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Sample records for quantitative stopped-flow fluorescence

  1. [Study of Reaction Dynamics between Bovine Serum Albumin and Folic Acid by Stopped-Flow/Fluorescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, San-xian; Luo, Yun-jing; Qiao, Shu-liang; Li, Li; Liu, Cai-hong; Shi, Jian-long; An, Xue-jing

    2016-01-01

    As a kind of coenzyme of one-carbon enzymes in vivo, folic acid belongs to B vitamins, which can interact with other vitamins and has great significance for converting among amino acids, dividing growth of cells and protein synthesis reactions. Half-life, concentration and reaction rate constant of drugs are important parameters in pharmacokinetic study. In this paper, by utilizing fluorescence spectrophotometer and stopped-flow spectrum analyzer, reaction kinetic parameters between bovine serum albumin(BSA) and folic acid in a bionic system have been investigated, which provide references for parameters of drug metabolism related to folic acid. By using Stern-Volmer equation dealing with fluorescence quenching experiments data, we concluded that under 25, 30, and 37 degrees C, the static quenching constants of folic acid to intrinsic fluorescence from bovine serum albumin were 2.455 x 10(10), 4.900 x 10(10) and 6.427 x 10(10) L x mol(-1) x s(-1) respectively; The results of kinetic reaction rate have shown that the reaction rate of BSA and folic acid are greater than 100 mol x L(-1) x s(-1) at different temperatures, pH and buffering media, illustrating that the quenching mechanism between BSA and folic acid is to form composite static quenching process. Reaction concentration of bovine serum albumin and its initial concentration were equal to the secondary reaction formula, and the correlation coefficient was 0.998 7, while the half-life (t1/2) was 0.059 s at physiological temperature. With the increase of folic acid concentration, the apparent rate constant of this reaction had a linear increasing trend, the BSA fluorescence quenching rate constant catalyzed by folic acid was 3.174 x 10(5) mol x L(-1) x s(-1). Furthermore, with different buffer, the apparent rate constant and reaction rate constant of BSA interacting with folic acid were detected to explore the influence on the reaction under physiological medium, which is of great significance to determine the

  2. Stopped-flow studies of changes in fluorescence of 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid caused by magnesium and salt binding to yeast enolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, J M

    1976-12-11

    Stopped-flow studies of magnesium and salt (potassium chloride and acetate) effects on yeast enolase were carried out by following 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid fluorescence changes. The fluorescence changes appear to be largely caused by subunit association and dissociation, though there is evidence in some reactions for large changes in fluorescence occurring within the dead time of the stopped-flow measurements. These data are combined with measurements of initial enzyme activity after incubation in various solvents with or without magnesium to obtain subunit association and dissociation rates. From these, it is concluded that magnesium and the salts act by directly changing the affinities of the subunits for each other, apparently by producing a rapid change in protein conformation.

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Piroxicam Using Temperature-Controlled Ionic Liquid Dispersive Liquid Phase Microextraction Followed By Stopped-Flow Injection Spectrofluorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Ganjali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Piroxicam (PXM belongs to the wide class of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. PXM has been widely applied in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, gonarthrosis, osteoarthritis, backaches, neuralgia, mialgia. In the presented work, a green and benign sample pretreatment method called temperature-controlled ionic liquid dispersive liquid phase microextraction (TCIL-DLPME was followed with stopped-flow injection spectrofluorimetry (SFIS for quantitation of PXM in pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples.Methods:Temperature-controlled ionic liquid dispersive liquid phase microextraction (TCIL-DLPME was applied as an environmentally friendly sample enrichment method to extract and isolate PXM prior to quantitation. Dispersion of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Hmim][PF6] ionic liquid (IL through the sample aqueous solution was performed by applying a relatively high temperature. PXM was extracted into the extractor, and after phase separation, PXM in the final solution was determined by stopped-flow injection spectrofluorimetry (SFIS.Results and Major Conclusion:Different factors affecting the designed method such as IL amount, diluting agent, pH and temperature were investigated in details and optimized. The method provided a linear dynamic range of 0.2-150 μg l-1, a limit of detection (LOD of 0.046 μg l-1 and a relative standard deviation (RSD of 3.1%. Furthermore, in order to demonstrate the analytical applicability of the recommended method, it was applied for quantitation of PXM in real samples.

  4. Quantitative fluorescence angiography for neurosurgical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichelt, Claudia; Duscha, Philipp; Steinmeier, Ralf; Meyer, Tobias; Kuß, Julia; Cimalla, Peter; Kirsch, Matthias; Sobottka, Stephan B; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Morgenstern, Ute

    2013-06-01

    Present methods for quantitative measurement of cerebral perfusion during neurosurgical operations require additional technology for measurement, data acquisition, and processing. This study used conventional fluorescence video angiography--as an established method to visualize blood flow in brain vessels--enhanced by a quantifying perfusion software tool. For these purposes, the fluorescence dye indocyanine green is given intravenously, and after activation by a near-infrared light source the fluorescence signal is recorded. Video data are analyzed by software algorithms to allow quantification of the blood flow. Additionally, perfusion is measured intraoperatively by a reference system. Furthermore, comparing reference measurements using a flow phantom were performed to verify the quantitative blood flow results of the software and to validate the software algorithm. Analysis of intraoperative video data provides characteristic biological parameters. These parameters were implemented in the special flow phantom for experimental validation of the developed software algorithms. Furthermore, various factors that influence the determination of perfusion parameters were analyzed by means of mathematical simulation. Comparing patient measurement, phantom experiment, and computer simulation under certain conditions (variable frame rate, vessel diameter, etc.), the results of the software algorithms are within the range of parameter accuracy of the reference methods. Therefore, the software algorithm for calculating cortical perfusion parameters from video data presents a helpful intraoperative tool without complex additional measurement technology.

  5. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy and image deconvolution.

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    Swedlow, Jason R

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative imaging and image deconvolution have become standard techniques for the modern cell biologist because they can form the basis of an increasing number of assays for molecular function in a cellular context. There are two major types of deconvolution approaches--deblurring and restoration algorithms. Deblurring algorithms remove blur but treat a series of optical sections as individual two-dimensional entities and therefore sometimes mishandle blurred light. Restoration algorithms determine an object that, when convolved with the point-spread function of the microscope, could produce the image data. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed in this chapter. Image deconvolution in fluorescence microscopy has usually been applied to high-resolution imaging to improve contrast and thus detect small, dim objects that might otherwise be obscured. Their proper use demands some consideration of the imaging hardware, the acquisition process, fundamental aspects of photon detection, and image processing. This can prove daunting for some cell biologists, but the power of these techniques has been proven many times in the works cited in the chapter and elsewhere. Their usage is now well defined, so they can be incorporated into the capabilities of most laboratories. A major application of fluorescence microscopy is the quantitative measurement of the localization, dynamics, and interactions of cellular factors. The introduction of green fluorescent protein and its spectral variants has led to a significant increase in the use of fluorescence microscopy as a quantitative assay system. For quantitative imaging assays, it is critical to consider the nature of the image-acquisition system and to validate its response to known standards. Any image-processing algorithms used before quantitative analysis should preserve the relative signal levels in different parts of the image. A very common image-processing algorithm, image deconvolution, is used

  6. Quantitative fluorescence nanoscopy for cancer biomedicine

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    Huang, Tao; Nickerson, Andrew; Peters, Alec; Nan, Xiaolin

    2015-08-01

    Cancer is a major health threat worldwide. Options for targeted cancer therapy, however, are often limited, in a large part due to our incomplete understanding of how key processes including oncogenesis and drug response are mediated at the molecular level. New imaging techniques for visualizing biomolecules and their interactions at the nanometer and single molecule scales, collectively named fluorescence nanoscopy, hold the promise to transform biomedical research by providing direct mechanistic insight into cellular processes. We discuss the principles of quantitative single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM), a subset of fluorescence nanoscopy, and their applications to cancer biomedicine. In particular, we will examine oncogenesis and drug resistance mediated by mutant Ras, which is associated with ~1/3 of all human cancers but has remained an intractable drug target. At ~20 nm spatial and single-molecule stoichiometric resolutions, SMLM clearly showed that mutant Ras must form dimers to activate its effector pathways and drive oncogenesis. SMLM further showed that the Raf kinase, one of the most important effectors of Ras, also forms dimers upon activation by Ras. Moreover, treatment of cells expressing wild type Raf with Raf inhibitors induces Raf dimer formation in a manner dependent on Ras dimerization. Together, these data suggest that Ras dimers mediate oncogenesis and drug resistance in tumors with hyperactive Ras and can potentially be targeted for cancer therapy. We also discuss recent advances in SMLM that enable simultaneous imaging of multiple biomolecules and their interactions at the nanoscale. Our work demonstrates the power of quantitative SMLM in cancer biomedicine.

  7. Additional band broadening of peptides in the first size-exclusion chromatographic dimension of an automated stop-flow two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography.

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    Xu, Jucai; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Qiu, Chaoying; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Baoguo; Lin, Lianzhu; Su, Guowan

    2017-10-27

    The need to improve the peak capacity of liquid chromatography motivates the development of two-dimensional analysis systems. This paper presented a fully automated stop-flow two-dimensional liquid chromatography system with size exclusion chromatography followed by reversed phase liquid chromatography (SEC×RPLC) to efficiently separate peptides. The effects of different stop-flow operational parameters (stop-flow time, peak parking position, number of stop-flow periods and column temperature) on band broadening in the first dimension (1 st D) SEC column were quantitatively evaluated by using commercial small proteins and peptides. Results showed that the effects of peak parking position and the number of stop-flow periods on band broadening were relatively small. Unlike stop-flow analysis of large molecules with a long running time, additional band broadening was evidently observed for small molecule analytes due to the relatively high effective diffusion coefficient (D eff ). Therefore, shorter analysis time and lower 1 st D column temperature were suggested for analyzing small molecules. The stop-flow two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) system was further tested on peanut peptides and an evidently improved resolution was observed for both stop-flow heart-cutting and comprehensive 2D-LC analysis (in spite of additional band broadening in SEC). The stop-flow SEC×RPLC, especially heart-cutting analysis with shorter analysis time and higher 1 st D resolution for selected fractions, offers a promising approach for efficient analysis of complex samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Quantitative Fluorescence-Based Lipase Assay

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    Giovanna Lomolino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An easy and fast gel diffusion assay for detecting and monitoring lipase activity by quantification of fluorescein is described. By measuring the intensity of fluorescein, it is possible to obtain a calibration curve with a regression coefficient better than by using the radius of fluorescent haloes. Through the quantification of fluorescence intensity of fluorescein released after the hydrolysis of a fluorescent ester, fluorescein dibutyrate, used as substrate in agar plates, commercial and skimmed milk lipase activity were studied. Moreover, with this method, lipase activity can be monitored in reaction medium that contains compounds which are affected by turbidity or cause measurement interference for UV-spectrophotometer and fluorimeter. In this experiment, boiled skimmed milk was dispersed in the agar gel with fluorescein dibutyrate, and it was used as a reaction medium to mimic natural conditions. The development of such an assay has a potential for applications in industries ranging from pharmaceuticals to food production and monitoring.

  9. Multimodal quantitative phase and fluorescence imaging of cell apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinye; Zuo, Chao; Yan, Hao

    2017-06-01

    Fluorescence microscopy, utilizing fluorescence labeling, has the capability to observe intercellular changes which transmitted and reflected light microscopy techniques cannot resolve. However, the parts without fluorescence labeling are not imaged. Hence, the processes simultaneously happen in these parts cannot be revealed. Meanwhile, fluorescence imaging is 2D imaging where information in the depth is missing. Therefore the information in labeling parts is also not complete. On the other hand, quantitative phase imaging is capable to image cells in 3D in real time through phase calculation. However, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction and cannot observe intercellular changes below 200 nanometers. In this work, fluorescence imaging and quantitative phase imaging are combined to build a multimodal imaging system. Such system has the capability to simultaneously observe the detailed intercellular phenomenon and 3D cell morphology. In this study the proposed multimodal imaging system is used to observe the cell behavior in the cell apoptosis. The aim is to highlight the limitations of fluorescence microscopy and to point out the advantages of multimodal quantitative phase and fluorescence imaging. The proposed multimodal quantitative phase imaging could be further applied in cell related biomedical research, such as tumor.

  10. Reproducibility and Reliability of Repeated Quantitative Fluorescence Angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerup, Nikolaj; Knudsen, Kristine Bach Korsholm; Ambrus, Rikard

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: When using fluorescence angiography (FA) in perioperative perfusion assessment, repeated measures with re-injections of fluorescent dye (ICG) may be required. However, repeated injections may cause saturation of dye in the tissue, exceeding the limit of fluorescence intensity...... that the camera can detect. As the emission of fluorescence is dependent of the excitatory light intensity, reduction of this may solve the problem. The aim of the present study was to investigate the reproducibility and reliability of repeated quantitative FA during a reduction of excitatory light....

  11. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy in turbid media using fluorescence differential path length spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelink, Arjen; Kruijt, Bastiaan; Robinson, Dominic J.; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new technique, fluorescence differential path length spectroscopy (FDPS), that enables the quantitative investigation of fluorophores in turbid media. FDPS measurements are made with the same probe geometry as differential path length spectroscopy (DPS) measurements. Phantom

  12. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Using Noncorrosive Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigodich, Richard V.

    2014-01-01

    Stopped-flow kinetics techniques are important to the study of rapid chemical and biochemical reactions. Incorporation of a stopped-flow kinetics experiment into the physical chemistry laboratory curriculum would therefore be an instructive addition. However, the usual reactions studied in such exercises employ a corrosive reagent that can over…

  13. Stop Flow Lithography Synthesis and Characterization of Structured Microparticles

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    David Baah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the synthesis of nonspherical composite particles of poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-DA/SiO2 and PEG-DA/Al2O3 with single or multiple vias and the corresponding inorganic particles of SiO2 and Al2O3 synthesized using the Stop Flow Lithography (SFL method is reported. Precursor suspensions of PEG-DA, 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropiophenone, and SiO2 or Al2O3 nanoparticles were prepared. The precursor suspension flows through a microfluidic device mounted on an upright microscope and is polymerized in an automated process. A patterned photomask with transparent geometric features masks UV light to synthesize the particles. Composite particles with vias were synthesized and corresponding inorganic SiO2 and Al2O3 particles were obtained through polymer burn-off and sintering of the composites. The synthesis of porous inorganic particles of SiO2 and Al2O3 with vias and overall dimensions in the range of ~35–90 µm was achieved. BET specific surface area measurements for single via inorganic particles were 56–69 m2/g for SiO2 particles and 73–81 m2/g for Al2O3 particles. Surface areas as high as 114 m2/g were measured for multivia cubic SiO2 particles. The findings suggest that, with optimization, the particles should have applications in areas where high surface area is important such as catalysis and sieving.

  14. Shedding quantitative fluorescence light on novel regulatory mechanisms in skeletal biomedicine and biodentistry.

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    Lee, Ji-Won; Iimura, Tadahiro

    2017-02-01

    Digitalized fluorescence images contain numerical information such as color (wavelength), fluorescence intensity and spatial position. However, quantitative analyses of acquired data and their validation remained to be established. Our research group has applied quantitative fluorescence imaging on tissue sections and uncovered novel findings in skeletal biomedicine and biodentistry. This review paper includes a brief background of quantitative fluorescence imaging and discusses practical applications by introducing our previous research. Finally, the future perspectives of quantitative fluorescence imaging are discussed.

  15. Quantitative x-ray fluorescent analysis using fundamental parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, C.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A monochromatic source of x-rays for sample excitation permits the use of pure elemental standards and relatively simple calculations to convert the measured fluorescent intensities to an absolute basis of weight per unit weight of sample. Only the mass absorption coefficients of the sample for the exciting and the fluorescent radiation need be determined. Besides the direct measurement of these absorption coefficients in the sample, other techniques are considered which require fewer sample manipulations and measurements. These fundamental parameters methods permit quantitative analysis without recourse to the time-consuming process of preparing nearly identical standards

  16. Quantitative analysis with energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataria, S.K.; Kapoor, S.S.; Lal, M.; Rao, B.V.N.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of samples using radioisotope excited energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence system is described. The complete set-up is built around a locally made Si(Li) detector x-ray spectrometer with an energy resolution of 220 eV at 5.94 KeV. The photopeaks observed in the x-ray fluorescence spectra are fitted with a Gaussian function and the intensities of the characteristic x-ray lines are extracted, which in turn are used for calculating the elemental concentrations. The results for a few typical cases are presented. (author)

  17. Fluorescent foci quantitation for high-throughput analysis

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    Elena Ledesma-Fernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of cellular proteins localize to discrete foci within cells, for example DNA repair proteins, microtubule organizing centers, P bodies or kinetochores. It is often possible to measure the fluorescence emission from tagged proteins within these foci as a surrogate for the concentration of that specific protein. We wished to develop tools that would allow quantitation of fluorescence foci intensities in high-throughput studies. As proof of principle we have examined the kinetochore, a large multi-subunit complex that is critical for the accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell division. Kinetochore perturbations lead to aneuploidy, which is a hallmark of cancer cells. Hence, understanding kinetochore homeostasis and regulation are important for a global understanding of cell division and genome integrity. The 16 budding yeast kinetochores colocalize within the nucleus to form a single focus. Here we have created a set of freely-available tools to allow high-throughput quantitation of kinetochore foci fluorescence. We use this ‘FociQuant’ tool to compare methods of kinetochore quantitation and we show proof of principle that FociQuant can be used to identify changes in kinetochore protein levels in a mutant that affects kinetochore function. This analysis can be applied to any protein that forms discrete foci in cells.

  18. Scanning fluorescent microscopy is an alternative for quantitative fluorescent cell analysis.

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    Varga, Viktor Sebestyén; Bocsi, József; Sipos, Ferenc; Csendes, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2004-07-01

    Fluorescent measurements on cells are performed today with FCM and laser scanning cytometry. The scientific community dealing with quantitative cell analysis would benefit from the development of a new digital multichannel and virtual microscopy based scanning fluorescent microscopy technology and from its evaluation on routine standardized fluorescent beads and clinical specimens. We applied a commercial motorized fluorescent microscope system. The scanning was done at 20 x (0.5 NA) magnification, on three channels (Rhodamine, FITC, Hoechst). The SFM (scanning fluorescent microscopy) software included the following features: scanning area, exposure time, and channel definition, autofocused scanning, densitometric and morphometric cellular feature determination, gating on scatterplots and frequency histograms, and preparation of galleries of the gated cells. For the calibration and standardization Immuno-Brite beads were used. With application of shading compensation, the CV of fluorescence of the beads decreased from 24.3% to 3.9%. Standard JPEG image compression until 1:150 resulted in no significant change. The change of focus influenced the CV significantly only after +/-5 microm error. SFM is a valuable method for the evaluation of fluorescently labeled cells. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, T. J.; Saunter, C. D.; O’Nions, W.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D.

    2014-01-01

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences

  20. Quantitative analysis by computer controlled X-ray fluorescence spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, T.V.; Angelo, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy has become a widely accepted method in the metallurgical field for analysis of both minor and major elements. As encountered in many other analytical techniques, the problem of matrix effect generally known as the interelemental effects is to be dealt with effectively in order to make the analysis accurate. There are several methods by which the effects of matrix on the analyte are minimised or corrected for and the mathematical correction is one among them. In this method the characteristic secondary X-ray intensities are measured from standard samples and correction coefficients. If any, for interelemental effects are evaluated by mathematical calculations. This paper describes attempts to evaluate the correction coefficients for interelemental effects by multiple linear regression programmes using a computer for the quantitative analysis of stainless steel and a nickel base cast alloy. The quantitative results obtained using this method for a standard stainless steel sample are compared with the given certified values. (author)

  1. Absorption correction factor in X-ray fluorescent quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimjun, S.

    1994-01-01

    An experiment on absorption correction factor in X-ray fluorescent quantitative analysis were carried out. Standard samples were prepared from the mixture of Fe 2 O 3 and tapioca flour at various concentration of Fe 2 O 3 ranging from 5% to 25%. Unknown samples were kaolin containing 3.5% to-50% of Fe 2 O 3 Kaolin samples were diluted with tapioca flour in order to reduce the absorption of FeK α and make them easy to prepare. Pressed samples with 0.150 /cm 2 and 2.76 cm in diameter, were used in the experiment. Absorption correction factor is related to total mass absorption coefficient (χ) which varied with sample composition. In known sample, χ can be calculated by conveniently the formula. However in unknown sample, χ can be determined by Emission-Transmission method. It was found that the relationship between corrected FeK α intensity and contents of Fe 2 O 3 in these samples was linear. This result indicate that this correction factor can be used to adjust the accuracy of X-ray intensity. Therefore, this correction factor is essential in quantitative analysis of elements comprising in any sample by X-ray fluorescent technique

  2. Fast automatic quantitative cell replication with fluorescent live cell imaging

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    Wang Ching-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background live cell imaging is a useful tool to monitor cellular activities in living systems. It is often necessary in cancer research or experimental research to quantify the dividing capabilities of cells or the cell proliferation level when investigating manipulations of the cells or their environment. Manual quantification of fluorescence microscopic image is difficult because human is neither sensitive to fine differences in color intensity nor effective to count and average fluorescence level among cells. However, auto-quantification is not a straightforward problem to solve. As the sampling location of the microscopy changes, the amount of cells in individual microscopic images varies, which makes simple measurement methods such as the sum of stain intensity values or the total number of positive stain within each image inapplicable. Thus, automated quantification with robust cell segmentation techniques is required. Results An automated quantification system with robust cell segmentation technique are presented. The experimental results in application to monitor cellular replication activities show that the quantitative score is promising to represent the cell replication level, and scores for images from different cell replication groups are demonstrated to be statistically significantly different using ANOVA, LSD and Tukey HSD tests (p-value Conclusion A robust automated quantification method of live cell imaging is built to measure the cell replication level, providing a robust quantitative analysis system in fluorescent live cell imaging. In addition, the presented unsupervised entropy based cell segmentation for live cell images is demonstrated to be also applicable for nuclear segmentation of IHC tissue images.

  3. Rapid coagulation of polystyrene latex in a stopped-flow spectrophotometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, J.W.Th.; Pathmamanoharan, C.; Wiersema, P.H.

    1974-01-01

    With a stopped-flow method the rapid coagulation by electrolyte of several polystyrene latices is measured. By extrapolating back to zero time the initial process of two single particles forming a doublet is observed. We find an average rate constant ifk11 = 6.0 × 10−12 p−1 cm3 sec su−1 at 20°C,

  4. Rapid diagnosis of aneuploidy using segmental duplication quantitative fluorescent PCR.

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    Xiangdong Kong

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was use a simple and rapid procedure, called segmental duplication quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (SD-QF-PCR, for the prenatal diagnosis of fetal chromosomal aneuploidies. This method is based on the co-amplification of segmental duplications located on two different chromosomes using a single pair of fluorescent primers. The PCR products of different sizes were subsequently analyzed through capillary electrophoresis, and the aneuploidies were determined based on the relative dosage between the two chromosomes. Each primer set, containing five pairs of primers, was designed to simultaneously detect aneuploidies located on chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X and Y in a single reaction. We applied these two primer sets to DNA samples isolated from individuals with trisomy 21 (n = 36; trisomy 18 (n = 6; trisomy 13 (n = 4; 45, X (n = 5; 47, XXX (n = 3; 48, XXYY (n = 2; and unaffected controls (n = 40. We evaluated the performance of this method using the karyotyping results. A correct and unambiguous diagnosis with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity, was achieved for clinical samples examined. Thus, the present study demonstrates that SD-QF-PCR is a robust, rapid and sensitive method for the diagnosis of common aneuploidies, and these analyses can be performed in less than 4 hours for a single sample, providing a competitive alternative for routine use.

  5. A simple optical fiber device for quantitative fluorescence microscopy of single living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Graft, M.; van Graft, Marja; Oosterhuis, B.; Oosterhuis, Bernard; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    simple and relatively inexpensive system is described for obtaining quantitative fluorescence measurements on single living cells loaded with a fluorescent probe to study cell physiological processes. The light emitted from the fluorescent cells is captured by and transported through an optical

  6. Quantitative laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbiezen, K.; Klein-Douwel, R. J. H.; van Viet, A. P.; Donkerbroek, A. J.; Meerts, W. L.; Dam, N. J.; ter Meulen, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    We present quantitative, in-cylinder, UV-laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine. Processing of the raw fluorescence signals includes a detailed correction, based on additional measurements, for the effect of laser beam and fluorescence attenuation, and

  7. Stopped-flow technique for transit time measurement in a gas jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rengan, K.; Lin, J.; Lim, T.; Meyer, R.A.; Harrell, J.

    1985-01-01

    A 'stopped-flow' technique for the measurement of transit time of reaction products in a gas jet is described. The method involved establishing the gas flow through the jet system when the reactor is operating steadily and allowing the pressure to reach equilibrium values. The gas flow is stopped by means of electrically operated valves. The transit-time measurement is achieved by opening the valves and initiating the multiscanning of total activity simultaneously. The value obtained agrees well with the transit time measured by pulsing the reactor. The 'stopped-flow' technique allows on-line measurement of transit time in any gas jet system where the physical transportation time is the major component of the transit time. This technique is especially useful for systems installed in reactors which do not have pulsing capability. (orig.)

  8. Stopped-flow injection spectrophotometric method for determination of chlorate in soil

    OpenAIRE

    Jaroon Jakmunee

    2008-01-01

    A stopped-flow injection (FI) spectrophotometric procedure based on iodometric reaction for the determination of chlorate has been developed. Standard/sample was injected into a stream of potassium iodide solution and then merged with a stream of hydrochloric acid solution to produce triiodide. By stopping the flow while the sample zone is being in a mixing coil, a slow reaction of chlorate with iodide in acidic medium was promoted to proceed with minimal dispersion of the triiodide product z...

  9. Stopped-flow kinetic studies of poly(amidoamine) dendrimer-calf thymus DNA to form dendriplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Debabrata; Kumar, Santosh; Maiti, Souvik; Dhara, Dibakar

    2013-11-07

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers are known to be highly efficient nonviral carriers in gene delivery. Dendrimer-mediated transfection is known to be a function of the dendrimer to DNA charge ratio as well as the size of the dendrimer. In the present study, the binding kinetics of four PAMAM dendrimers (G1, G2, G3, and G4) with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been studied using stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy. The effect of dendrimer-to-DNA charge ratio and dendrimer generation on the binding kinetics was investigated. In most cases, the results of dendrimer-CT-DNA binding can be explained by a two-step reaction mechanism: a rapid electrostatic binding between the dendrimer and DNA, followed by a conformational change of the dendrimer-DNA complex that ultimately leads to DNA condensation. It was observed that the charge ratio on the dendrimer and the DNA phosphate groups, as well as the dendrimer generation (size), has a marked effect on the kinetics of binding between the DNA and the dendrimers. The rate constant (k'1) of the first step was much higher compared to that of the second step (k'2), and both were found to increase with an increase in dendrimer concentration. Among the four generations of dendrimers, G4 exhibited significantly faster binding kinetics compared to the three smaller generation dendrimers.

  10. Ribosome formation from subunits studied by stopped-flow and Rayleigh light scattering

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    Antoun Ayman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Light scattering and standard stopped-flow techniques were used to monitor rapid association of ribosomal subunits during initiation of eubacterial protein synthesis. The effects of the initiation factors IF1, IF2, IF3 and buffer conditions on subunit association were studied along with the role of GTP in this process. The part of light scattering theory that is essential for kinetic measurements is high-lighted in the main text and a more general treatment of Rayleigh scattering from macromolecules is given in an appendix.

  11. A simple optical fiber device for quantitative fluorescence microscopy of single living cells

    OpenAIRE

    van Graft, M.; van Graft, Marja; Oosterhuis, B.; Oosterhuis, Bernard; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    simple and relatively inexpensive system is described for obtaining quantitative fluorescence measurements on single living cells loaded with a fluorescent probe to study cell physiological processes. The light emitted from the fluorescent cells is captured by and transported through an optical fiber. After passage through appropriate filters the light is measured using a photomultiplier tube. The optical fiber is mounted in one of the microscope outlets. Signals derived from the photomultipl...

  12. DNA origami-based standards for quantitative fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Jürgen J; Raab, Mario; Forthmann, Carsten; Pibiri, Enrico; Wünsch, Bettina; Dammeyer, Thorben; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Validating and testing a fluorescence microscope or a microscopy method requires defined samples that can be used as standards. DNA origami is a new tool that provides a framework to place defined numbers of small molecules such as fluorescent dyes or proteins in a programmed geometry with nanometer precision. The flexibility and versatility in the design of DNA origami microscopy standards makes them ideally suited for the broad variety of emerging super-resolution microscopy methods. As DNA origami structures are durable and portable, they can become a universally available specimen to check the everyday functionality of a microscope. The standards are immobilized on a glass slide, and they can be imaged without further preparation and can be stored for up to 6 months. We describe a detailed protocol for the design, production and use of DNA origami microscopy standards, and we introduce a DNA origami rectangle, bundles and a nanopillar as fluorescent nanoscopic rulers. The protocol provides procedures for the design and realization of fluorescent marks on DNA origami structures, their production and purification, quality control, handling, immobilization, measurement and data analysis. The procedure can be completed in 1-2 d.

  13. Quantitative wavelenght-resolved fluorescence detection for microchip capillary electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, S.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and application of a new wavelengthresolved CCD-based fluorescence detector for microchip separations. In recent years, miniaturization has been one of the major trends in the development of new analytical separation systems. As the manipulated sample amounts

  14. Quantitative micro x-ray fluorescence analyses without reference standard material; Referenzprobenfreie quantitative Mikro-Roentgenfluoreszenzanalyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Timo

    2009-07-15

    X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) is a standard method for non-destructive investigations. Due to the development of polycapillary optics and SDDdetectors requiring no cooling with liquid nitrogen, XRF becomes a suitable method for a large number of applications, e. g. for the analysis of objects in arts and archaeology. Spectrometers developed for those purposes allow investigations outside of laboratories und provide excitation areas with diameters of 10-70 {mu}m. In most applications, quantification of XRF data is realized by the usage of standard reference materials. Due to absorption processes in the samples the accuracy of the results depends strongly on the similarity of the sample and the reference standard. In cases where no suitable references are available, quantification can be done based on the ''fundamental parameter (fp) method''. This quantification procedure is based on a set of equations describing the fluorescence production and detection mathematical. The cross sections for the interaction of x-rays with matter can be taken from different databases. During an iteration process the element concentrations can be determined. Quantitative XRF based on fundamental parameters requires an accurate knowledge of the excitation spectrum. In case of a conventional setup this spectrum is given by the X-ray tube spectrum and can be calculated. The use of polycapillary optics in micro-XRF spectrometers changes the spectral distribution of the excitation radiation. For this reason it is necessary to access the transmission function of the used optic. The aim of this work is to find a procedure to describe this function for routine quantification based on fundamental parameters. Most of the measurements have been carried out using a commercial spectrometer developed for applications in arts and archaeology. On the one hand the parameters of the lens, used in the spectrometer, have been investigated by different experimental characterization

  15. Analysis of archaeological ceramics by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence: Quantitative approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Ruiz, R.; Garcia-Heras, M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the quantitative methodologies developed for the compositional characterization of archaeological ceramics by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence at two levels. A first quantitative level which comprises an acid leaching procedure, and a second selective level, which seeks to increase the number of detectable elements by eliminating the iron present in the acid leaching procedure. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry has been compared, at a quantitative level, with Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis in order to test its applicability to the study of this kind of materials. The combination of a solid chemical homogenization procedure previously reported with the quantitative methodologies here presented allows the total-reflection X-ray fluorescence to analyze 29 elements with acceptable analytical recoveries and accuracies

  16. Analysis of archaeological ceramics by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence: Quantitative approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Ruiz, R. [Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigacion, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Modulo C-9, Laboratorio de TXRF, Crta. Colmenar, Km 15, Cantoblanco, E-28049, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: ramon.fernandez@uam.es; Garcia-Heras, M. [Grupo de Arqueometria de Vidrios y Materiales Ceramicos, Instituto de Historia, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, CSIC, C/ Albasanz, 26-28, 28037 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports the quantitative methodologies developed for the compositional characterization of archaeological ceramics by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence at two levels. A first quantitative level which comprises an acid leaching procedure, and a second selective level, which seeks to increase the number of detectable elements by eliminating the iron present in the acid leaching procedure. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry has been compared, at a quantitative level, with Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis in order to test its applicability to the study of this kind of materials. The combination of a solid chemical homogenization procedure previously reported with the quantitative methodologies here presented allows the total-reflection X-ray fluorescence to analyze 29 elements with acceptable analytical recoveries and accuracies.

  17. Toward quantitative fluorescence microscopy with DNA origami nanorulers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beater, Susanne; Raab, Mario; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic development of fluorescence microscopy has created a large number of new techniques, many of which are able to overcome the diffraction limit. This chapter describes the use of DNA origami nanostructures as scaffold for quantifying microscope properties such as sensitivity and resolution. The DNA origami technique enables placing of a defined number of fluorescent dyes in programmed geometries. We present a variety of DNA origami nanorulers that include nanorulers with defined labeling density and defined distances between marks. The chapter summarizes the advantages such as practically free choice of dyes and labeling density and presents examples of nanorulers in use. New triangular DNA origami nanorulers that do not require photoinduced switching by imaging transient binding to DNA nanostructures are also reported. Finally, we simulate fluorescence images of DNA origami nanorulers and reveal that the optimal DNA nanoruler for a specific application has an intermark distance that is roughly 1.3-fold the expected optical resolution. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Supramolecular assembly affording a ratiometric two-photon fluorescent nanoprobe for quantitative detection and bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Hong-Wen; Xiong, Mengyi; Yin, Sheng-Yan; Yang, Yue; Hu, Xiao-Xiao; Yin, Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence quantitative analyses for vital biomolecules are in great demand in biomedical science owing to their unique detection advantages with rapid, sensitive, non-damaging and specific identification. However, available fluorescence strategies for quantitative detection are usually hard to design and achieve. Inspired by supramolecular chemistry, a two-photon-excited fluorescent supramolecular nanoplatform ( TPSNP ) was designed for quantitative analysis with three parts: host molecules (β-CD polymers), a guest fluorophore of sensing probes (Np-Ad) and a guest internal reference (NpRh-Ad). In this strategy, the TPSNP possesses the merits of (i) improved water-solubility and biocompatibility; (ii) increased tissue penetration depth for bioimaging by two-photon excitation; (iii) quantitative and tunable assembly of functional guest molecules to obtain optimized detection conditions; (iv) a common approach to avoid the limitation of complicated design by adjustment of sensing probes; and (v) accurate quantitative analysis by virtue of reference molecules. As a proof-of-concept, we utilized the two-photon fluorescent probe NHS-Ad-based TPSNP-1 to realize accurate quantitative analysis of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), with high sensitivity and good selectivity in live cells, deep tissues and ex vivo -dissected organs, suggesting that the TPSNP is an ideal quantitative indicator for clinical samples. What's more, TPSNP will pave the way for designing and preparing advanced supramolecular sensors for biosensing and biomedicine.

  19. Fluorescence-based Western blotting for quantitation of protein biomarkers in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, Maria; Babeluk, Rita; Diestinger, Michael; Pirchegger, Petra; Skeledzic, Senada; Oehler, Rudolf

    2008-09-01

    Since most high throughput techniques used in biomarker discovery are very time and cost intensive, highly specific and quantitative analytical alternative application methods are needed for the routine analysis. Conventional Western blotting allows detection of specific proteins to the level of single isotypes while its quantitative accuracy is rather limited. We report a novel and improved quantitative Western blotting method. The use of fluorescently labelled secondary antibodies strongly extends the dynamic range of the quantitation and improves the correlation with the protein amount (r=0.997). By an additional fluorescent staining of all proteins immediately after their transfer to the blot membrane, it is possible to visualise simultaneously the antibody binding and the total protein profile. This allows for an accurate correction for protein load. Applying this normalisation it could be demonstrated that fluorescence-based Western blotting is able to reproduce a quantitative analysis of two specific proteins in blood platelet samples from 44 subjects with different diseases as initially conducted by 2D-DIGE. These results show that the proposed fluorescence-based Western blotting is an adequate application technique for biomarker quantitation and suggest possibilities of employment that go far beyond.

  20. Automated Image Analysis for Quantitative Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Environmental Samples▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zhi; Pons, Marie Noëlle; Raskin, Lutgarde; Zilles, Julie L.

    2007-01-01

    When fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses are performed with complex environmental samples, difficulties related to the presence of microbial cell aggregates and nonuniform background fluorescence are often encountered. The objective of this study was to develop a robust and automated quantitative FISH method for complex environmental samples, such as manure and soil. The method and duration of sample dispersion were optimized to reduce the interference of cell aggregates. An au...

  1. Fluorescent chemosensor for detection and quantitation of carbon dioxide gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Tang, Youhong; Barashkov, Nikolay N; Irgibaeva, Irina S; Lam, Jacky W Y; Hu, Rongrong; Birimzhanova, Dinara; Yu, Yong; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2010-10-13

    CO(2) sensing is of great societal implications, as CO(2) is a component of gas mixtures from many natural and anthropogenic processes with huge impacts on globe climate and human well-being. Herein we report a CO(2) assay scheme over a wide concentration range, utilizing a fluorogen with an aggregation-induced emission feature and a liquid with tunable polarity and viscosity. The CO(2) sensing process is specific, quantitative, and interferent tolerant.

  2. Synthesis, quantitative structure-property relationship study of novel fluorescence active 2-pyrazolines and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Adel S.; Basta, Altaf H.; El-Saied, Houssni; Mohamed, Mohamed A.; Bedair, Ahmad H.; Salim, Ahmad S.

    2018-03-01

    A variety of fluorescence-active fluorinated pyrazolines 13-33 was synthesized in good yields through cyclocondensation reaction of propenones 1-9 with aryl hydrazines 10-12. Some of the synthesized compounds provided promising fluorescence properties with quantum yield (Φ) higher than that of quinine sulfate (standard reference). Quantitative structure-property relationship studies were undertaken supporting the exhibited fluorescence properties and estimating the parameters governing properties. Five synthesized fluorescence-active pyrazolines (13, 15, 18, 19 and 23) with variable Φ were selected for treating two types of paper sheets (Fabriano and Bible paper). These investigated fluorescence compounds, especially compounds 19 and 23, provide improvements in strength properties of paper sheets. Based on the observed performance they can be used as markers in security documents.

  3. Quantitative Brightness Analysis of Fluorescence Intensity Fluctuations in E. Coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Ho Hur

    Full Text Available The brightness measured by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy specifies the average stoichiometry of a labeled protein in a sample. Here we extended brightness analysis, which has been mainly applied in eukaryotic cells, to prokaryotic cells with E. coli serving as a model system. The small size of the E. coli cell introduces unique challenges for applying brightness analysis that are addressed in this work. Photobleaching leads to a depletion of fluorophores and a reduction of the brightness of protein complexes. In addition, the E. coli cell and the point spread function of the instrument only partially overlap, which influences intensity fluctuations. To address these challenges we developed MSQ analysis, which is based on the mean Q-value of segmented photon count data, and combined it with the analysis of axial scans through the E. coli cell. The MSQ method recovers brightness, concentration, and diffusion time of soluble proteins in E. coli. We applied MSQ to measure the brightness of EGFP in E. coli and compared it to solution measurements. We further used MSQ analysis to determine the oligomeric state of nuclear transport factor 2 labeled with EGFP expressed in E. coli cells. The results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying the stoichiometry of proteins by brightness analysis in a prokaryotic cell.

  4. Stopped-flow studies of spectral changes in human serum albumin following an alkaline pH jump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B

    1987-01-01

    A stopped-flow technique was used to study the spectral changes occurring in albumin following a pH jump from 11.3 to 11.8 at 25 degrees C. Ultraviolet difference spectra between various albumin species participating in the process are reported. These spectra are similar in shape to the difference...

