibility of the strong coupling in MPs with modest oscillator strength quantum dots. A quality factor of 13,600 and a Rabi splitting of 85 \\mueV with an estimated visibility v of 0.38 are observed for a small mode volume MP with a diameter dc of 850 nm.

  14. The Detector Control of the PANDA Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbauer, F.

    2014-08-01

    The PANDA experiment will be built at the antiproton storage ring HESR, a part of the new accelerator facility FAIR in Darmstadt, Germany. PANDA aims amongst other topics for high precision measurements in hadron spectroscopy and search for exotic matter. To guarantee the high resolution of the different components a detector control system (DCS) monitoring temperatures, humidity, pressure, and controlling chillers and power supplies is needed. The DCS of PANDA is built using the open-source software package EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) with a PANDA specific version of Control-System Studio. In this document the general concepts of the PANDA DCS will be discussed.

  15. Phase-controlled superconducting heat-flux quantum modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giazotto, F.; Martínez-Pérez, M. J.

    2012-09-01

    We theoretically put forward the concept of a phase-controlled superconducting heat-flux quantum modulator. Its operation relies on phase-dependent heat current predicted to occur in temperature-biased Josephson tunnel junctions. The device behavior is investigated as a function of temperature bias across the junctions, bath temperature, and junctions asymmetry as well. In a realistic Al-based setup the structure could provide temperature modulation amplitudes up to ˜50 mK with flux-to-temperature transfer coefficients exceeding ˜125 mK/Φ0 below 1 K, and temperature modulation frequency of the order of a few MHz. The proposed structure appears as a promising building-block for the implementation of caloritronic devices operating at cryogenic temperatures.

  16. Decoherence control in quantum computing with simple chirped pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debabrata Goswami

    2002-08-01

    We show how the use of optimally shaped pulses to guide the time evolution of a system (‘coherent control’) can be an effective approach towards quantum computation logic. We demonstrate this with selective control of decoherence for a multilevel system with a simple linearly chirped pulse. We use a multiphoton density-matrix approach to explore the effects of ultrafast shaped pulses for two-level systems that do not have a single photon resonance, and show that many multiphoton results are surprisingly similar to the single-photon results. Finally, we choose two specific chirped pulses: one that always generates inversion and the other that always generates self-induced transparency to demonstrate an ensemble CNOT gate.

  17. Quantum control of vibrational excitations in a heteronuclear diatomic molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sitansh Sharma; Purshotam Sharma; Harjinder Singh

    2007-09-01

    Optimal control theory is applied to obtain infrared laser pulses for selective vibrational excitation in a heteronuclear diatomic molecule. The problem of finding the optimized field is phrased as a maximization of a cost functional which depends on the laser field. A time dependent Gaussian factor is introduced in the field prior to evaluation of the cost functional for better field shape. Conjugate gradient method21,24 is used for optimization of constructed cost functional. At each instant of time, the optimal electric field is calculated and used for the subsequent quantum dynamics, within the dipole approximation. The results are obtained using both Morse potential as well as potential energy obtained using ab initio calculations.

  18. Optical control of the spin of a magnetic atom in a semiconductor quantum dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besombes L.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The control of single spins in solids is a key but challenging step for any spin-based solid-state quantumcomputing device. Thanks to their expected long coherence time, localized spins on magnetic atoms in a semiconductor host could be an interesting media to store quantum information in the solid state. Optical probing and control of the spin of individual or pairs of Manganese (Mn atoms (S = 5/2 have been obtained in II-VI and IIIV semiconductor quantum dots during the last years. In this paper, we review recently developed optical control experiments of the spin of an individual Mn atoms in II-VI semiconductor self-assembled or strain-free quantum dots (QDs.We first show that the fine structure of the Mn atom and especially a strained induced magnetic anisotropy is the main parameter controlling the spin memory of the magnetic atom at zero magnetic field. We then demonstrate that the energy of any spin state of a Mn atom or pairs of Mn atom can be independently tuned by using the optical Stark effect induced by a resonant laser field. The strong coupling with the resonant laser field modifies the Mn fine structure and consequently its dynamics.We then describe the spin dynamics of a Mn atom under this strong resonant optical excitation. In addition to standard optical pumping expected for a resonant excitation, we show that the Mn spin population can be trapped in the state which is resonantly excited. This effect is modeled considering the coherent spin dynamics of the coupled electronic and nuclear spin of the Mn atom optically dressed by a resonant laser field. Finally, we discuss the spin dynamics of a Mn atom in strain-free QDs and show that these structures should permit a fast optical coherent control of an individual Mn spin.

  19. GEECS (Generalized Equipment and Experiment Control System)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-12

    GEECS (Generalized Equipment and Experiment Control System) monitors and controls equipment distributed across a network, performs experiments by scanning input variables, and collects and stores various types of data synchronously from devices. Examples of devices include cameras, motors and pressure gauges. GEEKS is based upon LabView graphical object oriented programming (GOOP), allowing for a modular and scalable framework. Data is published for subscription of an arbitrary number of variables over TCP. A secondary framework allows easy development of graphical user interfaces for a combined control of any available devices on the control system without the need of programming knowledge. This allows for rapid integration of GEECS into a wide variety of systems. A database interface provides for devise and process configuration while allowing the user to save large quantities of data to local or network drives.

  20. New Experiments Call for a Continuous Absorption Alternative to Quantum Mechanics — The Unquantum Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiter E. S.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A famous beam-split coincidence test of the photon model was performed with -rays instead of visible light. A similar test was performed to split -rays. In both tests, co- incidence rates greatly exceed chance, leading to an unquantum effect. In contradiction to quantum theory and the photon model, these new results are strong evidence of the long abandoned accumulation hypothesis, also known as the loading theory. Attention is drawn to assumptions applied to past key experiments that led to quantum mechan- ics. The history of the loading theory is outlined, and a few key experiment equations are derived, now free of wave-particle duality. Quantum theory usually works because there is a subtle difference between quantized and thresholded absorption.

  1. Quantum Brachistochrone Curves as Geodesics: Obtaining Accurate Minimum-Time Protocols for the Control of Quantum Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Allegra, Michele; Jacobs, Kurt; Lloyd, Seth; Lupo, Cosmo; Mohseni, Masoud

    2015-05-01

    Most methods of optimal control cannot obtain accurate time-optimal protocols. The quantum brachistochrone equation is an exception, and has the potential to provide accurate time-optimal protocols for a wide range of quantum control problems. So far, this potential has not been realized, however, due to the inadequacy of conventional numerical methods to solve it. Here we show that the quantum brachistochrone problem can be recast as that of finding geodesic paths in the space of unitary operators. We expect this brachistochrone-geodesic connection to have broad applications, as it opens up minimal-time control to the tools of geometry. As one such application, we use it to obtain a fast numerical method to solve the brachistochrone problem, and apply this method to two examples demonstrating its power.

  2. Quantum-limited biochemical magnetometers designed using the Fisher information and quantum reaction control

    OpenAIRE

    Vitalis, K. M.; Kominis, I. K.

    2016-01-01

    Radical-ion pairs and their reactions have triggered the study of quantum effects in biological systems. This is because they exhibit a number of effects best understood within quantum information science, and at the same time are central in understanding the avian magnetic compass and the spin transport dynamics in photosynthetic reaction centers. Here we address radical-pair reactions from the perspective of quantum metrology. Since the coherent spin motion of radical-pairs is effected by a...

  3. Optimal control of multi-level quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Robert M.

    2010-12-02

    This thesis is concerned with the control of quantum systems. Given a Hamiltonian model of a quantum system, we are interested in finding controls - typically shaped electromagnetic pulses - that steer the evolution of the system toward a desired target operation. For this we employ a numerical optimisation method known as the GRAPE algorithm. For particular experimental systems, we design control schemes that respect constraints of robustness and addressability, and are within the reach of the experimental hardware. A general procedure is given for specifying a Hamiltonian model of a driven N-level system and converting it to an appropriate rotating frame. This is then applied together with the numerical algorithm to design improved schemes for two different systems, where laser fields manipulate orbital and hyperfine states of Pr{sup 3+} and Rb. The generation of cluster states in Ising-coupled systems is also studied. We find that, in the ideal case, the solution of evolving only under the coupling Hamiltonian is not time-optimal. This surprising result is in contrast to the known cases for unitary gates. For a symmetrised three-qubit example, we provide a geometrical interpretation of this. Numerically optimised control schemes are then developed for a nonideal coupling topology, modelling an experimental configuration of trapped ions. Controls for the implementation of the two-qubit Deutsch and Grover algorithms are designed for a pair of {sup 13}C nuclear spins at a nitrogen vacancy center in diamond. These implementations are robust to experimental errors, and found to be reproduced with high accuracy on a VFG-150 pulse generator. We also consider two-qubit gate synthesis in a system of superconducting qubits coupled by microwave resonators known as the cavity grid. We find that the optimised schemes allow two-qubit operations to be performed between an arbitrary qubit pair on the grid with only a small time overhead, with speedups of 2-4 over the existing

  4. Nuclear Quantum Effects in Water and Aqueous Systems: Experiment, Theory, and Current Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, Michele; Fang, Wei; Kusalik, Peter G; McKenzie, Ross H; Michaelides, Angelos; Morales, Miguel A; Markland, Thomas E

    2016-07-13

    Nuclear quantum effects influence the structure and dynamics of hydrogen-bonded systems, such as water, which impacts their observed properties with widely varying magnitudes. This review highlights the recent significant developments in the experiment, theory, and simulation of nuclear quantum effects in water. Novel experimental techniques, such as deep inelastic neutron scattering, now provide a detailed view of the role of nuclear quantum effects in water's properties. These have been combined with theoretical developments such as the introduction of the principle of competing quantum effects that allows the subtle interplay of water's quantum effects and their manifestation in experimental observables to be explained. We discuss how this principle has recently been used to explain the apparent dichotomy in water's isotope effects, which can range from very large to almost nonexistent depending on the property and conditions. We then review the latest major developments in simulation algorithms and theory that have enabled the efficient inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in molecular simulations, permitting their combination with on-the-fly evaluation of the potential energy surface using electronic structure theory. Finally, we identify current challenges and future opportunities in this area of research.

  5. Deterministic Photon Pairs and Coherent Optical Control of a Single Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Harishankar; Predojević, Ana; Huber, Tobias; Kauten, Thomas; Solomon, Glenn S.; Weihs, Gregor

    2013-03-01

    The strong confinement of semiconductor excitons in a quantum dot gives rise to atomlike behavior. The full benefit of such a structure is best observed in resonant excitation where the excited state can be deterministically populated and coherently manipulated. Because of the large refractive index and device geometry it remains challenging to observe resonantly excited emission that is free from laser scattering in III/V self-assembled quantum dots. Here we exploit the biexciton binding energy to create an extremely clean single photon source via two-photon resonant excitation of an InAs/GaAs quantum dot. We observe complete suppression of the excitation laser and multiphoton emissions. Additionally, we perform full coherent control of the ground-biexciton state qubit and observe an extended coherence time using an all-optical echo technique. The deterministic coherent photon pair creation makes this system suitable for the generation of time-bin entanglement and experiments on the interaction of photons from dissimilar sources.

  6. Bloch-wave engineering of quantum dot micropillars for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lermer, M; Gregersen, N; Dunzer, F; Reitzenstein, S; Höfling, S; Mørk, J; Worschech, L; Kamp, M; Forchel, A

    2012-02-01

    We have employed Bloch-wave engineering to realize submicron diameter high quality factor GaAs/AlAs micropillars (MPs). The design features a tapered cavity in which the fundamental Bloch mode is subject to an adiabatic transition to match the Bragg mirror Bloch mode. The resulting reduced scattering loss leads to record-high vacuum Rabi splitting of the strong coupling in MPs with modest oscillator strength quantum dots. A quality factor of 13, 600 and a splitting of 85  μeV with an estimated visibility v of 0.41 are observed for a small mode volume MP with a diameter d{c} of 850 nm.

  7. Quantum control of the photoinduced Wolff rearrangement of diazonaphthoquinone in the condensed phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolpert, Daniel; Gerber, Gustav; Brixner, Tobias [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Schade, Marco; Langhojer, Florian [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)], E-mail: brixner@phys-chemie.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2008-04-14

    A shaped UV pump-MIR probe setup is employed for quantum control of the photoinduced Wolff rearrangement reaction of diazonaphthoquinone (DNQ) dissolved in methanol, yielding a ketene photoproduct. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy is a well-suited tool to monitor a photoreaction in the liquid phase as the narrow vibrational lines allow the observation of structural changes. Especially in the mid-infrared region, marker modes originating from different photoproducts can be identified unambiguously providing suitable feedback signals for open-loop or closed-loop control schemes. We report an experiment where the initiation of a complicated structural change of a molecule, involving bond cleavage and rearrangement, in the liquid phase can be controlled and mechanistic insight is obtained. Single-parameter scans show that the molecule is sensitive to intrapulse dumping during the excitation. Adaptive optimizations lead to pulse structures which can be understood consistently with this dumping mechanism.

  8. Controlled Remote Implementation of an Arbitrary Single-Qubit Operation with Partially Entangled Quantum Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun-You; He, Jun-Gang; Gao, Yan-Chun; Li, Xue-Mei; Zhou, Ping

    2017-04-01

    We present a scheme for controlled remote implementation of an arbitrary single-qubit operation by using partially entangled states as the quantum channel. The sender can remote implement an arbitrary single-qubit operation on the remote receiver's quantum system via partially entangled states under the controller's control. The success probability for controlled remote implementation of quantum operation can achieve 1 if the sender and the controller perform proper projective measurements on their entangled particles. Moreover, we also discuss the scheme for remote sharing the partially unknown operations via partially entangled quantum channel. It is shown that the quantum entanglement cost and classical communication can be reduced if the implemented operation belongs to the restrict sets.

  9. Bicycle Rider Control: Observations, Modeling & Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, J.D.G.

    2012-01-01

    Bicycle designers traditionally develop bicycles based on experience and trial and error. Adopting modern engineering tools to model bicycle and rider dynamics and control is another method for developing bicycles. This method has the potential to evaluate the complete design space, and thereby dev

  10. All-electrical coherent control of the exciton states in a single quantum dot

    CERN Document Server

    de la Giroday, A Boyer; Pooley, M A; Stevenson, R M; Skold, N; Patel, R B; Farrer, I; Ritchie, D A; Shields, A J

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate high-fidelity reversible transfer of quantum information from the polarisation of photons into the spin-state of an electron-hole pair in a semiconductor quantum dot. Moreover, spins are electrically manipulated on a sub-nanosecond timescale, allowing us to coherently control their evolution. By varying the area of the electrical pulse, we demonstrate phase-shift and spin-flip gate operations with near-unity fidelities. Our system constitutes a controllable quantum interface between flying and stationary qubits, an enabling technology for quantum logic in the solid-state.

  11. Single photon counting for space based quantum experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekara, R.; Tang, Z. K.; Tan, Y. C.; Cheng, C.; Wildfeuer, C.; Ling, A.

    2015-05-01

    We present a software based control system for Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs) that enables constant photon detection efficiency irrespective of the diode's junction temperature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this control system enables passively quenched GM-APDs to double the rate of photon detection events before saturation compared to the standard control method that fixes the junction temperature and applied bias voltage. We present data demonstrating the robustness of the GM-APD control system when tested in near-space conditions using a correlated photon pair source carried by a weather balloon to an altitude of 35.5 km.

  12. Zeeman effect and optical pumping in atomic rubidium: a teaching experiment in quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, R.J.; Adams, S.; Seddon, G.; Golby, J.A.; Massey, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe an experiment developed recently in an undergraduate laboratory to measure the Zeeman splitting of the ground state of atomic rubidium. An optical pumping technique is employed and the magnetic field is calibrated by using free-electron spin resonance. Multiphoton absorption and power broadening of transitions are also investigated and a number of quantum principles introduced experimentally.

  13. Molecular Orbitals of NO, NO[superscript+], and NO[superscript-]: A Computational Quantum Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenha, Renato P.; Galembeck, Sérgio E.

    2014-01-01

    This computational experiment presents qualitative molecular orbital (QMO) and computational quantum chemistry exercises of NO, NO[superscript+], and NO[superscript-]. Initially students explore several properties of the target molecules by Lewis diagrams and the QMO theory. Then, they compare qualitative conclusions with EHT and DFT calculations…

  14. Remote Experiments in Control Engineering Education Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica B Naumović

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Automatic Control Engineering Laboratory (ACEL - WebLab, an under-developed, internet-based remote laboratory for control engineering education at the Faculty of Electronic Engineering in Niš. Up to now, the remote laboratory integrates two physical systems (velocity servo system and magnetic levitation system and enables some levels of measurement and control. To perform experiments in ACEL-WebLab, the "LabVIEW Run Time Engine"and a standard web browser are needed.

  15. Quantum-State Controlled Chemical Reactions of Ultracold KRb Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ospelkaus, S; Wang, D; de Miranda, M H G; Neyenhuis, B; Quéméner, G; Julienne, P S; Bohn, J L; Jin, D S; Ye, J

    2009-01-01

    How does a chemical reaction proceed at ultralow temperatures? Can simple quantum mechanical rules such as quantum statistics, single scattering partial waves, and quantum threshold laws provide a clear understanding for the molecular reactivity under a vanishing collision energy? Starting with an optically trapped near quantum degenerate gas of polar $^{40}$K$^{87}$Rb molecules prepared in their absolute ground state, we report experimental evidence for exothermic atom-exchange chemical reactions. When these fermionic molecules are prepared in a single quantum state at a temperature of a few hundreds of nanoKelvins, we observe p-wave-dominated quantum threshold collisions arising from tunneling through an angular momentum barrier followed by a near-unity probability short-range chemical reaction. When these molecules are prepared in two different internal states or when molecules and atoms are brought together, the reaction rates are enhanced by a factor of 10 to 100 due to s-wave scattering, which does not ...

  16. Decentralized control experiments on NASA's flexible grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozguner, U.; Yurkowich, S.; Martin, J., III; Al-Abbass, F.

    1986-01-01

    Methods arising from the area of decentralized control are emerging for analysis and control synthesis for large flexible structures. In this paper the control strategy involves a decentralized model reference adaptive approach using a variable structure control. Local models are formulated based on desired damping and response time in a model-following scheme for various modal configurations. Variable structure controllers are then designed employing co-located angular rate and position feedback. In this scheme local control forces the system to move on a local sliding mode in some local error space. An important feature of this approach is that the local subsystem is made insensitive to dynamical interactions with other subsystems once the sliding surface is reached. Experiments based on the above have been performed for NASA's flexible grid experimental apparatus. The grid is designed to admit appreciable low-frequency structural dynamics, and allows for implementation of distributed computing components, inertial sensors, and actuation devices. A finite-element analysis of the grid provides the model for control system design and simulation; results of several simulations are reported on here, and a discussion of application experiments on the apparatus is presented.

  17. Progress on control experiments of flexible structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    1990-01-01

    Progress at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of control experiments for flexible structures is described. First the author presents the experimental results for a linear model which represents slewing maneuvers of a generic space station solar panel carried out to evaluate experimentally some control technologies. Then the status of the rotational/translational maneuvering experiment of a flexible steel panel carried by a translation cart is presented. Finally, experimental results of the NASA minimast testbed using velocity command stepper motors as reaction mass reactors are shown. All the test configurations are briefly described, including actuator and sensor, test setup, and test software. The status of some research activities oriented primarily to the experimental methods for control of flexible structures is presented.

  18. Optically Controlled Distributed Quantum Computing Using Atomic Ensembles As Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-23

    Distribution approved for public release. 8 Figure 7: Schematic Illustration of a network of small-scale quantum...quantum bits in different systems, for example, Rb atoms and NV diamond, preferably using telecom fibres. In this paper, we describe a quantum frequency...converter (QFC) that will perform this telecom band qubit conversion. The QFC is based on periodically poled lithium niobate waveguides. For

  19. Ascertaining complementary and incompatible quantum properties by means of double-slit experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nistico, G [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita della Calabria, via P. Bucci 30b, 87036, Rende, Italy and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare (Italy)], E-mail: gnistico@unical.it

    2008-03-28

    The famous two-slits experiment is used to theoretically introduce the problem of detecting both which-slit (WS) property and another quantum property incompatible with the WS one, together with the measurement of the (complementary) position of the final impact point. General conditions for the existence of solutions are singled out, and a family of solutions is concretely found. Moreover, we theoretically design an ideal experiment which realizes this non-trivial detection.

  20. Quantum-limited biochemical magnetometers designed using the Fisher information and quantum reaction control

    CERN Document Server

    Vitalis, K M

    2016-01-01

    Radical-ion pairs and their reactions have triggered the study of quantum effects in biological systems. This is because they exhibit a number of effects best understood within quantum information science, and at the same time are central in understanding the avian magnetic compass and the spin transport dynamics in photosynthetic reaction centers. Here we address radical-pair reactions from the perspective of quantum metrology. Since the coherent spin motion of radical-pairs is effected by an external magnetic field, these spin-dependent reactions essentially realize a biochemical magnetometer. Using the quantum Fisher information, we find the fundamental quantum limits to the magnetic sensitivity of radical-pair magnetometers. We then explore how well the usual measurement scheme considered in radical-pair reactions, the measurement of reaction yields, approaches the fundamental limits. In doing so, we find the optimal hyperfine interaction Hamiltonian that leads to the best magnetic sensitivity as obtained...

  1. Quantum-biological control of energy transfer in hybrid quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Hood, Brady; Patty, Kira

    2016-09-01

    We show theoretically that when a semiconductor quantum dot and metallic nanoparticle system interacts with a laser field, quantum coherence can introduce a new landscape for the dynamics of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET). We predict adsorption of biological molecules to such a hybrid system can trigger dramatic changes in the way energy is transferred, blocking FRET while the distance between the quantum dot and metallic nanoparticle (R) and other structural specifications remain unchanged. We study the impact of variation of R on the FRET rate in the presence of quantum coherence and its ultrafast decay, offering a characteristically different dependency than the standard 1/R6. Application of the results for quantum nanosensors is discussed.

  2. High-fidelity single-shot Toffoli gate via quantum control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Barry; Zahedinejad, Ehsan; Ghosh, Joydip

    2015-05-01

    A single-shot Toffoli, or controlled-controlled-NOT, gate is desirable for classical and for quantum information processing. The Toffoli gate alone is universal for reversible computing and, accompanied by the Hadamard gate, are universal for quantum computing. The Toffoli gate is a key ingredient for (non-topological) quantum error correction. Currently Toffoli gates are achieved by decomposing into sequentially implemented single- and two-qubit gates, which requires much longer times and yields lower overall fidelities compared to a single-shot implementation. We develop a quantum-control procedure to directly construct single-shot Toffoli gates and devise a scheme for three nearest-neighbor-coupled superconducting transmon systems that should operate with 99.9% fidelity under realistic conditions. The gate is achieved by a non-greedy quantum control procedure using our enhanced version of the Differential Evolution algorithm. arXiv:1501.04676 Acknowledges support from AITF, NSERC, USARO and 1000 Talent Plan.

  3. On the relationship between quantum control landscape structure and optimization complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Katharine; Hsieh, Michael; Rabitz, Herschel

    2008-04-21

    It has been widely observed in optimal control simulations and experiments that state preparation is surprisingly easy to achieve, regardless of the dimension N of the system Hilbert space. In contrast, simulations for the generation of targeted unitary transformations indicate that the effort increases exponentially with N. In order to understand such behavior, the concept of quantum control landscapes was recently introduced, where the landscape is defined as the physical objective, as a function of the control variables. The present work explores how the local structure of the control landscape influences the effectiveness and efficiency of quantum optimal control search efforts. Optimizations of state and unitary transformation preparation using kinematic control variables (i.e., the elements of the action matrix) are performed with gradient, genetic, and simplex algorithms. The results indicate that the search effort scales weakly, or possibly independently, with N for state preparation, while the search effort for the unitary transformation objective increases exponentially with N. Analysis of the mean path length traversed during a search trajectory through the space of action matrices and the local structure along this trajectory provides a basis to explain the difference in the scaling of the search effort with N for these control objectives. Much more favorable scaling for unitary transformation preparation arises upon specifying an initial action matrix based on state preparation results. The consequences of choosing a reduced number of control variables for state preparation is also investigated, showing a significant reduction in performance for using fewer than 2N-2 variables, which is consistent with the topological analysis of the associated landscape.

  4. Quantum theory as a description of robust experiments: Derivation of the Pauli equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Raedt, Hans [Department of Applied Physics, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, NL-9747AG Groningen (Netherlands); Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Donker, Hylke C. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Heyendaalseweg 135, NL-6525AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Michielsen, Kristel, E-mail: k.michielsen@fz-juelich.de [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    It is shown that the Pauli equation and the concept of spin naturally emerge from logical inference applied to experiments on a charged particle under the conditions that (i) space is homogeneous (ii) the observed events are logically independent, and (iii) the observed frequency distributions are robust with respect to small changes in the conditions under which the experiment is carried out. The derivation does not take recourse to concepts of quantum theory and is based on the same principles which have already been shown to lead to e.g. the Schrödinger equation and the probability distributions of pairs of particles in the singlet or triplet state. Application to Stern–Gerlach experiments with chargeless, magnetic particles, provides additional support for the thesis that quantum theory follows from logical inference applied to a well-defined class of experiments. - Highlights: • The Pauli equation is obtained through logical inference applied to robust experiments on a charged particle. • The concept of spin appears as an inference resulting from the treatment of two-valued data. • The same reasoning yields the quantum theoretical description of neutral magnetic particles. • Logical inference provides a framework to establish a bridge between objective knowledge gathered through experiments and their description in terms of concepts.

  5. Interpreting Quantum Oscillation Experiments on Underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquada, J.M.

    2010-02-01

    On the basis of negative transport coefficients, it has been argued that the quantum oscillations observed in underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} in high magnetic fields must be due to antinodal electron pockets. We point out a counterexample in which electronlike transport in a hole-doped cuprate is associated with Fermi-arc states. We also present evidence that the antinodal gap in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.67} is robust to modest applied magnetic fields. We suggest that these observations should be taken into account when interpreting the results of the quantum oscillation experiments.

  6. Implementation of non-local quantum controlled-NOT gate with multiple targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Libing Chen(陈立冰); Hong Lu(路洪)

    2004-01-01

    We show how a non-local quantum controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate with multiple targets can be implemented with unit fidelity and unit probability. The explicit quantum circuit for implementing the operation is presented. Two schemes for probabilistic implementing the operation via partially entangled quantum channels with unit fidelity are put forward. The overall physical resources required for accomplishing these schemes are different, and the successful implementation probabilities are also different.