  5. Fluorescence quantitative PCR in detection of HBV DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zheng; Li Ming; Shen Xia

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the serum content of HBV-DNA and expression of serological markers with HBV infection patients. Methods: Serum samples from 375 hepatitis B patients with different clinical status and 70 normal persons were quantitated for HBV-DNA by FQ-PCR. Results: The average of HBV-DNA contents in the patient in the groups of HBsAg (+) and of HBeAg(+) were significantly higher than those in the group of HBsAg(-) and of HBeAg(-). Even in the group of HBeAg negative, high HBV-DNA contents might still be present in both the HBeAg(+) and HBeAg(-) groups. Conclusion: FQ-PCR can be used to monitor the real state of HBV infection, replication and the course of disease

  6. Quantitative liquid and vapor distribution measurements in evaporating fuel sprays using laser-induced exciplex fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fansler, Todd D; Drake, Michael C; Gajdeczko, Boguslaw; Düwel, Isabell; Koban, Wieland; Zimmermann, Frank P; Schulz, Christof

    2009-01-01

    Fully quantitative two-dimensional measurements of liquid- and vapor-phase fuel distributions (mass per unit volume) from high-pressure direct-injection gasoline injectors are reported for conditions of both slow and rapid vaporization in a heated, high-pressure spray chamber. The measurements employ the coevaporative gasoline-like fluorobenzene (FB)/diethylmethylamine (DEMA)/hexane exciplex tracer/fuel system. In contrast to most previous laser-induced exciplex-fluorescence (LIEF) experiments, the quantitative results here include regions in which liquid and vapor fuel coexist (e.g. near the injector exit). A unique aspect is evaluation of both vapor- and liquid-phase distributions at varying temperature and pressure using only in situ vapor-phase fluorescence calibration measurements at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. This approach draws on recent extensive measurements of the temperature-dependent spectroscopic properties of the FB–DEMA exciplex system, in particular on knowledge of the quantum efficiencies of the vapor-phase and liquid-phase (exciplex) fluorescence. In addition to procedures necessary for quantitative measurements, we discuss corrections for liquid–vapor crosstalk (liquid fluorescence that overlaps the vapor-fluorescence bandpass), the unknown local temperature due to vaporization-induced cooling, and laser-sheet attenuation by scattering and absorption

  7. Wide-field spectrally resolved quantitative fluorescence imaging system: toward neurosurgical guidance in glioma resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yijing; Thom, Maria; Ebner, Michael; Wykes, Victoria; Desjardins, Adrien; Miserocchi, Anna; Ourselin, Sebastien; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Vercauteren, Tom

    2017-11-01

    In high-grade glioma surgery, tumor resection is often guided by intraoperative fluorescence imaging. 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) provides fluorescent contrast between normal brain tissue and glioma tissue, thus achieving improved tumor delineation and prolonged patient survival compared with conventional white-light-guided resection. However, commercially available fluorescence imaging systems rely solely on visual assessment of fluorescence patterns by the surgeon, which makes the resection more subjective than necessary. We developed a wide-field spectrally resolved fluorescence imaging system utilizing a Generation II scientific CMOS camera and an improved computational model for the precise reconstruction of the PpIX concentration map. In our model, the tissue's optical properties and illumination geometry, which distort the fluorescent emission spectra, are considered. We demonstrate that the CMOS-based system can detect low PpIX concentration at short camera exposure times, while providing high-pixel resolution wide-field images. We show that total variation regularization improves the contrast-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed quantitative concentration map by approximately twofold. Quantitative comparison between the estimated PpIX concentration and tumor histopathology was also investigated to further evaluate the system.

  8. Fluorescence, Absorption, and Excitation Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as a Tool for Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Figueroa, A. M.; Ramazan, K. A.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative and qualitative study of the interplay between absorption, fluorescence, and excitation spectra of pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is conducted. The study of five PAH displays the correlation of the above-mentioned properties along with the associated molecular changes.

  9. Time-Gated Raman Spectroscopy for Quantitative Determination of Solid-State Forms of Fluorescent Pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiäinen, Tiina; Pessi, Jenni; Movahedi, Parisa; Koivistoinen, Juha; Kurki, Lauri; Tenhunen, Mari; Yliruusi, Jouko; Juppo, Anne M; Heikkonen, Jukka; Pahikkala, Tapio; Strachan, Clare J

    2018-04-03

    Raman spectroscopy is widely used for quantitative pharmaceutical analysis, but a common obstacle to its use is sample fluorescence masking the Raman signal. Time-gating provides an instrument-based method for rejecting fluorescence through temporal resolution of the spectral signal and allows Raman spectra of fluorescent materials to be obtained. An additional practical advantage is that analysis is possible in ambient lighting. This study assesses the efficacy of time-gated Raman spectroscopy for the quantitative measurement of fluorescent pharmaceuticals. Time-gated Raman spectroscopy with a 128 × (2) × 4 CMOS SPAD detector was applied for quantitative analysis of ternary mixtures of solid-state forms of the model drug, piroxicam (PRX). Partial least-squares (PLS) regression allowed quantification, with Raman-active time domain selection (based on visual inspection) improving performance. Model performance was further improved by using kernel-based regularized least-squares (RLS) regression with greedy feature selection in which the data use in both the Raman shift and time dimensions was statistically optimized. Overall, time-gated Raman spectroscopy, especially with optimized data analysis in both the spectral and time dimensions, shows potential for sensitive and relatively routine quantitative analysis of photoluminescent pharmaceuticals during drug development and manufacturing.

  10. Quantitative imaging of glutathione in live cells using a reversible reaction-based ratiometric fluorescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining redox homeostasis inside cells. Currently, there are no methods available to quantitatively assess the GSH concentration in live cells. Live cell fluorescence imaging revolutionized the understanding of cell biology and has become an indispens...

  11. Detection of chromosome abnormalities by quantitative fluorescent PCR in ectopic pregnancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goddijn, Mariette; van Stralen, Marja; Schuring-Blom, Heleen; Redeker, Bert; van Leeuwen, Liesbeth; Repping, Sjoerd; Leschot, Nico; van der Veen, Fulco

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the potential value of quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) in the detection of chromosome abnormalities in ectopic pregnancies. Methods: Seventy chorionic villi samples of ectopic pregnancies were studied by QF-PCR. Primers for chromosomes 16, 21, X and

  12. Quantitative analysis of dynamic association in live biological fluorescent samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Ruusuvuori

    Full Text Available Determining vesicle localization and association in live microscopy may be challenging due to non-simultaneous imaging of rapidly moving objects with two excitation channels. Besides errors due to movement of objects, imaging may also introduce shifting between the image channels, and traditional colocalization methods cannot handle such situations. Our approach to quantifying the association between tagged proteins is to use an object-based method where the exact match of object locations is not assumed. Point-pattern matching provides a measure of correspondence between two point-sets under various changes between the sets. Thus, it can be used for robust quantitative analysis of vesicle association between image channels. Results for a large set of synthetic images shows that the novel association method based on point-pattern matching demonstrates robust capability to detect association of closely located vesicles in live cell-microscopy where traditional colocalization methods fail to produce results. In addition, the method outperforms compared Iterated Closest Points registration method. Results for fixed and live experimental data shows the association method to perform comparably to traditional methods in colocalization studies for fixed cells and to perform favorably in association studies for live cells.

  13. A novel stopped flow injection-amperometric procedure for the determination of chlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tue-Ngeun, Orawan; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Grudpan, Kate

    2005-12-15

    A novel stopped flow injection-amperometric (sFI-Amp) procedure for determination of chlorate has been developed. The reaction of chlorate with excess potassium iodide and hydrochloric acid, forming iodine/triiodide that is further electrochemically reduced at a glassy carbon electrode at +200mV versus Ag/AgCl electrode is employed. In order to increase sensitivity without using of too high acid concentration, promoting of the reaction by increasing reaction time and temperature can be carried out. This can be done without increase of dispersion of the product zone by stopping the flow while the injected zone is being in a mixing coil which is immersed in a water bath of 55+/-0.5 degrees C. In a closed system of FIA, a side reaction of oxygen with iodide is also minimized. Under a set of conditions, linear calibration graphs were in the ranges of 1.2x10(-6)-6.0x10(-5)moll(-1)and 6.0x10(-5)-6.0x10(-4)moll(-1). A sample throughput of 25h(-1) was accomplished. Relative standard deviation was 2% (n=21, 1.2x10(-4)moll(-1) chlorate). The proposed sFI-Amp procedure was successfully applied to the determination of chlorate in soil samples from longan plantation area.

  14. Stopped-flow injection spectrophotometric method for determination of chlorate in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroon Jakmunee

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A stopped-flow injection (FI spectrophotometric procedure based on iodometric reaction for the determination of chlorate has been developed. Standard/sample was injected into a stream of potassium iodide solution and then merged with a stream of hydrochloric acid solution to produce triiodide. By stopping the flow while the sample zone is being in a mixing coil, a slow reaction of chlorate with iodide in acidic medium was promoted to proceed with minimal dispersion of the triiodide product zone. When the flow started again, a concentrated product zone was pushed into a flow cell and a signal profile due to light absorption of the product was recorded. Employing a lab-built semi-automatic stopped-FI analyser, the analysis can be performed with higher degree of automation and low chemical consumption. Linear calibration graph in the range of 5-50 mg ClO3- L-1 was obtained, with detection limit of 1.4 mg ClO3- L-1. Relative standard deviation of 2.2% (30 mg ClO3- L-1, n=10 and sample throughput of about 20 h-1 were achieved. The system was applied to soil samples and validated by batch spectrophotometric and standard titrimetric methods.

  15. Determination of myoglobin based on its enzymatic activity by stopped-flow spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi; Liu, Zhihong; Cai, Ruxiu

    2005-04-01

    A new method has been developed for the determination of myoglobin (Mb) based on its enzymatic activity for the oxidation of o-phenylenediamine (OPDA) with hydrogen peroxide. Stopped-flow spectrophotometry was used to study the kinetic behavior of the oxidation reaction. The catalytic activity of Mb was compared to other three kinds of catalyst. The time dependent absorbance of the reaction product, 2,3-diamimophenazine (DAPN), at a wavelength of 426 nm was recorded. The initial reaction rate obtained at 40 °C was found to be proportional to the concentration of Mb in the range of 1.0 × 10 -6 to 4.0 × 10 -9 mol L -1. The detection limit of Mb was found to be 9.93 × 10 -10 mol L -1. The relative standard deviations were within 5% for the determination of different concentrations of Mb. Excess of bovine serum albumin (BSA), Ca(II), Mg(II), Cu(II), glucose, caffeine, lactose and uric acid did not interfere.

  16. Stopped-flow injection method for determination of phosphate in soils and fertilisers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroon Jakmunee

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A stopped-flow injection system for the determination of phosphate has been developed. It involves the phosphate-molybdate-ascorbic acid reactions in the molybdenum blue method. The system is controlled by a semi-automatic stopped-FI analyser with a light emitting diode (LED-colorimeter for monitoring the absorbance change relating to the concentration of a reaction product formed during the stopping period while the injected zone of a standard or sample is being in the flow cell. The slope of the FIAgram obtained is linearly proportional to the reaction rate, which depends on the phosphate concentration. Effects of concentration of reagents, viz. sodium molybdate, ascorbic acid and nitric acid, on the slope of the FIAgram were studied. The suitable concentration is 0.02 M, 0.25 %w/v and 0.15 M, respectively. A linear calibration graph in the range of 0.3-6.0 mg P L-1 was employed for the determination of phosphate in soil and fertiliser samples. The results obtained agree well with those from a standard spectrophotometric method.

  17. Utilization of Stop-flow Micro-tubing Reactors for the Development of Organic Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Ren Wei; Li, Jie Sheng; Wu, Jie

    2018-01-04

    A new reaction screening technology for organic synthesis was recently demonstrated by combining elements from both continuous micro-flow and conventional batch reactors, coined stop-flow micro-tubing (SFMT) reactors. In SFMT, chemical reactions that require high pressure can be screened in parallel through a safer and convenient way. Cross-contamination, which is a common problem in reaction screening for continuous flow reactors, is avoided in SFMT. Moreover, the commercially available light-permeable micro-tubing can be incorporated into SFMT, serving as an excellent choice for light-mediated reactions due to a more effective uniform light exposure, compared to batch reactors. Overall, the SFMT reactor system is similar to continuous flow reactors and more superior than batch reactors for reactions that incorporate gas reagents and/or require light-illumination, which enables a simple but highly efficient reaction screening system. Furthermore, any successfully developed reaction in the SFMT reactor system can be conveniently translated to continuous-flow synthesis for large scale production.

  18. Quantitative fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy in turbid media: comparison of theoretical, experimental and computational methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishwanath, Karthik; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Pogue, Brian

    2002-01-01

    A Monte Carlo model developed to simulate time-resolved fluorescence propagation in a semi-infinite turbid medium was validated against previously reported theoretical and computational results. Model simulations were compared to experimental measurements of fluorescence spectra and lifetimes on tissue-simulating phantoms for single and dual fibre-optic probe geometries. Experiments and simulations using a single probe revealed that scattering-induced artefacts appeared in fluorescence emission spectra, while fluorescence lifetimes were unchanged. Although fluorescence lifetime measurements are generally more robust to scattering artefacts than are measurements of fluorescence spectra, in the dual-probe geometry scattering-induced changes in apparent lifetime were predicted both from diffusion theory and via Monte Carlo simulation, as well as measured experimentally. In all cases, the recovered apparent lifetime increased with increasing scattering and increasing source-detector separation. Diffusion theory consistently underestimated the magnitude of these increases in apparent lifetime (predicting a maximum increase of ∼15%), while Monte Carlo simulations and experiment were closely matched (showing increases as large as 30%). These results indicate that quantitative simulations of time-resolved fluorescence propagation in turbid media will be important for accurate recovery of fluorophore lifetimes in biological spectroscopy and imaging applications. (author)

  19. Quantitative analysis by X-ray fluorescence using first principles for matrix correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulett, L.D.; Dunn, H.W.; Tarter, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    The quantitative interpretation of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) data is often difficult because of matrix effects. The intensity of fluorescence measured for a given element is not only dependent on the element's concentration, but also on the mass absorption coefficients of the sample for the excitation and fluorescence radiation. Also, there are interelement effects in which high-energy fluorescence from heavier elements is absorbed by lighter elements with a resulting enhancement of their fluorescence. Recent theoretical treatments of this problem have shown that X-ray fluorescence data can be corrected for these matrix effects by calculations based on first principles. Fundamental constants, available in atomic physics data tables, are the only parameters needed. It is not necessary to make empirical calibrations. The application of this correctional procedure to alloys and alumina-supported catalysts is described. A description is given of a low-background spectrometer which uses monochromatic Ag Ksub(α) radiation for excitation. Matrix corrections by first principles can be easily applied to data from instruments of this type because fluorescence excitation cross-sections and mass absorption coefficients can be accurately defined for monochromatic radiation. (author)

  20. Quantitative schemes in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence implemented in AXIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchantchane, A.; Benamar, M.A.; Tobbeche, S.

    1995-01-01

    E.D.X.R.F (Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence) has long been used for quantitative analysis of many types of samples including environment samples. the software package AXIL (Analysis of x-ray spectra by iterative least quares) is extensively used for the spectra analysis and the quantification of x-ray spectra. It includes several methods of quantitative schemes for evaluating element concentrations. We present the general theory behind each scheme implemented into the software package. The spectra of the performance of each of these quantitative schemes. We have also investigated their performance relative to the uncertainties in the experimental parameters and sample description

  1. Single particle transfer for quantitative analysis with total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Esaka, Konomi T.; Magara, Masaaki; Sakurai, Satoshi; Usuda, Shigekazu; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    The technique of single particle transfer was applied to quantitative analysis with total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry. The technique was evaluated by performing quantitative analysis of individual Cu particles with diameters between 3.9 and 13.2 μm. The direct quantitative analysis of the Cu particle transferred onto a Si carrier gave a discrepancy between measured and calculated Cu amounts due to the absorption effects of incident and fluorescent X-rays within the particle. By the correction for the absorption effects, the Cu amounts in individual particles could be determined with the deviation within 10.5%. When the Cu particles were dissolved with HNO 3 solution prior to the TXRF analysis, the deviation was improved to be within 3.8%. In this case, no correction for the absorption effects was needed for quantification

  2. Fluorescence reporters for Hfq oligomerization and RNA annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panja, Subrata; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for detecting protein-protein, protein-RNA and RNA-RNA interactions, requiring only nanomolar concentrations of labeled components. Fluorescence anisotropy provides information about the assembly of multi-subunit proteins, while molecular beacons provide a sensitive and quantitative reporter for base pairing between complementary RNAs. Here we present a detailed protocol for labeling Hfq protein with cyanine 3-maleimide and dansyl chloride to study the protein oligomerization and RNA binding by semi-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and fluorescence anisotropy. We also present a detailed protocol for measuring the rate of annealing between a molecular beacon and a target RNA in the presence of Hfq using a stopped-flow spectrometer. PMID:25579597

  3. Quantitative generalized ratiometric fluorescence spectroscopy for turbid media based on probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Xiu-Fang; Chen, Zeng-Ping; Cui, Yin-Yin; Hu, Yuan-Liang; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-01-01

    PEBBLE (probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding) nanosensor encapsulating an intensity-based fluorescence indicator and an inert reference fluorescence dye inside the pores of stable matrix can be used as a generalized wavelength-ratiometric probe. However, the lack of an efficient quantitative model render the choices of inert reference dyes and intensity-based fluorescence indicators used in PEBBLEs based generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes rather limited. In this contribution, an extended quantitative fluorescence model was derived specifically for generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes based on PEBBLE technique (QFM GRP ) with a view to simplify the design of PEBBLEs and hence further extend their application potentials. The effectiveness of QFM GRP has been tested on the quantitative determination of free Ca 2+ in both simulated and real turbid media using a Ca 2+ sensitive PEBBLE nanosensor encapsulating Rhod-2 and eosin B inside the micropores of stable polyacrylamide matrix. Experimental results demonstrated that QFM GRP could realize precise and accurate quantification of free Ca 2+ in turbid samples, even though there is serious overlapping between the fluorescence excitation peaks of eosin B and Ca 2+ bound Rhod-2. The average relative predictive error value of QFM GRP for the test simulated turbid samples was 5.9%, about 2–4 times lower than the corresponding values of partial least squares calibration model and the empirical ratiometric model based on the ratio of fluorescence intensities at the excitation peaks of Ca 2+ bound Rhod-2 and eosin B. The recovery rates of QFM GRP for the real and spiked turbid samples varied from 93.1% to 101%, comparable to the corresponding results of atomic absorption spectrometry. - Highlights: • An advanced model was derived for generalized wavelength-ratiometric PEBBLEs. • The model can simplify the design of generalized wavelength-ratiometric PEBBLEs. • The model realized accurate

  4. Real-time label-free quantitative fluorescence microscopy-based detection of ATP using a tunable fluorescent nano-aptasensor platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Sajal; Sohn, Il-Yung; Son, Young-Min; Lee, Won-Il; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2015-12-14

    Although real-time label-free fluorescent aptasensors based on nanomaterials are increasingly recognized as a useful strategy for the detection of target biomolecules with high fidelity, the lack of an imaging-based quantitative measurement platform limits their implementation with biological samples. Here we introduce an ensemble strategy for a real-time label-free fluorescent graphene (Gr) aptasensor platform. This platform employs aptamer length-dependent tunability, thus enabling the reagentless quantitative detection of biomolecules through computational processing coupled with real-time fluorescence imaging data. We demonstrate that this strategy effectively delivers dose-dependent quantitative readouts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) Gr and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) surfaces, thereby providing cytotoxicity assessment. Compared with conventional fluorescence spectrometry methods, our highly efficient, universally applicable, and rational approach will facilitate broader implementation of imaging-based biosensing platforms for the quantitative evaluation of a range of target molecules.

  5. Real-time label-free quantitative fluorescence microscopy-based detection of ATP using a tunable fluorescent nano-aptasensor platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Sajal; Sohn, Il-Yung; Son, Young-Min; Lee, Won-Il; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2015-11-01

    Although real-time label-free fluorescent aptasensors based on nanomaterials are increasingly recognized as a useful strategy for the detection of target biomolecules with high fidelity, the lack of an imaging-based quantitative measurement platform limits their implementation with biological samples. Here we introduce an ensemble strategy for a real-time label-free fluorescent graphene (Gr) aptasensor platform. This platform employs aptamer length-dependent tunability, thus enabling the reagentless quantitative detection of biomolecules through computational processing coupled with real-time fluorescence imaging data. We demonstrate that this strategy effectively delivers dose-dependent quantitative readouts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) Gr and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) surfaces, thereby providing cytotoxicity assessment. Compared with conventional fluorescence spectrometry methods, our highly efficient, universally applicable, and rational approach will facilitate broader implementation of imaging-based biosensing platforms for the quantitative evaluation of a range of target molecules.Although real-time label-free fluorescent aptasensors based on nanomaterials are increasingly recognized as a useful strategy for the detection of target biomolecules with high fidelity, the lack of an imaging-based quantitative measurement platform limits their implementation with biological samples. Here we introduce an ensemble strategy for a real-time label-free fluorescent graphene (Gr) aptasensor platform. This platform employs aptamer length-dependent tunability, thus enabling the reagentless quantitative detection of biomolecules through computational processing coupled with real-time fluorescence imaging data. We demonstrate that this strategy effectively delivers dose-dependent quantitative readouts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) Gr and reduced graphene oxide (r

  6. Nonmydriatic fluorescence-based quantitative imaging of human macular pigment distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Bernstein, Paul S.; Gellermann, Werner

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a CCD-camera-based nonmydriatic instrument that detects fluorescence from retinal lipofuscin chromophores ("autofluorescence") as a means to indirectly quantify and spatially image the distribution of macular pigment (MP). The lipofuscin fluorescence intensity is reduced at all retinal locations containing MP, since MP has a competing absorption in the blue-green wavelength region. Projecting a large diameter, 488 nm excitation spot onto the retina, centered on the fovea, but extending into the macular periphery, and comparing lipofuscin fluorescence intensities outside and inside the foveal area, it is possible to spatially map out the distribution of MP. Spectrally selective detection of the lipofuscin fluorescence reveals an important wavelength dependence of the obtainable image contrast and deduced MP optical density levels, showing that it is important to block out interfering fluorescence contributions in the detection setup originating from ocular media such as the lens. Measuring 70 healthy human volunteer subjects with no ocular pathologies, we find widely varying spatial extent of MP, distinctly differing distribution patterns of MP, and strongly differing absolute MP levels among individuals. Our population study suggests that MP imaging based on lipofuscin fluorescence is useful as a relatively simple, objective, and quantitative noninvasive optical technique suitable to rapidly screen MP levels and distributions in healthy humans with undilated pupils.

  7. Quantitative segmentation of fluorescence microscopy images of heterogeneous tissue: Approach for tuning algorithm parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jenna L.; Harmany, Zachary T.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Kennedy, Stephanie A.; Kim, Yongbaek; Dodd, Leslie; Geradts, Joseph; Kirsch, David G.; Willett, Rebecca M.; Brown, J. Quincy; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2013-02-01

    The combination of fluorescent contrast agents with microscopy is a powerful technique to obtain real time images of tissue histology without the need for fixing, sectioning, and staining. The potential of this technology lies in the identification of robust methods for image segmentation and quantitation, particularly in heterogeneous tissues. Our solution is to apply sparse decomposition (SD) to monochrome images of fluorescently-stained microanatomy to segment and quantify distinct tissue types. The clinical utility of our approach is demonstrated by imaging excised margins in a cohort of mice after surgical resection of a sarcoma. Representative images of excised margins were used to optimize the formulation of SD and tune parameters associated with the algorithm. Our results demonstrate that SD is a robust solution that can advance vital fluorescence microscopy as a clinically significant technology.

  8. Quantitative method to assess caries via fluorescence imaging from the perspective of autofluorescence spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Q G; Xu, Y; Zhu, H H; Chen, H; Lin, B

    2015-01-01

    A quantitative method to discriminate caries lesions for a fluorescence imaging system is proposed in this paper. The autofluorescence spectral investigation of 39 teeth samples classified by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System levels was performed at 405 nm excitation. The major differences in the different caries lesions focused on the relative spectral intensity range of 565–750 nm. The spectral parameter, defined as the ratio of wavebands at 565–750 nm to the whole spectral range, was calculated. The image component ratio R/(G + B) of color components was statistically computed by considering the spectral parameters (e.g. autofluorescence, optical filter, and spectral sensitivity) in our fluorescence color imaging system. Results showed that the spectral parameter and image component ratio presented a linear relation. Therefore, the image component ratio was graded as <0.66, 0.66–1.06, 1.06–1.62, and >1.62 to quantitatively classify sound, early decay, established decay, and severe decay tissues, respectively. Finally, the fluorescence images of caries were experimentally obtained, and the corresponding image component ratio distribution was compared with the classification result. A method to determine the numerical grades of caries using a fluorescence imaging system was proposed. This method can be applied to similar imaging systems. (paper)

  9. Quantitative method to assess caries via fluorescence imaging from the perspective of autofluorescence spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Xu, Y.; Lin, B.; Chen, H.

    2015-08-01

    A quantitative method to discriminate caries lesions for a fluorescence imaging system is proposed in this paper. The autofluorescence spectral investigation of 39 teeth samples classified by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System levels was performed at 405 nm excitation. The major differences in the different caries lesions focused on the relative spectral intensity range of 565-750 nm. The spectral parameter, defined as the ratio of wavebands at 565-750 nm to the whole spectral range, was calculated. The image component ratio R/(G + B) of color components was statistically computed by considering the spectral parameters (e.g. autofluorescence, optical filter, and spectral sensitivity) in our fluorescence color imaging system. Results showed that the spectral parameter and image component ratio presented a linear relation. Therefore, the image component ratio was graded as 1.62 to quantitatively classify sound, early decay, established decay, and severe decay tissues, respectively. Finally, the fluorescence images of caries were experimentally obtained, and the corresponding image component ratio distribution was compared with the classification result. A method to determine the numerical grades of caries using a fluorescence imaging system was proposed. This method can be applied to similar imaging systems.

  10. Detection of Colorectal Cancer by a Quantitative Fluorescence Determination of DNA Amplification in Stool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Calistri

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA amplification of exfoliated cells in stool repre sents an inexpensive and rapid test, but has only 50% to 60% sensitivity. A new quantitative method, calle( fluorescence long DNA, was developed and validate( in our laboratory on stool obtained from 86 patient., with primary colorectal cancer and from 62 health individuals. It consists of the amplification of stoo DNA with fluorescence primers and the quantification of the amplification using a standard curve. Results are arbitrarily expressed in nanograms. The potential of thi new method compared to the conventional approact was analyzed in a subgroup of 94 individuals (51 patients and 38 healthy volunteers. In the presen series, DNA amplification analysis showed a specific ity of 97% and a sensitivity of only 50%. Conversely fluorescence DNA evaluation, using the best cutoff o 25 ng, showed a sensitivity of about 76% and a spec ificity of 93%. Similar sensitivity was observed regard less of Dukes stage, tumor location, and size, thu., also permitting the detection of early-stage tumors The present study seems to indicate that quantitative fluorescence DNA determination in stool successfully identifies colorectal cancer patients with a sensitivity comparable, if not superior, to that of multiple gene analysis but at a lower cost and in a shorter time.

  11. Quantitative performance characterization of three-dimensional noncontact fluorescence molecular tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favicchio, Rosy; Psycharakis, Stylianos; Schönig, Kai; Bartsch, Dusan; Mamalaki, Clio; Papamatheakis, Joseph; Ripoll, Jorge; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins and dyes are routine tools for biological research to describe the behavior of genes, proteins, and cells, as well as more complex physiological dynamics such as vessel permeability and pharmacokinetics. The use of these probes in whole body in vivo imaging would allow extending the range and scope of current biomedical applications and would be of great interest. In order to comply with a wide variety of application demands, in vivo imaging platform requirements span from wide spectral coverage to precise quantification capabilities. Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) detects and reconstructs in three dimensions the distribution of a fluorophore in vivo. Noncontact FMT allows fast scanning of an excitation source and noninvasive measurement of emitted fluorescent light using a virtual array detector operating in free space. Here, a rigorous process is defined that fully characterizes the performance of a custom-built horizontal noncontact FMT setup. Dynamic range, sensitivity, and quantitative accuracy across the visible spectrum were evaluated using fluorophores with emissions between 520 and 660 nm. These results demonstrate that high-performance quantitative three-dimensional visible light FMT allowed the detection of challenging mesenteric lymph nodes in vivo and the comparison of spectrally distinct fluorescent reporters in cell culture.

  12. Tools for the quantitative analysis of sedimentation boundaries detected by fluorescence optical analytical ultracentrifugation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaying Zhao

    Full Text Available Fluorescence optical detection in sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation allows the study of macromolecules at nanomolar concentrations and below. This has significant promise, for example, for the study of systems of high-affinity protein interactions. Here we describe adaptations of the direct boundary modeling analysis approach implemented in the software SEDFIT that were developed to accommodate unique characteristics of the confocal fluorescence detection system. These include spatial gradients of signal intensity due to scanner movements out of the plane of rotation, temporal intensity drifts due to instability of the laser and fluorophores, and masking of the finite excitation and detection cone by the sample holder. In an extensive series of experiments with enhanced green fluorescent protein ranging from low nanomolar to low micromolar concentrations, we show that the experimental data provide sufficient information to determine the parameters required for first-order approximation of the impact of these effects on the recorded data. Systematic deviations of fluorescence optical sedimentation velocity data analyzed using conventional sedimentation models developed for absorbance and interference optics are largely removed after these adaptations, resulting in excellent fits that highlight the high precision of fluorescence sedimentation velocity data, thus allowing a more detailed quantitative interpretation of the signal boundaries that is otherwise not possible for this system.

  13. Quantitative Fluorescence Sensing Through Highly Autofluorescent, Scattering, and Absorbing Media Using Mobile Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Göröcs, Zoltán

    2016-09-13

    Compact and cost-effective systems for in vivo fluorescence and near-infrared imaging in combination with activatable reporters embedded inside the skin to sample interstitial fluid or blood can enable a variety of biomedical applications. However, the strong autofluorescence of human skin creates an obstacle for fluorescence-based sensing. Here we introduce a method for quantitative fluorescence sensing through highly autofluorescent, scattering, and absorbing media. For this, we created a compact and cost-effective fluorescence microscope weighing <40 g and used it to measure various concentrations of a fluorescent dye embedded inside a tissue phantom, which was designed to mimic the optical characteristics of human skin. We used an elliptical Gaussian beam excitation to digitally separate tissue autofluorescence from target fluorescence, although they severely overlap in both space and optical spectrum. Using ∼10-fold less excitation intensity than the safety limit for skin radiation exposure, we successfully quantified the density of the embedded fluorophores by imaging the skin phantom surface and achieved a detection limit of ∼5 × 105 and ∼2.5 × 107 fluorophores within ∼0.01 μL sample volume that is positioned 0.5 and 2 mm below the phantom surface, corresponding to a concentration of 105.9 pg/mL and 5.3 ng/mL, respectively. We also confirmed that this approach can track the spatial misalignments of the mobile microscope with respect to the embedded target fluorescent volume. This wearable microscopy platform might be useful for designing implantable biochemical sensors with the capability of spatial multiplexing to continuously monitor a panel of biomarkers and chronic conditions even at patients’ home.

  14. Quantitative Fluorescence Sensing Through Highly Autofluorescent, Scattering, and Absorbing Media Using Mobile Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Gö rö cs, Zoltá n; Rivenson, Yair; Ceylan Koydemir, Hatice; Tseng, Derek; Troy, Tamara L.; Demas, Vasiliki; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    Compact and cost-effective systems for in vivo fluorescence and near-infrared imaging in combination with activatable reporters embedded inside the skin to sample interstitial fluid or blood can enable a variety of biomedical applications. However, the strong autofluorescence of human skin creates an obstacle for fluorescence-based sensing. Here we introduce a method for quantitative fluorescence sensing through highly autofluorescent, scattering, and absorbing media. For this, we created a compact and cost-effective fluorescence microscope weighing <40 g and used it to measure various concentrations of a fluorescent dye embedded inside a tissue phantom, which was designed to mimic the optical characteristics of human skin. We used an elliptical Gaussian beam excitation to digitally separate tissue autofluorescence from target fluorescence, although they severely overlap in both space and optical spectrum. Using ∼10-fold less excitation intensity than the safety limit for skin radiation exposure, we successfully quantified the density of the embedded fluorophores by imaging the skin phantom surface and achieved a detection limit of ∼5 × 105 and ∼2.5 × 107 fluorophores within ∼0.01 μL sample volume that is positioned 0.5 and 2 mm below the phantom surface, corresponding to a concentration of 105.9 pg/mL and 5.3 ng/mL, respectively. We also confirmed that this approach can track the spatial misalignments of the mobile microscope with respect to the embedded target fluorescent volume. This wearable microscopy platform might be useful for designing implantable biochemical sensors with the capability of spatial multiplexing to continuously monitor a panel of biomarkers and chronic conditions even at patients’ home.

  15. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for Advanced Undergraduate Laboratories: Formation of Iron(III) Thiocyannate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charles R.

    1997-10-01

    A series of 15 stopped-flow kinetic experiments relating to the formation of iron(III)- thiocyanate at 25.0 °C and I = 1.0 M (NaClO4) is described. A methodology is given whereby solution preparation and data collection are able to be carried out within the time scale of a single laboratory period (3-4 h). Kinetic data are obtained using constant [SCN-], and at three H+ concentrations (0.10, 0.20, 0.30 M) for varying concentrations of Fe3+ (ca. 0.0025 - 0.020 M). Rate data (450 nm) are consistent with rate laws for the forward and reverse reactions: kf = (k1 + k2Ka1/[H+])[Fe3+] and kr = k-1 + k-2Ka2/[H+] respectively, with k1,k-1 corresponding to the rate constants for formation and decay of FeSCN2+, k2, k-2 to the rate constants for formation and decay of the FeSCN(OH)+ ion and Ka1,Ka2 to the acid dissociation constants (coordinated OH2 ionization) of Fe3+ and FeSCN2+. Using literature values for the latter two quantities ( Ka1 = 2.04 x 10-3 M, Ka2 = 6.5 x 10-5 M) allows values for the four rate constants to be obtained. A typical data set is analyzed to give k1 = 109(10) M-1s-1, k-1 = 0.79(0.10) s-1, k2= 8020(800) M-1s-1, k-2 = 2630(230) s-1. Absorbance change data for reaction (DeltaA) follow the expression: DeltaA = Alim.Kf.[Fe3+]/(1 + Kf.[Fe3+]), with Alim corresponding to the absorbance of fully formed FeSCN2+ (i.e. free SCN- absent) and Kf to the formation constant of this complex (value in the example 112(5) M-1, c.f. 138(29) M-1 from the kinetic data).

  16. Quantitative frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy in tissues and tissue-like media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert Edward

    1999-09-01

    In the never-ending quest for improved medical technology at lower cost, modern near-infrared optical spectroscopy offers the possibility of inexpensive technology for quantitative and non-invasive diagnoses. Hemoglobin is the dominant chromophore in the 700-900 nm spectral region and as such it allows for the optical assessment of hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygenation by absorption spectroscopy. However, there are many other important physiologically relevant compounds or physiological states that cannot be effectively sensed via optical methods because of poor optical contrast. In such cases, contrast enhancements are required. Fluorescence spectroscopy is an attractive component of optical tissue spectroscopy. Exogenous fluorophores, as well as some endogenous ones, may furnish the desperately needed sensitivity and specificity that is lacking in near-infrared optical tissue spectroscopy. The main focus of this thesis was to investigate the generation and propagation of fluorescence photons inside tissues and tissue-like media (i.e., scattering dominated media). The standard concepts of fluorescence spectroscopy have been incorporated into a diffusion-based picture that is sometimes referred to as photon migration. The novelty of this work lies in the successful quantitative recovery of fluorescence lifetimes, absolute fluorescence quantum yields, fluorophore concentrations, emission spectra, and both scattering and absorption coefficients at the emission wavelength from a tissue-like medium. All of these parameters are sensitive to the fluorophore local environment and hence are indicators of the tissue's physiological state. One application demonstrating the capabilities of frequency-domain lifetime spectroscopy in tissue-like media is a study of the binding of ethidium bromide to bovine leukocytes in fresh milk. Ethidium bromide is a fluorescent dye that is commonly used to label DNA, and hence visualize chromosomes in cells. The lifetime of

  17. Visualization of plant viral suppressor silencing activity in intact leaf lamina by quantitative fluorescent imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Kevin P

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient expression of proteins in plants has become a favoured method over the production of stably transformed plants because, in addition to enabling high protein yields, it is both fast and easy to apply. An enhancement of transient protein expression can be achieved by plant virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressor proteins. Since viral suppressor proteins differ in their efficiency to enhance transient protein expression in plants, we developed a whole-leaf green fluorescent protein (GFP-based imaging assay to quantitatively assess suppressor protein activity. Results In a transient GFP-expression assay using wild-type and GFP-transgenic N. benthamiana, addition of the plant viral suppressors Beet mild yellowing virus (BMYV-IPP P0 or Plum pox virus (PPV HC-Pro was shown to increase fluorescent protein expression 3-4-fold, 7 days post inoculation (dpi when compared to control plants. In contrast, in agroinfiltrated patches without suppressor activity, near complete silencing of the GFP transgene was observed in the transgenic N. benthamiana at 21 dpi. Both co-infiltrated suppressors significantly enhanced GFP expression over time, with HC-Pro co-infiltrations leading to higher short term GFP fluorescence (at 7 dpi and P0 giving higher long term GFP fluorescence (at 21 dpi. Additionally, in contrast to HC-Pro co-infiltrations, an area of complete GFP silencing was observed at the edge of P0 co-infiltrated areas. Conclusions Fluorescence imaging of whole intact leaves proved to be an easy and effective method for spatially and quantitatively observing viral suppressor efficiency in plants. This suppressor assay demonstrates that plant viral suppressors greatly enhanced transient GFP expression, with P0 showing a more prolonged suppressor activity over time than HC-Pro. Both suppressors could prove to be ideal candidates for enhancing target protein expression in plants.

  18. Quantitative X ray analysis system. User's manual and guide to X ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This guide covers trimmed and re-arranged version 3.6 of the Quantitative X ray Analysis System (QXAS) software package that includes the most frequently used methods of quantitative analysis. QXAS is a comprehensive quantitative analysis package that has been developed by the IAEA through research and technical contracts. Additional development has also been carried out in the IAEA Laboratories in Seibersdorf where QXAS was extensively tested. New in this version of the manual are the descriptions of the Voigt-profile peak fitting, the backscatter fundamental parameters' and emission-transmission methods of chemical composition analysis, an expanded chapter on the X ray fluorescence physics, and completely revised and increased number of practical examples of utilization of the QXAS software package. The analytical data accompanying this manual were collected in the IAEA Seibersdorf Laboratories in the years 2006/2007

  19. Use of quantitative light-induced fluorescence to monitor tooth whitening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.; Higham, Susan M.

    2001-04-01

    The changing of tooth shade by whitening agents occurs gradually. Apart from being subjective and affected by the conditions of the surroundings, visual observation cannot detect a very slight change in tooth color. An electronic method, which can communicate the color change quantitatively, would be more reliable. Quantitative Light- induced Fluorescence (QLF) was developed to detect and assess dental caries based on the phenomenon of change of autofluorescence of a tooth by demineralization. However, stains on the tooth surface exhibit the same phenomenon, and therefore QLF can be used to measure the percentage fluorescence change of stained enamel with respect to surrounding unstained enamel. The present study described a technique of assessing the effect of a tooth-whitening agent using QLF. This was demonstrated in two experiments in which either wholly or partially stained teeth were whitened by intermittent immersion in sodium hypochlorite. Following each immersion, the integrated fluorescence change due to the stain was quantified using QLF. In either situation, the value of (Delta) Q decreased linearly as the tooth regained its natural shade. It was concluded that gradual changing of the shade of discolored teeth by a whitening agent could be quantified using QLF.

  20. Quantitative nitric oxide measurements by means of laser-induced fluorescence in a heavy-duty Diesel engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbiezen, K.; Vliet, van A.P.; Klein-Douwel, R.J.H.; Ganippa, L.C.; Bougie, H.J.T.; Meerts, W.L.; Dam, N.J.; Meulen, ter J.J.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative in-cylinder laser-induced fluorescence measurements ofnitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine are presented. Special attention is paid to experimental techniques to assess the attenuation of the laser beam and the fluorescence signal by the cylinder contents.This attenuation can be

  1. Quantitative comparison of X-ray fluorescence microtomography setups: Standard and confocal collimator apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chukalina, M. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, 142432, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: marina@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru; Simionovici, A. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, University of Grenoble, BP 53, 38041, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: alexandre.simionovici@ujf-grenoble.fr; Zaitsev, S. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, 142432, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: zaitsev@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru; Vanegas, C.J. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, 142432, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vanegas@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru

    2007-07-15

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest for fluorescence spectroscopy, as provided by modern setups which allow 2D and 3D imaging of elemental distributions. Two directions are currently under development: the SR-based fluorescence tomography in polar scanning geometry, provided by the new generation of X-ray microprobes and the confocal scanning geometry, which can be fielded in both SR and laboratory environments. The new probes bring forth a new age in fluorescence spectrometry: high resolution, high intensity and high sensitivity which allow 3D elemental mapping of volumes. The major task now is the development of these complex tools into fully quantitative probes, reproducible and straightforward for general use. In this work we analyze two X-ray fluorescence microtomography techniques: an apparatus tomography using a confocal collimator for the data collection and a standard first generation Computed Tomography (CT) in the parallel scanning scheme. We calculate the deposited dose (amount of energy deposited and distributed in the sample during the data collection time) and find the conditions for the choice of the tomography scheme.