  7. Quantum logic networks for controlled teleportation of a single particle via W state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Hong-Chun; Qi Kai-Guo

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the scheme for probabilistic and controlled teleportation of an unknown state of one particle using the general three-particle W state as the quantum channel. The feature of this scheme is that teleportation between two sides depends on the agreement of the third side (Charlie), who may participate the process of quantum teleportation as a supervisor. In addition, we also construct efficient quantum logic networks for implementing the new scheme by means of the primitive operations.

  8. Molecular spintronics: destructive quantum interference controlled by a gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva-Souza, Aldilene; Smeu, Manuel; Zhang, Lei; Souza Filho, Antonio Gomes; Guo, Hong; Ratner, Mark A

    2014-10-22

    The ability to control the spin-transport properties of a molecule bridging conducting electrodes is of paramount importance to molecular spintronics. Quantum interference can play an important role in allowing or forbidding electrons from passing through a system. In this work, the spin-transport properties of a polyacetylene chain bridging zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) are studied with nonequilibrium Green's function calculations performed within the density functional theory framework (NEGF-DFT). ZGNR electrodes have inherent spin polarization along their edges, which causes a splitting between the properties of spin-up and spin-down electrons in these systems. Upon adding an imidazole donor group and a pyridine acceptor group to the polyacetylene chain, this causes destructive interference features in the electron transmission spectrum. Particularly, the donor group causes a large antiresonance dip in transmission at the Fermi energy EF of the electrodes. The application of a gate is investigated and found to provide control over the energy position of this feature making it possible to turn this phenomenon on and off. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of this system are also calculated, showing near ohmic scaling for spin-up but negative differential resistance (NDR) for spin-down.

  9. Controlling a class of chaotic quantum system under disturbances and noisy measurements: Application to 1D Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-López, Ricardo; López-Pérez, Pablo A.; Lara-Cisneros, Gerardo; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a robust nonlinear feedback control scheme with adaptive gain is proposed to control the chaotic behavior in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The control goal concerns the track or regulation purposes. The BEC system is represented as stochastic ordinary differential equations with measured output perturbed by Gaussian noise, which represents the nature of the quantum systems. The convergence of the BEC control law is analyzed under the frame of the Lyapunov stability theory. Numerical experiments show an adequate performance of the proposed methodology under the required conditions. The results are applicable when the shape of the condensate is sufficiently simple.

  10. Optimal Control of High-Fidelity Quantum Gates in the Presence of Decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Grace, M; Kosut, R; Lidar, D A; Rabitz, H; Walmsley, I; Brif, Constantin; Grace, Matthew; Kosut, Robert; Lidar, Daniel A.; Rabitz, Herschel; Walmsley, Ian

    2006-01-01

    This work studies the feasibility of optimal control of high-fidelity quantum gates in a model of interacting two-level particles. One set of particles serves as the quantum information processor, whose evolution is controlled by a time-dependent external field. The other particles are not directly controlled and serve as an effective environment, coupling to which is the source of decoherence. The control objective is to generate target one- and two-qubit gates in the presence of strong environmentally-induced decoherence and physically motivated restrictions on the control field. The quantum-gate fidelity, expressed in terms of a state-independent distance measure, is maximized with respect to the control field using combined genetic and gradient algorithms. The resulting high-fidelity gates demonstrate the utility of optimal control for precise management of quantum dynamics, especially when the system complexity is exacerbated by environmental coupling.

  11. Zero forcing, linear and quantum controllability for systems evolving on networks

    CERN Document Server

    Burgarth, Daniel; Hogben, Leslie; Severini, Simone; Young, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We study the dynamics of systems on networks from a linear algebraic perspective. The control theoretic concept of controllability describes the set of states that can be reached for these systems. Under appropriate conditions, there is a connection between the quantum (Lie theoretic) property of controllability and the linear systems (Kalman) controllability condition. We investigate how the graph theoretic concept of a zero forcing set impacts the controllability property. In particular, we prove that if a set of vertices is a zero forcing set, the associated dynamical system is controllable. The results open up the possibility of further exploiting the analogy between networks, linear control systems theory, and quantum systems Lie algebraic theory. This study is motivated by several quantum systems currently under study, including continuous quantum walks modeling transport phenomena. Additionally, it proposes zero forcing as a new notion in the analysis of complex networks.

  12. The critical point of quantum chromodynamics through lattice and experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sourendu Gupta

    2011-05-01

    This talk discusses methods of extending lattice computations at finite temperature into regions of finite chemical potential, and the conditions under which such results from the lattice may be compared to experiments. Such comparisons away from a critical point are absolutely essential for quantitative use of lattice QCD in heavy-ion physics. An outline of various arguments which can then be used to locate the critical point is also presented.

  13. Ultrafast Quantum Control and Quantum Processing in the Vibronic States of Molecules and Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Benjamin; Bustard, Philip; England, Duncan; Lausten, Rune

    2014-05-01

    The unusual features of quantum mechanics are enabling the development of technologies not possible with classical physics, including applications in secure communications, quantum processing, and enhanced measurement. Efforts to build these devices utilize nonclassical states in numerous quantum systems, including cavity quantum electrodynamics, trap ions, nuclear spins, etc. as the basis for many prototypes. Here we investigate vibronic states in both molecules and bulk solids as distinct alternatives. We demonstrate a memory for light based on storing photons in the vibrations of hydrogen molecules and the optical phonons of diamond. Both classical and nonclassical photon states are used. These THz-bandwidth memories can be used to store femtosecond pulses for many operational time bins before the states decohere, making them viable for local photonic processing. We investigate decoherence and major sources of competing noise. While sustaining quantum coherence is critical for most quantum processing, rapid dephasing can also be used as a resource in these systems for rapid quantum random number generation, suitable for high-performance cryptography. NSERC

  14. Controlling light-matter interaction with mesoscopic quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Lodahl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) enable efficient coupling between light and matter, which is useful in applications such as light-harvesting and all-solid-state quantum information processing. This coupling can be increased by placing QDs in nanostructured optical environments such as photonic...

  15. Computer controls for the WITCH experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tandecki, M; Van Gorp, S; Friedag, P; De Leebeeck, V; Beck, D; Brand, H; Weinheimer, C; Breitenfeldt, M; Traykov, E; Mader, J; Roccia, S; Severijns, N; Herlert, A; Wauters, F; Zakoucky, D; Kozlov, V; Soti, G

    2011-01-01

    The WITCH experiment is a medium-scale experimental set-up located at ISOLDE/CERN. It combines a double Penning trap system with,a retardation spectrometer for energy measurements of recoil ions from beta decay. For a correct operation of such a set-up a whole range of different devices is required. Along with the installation and optimization of the set-up a computer control system was developed to control these devices. The CS-Framework that is developed and maintained at GSI, was chosen as a basis for this control system as it is perfectly suited to handle the distributed nature of a control system.We report here on the required hardware for WITCH, along with the basis of this CS-Framework and the add-ons that were implemented for WITCH. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Peres experiment using photons: No test for hypercomplex (quaternionic) quantum theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Stephen L.

    2017-06-01

    Assuming the standard axioms for quaternionic quantum theory and a spatially localized scattering interaction, the S matrix in quaternionic quantum theory is complex valued, not quaternionic. Using the standard connections between the S matrix, the forward scattering amplitude for electromagnetic wave scattering, and the index of refraction, we show that the index of refraction is necessarily complex, not quaternionic. This implies that the recent optical experiment of Procopio et al. [Nat. Commun. 8, 15044 (2017), 10.1038/ncomms15044] based on the Peres proposal does not test for hypercomplex or quaternionic quantum effects arising within the standard Hilbert space framework. Such a test requires looking at near zone fields, not radiation zone fields.

  17. Shifting the Quantum-Classical Boundary: Theory and Experiment for Statistically Classical Optical Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, Xiao-Feng; Howell, John C; Eberly, J H

    2015-01-01

    The growing recognition that entanglement is not exclusively a quantum property, and does not even originate with Schr\\"odinger's famous remark about it [Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. {\\bf 31}, 555 (1935)], prompts examination of its role in marking the quantum-classical boundary. We have done this by subjecting correlations of classical optical fields to new Bell-analysis experiments, and report here values of the Bell parameter greater than ${\\cal B} = 2.54$. This is many standard deviations outside the limit ${\\cal B} = 2$ established by the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 23}, 880 (1969)], in agreement with our theoretical classical prediction, and not far from the Tsirelson limit ${\\cal B} = 2.828...$. These results cast a new light on the standard quantum-classical boundary description, and suggest a reinterpretation of it.

  18. An extension of "Popper's experiment" can test interpretations of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Plaga, R

    2000-01-01

    Karl Popper proposed a way to test whether a proposed relation of a quantum-mechanical state to perceived reality in the Copenhagen interpretation (CI) of quantum mechanics - namely that the state of a particle is merely an expression of ``what is known'' about the system - is in agreement with all experimental facts. A conceptual flaw in Popper's proposal is identified and an improved version of his experiment (called ``Extension step 1'') - which fully serves its original purpose - is suggested. The main purpose of this paper is to suggest to perform this experiment. The results of this experiment predicted under the alternative assumptions that the CI - together with the above connection of the state function with reality - or the ``many-worlds'' interpretation (MWI) is correct are shown to be identical. Only after a further modification (called ``Extension step 2'') - the use of an ion isolated from the macroscopic environment as particle detector - the predictions using the respective interpretations bec...

  19. Improving Students' Understanding of Quantum Mechanics via the Stern-Gerlach Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Guangtian

    2016-01-01

    The Stern-Gerlach experiment has played a central role in the discovery of spin angular momentum. It can also play a pivotal role in teaching the formalism of quantum mechanics using a concrete example involving a finite-dimensional Hilbert space. Using this context, students can learn about how to prepare a specific quantum state starting from an arbitrary state, issues related to the time evolution of the wave function, and quantum measurement. It can also be exploited to teach students about the distinction between the physical space where one performs the experiment and the Hilbert space where the state of the system lies and how the information about the state of the system in the Hilbert space can be exploited to interpret the possible outcomes of the experiment in the physical space. Students can learn the advantages of choosing an appropriate basis to make suitable predictions about the outcomes of experiments with different arrangements of Stern-Gerlach devices. This experiment can also help students...

  20. AdS/QHE: towards a holographic description of quantum Hall experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayntun, Allan; Burgess, C P; Lee, Sung-Sik [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Dolan, Brian P, E-mail: bayntun@mcmaster.ca [Department of Mathematical Physics, National University of Ireland, Maynooth (Ireland)

    2011-03-15

    Transitions among quantum Hall plateaux share a suite of remarkable experimental features, such as semicircle laws and duality relations, whose accuracy and robustness are difficult to explain directly in terms of the detailed dynamics of the microscopic electrons. They would naturally follow if the low-energy transport properties were governed by an emergent discrete duality group relating the different plateaux, but no explicit examples of interacting systems having such a group are known. Recent progress using the AdS/CFT correspondence has identified examples with similar duality groups, but without the dc ohmic conductivity characteristic of quantum Hall experiments. We use this to propose a simple holographic model for low-energy quantum Hall systems, with a nonzero dc conductivity that automatically exhibits all of the observed consequences of duality, including the existence of the plateaux and the semicircle transitions between them. The model can be regarded as a strongly coupled analogue of the old 'composite boson' picture of quantum Hall systems. Non-universal features of the model can be used to test whether it describes actual materials, and we comment on some of these in our proposed model. In particular, the model indicates the value 2/5 for low-temperature scaling exponents for transitions among quantum Hall plateaux, in agreement with the measured value 0.42{+-}0.01.

  1. Bending strain engineering in quantum spin hall system for controlling spin currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bing; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Cui, Bin; Zhai, Feng; Mei, Jiawei; Liu, Feng

    2017-06-01

    Quantum spin Hall system can exhibit exotic spin transport phenomena, mediated by its topological edge states. Here the concept of bending strain engineering to tune the spin transport properties of a quantum spin Hall system is demonstrated. We show that bending strain can be used to control the spin orientation of counter-propagating edge states of a quantum spin system to generate a non-zero spin current. This physics mechanism can be applied to effectively tune the spin current and pure spin current decoupled from charge current in a quantum spin Hall system by control of its bending curvature. Furthermore, the curved quantum spin Hall system can be achieved by the concept of topological nanomechanical architecture in a controllable way, as demonstrated by the material example of Bi/Cl/Si(111) nanofilm. This concept of bending strain engineering of spins via topological nanomechanical architecture affords a promising route towards the realization of topological nano-mechanospintronics.

  2. 'Unconventional' experiments in biology and medicine with optimized design based on quantum-like correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Francis

    2017-02-01

    In previous articles, a description of 'unconventional' experiments (e.g. in vitro or clinical studies based on high dilutions, 'memory of water' or homeopathy) using quantum-like probability was proposed. Because the mathematical formulations of quantum logic are frequently an obstacle for physicians and biologists, a modified modeling that rests on classical probability is described in the present article. This modeling is inspired from a relational interpretation of quantum physics that applies not only to microscopic objects, but also to macroscopic structures, including experimental devices and observers. In this framework, any outcome of an experiment is not an absolute property of the observed system as usually considered but is expressed relatively to an observer. A team of interacting observers is thus described from an external view point based on two principles: the outcomes of experiments are expressed relatively to each observer and the observers agree on outcomes when they interact with each other. If probability fluctuations are also taken into account, correlations between 'expected' and observed outcomes emerge. Moreover, quantum-like correlations are predicted in experiments with local blind design but not with centralized blind design. No assumption on 'memory' or other physical modification of water is necessary in the present description although such hypotheses cannot be formally discarded. In conclusion, a simple modeling of 'unconventional' experiments based on classical probability is now available and its predictions can be tested. The underlying concepts are sufficiently intuitive to be spread into the homeopathy community and beyond. It is hoped that this modeling will encourage new studies with optimized designs for in vitro experiments and clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantum-control-landscape structure viewed along straight paths through the space of control fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Arun; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of closed quantum systems may be manipulated by using an applied field to achieve a control objective value for a physical goal. The functional relationship between the applied field and the objective value forms a quantum control landscape, and the optimization process consists of a guided climb up the landscape from the bottom to the top. Two classes of landscape features are important for understanding the ease of finding an optimal control field. The first class of topological landscape features has been proven to be especially simple in that no suboptimal local maxima exist (upon satisfaction of certain assumptions), which partially accounts for the ease of finding optimal fields. Complementary to the topology, the second class of features entails the landscape structure, characterizing the sinuous nature of the paths leading to an optimal control field. Previous work found that the landscape structure is also particularly simple, as excursions up the landscape guided by a gradient algorithm correspond to nearly straight paths through the space of control fields. In this paper we take an alternative approach to examining landscape structure by constructing, and then following, exactly straight trajectories in control space. Each trajectory starts at a corresponding point on the bottom of the landscape and ends at an associated point on the top, with the observable values taken either as the state-to-state transition probability, the expectation value of a general observable, or the distance from a desired unitary transformation. In some cases the starting point is at a suboptimal critical-point saddle, with the goal, again, of following a straight field path to the optimal objective yield or another suboptimal critical point. We find that the objective value almost always rises monotonically upon following a straight control path from one critical point to another, which shows that landscape structure is very simple, being devoid of rough bumps

  4. Control of optical bistability and third-order nonlinearity via tunneling induced quantum interference in triangular quantum dot molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Si-Cong, E-mail: tiansicong@ciomp.ac.cn; Tong, Cun-Zhu, E-mail: tongcz@ciomp.ac.cn; Zhang, Jin-Long; Shan, Xiao-Nan; Fu, Xi-Hong; Zeng, Yu-Gang; Qin, Li; Ning, Yong-Qiang [State Key laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Wan, Ren-Gang [School of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The optical bistability of a triangular quantum dot molecules embedded inside a unidirectional ring cavity is studied. The type, the threshold and the hysteresis loop of the optical bistability curves can be modified by the tunneling parameters, as well as the probe laser field. The linear and nonlinear susceptibilities of the medium are also studied to interpret the corresponding results. The physical interpretation is that the tunneling can induce the quantum interference, which modifies the linear and the nonlinear response of the medium. As a consequence, the characteristics of the optical bistability are changed. The scheme proposed here can be utilized for optimizing and controlling the optical switching process.

  5. A Coherence Preservation Control Strategy in Cavity QED Based on Classical Quantum Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For eliminating the unexpected decoherence effect in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED, the transfer function of Rabi oscillation is derived theoretically using optical Bloch equations. In particular, the decoherence in cavity QED from the atomic spontaneous emission is especially considered. A feedback control strategy is proposed to preserve the coherence through Rabi oscillation stabilization. In the scheme, a classical quantum feedback channel for the quantum information acquisition is constructed via the quantum tomography technology, and a compensation system based on the root locus theory is put forward to suppress the atomic spontaneous emission and the associated decoherence. The simulation results have proved its effectiveness and superiority for the coherence preservation.

  6. Open-loop quantum control as a resource for secure communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorello, Davide

    2016-05-01

    Properties of unitary time evolution of quantum systems can be applied to define quantum cryptographic protocols. Dynamics of a qubit can be exploited as a data encryption/decryption procedure by means of timed measurements, implementation of an open-loop control scheme over a qubit increases robustness of a protocol employing this principle.

  7. Open-loop quantum control as a resource for secure communications

    CERN Document Server

    Pastorello, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Properties of unitary time evolution of quantum systems can be applied to define quantum cryptographic protocols. Dynamics of a qubit can be exploited as a data encryption/decryption procedure by means of timed measurements, implementation of an open-loop control scheme over a qubit increases robustness of a protocol employing this principle.

  8. Correcting errors in a quantum gate with pushed ions via optimal control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Uffe Vestergaard; Sklarz, Shlomo; Tannor, David

    2010-01-01

    of errors coming from the quantum dynamics and reveal that slight nonlinearities in the ion-pushing force can have a dramatic effect on the adiabaticity of gate operation. By means of quantum optimal control techniques, we show how to suppress each of the resulting gate errors in order to reach a high...

  9. Selective darkening of degenerate transitions for implementing quantum controlled-NOT gates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, P.C.; Ashhab, S.; Lupascu, A.; DiCarlo, L.; Nori, F.; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Mooij, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the selective darkening method for implementing quantum controlled-NOT (CNOT) gates. This method, which we have recently proposed and demonstrated, consists of driving two transversely coupled quantum bits (qubits) with a driving field that is resonant with one o

  10. Protecting a Diamond Quantum Memory by Charge State Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Simon, Patrick; Antonov, Denis; Thiering, Gergő; Burk, Sina; Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Denisenko, Andrej; Fedder, Helmut; Meijer, Jan; Garrido, Jose A; Gali, Adam; Teraji, Tokuyuki; Isoya, Junichi; Doherty, Marcus William; Alkauskas, Audrius; Gallo, Alejandro; Grüneis, Andreas; Neumann, Philipp; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-09-11

    In recent years, solid-state spin systems have emerged as promising candidates for quantum information processing. Prominent examples are the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond, phosphorus dopants in silicon (Si:P), rare-earth ions in solids, and VSi-centers in silicon-carbide. The Si:P system has demonstrated that its nuclear spins can yield exceedingly long spin coherence times by eliminating the electron spin of the dopant. For NV centers, however, a proper charge state for storage of nuclear spin qubit coherence has not been identified yet. Here, we identify and characterize the positively charged NV center as an electron-spin-less and optically inactive state by utilizing the nuclear spin qubit as a probe. We control the electronic charge and spin utilizing nanometer scale gate electrodes. We achieve a lengthening of the nuclear spin coherence times by a factor of 4. Surprisingly, the new charge state allows switching of the optical response of single nodes facilitating full individual addressability.

  11. Continuing progress toward controlled intracellular delivery of semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, Joyce; Delehanty, James B; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-01-01

    The biological applications of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) continue to grow at a nearly unabated pace. This growth is driven, in part, by their unique photophysical and physicochemical properties which have allowed them to be used in many different roles in cellular biology including: as superior fluorophores for a wide variety of cellular labeling applications; as active platforms for assembly of nanoscale sensors; and, more recently, as a powerful tool to understand the mechanisms of nanoparticle mediated drug delivery. Given that controlled cellular delivery is at the intersection of all these applications, the latest progress in delivering QDs to cells is examined here. A brief discussion of relevant considerations including the importance of materials preparation and bioconjugation along with the continuing issue of endosomal sequestration is initially provided for context. Methods for the cellular delivery of QDs are then highlighted including those based on passive exposure, facilitated strategies that utilize peptides or polymers and fully active modalities such as electroporation and other mechanically based methods. Following on this, the exciting advent of QD cellular delivery using multiple or combined mechanisms is then previewed. Several recent methods reporting endosomal escape of QD materials in cells are also examined in detail with a focus on the mechanisms by which access to the cytosol is achieved. The ongoing debate over QD cytotoxicity is also discussed along with a perspective on how this field will continue to evolve in the future. PMID:25154379

  12. Control of the spin geometric phase in semiconductor quantum rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Fumiya; Frustaglia, Diego; Saarikoski, Henri; Richter, Klaus; Nitta, Junsaku

    2013-09-01

    Since the formulation of the geometric phase by Berry, its relevance has been demonstrated in a large variety of physical systems. However, a geometric phase of the most fundamental spin-1/2 system, the electron spin, has not been observed directly and controlled independently from dynamical phases. Here we report experimental evidence on the manipulation of an electron spin through a purely geometric effect in an InGaAs-based quantum ring with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. By applying an in-plane magnetic field, a phase shift of the Aharonov-Casher interference pattern towards the small spin-orbit-coupling regions is observed. A perturbation theory for a one-dimensional Rashba ring under small in-plane fields reveals that the phase shift originates exclusively from the modulation of a pure geometric-phase component of the electron spin beyond the adiabatic limit, independently from dynamical phases. The phase shift is well reproduced by implementing two independent approaches, that is, perturbation theory and non-perturbative transport simulations.

  13. Controlled self-assembly of hydrophobic quantum dots through silanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Ando, Masanori; Murase, Norio

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate the formation of one-, two-, and three-dimensional nanocomposites through the self-assembly of silanized CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) by using a controlled sol-gel process. The self-assembly behavior of the QDs was created when partially hydrolyzed silicon alkoxide monomers replaced hydrophobic ligands on the QDs. We examined systematically self-assembly conditions such as solvent components and QD sizes in order to elucidate the formation mechanism of various QD nanocomposites. The QD nanocomposites were assembled in water phase or on the interface of water and oil phase in emulsions. The partially hydrolyzed silicon alkoxides act as intermolecules to assemble the QDs. The QD nanocomposites with well-defined solid or hollow spherical, fiber-like, sheet-like, and pearl-like morphologies were prepared by adjusting the experimental conditions. The high photoluminescence efficiency of the prepared QD nanocomposites suggests partially hydrolyzed silicon alkoxides reduced the surface deterioration of QDs during self-assembly. These techniques are applicable to other hydrophobic QDs for fabricating complex QD nanocomposites.

  14. Controlling transfer of quantum correlations among bi-partitions of a composite quantum system by combining different noisy environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiu-Xing; LiFu-Li

    2011-01-01

    The correlation dynamics are investigated for various bi-partitions of a composite quantum system consisting of two qubits and two independent and non-identical noisy environments.The two qubits have no direct interaction with each other and locally interact with their environments.Classical and quantum correlations including the entanglement are initially prepared only between the two qubits.We find that contrary to the identical noisy environment case,the quantum correlation transfer direction can be controlled by combining different noisy environments.The amplitudedamping environment determines whether there exists the entanglement transfer among bi-partitions of the system.When one qubit is coupled to an amplitude-damping environment and the other one to a bit-flip one,we find a very interesting result that all the quantum and the classical correlations,and even the entanglement,originally existing between the qubits,can be completely transferred without any loss to the qubit coupled to the bit-flit environment and the amplitude-damping environment.We also notice that it is possible to distinguish the quantum correlation from the classical correlation and the entanglement by combining different noisy environments.

  15. Size control by rate control in colloidal PbSe quantum dot synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čapek, Richard Karel; Yanover, Dianna; Lifshitz, Efrat

    2015-03-01

    A recently demonstrated approach to control the size of colloidal nanoparticles, ``size control by rate control'', which was validated on the examples of colloidal CdSe- and CdS-quantum dot (CQD) synthesis, appears to be a general strategy for designing technically applicable CQD-syntheses. The ``size control by rate control'' concept allows full-yield syntheses of ensembles of CQDs with different sizes by tuning the solute formation rate. In this work, we extended this strategy to dialkylphosphine enhanced hot-injection synthesis of PbSe-CQDs. Furthermore, we provide new insight into the reaction mechanism of dialkylphosphine enhancement in TOPSe based CQD-syntheses.A recently demonstrated approach to control the size of colloidal nanoparticles, ``size control by rate control'', which was validated on the examples of colloidal CdSe- and CdS-quantum dot (CQD) synthesis, appears to be a general strategy for designing technically applicable CQD-syntheses. The ``size control by rate control'' concept allows full-yield syntheses of ensembles of CQDs with different sizes by tuning the solute formation rate. In this work, we extended this strategy to dialkylphosphine enhanced hot-injection synthesis of PbSe-CQDs. Furthermore, we provide new insight into the reaction mechanism of dialkylphosphine enhancement in TOPSe based CQD-syntheses. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional data about the reaction and growth kinetics, NMR-data and exemplary TEM images of PbSe-CQDs prepared by the procedure described in this publication. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00028a

  16. Laboratory Transferability of Optimally Shaped Laser Pulses for Quantum Control

    CERN Document Server

    Tibbetts, Katharine Moore; Rabitz, Herschel

    2013-01-01

    Optimal control experiments can readily identify effective shaped laser pulses, or "photonic reagents", that achieve a wide variety of objectives. For many practical applications, an important criterion is that a particular photonic reagent prescription still produce a good, if not optimal, target objective yield when transferred to a different system or laboratory, {even if the same shaped pulse profile cannot be reproduced exactly. As a specific example, we assess the potential for transferring optimal photonic reagents for the objective of optimizing a ratio of photoproduct ions from a family of halomethanes through three related experiments.} First, applying the same set of photonic reagents with systematically varying second- and third-order chirp on both laser systems generated similar shapes of the associated control landscape (i.e., relation between the objective yield and the variables describing the photonic reagents). Second, optimal photonic reagents obtained from the first laser system were found...