  2. Segmentation-based retrospective shading correction in fluorescence microscopy E. coli images for quantitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Fei; Chang, Chunqi; Liu, Wenqing; Xu, Weichao; Hung, Yeung S.

    2009-10-01

    Due to the inherent imperfections in the imaging process, fluorescence microscopy images often suffer from spurious intensity variations, which is usually referred to as intensity inhomogeneity, intensity non uniformity, shading or bias field. In this paper, a retrospective shading correction method for fluorescence microscopy Escherichia coli (E. Coli) images is proposed based on segmentation result. Segmentation and shading correction are coupled together, so we iteratively correct the shading effects based on segmentation result and refine the segmentation by segmenting the image after shading correction. A fluorescence microscopy E. Coli image can be segmented (based on its intensity value) into two classes: the background and the cells, where the intensity variation within each class is close to zero if there is no shading. Therefore, we make use of this characteristics to correct the shading in each iteration. Shading is mathematically modeled as a multiplicative component and an additive noise component. The additive component is removed by a denoising process, and the multiplicative component is estimated using a fast algorithm to minimize the intra-class intensity variation. We tested our method on synthetic images and real fluorescence E.coli images. It works well not only for visual inspection, but also for numerical evaluation. Our proposed method should be useful for further quantitative analysis especially for protein expression value comparison.

  3. Quantitative analysis of essential oils of Thymus daenensis using laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshroo, H; Khadem, H; Bahreini, M; Tavassoli, S H; Hadian, J

    2015-11-10

    Laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy are used for the investigation of different genotypes of Thymus daenensis native to the Ilam province of Iran. Different genotypes of T. daenensis essential oils, labeled T1 through T7, possess slight differences with regard to the composition of the thymol. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method is performed to determine the concentration of each constituent as a reference method. The Raman spectra of different concentrations of pure thymol dissolved in hexane as standard samples are obtained via a laboratory prototype Raman spectroscopy setup for the calculation of the calibration curve. The regression coefficient and limit of detection are calculated. The possibility of the differentiation of different genotypes of T. daenensis is also examined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, although we do not know the exact amounts of their components. All the fluorescence spectral information is used jointly by cluster analysis to differentiate between 7 genotypes. Our results demonstrate the acceptable precision of Raman spectroscopy with GC-MS and corroborate the capacity of Raman spectroscopy in applications in the quantitative analysis field. Furthermore, the cluster analysis results show that laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy is an acceptable technique for the rapid classification of different genotypes of T. daenensis without having any previous information of their exact amount of constituents. So, the ability to rapidly and nondestructively differentiate between genotypes makes it possible to efficiently select high-quality herbs from many samples.

  4. Evaluation of dental enamel caries assessment using Quantitative Light Induced Fluorescence and Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Marly Araújo; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi; de L Campello, Sergio; Gomes, Anderson Stevens Leônidas; Karlsson, Lena

    2016-06-01

    An in vitro study of morphological alterations between sound dental structure and artificially induced white spot lesions in human teeth, was performed through the loss of fluorescence by Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF) and the alterations of the light attenuation coefficient by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). To analyze the OCT images using a commercially available system, a special algorithm was applied, whereas the QLF images were analyzed using the software available in the commercial system employed. When analyzing the sound region against white spot lesions region by QLF, a reduction in the fluorescence intensity was observed, whilst an increase of light attenuation by the OCT system occurred. Comparison of the percentage of alteration between optical properties of sound and artificial enamel caries regions showed that OCT processed images through the attenuation of light enhanced the tooth optical alterations more than fluorescence detected by QLF System. QLF versus OCT imaging of enamel caries: a photonics assessment. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Synovitis in mice with inflammatory arthritis monitored with quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced NIR fluorescence imaging using iRGD-targeted liposomes as fluorescence probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu H

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hao Wu,1,2,* Haohan Wu,1,2,* Yanni He,1 Zhen Gan,2 Zhili Xu,1,2 Meijun Zhou,1,2 Sai Liu,1,2 Hongmei Liu1 1Department of Ultrasonography, Guangdong Second Provincial General Hospital Affiliated to Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China; 2Department of Ultrasonography, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a common inflammatory disorder characterized primarily by synovitis and pannus formation in multiple joints, causing joints destruction and irreversible disability in most cases. Early diagnosis and effective therapy monitoring of RA are of importance for achieving the favorable prognosis. Methods: We first prepared the targeted fluorescence probes, and then explored the feasibility of near-infrared (NIR fluorescence molecular imaging to detect and evaluate the RA via the targeted fluorescence probes by quantitative analysis in this study. Results: The targeted fluorescence probes (indocyanine green-liposomes decorated with iRGD peptide [iLPs] was successfully prepared. The quantitative analysis found that strong fluorescence signal was detected in inflamed paws and the fluorescence signal in iLPs group was 3.03-fold higher than that in non-targeted (indocyanine green-liposomes decorated without iRGD peptide [LPs] group (P<0.01 at 15 min after injection, whereas the fluorescence signal from iLPs signal can almost not be observed in the non-inflamed paws, showing the high sensitivity and accuracy for arthritis by the NIR fluorescence imaging based on iLPs. Conclusion: The NIR fluorescence imaging by iLPs may facilitate improved arthritis diagnosis and early assessment of the disease progression by providing an in vivo characterization of angiogenesis in inflammatory joint diseases. Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, synovitis, diagnosis, near-infrared fluorescence imaging, iRGD-targeted probes

  6. Determination of tartrazine in beverage samples by stopped-flow analysis and three-way multivariate calibration of non-linear kinetic-spectrophotometric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenone, Agustina V; Culzoni, María J; Marsili, Nilda R; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2013-06-01

    The performance of MCR-ALS was studied in the modeling of non-linear kinetic-spectrophotometric data acquired by a stopped-flow system for the quantitation of tartrazine in the presence of brilliant blue and sunset yellow FCF as possible interferents. In the present work, MCR-ALS and U-PCA/RBL were firstly applied to remove the contribution of unexpected components not included in the calibration set. Secondly, a polynomial function was used to model the non-linear data obtained by the implementation of the algorithms. MCR-ALS was the only strategy that allowed the determination of tartrazine in test samples accurately. Therefore, it was applied for the analysis of tartrazine in beverage samples with minimum sample preparation and short analysis time. The proposed method was validated by comparison with a chromatographic procedure published in the literature. Mean recovery values between 98% and 100% and relative errors of prediction values between 4% and 9% were indicative of the good performance of the method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Physical aspects of quantitative particles analysis by X-ray fluorescence and electron microprobe techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowicz, A.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present both physical fundamentals and recent advances in quantitative particles analysis by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and electron microprobe (EPXMA) techniques. A method of correction for the particle-size effect in XRF analysis is described and theoretically evaluated. New atomic number- and absorption correction procedures in EPXMA of individual particles are proposed. The applicability of these two correction methods is evaluated for a wide range of elemental composition, X-ray energy and sample thickness. Also, a theoretical model for composition and thickness dependence of Bremsstrahlung background generated in multielement bulk specimens as well as thin films and particles are presented and experimantally evaluated. Finally, the limitations and further possible improvements in quantitative particles analysis by XFR and EPXMA are discussed. 109 refs. (author)

  8. Quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis at the ESRF ID18F microprobe

    CERN Document Server

    Vekemans, B; Somogyi, A; Drakopoulos, M; Kempenaers, L; Simionovici, A; Adams, F

    2003-01-01

    The new ID18F end-station at the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble (France) is dedicated to sensitive and accurate quantitative micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis at the ppm level with accuracy better than 10% for elements with atomic numbers above 18. For accurate quantitative analysis, given a high level of instrumental stability, major steps are the extraction and conversion of experimental X-ray line intensities into elemental concentrations. For this purpose a two-step quantification approach was adopted. In the first step, the collected XRF spectra are deconvoluted on the basis of a non-linear least-squares fitting algorithm (AXIL). The extracted characteristic line intensities are then used as input for a detailed Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code dedicated to XRF spectroscopy taking into account specific experimental conditions (excitation/detection) as well as sample characteristics (absorption and enhancement effects, sample topology, heterogeneity etc.). The iterative u...

  9. A set of enhanced green fluorescent protein concatemers for quantitative determination of nuclear localization signal strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Jennifer; Thavaraja, Ramya; Giehler, Susanne; Nalaskowski, Marcus M

    2017-09-15

    Regulated transport of proteins between nucleus and cytoplasm is an important process in the eukaryotic cell. In most cases, active nucleo-cytoplasmic protein transport is mediated by nuclear localization signal (NLS) and/or nuclear export signal (NES) motifs. In this study, we developed a set of vectors expressing enhanced GFP (EGFP) concatemers ranging from 2 to 12 subunits (2xEGFP to 12xEGFP) for analysis of NLS strength. As shown by in gel GFP fluorescence analysis and αGFP Western blotting, EGFP concatemers are expressed as fluorescent full-length proteins in eukaryotic cells. As expected, nuclear localization of concatemeric EGFPs decreases with increasing molecular weight. By oligonucleotide ligation this set of EGFP concatemers can be easily fused to NLS motifs. After determination of intracellular localization of EGFP concatemers alone and fused to different NLS motifs we calculated the size of a hypothetic EGFP concatemer showing a defined distribution of EGFP fluorescence between nucleus and cytoplasm (n/c ratio = 2). Clear differences of the size of the hypothetic EGFP concatemer depending on the fused NLS motif were observed. Therefore, we propose to use the size of this hypothetic concatemer as quantitative indicator for comparing strength of different NLS motifs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Water excretion mechanisms of the kidney studied in the rabbit using tritiated water during the stop-flow assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, F.; Amiel, CI.; Falbriard, A.

    1960-01-01

    The pattern of water turnover in the kidney and the mechanisms of water transfer into the urine have been studied in the rabbit using tritiated water as a tracer and the stop-flow technique. The experiments have given the following results: a) During the interruption of the diuresis, the injected tritiated water is completely exchanged with the water of the renal cortex, but the tracer does not reach the deep regions of the kidney, despite the fact that the blood circulation is maintained in these regions; this suggests that the vascular loops of the vasa recta function as a mechanism of water exchange by countercurrent. b) During the osmotic polyuria following the stop-flow period, the concentration gradient of tritiated water inside the kidney diminishes progressively. The concentration of the tracer in the urine is at all time similar to that existing in the deep medulla and the renal papilla and markedly different from that of the cortex or arterial blood. This fact shows that the molecules of water in the urine excreted do not come from either the glomerular filtrate or the convoluted tubules but from the water contained in the deep regions of the kidney. Also these results indicate that the walls of the collecting ducts have a very high permeability to water diffusion. Reprint of a paper published in Revue francaise d'etudes cliniques et biologiques, Vol. IV, no. 8, p. 773-779, 1959 [fr

  11. Quantitative fluorescence loss in photobleaching for analysis of protein transport and aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wüstner Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP is a widely used imaging technique, which provides information about protein dynamics in various cellular regions. In FLIP, a small cellular region is repeatedly illuminated by an intense laser pulse, while images are taken with reduced laser power with a time lag between the bleaches. Despite its popularity, tools are lacking for quantitative analysis of FLIP experiments. Typically, the user defines regions of interest (ROIs for further analysis which is subjective and does not allow for comparing different cells and experimental settings. Results We present two complementary methods to detect and quantify protein transport and aggregation in living cells from FLIP image series. In the first approach, a stretched exponential (StrExp function is fitted to fluorescence loss (FL inside and outside the bleached region. We show by reaction–diffusion simulations, that the StrExp function can describe both, binding/barrier–limited and diffusion-limited FL kinetics. By pixel-wise regression of that function to FL kinetics of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP, we determined in a user-unbiased manner from which cellular regions eGFP can be replenished in the bleached area. Spatial variation in the parameters calculated from the StrExp function allow for detecting diffusion barriers for eGFP in the nucleus and cytoplasm of living cells. Polyglutamine (polyQ disease proteins like mutant huntingtin (mtHtt can form large aggregates called inclusion bodies (IB’s. The second method combines single particle tracking with multi-compartment modelling of FL kinetics in moving IB’s to determine exchange rates of eGFP-tagged mtHtt protein (eGFP-mtHtt between aggregates and the cytoplasm. This method is self-calibrating since it relates the FL inside and outside the bleached regions. It makes it therefore possible to compare release kinetics of eGFP-mtHtt between different cells and

  12. Fluorescent nanodiamonds enable quantitative tracking of human mesenchymal stem cells in miniature pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Long-Jyun; Wu, Meng-Shiue; Hui, Yuen Yung; Chang, Be-Ming; Pan, Lei; Hsu, Pei-Chen; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Huang, Yen-Hua; Ling, Thai-Yen; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2017-03-01

    Cell therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of human diseases. While the first use of cells for therapeutic purposes can be traced to the 19th century, there has been a lack of general and reliable methods to study the biodistribution and associated pharmacokinetics of transplanted cells in various animal models for preclinical evaluation. Here, we present a new platform using albumin-conjugated fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as biocompatible and photostable labels for quantitative tracking of human placenta choriodecidual membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (pcMSCs) in miniature pigs by magnetic modulation. With this background-free detection technique and time-gated fluorescence imaging, we have been able to precisely determine the numbers as well as positions of the transplanted FND-labeled pcMSCs in organs and tissues of the miniature pigs after intravenous administration. The method is applicable to single-cell imaging and quantitative tracking of human stem/progenitor cells in rodents and other animal models as well.

  13. Estimation of the number of fluorescent end-members for quantitative analysis of multispectral FLIM data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Navarro, Omar; Campos-Delgado, Daniel U; Arce-Santana, Edgar R; Maitland, Kristen C; Cheng, Shuna; Jabbour, Joey; Malik, Bilal; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Jo, Javier A

    2014-05-19

    Multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (m-FLIM) can potentially allow identifying the endogenous fluorophores present in biological tissue. Quantitative description of such data requires estimating the number of components in the sample, their characteristic fluorescent decays, and their relative contributions or abundances. Unfortunately, this inverse problem usually requires prior knowledge about the data, which is seldom available in biomedical applications. This work presents a new methodology to estimate the number of potential endogenous fluorophores present in biological tissue samples from time-domain m-FLIM data. Furthermore, a completely blind linear unmixing algorithm is proposed. The method was validated using both synthetic and experimental m-FLIM data. The experimental m-FLIM data include in-vivo measurements from healthy and cancerous hamster cheek-pouch epithelial tissue, and ex-vivo measurements from human coronary atherosclerotic plaques. The analysis of m-FLIM data from in-vivo hamster oral mucosa identified healthy from precancerous lesions, based on the relative concentration of their characteristic fluorophores. The algorithm also provided a better description of atherosclerotic plaques in term of their endogenous fluorophores. These results demonstrate the potential of this methodology to provide quantitative description of tissue biochemical composition.

  14. Noninvasive and Quantitative Assessment of In Vivo Fetomaternal Interface Angiogenesis Using RGD-Based Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Keramidas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a key process for proper placental development and for the success of pregnancy. Although numerous in vitro methods have been developed for the assessment of this process, relatively few reliable in vivo methods are available to evaluate this activity throughout gestation. Here we report an in vivo technique that specifically measures placental neovascularization. The technique is based on the measurement of a fluorescent alpha v beta 3 (αvβ3 integrin-targeting molecule called Angiolone-Alexa-Fluor 700. The αvβ3 integrin is highly expressed by endothelial cells during the neovascularization and by trophoblast cells during their invasion of the maternal decidua. Angiolone was injected to gravid mice at 6.5 and 11.5 days post coitus (dpc. The fluorescence was analyzed one day later at 7.5 and 12.5 dpc, respectively. We demonstrated that (i Angiolone targets αvβ3 protein in the placenta with a strong specificity, (ii this technique is quantitative as the measurement was correlated to the increase of the placental size observed with increasing gestational age, and (iii information on the outcome is possible, as abnormal placentation could be detected early on during gestation. In conclusion, we report the validation of a new noninvasive and quantitative method to assess the placental angiogenic activity, in vivo.

  15. Quantitative monitoring of activity-dependent bulk endocytosis of synaptic vesicle membrane by fluorescent dextran imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Emma Louise; Cousin, Michael Alan

    2012-01-01

    Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) retrieval mode in central nerve terminals during periods of intense neuronal activity. Despite this fact there are very few real time assays that report the activity of this critical SV retrieval mode. In this paper we report a simple and quantitative assay of ADBE using uptake of large flourescent dextrans as fluid phase markers. We show that almost all dextran uptake occurs in nerve terminals, using co-localisation with the fluorescent probe FM1-43. We also demonstrate that accumulated dextran cannot be unloaded by neuronal stimulation, indicating its specific loading into bulk endosomes and not SVs. Quantification of dextran uptake was achieved by using thresholding analysis to count the number of loaded nerve terminals, since monitoring the average fluorescence intensity of these nerve terminals did not accurately report the extent of ADBE. Using this analysis we showed that dextran uptake occurs very soon after stimulation and that it does not persist when stimulation terminates. Thus we have devised a simple and quantitative method to monitor ADBE in living neurones, which will be ideal for real time screening of small molecule inhibitors of this key SV retrieval mode. PMID:19766140

  16. Automated image analysis for quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization with environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Pons, Marie Noëlle; Raskin, Lutgarde; Zilles, Julie L

    2007-05-01

    When fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses are performed with complex environmental samples, difficulties related to the presence of microbial cell aggregates and nonuniform background fluorescence are often encountered. The objective of this study was to develop a robust and automated quantitative FISH method for complex environmental samples, such as manure and soil. The method and duration of sample dispersion were optimized to reduce the interference of cell aggregates. An automated image analysis program that detects cells from 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) micrographs and extracts the maximum and mean fluorescence intensities for each cell from corresponding FISH images was developed with the software Visilog. Intensity thresholds were not consistent even for duplicate analyses, so alternative ways of classifying signals were investigated. In the resulting method, the intensity data were divided into clusters using fuzzy c-means clustering, and the resulting clusters were classified as target (positive) or nontarget (negative). A manual quality control confirmed this classification. With this method, 50.4, 72.1, and 64.9% of the cells in two swine manure samples and one soil sample, respectively, were positive as determined with a 16S rRNA-targeted bacterial probe (S-D-Bact-0338-a-A-18). Manual counting resulted in corresponding values of 52.3, 70.6, and 61.5%, respectively. In two swine manure samples and one soil sample 21.6, 12.3, and 2.5% of the cells were positive with an archaeal probe (S-D-Arch-0915-a-A-20), respectively. Manual counting resulted in corresponding values of 22.4, 14.0, and 2.9%, respectively. This automated method should facilitate quantitative analysis of FISH images for a variety of complex environmental samples.

  17. In-focal-plane characterization of excitation distribution for quantitative fluorescence microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Klaus; Brülisauer, Martina; ćaǧin, Emine; Bertsch, Dietmar; Lüthi, Stefan; Heeb, Peter; Stärker, Ulrich; Bernard, André

    2017-06-01

    The applications of fluorescence microscopy span medical diagnostics, bioengineering and biomaterial analytics. Full exploitation of fluorescent microscopy is hampered by imperfections in illumination, detection and filtering. Mainly, errors stem from deviations induced by real-world components inducing spatial or angular variations of propagation properties along the optical path, and they can be addressed through consistent and accurate calibration. For many applications, uniform signal to noise ratio (SNR) over the imaging area is required. Homogeneous SNR can be achieved by quantifying and compensating for the signal bias. We present a method to quantitatively characterize novel reference materials as a calibration reference for biomaterials analytics. The reference materials under investigation comprise thin layers of fluorophores embedded in polymer matrices. These layers are highly homogeneous in their fluorescence response, where cumulative variations do not exceed 1% over the field of view (1.5 x 1.1 mm). An automated and reproducible measurement methodology, enabling sufficient correction for measurement artefacts, is reported. The measurement setup is equipped with an autofocus system, ensuring that the measured film quality is not artificially increased by out-of-focus reduction of the system modulation transfer function. The quantitative characterization method is suitable for analysis of modified bio-materials, especially through patterned protein decoration. The imaging method presented here can be used to statistically analyze protein patterns, thereby increasing both precision and throughput. Further, the method can be developed to include a reference emitter and detector pair on the image surface of the reference object, in order to provide traceable measurements.

  18. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors for quantitative monitoring of pentose and disaccharide accumulation in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Looger Loren L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineering microorganisms to improve metabolite flux requires detailed knowledge of the concentrations and flux rates of metabolites and metabolic intermediates in vivo. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors represent a promising technology for measuring metabolite levels and corresponding rate changes in live cells. These sensors have been applied successfully in mammalian and plant cells but potentially could also be used to monitor steady-state levels of metabolites in microorganisms using fluorimetric assays. Sensors for hexose and pentose carbohydrates could help in the development of fermentative microorganisms, for example, for biofuels applications. Arabinose is one of the carbohydrates to be monitored during biofuels production from lignocellulose, while maltose is an important degradation product of starch that is relevant for starch-derived biofuels production. Results An Escherichia coli expression vector compatible with phage λ recombination technology was constructed to facilitate sensor construction and was used to generate a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor for arabinose. In parallel, a strategy for improving the sensor signal was applied to construct an improved maltose sensor. Both sensors were expressed in the cytosol of E. coli and sugar accumulation was monitored using a simple fluorimetric assay of E. coli cultures in microtiter plates. In the case of both nanosensors, the addition of the respective ligand led to concentration-dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer responses allowing quantitative analysis of the intracellular sugar levels at given extracellular supply levels as well as accumulation rates. Conclusion The nanosensor destination vector combined with the optimization strategy for sensor responses should help to accelerate the development of metabolite sensors. The new carbohydrate fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors can be used for in vivo

  19. Account of spectral dependence of instrumental factor in quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershin, N.V.; Mosichev, V.I.

    1990-01-01

    A new method for calibration of X-ray fluorescence spectrometers using scanning spectrometric channel is proposed. The method is based on a separate account of matrix and instrumental effects and needs no calibration standards for the element analysed. For calibration in the whole spectral range of XRS (0.03-1.0 nm) it is sufficient to have from 10 to 15 pure element emitters made of most wide spread elements. The method provides rapid development of quantitative analysis for the elements which are not provided with standard samples and preparation of pure element emitters for which is impossible or problematic. The practical verification of the method was made by analysing a set of 146 standard samples covering a wide group of alloys. The mean relative error of the method was 3-5 % in an analytical range of 0.1-3.0 wt %

  20. A method for the quantitative analysis of heavy elements by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Caillaux, Z. de

    1981-01-01

    A study of quantitative analysis methodology by X-ray fluorescence analysis is presented. With no damage to precision it makes possible an analysis of heavy elements in samples with the form and texture as they present themselves. Some binary alloys were examined such as: FeCo; CuNi; CuZn; AgCd; AgPd; AuPt e PtIr. The possibility of application of this method is based on the compromise solutIon of wave lengths and the intensity of the homologous emission and absorption edges of constituents with the quantic efficiency of the detector, the dispersion and the wave lenght resolution of crystal analyser, and the uniformity of the excitation intensity. (Author) [pt

  1. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy analysis for accurate determination of proportion of doubly labeled DNA in fluorescent DNA pool for quantitative biochemical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Sen; Sun, Lili; Wieczorek, Stefan A; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Kaminski, Tomasz S; Holyst, Robert

    2014-01-15

    Fluorescent double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules labeled at both ends are commonly produced by annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules, labeled with fluorescent dyes at the same (3' or 5') end. Because the labeling efficiency of ssDNA is smaller than 100%, the resulting dsDNA have two, one or are without a dye. Existing methods are insufficient to measure the percentage of the doubly-labeled dsDNA component in the fluorescent DNA sample and it is even difficult to distinguish the doubly-labeled DNA component from the singly-labeled component. Accurate measurement of the percentage of such doubly labeled dsDNA component is a critical prerequisite for quantitative biochemical measurements, which has puzzled scientists for decades. We established a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system to measure the percentage of doubly labeled dsDNA (PDL) in the total fluorescent dsDNA pool. The method is based on comparative analysis of the given sample and a reference dsDNA sample prepared by adding certain amount of unlabeled ssDNA into the original ssDNA solution. From FCS autocorrelation functions, we obtain the number of fluorescent dsDNA molecules in the focal volume of the confocal microscope and PDL. We also calculate the labeling efficiency of ssDNA. The method requires minimal amount of material. The samples have the concentration of DNA in the nano-molar/L range and the volume of tens of microliters. We verify our method by using restriction enzyme Hind III to cleave the fluorescent dsDNA. The kinetics of the reaction depends strongly on PDL, a critical parameter for quantitative biochemical measurements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Description of CORSET: a computer program for quantitative x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohl, F.V.

    1980-08-01

    Quantitative x-ray fluorescence analysis requires a method of correcting for absorption and secondary fluorescence effects due to the sample matrix. The computer program CORSET carries out these corrections without requiring a knowledge of the spectral distribution of the x-ray source, and only requires one standard per element or one standard containing all the elements. Sandia's version of CORSET has been divided into three separate programs to fit Sandia's specific requirements for on-line analysis in a melt facility. The melt facility is used to fabricate new alloys with very variable compositions and requires very rapid analyses during a run. Therefore, the standards must be analyzed several days in advance. Program DAT1 is used to set up a permanent file consisting of all the data related to the standards. Program UNINT is used to set up a permanent file with the intensities, background counts and counting times of the unknowns. Program CORSET uses the files created in UNINT and DAT1 to carry out the analysis. This report contains descriptions, listings, and sample runs for these programs. The accuracy of the analyses carried out with these three programs is about 1 to 2% relative with an elemental concentration of about 10 wt %

  3. Quantitative metabolic imaging using endogenous fluorescence to detect stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Kyle P.; Sridharan, Gautham V.; Hayden, Rebecca S.; Kaplan, David L.; Lee, Kyongbum; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2013-12-01

    The non-invasive high-resolution spatial mapping of cell metabolism within tissues could provide substantial advancements in assessing the efficacy of stem cell therapy and understanding tissue development. Here, using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy, we elucidate the relationships among endogenous cell fluorescence, cell redox state, and the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells into adipogenic and osteoblastic lineages. Using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and quantitative PCR, we evaluate the sensitivity of an optical redox ratio of FAD/(NADH + FAD) to metabolic changes associated with stem cell differentiation. Furthermore, we probe the underlying physiological mechanisms, which relate a decrease in the redox ratio to the onset of differentiation. Because traditional assessments of stem cells and engineered tissues are destructive, time consuming, and logistically intensive, the development and validation of a non-invasive, label-free approach to defining the spatiotemporal patterns of cell differentiation can offer a powerful tool for rapid, high-content characterization of cell and tissue cultures.

  4. Quantitation of Brown Adipose Tissue Perfusion in Transgenic Mice Using Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Nakayama

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Brown adipose tissue (BAT; brown fat is the principal site of adaptive thermogenesis in the human newborn and other small mammals. Of paramount importance for thermogenesis is vascular perfusion, which controls the flow of cool blood in, and warmed blood out, of BAT. We have developed an optical method for the quantitative imaging of BAT perfusion in the living, intact animal using the heptamethine indocyanine IR-786 and near-infrared (NIR fluorescent light. We present a detailed analysis of the physical, chemical, and cellular properties of IR-786, its biodistribution and pharmacokinetics, and its uptake into BAT. Using transgenic animals with homozygous deletion of Type II iodothyronine deiodinase, or homozygous deletion of uncoupling proteins (UCPs 1 and 2, we demonstrate that BAT perfusion can be measured noninvasively, accurately, and reproducibly. Using these techniques, we show that UCP 1/2 knockout animals, when compared to wild-type animals, have a higher baseline perfusion of BAT but a similar maximal response to β3-receptor agonist. These results suggest that compensation for UCP deletion is mediated, in part, by the control of BAT perfusion. Taken together, BAT perfusion can now be measured noninvasively using NIR fluorescent light, and pharmacological modulators of thermogenesis can be screened at relatively high throughput in living animals.

  5. Investigation of the influence of sampling schemes on quantitative dynamic fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yunpeng; Chen, Xueli; Yin, Jipeng; Wang, Guodong; Wang, Bo; Zhan, Yonghua; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Liang, Jimin

    2018-04-01

    Dynamic optical data from a series of sampling intervals can be used for quantitative analysis to obtain meaningful kinetic parameters of probe in vivo . The sampling schemes may affect the quantification results of dynamic fluorescence imaging. Here, we investigate the influence of different sampling schemes on the quantification of binding potential ( BP ) with theoretically simulated and experimentally measured data. Three groups of sampling schemes are investigated including the sampling starting point, sampling sparsity, and sampling uniformity. In the investigation of the influence of the sampling starting point, we further summarize two cases by considering the missing timing sequence between the probe injection and sampling starting time. Results show that the mean value of BP exhibits an obvious growth trend with an increase in the delay of the sampling starting point, and has a strong correlation with the sampling sparsity. The growth trend is much more obvious if throwing the missing timing sequence. The standard deviation of BP is inversely related to the sampling sparsity, and independent of the sampling uniformity and the delay of sampling starting time. Moreover, the mean value of BP obtained by uniform sampling is significantly higher than that by using the non-uniform sampling. Our results collectively suggest that a suitable sampling scheme can help compartmental modeling of dynamic fluorescence imaging provide more accurate results and simpler operations.

  6. Quantitative analysis of fluorescence lifetime measurements of the macula using the fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysli, Chantal; Quellec, Gwénolé; Abegg, Mathias; Menke, Marcel N; Wolf-Schnurrbusch, Ute; Kowal, Jens; Blatz, Johannes; La Schiazza, Olivier; Leichtle, Alexander B; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2014-04-03

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) cannot only be characterized by the intensity or the emission spectrum, but also by its lifetime. As the lifetime of a fluorescent molecule is sensitive to its local microenvironment, this technique may provide more information than fundus autofluorescence imaging. We report here the characteristics and repeatability of FAF lifetime measurements of the human macula using a new fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope (FLIO). A total of 31 healthy phakic subjects were included in this study with an age range from 22 to 61 years. For image acquisition, a fluorescence lifetime ophthalmoscope based on a Heidelberg Engineering Spectralis system was used. Fluorescence lifetime maps of the retina were recorded in a short- (498-560 nm) and a long- (560-720 nm) spectral channel. For quantification of fluorescence lifetimes a standard ETDRS grid was used. Mean fluorescence lifetimes were shortest in the fovea, with 208 picoseconds for the short-spectral channel and 239 picoseconds for the long-spectral channel, respectively. Fluorescence lifetimes increased from the central area to the outer ring of the ETDRS grid. The test-retest reliability of FLIO was very high for all ETDRS areas (Spearman's ρ = 0.80 for the short- and 0.97 for the long-spectral channel, P macula in healthy subjects. By using a custom-built software, we were able to quantify fluorescence lifetimes within the ETDRS grid. Establishing a clinically accessible standard against which to measure FAF lifetimes within the retina is a prerequisite for future studies in retinal disease.

  7. Quantitative analyses of the 3D nuclear landscape recorded with super-resolved fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Volker J; Cremer, Marion; Cremer, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Recent advancements of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy have revolutionized microscopic studies of cells, including the exceedingly complex structural organization of cell nuclei in space and time. In this paper we describe and discuss tools for (semi-) automated, quantitative 3D analyses of the spatial nuclear organization. These tools allow the quantitative assessment of highly resolved different chromatin compaction levels in individual cell nuclei, which reflect functionally different regions or sub-compartments of the 3D nuclear landscape, and measurements of absolute distances between sites of different chromatin compaction. In addition, these tools allow 3D mapping of specific DNA/RNA sequences and nuclear proteins relative to the 3D chromatin compaction maps and comparisons of multiple cell nuclei. The tools are available in the free and open source R packages nucim and bioimagetools. We discuss the use of masks for the segmentation of nuclei and the use of DNA stains, such as DAPI, as a proxy for local differences in chromatin compaction. We further discuss the limitations of 3D maps of the nuclear landscape as well as problems of the biological interpretation of such data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis at the ESRF ID18F microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vekemans, B.; Vincze, L.; Somogyi, A.; Drakopoulos, M.; Kempenaers, L.; Simionovici, A.; Adams, F.

    2003-01-01

    The new ID18F end-station at the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble (France) is dedicated to sensitive and accurate quantitative micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis at the ppm level with accuracy better than 10% for elements with atomic numbers above 18. For accurate quantitative analysis, given a high level of instrumental stability, major steps are the extraction and conversion of experimental X-ray line intensities into elemental concentrations. For this purpose a two-step quantification approach was adopted. In the first step, the collected XRF spectra are deconvoluted on the basis of a non-linear least-squares fitting algorithm (AXIL). The extracted characteristic line intensities are then used as input for a detailed Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code dedicated to XRF spectroscopy taking into account specific experimental conditions (excitation/detection) as well as sample characteristics (absorption and enhancement effects, sample topology, heterogeneity etc.). The iterative use of the MC code gives a 'no-compromise' solution for the quantification problem

  9. Quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis at the ESRF ID18F microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vekemans, B. E-mail: vekemans@uia.ua.ac.be; Vincze, L.; Somogyi, A.; Drakopoulos, M.; Kempenaers, L.; Simionovici, A.; Adams, F

    2003-01-01

    The new ID18F end-station at the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble (France) is dedicated to sensitive and accurate quantitative micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis at the ppm level with accuracy better than 10% for elements with atomic numbers above 18. For accurate quantitative analysis, given a high level of instrumental stability, major steps are the extraction and conversion of experimental X-ray line intensities into elemental concentrations. For this purpose a two-step quantification approach was adopted. In the first step, the collected XRF spectra are deconvoluted on the basis of a non-linear least-squares fitting algorithm (AXIL). The extracted characteristic line intensities are then used as input for a detailed Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code dedicated to XRF spectroscopy taking into account specific experimental conditions (excitation/detection) as well as sample characteristics (absorption and enhancement effects, sample topology, heterogeneity etc.). The iterative use of the MC code gives a 'no-compromise' solution for the quantification problem.

  10. Detection and Analysis of Enamel Cracks by Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Mi-Kyoung; Ku, Hye-Min; Kim, Euiseong; Kim, Hee-Eun; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Baek-Il

    2016-03-01

    The ability to accurately detect tooth cracks and quantify their depth would allow the prediction of crack progression and treatment success. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the capabilities of quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) technology in the detection of enamel cracks. Ninety-six extracted human teeth were selected for examining naturally existing or suspected cracked teeth surfaces using a photocuring unit. QLF performed with a digital camera (QLF-D) images were used to assess the ability to detect enamel cracks based on the maximum fluorescence loss value (ΔFmax, %), which was then analyzed using the QLF-D software. A histologic evaluation was then performed in which the samples were sectioned and observed with the aid of a polarized light microscope. The relationship between ΔFmax and the histology findings was assessed based on the Spearman rank correlation. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated to evaluate the validity of using QLF-D to analyze enamel inner-half cracks and cracks extending to the dentin-enamel junction. There was a strong correlation between the results of histologic evaluations of enamel cracks and the ΔFmax value, with a correlation coefficient of 0.84. The diagnostic accuracy of QLF-D had a sensitivity of 0.87 and a specificity of 0.98 for enamel inner-half cracks and a sensitivity of 0.90 and a specificity of 1.0 for cracks extending to the dentin-enamel junction. These results indicate that QLF technology would be a useful clinical tool for diagnosing enamel cracks, especially given that this is a nondestructive method. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitation of circulating tumor cells in blood samples from ovarian and prostate cancer patients using tumor-specific fluorescent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Kularatne, Sumith A; Kalli, Kimberly R; Prendergast, Franklyn G; Amato, Robert J; Klee, George G; Hartmann, Lynn C; Low, Philip S

    2008-10-15

    Quantitation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can provide information on the stage of a malignancy, onset of disease progression and response to therapy. In an effort to more accurately quantitate CTCs, we have synthesized fluorescent conjugates of 2 high-affinity tumor-specific ligands (folate-AlexaFluor 488 and DUPA-FITC) that bind tumor cells >20-fold more efficiently than fluorescent antibodies. Here we determine whether these tumor-specific dyes can be exploited for quantitation of CTCs in peripheral blood samples from cancer patients. A CTC-enriched fraction was isolated from the peripheral blood of ovarian and prostate cancer patients by an optimized density gradient centrifugation protocol and labeled with the aforementioned fluorescent ligands. CTCs were then quantitated by flow cytometry. CTCs were detected in 18 of 20 ovarian cancer patients (mean 222 CTCs/ml; median 15 CTCs/ml; maximum 3,118 CTCs/ml), whereas CTC numbers in 16 gender-matched normal volunteers were negligible (mean 0.4 CTCs/ml; median 0.3 CTCs/ml; maximum 1.5 CTCs/ml; p < 0.001, chi(2)). CTCs were also detected in 10 of 13 prostate cancer patients (mean 26 CTCs/ml, median 14 CTCs/ml, maximum 94 CTCs/ml) but not in 18 gender-matched healthy donors (mean 0.8 CTCs/ml, median 1, maximum 3 CTC/ml; p < 0.0026, chi(2)). Tumor-specific fluorescent antibodies were much less efficient in quantitating CTCs because of their lower CTC labeling efficiency. Use of tumor-specific fluorescent ligands to label CTCs in peripheral blood can provide a simple, accurate and sensitive method for determining the number of cancer cells circulating in the bloodstream.

  12. Total protein analysis as a reliable loading control for quantitative fluorescent Western blotting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha L Eaton

    Full Text Available Western blotting has been a key technique for determining the relative expression of proteins within complex biological samples since the first publications in 1979. Recent developments in sensitive fluorescent labels, with truly quantifiable linear ranges and greater limits of detection, have allowed biologists to probe tissue specific pathways and processes with higher resolution than ever before. However, the application of quantitative Western blotting (QWB to a range of healthy tissues and those from degenerative models has highlighted a problem with significant consequences for quantitative protein analysis: how can researchers conduct comparative expression analyses when many of the commonly used reference proteins (e.g. loading controls are differentially expressed? Here we demonstrate that common controls, including actin and tubulin, are differentially expressed in tissues from a wide range of animal models of neurodegeneration. We highlight the prevalence of such alterations through examination of published "-omics" data, and demonstrate similar responses in sensitive QWB experiments. For example, QWB analysis of spinal cord from a murine model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy using an Odyssey scanner revealed that beta-actin expression was decreased by 19.3±2% compared to healthy littermate controls. Thus, normalising QWB data to β-actin in these circumstances could result in 'skewing' of all data by ∼20%. We further demonstrate that differential expression of commonly used loading controls was not restricted to the nervous system, but was also detectable across multiple tissues, including bone, fat and internal organs. Moreover, expression of these "control" proteins was not consistent between different portions of the same tissue, highlighting the importance of careful and consistent tissue sampling for QWB experiments. Finally, having illustrated the problem of selecting appropriate single protein loading controls, we demonstrate

  13. Quantitative determination of Sulfur and Chlorine in Crude Oils by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala Jimenez, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Given the importance of sulfur and chlorine content in crude petroleum, and that the actual methods used in the country to its determination are slow and cumbersome, the present work consisted in applying a new method, based on X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, to make this analysis as fast as possible with greater sensibility and precision. Samples of crude petroleum were analyzed using two different quantitative methods: a) through calibration curves elaborated with standard aqueous solutions of inorganic salts of S and Cl and b) through standard addition method using CS 2 as standard for S and CCl 4 for Cl. The measuring system consisted of Fe-55 radioactive source (10 mCi), Si-Li semiconductor detector, spectrum amplifier, multichannel analyzer and a DIGITAL Computer. The peak areas and their deviations were obtained through AXIL software. The values of area and deviation joined to weight of sample and amount of standard added were used to calculate the concentration of the analite and its deviation. In conclusion, calibration curves enable only semiquantitative analysis. However, the standard addition method has advantages over ASTM methods D 129-64 and D 808-63 for sulfur and chlorine respectively. The main advantage is the great speed with which an analysis is made: 20 minutes, while ASTM methods need approximately 16 hours. Likewise it was obtained: sensibility 0.05%; accuracy: maximum 0.02%, minimum 10%; and precision: maximum 2%, minimum 10%. (author)

  14. Multilayers quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis applied to easel paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Viguerie, Laurence; Sole, V Armando; Walter, Philippe

    2009-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) allows a rapid and simple determination of the elemental composition of a material. As a non-destructive tool, it has been extensively used for analysis in art and archaeology since the early 1970s. Whereas it is commonly used for qualitative analysis, recent efforts have been made to develop quantitative treatment even with portable systems. However, the interpretation of the results obtained with this technique can turn out to be problematic in the case of layered structures such as easel paintings. The use of differential X-ray attenuation enables modelling of the various layers: indeed, the absorption of X-rays through different layers will result in modification of intensity ratio between the different characteristic lines. This work focuses on the possibility to use XRF with the fundamental parameters method to reconstruct the composition and thickness of the layers. This method was tested on several multilayers standards and gives a maximum error of 15% for thicknesses and errors of 10% for concentrations. On a painting test sample that was rather inhomogeneous, the XRF analysis provides an average value. This method was applied in situ to estimate the thickness of the layers a painting from Marco d'Oggiono, pupil of Leonardo da Vinci.

  15. Time-Resolved Fluorescent Immunochromatography of Aflatoxin B1 in Soybean Sauce: A Rapid and Sensitive Quantitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Du; Zhang, Zhaowei; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Wen

    2016-07-14

    Rapid and quantitative sensing of aflatoxin B1 with high sensitivity and specificity has drawn increased attention of studies investigating soybean sauce. A sensitive and rapid quantitative immunochromatographic sensing method was developed for the detection of aflatoxin B1 based on time-resolved fluorescence. It combines the advantages of time-resolved fluorescent sensing and immunochromatography. The dynamic range of a competitive and portable immunoassay was 0.3-10.0 µg·kg(-1), with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1 µg·kg(-1) and recoveries of 87.2%-114.3%, within 10 min. The results showed good correlation (R² > 0.99) between time-resolved fluorescent immunochromatographic strip test and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Soybean sauce samples analyzed using time-resolved fluorescent immunochromatographic strip test revealed that 64.2% of samples contained aflatoxin B1 at levels ranging from 0.31 to 12.5 µg·kg(-1). The strip test is a rapid, sensitive, quantitative, and cost-effective on-site screening technique in food safety analysis.

  16. The use of rapid quantitative x-ray fluorescence analysis in paper manufacturing and construction materials industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocman, V.; Foley, L.; Woodger, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    A modern analytical laboratory of a large corporation manufacturing paper, construction materials and chemicals must be sufficiently diversified in methodology to provide accurate results in the shortest possible time. Among other techniques the implementation of an automated ''menu'' driven wavelength dispersive spectrometer allowed for the setting-up of a variety of quantitative X-ray fluorescence methods. An overview of these methods is given as presented at the 33rd. Annual Conference on the Application of X-ray Fluorescence Analysis in Denver, Colorado, 1984

  17. Culture-free, highly sensitive, quantitative detection of bacteria from minimally processed samples using fluorescence imaging by smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Sajal; Lee, Won-Il; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2018-06-30

    A critical unmet need in the diagnosis of bacterial infections, which remain a major cause of human morbidity and mortality, is the detection of scarce bacterial pathogens in a variety of samples in a rapid and quantitative manner. Herein, we demonstrate smartphone-based detection of Staphylococcus aureus in a culture-free, rapid, quantitative manner from minimally processed liquid samples using aptamer-functionalized fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles. The tagged S. aureus cells were magnetically captured in a detection cassette, and then fluorescence was imaged using a smartphone camera with a light-emitting diode as the excitation source. Our results showed quantitative detection capability with a minimum detectable concentration as low as 10 cfu/ml by counting individual bacteria cells, efficiently capturing S. aureus cells directly from a peanut milk sample within 10 min. When the selectivity of detection was investigated using samples spiked with other pathogenic bacteria, no significant non-specific detection occurred. Furthermore, strains of S. aureus from various origins showed comparable results, ensuring that the approach can be widely adopted. Therefore, the quantitative fluorescence imaging platform on a smartphone could allow on-site detection of bacteria, providing great potential assistance during major infectious disease outbreaks in remote and resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Results of improvement of simultaneous and sequential x-ray fluorescence equipment for quantitative routine analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zsamboky, Jozsef

    1985-01-01

    Two main types of x-ray fluorescence analyzers measuring sequentially and simultaneously, respectively, the intensities at given wave lengths are described. The main parts of an up to date x-ray fluorescence analyzer are surveyed in detail. The advantages and disadvantages of both methods are discussed. Some results on calibration and optimization are given. (D.Gy.)

  19. Quantitative estimation of the fluorescent parameters for crop leaves with the Bayesian inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, the fluorescent parameters of crop leaves were retrieved from the leaf hyperspectral measurements by inverting the FluorMODleaf model, which is a leaf-level fluorescence model that is based on the widely used and validated PROSPECT (leaf optical properties) model and can simulate the ...

  20. Stopped Flow Kinetics of MnII Catalysed Periodate Oxidation of 2, 3- dimethylaniline - Evaluation of Stability Constant of the Ternary Intermediate Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Dutt Kaushik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation of ternary intermediate unstable complex during the oxidation of aromatic amines by periodate ion catalysed by MnII has been proposed in case of some anilines. This paper is the first report on stopped-flow kinetic study and evaluation of stability constant of ternary complex forming in the MnII - catalysed periodate oxidation of 2, 3-dimethylaniline (D in acetone-water medium. Stop-flow spectrophotometric method was used to study the ternary complex formation and to determine its stability constant. The stop-flow trace shows the reaction to occur in two steps. The first step, which is presumably the formation of ternary complex, is relatively fast while the second stage is relatively quite slow. The stability constant evaluated for D - MnII - IO4- ternary complex by determining  equilibrium absorbance is (2.2 ± 1.0 × 105. Kinetics of ternary complex formation was defined by the rate law(A  under pseudo first order conditions. ln{[C2]eq / ( [C2]eq -[C2]} = kobs . t (A where, kobs is the pseudo first order rate constant, [C2] is concentration of ternary complex at given time t, and [C2]eq is the equilibrium concentration of ternary complex. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 3rd October 2014; Revised: 4th December 2014; Accepted: 15th December 2014How to Cite: Kaushik, R.D., Agarwal, R., Tyagi, P., Singh, O., Singh, J. (2015. Stopped Flow Kinetics of MnII Catalysed Periodate Oxidation of 2,3-dimethylaniline - Evaluation of Stability Constant of the Ternary Intermediate Complex. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (1: 78-87. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7621.78-87Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7621.78-87

  1. Kinetic Spectrophotometric Method for the 1,4-Diionic Organophosphorus Formation in the Presence of Meldrum′s Acid: Stopped-Flow Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ghodsi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the reaction between triphenylphosphine (TPP and dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate (DMAD in the presence of Meldrum’s acid (MA for the generation of the 1,4-diionic organophosphorus compound has been investigated using the stopped-flow and UV-VIS spectrophotometry techniques. The first step of the reaction between TPP and DMAD for the generation of (I1 in ethanol was followed by the stopped-flow apparatus. This step was recognized as a fast step. The reaction between the intermediate (I1 and MA showed first-order kinetics, and it was followed by the UV-VIS spectrophotometry technique. The activation parameters for the slow step of the proposed mechanism were determined using two linearized forms of the Eyring equation. From the temperature, concentration and solvent studies, the activation energy (Ea = 20.16 kJ·mol−1 and the related activation parameters (ΔG‡ = 71.17 ± 0.015 kJ·mol−1, ΔS‡ = −185.49 ± 0.026 J·mol−1 and ΔH‡ =17.72 ± 0.007 kJ·mol−1 were calculated. The experimental data indicated that the reaction was zero-order in MA and second-order overall. The proposed mechanism was confirmed with the observed kinetic data obtained from the UV-VIS and stopped-flow techniques.

  2. QUANTITATIVE IMAGING AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION (FISH) OF AUREOBASIDIUM PULLULANS. (R823845)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractImage and multifactorial statistical analyses were used to evaluate the intensity of fluorescence signal from cells of three strains of A. pullulans and one strain of Rhodosporidium toruloides, as an outgroup, hybridized with either a universal o...

  3. Optical-sectioning microscopy of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence in human gliomas: standardization and quantitative comparison with histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Linpeng; Chen, Ye; Yin, Chengbo; Borwege, Sabine; Sanai, Nader; Liu, Jonathan T. C.

    2017-04-01

    Systemic delivery of 5-aminolevulinic acid leads to enhanced fluorescence image contrast in many tumors due to the increased accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a fluorescent porphyrin that is associated with tumor burden and proliferation. The value of PpIX-guided resection of malignant gliomas has been demonstrated in prospective randomized clinical studies in which a twofold greater extent of resection and improved progression-free survival have been observed. In low-grade gliomas and at the diffuse infiltrative margins of all gliomas, PpIX fluorescence is often too weak to be detected with current low-resolution surgical microscopes that are used in operating rooms. However, it has been demonstrated that high-resolution optical-sectioning microscopes are capable of detecting the sparse and punctate accumulations of PpIX that are undetectable via conventional low-power surgical fluorescence microscopes. To standardize the performance of high-resolution optical-sectioning devices for future clinical use, we have developed an imaging phantom and methods to ensure that the imaging of PpIX-expressing brain tissues can be performed reproducibly. Ex vivo imaging studies with a dual-axis confocal microscope demonstrate that these methods enable the acquisition of images from unsectioned human brain tissues that quantitatively and consistently correlate with images of histologically processed tissue sections.

  4. Fluorescent quenching-based quantitative detection of specific DNA/RNA using a BODIPY® FL-labeled probe or primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Shinya; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Yamada, Kazutaka; Torimura, Masaki; Yokomaku, Toyokazu; Kamagata, Yoichi; Kurane, Ryuichiro

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a simple method for the quantitative detection of specific DNA or RNA molecules based on the finding that BODIPY® FL fluorescence was quenched by its interaction with a uniquely positioned guanine. This approach makes use of an oligonucleotide probe or primer containing a BODIPY® FL-modified cytosine at its 5′-end. When such a probe was hybridized with a target DNA, its fluorescence was quenched by the guanine in the target, complementary to the modified cytosine, and the quench rate was proportional to the amount of target DNA. This widely applicable technique will be used directly with larger samples or in conjunction with the polymerase chain reaction to quantify small DNA samples. PMID:11239011

  5. Improvement of the qualitative and quantitative detection of simultaneously present fluorescent tracers by systematic sample treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, H.

    1982-01-01

    The selective instrumental detection of individual fluorescent tracers in mixtures containing further fluorescent dyes is limited by spectral interferences. Therefore additional separations or other suitable procedures have to be included into the analytic technique. With the method described below, the respective tracer to be detected remains with its initial concentration in the sample and is analysed under the appropriate conditions, whereas the interfering tracers are separated or suppressed. The techniques applied for this base on the facts that 1) the fluorescence intensity of the tracers varies differently when the pH-value changes; 2) the tracers show different absorption behaviour and 3) they provide different degrees of light sensitivity. The procedures permit for example to detect uranin when eosin is present in a higher concentration or to detect eosin when amidorhodamin G is present. (orig.) [de

  6. Quantitative structural modeling on the wavelength interval (Δλ) in synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samari, Fayezeh; Yousefinejad, Saeed

    2017-11-01

    Emission fluorescence spectroscopy has an extremely restricted scope of application to analyze of complex mixtures since its selectivity is reduced by the extensive spectral overlap. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) is a technique enables us to analyze complex mixtures with overlapped emission and/or excitation spectra. The difference of excitation and emission wavelength of compounds (interval wavelength or Δλ) is an important characteristic in SFS. Thus a multi-parameter model was constructed to predict Δλ in 63 fluorescent compounds and the regression coefficient in training set, cross validation and test set were 0.88, 0.85 and 0.91 respectively. Furthermore, the applicability and validity of model were evaluated using different statistical methods such as y-scrambling and applicability domain. It was concluded that increasing average valence connectivity, number of Al2-NH functional group and Geary autocorrelation (lag 4) with electronegative weights can lead to increasing Δλ in the fluorescent compounds. The current study obtained an insight into the structural properties of compounds effective on their Δλ as an important parameter in SFS.

  7. Confirmation of molecular formulas of metallic complexes through X-ray fluorescence quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filgueiras, C.A.L.; Marques, E.V.; Machado, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrophotometry was employed to determined the metal content in a series of five transition element complexes (Mn, Ti, Zn, V). The results confirmed the molecular formulas of these complexes, already proposed on the basis of elemental microanalysis, solution condutimetry and other analytical methods. (C.L.B.) [pt

  8. Quantitative comparison of two particle tracking methods in fluorescence microscopy images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabaso, M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available that cannot be analysed efficiently by means of manual analysis. In this study we compare the performance of two computer-based tracking methods for tracking of bright particles in fluorescence microscopy image sequences. The methods under comparison are...

  9. Quantitative analysis of tear film fluorescence and discomfort during tear film instability and thinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Carolyn; Simpson, Trefford; Liu, Haixia; Salvo, Eliza; Wu, Ziwei; Bradley, Arthur; Situ, Ping

    2013-04-12

    The purpose of this study was to test the association between tear film fluorescence changes during tear break-up (TBU) or thinning and the concurrent ocular sensory response. Sixteen subjects kept one eye open as long as possible (MBI), indicated their discomfort level continuously, and rated ocular sensations of irritation, stinging, burning, pricking, and cooling using visual analog scales (VAS). Fluorescence of the tear film was quantified by a pixel-based analysis of the median pixel intensity (PI), TBU, and percentage of dark pixels (DarkPix) over time. A cutoff of 5% TBU was used to divide subjects into either break-up (BU) or minimal break-up (BUmin) groups. Tear film fluorescence decreased (median PI) and the percentage of TBU and DarkPix increased in all trials, with the rate significantly greater in the BU than the BUmin group (Mann-Whitney U test, P film thinning best explains decreasing tear film fluorescence during trials. This was highly correlated with increasing ocular discomfort, suggesting that both tear film thinning and TBU stimulate underlying corneal nerves, although TBU produced more rapid stimulation. Slow increases in tear film hyperosmolarity may cause the gradual increase in discomfort during slow tear film thinning, whereas the sharp increases in discomfort during TBU suggest a more complex stimulus.

  10. Quantitative cellular uptake of double fluorescent core-shelled model submicronic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclerc, Lara, E-mail: leclerc@emse.fr [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, LINA (France); Boudard, Delphine [LINA (France); Pourchez, Jeremie; Forest, Valerie [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, LINA (France); Marmuse, Laurence; Louis, Cedric [NANO-H S.A.S (France); Bin, Valerie [LINA (France); Palle, Sabine [Universite Jean Monnet, Centre de Microscopie Confocale Multiphotonique (France); Grosseau, Philippe; Bernache-Assollant, Didier [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, LINA (France); Cottier, Michele [LINA (France)

    2012-11-15

    The relationship between particles' physicochemical parameters, their uptake by cells and their degree of biological toxicity represent a crucial issue, especially for the development of new technologies such as fabrication of micro- and nanoparticles in the promising field of drug delivery systems. This work was aimed at developing a proof-of-concept for a novel model of double fluorescence submicronic particles that could be spotted inside phagolysosomes. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) particles were synthesized and then conjugated with a fluorescent pHrodo Trade-Mark-Sign probe, red fluorescence of which increases in acidic conditions such as within lysosomes. After validation in acellular conditions by spectral analysis with confocal microscopy and dynamic light scattering, quantification of phagocytosis was conducted on a macrophage cell line in vitro. The biological impact of pHrodo functionalization (cytotoxicity, inflammatory response, and oxidative stress) was also investigated. Results validate the proof-of-concept of double fluorescent particles (FITC + pHrodo), allowing detection of entirely engulfed pHrodo particles (green and red labeling). Moreover incorporation of pHrodo had no major effects on cytotoxicity compared to particles without pHrodo, making them a powerful tool for micro- and nanotechnologies.

  11. A novel high performance stopped-flow apparatus equipped with a special constructed mixing chamber containing a plunger under inert condition with a very short dead-time to investigate very rapid reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyed Mostafa Habibi Khorassani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work set out to establish a novel stopped-flow instrument equipped with a special constructed mixing chamber containing a plunger to enable a kinetic study of the very rapid reactions under a dry inert atmosphere glove bag, in particular, for the reactions are sensitive to moisture or air. A stopped-flow spectrophotometer is essentially a conventional spectrophotometer with the addition of a system for rapid mixing of solutions. The purpose of this work is to describe the fabrication and evaluation of specially constructed and in-expensive stopped-flow system. The evaluation includes determination of the dead-time, relative mixing efficiency, and the measurement of known rate constants. Herein, a dead-time of about 3.4 ms was determined in the final modified construction of the stopped-flow apparatus in order to investigate the rapid initial during which some form of reaction intermediate is presented to be formed.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Cultured on Microelectrode Arrays Based on Fluorescence Microscopy Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, João Fernando; Saito, José Hiroki; Neves, Amanda Ferreira; Lotufo, Celina Monteiro da Cruz; Destro-Filho, João-Batista; Nicoletti, Maria do Carmo

    2015-12-01

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEA) are devices for long term electrophysiological recording of extracellular spontaneous or evocated activities on in vitro neuron culture. This work proposes and develops a framework for quantitative and morphological analysis of neuron cultures on MEAs, by processing their corresponding images, acquired by fluorescence microscopy. The neurons are segmented from the fluorescence channel images using a combination of segmentation by thresholding, watershed transform, and object classification. The positioning of microelectrodes is obtained from the transmitted light channel images using the circular Hough transform. The proposed method was applied to images of dissociated culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal cells. The morphological and topological quantitative analysis carried out produced information regarding the state of culture, such as population count, neuron-to-neuron and neuron-to-microelectrode distances, soma morphologies, neuron sizes, neuron and microelectrode spatial distributions. Most of the analysis of microscopy images taken from neuronal cultures on MEA only consider simple qualitative analysis. Also, the proposed framework aims to standardize the image processing and to compute quantitative useful measures for integrated image-signal studies and further computational simulations. As results show, the implemented microelectrode identification method is robust and so are the implemented neuron segmentation and classification one (with a correct segmentation rate up to 84%). The quantitative information retrieved by the method is highly relevant to assist the integrated signal-image study of recorded electrophysiological signals as well as the physical aspects of the neuron culture on MEA. Although the experiments deal with DRG cell images, cortical and hippocampal cell images could also be processed with small adjustments in the image processing parameter estimation.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of radiation dose by γ-H2AX on a microfluidic chip in a miniature fluorescence cytometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Junsheng; Song, Wendong; Song, Yongxin; Xu, Dan; Zhang, Min; Pan, Xinxiang; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Dongqing

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of radiation dose is very important for the detection of radiation damage. γ-H2AX is a popular biological dosimeter to evaluate the radiation effect. Typically, bulky and expensive commercial flow cytometers are used to detect γ-H2AX. This paper presents a miniaturized and high sensitive cytometer using a microfluidic chip for evaluating the radiation dose by detecting the mean immunofluorescence intensity of γ-H2AX. A compact optical focusing system and a shift-phase differential amplifier are designed to improve the detection sensitivity. Sample lymphocyte cells are stained by FITC fluorescent dye after being irradiated by UVC. Comparison experiments between the developed miniature cytometer and a commercial flow cytometer were conducted under different radiation doses. The developed microfluidic cytometer also demonstrates a good linear correlation between the measured fluorescence intensity and the irradiation dose with a detection limit similar to that of the commercial flow cytometer. The developed cytometer can evaluate quantitatively the radiation dose by the mean fluorescence intensity of γ-H2AX with a significantly smaller amount of blood samples than a commercial flow cytometer. - Highlights: • A new microfluidic cytometer for evaluating irradiation dose was developed. • The utility of this biosensor is verified by comparison experiments using FCM. • The developed cytometer is small size, high sensitivity, low cost, and simple. • The cytometer can dramatically reduce sample consumption and analysis time

  14. TaqMan MGB probe fluorescence real-time quantitative PCR for rapid detection of Chinese Sacbrood virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Mingxiao

    Full Text Available Sacbrood virus (SBV is a picorna-like virus that affects honey bees (Apis mellifera and results in the death of the larvae. Several procedures are available to detect Chinese SBV (CSBV in clinical samples, but not to estimate the level of CSBV infection. The aim of this study was develop an assay for rapid detection and quantification of this virus. Primers and probes were designed that were specific for CSBV structural protein genes. A TaqMan minor groove binder (MGB probe-based, fluorescence real-time quantitative PCR was established. The specificity, sensitivity and stability of the assay were assessed; specificity was high and there were no cross-reactivity with healthy larvae or other bee viruses. The assay was applied to detect CSBV in 37 clinical samples and its efficiency was compared with clinical diagnosis, electron microscopy observation, and conventional RT-PCR. The TaqMan MGB-based probe fluorescence real-time quantitative PCR for CSBV was more sensitive than other methods tested. This assay was a reliable, fast, and sensitive method that was used successfully to detect CSBV in clinical samples. The technology can provide a useful tool for rapid detection of CSBV. This study has established a useful protocol for CSBV testing, epidemiological investigation, and development of animal models.

  15. A novel quantitative analysis method of three-dimensional fluorescence spectra for vegetable oils contents in edible blend oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Yu-Tian; Liu, Xiao-Fei

    2015-04-01

    Edible blend oil is a mixture of vegetable oils. Eligible blend oil can meet the daily need of two essential fatty acids for human to achieve the balanced nutrition. Each vegetable oil has its different composition, so vegetable oils contents in edible blend oil determine nutritional components in blend oil. A high-precision quantitative analysis method to detect the vegetable oils contents in blend oil is necessary to ensure balanced nutrition for human being. Three-dimensional fluorescence technique is high selectivity, high sensitivity, and high-efficiency. Efficiency extraction and full use of information in tree-dimensional fluorescence spectra will improve the accuracy of the measurement. A novel quantitative analysis is proposed based on Quasi-Monte-Carlo integral to improve the measurement sensitivity and reduce the random error. Partial least squares method is used to solve nonlinear equations to avoid the effect of multicollinearity. The recovery rates of blend oil mixed by peanut oil, soybean oil and sunflower are calculated to verify the accuracy of the method, which are increased, compared the linear method used commonly for component concentration measurement.

  16. Fundamental parameters method for quantitative energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirel, H.; Zararsiz, A.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, the requirement of the standart material in photon excited energy distributed X-ray fluorescence analysis has been removed. The interaction of X-rays with matter has been taken into account. A computer program has been developed by using the fundamental parameters of X-ray fluorescence technique and the spectral intensity 'K' of pure elements at saturation thickness has been obtained. For experimental purpose a convenient source-target-detector geometry has been designed. In order to excite the samples,Cd-109 radioisotope source has been used. The peak intensities has been obtained in a vacum chamber by counting the emitted X-rays. The calculation of concentration has been performed for double mixed samples correcting the effects of absorption and enchancement factors. The results were in conformity with their certificate values. (author)

  17. Quantitative analysis and metallic coating thickness measurements by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negrea, Denis; Ducu, Catalin; Malinovschi, Viorel; Moga, Sorin; Boicea, Niculae

    2009-01-01

    Full text: This paperwork covers the use of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) for determining the concentration and the coating thickness on metallic samples. The analysis method presented here may also be applicable to other coatings, providing that the elemental nature of the coating and substrate are compatible with the technical aspects of XRF, such as the absorption coefficient of the system, primary radiation, fluorescent radiation and type of detection. For the coating thickness measurement it was used the substrate-line attenuation method and a computing algorithm was developed. Its advantage relies in the fact that no special calibration with standard samples having different layer thickness is needed. The samples used for evaluation were metallic pieces of iron with zinc-nickel coatings of different thickness obtained by electrochemical deposition. (authors)

  18. Quantitative analysis and metallic coating thickness measurements by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negrea, Denis; Ducu, Catalin; Malinovschi, Viorel; Moga, Sorin; Boicea, Niculae

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with the use of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) for determining the concentration and the coating thickness on metallic samples. The analysis method presented here may also be applicable to other coatings, providing that the elemental nature of the coating and substrate are compatible with the technical aspects of XRF, such as the absorption coefficient of the system, primary radiation, fluorescent radiation and type of detection. For the coating thickness measurement it was used the substrate-line attenuation method and an algorithm was developed. Its advantage relies in the fact that no special calibration with standard samples having different layer thickness is needed. The samples used for evaluation were metallic pieces of iron with zinc-nickel coatings of different thickness obtained by electrochemical deposition. (authors)

  19. Quantitative determination of uranium in organic solution by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyt, D.V. de; Colangelo, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    An X-ray fluorescent method for the determination of uranium in tributilphosphate-kerosene-nitriacid solution has been developed. Chemical properties of the matrix elements were studied in order to select a convenient procedure to determine samples and standards on the same way. The method avoids the destruction of the organic material and has proved to be very useful for the fast control of uranium concentration. (Author) [es

  20. Fluorescence in situ hybridization: an improved method of quantitating chromosome damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.M.; Evans, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    The authors combined fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with specific full-length chromosome probes using the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique chromosome condensation (PCC) technique to simplify scoring chromosome damage and its repair. They have shown the technique works well and enables breaks and exchanges to be readily detected and scored in individual chromosomes. A chromosome 4 full-length specific library has been used in initial studies. (UK)

  1. Groping for Quantitative Digital 3-D Image Analysis: An Approach to Quantitative Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization in Thick Tissue Sections of Prostate Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Rodenacker

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In molecular pathology numerical chromosome aberrations have been found to be decisive for the prognosis of malignancy in tumours. The existence of such aberrations can be detected by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. The gain or loss of certain base sequences in the desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA can be estimated by counting the number of FISH signals per cell nucleus. The quantitative evaluation of such events is a necessary condition for a prospective use in diagnostic pathology. To avoid occlusions of signals, the cell nucleus has to be analyzed in three dimensions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is the means to obtain series of optical thin sections from fluorescence stained or marked material to fulfill the conditions mentioned above. A graphical user interface (GUI to a software package for display, inspection, count and (semi‐automatic analysis of 3‐D images for pathologists is outlined including the underlying methods of 3‐D image interaction and segmentation developed. The preparative methods are briefly described. Main emphasis is given to the methodical questions of computer‐aided analysis of large 3‐D image data sets for pathologists. Several automated analysis steps can be performed for segmentation and succeeding quantification. However tumour material is in contrast to isolated or cultured cells even for visual inspection, a difficult material. For the present a fully automated digital image analysis of 3‐D data is not in sight. A semi‐automatic segmentation method is thus presented here.

  2. Association between quantitative measures obtained using fluorescence-based methods and activity status of occlusal caries lesions in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Tatiane Fernandes; Reyes, Alessandra; Matos, Ronilza; Antunes-Pontes, Laura Regina; Marques, Renata Pereira de Samuel; Braga, Mariana Minatel; Diniz, Michele Baffi; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros

    2017-05-01

    Fluorescence-based methods (FBM) can add objectiveness to diagnosis strategy for caries. Few studies, however, have focused on the evaluation of caries activity. To evaluate the association between quantitative measures obtained with FBM, clinical parameters acquired from the patients, caries detection, and assessment of activity status in occlusal surfaces of primary molars. Six hundred and six teeth from 113 children (4-14 years) were evaluated. The presence of a biofilm, caries experience, and the number of active lesions were recorded. The teeth were assessed using FBM: DIAGNOdent pen (Lfpen) and Quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). As reference standard, all teeth were evaluated using the ICDAS (International Caries Detection and Assessment System) associated with clinical activity assessments. Multilevel regressions compared the FBM values and evaluated the association between the FBM measures and clinical variables related to the caries activity. The measures from the FBM were higher in cavitated lesions. Only, ∆F values distinguished active and inactive lesions. The LFpen measures were higher in active lesions, at the cavitated threshold (56.95 ± 29.60). Following regression analyses, only the presence of visible biofilm on occlusal surfaces (adjusted prevalence ratio = 1.43) and ∆R values of the teeth (adjusted prevalence ratio = 1.02) were associated with caries activity. Some quantitative measures from FBM parameters are associated with caries activity evaluation, which is similar to the clinical evaluation of the presence of visible biofilm. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Elimination of matrix effect in quantitative analysis of elements using x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampaio, R.V.

    1973-07-01

    The emission-transmission method of Leroux and Mahmud, an experimental technique for compensating matrix effects in photon excited X-ray fluorescence analysis, was used to determine the concentration of lead and antimony in pellets of galalith. The effect of interfering elements was studied by adding various concentrations of mercury and tin to the respective pellets. To illustrate possible environmental applications, a number of pellets was prepared from leaves of almond trees located in different regions of Rio de Janeiro. Lead concentrations were determined for the dried leaf material and showed values ranging from 50 to 145 parts per million [pt

  4. Quantitative Studies of Antimicrobial Peptide Pore Formation in Large Unilamellar Vesicles by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2013-01-01

    In spite of intensive research efforts over the past decades, the mechanisms by which membrane-active antimicrobial peptides interact with phospholipid membranes are not yet fully elucidated. New tools that can be used to characterize antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions are therefore...... to quantify leakage from large unilamellar vesicles is associated with a number of experimental pitfalls. Based on theoretical and experimental considerations, we discuss how to properly design experiments to avoid these pitfalls. Subsequently, we apply fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to quantify...

  5. Classification of quantitative light-induced fluorescence images using convolutional neural network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imangaliyev, S.; van der Veen, M.H.; Volgenant, C.M.C.; Loos, B.G.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Crielaard, W.; Levin, E.; Lintas, A.; Rovetta, S.; Verschure, P.F.M.J.; Villa, A.E.P.

    2017-01-01

    Images are an important data source for diagnosis of oral diseases. The manual classification of images may lead to suboptimal treatment procedures due to subjective errors. In this paper an image classification algorithm based on Deep Learning framework is applied to Quantitative Light-induced

  6. A borax fusion technique for quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Willigen, J.H.H.G.; Kruidhof, H.; Dahmen, E.A.M.F.

    1971-01-01

    A borax fusion technique to cast glass discs for quantitative X-ray analysis is described in detail. The method is based on the “nonwetting” properties of a Pt/Au alloy towards molten borax, on the favourable composition of the flux and finally on the favourable form of the casting mould. The

  7. Stopped-flow studies of spectral changes in bilirubin-human serum albumin following an alkaline pH jump and following binding of bilirubin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B

    1987-01-01

    A stopped-flow technique was used to study the spectral changes occurring in bilirubin-albumin following a pH jump as well as following binding of bilirubin at 25 degrees C. The changes were studied in two wavelength ranges, 280-310 nm (tyrosine residues) and 400-510 nm (bound bilirubin). The cha......A stopped-flow technique was used to study the spectral changes occurring in bilirubin-albumin following a pH jump as well as following binding of bilirubin at 25 degrees C. The changes were studied in two wavelength ranges, 280-310 nm (tyrosine residues) and 400-510 nm (bound bilirubin......). The changes were analyzed according to a scheme of consecutive unimolecular reactions. Spectral monitoring of a pH jump from 11.3 to 11.8 reveals that the bilirubin-albumin complex changes its structure in several steps. The UV absorption spectra show that 3.8 tyrosine residues ionize in the first step, 2...

  8. Quantitative analysis of thorium in the presence of rare earth by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, Camila S. de; Taam, Isabel; Vianna, Claudio A.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of Thorium in ores is normally associated to other elements such as Uranium and Cerium, as well as some Rare-Earths (RE). The separation of these elements by traditional analytic chemistry techniques is both time and reagent consuming, thus increasing the analysis cost. The hereby proposed method consists in the direct determination of Thorium in rare earths ores and compounds by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy without any prior chemical separation from other matrix elements. This non-destructive technique is used to determine which elements are present in solid and liquid samples, as well as their concentrations. The studied matrix contains Lanthanum, Cerium, Praseodymium, Neodymium, Samarium, Gadolinium and Yttrium. This study evaluated the analytical lines of radiation emission for each rare earth contained in the matrix, comparing it to the Thorium main analytical line. The Thorium quantification was measured through the Th L line, where there is no influence or interference from the rare earths analytical lines. The studied samples are certified standards and the obtained results have been compared to Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) titration results, an already well-established and widely trusted method. We also measured the matrix effect thus using complex rare earths liquor. This liquor contains also elements commonly found in monazites sands: phosphates, aluminum, iron. Obtained results state the efficiency of X-ray Fluorescence to determine Thorium in the presence of rare earths without any prior chemical separation. (author)

  9. Findings of quantitative fluorescence scintiscanning in the case of euthyroid struma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leisner, B.; Kantlehner, R.; Igl, W.; Fink, U.; Scriba, P.C.; Lissner, J.; Muenchen Univ.

    1981-01-01

    The fluorescence scintiscanning is a new method with minimal radiation exposure to show the distribution and quantification of stable iodine in the thyroid. In regions with high nutritional iodine supply (USA), the concentration of iodine-127 is, on an average, appr. 0.6 mg/g thyroid tissue. In normal persons in iodine-lacking regions it amounts to 0.38 mg/g and is even more reduced if there is an enthyreotic goiter (0.22 mg/g). A single administration of a high quantity of iodine by means of water-soluble contrast substances to adults with a healthy thyroid and to persons with an enthyreotic goiter does generally not cause an increase in the intrathyroidal iodine concentration; if a hyperthyreosis is indicated, however, high values are found and this might be useful for a differential diagnosis. Chronic iodine intake (non-water soluble contrast substances) leads to a slow increase in the intrathyreoidal iodine concentration. Fluorescence scintiscanning is here the method chosen to present the thyroid morphologically. Iodine substitution in low doses does not cause a significant increase in the iodine contents of the thyroid of adults. In children and juveniles, however, normal iodine concentrations in the thyroid tissue could be found substituting with 100 μg potassium iodide. Taking into consideration kinetic data of the iodine metabolism an iodine-'escape' of the false adapted 'older' goiter tissue must be assumed. (orig.) [de

  10. Quantitative microanalysis of hafnium - zirconium system by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid, C.A.; Hussain, M.A.; Saeed, K.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence technique has been used for the analysis of Hf in the presence of Zr by developing a method. In this method the spectral interference of Hf lines by Zr is eliminated completely and the Hf detection is accomplished using the most efficient Li line of its L-series. The principle of the method is based on the extinction properties of crystals for some orders of reflection. Ge(III) is used as the analyzing crystal. This method can be used accurately to detect Hf in any concentration of Zr at least from about 20 ppm to 100%. Also no information about the expected range of the analyte sample, is required in advance. (authors)

  11. Semi-Quantitative Evaluation of Secondary Carbonates via Portable X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Somsubhra; Weindorf, David; Weindorf, Camille; Duda, Bogdan; Pennington, Sarah; Ortiz, Rebekah

    2017-04-01

    Secondary calcium carbonate commonly occurs in subsoils of semi-arid soils worldwide. In US Soil Taxonomy, such horizons are frequently described as Bk, Bkk, Bkm, Bkkm, or Ck horizons at variable stages of development. Specifically, the Soil Survey Staff uses a qualitative scale of one through six to indicate differential developmental stages. However, considerable disagreement exists even among experienced soil scientists. Evaluating 75 soil samples from across four US states, a portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer was used to quantify the total soil Ca content and compare it to average developmental stage scores as determined by a panel of Soil Survey Staff personnel. Samples were evaluated both as intact aggregates as well as ground (human eye.

  12. Quantitative super-resolution localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Żurek-Biesiada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM is a recently emerged optical imaging method that was shown to achieve a resolution in the order of tens of nanometers in intact cells. Novel high resolution imaging methods might be crucial for understanding of how the chromatin, a complex of DNA and proteins, is arranged in the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Such an approach utilizing switching of a fluorescent, DNA-binding dye Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet has been previously demonstrated by us (Żurek-Biesiada et al., 2015 [1]. Here we provide quantitative information on the influence of the chemical environment on the behavior of the dye, discuss the variability in the DNA-associated signal density, and demonstrate direct proof of enhanced structural resolution. Furthermore, we compare different visualization approaches. Finally, we describe various opportunities of multicolor DNA/SMLM imaging in eukaryotic cell nuclei.

  13. Studying flow close to an interface by total internal reflection fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy: Quantitative data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, R.; Yordanov, S.; Butt, H. J.; Koynov, K.; Dünweg, B.

    2011-12-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (TIR-FCCS) has recently [S. Yordanov , Optics ExpressOPEXFF1094-408710.1364/OE.17.021149 17, 21149 (2009)] been established as an experimental method to probe hydrodynamic flows near surfaces, on length scales of tens of nanometers. Its main advantage is that fluorescence occurs only for tracer particles close to the surface, thus resulting in high sensitivity. However, the measured correlation functions provide only rather indirect information about the flow parameters of interest, such as the shear rate and the slip length. In the present paper, we show how to combine detailed and fairly realistic theoretical modeling of the phenomena by Brownian dynamics simulations with accurate measurements of the correlation functions, in order to establish a quantitative method to retrieve the flow properties from the experiments. First, Brownian dynamics is used to sample highly accurate correlation functions for a fixed set of model parameters. Second, these parameters are varied systematically by means of an importance-sampling Monte Carlo procedure in order to fit the experiments. This provides the optimum parameter values together with their statistical error bars. The approach is well suited for massively parallel computers, which allows us to do the data analysis within moderate computing times. The method is applied to flow near a hydrophilic surface, where the slip length is observed to be smaller than 10nm, and, within the limitations of the experiments and the model, indistinguishable from zero.

  14. Improving the competency of dental hygiene students in detecting dental restorations using quantitative light-induced fluorescence technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hye-Young; Jung, Hoi-In; Lee, Jeong-Woo; de Jong, Elbert de Josselin; Kim, Baek-Il

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of a quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) technology in detecting dental restorations by comparing the detection ability of dental hygiene students between using conventional visual inspection alone and visual inspection combined with QLF technology. The subjects of this study comprised 92 dental hygiene students. The students assigned to the control group only used white-light images to visually assess the mouth environment, while those in the experimental group additionally used fluorescence images. Using the test results of an experienced inspector as a reference value, the agreement between the reference value and the evaluation results of the students in the experimental and control groups was evaluated using Cohen's kappa and the percentage agreement. The subjects were then classified into groups covering three percentage ranges according to the score distribution and agreement values of the three groups were compared. The percentage agreement was calculated according to the type of dental restorations. The mean kappa value was significantly higher in the experimental group than the control group (0.70 vs 0.60, ptechnology increased by 8% more in the middle and bottom percentage groups than in the top percentage group (ptechnology with conventional visual inspections could improve the ability to detect dental restorations and distinguish sound teeth from aesthetic restorations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of nanoencapsulation and PEGylation on biodistribution of indocyanine green in healthy mice: quantitative fluorescence imaging and analysis of organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahmani B

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Baharak Bahmani,1 Christian Y Lytle,2 Ameae M Walker,2 Sharad Gupta,1 Valentine I Vullev,1 Bahman Anvari1 1Department of Bioengineering, 2Division of Biomedical Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA, USA Abstract: Near-infrared nanoconstructs present a potentially effective platform for site-specific and deep tissue optical imaging and phototherapy. We have engineered a polymeric nanocapsule composed of polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH chains cross-linked with sodium phosphate and doped with indocyanine green (ICG toward such endeavors. The ICG-doped nanocapsules were coated covalently with polyethylene glycol (5000 daltons through reductive amination. We administrated the constructs by tail vein injection to healthy mice. To characterize the biodistribution of the constructs, we performed in vivo quantitative fluorescence imaging and subsequently analyzed the various extracted organs. Our results suggest that encapsulation of ICG in these PEGylated constructs is an effective approach to prolong the circulation time of ICG and delay its hepatic accumulation. Increased bioavailability of ICG, due to encapsulation, offers the potential of extending the clinical applications of ICG, which are currently limited due to rapid elimination of ICG from the vasculature. Our results also indicate that PAH and ICG-doped nanocapsules (ICG-NCs are not cytotoxic at the levels used in this study. Keywords: cancer, fluorescent imaging, nanoprobes, near infrared, pharmacokinetics, phototherapy, vascular imaging

  16. An in vitro comparison of quantitative light-induced fluorescence-digital and spectrophotometer on monitoring artificial white spot lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Eun; Kim, Baek-Il

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of quantitative light-induced fluorescence-digital (QLF-D) compared to a spectrophotometer in monitoring progression of enamel lesions. To generate artificial caries with various severities of lesion depths, twenty bovine specimens were immersed in demineralizing solution for 40 days. During the production of the lesions, repeat measurements of fluorescence loss (ΔF) and color change (ΔE) were performed in six distinct stages after the demineralization of the specimens: after 3, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 days of exposure to the demineralizing solution. Changes in the ΔF values in the lesions were analyzed using the QLF-D, and changes in the ΔE values in lesions were analyzed using a spectrophotometer. The repeated measures ANOVA of ΔF and ΔE values were used to determine whether there are significant differences at different exposure times in the demineralizing solution. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was analyzed between ΔF and ΔE. The ΔF values significantly decreased based on the demineralizing period (pmonitoring color changes. Our findings demonstrate that QLF-D are a more efficient and stable tool for early caries detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A bench-top K X-ray fluorescence system for quantitative measurement of gold nanoparticles for biological sample diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricketts, K., E-mail: k.ricketts@ucl.ac.uk [Division of Surgery and Interventional Sciences, University College London, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Guazzoni, C.; Castoldi, A. [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria Politecnico di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano P.za Leonardo da Vinci, 32-20133 Milano (Italy); Royle, G. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place Engineering Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-21

    Gold nanoparticles can be targeted to biomarkers to give functional information on a range of tumour characteristics. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques offer potential quantitative measurement of the distribution of such heavy metal nanoparticles. Biologists are developing 3D tissue engineered cellular models on the centimetre scale to optimise targeting techniques of nanoparticles to a range of tumour characteristics. Here we present a high energy bench-top K-X-ray fluorescence system designed for sensitivity to bulk measurement of gold nanoparticle concentration for intended use in such thick biological samples. Previous work has demonstrated use of a L-XRF system in measuring gold concentrations but being a low energy technique it is restricted to thin samples or superficial tumours. The presented system comprised a high purity germanium detector and filtered tungsten X-ray source, capable of quantitative measurement of gold nanoparticle concentration of thicker samples. The developed system achieved a measured detection limit of between 0.2 and 0.6 mgAu/ml, meeting specifications of biologists and being approximately one order of magnitude better than the detection limit of alternative K-XRF nanoparticle detection techniques. The scatter-corrected K-XRF signal of gold was linear with GNP concentrations down to the detection limit, thus demonstrating potential in GNP concentration quantification. The K-XRF system demonstrated between 5 and 9 times less sensitivity than a previous L-XRF bench-top system, due to a fundamental limitation of lower photoelectric interaction probabilities at higher K-edge energies. Importantly, the K-XRF technique is however less affected by overlying thickness, and so offers future potential in interrogating thick biological samples.