  17. On-chip generation of high-dimensional entangled quantum states and their coherent control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kues, Michael; Reimer, Christian; Roztocki, Piotr; Cortés, Luis Romero; Sciara, Stefania; Wetzel, Benjamin; Zhang, Yanbing; Cino, Alfonso; Chu, Sai T.; Little, Brent E.; Moss, David J.; Caspani, Lucia; Azaña, José; Morandotti, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    Optical quantum states based on entangled photons are essential for solving questions in fundamental physics and are at the heart of quantum information science. Specifically, the realization of high-dimensional states (D-level quantum systems, that is, qudits, with D > 2) and their control are necessary for fundamental investigations of quantum mechanics, for increasing the sensitivity of quantum imaging schemes, for improving the robustness and key rate of quantum communication protocols, for enabling a richer variety of quantum simulations, and for achieving more efficient and error-tolerant quantum computation. Integrated photonics has recently become a leading platform for the compact, cost-efficient, and stable generation and processing of non-classical optical states. However, so far, integrated entangled quantum sources have been limited to qubits (D = 2). Here we demonstrate on-chip generation of entangled qudit states, where the photons are created in a coherent superposition of multiple high-purity frequency modes. In particular, we confirm the realization of a quantum system with at least one hundred dimensions, formed by two entangled qudits with D = 10. Furthermore, using state-of-the-art, yet off-the-shelf telecommunications components, we introduce a coherent manipulation platform with which to control frequency-entangled states, capable of performing deterministic high-dimensional gate operations. We validate this platform by measuring Bell inequality violations and performing quantum state tomography. Our work enables the generation and processing of high-dimensional quantum states in a single spatial mode.

  18. On-chip generation of high-dimensional entangled quantum states and their coherent control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kues, Michael; Reimer, Christian; Roztocki, Piotr; Cortés, Luis Romero; Sciara, Stefania; Wetzel, Benjamin; Zhang, Yanbing; Cino, Alfonso; Chu, Sai T; Little, Brent E; Moss, David J; Caspani, Lucia; Azaña, José; Morandotti, Roberto

    2017-06-28

    Optical quantum states based on entangled photons are essential for solving questions in fundamental physics and are at the heart of quantum information science. Specifically, the realization of high-dimensional states (D-level quantum systems, that is, qudits, with D > 2) and their control are necessary for fundamental investigations of quantum mechanics, for increasing the sensitivity of quantum imaging schemes, for improving the robustness and key rate of quantum communication protocols, for enabling a richer variety of quantum simulations, and for achieving more efficient and error-tolerant quantum computation. Integrated photonics has recently become a leading platform for the compact, cost-efficient, and stable generation and processing of non-classical optical states. However, so far, integrated entangled quantum sources have been limited to qubits (D = 2). Here we demonstrate on-chip generation of entangled qudit states, where the photons are created in a coherent superposition of multiple high-purity frequency modes. In particular, we confirm the realization of a quantum system with at least one hundred dimensions, formed by two entangled qudits with D = 10. Furthermore, using state-of-the-art, yet off-the-shelf telecommunications components, we introduce a coherent manipulation platform with which to control frequency-entangled states, capable of performing deterministic high-dimensional gate operations. We validate this platform by measuring Bell inequality violations and performing quantum state tomography. Our work enables the generation and processing of high-dimensional quantum states in a single spatial mode.

  19. Control of valley dynamics in silicon quantum dots in the presence of an interface step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boross, Péter; Széchenyi, Gábor; Culcer, Dimitrie; Pályi, András

    2016-07-01

    Recent experiments on silicon nanostructures have seen breakthroughs toward scalable, long-lived quantum information processing. The valley degree of freedom plays a fundamental role in these devices, and the two lowest-energy electronic states of a silicon quantum dot can form a valley qubit. In this paper, we show that a single-atom high step at the silicon/barrier interface induces a strong interaction of the qubit and in-plane electric fields and that the strength of this interaction can be controlled by varying the relative position of the electron and the step. We analyze the consequences of this enhanced interaction on the dynamics of the qubit. The charge densities of the qubit states are deformed differently by the interface step, allowing nondemolition qubit readout via valley-to-charge conversion. A gate-induced in-plane electric field together with the interface step enables fast control of the valley qubit via electrically driven valley resonance. We calculate single- and two-qubit gate times, as well as relaxation and dephasing times, and present predictions for the parameter range where the gate times can be much shorter than the relaxation time and dephasing is reduced.

  20. Gate control of spin polarization in a quantum Hall regime toward reconfigurable network of helical channels (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhinson, Leonid; Kazakov, Aleksandr; Simion, George; Lyanda-Geller, Yuli; Kolkovsky, Valery; Karczewski, Grzegorz; Adamus, Zbigniew; Wojtowicz, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    Several experiments in nanowires detected signatures of Majorana fermions, building block for topologicaly protected quantum computer. Now the focus of research is shifting toward systems where non-Abelian statistics of excitations can be demonstrated. To achieve this goal we are developing a new dilute magnetic semiconductor-based platform where non-Abelian excitations can be created and manipulated in a two-dimensional plane, with support for Majorana and higher order non-Abelian excitations. Here we report development of heterostructures where spin polarization of a two-dimensional electron gas in a quantum Hall regime can be controlled locally by electrostatic gating. This is demonstrated via voltage induced shift of quantum Hall ferromagnetic transition in the CdTe quantum wells with engineered placement of paramagnetic Mn impurities. The structures can be used to form helical domain walls in integer quantum Hall regime which, coupled to an s-wave superconductor, are expected to support Majorana zero modes. These heterostructures can be used as a testbed to study gate-reconfigurable domain walls networks.

  1. Confined-but-Connected Quantum Solids via Controlled Ligand Displacement

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, William J.

    2013-07-10

    Confined-but-connected quantum dot solids (QDS) combine the advantages of tunable, quantum-confined energy levels with efficient charge transport through enhanced electronic interdot coupling. We report the fabrication of QDS by treating self-assembled films of colloidal PbSe quantum dots with polar nonsolvents. Treatment with dimethylformamide balances the rates of self-assembly and ligand displacement to yield confined-but-connected QDS structures with cubic ordering and quasi-epitaxial interdot connections through facets of neighboring dots. The QDS structure was analyzed by a combination of transmission electron microscopy and wide-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering. Excitonic absorption signatures in optical spectroscopy confirm that quantum confinement is preserved. Transport measurements show significantly enhanced conductivity in treated films. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  2. Fast quantum control and light-matter interactions at the 10,000 quanta level

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, J; Soler, Z U; Fadel, M; Marinelli, M; Keitch, B C; Negnevitsky, V; Home, J P

    2015-01-01

    Fast control of quantum systems is essential in order to make use of quantum properties before they are degraded by decoherence. This is important for quantum-enhanced information processing, as well as for pushing quantum systems into macroscopic regimes at the boundary between quantum and classical physics. Bang-bang control attains the ultimate speed limit by making large changes to control fields on timescales much faster than the system can respond, however these methods are often challenging to implement experimentally. Here we demonstrate bang-bang control of a trapped-ion oscillator using nano-second switching of the trapping potentials. We perform controlled displacements which allow us to realize quantum states with up to 10,000 quanta of energy. We use these displaced states to verify the form of the ion-light interaction at high excitations which are far outside the usual regime of operation. These methods provide new possibilities for quantum-state manipulation and generation, alongside the poten...

  3. Controlling quantum systems by embedded dynamical decoupling schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Kern, O; Kern, Oliver; Alber, Gernot

    2005-01-01

    A dynamical decoupling method is presented which is based on embedding a deterministic decoupling scheme into a stochastic one. This way it is possible to combine the advantages of both methods and to increase the suppression of undesired perturbations of quantum systems significantly even for long interaction times. As a first application the stabilization of a quantum memory is discussed which is perturbed by one-and two-qubit interactions.

  4. Basic radiological studies contamination control experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duce, S.W.; Winberg, M.R.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the results of experiments relating to contamination control performed in support of the Environmental Restoration Programs Retrieval Project. During the years 1950 to 1970 waste contaminated with plutonium and other transuranic radionuclides was disposed of in shallow land-filled pits and trenches at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Due to potential for migration of radionuclides to an existing aquifer the feasibility of retrieving and repackaging the waste for placement in a final repository is being examined as part of a retrieval project. Contamination control experiments were conducted to determine expected respirable and nonrespirable plutonium contaminated dust fractions and the effectiveness of various dust suppression techniques. Three soil types were tested to determine respirable fractions: Rocky Flats Plant generic soil, Radioactive Waste Management Complex generic soil, and a 1:1 blend of the two soil types. Overall, the average respirable fraction of airborne dust was 5.4% by weight. Three contamination control techniques were studied: soil fixative sprays, misting agents, and dust suppression agents. All of the tested agents proved to be effective in reducing dust in the air. Details of product performance and recommended usage are discussed.

  5. EDUCATIONAL COMPUTER SIMULATION EXPERIMENT «REAL-TIME SINGLE-MOLECULE IMAGING OF QUANTUM INTERFERENCE»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Baranov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking part in the organized project activities students of the technical University create virtual physics laboratories. The article gives an example of the student’s project-computer modeling and visualization one of the most wonderful manifestations of reality-quantum interference of particles. The real experiment with heavy organic fluorescent molecules is used as a prototype for this computer simulation. The student’s software product can be used in informational space of the system of open education.

  6. A fully guided-wave squeezing experiment for fiber quantum networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Florian; Fedrici, Bruno; Zavatta, Alessandro; D'Auria, Virginia; Tanzilli, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Squeezed light is a fundamental resource for quantum communication. In view of its real-world applications, the realization of easy-to-operate experimental systems compatible with existing fiber networks is a crucial step. To comply with these requirements, we demonstrate the feasibility of a squeezing experiment at a telecom wavelength realized, for the first time, in an entirely guided-wave fashion. In our work, the state generation relies on waveguide non-linear opt...

  7. Verifying Unmatter by Experiments, More Types of Unmatter, and a Quantum Chromodynamics Formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarandache F.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available As shown, experiments registered unmatter: a new kind of matter whose atoms include both nucleons and anti-nucleons, while their life span was very short, no more than 10^−20 sec. Stable states of unmatter can be built on quarks and anti-quarks: applying the unmatter principle here it is obtained a quantum chromodynamics formula that gives many combinations of unmatter built on quarks and anti-quarks.

  8. Functional Basis for Efficient Physical Layer Classical Control in Quantum Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Harrison; Nguyen, Trung; Leong, Philip H. W.; Biercuk, Michael J.

    2016-12-01

    The rapid progress seen in the development of quantum-coherent devices for information processing has motivated serious consideration of quantum computer architecture and organization. One topic which remains open for investigation and optimization relates to the design of the classical-quantum interface, where control operations on individual qubits are applied according to higher-level algorithms; accommodating competing demands on performance and scalability remains a major outstanding challenge. In this work, we present a resource-efficient, scalable framework for the implementation of embedded physical layer classical controllers for quantum-information systems. Design drivers and key functionalities are introduced, leading to the selection of Walsh functions as an effective functional basis for both programing and controller hardware implementation. This approach leverages the simplicity of real-time Walsh-function generation in classical digital hardware, and the fact that a wide variety of physical layer controls, such as dynamic error suppression, are known to fall within the Walsh family. We experimentally implement a real-time field-programmable-gate-array-based Walsh controller producing Walsh timing signals and Walsh-synthesized analog waveforms appropriate for critical tasks in error-resistant quantum control and noise characterization. These demonstrations represent the first step towards a unified framework for the realization of physical layer controls compatible with large-scale quantum-information processing.

  9. APECS - The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Muders, D; Hafok, H; Hatchell, J; Koenig, C; Polehampton, E; Schaaf, R; Schuller, F; Tak, F; Wyrowski, F

    2006-01-01

    APECS is the distributed control system of the new Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope located on the Llano de Chajnantor at an altitude of 5107 m in the Atacama desert in northern Chile. APECS is based on Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) software and employs a modern, object-oriented design using the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) as the middleware. New generic device interfaces simplify adding instruments to the control system. The Python based observer command scripting language allows using many existing software libraries and facilitates creating more complex observing modes. A new self-descriptive raw data format (Multi-Beam FITS or MBFITS) has been defined to store the multi-beam, multi-frequency data. APECS provides an online pipeline for initial calibration, observer feedback and a quick-look display. APECS is being used for regular science observations in local and remote mode since August 2005.

  10. Designing artificial 2D crystals with site and size controlled quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xuejun; Kang, Jiahao; Cao, Wei; Chu, Jae Hwan; Gong, Yongji; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Banerjee, Kaustav

    2017-08-30

    Ordered arrays of quantum dots in two-dimensional (2D) materials would make promising optical materials, but their assembly could prove challenging. Here we demonstrate a scalable, site and size controlled fabrication of quantum dots in monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and quantum dot arrays with nanometer-scale spatial density by focused electron beam irradiation induced local 2H to 1T phase change in MoS2. By designing the quantum dots in a 2D superlattice, we show that new energy bands form where the new band gap can be controlled by the size and pitch of the quantum dots in the superlattice. The band gap can be tuned from 1.81 eV to 1.42 eV without loss of its photoluminescence performance, which provides new directions for fabricating lasers with designed wavelengths. Our work constitutes a photoresist-free, top-down method to create large-area quantum dot arrays with nanometer-scale spatial density that allow the quantum dots to interfere with each other and create artificial crystals. This technique opens up new pathways for fabricating light emitting devices with 2D materials at desired wavelengths. This demonstration can also enable the assembly of large scale quantum information systems and open up new avenues for the design of artificial 2D materials.