  18. The clinical application of fluorescent-enzyme immunoassay to detect human thyroid peroxidase autoantibody quantitatively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Jinyan; Fang Peihua; Li Ning; Zhang Yanli

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To establish a fluorescent-enzyme immunoassay (FEIA) with recombinant human thyroid peroxidase (hTPO) as the antigen. Methods: Sera of 326 healthy people, 119 cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), 116 cases of Graves disease (untreated), 28 cases of nodular goiter, 10 ca-ses of subacute thyroiditis and 6 cases of simple goiter were measured by the FEIA with recombinant hTPO as the antigen. Rrank sum test and χ 2 -test were used in inter-groups. Results: (1) Concentration above 4000 U/L was considered to be positive. (2) The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) and the inter-as-say CV were 4.59% ∼ 6.52% and 17.37% ∼ 17.45%. (3) The values measured by the FEIA were positively correlated with the values measured by hTPO antibody (hTPOAb) commercial kit (r=0.80, P 2 = 53.45, 39.30, 15.41 and 21.74, all P < 0.01). Conclusions: The method can be applied in the serum measurement of thyroid disease. HT presented the highest positive rate, therefore, the FEIA was an effective method in diagnosing HT. (authors)

  19. Release of Halide Ions from the Buried Active Site of the Haloalkane Dehalogenase LinB Revealed by Stopped-Flow Fluorescence Analysis and Free Energy Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hladílková, Jana; Prokop, Z.; Chaloupková, R.; Damborský, J.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 46 (2013), s. 14329-14335 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/0775 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : access tunnel * buried active site * catalytic activity * enzyme mechanism * haloalkane dehalogenase * halide ions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.377, year: 2013

  20. An Image Analysis Method for the Precise Selection and Quantitation of Fluorescently Labeled Cellular Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agley, Chibeza C.; Velloso, Cristiana P.; Lazarus, Norman R.

    2012-01-01

    The accurate measurement of the morphological characteristics of cells with nonuniform conformations presents difficulties. We report here a straightforward method using immunofluorescent staining and the commercially available imaging program Adobe Photoshop, which allows objective and precise information to be gathered on irregularly shaped cells. We have applied this measurement technique to the analysis of human muscle cells and their immunologically marked intracellular constituents, as these cells are prone to adopting a highly branched phenotype in culture. Use of this method can be used to overcome many of the long-standing limitations of conventional approaches for quantifying muscle cell size in vitro. In addition, wider applications of Photoshop as a quantitative and semiquantitative tool in immunocytochemistry are explored. PMID:22511600

  1. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown.

  2. Quantitative analysis of concrete using portable x-ray fluorescence: Method development and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, Aaron L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Narrows, William [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Christian, Jonathan H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Msgwood, Leroy [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-27

    During Decommissioning and Demolition (D&D) activities at SRS, it is important that the building be screened for radionuclides and heavy metals to ensure that the proper safety and disposal metrics are in place. A major source of contamination at DOE facilities is the accumulation of mercury contamination, from nuclear material processing and Liquid Waste System (LWS). This buildup of mercury could possibly cause harm to any demolition crew or the environment should this material be released. The current standard method is to take core samples in various places in the facility and use X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to detect the contamination. This standard method comes with a high financial value due to the security levels of these sample facilities with unknown contamination levels. Here in we propose the use of portable XRF units to detect for this contamination on-site. To validate this method, the instrument has to be calibrated to detect the heavy metal contamination, be both precise with the known elemental concentrations and consistent with its actual results of a sample concrete and pristine contaminant, and be able to detect changes in the sample concrete’s composition. After receiving the various concrete samples with their compositions found by a XRF wave-dispersive method, the calibration factor’s linear regressions were adjusted to give the baseline concentration of the concrete with no contamination. Samples of both concrete and concrete/flyash were evaluated; their standard deviations revealed that the measurements were consistent with the known composition. Finally, the samples were contaminated with different concentrations of sodium tungsten dihydrate, allowed to air dry, and measured. When the contaminated samples were analyzed, the heavy metal contamination was seen within the spectrum of the instrument, but there was not a trend of quantification based on the concentration of the solution.

  3. The evaluation of a novel method comparing quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) with spectrophotometry to assess staining and bleaching of teeth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adeyemi, A.A.; Jarad, F.D.; de Josselin de Jong, E.; Pender, N.; Higham, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of a novel method using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF), which enables its use for quantifying and assessing whole tooth surface staining and tooth whitening. The method was compared with a spectrophotometer to assess reliability. Two

  4. MIQE précis: Practical implementation of minimum standard guidelines for fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bustin, S.A.; Beaulieu, J.F.; Huggett, J.; Jaggi, R.; Kibenge, F.S.; Olsvik, P.A.; Penning, L.C.; Toegel, S.

    2010-01-01

    MIQE précis: Practical implementation of minimum standard guidelines for fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR experiments Stephen A Bustin1 , Jean-François Beaulieu2 , Jim Huggett3 , Rolf Jaggi4 , Frederick SB Kibenge5 , Pål A Olsvik6 , Louis C Penning7 and Stefan Toegel8 1 Centre for

  5. Quantitative analysis or rare earths by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taam, Isabel; Mantovano, J.L.; Gante, Valdir; Jesus, Camila S.

    2013-01-01

    Rare earths ores and compounds are of growing importance to the worldwide industry. Its applications range from raw material to catalysts, manufacturing of electronics and even super magnets. Therefore, the demand for quick and accurate quantitative analysis methods is continuously growing. Current quantification methods of rare earths involve the separation of these elements by ion exchange and liquid-liquid extraction prior to the analysis itself, processes both time and reagent consuming. In the present work, we propose a method that directly quantifies by XRF technique the following rare earths: La, Pr, Nd, Sm and Gd in a concentrated liquor whose matrix also contains Ca, Y, PO4, U and Th. We evaluated the analytical interference of each element present on the sample on X-rays spectrum. The studied samples are certified standards and the obtained results have been compared to EDTA titration results, an already well-established and widely trusted method.We also measured the matrix effect thus using a complex rare earths standard. Results show that quantification by XRF technique is as accurate as the results in dose titration with EDTA for the same elements, with the advantage of exempting the previous separation step from each rare earth and from other elements present in the matrix (such as U and Th). (author)

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF EVALUATION OF A QUANTITATIVE VIDEO-FLUORESCENCE IMAGING SYSTEM AND FLUORESCENT TRACER FOR MEASURING TRANSFER OF PESTICIDE RESIDUES FROM SURFACES TO HANDS WITH REPEATED CONTACTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A video imaging system and the associated quantification methods have been developed for measurement of the transfers of a fluorescent tracer from surfaces to hands. The highly fluorescent compound riboflavin (Vitamin B2), which is also water soluble and non-toxic, was chosen as...

  7. Quantitative Light Fluorescence (QLF and Polarized White Light (PWL assessments of dental fluorosis in an epidemiological setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pretty Iain A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine if a novel dual camera imaging system employing both polarized white light (PWL and quantitative light induced fluorescence imaging (QLF is appropriate for measuring enamel fluorosis in an epidemiological setting. The use of remote and objective scoring systems is of importance in fluorosis assessments due to the potential risk of examiner bias using clinical methods. Methods Subjects were recruited from a panel previously characterized for fluorosis and caries to ensure a range of fluorosis presentation. A total of 164 children, aged 11 years (±1.3 participated following consent. Each child was examined using the novel imaging system, a traditional digital SLR camera, and clinically using the Dean’s and Thylstrup and Fejerskov (TF Indices on the upper central and lateral incisors. Polarized white light and SLR images were scored for both Dean’s and TF indices by raters and fluorescence images were automatically scored using software. Results Data from 164 children were available with a good distribution of fluorosis severity. The automated software analysis of QLF images demonstrated significant correlations with the clinical examinations for both Dean’s and TF index. Agreement (measured by weighted Kappa’s between examiners scoring clinically, from polarized photographs and from SLR images ranged from 0.56 to 0.92. Conclusions The study suggests that the use of a digital imaging system to capture images for either automated software analysis, or remote assessment by raters is suitable for epidemiological work. The use of recorded images enables study archiving, assessment by multiple examiners, remote assessment and objectivity due to the blinding of subject status.

  8. An integrated enhancement and reconstruction strategy for the quantitative extraction of actin stress fibers from fluorescence micrographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Xia, Shumin; Kanchanawong, Pakorn

    2017-05-22

    The stress fibers are prominent organization of actin filaments that perform important functions in cellular processes such as migration, polarization, and traction force generation, and whose collective organization reflects the physiological and mechanical activities of the cells. Easily visualized by fluorescence microscopy, the stress fibers are widely used as qualitative descriptors of cell phenotypes. However, due to the complexity of the stress fibers and the presence of other actin-containing cellular features, images of stress fibers are relatively challenging to quantitatively analyze using previously developed approaches, requiring significant user intervention. This poses a challenge for the automation of their detection, segmentation, and quantitative analysis. Here we describe an open-source software package, SFEX (Stress Fiber Extractor), which is geared for efficient enhancement, segmentation, and analysis of actin stress fibers in adherent tissue culture cells. Our method made use of a carefully chosen image filtering technique to enhance filamentous structures, effectively facilitating the detection and segmentation of stress fibers by binary thresholding. We subdivided the skeletons of stress fiber traces into piecewise-linear fragments, and used a set of geometric criteria to reconstruct the stress fiber networks by pairing appropriate fiber fragments. Our strategy enables the trajectory of a majority of stress fibers within the cells to be comprehensively extracted. We also present a method for quantifying the dimensions of the stress fibers using an image gradient-based approach. We determine the optimal parameter space using sensitivity analysis, and demonstrate the utility of our approach by analyzing actin stress fibers in cells cultured on various micropattern substrates. We present an open-source graphically-interfaced computational tool for the extraction and quantification of stress fibers in adherent cells with minimal user input. This

  9. Non-rigid contour-to-pixel registration of photographic and quantitative light-induced fluorescence imaging of decalcified teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Deserno, Thomas; Ehrlich, Eva E.; Fritz, Ulrike B.; Sirazitdinova, Ekaterina; Tatano, Rosalia

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) is widely used to assess the damage of a tooth due to decalcification. In digital photographs, decalcification appears as white spot lesions, i.e. white spots on the tooth surface. We propose a novel multimodal registration approach for the matching of digital photographs and QLF images of decalcified teeth. The registration is based on the idea of contour-to-pixel matching. Here, the curve, which represents the shape of the tooth, is extracted from the QLF image using a contour segmentation by binarization and morphological processing. This curve is aligned to the photo with a non-rigid variational registration approach. Thus, the registration problem is formulated as minimization problem with an objective function that consists of a data term and a regularizer for the deformation. To construct the data term, the photo is pointwise classified into tooth and non-tooth regions. Then, the signed distance function of the tooth region allows to measure the mismatch between curve and photo. As regularizer a higher order, linear elastic prior is used. The resulting minimization problem is solved numerically using bilinear Finite Elements for the spatial discretization and the Gauss-Newton algorithm. The evaluation is based on 150 image pairs, where an average of 5 teeth have been captured from 32 subjects. All registrations have been confirmed correctly by a dental expert. The contour-to-pixel methods can directly be used in 3D for surface-to-voxel tasks.

  10. Quantitative Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Heterogeneous Tissue: Application to the Detection of Residual Disease in Tumor Margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jenna L; Harmany, Zachary T; Mito, Jeffrey K; Kennedy, Stephanie A; Kim, Yongbaek; Dodd, Leslie; Geradts, Joseph; Kirsch, David G; Willett, Rebecca M; Brown, J Quincy; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2013-01-01

    To develop a robust tool for quantitative in situ pathology that allows visualization of heterogeneous tissue morphology and segmentation and quantification of image features. TISSUE EXCISED FROM A GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MOUSE MODEL OF SARCOMA WAS IMAGED USING A SUBCELLULAR RESOLUTION MICROENDOSCOPE AFTER TOPICAL APPLICATION OF A FLUORESCENT ANATOMICAL CONTRAST AGENT: acriflavine. An algorithm based on sparse component analysis (SCA) and the circle transform (CT) was developed for image segmentation and quantification of distinct tissue types. The accuracy of our approach was quantified through simulations of tumor and muscle images. Specifically, tumor, muscle, and tumor+muscle tissue images were simulated because these tissue types were most commonly observed in sarcoma margins. Simulations were based on tissue characteristics observed in pathology slides. The potential clinical utility of our approach was evaluated by imaging excised margins and the tumor bed in a cohort of mice after surgical resection of sarcoma. Simulation experiments revealed that SCA+CT achieved the lowest errors for larger nuclear sizes and for higher contrast ratios (nuclei intensity/background intensity). For imaging of tumor margins, SCA+CT effectively isolated nuclei from tumor, muscle, adipose, and tumor+muscle tissue types. Differences in density were correctly identified with SCA+CT in a cohort of ex vivo and in vivo images, thus illustrating the diagnostic potential of our approach. The combination of a subcellular-resolution microendoscope, acriflavine staining, and SCA+CT can be used to accurately isolate nuclei and quantify their density in anatomical images of heterogeneous tissue.

  11. Application of quantitative structure-activity relationship to the determination of binding constant based on fluorescence quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Yingying [Department of Applied Chemistry, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China); Liu Huitao, E-mail: liuht-ytu@163.co [Department of Applied Chemistry, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China); Luan Feng; Gao Yuan [Department of Applied Chemistry, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China)

    2011-01-15

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was used to predict and explain binding constant (log K) determined by fluorescence quenching. This method allowed us to predict binding constants of a variety of compounds with human serum albumin (HSA) based on their structures alone. Stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) and nonlinear radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) were performed to build the models. The statistical parameters provided by the MLR model (R{sup 2}=0.8521, RMS=0.2678) indicated satisfactory stability and predictive ability while the RBFNN predictive ability is somewhat superior (R{sup 2}=0.9245, RMS=0.1736). The proposed models were used to predict the binding constants of two bioactive components in traditional Chinese medicines (isoimperatorin and chrysophanol) whose experimental results were obtained in our laboratory and the predicted results were in good agreement with the experimental results. This QSAR approach can contribute to a better understanding of structural factors of the compounds responsible for drug-protein interactions, and can be useful in predicting the binding constants of other compounds. - Research Highlights: QSAR models for binding constants of some compounds to HSA were developed. The models provide a simple and straightforward way to predict binding constant. QSAR can give some insight into structural features related to binding behavior.

  12. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization measurement of telomere length in skin with/without sun exposure or actinic keratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Aida, Junko; Hatamochi, Atsushi; Hamasaki, Yoichiro; Izumiyama-Shimomura, Naotaka; Nakamura, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Naoshi; Poon, Steven S; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Tomita, Ken-Ichiro; Hiraishi, Naoki; Kuroiwa, Mie; Matsuura, Masaaki; Sanada, Yukihiro; Kawano, Youichi; Arai, Tomio; Takubo, Kaiyo

    2014-03-01

    Chromosomal and genomic instability due to telomere dysfunction is known to play an important role in carcinogenesis. To study telomere shortening in the epidermis surrounding actinic keratosis, we measured telomere lengths of basal, parabasal, and suprabasal cells in epidermis with actinic keratosis (actinic keratosis group, n = 18) and without actinic keratosis (sun-protected, n = 15, and sun-exposed, n = 13 groups) and in actinic keratosis itself as well as in dermal fibroblasts in the 3 groups, using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization. Among the 3 cell types, telomeres of basal cells were not always the longest, suggesting that tissue stem cells are not necessarily located among basal cells. Telomeres of basal cells in the sun-exposed group were shorter than those in the sun-protected group. Telomeres in the background of actinic keratosis and in actinic keratosis itself and those of fibroblasts in actinic keratosis were significantly shorter than those in the controls. Our findings demonstrate that sun exposure induces telomere shortening and that actinic keratosis arises from epidermis with shorter telomeres despite the absence of any histologic atypia. © 2014.

  13. A Quantitative Theoretical Framework For Protein-Induced Fluorescence Enhancement-Förster-Type Resonance Energy Transfer (PIFE-FRET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Eitan; Ploetz, Evelyn; Hohlbein, Johannes; Cordes, Thorben; Weiss, Shimon

    2016-07-07

    Single-molecule, protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE) serves as a molecular ruler at molecular distances inaccessible to other spectroscopic rulers such as Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) or photoinduced electron transfer. In order to provide two simultaneous measurements of two distances on different molecular length scales for the analysis of macromolecular complexes, we and others recently combined measurements of PIFE and FRET (PIFE-FRET) on the single molecule level. PIFE relies on steric hindrance of the fluorophore Cy3, which is covalently attached to a biomolecule of interest, to rotate out of an excited-state trans isomer to the cis isomer through a 90° intermediate. In this work, we provide a theoretical framework that accounts for relevant photophysical and kinetic parameters of PIFE-FRET, show how this framework allows the extraction of the fold-decrease in isomerization mobility from experimental data, and show how these results provide information on changes in the accessible volume of Cy3. The utility of this model is then demonstrated for experimental results on PIFE-FRET measurement of different protein-DNA interactions. The proposed model and extracted parameters could serve as a benchmark to allow quantitative comparison of PIFE effects in different biological systems.

  14. Detection and quantitative determination of heavy metals in electronic cigarette refill liquids using Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamilari, Eleni; Farsalinos, Konstantinos; Poulas, Konstantinos; Kontoyannis, Christos G; Orkoula, Malvina G

    2018-06-01

    Electronic cigarettes are considered healthier alternatives to conventional cigarettes containing tobacco. They produce vapor through heating of the refill liquids (e-liquids) which consist of propylene glycol, vegetable glycerin, nicotine (in various concentrations), water and flavoring agents. Heavy metals may enter the refill liquid during the production, posing a risk for consumer's health due to their toxicity. The objective of the present study was the development of a methodology for the detection and quantitative analysis of cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr), employing Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TXRF) as an alternative technique to ICP-MS or ICP-OES commonly used for this type of analysis. TXRF was chosen due to its advantages, which include short analysis time, promptness, simultaneous multi-element analysis capability and minimum sample preparation, low purchase and operational cost. The proposed methodology was applied to a large number of electronic cigarette liquids commercially available, as well as their constituents, in order to evaluate their safety. TXRF may be a valuable tool for probing heavy metals in electronic cigarette refill liquids to serve for the protection of human health. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Turn-on Fluorescent Probe for Exogenous and Endogenous Imaging of Hypochlorous Acid in Living Cells and Quantitative Application in Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Zixuan; Liu, Rui; Chai, Li; Li, Qiuyan; Zhang, Kexin; Lv, Yi

    2017-09-05

    Hypochlorous acid (HClO) acts as a dominant microbicidal mediator in the natural immune system, and the excess production of hypochlorites is related to a series of diseases. Thus, it is vitally important and necessary to develop a highly sensitive and selective method for HClO detection in living systems, and most of fluorescent probes are mainly focused on cells imaging. Besides, accurate HClO quantitative information about individual cells in a large cell population is extremely important for understanding inflammation and cellular apoptosis as well. In our work, a turn-on fluorescent probe has been synthesized, which can selectively and sensitively detect HClO with fast response time. The probe is almost nonfluorescent possibly due to both the spirolactam form of fluorescein and unbridged C═N bonds which can undergo a nonradiative decay process in the excited state. Upon the addition of ClO - , the probe was oxidized to ring-opened fluorescent form and the fluorescence intensity was greatly enhanced. In live cell experiments, the probe was successfully applied to image exogenous ClO - in HeLa cells and endogenous HClO in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. In particular, the quantitative information on exogenous and endogenous HClO can also be acquired in flow cytometry. Therefore, the probe not only can image exogenous and endogenous HClO but also provides a new and promising platform to quantitatively detect HClO in flow cytometry.

  16. Comparison of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging CT to fluorescent microsphere-based flow from high-resolution cryo-images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Li, Yuemeng; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) has the potential to provide quantitative measures of myocardial blood flow (MBF) which can aid the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. We evaluated the quantitative accuracy of MPI-CT in a porcine model of balloon-induced LAD coronary artery ischemia guided by fractional flow reserve (FFR). We quantified MBF at baseline (FFR=1.0) and under moderate ischemia (FFR=0.7) using MPI-CT and compared to fluorescent microsphere-based MBF from high-resolution cryo-images. Dynamic, contrast-enhanced CT images were obtained using a spectral detector CT (Philips Healthcare). Projection-based mono-energetic images were reconstructed and processed to obtain MBF. Three MBF quantification approaches were evaluated: singular value decomposition (SVD) with fixed Tikhonov regularization (ThSVD), SVD with regularization determined by the L-Curve criterion (LSVD), and Johnson-Wilson parameter estimation (JW). The three approaches over-estimated MBF compared to cryo-images. JW produced the most accurate MBF, with average error 33.3+/-19.2mL/min/100g, whereas LSVD and ThSVD had greater over-estimation, 59.5+/-28.3mL/min/100g and 78.3+/-25.6 mL/min/100g, respectively. Relative blood flow as assessed by a flow ratio of LAD-to-remote myocardium was strongly correlated between JW and cryo-imaging, with R2=0.97, compared to R2=0.88 and 0.78 for LSVD and ThSVD, respectively. We assessed tissue impulse response functions (IRFs) from each approach for sources of error. While JW was constrained to physiologic solutions, both LSVD and ThSVD produced IRFs with non-physiologic properties due to noise. The L-curve provided noise-adaptive regularization but did not eliminate non-physiologic IRF properties or optimize for MBF accuracy. These findings suggest that model-based MPI-CT approaches may be more appropriate for quantitative MBF estimation and that cryo-imaging can support the development of MPI-CT by providing spatial distributions of MBF.

  17. A unique charge-coupled device/xenon arc lamp based imaging system for the accurate detection and quantitation of multicolour fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spibey, C A; Jackson, P; Herick, K

    2001-03-01

    In recent years the use of fluorescent dyes in biological applications has dramatically increased. The continual improvement in the capabilities of these fluorescent dyes demands increasingly sensitive detection systems that provide accurate quantitation over a wide linear dynamic range. In the field of proteomics, the detection, quantitation and identification of very low abundance proteins are of extreme importance in understanding cellular processes. Therefore, the instrumentation used to acquire an image of such samples, for spot picking and identification by mass spectrometry, must be sensitive enough to be able, not only, to maximise the sensitivity and dynamic range of the staining dyes but, as importantly, adapt to the ever changing portfolio of fluorescent dyes as they become available. Just as the available fluorescent probes are improving and evolving so are the users application requirements. Therefore, the instrumentation chosen must be flexible to address and adapt to those changing needs. As a result, a highly competitive market for the supply and production of such dyes and the instrumentation for their detection and quantitation have emerged. The instrumentation currently available is based on either laser/photomultiplier tube (PMT) scanning or lamp/charge-coupled device (CCD) based mechanisms. This review briefly discusses the advantages and disadvantages of both System types for fluorescence imaging, gives a technical overview of CCD technology and describes in detail a unique xenon/are lamp CCD based instrument, from PerkinElmer Life Sciences. The Wallac-1442 ARTHUR is unique in its ability to scan both large areas at high resolution and give accurate selectable excitation over the whole of the UV/visible range. It operates by filtering both the excitation and emission wavelengths, providing optimal and accurate measurement and quantitation of virtually any available dye and allows excellent spectral resolution between different fluorophores

  18. S-naproxen-ss-1-O-acyl glucuronide degradation kinetic studies by stopped-flow high-performance liquid chromatography-H-1 NMR and high-performance liquid chromatography-UV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, R. W.; Corcoran, O.; Cornett, Claus

    2001-01-01

    Acyl-migrated isomers of drug beta -1-O-acyl glucuronides have been implicated in drug toxicity because they can bind to proteins. The acyl migration and hydrolysis of S-naproxen-beta -1-O-acyl glucuronide (S-nap-g) was followed by dynamic stopped-flow HPLC-H-1 NMR and HPLC methods. Nine first or...

  19. Fluorescence-labeled methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism (FL-MS-AFLP) analysis for quantitative determination of DNA methylation and demethylation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Shinji; Shinmura, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Goto, Masanori; Suzuki, Koichi; Tanioka, Fumihiko; Tsuneyoshi, Toshihiro; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2008-04-01

    The PCR-based DNA fingerprinting method called the methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism (MS-AFLP) analysis is used for genome-wide scanning of methylation status. In this study, we developed a method of fluorescence-labeled MS-AFLP (FL-MS-AFLP) analysis by applying a fluorescence-labeled primer and fluorescence-detecting electrophoresis apparatus to the existing method of MS-AFLP analysis. The FL-MS-AFLP analysis enables quantitative evaluation of more than 350 random CpG loci per run. It was shown to allow evaluation of the differences in methylation level of blood DNA of gastric cancer patients and evaluation of hypermethylation and hypomethylation in DNA from gastric cancer tissue in comparison with adjacent non-cancerous tissue.

  20. Development and validation of a quantitative, high-throughput, fluorescent-based bioassay to detect schistosoma viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Peak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis, caused by infection with the blood fluke Schistosoma, is responsible for greater than 200,000 human deaths per annum. Objective high-throughput screens for detecting novel anti-schistosomal targets will drive 'genome to drug' lead translational science at an unprecedented rate. Current methods for detecting schistosome viability rely on qualitative microscopic criteria, which require an understanding of parasite morphology, and most importantly, must be subjectively interpreted. These limitations, in the current state of the art, have significantly impeded progress into whole schistosome screening for next generation chemotherapies.We present here a microtiter plate-based method for reproducibly detecting schistosomula viability that takes advantage of the differential uptake of fluorophores (propidium iodide and fluorescein diacetate by living organisms. We validate this high-throughput system in detecting schistosomula viability using auranofin (a known inhibitor of thioredoxin glutathione reductase, praziquantel and a range of small compounds with previously-described (gambogic acid, sodium salinomycin, ethinyl estradiol, fluoxetidine hydrochloride, miconazole nitrate, chlorpromazine hydrochloride, amphotericin b, niclosamide or suggested (bepridil, ciclopirox, rescinnamine, flucytosine, vinblastine and carbidopa anti-schistosomal activities. This developed method is sensitive (200 schistosomula/well can be assayed, relevant to industrial (384-well microtiter plate compatibility and academic (96-well microtiter plate compatibility settings, translatable to functional genomics screens and drug assays, does not require a priori knowledge of schistosome biology and is quantitative.The wide-scale application of this fluorescence-based bioassay will greatly accelerate the objective identification of novel therapeutic lead targets/compounds to combat schistosomiasis. Adapting this bioassay for use with other parasitic worm species

  1. Quantitative Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Heterogeneous Tissue: Application to the Detection of Residual Disease in Tumor Margins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna L Mueller

    Full Text Available To develop a robust tool for quantitative in situ pathology that allows visualization of heterogeneous tissue morphology and segmentation and quantification of image features.TISSUE EXCISED FROM A GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MOUSE MODEL OF SARCOMA WAS IMAGED USING A SUBCELLULAR RESOLUTION MICROENDOSCOPE AFTER TOPICAL APPLICATION OF A FLUORESCENT ANATOMICAL CONTRAST AGENT: acriflavine. An algorithm based on sparse component analysis (SCA and the circle transform (CT was developed for image segmentation and quantification of distinct tissue types. The accuracy of our approach was quantified through simulations of tumor and muscle images. Specifically, tumor, muscle, and tumor+muscle tissue images were simulated because these tissue types were most commonly observed in sarcoma margins. Simulations were based on tissue characteristics observed in pathology slides. The potential clinical utility of our approach was evaluated by imaging excised margins and the tumor bed in a cohort of mice after surgical resection of sarcoma.Simulation experiments revealed that SCA+CT achieved the lowest errors for larger nuclear sizes and for higher contrast ratios (nuclei intensity/background intensity. For imaging of tumor margins, SCA+CT effectively isolated nuclei from tumor, muscle, adipose, and tumor+muscle tissue types. Differences in density were correctly identified with SCA+CT in a cohort of ex vivo and in vivo images, thus illustrating the diagnostic potential of our approach.The combination of a subcellular-resolution microendoscope, acriflavine staining, and SCA+CT can be used to accurately isolate nuclei and quantify their density in anatomical images of heterogeneous tissue.

  2. Establishment of a 10-Plex Quantitative Fluorescent-PCR Assay for rapid diagnosis of sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmei Xie

    Full Text Available Sex chromosome aneuploidies occur commonly in the general population, with an incidence of 1 in 400 newborns. However, no tests specifically targeting sex chromosomes have been carried out in prenatal diagnosis or newborn screening, resulting in late recognition of these diseases. In this study, a rapid diagnostic method for sex chromosome aneuploidies was established using Quantitative Fluorescent-PCR (QF-PCR. Ten markers were included in one multiplex QF-PCR assay, including two sex determination genes (AMXY and SRY, five X-linked short tandem repeats (STRs; DXS1053, DXS981, DXS6809, DXS1187, and DXS8377, one X/Y-common STR (X22, and two autosomal STRs (D13S305 and D21S11. Retrospective tests of 70 cases with known cytogenetic results indicated that the 10-plex QF-PCR assay could well determine sex chromosome copy numbers by both allelic peak numbers and a sex chromosome dosage calculation with the autosomal STRs as internal controls. Prospective comparison with cytogenetic karyotyping on 534 cases confirmed that the 10-plex QF-PCR assay could be well employed for sex chromosome aneuploidy diagnosis in at least the Chinese Han population. This is the first QF-PCR test for the diagnosis of sex chromosome aneuploidies in the Chinese population. This test is superior to previous designs by including up to 8 sex-linked markers covering different parts of sex chromosomes as well as employing internal controls for copy number dosage calculation in a single PCR reaction. Due to simple technique and data analysis, as well as easy implementation within routine clinical services, this method is of great clinical application value and could be widely applied.

  3. Visualization and quantitation of abundant macroautophagy in virus-infected cells by confocal three-dimensional fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Wallen; Yamada, Masaki; Moninger, Thomas; Grose, Charles

    2013-10-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human herpesvirus. Primary infection causes varicella (chickenpox), a viremic illness typified by an exanthem consisting of several hundred vesicles. When VZV reactivates from latency in the spinal ganglia during late adulthood, the emerging virus causes a vesicular dermatomal rash (herpes zoster or shingles). To expand investigations of autophagy during varicella and zoster, newer 3D imaging technology was combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy to provide animations of autophagosomes in the vesicular rash. First, the cells were immunolabeled with antibodies against VZV proteins and the LC3 protein, an integral autophagosomal protein. Antibody reagents lacking activity against the human blood group A1 antigen were selected. After laser excitation of the samples, optimized emission detection bandwidths were configured by Zeiss Zen control software. Confocal Z-stacks comprising up to 40 optical slices were reconstructed into 3D animations with the aid of Imaris software. With this imaging technology, individual autophagosomes were clearly detectable as spheres within each vesicular cell. To enumerate the number of autophagosomes, data sets from 50 cells were reconstructed as 3D fluorescence images and analyzed with MeasurementPro software. The mean number of autophagosomes per infected vesicular cell was >100, although over 200 autophagosomes were seen in a few cells. In summary, macroautophagy was easily quantitated within VZV-infected cells after immunolabeling and imaging by 3D confocal animation technology. These same 3D imaging techniques will be applicable for investigations of autophagy in other virus-infected cells. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lipid domains in giant unilamellar vesicles and their correspondence with equilibrium thermodynamic phases: A quantitative fluorescence microscopy imaging approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidorra, Matthias; Garcia, Alejandra; Ipsen, John Hjort

    2009-01-01

    We report a novel analytical procedure to measure the surface areas of coexisting lipid domains in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) based on image processing of 3D fluorescence microscopy data. The procedure involves the segmentation of lipid domains from fluorescent image stacks...

  5. Fluorescence properties of the anti-tumour alkaloid luotonin A and new synthetic analogues: pH modulation as an approach to their fluorimetric quantitation in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González-Ruiz, Víctor; González-Cuevas, Yamisley; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam; Martín, M. Antonia; Olives, Ana I.; Ribelles, Pascual; Ramos, M. Teresa; Menéndez, J. Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Luotonin A is an alkaloid structurally related to the natural anti-tumour agent camptothecin. The fluorescence behaviour of luotonin A and a series of six analogues is described in the present work. The influence of solvent polarity and pH on the native fluorescence properties of these alkaloids was studied, finding that in organic solvents or in aqueous solutions (pH 5.5–7.2) the neutral form of the luotonin derivatives emit in the region of 410–450 nm but, in both media, acidification to pH values below 3.0 causes a new emission band to appear at about 500 nm. An ESPT reaction occurs due to the protonation of the basic nitrogen atoms of the pentacyclic ring. Acid-base titrations of luotonin A and its derivatives in aqueous and acetonitrile media were carried out in order to determine their pK a ⁎ values which were around 2, showing these compounds to be very weak bases. In aqueous media, the absence of an iso-emissive point in the emission spectra suggests the existence of more than two species in the proton transfer equilibria. The basicity of the luotonin A derivatives is increased in organic media, and a good correlation between the pK a ⁎ values and the chemical structure was found. The protonation of luotonin A was also studied by 1 H-NMR and 13 C-NMR experiments, which proved the protonation of the nitrogen atoms at the positions 5 and 6 of the pentacyclic ring. The fluorescence quantum yields were determined in ethanol and in aqueous solutions under neutral and acidic conditions. The fluorescence quantum yields were higher in water for the case of the more polar compounds, and the opposite result was obtained for the more hydrophobic ones. The remarkable and interesting fluorescence properties of luotonin A prompted the development of its fluorimetric analytical quantitation, obtaining very good analytical features. - Highlights: ► This is the first study on the fluorescence properties of luotonin A analogues. ► Fluorescence and NMR experiments

  6. Fluorescence properties of the anti-tumour alkaloid luotonin A and new synthetic analogues: pH modulation as an approach to their fluorimetric quantitation in biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Ruiz, Victor; Gonzalez-Cuevas, Yamisley; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam [S. D. Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040-Madrid (Spain); Martin, M. Antonia, E-mail: mantonia@farm.ucm.es [S. D. Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040-Madrid (Spain); Olives, Ana I. [S. D. Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040-Madrid (Spain); Ribelles, Pascual; Ramos, M. Teresa; Menendez, J. Carlos [D. Quimica Organica y Farmaceutica, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040-Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Luotonin A is an alkaloid structurally related to the natural anti-tumour agent camptothecin. The fluorescence behaviour of luotonin A and a series of six analogues is described in the present work. The influence of solvent polarity and pH on the native fluorescence properties of these alkaloids was studied, finding that in organic solvents or in aqueous solutions (pH 5.5-7.2) the neutral form of the luotonin derivatives emit in the region of 410-450 nm but, in both media, acidification to pH values below 3.0 causes a new emission band to appear at about 500 nm. An ESPT reaction occurs due to the protonation of the basic nitrogen atoms of the pentacyclic ring. Acid-base titrations of luotonin A and its derivatives in aqueous and acetonitrile media were carried out in order to determine their pK{sub a}{sup Low-Asterisk} values which were around 2, showing these compounds to be very weak bases. In aqueous media, the absence of an iso-emissive point in the emission spectra suggests the existence of more than two species in the proton transfer equilibria. The basicity of the luotonin A derivatives is increased in organic media, and a good correlation between the pK{sub a}{sup Low-Asterisk} values and the chemical structure was found. The protonation of luotonin A was also studied by {sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C-NMR experiments, which proved the protonation of the nitrogen atoms at the positions 5 and 6 of the pentacyclic ring. The fluorescence quantum yields were determined in ethanol and in aqueous solutions under neutral and acidic conditions. The fluorescence quantum yields were higher in water for the case of the more polar compounds, and the opposite result was obtained for the more hydrophobic ones. The remarkable and interesting fluorescence properties of luotonin A prompted the development of its fluorimetric analytical quantitation, obtaining very good analytical features. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first study on the fluorescence

  7. The erosive potential of commercially available mouthrinses on enamel as measured by Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretty, I A; Edgar, W M; Higham, S M

    2003-07-01

    Longitudinal in vitro. Previously extracted, caries free, human premolars were selected and prepared by gentle pumicing and coating in an acid-resistant nail-varnish save for an exposed enamel window on the buccal surface. Each was assigned to one of eight groups (six per group, 10 in positive control); positive control (citric acid, pH 2.7, F(-) 0 ppm), negative control (pH 7.0, F(-) 0 ppm) Listerine (pH 3.87, F(-) 0.021 ppm), Tesco Value (pH 6.05, F(-) 289.00 ppm), Tesco Total Care (pH 6.20, F(-) 313.84 ppm), Sainsbury's (pH 6.15, F(-) 365.75 ppm), Sensodyne (pH 6.12, F(-) 285.30 ppm) and Corsodyl (pH 5.65, F(-) 0 ppm). The titratable acid values (TAV) for each rinse were established using volume (ml) of 0.1 M NaOH to achieve pH 7. Fluoride values were obtained by ion selective electrode. The solutions were kept at 37 degrees C and gently agitated. Teeth were removed at hourly intervals for 15 h, air-dried and subjected to Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF) examination by a blinded examiner and DeltaQ values recorded. At the conclusion of the study each of the positive control teeth and one from each other group were sectioned through the eroded lesion, ground and polished to 100 micrometers and subjected to transverse microradiography and DeltaZ recorded for validation. TAVs were: Listerine 2.45 L > Sainsbury's 0.35 ml >Tesco Total Care 0.14 ml > Tesco Value 0.08 ml > Corsodyl 0.10 ml >Sensodyne 0.9 ml. DeltaQ increased over time for the positive control, (0 h 0.2, 10 h 95.2, 15 h 152.3). Negative controls remained stable. The increase in DeltaQ for each rinse after 15 h was Listerine (9.3(+/-7.2)), Corsodyl (1.5(+/-1.2)), Tesco Value (1.8(+/-1.2)), Tesco Total Care (1.4(+/-1.1)), Sainsbury's (3.4(+/-2.2)), Sensodyne (0.9(+/-1.6)). TMR confirmed the presence/absence of erosive lesions. QLF effectively monitored erosion in the positive controls and lack of erosion in the NC. Only one mouthrinse (Listerine) caused any erosion compared to the negative

  8. Artificial neural networks study of the catalytic reduction of resazurin: stopped-flow injection kinetic-spectrophotometric determination of Cu(II) and Ni(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magni, Diana M.; Olivieri, Alejandro C.; Bonivardi, Adrian L.