  11. Perfect controlled joint remote state preparation independent of entanglement degree of the quantum channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Nguyen Ba, E-mail: nban@iop.vast.ac.vn; Bich, Cao Thi

    2014-11-14

    We construct a quantum circuit to produce a task-oriented partially entangled state and use it as the quantum channel for controlled joint remote state preparation. Unlike most previous works, where the parameters of the quantum channel are given to the receiver who can accomplish the task only probabilistically by consuming auxiliary resource, operation and measurement, here we give them to the supervisor. Thanks to the knowledge of the task-oriented quantum channel parameters, the supervisor can carry out proper complete projective measurement, which, combined with the feed-forward technique adapted by the preparers, not only much economizes (simplifies) the receiver's resource (operation) but also yields unit total success probability. Notably, such apparent perfection does not depend on the entanglement degree of the shared quantum channel. Our protocol is within the reach of current quantum technologies. - Highlights: • Controlled joint remote state preparation is considered. • Quantum circuit is proposed to produce task-oriented partially entangled channel. • The quantum channel parameter is given to the supervisor (not to the receiver). • Unit success probability without additional resource/operations/measurement. • Perfection is achieved regardless of the shared entanglement degree.

  12. Controlled phase gates based on two nonidentical quantum dots trapped in separate cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiao-Xia; Zhang Jian-Qi; Yu Ya-Fei; Zhang Zhi-Ming

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for realizing two-qubit controlled phase gates on two nonidentical quantum dots trapped in separate cavities.In our scheme,each dot simultaneously interacts with one highly detuned cavity mode and two strong driven classical fields.During the gate operation,the quantum dots undergo no transition,while the system can acquire different phases conditional on different states of the quantum dots.With the application of the single-qubit operations,two-qubit controlled phase gates can be realized.

  13. Storing quantum information in XXZ spin rings with periodically time-controlled interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F; Mazzarella, G [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. R. Caianiello' , Universita di Salerno, INFM UdR di Salerno, INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, 84081 Baronissi, SA (Italy)

    2005-10-01

    We introduce a general scheme to realize massive quantum memories in simple systems of interacting qubits. Such systems are described by spin rings with XXZ intersite couplings of suitably time-periodically controlled amplitudes. We show that initially localized excitations undergo perfect periodic revivals, allowing for the simultaneous storage of arbitrary sets of different local states. This novel approach to the problem of storing quantum information hints at a new way to control and suppress the effect of decoherence on a quantum computer realized in a system with nonvanishing interactions between the constituent qubits.

  14. Quantum manipulation and enhancement of deterministic entanglement between atomic ensemble and light via coherent feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhihui; Jia, Xiaojun

    2017-06-01

    A quantum mechanical model of the non-measurement based coherent feedback control (CFC) is applied to deterministic atom-light entanglement with imperfect retrieval efficiency, which is generated based on Raman process. We investigate the influence of different experimental parameters on entanglement property of CFC Raman system. By tailoring the transmissivity of coherent feedback controller, it is possible to manipulate the atom-light entanglement. Particularly, we show that CFC allows atom-light entanglement enhancement under appropriate operating conditions. Our work can provide entanglement source between atomic ensemble and light of high quality for high-fidelity quantum networks and quantum computation based on atomic ensemble.

  15. All-Electromagnetic Control of Broadband Quantum Excitations using Gradient Photon Echoes

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Wen-Te; Pálffy, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    A broadband quantum echo effect in a three level $\\varLambda$-type system interacting with two laser fields is investigated theoretically. Inspired by the emerging field of nuclear quantum optics which typically deals with very narrow resonances, we consider broadband probe pulses that couple to the system in the presence of an inhomogeneous control field. We show that such a setup provides an all-electromagnetic-field solution to implement high bandwidth photon echoes, which are easy to control, store and shape on a short time scale and therefore may speed up future photonic information processing. The time compression of the echo signal and possible applications for quantum memories are discussed.

  16. Controllable Quantum State Transfer Between a Josephson Charge Qubit and an Electronic Spin Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Run-Ying; Wang, Hong-Ling; Feng, Zhi-Bo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a theoretical scheme to implement controllable quantum state transfer between a superconducting charge qubit and an electronic spin ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers. By an electro-mechanical resonator acting as a quantum data bus, an effective interaction between the charge qubit and the spin ensemble can be achieved in the dispersive regime, by which state transfers are switchable due to the adjustable electrical coupling. With the accessible experimental parameters, we further numerically analyze the feasibility and robustness. The present scheme could provide a potential approach for transferring quantum states controllably with the hybrid system.

  17. Perfect/complete scattering experiments probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinpoppen, Hans; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter.  The feasibility of such perfect' and-or `complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory.  It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment `complete'.  The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases.  This book captures the spi...

  18. Optimal control theory--closing the gap between theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von den Hoff, Philipp; Thallmair, Sebastian; Kowalewski, Markus; Siemering, Robert; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2012-11-14

    Optimal control theory and optimal control experiments are state-of-the-art tools to control quantum systems. Both methods have been demonstrated successfully for numerous applications in molecular physics, chemistry and biology. Modulated light pulses could be realized, driving these various control processes. Next to the control efficiency, a key issue is the understanding of the control mechanism. An obvious way is to seek support from theory. However, the underlying search strategies in theory and experiment towards the optimal laser field differ. While the optimal control theory operates in the time domain, optimal control experiments optimize the laser fields in the frequency domain. This also implies that both search procedures experience a different bias and follow different pathways on the search landscape. In this perspective we review our recent developments in optimal control theory and their applications. Especially, we focus on approaches, which close the gap between theory and experiment. To this extent we followed two ways. One uses sophisticated optimization algorithms, which enhance the capabilities of optimal control experiments. The other is to extend and modify the optimal control theory formalism in order to mimic the experimental conditions.

  19. Quantum Information, computation and cryptography. An introductory survey of theory, technology and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benatti, Fabio [Trieste Univ., Miramare (Italy). Dipt. Fisica Teorica; Fannes, Mark [Leuven Univ. (Belgium). Inst. voor Theoretische Fysica; Floreanini, Roberto [INFN, Trieste (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica; Petritis, Dimitri (eds.) [Rennes 1 Univ., 35 (France). Inst. de Recherche Mathematique de Rennes

    2010-07-01

    This multi-authored textbook addresses graduate students with a background in physics, mathematics or computer science. No research experience is necessary. Consequently, rather than comprehensively reviewing the vast body of knowledge and literature gathered in the past twenty years, this book concentrates on a number of carefully selected aspects of quantum information theory and technology. Given the highly interdisciplinary nature of the subject, the multi-authored approach brings together different points of view from various renowned experts, providing a coherent picture of the subject matter. The book consists of ten chapters and includes examples, problems, and exercises. The first five present the mathematical tools required for a full comprehension of various aspects of quantum mechanics, classical information, and coding theory. Chapter 6 deals with the manipulation and transmission of information in the quantum realm. Chapters 7 and 8 discuss experimental implementations of quantum information ideas using photons and atoms. Finally, chapters 9 and 10 address ground-breaking applications in cryptography and computation. (orig.)

  20. Control of a velocity-sensitive audio-band quantum non-demolition interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Leavey, S S; Gläfke, A; Barr, B W; Bell, A S; Gräf, C; Hennig, J -S; Houston, E A; Huttner, S H; Lück, H; Pascucci, D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Spencer, A; Steinlechner, S; Strain, K A; Wright, J; Zhang, T; Hild, S

    2016-01-01

    The Sagnac speed meter interferometer topology can potentially provide enhanced sensitivity to gravitational waves in the audio-band compared to equivalent Michelson interferometers. A challenge with the Sagnac speed meter interferometer arises from the intrinsic lack of sensitivity at low frequencies where the velocity-proportional signal is smaller than the noise associated with the sensing of the signal. Using as an example the on-going proof-of-concept Sagnac speed meter experiment in Glasgow, we quantify the problem and present a solution involving the extraction of a small displacement-proportional signal. This displacement signal can be combined with the existing velocity signal to enhance low frequency sensitivity, and we derive optimal filters to accomplish this for different signal strengths. We show that the extraction of the displacement signal for low frequency control purposes can be performed without reducing significantly the quantum non-demolition character of this type of interferometer.

  1. How to control spin-Seebeck current in a metal-quantum dot-magnetic insulator junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lei; Fu, Hua-Hua; Wu, Ruqian

    2016-09-01

    The control of the spin-Seebeck current is still a challenging task for the development of spin caloritronic devices. Here, we construct a spin-Seebeck device by inserting a quantum dot (QD) between the metal lead and magnetic insulator. Using the slave-particle approach and noncrossing approximation, we find that the spin-Seebeck effect increases significantly when the energy level of the QD locates near the Fermi level of the metal lead due to the enhancement of spin flipping and occurrences of quantum resonance. Since this can be easily realized by applying a gate voltage in experiments, the spin-Seebeck device proposed here can also work as a thermovoltaic transistor. Moreover, the optimal correlation strength and the energy level position of the QD are discussed to maximize the spin-Seebeck current as required for applications in controllable spin caloritronic devices.

  2. Quantum control of two interacting electrons in a coupled quantum dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Hong-Zhou; Zhang Ping; Duan Su-Qing; Zhao Xian-Geng

    2006-01-01

    Quantum-state engineering, i.e. active manipulation over the coherent dynamics of suitable quantum-mechanical systems, has become a fascinating prospect of modern physics. Here we discuss the dynamics of two interacting electrons in a coupled quantum dot driven by an external electric field. The results show that the two quantum dots can be used to prepare a maximally entangled Bell state by changing the strength and duration of an oscillatory electric field. Different from the suggestion made by Loss et al (1998 Phys. Rev. A 57 120), the present entanglement involves the spatial degree of freedom for the two electrons. We also find that the coherent tunnelling suppression discussed by Grossmann et al (1991 Phys. Rev. Lett. 67 516) persists in the two-particle case: i.e. two electrons initially localized in one dot can remain dynamically localized, although the strong Coulomb repulsion prevents them from behaving so. Surprisingly,the interaction enhances the degree of localization to a large extent compared with that in the non-interacting case.This phenomenon is referred to as the Coulomb-enhanced dynamical localization.

  3. A full quantum analysis of the Stern–Gerlach experiment using the evolution operator method: analyzing current issues in teaching quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez Rodríguez, E.; Arévalo Aguilar, L. M.; Piceno Martínez, E.

    2017-03-01

    To the quantum mechanics specialists community it is a well-known fact that the famous original Stern–Gerlach experiment (SGE) produces entanglement between the external degrees of freedom (position) and the internal degree of freedom (spin) of silver atoms. Despite this fact, almost all textbooks on quantum mechanics explain this experiment using a semiclassical approach, where the external degrees of freedom are considered classical variables, the internal degree is treated as a quantum variable, and Newton's second law is used to describe the dynamics. In the literature there are some works that analyze this experiment in its full quantum mechanical form. However, astonishingly, to the best of our knowledge the original experiment, where the initial states of the spin degree of freedom are randomly oriented coming from the oven, has not been analyzed yet in the available textbooks using the Schrödinger equation (to the best of our knowledge there is only one paper that treats this case: Hsu et al (2011 Phys. Rev. A 83 012109)). Therefore, in this contribution we use the time-evolution operator to give a full quantum mechanics analysis of the SGE when the initial state of the internal degree of freedom is completely random, i.e. when it is a statistical mixture. Additionally, as the SGE and the development of quantum mechanics are heavily intermingled, we analyze some features and drawbacks in the current teaching of quantum mechanics. We focus on textbooks that use the SGE as a starting point, based on the fact that most physicist do not use results from physics education research, and comment on traditional pedagogical attitudes in the physics community.

  4. Implementation of a quantum controlled-SWAP gate with photonic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Takafumi; Okamoto, Ryo; Tanida, Masato; Hofmann, Holger F.; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2017-01-01

    Quantum information science addresses how the processing and transmission of information are affected by uniquely quantum mechanical phenomena. Combination of two-qubit gates has been used to realize quantum circuits, however, scalability is becoming a critical problem. The use of three-qubit gates may simplify the structure of quantum circuits dramatically. Among them, the controlled-SWAP (Fredkin) gates are essential since they can be directly applied to important protocols, e.g., error correction, fingerprinting, and optimal cloning. Here we report a realization of the Fredkin gate for photonic qubits. We achieve a fidelity of 0.85 in the computational basis and an output state fidelity of 0.81 for a 3-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. The estimated process fidelity of 0.77 indicates that our Fredkin gate can be applied to various quantum tasks. PMID:28361950

  5. Dynamics of observables and exactly solvable quantum problems: Using time-dependent density-functional theory to control quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanehpour, M.; Tokatly, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    We use analytic (current) density-potential maps of time-dependent (current) density-functional theory [TD(C)DFT] to inverse engineer analytically solvable time-dependent quantum problems. In this approach the driving potential (the control signal) and the corresponding solution of the Schrödinger equation are parametrized analytically in terms of the basic TD(C)DFT observables. We describe the general reconstruction strategy and illustrate it with a number of explicit examples. First we consider the real space one-particle dynamics driven by a time-dependent electromagnetic field and recover, from the general TDDFT reconstruction formulas, the known exact solution for a driven oscillator with a time-dependent frequency. Then we use analytic maps of the lattice TD(C)DFT to control quantum dynamics in a discrete space. As a first example we construct a time-dependent potential which generates prescribed dynamics on a tight-binding chain. Then our method is applied to the dynamics of spin-1/2 driven by a time-dependent magnetic field. We design an analytic control pulse that transfers the system from the ground to excited state and vice versa. This pulse generates the spin flip thus operating as a quantum not gate.