    2005-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) procedure was used in the development of a catalytic spectrophotometric method for the determination of Cu(II) and Ni(II) employing a stopped-flow injection system. The method is based on the catalytic action of these ions on the reduction of resazurin by sulfide. ANNs trained by back-propagation of errors allowed us to model the systems in a concentration range of 0.5-6 and 1-15 mg l -1 for Cu(II) and Ni(II), respectively, with a low relative error of prediction (REP) for each cation: REP Cu(II) = 0.85% and REP Ni(II) = 0.79%. The standard deviations of the repeatability (s r ) and of the within-laboratory reproducibility (s w ) were measured using standard solutions of Cu(II) and Ni(II) equal to 2.75 and 3.5 mg l -1 , respectively: s r [Cu(II)] = 0.039 mg l -1 , s r [Ni(II)] = 0.044 mg l -1 , s w [Ni(II)] = 0.045 mg l -1 and s w [Ni(II)] = 0.050 mg l -1 . The ANNs-kinetic method has been applied to the determination of Cu(II) and Ni(II) in electroplating solutions and provided satisfactory results as compared with flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. The effect of resazurin, NaOH and Na 2 S concentrations and the reaction temperature on the analytical sensitivity is discussed

  9. Combined pressure and cosolvent effects on enzyme activity - a high-pressure stopped-flow kinetic study on α-chymotrypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Trung Quan; Winter, Roland

    2015-09-21

    We investigated the combined effects of cosolvents and pressure on the hydrolysis of a model peptide catalysed by α-chymotrypsin. The enzymatic activity was measured in the pressure range from 0.1 to 200 MPa using a high-pressure stopped-flow systems with 10 ms time resolution. A kosmotropic (trimethalymine-N-oxide, TMAO) and chaotropic (urea) cosolvent and mixtures thereof were used as cosolvents. High pressure enhances the hydrolysis rate as a consequence of a negative activation volume, ΔV(#), which, depending on the cosolvent system, amounts to -2 to -4 mL mol(-1). A more negative activation volume can be explained by a smaller compression of the ES complex relative to the transition state. Kinetic constants, such as kcat and the Michaelis constant KM, were determined for all solution conditions as a function of pressure. With increasing pressure, kcat increases by about 35% and its pressure dependence by a factor of 1.9 upon addition of 2 M urea, whereas 1 M TMAO has no significant effect on kcat and its pressure dependence. Similarly, KM increases upon addition of urea 6-fold. Addition of TMAO compensates the urea-effect on kcat and KM to some extent. The maximum rate of the enzymatic reaction increases with increasing pressure in all solutions except in the TMAO : urea 1 : 2 mixture, where, remarkably, pressure is found to have no effect on the rate of the enzymatic reaction anymore. Our data clearly show that compatible solutes can easily override deleterious effects of harsh environmental conditions, such as high hydrostatic pressures in the 100 MPa range, which is the maximum pressure encountered in the deep biosphere on Earth.

  10. Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence-Digital as an oral hygiene evaluation tool to assess plaque accumulation and enamel demineralization in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cara C; Burnside, Girvan; Higham, Susan M; Flannigan, Norah L

    2016-11-01

      To assess the use of Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence-Digital as an oral hygiene evaluation tool during orthodontic treatment.   In this prospective, randomized clinical trial, 33 patients undergoing fixed orthodontic appliance treatment were randomly allocated to receive oral hygiene reinforcement at four consecutive appointments using either white light (WL) or Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence-Digital (QLF) images, taken with a device, as visual aids. Oral hygiene was recorded assessing the QLF images for demineralization, by fluorescence loss (ΔF), and plaque coverage (ΔR30). A debriefing questionnaire ascertained patient perspectives.   There were no significant differences in demineralization (P  =  .56) or plaque accumulation (P  =  .82) between the WL and QLF groups from T0 to T4. There was no significant reduction in demineralization, ΔF, in the WL, or the QLF group from T0-T4 (P > .05); however, there was a significant reduction in ΔR30 plaque scores (P orthodontics. Oral hygiene reinforcement at consecutive appointments using WL or QLF images as visual aids is effective in reducing plaque coverage. In terms of clinical benefits, QLF and WL images are of similar effectiveness; however, patients preferred the QLF images.

  11. MATtrack: A MATLAB-Based Quantitative Image Analysis Platform for Investigating Real-Time Photo-Converted Fluorescent Signals in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Jane; Woods, Elena; Scholz, Dimitri; Hall, William W; Gautier, Virginie W

    2015-01-01

    We introduce here MATtrack, an open source MATLAB-based computational platform developed to process multi-Tiff files produced by a photo-conversion time lapse protocol for live cell fluorescent microscopy. MATtrack automatically performs a series of steps required for image processing, including extraction and import of numerical values from Multi-Tiff files, red/green image classification using gating parameters, noise filtering, background extraction, contrast stretching and temporal smoothing. MATtrack also integrates a series of algorithms for quantitative image analysis enabling the construction of mean and standard deviation images, clustering and classification of subcellular regions and injection point approximation. In addition, MATtrack features a simple user interface, which enables monitoring of Fluorescent Signal Intensity in multiple Regions of Interest, over time. The latter encapsulates a region growing method to automatically delineate the contours of Regions of Interest selected by the user, and performs background and regional Average Fluorescence Tracking, and automatic plotting. Finally, MATtrack computes convenient visualization and exploration tools including a migration map, which provides an overview of the protein intracellular trajectories and accumulation areas. In conclusion, MATtrack is an open source MATLAB-based software package tailored to facilitate the analysis and visualization of large data files derived from real-time live cell fluorescent microscopy using photoconvertible proteins. It is flexible, user friendly, compatible with Windows, Mac, and Linux, and a wide range of data acquisition software. MATtrack is freely available for download at eleceng.dit.ie/courtney/MATtrack.zip.

  12. A real-time fluorescent sensor specific to Mg2+: crystallographic evidence, DFT calculation and its use for quantitative determination of magnesium in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Guangwen; Chen, Chunrong; Zhang, Shitong; Liang, Chunshuang; Wang, Ying; Deng, Mengyu; Shang, Hongxing; Yang, Bing; Jiang, Shimei

    2015-02-14

    An "off-the-shelf" fluorescence "turn-on" Mg(2+) chemosensor 3,5-dichlorosalicylaldehyde (BCSA) was rationally designed and developed. This proposed sensor works based on Mg(2+)-induced formation of the 2 : 1 BCSA-Mg(2+) complex. The coordination of BSCA to Mg(2+) increases its structural rigidity generating a chelation-enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) effect which was confirmed by single crystal XRD studies of the BSCA-Mg(2+) complex and TD/DFT calculations. This sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for the quantitative monitoring of Mg(2+) with a wide detection range (0-40 μM), a low detection limit (2.89 × 10(-7) mol L(-1)) and a short response time (sensor can be utilized to monitor Mg(2+) in real time within actual samples from drinking water.

  13. Quantitative time domain analysis of lifetime-based Förster resonant energy transfer measurements with fluorescent proteins: Static random isotropic fluorophore orientation distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandrov, Yuriy; Nikolic, Dino Solar; Dunsby, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) measurements are widely used to obtain information about molecular interactions and conformations through the dependence of FRET efficiency on the proximity of donor and acceptor fluorophores. Fluorescence lifetime measurements can provide quantitative...... into new software for fitting donor emission decay profiles. Calculated FRET parameters, including molar population fractions, are compared for the analysis of simulated and experimental FRET data under the assumption of static and dynamic fluorophores and the intermediate regimes between fully dynamic...... analysis of FRET efficiency and interacting population fraction. Many FRET experiments exploit the highly specific labelling of genetically expressed fluorescent proteins, applicable in live cells and organisms. Unfortunately, the typical assumption of fast randomization of fluorophore orientations...

  14. Rapid and quantitative detection of zoonotic influenza A virus infection utilizing coumarin-derived dendrimer-based fluorescent immunochromatographic strip test (FICT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Seon-Ju; Huong, Dinh Thi; Hong, Nguyen Ngoc; Li, Chun-Ying; Choi, Kyunghan; Yu, Kyoungsik; Choi, Du-Young; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Choi, Hak Soo; Mallik, Shyam Kumar; Kim, Hak Sung; Sung, Haan Woo; Park, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Great efforts have been made to develop robust signal-generating fluorescence materials which will help in improving the rapid diagnostic test (RDT) in terms of sensitivity and quantification. In this study, we developed coumarin-derived dendrimer-based fluorescent immunochromatographic strip test (FICT) assay with enhanced sensitivity as a quantitative diagnostic tool in typical RDT environments. The accuracy of the proposed FICT was compared with that of dot blot immunoassay techniques and conventional RDTs. Through conjugation of coumarin-derived dendrimers with latex beads, fluorescent emission covering broad output spectral ranges was obtained which provided a distinct advantage of easy discrimination of the fluorescent emission of the latex beads with a simple insertion of a long-pass optical filter away from the excitation wavelength. The newly developed FICT assay was able to detect 100 ng/10 μL of influenza A nucleoprotein (NP) antigen within 5 minutes, which corresponded to 2.5-fold higher sensitivity than that of the dot blot immunoassay or conventional RDTs. Moreover, the FICT assay was confirmed to detect at least four avian influenza A subtypes (H5N3, H7N1, H7N7, and H9N2). On applying the FICT to the clinical swab samples infected with respiratory viruses, our FICT assay was confirmed to differentiate influenza H1N1 infection from other respiratory viral diseases. These data demonstrate that the proposed FICT assay is able to detect zoonotic influenza A viruses with a high sensitivity, and it enables the quantitation of the infection intensity by providing the numerical diagnostic values; thus demonstrating enhanced detectability of influenza A viruses.

  15. The Potential of Self-assembling Peptides for Enhancement of In Vitro Remineralisation of White Spot Lesions as Measured by Quantitative Laser Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golland, Luca; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Schätzle, Marc

    To test the remineralisation potential of a single application of self-assembling peptides or acidic fluoride solution using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) in vitro. Bovine enamel disks were prepared, and white spot lesions were created on one half of the disk with an acidic buffer solution. After demineralisation, disks were allocated into three groups of 11 specimens each. Group A served as a control group and received no treatment. Group B had a single application of fluoride, and group C was treated once with self-assembling peptides. All disks were embedded in a plastic mold (diameter 15 mm, height 9 mm) with an a-silicone, and remineralisation was initiated using a pH-cycling protocol for five days. Four experimental regions on each disk were measured prior to the start of the study (T0), after demineralisation (T1) and after the remineralisation process (T2) using QLF. After demineralisation, all areas showed a distinct loss of fluorescence, with no statistically significant difference between the groups (ΔF from -69.3 to -10.2). After remineralisation, samples of group B (treated with fluoride) showed a statistically significant fluorescence increase (ΔF from T1 to T2 15.2 ± 7.3) indicating remineralisation, whereas the samples of control group A and group C (treated with self-assembling peptides) showed no significant changes in ΔF of 1.1 ± 1.9 and 2.5 ± 1.9, respectively. Application of self-assembling peptides on demineralised bovine enamel did not lead to increased fluorescence using QLF, indicating either lack of remineralisation or irregular crystals. Increased fluorescence using QLF indicated mineral gain following a single application of a highly concentrated fluoride.

  16. Stopped-flow studies of carbon dioxide hydration and bicarbonate dehydration in H2O and D2O. Acid-base and metal ion catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocker, Y.; Bjorkquist, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    The approach to equilibrium between carbon dioxide and bicarbonate has been followed by zero-order kinetics both from direction of CO 2 hydration and HCO 3 - dehydration. The rates are monitored at 25.0 0 C using stopped-flow indicator technique in H 2 O as well as D 2 O. The hydration of CO 2 is subject to catalysis by H 2 O (k 0 = 2.9 x 10 -2 s -1 ) and OH - (k/sub OH - / = 6.0 x 10 3 M -1 s -1 ). The value of 0.63 for the ratio k/sub OH - //k/sub OD - / is consistent with a mechanism utilizing a direct nucleophilic attack of OH - on CO 2 . In reverse direction HCO 3 - dehydration is catalyzed predominantly by H 3 O + (k/sub H 3 O + / 4.1 x 10 4 M -1 s -1 ) and to a much lesser degree by H 2 O (k 0 = 2 x 10 -4 s -1 ). The value of 0.56 for ratio k/sub H 3 O + //kD 3 O + / indicates that HCO 3 - may be protonated either in a preequilibrium step or in a rate-determining dehydration step. Both the hydration of CO 2 and the dehydration of bicarbonate are subject to general catalysis. For CO 2 , dibasic phosphate, a zinc imidazole complex, and a copper imidazole complex all enhanced the rate of hydration with respective rate coefficients of 3 x 10 -1 , 6.0, and 2.5 M -1 s -1 . For bicarbonate, monobasic phosphate catalyzed the rate of dehydration (k/sub H 2 PO 4 - / = 1 x 10 -1 M -1 s -1 ). Additionally in going from an ionic strength of 0.1 to 1.0 there was a negligible salt effect for the water-catalyzed hydration of CO 2 . However, the rate constant for the hydronium ion catalyzed dehydration of HCO 3 - was reduced from 4.1 x 10 4 M -1 s -1 to 2.3 x 10 4 M -1 s -1 for the same change in ionic strength. Finally the rate of CO 2 uptake by the complex Co(NH 3 ) 5 OH 2 3+ was followed spectrophotometrically both in H 2 O and D 2 O to determine the solvent isotope effect for a reaction known to involve a nucleophilic attack of a Co(III)-hydroxo complex on CO 2

  17. Quantitative analysis of the sediments from the Solimoes/Amazonas river flood plain using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, Ana E.V.

    1995-01-01

    A methodology for quantitative analysis of geological, biological and environmental samples with a high fraction of light elements (atomic number less than 13), using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique with radioisotopic excitation, is proposed. The proposed procedure is based on the method of Fundamental Parameters for analytical elements (≥->13 evaluation, and coherent and incoherent scattered radiation for the quantitation of the light fraction of the matrix. In the order to obtain the characteristic X-ray of the elements in the Mn to Zr range a Cd-109 annular radioactive source (1,70 GBq) was used, and for Al to CR, Fe-55 (o,74 GBq). For the X-ray detection a Si (Li) detector coupled to a multichannel emulation card was employed. The characteristic X-ray net intensity as well as the coherent and incoherent scattered intensities were obtained by using the AXL software for spectrum analysis. (author). 89 refs., 37 figs., 32 tabs

  18. Quantitative in vivo fluorescence cross-correlation analyses highlight the importance of competitive effects in the regulation of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaie, Wakako; Harada, Yoshie; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2014-09-01

    Computer-assisted simulation is a promising approach for clarifying complicated signaling networks. However, this approach is currently limited by a deficiency of kinetic parameters determined in living cells. To overcome this problem, we applied fluorescence cross-correlation spectrometry (FCCS) to measure dissociation constant (Kd) values of signaling molecule complexes in living cells (in vivo Kd). Among the pairs of fluorescent molecules tested, that of monomerized enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) and HaloTag-tetramethylrhodamine was most suitable for the measurement of in vivo Kd by FCCS. Using this pair, we determined 22 in vivo Kd values of signaling molecule complexes comprising the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. With these parameters, we developed a kinetic simulation model of the EGFR-Ras-ERK MAP kinase pathway and uncovered a potential role played by stoichiometry in Shc binding to EGFR during the peak activations of Ras, MEK, and ERK. Intriguingly, most of the in vivo Kd values determined in this study were higher than the in vitro Kd values reported previously, suggesting the significance of competitive bindings inside cells. These in vivo Kd values will provide a sound basis for the quantitative understanding of signal transduction. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Quantitative analysis of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling using live-cell total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Heath E; Haugh, Jason M

    2013-12-02

    This unit focuses on the use of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and image analysis methods to study the dynamics of signal transduction mediated by class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) in mammalian cells. The first four protocols cover live-cell imaging experiments, image acquisition parameters, and basic image processing and segmentation. These methods are generally applicable to live-cell TIRF experiments. The remaining protocols outline more advanced image analysis methods, which were developed in our laboratory for the purpose of characterizing the spatiotemporal dynamics of PI3K signaling. These methods may be extended to analyze other cellular processes monitored using fluorescent biosensors. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Quantitative analysis of phosphosilicate glass films on silicon wafers for calibration of x-ray fluorescence spectrometry standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    The phosphorus and silicon contents of phosphosilicate glass films deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on silicon wafers were determined. These films were prepared for use as x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry standards. The thin films were removed from the wafer by etching with dilute hydrofluoric acid, and the P and Si concentrations in solution were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP). The calculated phosphorus concentration ranged from 2.2 to 12 wt %, with an uncertainty of 2.73 to 10.1 relative percent. Variation between the calculated weight loss (summation of P 2 O 5 and SiO 2 amounts as determined by ICP) and the measured weight loss (determined gravimetrically) averaged 4.9%. Results from the ICP method, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), dispersive infrared spectroscopy, electron microprobe, and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for the same samples are compared

  1. Quantitative fluorescence-polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of the duplication of the Charcot Marie Tooth disease type 1A critical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toffol, Simona; Bellone, Emilia; Dulcetti, Francesca; Ruggeri, Anna Maria; Maggio, Pietro Paolo; Pulimeno, Maria Rosaria; Mandich, Paola; Maggi, Federico; Simoni, Giuseppe; Grati, Francesca Romana

    2010-04-01

    Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) syndrome is the most common hereditary peripheral neuropathy, with an incidence of about 1 in 2500. The subtype 1A (CMT1A) is caused by a tandem duplication of a 1.5-Mb region encompassing the PMP22 gene. Conventional short tandem repeat (STR) analysis can reveal this imbalance if a triallelic pattern, defining with certainty the presence of duplication, is present. In case of duplication with a biallelic pattern, it can only indicate a semiquantitative dosage of the fluorescence intensity ratio of the two fragments. In this study we developed a quantitative fluorescence-PCR using seven highly informative STRs within the CMT1A critical region that successfully disclosed or excluded the presence of the pathogenic imbalance in a cohort of 60 samples including 40 DNAs from samples with the CMT1A duplication previously characterized with two different molecular approaches, and 20 diagnostic samples from 10 members of a five-generation pedigree segregating CMT1A, 8 unrelated cases and 2 prenatal samples. The application of the quantitative fluorescence-PCR using STRs located in the critical region could be a reliable method to evaluate the presence of the PMP22 duplication for the diagnosis and classification of hereditary neuropathies in asymptomatic subjects with a family history of inherited neuropathy, in prenatal samples in cases with one affected parent, and in unrelated patients with a sporadic demyelinating neuropathy with clinical features resembling CMT (i.e., pes cavus with hammer toes) or with conduction velocities in the range of CMT1A.

  2. STANDARDIZATION OF A FLUORESCENT-BASED QUANTITATIVE ADHESION ASSAY TO STUDY ATTACHMENT OF Taenia solium ONCOSPHERE TO EPITHELIAL CELLS In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chile, Nancy; Evangelista, Julio; Gilman, Robert H.; Arana, Yanina; Palma, Sandra; Sterling, Charles R; Garcia, Hector H.; Gonzalez, Armando; Verastegui, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    To fully understand the preliminary stages of Taenia solium oncosphere attachment in the gut, adequate tools and assays are necessary to observe and quantify this event that leads to infection. A fluorescent-based quantitative adhesion assay, using biotinylated activated-oncospheres and monolayers of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) or human intestinal monolayer cells (INT-407, HCT-8 or HT-29), was developed to study initial events during the infection of target cells and to rapidly quantify the in vitro adhesion of T. solium oncospheres. Fluorescein streptavidin was used to identify biotinylated activated-oncospheres adhered to cells. This adherence was quantified using an automated fluorescence plate reader, and the results were expressed as fluorescence intensity values. A series of three assays were performed. The first was to identify the optimum number of biotinylated activated-oncospheres to be used in the adhesion assay. The goal of the second assay was to validate this novel method with the established oncosphere-binding system using the immunofluorescent-antibody assay (IFA) method to quantify oncosphere adhesion. A total of 10,000 biotinylated activated-oncospheres were utilized to assess the role of sera and laminin (LM) in oncosphere adherence to a CHO-K1 cell monolayer. The findings that sera and LM increase the adhesion of oncospheres to monolayer cells were similar to results that were previously obtained using the IFA method. The third assay compared the adherence of biotinylated activated-oncospheres to different types of human intestinal monolayer cells. In this case, the fluorescence intensity was greatest when using the INT-407 cell monolayer. We believe this new method of quantification offers the potential for rapid, large-scale screening to study and elucidate specific molecules and mechanisms involved in oncosphere-host cell attachment. PMID:22178422

  3. Development of Total Reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry quantitative methodologies for elemental characterization of building materials and their degradation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Florentino, Cristina; Maguregui, Maite; Marguí, Eva; Torrent, Laura; Queralt, Ignasi; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2018-05-01

    In this work, a Total Reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry based quantitative methodology for elemental characterization of liquid extracts and solids belonging to old building materials and their degradation products from a building of the beginning of 20th century with a high historic cultural value in Getxo, (Basque Country, North of Spain) is proposed. This quantification strategy can be considered a faster methodology comparing to traditional Energy or Wavelength Dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF and WD-XRF) spectrometry based methodologies or other techniques such as Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). In particular, two kinds of liquid extracts were analysed: (i) water soluble extracts from different mortars and (ii) acid extracts from mortars, black crusts, and calcium carbonate formations. In order to try to avoid the acid extraction step of the materials and their degradation products, it was also studied the TXRF direct measurement of the powdered solid suspensions in water. With this aim, different parameters such as the deposition volume and the measuring time were studied for each kind of samples. Depending on the quantified element, the limits of detection achieved with the TXRF quantitative methodologies for liquid extracts and solids were set around 0.01-1.2 and 2-200 mg/L respectively. The quantification of K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Zn, Rb, Sr, Sn and Pb in the liquid extracts was proved to be a faster alternative to other more classic quantification techniques (i.e. ICP-MS), accurate enough to obtain information about the composition of the acidic soluble part of the materials and their degradation products. Regarding the solid samples measured as suspensions, it was quite difficult to obtain stable and repetitive suspensions affecting in this way the accuracy of the results. To cope with this problem, correction factors based on the quantitative results obtained using ED-XRF were calculated to improve the accuracy of

  4. Quantitative analysis of heavy metals in water samples of the Chapala lake by X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Novara, Ana Ma.

    1987-01-01

    Seven samples of water from Chapala Lake were sent to the ININ X-Ray Fluorescence Laboratory. The presence of Fe, Ni, Cu, Hg and Pb in general could be observed, The results for Pb and Hg were compared with those obtained by atomic absorption in laboratories at the SARH (Ministry of Agriculture and Hydraulic Resources). Corrections had to be made in order to quantify the amount of mercury. There are good working conditions to perform routine analyses of heavy metals ions in water. (author)

  5. Major constituent quantitative determination in uranium alloys by coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and X ray fluorescence wavelength dispersive spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Luis Claudio de; Silva, Adriana Mascarenhas Martins da; Gomide, Ricardo Goncalves; Silva, Ieda de Souza

    2013-01-01

    A wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) spectrometric method for determination of major constituents elements (Zr, Nb, Mo) in Uranium/Zirconium/Niobium and Uranium/Molybdenum alloy samples were developed. The methods use samples taken in the form of chips that were dissolved in hot nitric acid and precipitate particles melted with lithium tetraborate and dissolved in hot nitric acid and finally analyzed as a solution. Studies on the determination by inductively coupled plasma optic emission spectrometry (ICP OES) using matched matrix in calibration curve were developed. The same samples solution were analyzed in both methods. The limits of detection (LOD), linearity of the calibrations curves, recovery study, accuracy and precision of the both techniques were carried out. The results were compared. (author)

  6. Quantitative determination of the dopamine agonist lisuride in plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolthers, B G; Verhagen Kamerbeek, W D; van Beusekom, C M; Elshof, F; de Ruyter Buitenhuis, A W; Brunt, E P; Lakke, J P

    1993-12-08

    An HPLC method for the determination of lisuride hydrogen maleate in plasma is described. After addition of ergotamine tartrate as internal standard, plasma is extracted with diethyl ether. Following evaporation of the solvent and redissolving in methanol the extract is injected on a silica HPLC column and lisuride is monitored by fluorescence detection using an excitation wavelength of 322 nm and an emission wavelength of 405 nm. The method is sufficiently accurate and precise with a detection limit of 20 pg/ml lisuride in plasma. The usefulness of the method is demonstrated by measurements of lisuride levels after oral intake of a 0.6 mg dose of the drug by a healthy male volunteer, showing a peak level of 1266 pg/ml, 45 min after intake.

  7. Hairpin stabilized fluorescent silver nanoclusters for quantitative detection of NAD+ and monitoring NAD+/NADH based enzymatic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Priyamvada; Chakma, Babina; Patra, Sanjukta; Goswami, Pranab

    2017-03-01

    A set of 90 mer long ssDNA candidates, with different degrees of cytosine (C-levels) (% and clusters) was analyzed for their function as suitable Ag-nanocluster (AgNC) nucleation scaffolds. The sequence (P4) with highest C-level (42.2%) emerged as the only candidate supporting the nucleation process as evident from its intense fluorescence peak at λ 660 nm . Shorter DNA subsets derived from P4 with only stable hairpin structures could support the AgNC formation. The secondary hairpin structures were confirmed by PAGE, and CD studies. The number of base pairs in the stem region also contributes to the stability of the hairpins. A shorter 29 mer sequence (Sub 3) (ΔG = -1.3 kcal/mol) with 3-bp in the stem of a 7-mer loop conferred highly stable AgNC. NAD + strongly quenched the fluorescence of Sub 3-AgNC in a concentration dependent manner. Time resolved photoluminescence studies revealed the quenching involves a combined static and dynamic interaction where the binding constant and number of binding sites for NAD + were 0.201 L mol -1 and 3.6, respectively. A dynamic NAD + detection range of 50-500 μM with a limit of detection of 22.3 μM was discerned. The NAD + mediated quenching of AgNC was not interfered by NADH, NADP + , monovalent and divalent ions, or serum samples. The method was also used to follow alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase catalyzed physiological reactions in a turn-on and turn-off assay, respectively. The proposed method with ssDNA-AgNC could therefore be extended to monitor other NAD + /NADH based enzyme catalyzed reactions in a turn-on/turn-off approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A facile one-step fluorescence method for the quantitation of low-content single base deamination impurity in synthetic oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoye; Liang, Ruiting; Stolee, Jessica A

    2018-06-05

    Oligonucleotides are being researched and developed as potential drug candidates for the treatment of a broad spectrum of diseases. The characterization of antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) impurities caused by base mutations (e.g. deamination) which are closely related to the target ASO is a significant analytical challenge. Herein, we describe a novel one-step method, utilizing a strategy that combines fluorescence-ON detection with competitive hybridization, to achieve single base mutation quantitation in extensively modified synthetic ASOs. Given that this method is highly specific and sensitive (LoQ = 4 nM), we envision that it will find utility for screening other impurities as well as sequencing modified oligonucleotides. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Application of quantitative light-induced fluorescence to determine the depth of demineralization of dental fluorosis in enamel microabrasion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Young Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Enamel microabrasion has become accepted as a conservative, nonrestorative method of removing intrinsic and superficial dysmineralization defects from dental fluorosis, restoring esthetics with minimal loss of enamel. However, it can be difficult to determine if restoration is necessary in dental fluorosis, because the lesion depth is often not easily recognized. This case report presents a method for analysis of enamel hypoplasia that uses quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF followed by a combination of enamel microabrasion with carbamide peroxide home bleaching. We describe the utility of QLF when selecting a conservative treatment plan and confirming treatment efficacy. In this case, the treatment plan was based on QLF analysis, and the selected combination treatment of microabrasion and bleaching had good results.

  10. Quantitative 3-dimensional imaging of auxin and cytokinin levels in transgenic soybean and medicago truncatula roots via two-photon induced fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jon; Gaillard, Paul; Nurmalasari, Ni Putu Dewi; Fellbaum, Carl; Subramaniam, Sen; Smith, Steve

    2018-02-01

    Industrial nitrogen fertilizers account for nearly 50% of the fossil fuel costs in modern agriculture and contribute to soil and water pollution. Therefore, significant interest exists in understanding and characterizing the efficiency of nitrogen fixation, and the biochemical signaling pathways which orchestrate the plant-microbial symbiosis through which plants fix nitrogen. Legume plant species exhibit a particularly efficient nitrogen uptake mechanism, using root nodules which house nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. While nodule development has been widely studied, there remain significant gaps in understanding the regulatory hormones' role in plant development. In this work, we produce 3-dimensional maps of auxin (AX) and cytokinin (CK) hormone concentrations within model plant root tips and nodules with respect to root architecture and cell type. Soybean and Medicago plants were transfected with a two-color fluorescent vector with AXsensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) and CK-sensitive TdTomato (TdT). 3D images of soybean root nodules were captured using two-photon induced fluorescence microscopy. The resulting images were computationally analyzed using the localization code first developed by Weeks and later adapted by Kilfoil, and analyzed in the context of the root architecture. Statistical analysis of the resulting 3D hormone level maps reproduce-well the known roles of AX and CK in developing plant roots, and are the first quantitative description of these regulatory hormones tied to specific plant architecture. The analytical methods used, and the spatial distribution of these key regulatory hormones in plant roots, nodule primordia and root nodules, and their statistical interpretation are presented.

  11. Development of quantitative analysis for cadmium, lead and chromium in aluminum alloys by using x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Kurusu, Kazuhiko; Kudou, Aiko

    2009-01-01

    A highly reliable quantitative analysis for cadmium, lead and chromium in aluminum alloys was developed. Standard samples were made by doping cadmium, lead and chromium into several aluminum alloys, and the composition of standard samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and gravimetric method. The calibration curves for these standard samples by using WD-XRF and ED-XRF exhibited linear correlation. Slope of calibration curves for Al-Cu alloy and Al-Zn-Mg alloy were smaller than other alloy's one, because of the effect by coexistent elements. Then, all calibration curves agreed with each other by performing correction with α-coefficient method. (author)

  12. Quantitative 3D elemental analysis inside plant roots by means of synchrotron confocal micro X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzano, R.; Vekemans, B.; Tomasi, N.; Spagnuolo, M.; Schoonjans, T.; Vincze, L.; Pinton, R.; Cesco, S.; Ruggiero, P.

    2009-04-01

    The knowledge of the distribution and concentration of elements within plants is a fundamental step to better understand how these plants uptake specific elements from the medium of growth and how they manage acquisition and compartmentalisation of nutrients as well as toxic metals. For some elements, either nutrients or toxicants, it can be of relevance to know their concentration level within microscopic volumes in plant organs, where they are stored or accumulated. Usually, this type of microscopic analysis requires complex cutting procedures and extensive sample manipulations. In this research, the technique of synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence in the confocal mode was applied to image the distribution of elements in selected key-planes of tomato roots without the need of any sample preparation, except washing and freeze-drying. Using this method, a first polycapillary lens focussed the X-ray beam with an energy of 12.4 keV down to a 20 µm beam that is penetrating the sample, and a second polycapillary half-lens, that was positioned at the detection side at 90 degrees to the first polycapillary, could then restrict further the view on this irradiated volume to a defined microscopic volume (typically 20x20x20 µm3) from which the induced fluorescent radiation is finally collected by the energy dispersive detector. In this way, it was possible to investigate the concentration levels of some elements such as K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn within the roots of tomato plants. The quantification was performed by means of a dedicated XRF Fundamental Parameter (FP) method in order to calculate the concentrations of trace elements within the analysed plants. Utilizing fundamental atomic parameters, the applied FP method is taking into account the influence of sample self-absorption and especially the specific detection processes by the polycapillary lens. Quantification was assessed and validated by using different standards: NIST SRM 1573a (trace elements in tomato leaves

  13. Quantitative retinal and choroidal blood flow during light, dark adaptation and flicker light stimulation in rats using fluorescent microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yen-Yu I; Wang, Lin; De La Garza, Bryan H; Li, Guang; Cull, Grant; Kiel, Jeffery W; Duong, Timothy Q

    2013-02-01

    The present study aimed to quantify retinal and choroidal blood flow (BF) during light, dark adaptation and flicker light stimulation using the microsphere technique. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with isoflurane. Eyes were dark (Group I, n = 8), light (Group II, n = 8) adapted or stimulated with 10 Hz flicker light (Group III, n = 10). Retinal and choroidal BF were measured by a previously established method, using a mixture of 8 µm yellow-green and 10 µm red fluorescent microspheres. The microspheres were counted ex vivo in the dissected retina and choroid and in the reference arterial blood under a fluorescent microscope. The choroidal BF was 64.8 ± 29 µl/min (mean ± SD) during dark adaptation, not significantly different from that during light adaptation (66.0 ± 17.8 µl/min). The retinal BF was 13.5 ± 3.2 µl/min during 10 Hz flickering light stimulation, significantly higher than that during dark adaptation in the control fellow eyes (9.9 ± 2.9 µl/min). The choroidal BF values were not statistically different between flicker stimulation and dark adaptation. Retinal BF was 11.6 ± 2.9 µl/min during light adaptation. Dark adaptation did not increase retinal BF (Group I, 8.2 ± 2.4 µl/min; Group II, 9.9 ± 2.9 µl/min). These findings argue against a dark-induced or flicker-induced functional hyperemia in the choroid as a result of the demands of the outer retina. Retinal BF was not higher during dark adaptation. Our data support the conclusion that the inner retina has a higher energy demand in flicker conditions relative to dark.

  14. A pressure tuned stop-flow atomic layer deposition process for MoS2 on high porous nanostructure and fabrication of TiO2/MoS2 core/shell inverse opal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianglin; Puttaswamy, Manjunath; Wang, Zhiwei; Kei Tan, Chiew; Grimsdale, Andrew C.; Kherani, Nazir P.; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2017-11-01

    MoS2 thin films are obtained by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in the temperature range of 120-150 °C using Mo(CO)6 and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) as precursors. A pressure tuned stop-flow ALD process facilitates the precursor adsorption and enables the deposition of MoS2 on high porous three dimensional (3D) nanostructures. As a demonstration, a TiO2/MoS2 core/shell inverse opal (TiO2/MoS2-IO) structure has been fabricated through ALD of TiO2 and MoS2 on a self-assembled multilayer polystyrene (PS) structure template. Due to the self-limiting surface reaction mechanism of ALD and the utilization of pressure tuned stop-flow ALD processes, the as fabricated TiO2/MoS2-IO structure has a high uniformity, reflected by FESEM and FIB-SEM characterization. A crystallized TiO2/MoS2-IO structure can be obtained through a post annealing process. As a 3D photonic crystal, the TiO2/MoS2-IO exhibits obvious stopband reflecting peaks, which can be adjusted through changing the opal diameters as well as the thickness of MoS2 layer.

  15. Quantitative in vivo elemental analysis using X-ray fluorescence and scattering techniques. Applications to cadmium, lead and bone mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Ulf.

    1994-05-01

    The X-ray fluorescence technique for in vivo determination of cadmium concentration in the human body has been considerably improved so that the minimum concentration now is 10 μg/g for a skin-organ distance of 50 mm and a measurement time of 30 minutes. The technique has been used for measurements of cadmium in the kidney cortex of 60 non-occupationally exposed persons, showing twice the concentration (26±9 μg/g) in a sub-group of frequent tobacco smokers compared with a group of non-smokers (10±11 μg/g). Concentrations of lead in the skeleton of 112 persons have been measured at three bone sites (finger bone, tibia, heel bone) using in vivo XRF techniques either based on Co-57 or Cd-109 sources. There was a good correlation between lead levels at the three bone sites as well as to cumulative exposure index. However, the association between the amount of chelatable lead and measured bone lead levels was poor. The retention of lead in the skeleton of 14 retired workers, now studied for up to 18 years after retirement, shows a half-time of 16 years. 43 refs

  16. A Rapid, Onsite, Ultrasensitive Melamine Quantitation Method for Protein Beverages Using Time-Resolved Fluorescence Detection Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanghua; Wang, Du; Zhou, Aijun; Sun, Yimin; Zhang, Qi; Poapolathep, Amnart; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zhiyong; Zhang, Zhaowei; Li, Peiwu

    2018-05-02

    To ensure protein beverage safety and prevent illegal melamine use to artificially increase protein content, a rapid, onsite, ultrasensitive detection method for melamine must be developed because melamine is detrimental to human health and life. Herein, an ultrasensitive time-resolved fluorescence detection paper (TFDP) was developed to detect melamine in protein beverages within 15 min using a one-step sample preparation. The lower limits of detection were 0.89, 0.94, and 1.05 ng/mL, and the linear ranges were 2.67-150, 2.82-150, and 3.15-150 ng/mL (R2>0.982) for peanut, walnut, and coconut beverages, respectively. The recovery rates were 85.86-110.60% with a coefficient of variation beverage samples, the TFDP and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer (UPLC-MS/MS) results were consistent. This method is a promising alternative for rapid, onsite detection of melamine in beverages.

  17. Quantitative Time-Resolved Fluorescence Imaging of Androgen Receptor and Prostate-Specific Antigen in Prostate Tissue Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, Agnieszka; Lippolis, Giuseppe; Helczynski, Leszek; Anand, Aseem; Peltola, Mari; Pettersson, Kim; Lilja, Hans; Bjartell, Anders

    2016-05-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) are expressed in the prostate and are involved in prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this study was to develop reliable protocols for reproducible quantification of AR and PSA in benign and malignant prostate tissue using time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) imaging techniques. AR and PSA were detected with TRF in tissue microarrays from 91 PCa patients. p63/ alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) staining on consecutive sections was used to categorize tissue areas as benign or cancerous. Automated image analysis was used to quantify staining intensity. AR intensity was significantly higher in AMACR+ and lower in AMACR- cancer areas as compared with benign epithelium. The PSA intensity was significantly lower in cancer areas, particularly in AMACR- glands. The AR/PSA ratio varied significantly in the AMACR+ tumor cells as compared with benign glands. There was a trend of more rapid disease progression in patients with higher AR/PSA ratios in the AMACR- areas. This study demonstrates the feasibility of developing reproducible protocols for TRF imaging and automated image analysis to study the expression of AR and PSA in benign and malignant prostate. It also highlighted the differences in AR and PSA protein expression within AMACR- and AMACR+ cancer regions. © 2016 The Histochemical Society.

  18. Detection and quantitation of HER-2/neu gene amplification in human breast cancer archival material using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauletti, G; Godolphin, W; Press, M F; Slamon, D J

    1996-07-04

    Amplification and overexpression of the HER-2/neu gene occurs in 25-30% of human breast cancers. This genetic alteration is associated with a poor clinical prognosis in women with either node negative or node positive breast cancers. The initial studies testing this association were somewhat controversial and this controversy was due in large part to significant heterogeneity in both the methods and/or reagents used in testing archival material for the presence of the alteration. These methods included a number of solid matrix blotting techniques for DNA, RNA and protein as well as immunohistochemistry. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) represents the newest methodologic approach for testing for this genetic alteration. In this study, FISH is compared to Southern, Northern and Western blot analyses as well as immunohistochemistry in a large cohort of archival human breast cancer specimens. FISH was found to be superior to all other methodologies tested in assessing formalin fixed, paraffin embedded material for HER-2/neu amplification. The results from this study also confirm that overexpression of HER-2/neu rarely occurs in the absence of gene amplification in breast cancer (approximately 3% of cases). This method of analysis is rapid, reproducible and extremely reliable in detecting presence of HER-2/neu gene amplification and should have clinical utility.

  19. Quantitation of fumonisin B1 and B2 in feed using FMOC pre-column derivatization with HPLC and fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lori L; Francis, Kyle A; Johnson, Joseph T; Gaskill, Cynthia L

    2017-11-01

    Pre-column derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOC-Cl) was determined to be effective for quantitation of fumonisins B 1 and B 2 in feed. Liquid-solid extraction, clean-up using immunoaffinity solid phase extraction chromatography, and FMOC-derivatization preceded analysis by reverse phase HPLC with fluorescence. Instrument response was unchanged in the presence of matrix, indicating no need to use matrix-matched calibrants. Furthermore, high method recoveries indicated calibrants do not need to undergo clean-up to account for analyte loss. Established method features include linear instrument response from 0.04-2.5µg/mL and stable derivatized calibrants over 7days. Fortified cornmeal method recoveries from 0.1-30.0μg/g were determined for FB 1 (75.1%-109%) and FB 2 (96.0%-115.2%). Inter-assay precision ranged from 1.0%-16.7%. Method accuracy was further confirmed using certified reference material. Inter-laboratory comparison with naturally-contaminated field corn demonstrated equivalent results with conventional derivatization. These results indicate FMOC derivatization is a suitable alternative for fumonisins B 1 and B 2 quantitation in corn-based feeds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Improved Quantitation of Gluten in Wheat Starch for Celiac Disease Patients by Gel-Permeation High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Fluorescence Detection (GP-HPLC-FLD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherf, Katharina Anne; Wieser, Herbert; Koehler, Peter

    2016-10-12

    Purified wheat starch (WSt) is commonly used in gluten-free products for celiac disease (CD) patients. It is mostly well-tolerated, but doubts about its safety for CD patients persist. One reason may be that most ELISA kits primarily recognize the alcohol-soluble gliadin fraction of gluten, but insufficiently target the alcohol-insoluble glutenin fraction. To address this problem, a new sensitive method based on the sequential extraction of gliadins, glutenins, and gluten from WSt followed by gel-permeation high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (GP-HPLC-FLD) was developed. It revealed that considerable amounts of glutenins were present in most WSt. The gluten contents quantitated by GP-HPLC-FLD as sum of gliadins and glutenins were higher than those by R5 ELISA (gluten as gliadin content multiplied by a factor of 2) in 19 out of 26 WSt. Despite its limited selectivity, GP-HPLC-FLD may be applied as confirmatory method to ELISA to quantitate gluten in WSt.