  6. Nuclear Quantum Effects in Water at the Triple Point: Using Theory as a Link Between Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bingqing; Behler, Jörg; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-06-16

    One of the most prominent consequences of the quantum nature of light atomic nuclei is that their kinetic energy does not follow a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS) experiments can measure this effect. Thus, the nuclear quantum kinetic energy can be probed directly in both ordered and disordered samples. However, the relation between the quantum kinetic energy and the atomic environment is a very indirect one, and cross-validation with theoretical modeling is therefore urgently needed. Here, we use state of the art path integral molecular dynamics techniques to compute the kinetic energy of hydrogen and oxygen nuclei in liquid, solid, and gas-phase water close to the triple point, comparing three different interatomic potentials and validating our results against equilibrium isotope fractionation measurements. We will then show how accurate simulations can draw a link between extremely precise fractionation experiments and DINS, therefore establishing a reliable benchmark for future measurements and providing key insights to increase further the accuracy of interatomic potentials for water.

  7. Proposal for a quantum delayed-choice experiment with a spin-mechanical setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng-Bo; Li, Fu-Li

    2016-10-01

    We describe an experimentally feasible protocol for performing a variant of the quantum delayed-choice experiment with massive objects. In this scheme, a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond driven by microwave fields is dispersively coupled to a massive mechanical resonator. A double-pulse Ramsey interferometer can be implemented with the spin-mechanical setup, where the second Ramsey microwave pulse drives the spin conditioned on the number states of the resonator. The probability for finding the NV center in definite spin states exhibits interference fringes when the mechanical resonator is prepared in a specific number state. On the other hand, the interference is destroyed if the mechanical resonator stays in some other number states. The wavelike and particlelike behavior of the NV spin can be superposed by preparing the mechanical resonator in a superposition of two distinct number states. Thus a quantum version of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment could be implemented, allowing fundamental tests of quantum mechanics on a macroscopic scale.

  8. Comparing, Optimising and Benchmarking Quantum Control Algorithms in a Unifying Programming Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Machnes, S; Glaser, S J; de Fouquieres, P; Gruslys, A; Schirmer, S; Schulte-Herbrueggen, T

    2010-01-01

    For paving the way to novel applications in quantum simulation, computation, and technology, increasingly large quantum systems have to be steered with high precision. It is a typical task amenable to numerical optimal control to turn the time course of pulses, i.e. piecewise constant control amplitudes, iteratively into an optimised shape. Here, we present the first comparative study of optimal control algorithms for a wide range of finite-dimensional applications. We focus on the most commonly used algorithms: GRAPE methods which update all controls concurrently, and KROTOV-type methods which do so sequentially. Guidelines for their use are given and open research questions are pointed out. --- Moreover we introduce a novel unifying algorithmic framework, DYNAMO (Dynamic Optimisation Platform) designed to provide the quantum-technology community with a convenient MATLAB-based toolset for optimal control. In addition, it gives researchers in optimal-control techniques a framework for benchmarking and compari...

  9. Site-controlled quantum dots fabricated using an atomic-force microscope assisted technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakuma Y

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAn atomic-force microscope assisted technique is developed to control the position and size of self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs. Presently, the site precision is as good as ± 1.5 nm and the size fluctuation is within ± 5% with the minimum controllable lateral diameter of 20 nm. With the ability of producing tightly packed and differently sized QDs, sophisticated QD arrays can be controllably fabricated for the application in quantum computing. The optical quality of such site-controlled QDs is found comparable to some conventionally self-assembled semiconductor QDs. The single dot photoluminescence of site-controlled InAs/InP QDs is studied in detail, presenting the prospect to utilize them in quantum communication as precisely controlled single photon emitters working at telecommunication bands.

  10. Design and optimisation of quantum logic circuits for a three-qubit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm implemented with optically-controlled, solid-state quantum logic gates

    CERN Document Server

    Del Duce, A; Bayvel, P

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the design and optimisation of quantum logic circuits suitable for the experimental demonstration of a three-qubit quantum computation prototype based on optically-controlled, solid-state quantum logic gates. In these gates, the interaction between two qubits carried by the electron-spin of donors is mediated by the optical excitation of a control particle placed in their proximity. First, we use a geometrical approach for analysing the entangling characteristics of these quantum gates. Then, using a genetic programming algorithm, we develop circuits for the refined Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm investigating different strategies for obtaining short total computational times. We test two separate approaches based on using different sets of entangling gates with the shortest possible gate computation time which, however, does not introduce leakage of quantum information to the control particles. The first set exploits fast approximations of controlled-phase gates as entangling gates, while the other one a...

  11. Performance of a radiatively cooled system for quantum optomechanical experiments in space

    CERN Document Server

    Pilan-Zanoni, André; Johann, Ulrich; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Hechenblaikner, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a radiatively cooled instrument is investigated in the context of optomechanical quantum experiments, where the environment of a macroscopic particle in a quantum-superposition has to be cooled to less than 20\\,K in deep space. A heat-transfer analysis between the components of the instrument as well as a transfer-function analysis on thermal oscillations induced by the spacecraft interior and by dissipative sources is performed. The thermal behaviour of the instrument in an orbit around a Lagrangian point and in a highly elliptical Earth orbit is discussed. Finally, we investigate further possible design improvements aiming at lower temperatures of the environment of the macroscopic particle. These include a mirror-based design of the imaging system on the optical bench and the extension of the heat shields.

  12. Tests of Quantum Gravity-Induced Non-Locality via Opto-mechanical Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Belenchia, Alessio; Liberati, Stefano; Marin, Francesco; Marino, Francesco; Ortolan, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    The nonrelativistic limit of nonlocal modifications to the Klein Gordon operator is studied, and the experimental possibilities of casting stringent constraints on the nonlocality scale via planned and/or current optomechanical experiments are discussed. Details of the perturbative analysis and semianalitical simulations leading to the dynamical evolution of a quantum harmonic oscillator in the presence of non locality reported in [1], together with a comprehensive account of the experimental methodology with particular regard to sensitivity limitations related to thermal decoherence time and active cooling of the oscillator, are given. Finally, a strategy for detecting non-locality scales of the order of $10^{- 22} \\div 10^{- 26}$ m by means of the spontaneous time periodic squeezing of quantum coherent states is provided.

  13. Amplified transduction of Planck-scale effects for quantum optical experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bosso, Pasquale; Pikovski, Igor; Vanner, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The unification of quantum mechanics and gravity remains one of the main challenges in modern physics. Quantum-gravity-inspired phenomenological models offer a window to explore potential aspects of such a theory including observable consequences. One such phenomenological model is the Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP), which predicts a modified Heisenberg uncertainty relation and a deformed canonical commutator. It was recently shown that under some assumptions, opto-mechanical systems can put stringent experimental bounds on such models. In this paper, we introduce a scheme to increase the sensitivity of these experiments with an extended sequence of optomechanical interactions. We also analyze the effects of optical phase noise and optical loss and present a strategy to mitigate such deleterious effects.

  14. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Time-Dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics : Theory and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lathouwers, L

    1992-01-01

    From March 30th to April 3rd, 1992, a NATO Advanced Research workshop entitled "Time Dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Experiment" was held at Snowbird, Utah. The organizing committee consisted of J. BROECKHOVE (Antwerp, Belgium), L. CEDERBAUM (Heidelberg, Germany), L. LATHOUWERS (Antwerp, Belgium), N. OHRN (Gainesville, Florida) and J. SIMONS (Salt Lake City, Utah). Fifty-two participants from eleven different countries attended the meeting at which thirty-three talks and one poster session were held. Twenty-eight participants submitted contributions to the proceedings of the meeting, which are reproduced in this volume. The workshop brought together experts in different areas 0 f molecular quantum dynamics, all adhering to the time dependent approach. The aim was to discuss and compare methods and applications. The ~amiliarityo~ the aUdience with the concepts o~ time dependent approaches greatly facilitated topical discussions and probing towards new applications. A broad area of subject matt...

  15. Experimental implementation of the quantum baker's map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Yaakov S; Lloyd, Seth; Emerson, Joseph; Cory, David G

    2002-10-07

    This Letter reports on the experimental implementation of the quantum baker's map via a three bit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor. The experiments tested the sensitivity of the quantum chaotic map to perturbations. In the first experiment, the map was iterated forward and then backward to provide benchmarks for intrinsic errors and decoherence. In the second set of experiments, the least significant qubit was perturbed in between the iterations to test the sensitivity of the quantum chaotic map to controlled perturbations. These experiments can be used to investigate existing theoretical predictions for quantum chaotic dynamics.

  16. Electromagnetically induced vorticity control in a quantum fluid velocity field

    CERN Document Server

    Raptis, T E

    2013-01-01

    A new method is reported by which it is possible to induce certain flux configurations of desired characteristics via electromagnetic means into the overall quantum probability current of a many-body system in the Madelung hydrodynamic picture. Some indicative applications are also considered with emphasis in HTC and gravitational wave research.

  17. Controlling electron quantum dot qubits by spin-orbit interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stano, P.

    2007-01-15

    Single electron confined in a quantum dot is studied. A special emphasis is laid on the spin properties and the influence of spin-orbit interactions on the system. The study is motivated by a perspective exploitation of the spin of the confined electron as a qubit, a basic building block of in a foreseen quantum computer. The electron is described using the single band effective mass approximation, with parameters typical for a lateral electrostatically defined quantum dot in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The stemming data for the analysis are obtained by numerical methods of exact diagonalization, however, all important conclusions are explained analytically. The work focuses on three main areas -- electron spectrum, phonon induced relaxation and electrically and magnetically induced Rabi oscillations. It is shown, how spin-orbit interactions influence the energy spectrum, cause finite spin relaxation and allow for all-electrical manipulation of the spin qubit. Among the main results is the discovery of easy passages, where the spin relaxation is unusually slow and the qubit is protected against parasitic electrical fields connected with manipulation by resonant electromagnetic fields. The results provide direct guide for manufacturing quantum dots with much improved properties, suitable for realizing single electron spin qubits. (orig.)

  18. Degrees of controllability for quantum systems and application to atomic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirmer, S.G.; Solomon, A.I. [Quantum Processes Group, Open University, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom)]. E-mails: S.G.Schirmer@open.ac.uk; A.I.Solomon@open.ac.uk; Leahy, J.V. [Department of Mathematics and Institute of Theoretical Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)]. E-mail: leahy@math.uoregon.edu

    2002-05-10

    Precise definitions for different degrees of controllability for quantum systems are given, and necessary and sufficient conditions for each type of controllability are discussed. The results are applied to determine the degree of controllability for various atomic systems with degenerate energy levels and transition frequencies. (author)

  19. Loophole-free Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment via quantum steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Bernhard; Ramelow, Sven; Steinlechner, Fabian; Langford, Nathan K.; Brunner, Nicolas; Wiseman, Howard M.; Ursin, Rupert; Zeilinger, Anton

    2012-05-01

    Tests of the predictions of quantum mechanics for entangled systems have provided increasing evidence against local realistic theories. However, there remains the crucial challenge of simultaneously closing all major loopholes—the locality, freedom-of-choice and detection loopholes—in a single experiment. An important sub-class of local realistic theories can be tested with the concept of ‘steering’. The term ‘steering’ was introduced by Schrödinger in 1935 for the fact that entanglement would seem to allow an experimenter to remotely steer the state of a distant system as in the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) argument. Einstein called this ‘spooky action at a distance’. EPR-steering has recently been rigorously formulated as a quantum information task opening it up to new experimental tests. Here, we present the first loophole-free demonstration of EPR-steering by violating three-setting quadratic steering inequality, tested with polarization-entangled photons shared between two distant laboratories. Our experiment demonstrates this effect while simultaneously closing all loopholes: both the locality loophole and a specific form of the freedom-of-choice loophole are closed by having a large separation of the parties and using fast quantum random number generators, and the fair-sampling loophole is closed by having high overall detection efficiency. Thereby, we exclude—for the first time loophole-free—an important class of local realistic theories considered by EPR. Besides its foundational importance, loophole-free steering also allows the distribution of quantum entanglement secure event in the presence of an untrusted party.

  20. Controlled rephasing of single spin-waves in a quantum memory based on cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrera, Pau; Albrecht, Boris; Heinze, Georg; Cristiani, Matteo; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Quantum Photonics With Solids; Atoms Team

    2015-05-01

    Quantum memories for light allow a reversible transfer of quantum information between photons and long lived matter quantum bits. In atomic ensembles, this information is commonly stored in the form of single collective spin excitations (spin-waves). In this work we demonstrate that we can actively control the dephasing of the spin-waves created in a quantum memory based on a cold Rb87 atomic ensemble. The control is provided by an external magnetic field gradient, which induces an inhomogeneous broadening of the atomic hyperfine levels. We show that acting on this gradient allows to control the dephasing of individual spin-waves and to induce later a rephasing. The spin-waves are then mapped into single photons, and we demonstrate experimentally that the active rephasing preserves the sub-Poissonian statistics of the retrieved photons. Finally we show that this rephasing control enables the creation and storage of multiple spin-waves in different temporal modes, which can be selectively readout. This is an important step towards the implementation of a functional temporally multiplexed quantum memory for quantum repeaters. We acknowledge support from the ERC starting grant, the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, the Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional, and the International PhD- fellowship program ``la Caixa''-Severo Ochoa @ICFO.