  1. Quantitative fluorescence kinetic analysis of NADH and FAD in human plasma using three- and four-way calibration methods capable of providing the second-order advantage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Wu, Hai-Long, E-mail: hlwu@hnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhou, Chang; Xiang, Shou-Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Yu, Yong-Jie; Yu, Ru-Qin [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-03-03

    The metabolic coenzymes reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are the primary electron donor and acceptor respectively, participate in almost all biological metabolic pathways. This study develops a novel method for the quantitative kinetic analysis of the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma containing an uncalibrated interferent, by using three-way calibration based on multi-way fluorescence technique. In the three-way analysis, by using the calibration set in a static manner, we directly predicted the concentrations of both analytes in the mixture at any time after the start of their reactions, even in the presence of an uncalibrated spectral interferent and a varying background interferent. The satisfactory quantitative results indicate that the proposed method allows one to directly monitor the concentration of each analyte in the mixture as the function of time in real-time and nondestructively, instead of determining the concentration after the analytical separation. Thereafter, we fitted the first-order rate law to their concentration data throughout their reactions. Additionally, a four-way calibration procedure is developed as an alternative for highly collinear systems. The results of the four-way analysis confirmed the results of the three-way analysis and revealed that both the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma fit the first-order rate law. The proposed methods could be expected to provide promising tools for simultaneous kinetic analysis of multiple reactions in complex systems in real-time and nondestructively. - Highlights: • A novel three-way calibration method for the quantitative kinetic analysis of NADH and FAD in human plasma is proposed. • The method can directly monitor the concentration of each analyte in the reaction in real-time and nondestructively. • The method has the second-order advantage. • A

  2. Quantitative fluorescence kinetic analysis of NADH and FAD in human plasma using three- and four-way calibration methods capable of providing the second-order advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chao; Wu, Hai-Long; Zhou, Chang; Xiang, Shou-Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Yu, Yong-Jie; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic coenzymes reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are the primary electron donor and acceptor respectively, participate in almost all biological metabolic pathways. This study develops a novel method for the quantitative kinetic analysis of the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma containing an uncalibrated interferent, by using three-way calibration based on multi-way fluorescence technique. In the three-way analysis, by using the calibration set in a static manner, we directly predicted the concentrations of both analytes in the mixture at any time after the start of their reactions, even in the presence of an uncalibrated spectral interferent and a varying background interferent. The satisfactory quantitative results indicate that the proposed method allows one to directly monitor the concentration of each analyte in the mixture as the function of time in real-time and nondestructively, instead of determining the concentration after the analytical separation. Thereafter, we fitted the first-order rate law to their concentration data throughout their reactions. Additionally, a four-way calibration procedure is developed as an alternative for highly collinear systems. The results of the four-way analysis confirmed the results of the three-way analysis and revealed that both the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma fit the first-order rate law. The proposed methods could be expected to provide promising tools for simultaneous kinetic analysis of multiple reactions in complex systems in real-time and nondestructively. - Highlights: • A novel three-way calibration method for the quantitative kinetic analysis of NADH and FAD in human plasma is proposed. • The method can directly monitor the concentration of each analyte in the reaction in real-time and nondestructively. • The method has the second-order advantage. • A

  3. An atlas of histone deacetylase expression in breast cancer: fluorescence methodology for comparative semi-quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2012-01-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitors, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (Vorinostat, Zolinza™) and depsipeptide (Romidepsin, Istodax™) have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Numerous histone deacetylase inhibitors are currently undergoing clinical trials, predominantly in combination with other cancer modalities, for the treatment of various haematological and solid malignancies. Most of the traditional compounds are known as broad-spectrum or pan-histone deacetylase inhibitors, possessing activity against a number of the 11 metal-dependent enzymes. One of the main questions in the field is whether class- or isoform-specific compounds would offer a therapeutic benefit compared to broad-spectrum inhibitors. Therefore, analysis of the relative expression of the different histone deacetylase enzymes in cancer cells and tissues is important to determine whether there are specific targets. We used a panel of antibodies directed against the 11 known mammalian histone deacetylases to determine expression levels in MCF7 breast cancer cells and in tissue representative of invasive ductal cell carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ. Firstly, we utilized a semi-quantitative method based on immunofluorescence staining to examine expression of the different histone deacetylases in MCF7 cells. Our findings indicate high expression levels of HDAC1, 3 and 6 in accordance with findings from others using RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Following validation of our approach we examined the expression of the different isoforms in representative control and breast cancer tissue. In general, our findings indicate higher expression of class I histone deacetylases compared to class II enzymes in breast cancer tissue. Analysis of individual cancer cells in the same tissue indicated marked heterogeneity in the expression of most class I enzymes indicating potential complications with the use of class- or isoform

  4. A method to validate quantitative high-frequency power doppler ultrasound with fluorescence in vivo video microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Stephen Z; Kim, Dae-Ro; Hague, M Nicole; Chambers, Ann F; MacDonald, Ian C; Lacefield, James C

    2014-08-01

    Flow quantification with high-frequency (>20 MHz) power Doppler ultrasound can be performed objectively using the wall-filter selection curve (WFSC) method to select the cutoff velocity that yields a best-estimate color pixel density (CPD). An in vivo video microscopy system (IVVM) is combined with high-frequency power Doppler ultrasound to provide a method for validation of CPD measurements based on WFSCs in mouse testicular vessels. The ultrasound and IVVM systems are instrumented so that the mouse remains on the same imaging platform when switching between the two modalities. In vivo video microscopy provides gold-standard measurements of vascular diameter to validate power Doppler CPD estimates. Measurements in four image planes from three mice exhibit wide variation in the optimal cutoff velocity and indicate that a predetermined cutoff velocity setting can introduce significant errors in studies intended to quantify vascularity. Consistent with previously published flow-phantom data, in vivo WFSCs exhibited three characteristic regions and detectable plateaus. Selection of a cutoff velocity at the right end of the plateau yielded a CPD close to the gold-standard vascular volume fraction estimated using IVVM. An investigator can implement the WFSC method to help adapt cutoff velocity to current blood flow conditions and thereby improve the accuracy of power Doppler for quantitative microvascular imaging. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Automobile Exhaust by Means of High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Fluorescence Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tom

    1979-01-01

    A chromatographic method has been developed and applied to the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particulate matter in automobile exhaust, in petrols, and in crankcase oils. The PAHs were purified from other organic compounds by thin-layer chromatography, separated by high......-performance liquid chromatography, and measured by means of on-line fluorescence detection. The identities of the PAHs were verified by comparing the emission spectra obtained by a stop-flow technique with those of standard PAHs...

  6. [Detecting HB-1 Expression Level in Bone Marrow of Acute Leukemia Patients by Real-Time Fluorescence Quantitative RT-PCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Yun; Li, Yuan; Ji, Li; Liang, Ze-Yin; Liu, Wei; Ren, Han-Yun; Qiu, Zhi-Xiang

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the expression level of HB-1 gene in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and the significance of HB-1 gene in monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD). The method of real-time fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR (Taqman probe) was established to detect the expression levels of HB-1 gene; then the sensitivity, specificity and repeatability of this assay were evaluated and verified. The HB-1 gene expression levels in bone marrow of 183 cases of ALL, 70 cases of acute myeloid leukemias (AML), 52 cases of non-malignant hematologic diseases and 24 healthy hematopoietic stem cell donors were detected. The correlation of HB-1 level with diagnosis and relapse was analyzed by detecting bone marrow samples of 33 B-ALL. The sensitivity of this assay reached the 10 -4 level. The coefficient of variation for inter-batch and inter-tube of HB-1 were 6.79% and 4.80%, respectively. It was found that HB-1 gene specifically expressed in acute B lymphoblastic leukemia. The median expression levels of HB-1 gene in newly diagnosed and relapsed B-ALL patients were statistically significantly higher than those in ALL in complete remission(CR), newly diagnosed T-ALL, newly diagnosed AML, non-malignant hematologic diseases, and healthy hematopoietic stem cell donors(33.0% vs 0.68%, 0.07%, 0.02%, 0.58% and 0, respectively) (P0.05). The expression level of HB-1 gene declined sharply when B-ALL patients reached complete remission (0-7.99%, with median level 0.68%), but increased when relapsed (7.69%, 8.08% and 484.0% in 3 relapsed samples), which was in accordance with results of flow cytometry. HB-1 gene specifically expressed in acute B lymphoblastic leukemia cells. The established real-time fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR assay shows good sensitivity, specificity and repeatability, thus, can be used as a biological marker in the clinical detection, monitoring MRD and predicting of early relapse for B-ALL patients.

  7. Quantitative determination of iron, copper, lead, chromium and nickel in electronic waste samples using total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elaseer, A. S.; Musbah, A. S; Ammar, M. M. G.; Salah, M. A.; Aisha, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy in conjunction with microwave assisted extraction technique was used for the analysis of twenty electronic waste samples. The analysis was limited to the printed circuit boards of electronic devices. Iron, copper, lead, chromium and nickel were quantitatively determined in the samples. The samples were carefully milled to fine powder and 50mg was digested by acid using microwave digestion procedure. The digested samples solution was spread together with gallium as internal standard on the reflection disk and analyzed. The results showed that the cassette recorder boards contain the highest concentration of iron, lead and nickel. The average concentrations of these metals were 78, 73 and 71g/Kg respectively. Computer boards contained the highest copper average concentration 39g/Kg. the highest chromium average concentration 3.6 g/Kg was in mobile phone boards. Measurements were made using PicoTAX portable x-ray device. the instrument was used for quantitative multi-element analysis. An air cooled x-ray tube (40KV, 1 mA) with Mo target and Be window was used as x-ray source. The optics of the device was a multilayer Ni/C, 17.5 keV, 80% reflectivity provides analysis of elements from Si to Zr (K series) and Rh to U (L series). A Si PIN-diode detector (7mm"2, 195eV) was used for the elements detection. In this study heavy metals average concentration in electronic circuit boards in the in the order of iron (35.25g/kg), copper (21.14g/Kg), lead (16.59g/Kg), nickel (16.01g/Kg) and chromium (1.07g/Kg).(author)

  8. Effect of an oral health education program based on the use of quantitative light-induced fluorescence technology in Uzbekistan adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudanov, Bakhtinur; Jung, Hoi In; Kahharova, Dono; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Hamidov, Ilhom; Lee, Eun-Song; Kim, Baek-Il

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an oral health education program using a Qscan device based on quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) technology could improve the oral hygiene status and oral health literacy of adolescents. One hundred adolescents aged 14-16 years attending a school in Tashkent city were included in this study. The participants were assigned to the following two groups using permuted block randomization technique: (i) control group (traditional learning) and (ii) experimental group (Qscan device-based learning). The participants included in the experimental group received additional education and training on dental plaque removal using the Qscan device. The accumulated levels of plaque were assessed in all participants, who also completed questionnaires about their oral health status, oral health knowledge, attitude, and behavior during an 8-week period. There were statistically significant improvements in the experimental group compared to the control group in the plaque index (0.46 vs 0.07, p education program based on the use of QLF technology could be useful for improving the oral hygiene status and oral health literacy of adolescents in Uzbekistan. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of multi-component fuel/air mixing in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine: Effects of residual exhaust gas on quantitative PLIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ben; Ewart, Paul [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Wang, Xiaowei; Stone, Richard [Department of Engineering Science, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Ma, Hongrui; Walmsley, Harold; Cracknell, Roger [Shell Global Solutions (UK), Shell Research Centre Thornton, P. O. Box 1, Chester, CH1 3SH (United Kingdom); Stevens, Robert; Richardson, David; Fu, Huiyu; Wallace, Stan [Jaguar Cars, Engineering Centre, Abbey Road, Whitley, Coventry, CV3 4LF (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    A study of in-cylinder fuel-air mixing distributions in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine is reported using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. A multi-component fuel synthesised from three pairs of components chosen to simulate light, medium and heavy fractions was seeded with one of three tracers, each chosen to co-evaporate with and thus follow one of the fractions, in order to account for differential volatility of such components in typical gasoline fuels. In order to make quantitative measurements of fuel-air ratio from PLIF images, initial calibration was by recording PLIF images of homogeneous fuel-air mixtures under similar conditions of in-cylinder temperature and pressure using a re-circulation loop and a motored engine. This calibration method was found to be affected by two significant factors. Firstly, calibration was affected by variation of signal collection efficiency arising from build-up of absorbing deposits on the windows during firing cycles, which are not present under motored conditions. Secondly, the effects of residual exhaust gas present in the firing engine were not accounted for using a calibration loop with a motored engine. In order to account for these factors a novel method of PLIF calibration is presented whereby 'bookend' calibration measurements for each tracer separately are performed under firing conditions, utilising injection into a large upstream heated plenum to promote the formation of homogeneous in-cylinder mixtures. These calibration datasets contain sufficient information to not only characterise the quantum efficiency of each tracer during a typical engine cycle, but also monitor imaging efficiency, and, importantly, account for the impact of exhaust gas residuals (EGR). By use of this method EGR is identified as a significant factor in quantitative PLIF for fuel mixing diagnostics in firing engines. The effects of cyclic variation in fuel concentration on burn rate are analysed for

  10. Quantitation of itopride in human serum by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and its application to a bioequivalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sonu Sundd; Jain, Manish; Sharma, Kuldeep; Shah, Bhavin; Vyas, Meghna; Thakkar, Purav; Shah, Ruchy; Singh, Shriprakash; Lohray, Brajbhushan

    2005-04-25

    A new method was developed for determination of itopride in human serum by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection (excitation at 291 nm and emission at 342 nm). The method employed one-step extraction of itopride from serum matrix with a mixture of tert-butyl methyl ether and dichloromethane (70:30, v/v) using etoricoxib as an internal standard. Chromatographic separation was obtained within 12.0 min using a reverse phase YMC-Pack AM ODS column (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) and an isocratic mobile phase constituting of a mixture of 0.05% tri-fluoro acetic acid in water and acetonitrile (75:25, v/v) flowing at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. The method was linear in the range of 14.0 ng/ml to 1000.0 ng/ml. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was 14.0 ng/ml. Average recovery of itopride and the internal standard from the biological matrix was more than 66.04 and 64.57%, respectively. The inter-day accuracy of the drug containing serum samples was more than 97.81% with a precision of 2.31-3.68%. The intra-day accuracy was 96.91% or more with a precision of 5.17-9.50%. Serum samples containing itopride were stable for 180.0 days at -70+/-5 degrees C and for 24.0 h at ambient temperature (25+/-5 degrees C). The method was successfully applied to the bioequivalence study of itopride in healthy, male human subjects.

  11. L G-2 Scintrex manual.Fluorescence analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirelli, H.

    1987-01-01

    The Scintrex Fluorescence Analyzer LG-2 selectively detects the presence of certain fluorescent minerals through UV photoluminescence induced and provides quantitative information on its distribution.

  12. WE-H-206-03: Promises and Challenges of Benchtop X-Ray Fluorescence CT (XFCT) for Quantitative in Vivo Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.

    2016-01-01

    -modality imaging instrumentation and techniques that are being developed. Sang Hyun Cho; X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging, such as x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT), offers unique capabilities for accurate identification and quantification of metals within the imaging objects. As a result, it has emerged as a promising quantitative imaging modality in recent years, especially in conjunction with metal-based imaging probes. This talk will familiarize the audience with the basic principles of XRF/XFCT imaging. It will also cover the latest development of benchtop XFCT technology. Additionally, the use of metallic nanoparticles such as gold nanoparticles, in conjunction with benchtop XFCT, will be discussed within the context of preclinical multimodal multiplexed molecular imaging. Learning Objectives: To learn the basic principles of XRF/XFCT imaging To learn the latest advances in benchtop XFCT development for preclinical imaging Funding support received from NIH and DOD; Funding support received from GE Healthcare; Funding support received from Siemens AX; Patent royalties received from GE Healthcare; L. Wang, Funding Support: NIH; COI: Microphotoacoustics; S. Cho, Yes: ;NIH/NCI grant R01CA155446 DOD/PCRP grant W81XWH-12-1-0198

  13. WE-H-206-03: Promises and Challenges of Benchtop X-Ray Fluorescence CT (XFCT) for Quantitative in Vivo Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    -modality imaging instrumentation and techniques that are being developed. Sang Hyun Cho; X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging, such as x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT), offers unique capabilities for accurate identification and quantification of metals within the imaging objects. As a result, it has emerged as a promising quantitative imaging modality in recent years, especially in conjunction with metal-based imaging probes. This talk will familiarize the audience with the basic principles of XRF/XFCT imaging. It will also cover the latest development of benchtop XFCT technology. Additionally, the use of metallic nanoparticles such as gold nanoparticles, in conjunction with benchtop XFCT, will be discussed within the context of preclinical multimodal multiplexed molecular imaging. Learning Objectives: To learn the basic principles of XRF/XFCT imaging To learn the latest advances in benchtop XFCT development for preclinical imaging Funding support received from NIH and DOD; Funding support received from GE Healthcare; Funding support received from Siemens AX; Patent royalties received from GE Healthcare; L. Wang, Funding Support: NIH; COI: Microphotoacoustics; S. Cho, Yes: ;NIH/NCI grant R01CA155446 DOD/PCRP grant W81XWH-12-1-0198.

  14. Fluorescence Lifetime Readouts of Troponin-C-Based Calcium FRET Sensors: A Quantitative Comparison of CFP and mTFP1 as Donor Fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Romain; Stuckey, Daniel W.; Manning, Hugh; Warren, Sean C.; Kennedy, Gordon; Carling, David

    2012-01-01

    We have compared the performance of two Troponin-C-based calcium FRET sensors using fluorescence lifetime read-outs. The first sensor, TN-L15, consists of a Troponin-C fragment inserted between CFP and Citrine while the second sensor, called mTFP-TnC-Cit, was realized by replacing CFP in TN-L15 with monomeric Teal Fluorescent Protein (mTFP1). Using cytosol preparations of transiently transfected mammalian cells, we have measured the fluorescence decay profiles of these sensors at controlled concentrations of calcium using time-correlated single photon counting. These data were fitted to discrete exponential decay models using global analysis to determine the FRET efficiency, fraction of donor molecules undergoing FRET and calcium affinity of these sensors. We have also studied the decay profiles of the donor fluorescent proteins alone and determined the sensitivity of the donor lifetime to temperature and emission wavelength. Live-cell fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of HEK293T cells expressing each of these sensors was also undertaken. We confirmed that donor fluorescence of mTFP-TnC-Cit fits well to a two-component decay model, while the TN-L15 lifetime data was best fitted to a constrained four-component model, which was supported by phasor analysis of the measured lifetime data. If the constrained global fitting is employed, the TN-L15 sensor can provide a larger dynamic range of lifetime readout than the mTFP-TnC-Cit sensor but the CFP donor is significantly more sensitive to changes in temperature and emission wavelength compared to mTFP and, while the mTFP-TnC-Cit solution phase data broadly agreed with measurements in live cells, this was not the case for the TN-L15 sensor. Our titration experiment also indicates that a similar precision in determination of calcium concentration can be achieved with both FRET biosensors when fitting a single exponential donor fluorescence decay model to the fluorescence decay profiles. We therefore suggest that m

  15. The fate of Helicobacter pylori phagocytized by Acanthamoeba polyphaga demonstrated by fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerization chain reaction tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori able to express green fluorescent protein, as well as an ATCC strain, and a clinical isolate of this pathogen were evaluated for their ability to survive predation by Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Ingestion was evaluated by microscopic observation of the GFP-H. pyl...

  16. Three-color confocal Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer microscopy: Quantitative analysis of protein interactions in the nucleation of actin filaments in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallrabe, Horst; Sun, Yuansheng; Fang, Xiaolan; Periasamy, Ammasi; Bloom, George S

    2015-06-01

    Experiments using live cell 3-color Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy and corresponding in vitro biochemical reconstitution of the same proteins were conducted to evaluate actin filament nucleation. A novel application of 3-color FRET data is demonstrated, extending the analysis beyond the customary energy-transfer efficiency (E%) calculations. MDCK cells were transfected for coexpression of Teal-N-WASP/Venus-IQGAP1/mRFP1-Rac1, Teal-N-WASP/Venus-IQGAP1/mRFP1-Cdc42, CFP-Rac1/Venus-IQGAP1/mCherry-actin, or CFP-Cdc42/Venus-IQGAP1/mCherry-actin, and with single-label equivalents for spectral bleedthrough correction. Using confirmed E% as an entry point, fluorescence levels and related ratios were correlated at discrete accumulating levels at cell peripheries. Rising ratios of CFP-Rac1:Venus-IQGAP1 were correlated with lower overall actin fluorescence, whereas the CFP-Cdc42:Venus-IQGAP1 ratio correlated with increased actin fluorescence at low ratios, but was neutral at higher ratios. The new FRET analyses also indicated that rising levels of mRFP1-Cdc42 or mRFP1-Rac1, respectively, promoted or suppressed the association of Teal-N-WASP with Venus-IQGAP1. These 3-color FRET assays further support our in vitro results about the role of IQGAP1, Rac1, and Cdc42 in actin nucleation, and the differential impact of Rac1 and Cdc42 on the association of N-WASP with IQGAP1. In addition, this study emphasizes the power of 3-color FRET as a systems biology strategy for simultaneous evaluation of multiple interacting proteins in individual live cells. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  17. Quantitative determination on heavy metals in different stages of wine production by Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence: Comparison on two vineyards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessanha, Sofia [Centro Fisica Atomica, Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Carvalho, Maria Luisa, E-mail: luisa@cii.fc.ul.p [Centro Fisica Atomica, Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Becker, Maria; Bohlen, Alex von [Institute for analytical Sciences, Bunsen-Kirchhoff-Str. 11, 44139 Dortmund (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine the elemental content, namely heavy metals, of samples of vine-leaves, grapes must and wine. In order to assess the influence of the vineyard age on the elemental content throughout the several stages of wine production, elemental determinations of trace elements were made on products obtained from two vineyards aged 6 and 14 years from Douro region. The elemental content of vine-leaves and grapes was determined by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF), while analysis of the must and wine was performed by Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF). Almost all elements present in wine and must samples did not exceed the recommended values found in literature for wine. Bromine was present in the 6 years old wine in a concentration 1 order of magnitude greater than what is usually detected. The Cu content in vine-leaves from the older vineyard was found to be extremely high probably due to excessive use of Cu-based fungicides to control vine downy mildew. Higher Cu content was also detected in grapes although not so pronounced. Concerning the wine a slightly higher level was detected on the older vineyard, even so not exceeding the recommended value.

  18. Quantitative determination on heavy metals in different stages of wine production by Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence: Comparison on two vineyards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessanha, Sofia; Carvalho, Maria Luisa; Becker, Maria; Bohlen, Alex von

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the elemental content, namely heavy metals, of samples of vine-leaves, grapes must and wine. In order to assess the influence of the vineyard age on the elemental content throughout the several stages of wine production, elemental determinations of trace elements were made on products obtained from two vineyards aged 6 and 14 years from Douro region. The elemental content of vine-leaves and grapes was determined by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF), while analysis of the must and wine was performed by Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF). Almost all elements present in wine and must samples did not exceed the recommended values found in literature for wine. Bromine was present in the 6 years old wine in a concentration 1 order of magnitude greater than what is usually detected. The Cu content in vine-leaves from the older vineyard was found to be extremely high probably due to excessive use of Cu-based fungicides to control vine downy mildew. Higher Cu content was also detected in grapes although not so pronounced. Concerning the wine a slightly higher level was detected on the older vineyard, even so not exceeding the recommended value.

  19. Comparison of three-way and four-way calibration for the real-time quantitative analysis of drug hydrolysis in complex dynamic samples by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao-Li; Gu, Hui-Wen; Liu, Xiao-Lu; Zhang, Shan-Hui; Wu, Hai-Long

    2018-03-05

    Multiway calibration in combination with spectroscopic technique is an attractive tool for online or real-time monitoring of target analyte(s) in complex samples. However, how to choose a suitable multiway calibration method for the resolution of spectroscopic-kinetic data is a troubling problem in practical application. In this work, for the first time, three-way and four-way fluorescence-kinetic data arrays were generated during the real-time monitoring of the hydrolysis of irinotecan (CPT-11) in human plasma by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence. Alternating normalization-weighted error (ANWE) and alternating penalty trilinear decomposition (APTLD) were used as three-way calibration for the decomposition of the three-way kinetic data array, whereas alternating weighted residual constraint quadrilinear decomposition (AWRCQLD) and alternating penalty quadrilinear decomposition (APQLD) were applied as four-way calibration to the four-way kinetic data array. The quantitative results of the two kinds of calibration models were fully compared from the perspective of predicted real-time concentrations, spiked recoveries of initial concentration, and analytical figures of merit. The comparison study demonstrated that both three-way and four-way calibration models could achieve real-time quantitative analysis of the hydrolysis of CPT-11 in human plasma under certain conditions. However, it was also found that both of them possess some critical advantages and shortcomings during the process of dynamic analysis. The conclusions obtained in this paper can provide some helpful guidance for the reasonable selection of multiway calibration models to achieve the real-time quantitative analysis of target analyte(s) in complex dynamic systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of three-way and four-way calibration for the real-time quantitative analysis of drug hydrolysis in complex dynamic samples by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao-Li; Gu, Hui-Wen; Liu, Xiao-Lu; Zhang, Shan-Hui; Wu, Hai-Long

    2018-03-01

    Multiway calibration in combination with spectroscopic technique is an attractive tool for online or real-time monitoring of target analyte(s) in complex samples. However, how to choose a suitable multiway calibration method for the resolution of spectroscopic-kinetic data is a troubling problem in practical application. In this work, for the first time, three-way and four-way fluorescence-kinetic data arrays were generated during the real-time monitoring of the hydrolysis of irinotecan (CPT-11) in human plasma by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence. Alternating normalization-weighted error (ANWE) and alternating penalty trilinear decomposition (APTLD) were used as three-way calibration for the decomposition of the three-way kinetic data array, whereas alternating weighted residual constraint quadrilinear decomposition (AWRCQLD) and alternating penalty quadrilinear decomposition (APQLD) were applied as four-way calibration to the four-way kinetic data array. The quantitative results of the two kinds of calibration models were fully compared from the perspective of predicted real-time concentrations, spiked recoveries of initial concentration, and analytical figures of merit. The comparison study demonstrated that both three-way and four-way calibration models could achieve real-time quantitative analysis of the hydrolysis of CPT-11 in human plasma under certain conditions. However, it was also found that both of them possess some critical advantages and shortcomings during the process of dynamic analysis. The conclusions obtained in this paper can provide some helpful guidance for the reasonable selection of multiway calibration models to achieve the real-time quantitative analysis of target analyte(s) in complex dynamic systems.

  1. Quantitative pteridine fluorescence analysis: A possible age-grading technique for the adult stages of the blow fly Calliphora vicina (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Victoria; Hannig, Laura; Kinast, Ronja; Verhoff, Marcel A; Rothweiler, Florian; Zehner, Richard; Amendt, Jens

    2017-04-01

    Age estimation of adult flies could extend the possible window of time for calculating the minimal postmortem interval (PMI min ) by means of entomological methods. Currently, this is done by estimating the time required by necrophagous Diptera to reach certain juvenile developmental landmarks, and the method only works until the end of metamorphosis and emergence of the adult fly. Particularly at indoor crime scenes, being able to estimate the age of trapped adult flies would be an important tool with which to extend the calculable PMI beyond the developmental period. Recently, several promising age-dependent morphological and physiological characteristics of adult insects have been investigated in medical and forensic entomology, but the results are still preliminary and restricted to a few species. We examined adults of the forensically relevant blow fly species Calliphora vicina and investigated the fluorescence levels of pteridine, a group of metabolites that accumulates in the eyes during aging. From Day 1 to Day 25 post-emergence, flies were kept at three different temperature regimes (20°C, 25°C, and fluctuating temperatures in the context of a field study) and 12:12 L:D. From Day 1 until Day 7, the fluorescence of pteridine was determined on a daily basis, and thereafter, every three days. The achieved fly age was multiplied with the relevant temperature and converted into accumulated degree-days (ADD). The fluorescence level of pteridine increased linear with increasing ADD (females: R 2 =0.777; males: R 2 =0.802). The difference between sexes was significant (pstage (female abdomen). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In vivo quantitative imaging of point-like bioluminescent and fluorescent sources: Validation studies in phantoms and small animals post mortem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comsa, Daria Craita

    2008-10-01

    There is a real need for improved small animal imaging techniques to enhance the development of therapies in which animal models of disease are used. Optical methods for imaging have been extensively studied in recent years, due to their high sensitivity and specificity. Methods like bioluminescence and fluorescence tomography report promising results for 3D reconstructions of source distributions in vivo. However, no standard methodology exists for optical tomography, and various groups are pursuing different approaches. In a number of studies on small animals, the bioluminescent or fluorescent sources can be reasonably approximated as point or line sources. Examples include images of bone metastases confined to the bone marrow. Starting with this premise, we propose a simpler, faster, and inexpensive technique to quantify optical images of point-like sources. The technique avoids the computational burden of a tomographic method by using planar images and a mathematical model based on diffusion theory. The model employs in situ optical properties estimated from video reflectometry measurements. Modeled and measured images are compared iteratively using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to improve estimates of the depth and strength of the bioluminescent or fluorescent inclusion. The performance of the technique to quantify bioluminescence images was first evaluated on Monte Carlo simulated data. Simulated data also facilitated a methodical investigation of the effect of errors in tissue optical properties on the retrieved source depth and strength. It was found that, for example, an error of 4 % in the effective attenuation coefficient led to 4 % error in the retrieved depth for source depths of up to 12mm, while the error in the retrieved source strength increased from 5.5 % at 2mm depth, to 18 % at 12mm depth. Experiments conducted on images from homogeneous tissue-simulating phantoms showed that depths up to 10mm could be estimated within 8 %, and the relative

  3. A new modeling strategy for third-order fast high-performance liquid chromatographic data with fluorescence detection. Quantitation of fluoroquinolones in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaráz, Mirta R; Bortolato, Santiago A; Goicoechea, Héctor C; Olivieri, Alejandro C

    2015-03-01

    Matrix augmentation is regularly employed in extended multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS), as applied to analytical calibration based on second- and third-order data. However, this highly useful concept has almost no correspondence in parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) of third-order data. In the present work, we propose a strategy to process third-order chromatographic data with matrix fluorescence detection, based on an Augmented PARAFAC model. The latter involves decomposition of a three-way data array augmented along the elution time mode with data for the calibration samples and for each of the test samples. A set of excitation-emission fluorescence matrices, measured at different chromatographic elution times for drinking water samples, containing three fluoroquinolones and uncalibrated interferences, were evaluated using this approach. Augmented PARAFAC exploits the second-order advantage, even in the presence of significant changes in chromatographic profiles from run to run. The obtained relative errors of prediction were ca. 10 % for ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and danofloxacin, with a significant enhancement in analytical figures of merit in comparison with previous reports. The results are compared with those furnished by MCR-ALS.

  4. Cobalt deposition in mineralized bone tissue after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing: Quantitative μ-X-ray-fluorescence analysis of implant material incorporation in periprosthetic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Michael; Busse, Björn; Procop, Mathias; Zustin, Jozef; Amling, Michael; Katzer, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    Most resurfacing systems are manufactured from cobalt-chromium alloys with metal-on-metal (MoM) bearing couples. Because the quantity of particulate metal and corrosion products which can be released into the periprosthetic milieu is greater in MoM bearings than in metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) bearings, it is hypothesized that the quantity and distribution of debris released by the MoM components induce a compositional change in the periprosthetic bone. To determine the validity of this claim, nondestructive µ-X-ray fluorescence analysis was carried out on undecalcified histological samples from 13 femoral heads which had undergone surface replacement. These samples were extracted from the patients after gradient time points due to required revision surgery. Samples from nonintervened femoral heads as well as from a MoP resurfaced implant served as controls. Light microscopy and µ-X-ray fluorescence analyses revealed that cobalt debris was found not only in the soft tissue around the prosthesis and the bone marrow, but also in the mineralized bone tissue. Mineralized bone exposed to surface replacements showed significant increases in cobalt concentrations in comparison with control specimens without an implant. A maximum cobalt concentration in mineralized hard tissue of up to 380 ppm was detected as early as 2 years after implantation. Values of this magnitude are not found in implants with a MoP surface bearing until a lifetime of more than 20 years. This study demonstrates that hip resurfacing implants with MoM bearings present a potential long-term health risk due to rapid cobalt ion accumulation in periprosthetic hard tissue. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1855-1862, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Quantitation of species differences in albumin–ligand interactions for bovine, human and rat serum albumins using fluorescence spectroscopy: A test case with some Sudlow's site I ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poór, Miklós; Li, Yin; Matisz, Gergely; Kiss, László; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor; Kőszegi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Albumin, the most abundant plasma protein is an approximately 67 kDa sized water-soluble macromolecule. Since several drugs and xenobiotics circulate in the blood at least partially in albumin-bound form, albumin plays a key role in the pharmacokinetics/toxicokinetics of these chemicals. Most of the drugs and xenobiotics are Sudlow's site I ligands. In numerous studies, bovine serum albumin (BSA) is used for modeling albumin–ligand interactions and the results are extrapolated to human serum albumin (HSA). Furthermore, only limited information is available related to albumin–ligand interactions of different albumin species. Therefore, in our study, we have focused on the quantification of differences between bovine, human and rat serum albumin (RSA) using four Sudlow's site I ligands (luteolin, ochratoxin A, phenylbutazone and warfarin). Interactions were analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy. Stability constants as well as competing capacities of the ligands were determined, and thermodynamic study was also performed. Our results highlight that there could be major differences between BSA, HSA and RSA in their ligand binding properties. Based on our observations we emphasize that in molecular aspects BSA behaves considerably differently from HSA or from albumins of other species therefore, it is strongly recommended to apply at least some confirmatory measurements when data obtained from other species are attempted to be extrapolated to HSA. -- Highlights: • Albumin–ligand interactions of human, bovine and rat albumins were studied. • Four Sudlow's site I ligands were tested by fluorescence spectroscopy. • Substantial differences were found in stability constants among albumin complexes. • Competing capacity of ligands showed major differences in the studied species. • Data obtained for BSA cannot be directly extrapolated to human albumin

  6. Radiation applications in art and archaeometry X-ray fluorescence applications to archaeometry. Possibility of obtaining non-destructive quantitative analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milazzo, Mario

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of obtaining quantitative XRF analysis in archaeometric applications is considered in the following cases: - Examinations of metallic objects with irregular surface: coins, for instance. - Metallic objects with a natural or artificial patina on the surface. - Glass or ceramic samples for which the problems for quantitative analysis rise from the non-detectability of matrix low Z elements. The fundamental parameter method for quantitative XRF analysis is based on a numerical procedure involving he relative values of XRF lines intensity. As a consequence it can be applied also to the experimental XRF spectra obtained for metallic objects if the correction for the irregular shape consists only in introducing a constant factor which does not affect the XRF intensity relative value. This is in fact possible in non-very-restrictive conditions for the experimental set up. The finenesses of coins with a superficial patina can be evaluated by resorting to the measurements of Rayleigh to Compton scattering intensity ratio at an incident energy higher than the one of characteristic X-ray. For glasses and ceramics the measurements of the Compton scattered intensity of the exciting radiation and the use of a proper scaling law make possible to evaluate the matrix absorption coefficients for all characteristic X-ray line energies

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  8. Optimization of the quantitative direct solid total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of glass microspheres functionalized with Zr organometallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Ruiz, Ramon, E-mail: ramon.fernandez@uam.e [Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigacion, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049, Madrid (Spain); Andres, Roman; Jesus, Ernesto de [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Alcala, Campus Universitario, 28871, Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Terreros, Pilar [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleo-Quimica, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    Quantitative determination of Zr in the system constituted by quartz microspheres functionalized with two kinds of organometallic compounds has been studied due to the importance of the correct quantization of the Zr from a catalytic point of view. Two parallel approximations were done, i.e. acid leaching and direct solid quantization. To validate the acid leaching TXRF measures, ICP-MS analysis were carried out. The results obtained by means of the optimization of the quantitative direct solid procedure show that, with a previous particle size distribution modification, TXRF obtain the same analytical results as ICP-MS and TXRF by acid leaching way but without previous chemical acid manipulation. This fact implies an important improvement for the analysis time, reagents costs and analysis facility and it proves again the versatility of TXRF to solve analytical problems in an easy, quick and accurate way. Additionally and for the direct solid TXRF measurements, a deeper study was done to evaluate the intrinsic analytical parameters of the Zr TXRF analysis of this material. So, the influence of the particle size distributions (modified by means of a high power ultrasound probe) with respect to uncertainty and detection limits for Zr were developed. The main analytical conclusion was the strong correlation between the average particle sizes and the TXRF analytical parameters of Zr measurements, i.e. concentration, accuracy, uncertainty and detection limits.

  9. Determination of elemental distribution in green micro-algae using synchrotron radiation nano X-ray fluorescence (SR-nXRF) and electron microscopy techniques--subcellular localization and quantitative imaging of silver and cobalt uptake by Coccomyxa actinabiotis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardo, T; Farhi, E; Boisson, A-M; Vial, J; Cloetens, P; Bohic, S; Rivasseau, C

    2014-02-01

    The newly discovered unicellular micro-alga Coccomyxa actinabiotis proves to be highly radio-tolerant and strongly concentrates radionuclides, as well as large amounts of toxic metals. This study helps in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the accumulation and detoxification of silver and cobalt. Elemental distribution inside Coccomyxa actinabiotis cells was determined using synchrotron nano X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy at the ID22 nano fluorescence imaging beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The high resolution and high sensitivity of this technique enabled the assessment of elemental associations and exclusions in subcellular micro-algae compartments. A quantitative treatment of the scans was implemented to yield absolute concentrations of each endogenous and exogenous element with a spatial resolution of 100 nm and compared to the macroscopic content in cobalt and silver determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The nano X-ray fluorescence imaging was complemented by transmission electron microscopy coupled to X-ray microanalysis (TEM-EDS), yielding differential silver distribution in the cell wall, cytosol, nucleus, chloroplast and mitochondria with unique resolution. The analysis of endogenous elements in control cells revealed that iron had a unique distribution; zinc, potassium, manganese, molybdenum, and phosphate had their maxima co-localized in the same area; and sulfur, copper and chlorine were almost homogeneously distributed among the whole cell. The subcellular distribution and quantification of cobalt and silver in micro-alga, assessed after controlled exposure to various concentrations, revealed that exogenous metals were mainly sequestered inside the cell rather than on mucilage or the cell wall, with preferential compartmentalization. Cobalt was homogeneously distributed outside of the chloroplast. Silver was localized in the cytosol at low concentration and in the whole cell excluding the

  10. Fluorescent antibody test, quantitative polymerase chain reaction pattern and clinical aspects of rabies virus strains isolated from main reservoirs in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Appolinário

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rabies virus (RABV isolated from different mammals seems to have unique characteristics that influence the outcome of infection. RABV circulates in nature and is maintained by reservoirs that are responsible for the persistence of the disease for almost 4000 years. Considering the different pattern of pathogenicity of RABV strains in naturally and experimentally infected animals, the aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of RABV variants isolated from the main Brazilian reservoirs, being related to a dog (variant 2, Desmodus rotundus (variant 3, crab eating fox, marmoset, and Myotis spp. Viral replication in brain tissue of experimentally infected mouse was evaluated by two laboratory techniques and the results were compared to clinical evolution from five RABV variants. The presence of the RABV was investigated in brain samples by fluorescent antibody test (FAT and real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR for quantification of rabies virus nucleoprotein gene (N gene. Virus replication is not correlated with clinical signs and evolution. The pattern of FAT is associated with RABV replication levels. Virus isolates from crab eating fox and marmoset had a longer evolution period and higher survival rate suggesting that the evolution period may contribute to the outcome. RABV virus variants had independent characteristics that determine the clinical evolution and survival of the infected mice.