  1. Quantum measurement and real-time feedback with a spin-register in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Gaining precise control over quantum systems is crucial for applications in quantum information processing and quantum sensing and to perform experimental tests of quantum mechanics. The experiments presented in this thesis implement quantum measurements and real-time feedback protocols that can

  2. Quantum measurement and real-time feedback with a spin-register in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Gaining precise control over quantum systems is crucial for applications in quantum information processing and quantum sensing and to perform experimental tests of quantum mechanics. The experiments presented in this thesis implement quantum measurements and real-time feedback protocols that can hel

  3. Analysis of the quantum Zeno effect for quantum control and computation

    CERN Document Server

    Dominy, Jason M; Rezakhani, A T; Lidar, D A

    2012-01-01

    Within quantum information, many methods have been proposed to avoid or correct the deleterious effects of the environment on a system of interest. In this work, expanding on our earlier paper [G. A. Paz-Silva et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 080501 (2012), arXiv:1104.5507], we evaluate the applicability of the quantum Zeno effect as one such method. Using the algebraic structure of stabilizer quantum error correction codes as a unifying framework, two open-loop protocols are described which involve frequent non-projective (i.e., weak) measurement of either the full stabilizer group or a minimal generating set thereof. The effectiveness of the protocols is measured by the distance between the final state under the protocol and the final state of an idealized evolution in which system and environment do not interact. Rigorous bounds on this metric are derived which demonstrate that, under certain assumptions, a Zeno effect may be realized with arbitrarily weak measurements, and that this effect can protect an arb...

  4. Emission polarization control in semiconductor quantum dots coupled to a photonic crystal microcavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, E; Martínez, L J; Nowak, A K; van der Meulen, H P; Calleja, J M; Tejedor, C; Prieto, I; Granados, D; Taboada, A G; García, J M; Postigo, P A

    2010-06-07

    We study the optical emission of single semiconductor quantum dots weakly coupled to a photonic-crystal micro-cavity. The linearly polarized emission of a selected quantum dot changes continuously its polarization angle, from nearly perpendicular to the cavity mode polarization at large detuning, to parallel at zero detuning, and reversing sign for negative detuning. The linear polarization rotation is qualitatively interpreted in terms of the detuning dependent mixing of the quantum dot and cavity states. The present result is relevant to achieve continuous control of the linear polarization in single photon emitters.

  5. Direct and Indirect Couplings in Coherent Feedback Control of Linear Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Guofeng

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study and design direct and indirect couplings for use in coherent feedback control of a class of linear quantum stochastic systems. A general physical model for a nominal linear quantum system coupled directly and indirectly to external systems is presented. Fundamental properties of stability, dissipation, passivity, and gain for this class of linear quantum models are presented and characterized using complex Lyapunov equations and linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Coherent $H^\\infty$ and LQG synthesis methods are extended to accommodate direct couplings using multistep optimization. Examples are given to illustrate the results.

  6. Nanoscale magnetometry through quantum control of nitrogen-vacancy centres in rotationally diffusing nanodiamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Maclaurin, D; Martin, A M; Hollenberg, L C L

    2012-01-01

    The confluence of quantum physics and biology is driving a new generation of quantum-based sensing and imaging technology capable of harnessing the power of quantum effects to provide tools to understand the fundamental processes of life. One of the most promising systems in this area is the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond - a natural spin qubit which remarkably has all the right attributes for nanoscale sensing in ambient biological conditions. Typically the nitrogen-vacancy qubits are fixed in tightly controlled/isolated experimental conditions. In this work quantum control principles of nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry are developed for a randomly diffusing diamond nanocrystal. We find that the accumulation of geometric phases, due to the rotation of the nanodiamond plays a crucial role in the application of a diffusing nanodiamond as a bio-label and magnetometer. Specifically, we show that a freely diffusing nanodiamond can offer real-time information about local magnetic fields and its own rotational beh...

  7. Quantum and classical control of single photon states via a mechanical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiri-Esfahani, Sahar; Myers, Casey R.; Combes, Joshua; Milburn, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    Optomechanical systems typically use light to control the quantum state of a mechanical resonator. In this paper, we propose a scheme for controlling the quantum state of light using the mechanical degree of freedom as a controlled beam splitter. Preparing the mechanical resonator in non-classical states enables an optomechanical Stern-Gerlach interferometer. When the mechanical resonator has a small coherent amplitude it acts as a quantum control, entangling the optical and mechanical degrees of freedom. As the coherent amplitude of the resonator increases, we recover single photon and two-photon interference via a classically controlled beam splitter. The visibility of the two-photon interference is particularly sensitive to coherent excitations in the mechanical resonator and this could form the basis of an optically transduced weak-force sensor.

  8. Controlling quantum coherence of atom laser by light with strong strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING; Hui(景辉); GE; Molin(葛墨林); GE; Molin(葛墨林)

    2002-01-01

    A new method for controlling the quantum coherence of atom laser by applying input light with strong strength is presented within the framework of quantum dynamical theory. Unlike the case of rotating wave approximation(RWA), we show that the non-classical properties, such as sub-Poisson distribution and quadrature squeezed effect, can appear in the output atom laser beam with time. By choosing suitable initial RF phase, a steady and brighter output of squeezed coherent atom laser is also available.

  9. Generation of Quality Pulses for Control of Qubit/Quantum Memory Spin States: Experimental and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Further support was provided by student interns from the Naval Research Enterprise Internship Program (NREIP) and the SDSU Research Foundation... nuclear spin states of qubits/quantum memory applicable to semiconductor, superconductor, ionic, and superconductor-ionic hybrid technologies. As the...magnetic and nuclear spins of an entangled ensemble or of single spins or photons. These quantum states can be controlled by resonant microwave

  10. An improved arbitrated quantum signature protocol based on the key-controlled chained CNOT encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long; Sun, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Ke-Jia; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a new quantum encryption based on the key-controlled chained CNOT operations, which is named KCCC encryption, is proposed. With the KCCC encryption, an improved arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) protocol is presented. Compared with the existing protocols, our protocol can effectively prevent forgery attacks and disavowal attacks. Moreover, only single state is required in the protocol. We hope it is helpful to further research in the design of AQS protocols in future.

  11. Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Steane, A M

    1998-01-01

    The subject of quantum computing brings together ideas from classical information theory, computer science, and quantum physics. This review aims to summarise not just quantum computing, but the whole subject of quantum information theory. It turns out that information theory and quantum mechanics fit together very well. In order to explain their relationship, the review begins with an introduction to classical information theory and computer science, including Shannon's theorem, error correcting codes, Turing machines and computational complexity. The principles of quantum mechanics are then outlined, and the EPR experiment described. The EPR-Bell correlations, and quantum entanglement in general, form the essential new ingredient which distinguishes quantum from classical information theory, and, arguably, quantum from classical physics. Basic quantum information ideas are described, including key distribution, teleportation, data compression, quantum error correction, the universal quantum computer and qua...

  12. Optimal control of open quantum systems: a combined surrogate hamiltonian optimal control theory approach applied to photochemistry on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, Erik; Klüner, Thorsten

    2012-03-28

    In this paper, control of open quantum systems with emphasis on the control of surface photochemical reactions is presented. A quantum system in a condensed phase undergoes strong dissipative processes. From a theoretical viewpoint, it is important to model such processes in a rigorous way. In this work, the description of open quantum systems is realized within the surrogate hamiltonian approach [R. Baer and R. Kosloff, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8862 (1997)]. An efficient and accurate method to find control fields is optimal control theory (OCT) [W. Zhu, J. Botina, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 1953 (1998); Y. Ohtsuki, G. Turinici, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 5509 (2004)]. To gain control of open quantum systems, the surrogate hamiltonian approach and OCT, with time-dependent targets, are combined. Three open quantum systems are investigated by the combined method, a harmonic oscillator immersed in an ohmic bath, CO adsorbed on a platinum surface, and NO adsorbed on a nickel oxide surface. Throughout this paper, atomic units, i.e., ℏ = m(e) = e = a(0) = 1, have been used unless otherwise stated.

  13. Exotic properties and optimal control of quantum heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Congjie; Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    A quantum heat engine of a specific type is studied. This engine contains a single particle confined in the infinite square well potential with variable width and consists of three processes: the isoenergetic process (which has no classical analogs) as well as the isothermal and adiabatic processes. It is found that the engine possesses exotic properties in its performance. The efficiency takes the maximum value when the expansion ratio of the engine is appropriately set, and, in addition, the lower the temperature is, the higher the maximum efficiency becomes, highlighting aspects of the influence of quantum effects on thermodynamics. A comment is also made on the relevance of this engine to that of Carnot.

  14. Dynamical control of quantum state transfer within hybrid open systems

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, B M; Clausen, J; Kurizki, G; Davidovich, L

    2010-01-01

    We analyze quantum state-transfer optimization within hybrid open systems, from a "noisy" (write-in) qubit to its "quiet" counterpart (storage qubit). Intriguing interplay is revealed between our ability to avoid bath-induced errors that profoundly depend on the bath-memory time and the limitations imposed by leakage out of the operational subspace. Counterintuitively, under no circumstances is the fastest transfer optimal (for a given transfer energy).

  15. Voltage controlled terahertz transmission through GaN quantum wells

    OpenAIRE

    Laurent, T.; Sharma, R.; Torres, J.; Nouvel, P; Blin, S.; Varani, L.; Cordier, Y.; Chmielowska, M.; Chenot, S.; Faurie, JP; Beaumont, B.; P. Shiktorov; Starikov, E.; Gruzinskis, V.; Korotyevyev, V.

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements of radiation transmission in the 0.220--0.325 THz frequency domain through GaN quantum wells grown on sapphire substrates at room and low temperatures. A significant enhancement of the transmitted beam intensity with the applied voltage on the devices under test is found. For a deeper understanding of the physical phenomena involved, these results are compared with a phenomenological theory of light transmission under electric bias relating the transmission enhancement ...

  16. Note: An ultranarrow bandpass filter system for single-photon experiments in quantum optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höckel, David; Martin, Eugen; Benson, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    We describe a combined ultranarrow bandpass filtering setup for single-photon experiments in quantum optics. The filter is particularly suitable for single-photon electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) experiments, but can also be used in several similar applications. A multipass planar Fabry-Perot etalon together with polarization filters and spatial filtering allows 114 dB pump beam suppression, while the signal beam is attenuated by just 4 dB, although both wavelengths are only separated by 0.025 nm (9.2 GHz). The multipass etalon alone accounts for 46 dB suppression while it has a peak transmission of 65%. We demonstrate EIT experiments in Cs vapor at room temperature with probe power in the femtowatt regime using this filter.

  17. The Heteronuclear Multiple-Quantum Correlation Experiment: Perspective from Classical Vectors, Nonclassical Vectors, and Product Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen de la Vega-Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is usually accepted that most 2D-NMR experiments cannot be approached using classical models. Instructors argue that Product Operators (PO or density matrix formalisms are the only alternative to get insights into complex spin evolution for experiments involving Multiple-Quantum Coherence, such as the Heteronuclear Multiple-Quantum Correlation (HMQC technique. Nevertheless, in recent years, several contributions have been published to provide vectorial descriptions for the HMQC taking PO formalism as the starting point. In this work we provide a graphical representation of the HMQC experiment, taking the basic elements of Bloch’s vector model as building blocks. This description bears an intuitive and comfortable understanding of spin evolution during the pulse sequence, for those who are novice in 2D-NMR. Finally, this classical vectorial depiction is tested against the PO formalism and nonclassical vectors, conveying the didactic advantage of shedding light on a single phenomenon from different perspectives. This comparative approach could be useful to introduce PO and nonclassical vectors for advanced upper-division undergraduate and graduate education.

  18. Measurement based controlled not gate for topological qubits in a Majorana fermion and quantum-dot hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    We propose a scheme to implement controlled not gate for topological qubits in a quantum-dot and Majorana fermion hybrid system. Quantum information is encoded on pairs of Majorana fermions, which live on the the interface between topologically trivial and nontrivial sections of a quantum nanowire deposited on an s-wave superconductor. A measurement based two-qubit controlled not gate is produced with the help of parity measurements assisted by the quantum-dot and followed by prescribed single-qubit gates. The parity measurement, on the quantum-dot and a topological qubit, is achieved by the Aharonov-Casher effect.

  19. Testing the effects of gravity and motion on quantum entanglement in space-based experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bruschi, David Edward; White, Angela; Baccetti, Valentina; Oi, Daniel K L; Fuentes, Ivette

    2013-01-01

    We propose an experiment to test the effects of gravity and acceleration on quantum entanglement in space-based setups. We show that the entanglement between transverse excitations of two Bose-Einstein condensates is degraded after one of them undergoes a change in the gravitational field strength. This prediction can be tested if the condensates are initially entangled in two separate satellites while being in the same orbit and then one of them moves to a different orbit. We show that the effect is observable in a typical orbital manoeuvre of nanosatellites like CanX4 and CanX5.

  20. Unified analysis of terminal-time control in classical and quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pechen, Alexander; 10.1209/0295-5075/91/60005

    2010-01-01

    Many phenomena in physics, chemistry, and biology involve seeking an optimal control to maximize an objective for a classical or quantum system which is open and interacting with its environment. The complexity of finding an optimal control for maximizing an objective is strongly affected by the possible existence of sub-optimal maxima. Within a unified framework under specified conditions, control objectives for maximizing at a terminal time physical observables of open classical and quantum systems are shown to be inherently free of sub-optimal maxima. This attractive feature is of central importance for enabling the discovery of controls in a seamless fashion in a wide range of phenomena transcending the quantum and classical regimes.