  11. Determination of organic compounds in medicinal plants, commercialized in capsulated forms and 'in natura' by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF). Determination of quantitative inorganic profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Manuel Octavio M.; Sato, Ivone Mulako; Salvador, Vera Lucia R.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence technique was used to determine major and trace elements for five Brazilian commercial medicinal plants. The bromobutane (Barbatimao), Ginkgo folium (Ginkgo biloba), Echinodorus macrophyllus (Chapeu de couro), Valeriana officinalis (Valeriana), Cordia salicifolia (Porangaba) samples were collected from three to six different commercial suppliers. The species were collected 'in natura' (leaves, flowers, barks and roots) and capsulated forms. The samples were grinded in liquid N 2 atmosphere and double layer pressed pellet were prepared. The elements Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb e Sr concentrations were determined by individual calibration curves. The precision and accuracy of method were evaluated by certified reference material, NIST 1547 - Peach Leaves and the Chauvenet, Cochrane, ANOVA and Z-score statistical tests were applied. Each specimen presented a distinct inorganic profile and a great variation in its composition was observed. The inorganic profile will contribute for the elaboration of a quality and security guide to assure the phytotherapics commercialization. Moreover, these profiles could be used as complementary data to active farmaco compounds profiles for specimen's ratification. (author)

  12. Optimization of ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with fluorescence detector (FLD) method for the quantitative determination of selected neurotransmitters in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stragierowicz, Joanna; Daragó, Adam; Brzeźnicki, Sławomir; Kilanowicz, Anna

    2017-07-26

    Glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are the main neurotransmitters in the central nervous system for excitatory and inhibitory processes, respectively. Monitoring these neurotransmitters is an essential tool in establishing pathological functions, among others in terms of occupational exposure to toxic substances. We present modification of the HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) to the UPLC (ultra-performance liquid chromatography) method for the simultaneous determination of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in a single injection. The isocratic separation of these neurotransmitter derivatives was performed on Waters Acquity BEH (ethylene bridged hybrid) C18 column with particle size of 1.7 μm at 35°C using a mobile phase consisting of 0.1 M acetate buffer (pH 6.0) and methanol (60:40, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.3 ml/min. The analytes were detected with the fluorescence detector (FLD) using derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA), resulting in excitation at 340 nm and emission at 455 nm. Several validation parameters including linearity (0.999), accuracy (101.1%), intra-day precision (1.52-1.84%), inter-day precision (2.47-3.12%), limit of detection (5-30 ng/ml) and quantification (100 ng/ml) were examined. The developed method was also used for the determination of these neurotransmitters in homogenates of selected rat brain structures. The presented UPLC-FLD is characterized by shorter separation time (3.5 min), which is an adaptation of the similar HPLC methods and is an alternative for more expensive references techniques such as liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods. Med Pr 2017;68(5):583-591. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  13. L G-2 Scintrex manual.Fluorescence analyzer; Manual de LG-2 Scintrex. Analizador de fluorescencias.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirelli, H

    1987-07-01

    The Scintrex Fluorescence Analyzer LG-2 selectively detects the presence of certain fluorescent minerals through UV photoluminescence induced and provides quantitative information on its distribution.

  14. Rapid and Quantitative Detection of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli in Sugarcane Stalk Juice Using a Real-Time Fluorescent (TaqMan PCR Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Ying Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ratoon stunting disease (RSD of sugarcane, one of the most important diseases seriously affecting the productivity of sugarcane crops, was caused by the bacterial agent Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli (Lxx. A TaqMan probe-based real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR assay was established in this study for the quantification of Lxx detection in sugarcane stalk juice. A pair of PCR primers (Pat1-QF/Pat1-QR and a fluorogenic probe (Pat1-QP targeting the Part1 gene of Lxx were used for the qPCR assay. The assay had a detection limit of 100 copies of plasmid DNA and 100 fg of Lxx genomic DNA, which was 100-fold more sensitive than the conventional PCR. Fifty (28.7% of 174 stalk juice samples from two field trials were tested to be positive by qPCR assay, whereas, by conventional PCR, only 12.1% (21/174 were tested to be positive with a published primer pair CxxITSf#5/CxxITSr#5 and 15.5% (27/174 were tested to be positive with a newly designed primer pair Pat1-F2/Pat1-R2. The new qPCR assay can be used as an alternative to current diagnostic methods for Lxx, especially when dealing with certificating a large number of healthy cane seedlings and determining disease incidence accurately in commercial fields.

  15. Development of a real-time fluorescence loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid and quantitative detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4 in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Zhang, He; Pu, Jinji; Qi, Yanxiang; Yu, Qunfang; Xie, Yixian; Peng, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc), the causal agent of Fusarium wilt (Panama disease), is one of the most devastating diseases of banana (Musa spp.). The Foc tropical race 4 (TR4) is currently known as a major concern in global banana production. No effective resistance is known in Musa to Foc, and no effective measures for controlling Foc once banana plants have been infected in place. Early and accurate detection of Foc TR4 is essential to protect banana industry and guide banana planting. A real-time fluorescence loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay (RealAmp) was developed for the rapid and quantitative detection of Foc TR4 in soil. The detection limit of the RealAmp assay was approximately 0.4 pg/µl plasmid DNA when mixed with extracted soil DNA or 10(3) spores/g of artificial infested soil, and no cross-reaction with other relative pathogens were observed. The RealAmp assay for quantifying genomic DNA of TR4 was confirmed by testing both artificially and naturally infested samples. Quantification of the soil-borne pathogen DNA of Foc TR4 in naturally infested samples was no significant difference compared to classic real-time PCR (P>0.05). Additionally, RealAmp assay was visual with an improved closed-tube visual detection system by adding SYBR Green I fluorescent dye to the inside of the lid prior to amplification, which avoided the inhibitory effects of the stain on DNA amplification and makes the assay more convenient in the field and could thus become a simple, rapid and effective technique that has potential as an alternative tool for the detection and monitoring of Foc TR4 in field, which would be a routine DNA-based testing service for the soil-borne pathogen in South China.

  16. Development of a real-time fluorescence loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid and quantitative detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4 in soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    Full Text Available Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc, the causal agent of Fusarium wilt (Panama disease, is one of the most devastating diseases of banana (Musa spp.. The Foc tropical race 4 (TR4 is currently known as a major concern in global banana production. No effective resistance is known in Musa to Foc, and no effective measures for controlling Foc once banana plants have been infected in place. Early and accurate detection of Foc TR4 is essential to protect banana industry and guide banana planting. A real-time fluorescence loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay (RealAmp was developed for the rapid and quantitative detection of Foc TR4 in soil. The detection limit of the RealAmp assay was approximately 0.4 pg/µl plasmid DNA when mixed with extracted soil DNA or 10(3 spores/g of artificial infested soil, and no cross-reaction with other relative pathogens were observed. The RealAmp assay for quantifying genomic DNA of TR4 was confirmed by testing both artificially and naturally infested samples. Quantification of the soil-borne pathogen DNA of Foc TR4 in naturally infested samples was no significant difference compared to classic real-time PCR (P>0.05. Additionally, RealAmp assay was visual with an improved closed-tube visual detection system by adding SYBR Green I fluorescent dye to the inside of the lid prior to amplification, which avoided the inhibitory effects of the stain on DNA amplification and makes the assay more convenient in the field and could thus become a simple, rapid and effective technique that has potential as an alternative tool for the detection and monitoring of Foc TR4 in field, which would be a routine DNA-based testing service for the soil-borne pathogen in South China.

  17. Determination of the inorganic components in the Brazilian medicinal plants from 'in natura' and capsule forms, using X-ray fluorescence techniques (WD and ED systems). Quantitative inorganic profile definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Manuel Octavio Marques

    2004-01-01

    The Na, Mg, P, S, CI, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr concentrations in the Stryphnodendron barbatiman (Barbatimao), Malva officinalis (Malva), Salvia officinalis (Salvia), Ginkgo folium (Ginkgo biloba), Echinodorus macrophylius (Chapeu de couro), Paulina cupana (Guarana), Valeriana officinalis (Valeriana), Cordia salicifolia (Porangaba), Calendula officinalis (Calendula), Solidago microglossa (Arnica), Arnica montana (Arnica) and Schinus molle (Aroeira) species were concentrations. The specimens were sampled 'in natura' (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) and capsule (powder) forms from different commercial labels. The elemental determination was outlined by wavelength dispersive (WDXRF) and energy dispersive (EDXRF) X-ray fluorescence techniques using, respectively, linear regression and fundamental parameter methods. The repeatability and accuracy of the methods were evaluated using the certified reference material NIST 1547 - 'Peach Leaves'. Statistical treatments, such as Chauvenet and Cochrane, ANOVA and Z-score tests, were applied. A quantitative inorganic profile was obtained for each specie from 'in natura' and capsule forms. Different inorganic compositions were observed in the different parts (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) of the Schinus molle (Aroeira), Arnica montana (Arnica), Calendula officinalis (Calendula) and Echinodorus macrophylius (Chapeu de couro) species. (author)

  18. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  19. Early Detection of Breast Cancer by Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2007-01-01

    .... We have successfully completed all goals and achieved the three major aims of the proposal, i.e. i) the development of appropriate fluorescence imaging methods for highly reliable and quantitative fluorescence imaging ii...

  20. Quantitative analysis by X ray fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagrera, José Luis

    1966-06-01

    Full Text Available Not availableSe describe en el presente trabajo el método operatorio para realizar un análisis cuantitativo rutinario de muestras naturales en estado pulverulento, determinando sus contenidos en calcio, silicio, aluminio, hierro, azufre y magnesio, expresados, todos ellos, en forma de óxidos. Dentro de la misma publicación se hace referencia a trabajos en los cuales se explican teórica y prácticamente, los procedimientos de preparación de muestras para el análisis de rayos X y eliminación de interferencias, aplicando la discriminación por altura de impulsos. Las ventajas del método se especifican en un apartado del presente trabajo.

  1. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  2. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 assessment in a case-control study: comparison of fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction performed by central laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehner, Frederick L; Achacoso, Ninah; Maddala, Tara; Shak, Steve; Quesenberry, Charles P; Goldstein, Lynn C; Gown, Allen M; Habel, Laurel A

    2010-10-01

    The optimal method to assess human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status remains highly controversial. Before reporting patient HER2 results, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)/College of American Pathologists (CAP) guidelines mandate that laboratories demonstrate ≥ 95% concordance to another approved laboratory or methodology. Here, we compare central laboratory HER2 assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using Oncotype DX in lymph node-negative, chemotherapy-untreated patients from a large Kaiser Permanente case-control study. Breast cancer specimens from the Kaiser-Genomic Health study were examined. Central FISH assessment of HER2 amplification and polysomy 17 was conducted by PhenoPath Laboratories (ratios > 2.2, 1.8 to 2.2, and < 1.8 define HER2 positive, HER2 equivocal, and HER2 negative, respectively). HER2 expression by RT-PCR was conducted using Oncotype DX by Genomic Health (normalized expression units ≥ 11.5, 10.7 to < 11.5, and < 10.7 define HER2 positive, HER2 equivocal, and HER2 negative, respectively). Concordance analyses followed ASCO/CAP guidelines. HER2 concordance by central FISH and central RT-PCR was 97% (95% CI, 96% to 99%). Twelve percent (67 of 568 patients) and 11% (60 of 568 patients) of patients were HER2 positive by RT-PCR and FISH, respectively. HER2-positive patients had increased odds of dying from breast cancer compared with HER2-negative patients. Polysomy 17 was demonstrated in 12.5% of all patients and 33% of FISH-positive patients. Nineteen of 20 FISH-positive patients with polysomy 17 were also RT-PCR HER2 positive. Although not statistically significantly different, HER2-positive/polysomy 17 patients tended to have the worst prognosis, followed by HER2-positive/eusomic, HER2-negative/polysomy 17, and HER2-negative/eusomic patients. There is a high degree of concordance between central FISH and quantitative RT

  3. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Water excretion mechanisms of the kidney studied in the rabbit using tritiated water during the stop-flow assay; Les mecanismes d'excretion de l'eau par le rein etudies a l'aide d'eau tritiee chez le lapin au cours de l'epreuve de diurese interrompue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, F.; Amiel, CI.; Falbriard, A. [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, Service de Biologie (France)

    1960-07-01

    The pattern of water turnover in the kidney and the mechanisms of water transfer into the urine have been studied in the rabbit using tritiated water as a tracer and the stop-flow technique. The experiments have given the following results: a) During the interruption of the diuresis, the injected tritiated water is completely exchanged with the water of the renal cortex, but the tracer does not reach the deep regions of the kidney, despite the fact that the blood circulation is maintained in these regions; this suggests that the vascular loops of the vasa recta function as a mechanism of water exchange by countercurrent. b) During the osmotic polyuria following the stop-flow period, the concentration gradient of tritiated water inside the kidney diminishes progressively. The concentration of the tracer in the urine is at all time similar to that existing in the deep medulla and the renal papilla and markedly different from that of the cortex or arterial blood. This fact shows that the molecules of water in the urine excreted do not come from either the glomerular filtrate or the convoluted tubules but from the water contained in the deep regions of the kidney. Also these results indicate that the walls of the collecting ducts have a very high permeability to water diffusion. Reprint of a paper published in Revue francaise d'etudes cliniques et biologiques, Vol. IV, no. 8, p. 773-779, 1959 [French] Les modalites du renouvellement de l'eau dans le rein et les mecanismes de son passage dans l'urine ont ete etudies chez le lapin a l'aide d'eau tritiee, employee comme indicateur au cours de l'epreuve de 'diurese interrompue' (stop flow). Les experiences effectuees montrent que: a) pendant l'interruption de la diurese, l'eau tritiee injectee s'echange completement avec l'eau contenue dans le cortex renal, mais elle n'atteint pratiquement pas les regions profondes du rein, bien que la circulation sanguine y soit maintenue; cette observation suggere que les anses

  5. QUANTITATIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Krog Raarup

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent advances in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM for imaging of 3D structure as well as quantitative characterization of biomolecular interactions and diffusion behaviour by means of one- and two-photon excitation. The use of CLSM for improved stereological length estimation in thick (up to 0.5 mm tissue is proposed. The techniques of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, FCS (Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching are introduced and their applicability for quantitative imaging of biomolecular (co-localization and trafficking in live cells described. The advantage of two-photon versus one-photon excitation in relation to these techniques is discussed.

  6. Sensitive turn-on fluorescent detection of tartrazine based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng Tian; Shi, Yan; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2012-01-18

    We introduce a sensitive, rapid, label-free and general fluorescent method for the determination of tartrazine by competitive binding to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) against fluorescein, and the fluorescence recovery upon fluorescein desorption from rGO provides a quantitative readout for tartrazine, giving a detection limit of 0.53 ng mL(-1).

  7. Quantitative analysis by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence by the transmission method applied to geological samples Análise quantitativa por fluorescência de raios X com dispersão por energia pelo método da transmissão aplicada à amostras geológicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Simabuco

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available Three certified samples of different matrices (Soil-5, SL-1/IAEA and SARM-4/SABS were quantitatively analysed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence with radioisotopic excitation. The observed errors were about 10-20% for the majority of the elements and less than 10% for Fe and Zn in the Soil-5, Mn in SL-1, and Ti, Fe and Zn in SARM-4 samples. Annular radioactive sources of Fe-55 and Cd-109 were utilized for the excitation of elements while a Si(Li semiconductor detector coupled to a multichannel emulation card inserted in a microcomputer was used for the detection of the characteristic X-rays. The fundamental parameters method was used for the determination of elemental sensitivities and the irradiator or transmission method for the correction of the absorption effect of characteristic X-rays of elements on the range of atomic number 22 to 42 (Ti to Mo and excitation with Cd-109. For elements in the range of atomic number 13 to 23 (Al to V the irradiator method cannot be applied since samples are not transparent for the incident and emergent X-rays. In order to perform the absorption correction for this range of atomic number excited with Fe-55 source, another method was developed based on the experimental value of the absorption coefficients, associated with absorption edges of the elements.Foi realizada a análise quantitativa de três amostras certificadas de diferentes matrizes (Soil-5/IAEA, SL-1/IAEA e SARM-4/SABS através da fluorescência de raios X por dispersão de energia e excitação radioisotópica. Os erros observados foram em torno de 10 a 20% para a maioria dos elementos e inferiores a 10% para Fe e Zn na amostra Soil-5, Mn na amostra SL-1 e Ti, Fe e Zn na amostra SARM-4. Para a excitação dos elementos presentes foram empregadas as fontes radioativas anelares de Fe-55 e Cd-109, enquanto que na detecção dos raios X característicos utilizou-se um detector de Si(Li, acoplado a uma placa analisadora de pulsos multicanal

  8. Accurate study of FosPeg® distribution in a mouse model using fluorescence imaging technique and fluorescence white monte carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Haiyan; Liu, Haichun; Svenmarker, Pontus

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is used for quantitative in vivo assessment of drug concentration. Light attenuation in tissue is compensated for through Monte-Carlo simulations. The intrinsic fluorescence intensity, directly proportional to the drug concentration, could be obtained....

  9. Three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix fluorescence (3DEEM) for quick and pseudo-quantitative determination of protein- and humic-like substances in full-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquin, Céline; Lesage, Geoffroy; Traber, Jacqueline; Pronk, Wouter; Heran, Marc

    2017-07-01

    The goal of this study is to help filling the research gaps linked to the on-line application of fluorescence spectroscopy in wastewater treatment and data processing tools suitable for rapid correction and extraction of data contained in three-dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (3DEEM) for real-time studies. 3DEEM was evaluated for direct quantification of Effluent Organic Matter (EfOM) fractions in full-scale MBR bulk supernatant and permeate samples. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to investigate possible correlations between conventional Lowry and Dubois methods, Liquid Chromatography coupled to Organic Carbon and Organic Nitrogen Detection (LC-OCD-OND) and 3DEEM. 3DEEM data were analyzed using the volume of fluorescence (Φ) parameter from the Fluorescence Regional Integration (FRI) method. Two mathematical correlations were established between LC-OCD-OND and 3DEEM data to quantify protein-like and humic-like substances. These correlations were validated with supplementary data from the initial full-scale MBR, and were checked with samples from other systems (a second full-scale MBR, a full-scale conventional activated sludge (CAS) and a laboratory-scale MBR). While humic-like correlation showed satisfactory prediction for a second full-scale MBR and a CAS system, further studies are required for protein-like estimation in other systems. This new approach offers interesting perspectives for the on-line application of 3DEEM for EfOM quantification (protein-like and humic-like substances), fouling prediction and MBR process control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Stopped-Flow Spectrophotometric Study of the Kinetics and Mechanism of CO2 Uptake by cis-[Cr(C2O4(BaraNH2(OH22]+ Cation and the Acid-Catalyzed Decomposition of cis-[Cr(C2O4(BaraNH2OCO2]− Anion in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Chmurzyński

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of CO2 uptake by the cis-[Cr(C2O4(BaraNH2(OH22]+ complex cation and the acid hydrolysis of the cis-[Cr(C2O4(BaraNH2OCO2]− complex anion (where BaraNH2 denotes methyl 3-amino-2,3-dideoxy-b-D-arabino-hexopyranoside were studied using the stopped-flow technique. The reactions under study were investigated in aqueous solution in the 288–308 K temperature range. In the case of the reaction between CO2 and cis-[Cr(C2O4(BaraNH2(OH22]+ cation variable pH values (6.82–8.91 and the constant ionic strength of solution (H+, Na+, ClO4− = 1.0 were used. Carbon dioxide was generated by the reaction between sodium pyruvate and hydrogen peroxide. The acid hydrolysis of cis-[Cr(C2O4(BaraNH2OCO2]− was investigated for varying concentrations of H+ ions (0.01–2.7 M. The obtained results enabled the determination of the number of steps of the studied reactions. Based on the kinetic equations, rate constants were determined for each step. Finally, mechanisms for both reactions were proposed and discussed. Based on the obtained results it was concluded that the carboxylation (CO2 uptake reactions of cis-[Cr(C2O4(BaraNH2(OH22]+ and the decarboxylation (acid hydrolysis of the cis-[Cr(C2O4(BaraNH2OCO2]− are the opposite of each other.

  11. qF-SSOP: real-time optical property corrected fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Pablo A.; Angelo, Joseph P.; Choi, Hak Soo; Gioux, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is well suited to provide image guidance during resections in oncologic and vascular surgery. However, the distorting effects of tissue optical properties on the emitted fluorescence are poorly compensated for on even the most advanced fluorescence image guidance systems, leading to subjective and inaccurate estimates of tissue fluorophore concentrations. Here we present a novel fluorescence imaging technique that performs real-time (i.e., video rate) optical property corrected fluorescence imaging. We perform full field of view simultaneous imaging of tissue optical properties using Single Snapshot of Optical Properties (SSOP) and fluorescence detection. The estimated optical properties are used to correct the emitted fluorescence with a quantitative fluorescence model to provide quantitative fluorescence-Single Snapshot of Optical Properties (qF-SSOP) images with less than 5% error. The technique is rigorous, fast, and quantitative, enabling ease of integration into the surgical workflow with the potential to improve molecular guidance intraoperatively. PMID:28856038

  12. Spectroscopic Tools for Quantitative Studies of DNA Structure and Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preus, Søren

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop quantitative fluorescence-based, spectroscopic tools for probing the 3D structure and dynamics of DNA and RNA. The thesis is founded on six peer-reviewed papers covering mainly the development, characterization and use of fluorescent nucleobase...... analogues. In addition, four software packages is presented for the simulation and quantitative analysis of time-resolved and steady-state UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence experiments....

  13. Quantitative optical fluorescence microprobe measurements of stresses around indentations in Al2O3 and Al2O3/SiC nanocomposites: The influence of depth resolution and specimen translucency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Sheng; Todd, R.I.

    2011-01-01

    Residual stresses around 1 kg Vickers indentations in Al 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 /SiC nanocomposites were measured using high-resolution Cr 3+ fluorescence microscopy. Experiments and modelling showed that the use of non-confocal microscopes can lead to significant underestimation of the surface stress in Al 2 O 3 because of the sampling of subsurface regions where the stresses are lower. The nanocomposites were less sensitive to the depth resolution of the microscope because their strong absorption limited the depth from which fluorescent radiation was collected. The use of confocal microscope settings allowed accurate measurements to be made and the indentation stresses were found to be very similar in Al 2 O 3 and the Al 2 O 3 /SiC nanocomposites. The stresses measured were significantly different from the predictions of the Yoffe model for indentation stresses. This was because of indentation cracking, which is not accounted for in the model. Cracking was also considered to be important in determining the plastic zone size in ceramics, which is much smaller relative to the indentation size than in metals.

  14. Radiometric dating and quantitative analysis of elements in depth profiles of sediments by means of nuclear physical as well as X-ray fluorescence and atomic emission spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenburg, M.

    1987-01-01

    The measurement of heavy metal concentration in sediments is of great importance for the assessment of water quality. If dating of the different layers of sediment cores is possible, informations about the history of pollution can be inferred. This paper describes the development and practical test of a procedure suitable for the investigation of sediment cores. Both the element analysis and the dating are based on physical methods. For element concentration determination inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP), total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) are used. The techniques are described and compared. For dating radiometric measurements of 210 Pb and 137 Cs are carried out with a coaxial well-type germanium γ-ray detector in a special low-level arrangement. Results of the systematic investigations are presented and a few individual depth profiles are discussed. (orig.) With 34 figs., 20 tabs [de

  15. Quantitation of species differences in albumin–ligand interactions for bovine, human and rat serum albumins using fluorescence spectroscopy: A test case with some Sudlow's site I ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poór, Miklós [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 13, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Li, Yin; Matisz, Gergely [Department of General and Physical Chemistry, University of Pécs, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); János Szentágothai Research Center, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Kiss, László [Department of General and Physical Chemistry, University of Pécs, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Kunsági-Máté, Sándor [Department of General and Physical Chemistry, University of Pécs, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); János Szentágothai Research Center, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Kőszegi, Tamás, E-mail: koszegit@freemail.hu [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 13, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary)

    2014-01-15

    Albumin, the most abundant plasma protein is an approximately 67 kDa sized water-soluble macromolecule. Since several drugs and xenobiotics circulate in the blood at least partially in albumin-bound form, albumin plays a key role in the pharmacokinetics/toxicokinetics of these chemicals. Most of the drugs and xenobiotics are Sudlow's site I ligands. In numerous studies, bovine serum albumin (BSA) is used for modeling albumin–ligand interactions and the results are extrapolated to human serum albumin (HSA). Furthermore, only limited information is available related to albumin–ligand interactions of different albumin species. Therefore, in our study, we have focused on the quantification of differences between bovine, human and rat serum albumin (RSA) using four Sudlow's site I ligands (luteolin, ochratoxin A, phenylbutazone and warfarin). Interactions were analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy. Stability constants as well as competing capacities of the ligands were determined, and thermodynamic study was also performed. Our results highlight that there could be major differences between BSA, HSA and RSA in their ligand binding properties. Based on our observations we emphasize that in molecular aspects BSA behaves considerably differently from HSA or from albumins of other species therefore, it is strongly recommended to apply at least some confirmatory measurements when data obtained from other species are attempted to be extrapolated to HSA. -- Highlights: • Albumin–ligand interactions of human, bovine and rat albumins were studied. • Four Sudlow's site I ligands were tested by fluorescence spectroscopy. • Substantial differences were found in stability constants among albumin complexes. • Competing capacity of ligands showed major differences in the studied species. • Data obtained for BSA cannot be directly extrapolated to human albumin.

  16. Bioorthogonal fluorescent labeling of functional G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, He; Naganathan, Saranga; Kazmi, Manija A

    2014-01-01

    Novel methods are required for site-specific, quantitative fluorescent labeling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and other difficult-to-express membrane proteins. Ideally, fluorescent probes should perturb the native structure and function as little as possible. We evaluated bioorthogonal...

  17. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  18. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  19. Reviews in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2010-01-01

    This volume serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence spectroscopy. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications as well as includes authoritative analytical reviews.

  20. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  1. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sue I [Berkeley, CA; Fergenson, David P [Alamo, CA; Srivastava, Abneesh [Santa Clara, CA; Bogan, Michael J [Dublin, CA; Riot, Vincent J [Oakland, CA; Frank, Matthias [Oakland, CA

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  2. An Evaluation of Quantitative PCR Assays (TaqMan® and SYBR Green for the Detection of Babesia bigemina and Babesia bovis, and a Novel Fluorescent-ITS1-PCR Capillary Electrophoresis Method for Genotyping B. bovis Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Babesia spp. are tick-transmitted haemoparasites causing tick fever in cattle. In Australia, economic losses to the cattle industry from tick fever are estimated at AUD$26 Million per annum. If animals recover from these infections, they become immune carriers. Here we describe a novel multiplex TaqMan qPCR targeting cytochrome b genes for the identification of Babesia spp. The assay shows high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility, and allows quantification of parasite DNA from Babesia bovis and B. bigemina compared to standard PCR assays. A previously published cytochrome b SYBR Green qPCR was also tested in this study, showing slightly higher sensitivity than the Taqman qPCRs but requires melting curve analysis post-PCR to confirm specificity. The SYBR Green assays were further evaluated using both diagnostic submissions and vaccinated cattle (at 7, 9, 11 and 14 days post-inoculation showed that B. bigemina can be detected more frequently than B. bovis. Due to fewer circulating parasites, B. bovis detection in carrier animals requires higher DNA input. Preliminary data for a novel fluorescent PCR genotyping based on the Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 region to detect vaccine and field alleles of B. bovis are described. This assay is capable of detecting vaccine and novel field isolate alleles in a single sample.

  3. A novel quantitative assay of mitophagy: Combining high content fluorescence microscopy and mitochondrial DNA load to quantify mitophagy and identify novel pharmacological tools against pathogenic heteroplasmic mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diot, Alan; Hinks-Roberts, Alex; Lodge, Tiffany; Liao, Chunyan; Dombi, Eszter; Morten, Karl; Brady, Stefen; Fratter, Carl; Carver, Janet; Muir, Rebecca; Davis, Ryan; Green, Charlotte J; Johnston, Iain; Hilton-Jones, David; Sue, Carolyn; Mortiboys, Heather; Poulton, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Mitophagy is a cellular mechanism for the recycling of mitochondrial fragments. This process is able to improve mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) quality in heteroplasmic mtDNA disease, in which mutant mtDNA co-exists with normal mtDNA. In disorders where the load of mutant mtDNA determines disease severity it is likely to be an important determinant of disease progression. Measuring mitophagy is technically demanding. We used pharmacological modulators of autophagy to validate two techniques for quantifying mitophagy. First we used the IN Cell 1000 analyzer to quantify mitochondrial co-localisation with LC3-II positive autophagosomes. Unlike conventional fluorescence and electron microscopy, this high-throughput system is sufficiently sensitive to detect transient low frequency autophagosomes. Secondly, because mitophagy preferentially removes pathogenic heteroplasmic mtDNA mutants, we developed a heteroplasmy assay based on loss of m.3243A>G mtDNA, during culture conditions requiring oxidative metabolism ("energetic stress"). The effects of the pharmacological modulators on these two measures were consistent, confirming that the high throughput imaging output (autophagosomes co-localising with mitochondria) reflects mitochondrial quality control. To further validate these methods, we performed a more detailed study using metformin, the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug that is still sometimes used in Maternally Inherited Diabetes and Deafness (MIDD). This confirmed our initial findings and revealed that metformin inhibits mitophagy at clinically relevant concentrations, suggesting that it may have novel therapeutic uses. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Optimization of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, D.S.; Goedhart, J.; Hink, M.A.; van Weeren, L.; Joosen, L.; Gadella (jr.), T.W.J.; Engelborghs, Y.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, fluorescent protein (FP) variants have been engineered to fluoresce in all different colors; to display photoswitchable, or photochromic, behavior; or to show yet other beneficial properties that enable or enhance a still growing set of new fluorescence spectroscopy and microcopy

  5. Free-cholesterol loading does not trigger phase separation of the fluorescent sterol dehydroergosterol in the plasma membrane of macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    membrane distribution of the fluorescent cholesterol-mimicking sterol dehydroergosterol (DHE) was investigated in FC-loaded J774 macrophages. Wide field fluorescence and deconvolution microscopy were combined with quantitative assessment of sterol distribution in straightened plasma membrane image segments...

  6. X-ray fluorescence method for trace analysis and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Shinjiro

    2000-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis has a long history as conventional bulk elemental analysis with medium sensitivity. However, with the use of synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence method has become a unique analytical technique which can provide tace elemental information with the spatial resolution. To obtain quantitative information of trace elemental distribution by using the x-ray fluorescence method, theoretical description of x-ray fluorescence yield is described. Moreover, methods and instruments for trace characterization with a scanning x-ray microprobe are described. (author)

  7. Quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roger

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the basic tenets of quantitative research. The concepts of dependent and independent variables are addressed and the concept of measurement and its associated issues, such as error, reliability and validity, are explored. Experiments and surveys – the principal research designs in quantitative research – are described and key features explained. The importance of the double-blind randomised controlled trial is emphasised, alongside the importance of longitudinal surveys, as opposed to cross-sectional surveys. Essential features of data storage are covered, with an emphasis on safe, anonymous storage. Finally, the article explores the analysis of quantitative data, considering what may be analysed and the main uses of statistics in analysis.

  8. Quantitative habitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, Everett L; Holland, Melanie E

    2007-12-01

    A framework is proposed for a quantitative approach to studying habitability. Considerations of environmental supply and organismal demand of energy lead to the conclusions that power units are most appropriate and that the units for habitability become watts per organism. Extreme and plush environments are revealed to be on a habitability continuum, and extreme environments can be quantified as those where power supply only barely exceeds demand. Strategies for laboratory and field experiments are outlined that would quantify power supplies, power demands, and habitability. An example involving a comparison of various metabolisms pursued by halophiles is shown to be well on the way to a quantitative habitability analysis.

  9. X-ray fluorescence analyzer arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatai, Endre; Ando, Laszlo; Gal, Janos.

    1981-01-01

    An x-ray fluorescence analyzer for the quantitative determination of one or more elements of complex samples is reported. The novelties of the invention are the excitation of the samples by x-rays or γ-radiation, the application of a balanced filter pair as energy selector, and the measurement of the current or ion charge of ionization detectors used as sensors. Due to the increased sensitivity and accuracy, the novel design can extend the application fields of x-ray fluorescence analyzers. (A.L.)

  10. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  11. Fluorescence of irradiated hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulis, I.G.; Evdokimenko, V.M.; Lapkovskij, M.P.; Petrov, P.T.; Gulis, I.M.; Markevich, S.V.

    1977-01-01

    A visible fluorescence has been found out in γ-irradiated aqueous of carbohydrates. Two bands have been distinguished in fluorescence spectra of the irradiated solution of dextran: a short-wave band lambdasub(max)=140 nm (where lambda is a wave length) at lambdasub(β)=380 nm and a long-wave band with lambdasub(max)=540 nm at lambdasub(β)=430 nm. A similar form of the spectrum has been obtained for irradiated solutions of starch, amylopectin, lowmolecular glucose. It has been concluded that a macromolecule of polysaccharides includes fluorescent centres. A relation between fluorescence and α-oxiketon groups formed under irradiation has been pointed out

  12. Quantitative Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative finance is a field that has risen to prominence over the last few decades. It encompasses the complex models and calculations that value financial contracts, particularly those which reference events in the future, and apply probabilities to these events. While adding greatly to the flexibility of the market available to corporations and investors, it has also been blamed for worsening the impact of financial crises. But what exactly does quantitative finance encompass, and where did these ideas and models originate? We show that the mathematics behind finance and behind games of chance have tracked each other closely over the centuries and that many well-known physicists and mathematicians have contributed to the field.

  13. Quantitative analysis of boron by neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayuelken, A.; Boeck, H.; Schachner, H.; Buchberger, T.

    1990-01-01

    The quantitative determination of boron in ores is a long process with chemical analysis techniques. As nuclear techniques like X-ray fluorescence and activation analysis are not applicable for boron, only the neutron radiography technique, using the high neutron absorption cross section of this element, can be applied for quantitative determinations. This paper describes preliminary tests and calibration experiments carried out at a 250 kW TRIGA reactor. (orig.) [de

  14. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...

  15. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  16. Quantification of fluorescence angiography in a porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerup, Nikolaj; Andersen, Helene Schou; Ambrus, Rikard

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is no consensus on how to quantify indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence angiography. The aim of the present study was to establish and gather validity evidence for a method of quantifying fluorescence angiography, to assess organ perfusion. METHODS: Laparotomy was performed on seven...... pigs, with two regions of interest (ROIs) marked. ICG and neutron-activated microspheres were administered and the stomach was illuminated in the near-infrared range, parallel to continuous recording of fluorescence signal. Tissue samples from the ROIs were sent for quantification of microspheres...... to calculate the regional blood flow. A software system was developed to assess the fluorescent recordings quantitatively, and each quantitative parameter was compared with the regional blood flow. The parameter with the strongest correlation was then compared with results from an independently developed...

  17. Is the flower fluorescence relevant in biocommunication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriel, Analía; Lagorio, María Gabriela

    2010-10-01

    Flower fluorescence has been previously proposed as a potential visual signal to attract pollinators. In this work, this point was addressed by quantitatively measuring the fluorescence quantum yield ( Φ f) for flowers of Bellis perennis (white, yellow, pink, and purple), Ornithogalum thyrsoides (petals and ovaries), Limonium sinuatum (white and yellow), Lampranthus productus (yellow), Petunia nyctaginiflora (white), Bougainvillea spectabilis (white and yellow), Antirrhinum majus (white and yellow), Eustoma grandiflorum (white and blue), Citrus aurantium (petals and stigma), and Portulaca grandiflora (yellow). The highest values were obtained for the ovaries of O. thyrsoides ( Φ f = 0.030) and for Citrus aurantium petals ( Φ f = 0.014) and stigma ( Φ f = 0.013). Emitted photons as fluorescence were compared with reflected photons. It was concluded that the fluorescence emission is negligible compared to the reflected light, even for the most fluorescent samples, and it may not be considered as an optical signal in biocommunication. The work was complemented with the calculation of quantum catches for each studied flower species to describe the visual sensitization of eye photoreceptors.

  18. Fluorescent Nanoparticle Uptake for Brain Tumor Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Tréhin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate delineation of tumor margins is vital to the successful surgical resection of brain tumors. We have previously developed a multimodal nanoparticle CLIO-Cy5.5, which is detectable by both magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence, to assist in intraoperatively visualizing tumor boundaries. Here we examined the accuracy of tumor margin determination of orthotopic tumors implanted in hosts with differing immune responses to the tumor. Using a nonuser-based signal intensity method applied to fluorescent micrographs of 9L gliosarcoma green fluorescent protein (GFP tumors, mean overestimations of 2 and 24 µm were obtained using Cy5.5 fluorescence, compared to the true tumor margin determined by GFP fluorescence, in nude mice and rats, respectively. To resolve which cells internalized the nanoparticle and to quantitate degree of uptake, tumors were disaggregated and cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Nanoparticle uptake was seen in both CD11b+ cells (representing activated microglia and macrophages and tumor cells in both animal models by both methods. CD11b+ cells were predominantly found at the tumor margin in both hosts, but were more pronounced at the margin in the rat model. Additional metastatic (CT26 colon and primary (Gli36 glioma brain tumor models likewise demonstrated that the nanoparticle was internalized both by tumor cells and by host cells. Together, these observations suggest that fluorescent nanoparticles provide an accurate method of tumor margin estimation based on a combination of tumor cell and host cell uptake for primary and metastatic tumors in animal model systems and offer potential for clinical translation.

  19. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  20. X-ray fluorescent elemental analysis. Ch. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshev, V.; Kulipanov, G.; Skrinsky, A.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis (XFA) is used worldwide to define a quantitative content of the elements as well as to visualize the distribution of elements in different regions (element mapping). Utilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) to excite X-ray fluorescence enables the XFA method to be qualitatively improved. This chapter reviews the experimental work in especially the last decade (author). 71 refs.; 24 figs.; 3 tabs

  1. X-ray fluorescence imaging with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivers, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The micro-distribution of trace elements is of great interest in fields such as geochemistry, biology and material science. The synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe provides a technique to quantitatively measure trace element compositions at individual points and to construct semiquantitative two dimensional maps of trace element compositions. This paper describes an x-ray fluorescence system used at the National Synchrotron Light Source

  2. Quantitative radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brase, J.M.; Martz, H.E.; Waltjen, K.E.; Hurd, R.L.; Wieting, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    Radiographic techniques have been used in nondestructive evaluation primarily to develop qualitative information (i.e., defect detection). This project applies and extends the techniques developed in medical x-ray imaging, particularly computed tomography (CT), to develop quantitative information (both spatial dimensions and material quantities) on the three-dimensional (3D) structure of solids. Accomplishments in FY 86 include (1) improvements in experimental equipment - an improved microfocus system that will give 20-μm resolution and has potential for increased imaging speed, and (2) development of a simple new technique for displaying 3D images so as to clearly show the structure of the object. Image reconstruction and data analysis for a series of synchrotron CT experiments conducted by LLNL's Chemistry Department has begun

  3. Quantitative lymphography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostbeck, A.; Lofferer, O.; Kahn, P.; Partsch, H.; Koehn, H.; Bialonczyk, Ch.; Koenig, B.

    1984-01-01

    Labelled colloids and macromolecules are removed lymphatically. The uptake of tracer in the regional lymphnodes is a parameter of lymphatic flow. Due to great variations in patient shape - obesity, cachexia - and accompanying variations in counting efficiencies quantitative measurements with reasonable accuracy have not been reported to date. A new approach to regional absorption correction is based on the combination of transmission and emission scans for each patient. The transmission scan is used for calculation of an absorption correction matrix. Accurate superposition of the correction matrix and the emission scan is achieved by computing the centers of gravity of point sources and - in the case of aligning opposite views - by cross correlation of binary images. In phantom studies the recovery was high (98.3%) and the coefficient of variation of repeated measurement below 1%. In patient studies a standardized stress is a prerequisite for reliable and comparable results. Discrimination between normals (14.3 +- 4.2D%) and patients with lymphedema (2.05 +- 2.5D%) was highly significant using praefascial lymphography and sc injection. Clearence curve analysis of the activities at the injection site, however, gave no reliable data for this purpose. In normals, the uptake in lymphnodes after im injection is by one order of magnitude lower then the uptake after sc injection. The discrimination between normals and patients with postthromboic syndrome was significant. Lymphography after ic injection was in the normal range in 2/3 of the patients with lymphedema and is therefore of no diagnostic value. The difference in uptake after ic and sc injection demonstrated for the first time by our quantitative method provides new insights into the pathophysiology of lymphedema and needs further investigation. (Author)

  4. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  5. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  6. Tracking Lithium Ions via Widefield Fluorescence Microscopy for Battery Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Nicolas A; Rea, Morgan T; Foy, Michael; Upadhyay, Sunil P; Desrochers, Kyle A; Derus, Tyler; Knapper, Kassandra A; Hunter, Nathanael H; Wood, Sharla; Hinton, Daniel A; Cavell, Andrew C; Masias, Alvaro G; Goldsmith, Randall H

    2017-07-28

    Direct tracking of lithium ions with time and spatial resolution can provide an important diagnostic tool for understanding mechanisms in lithium ion batteries. A fluorescent indicator of lithium ions, 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)naphthoxazole, was synthesized and used for real-time tracking of lithium ions via widefield fluorescence microscopy. The fluorophore can be excited with visible light and was shown to enable quantitative determination of the lithium ion diffusion constant in a microfluidic model system for a plasticized polymer electrolyte lithium battery. The use of widefield fluorescence microscopy for in situ tracking of lithium ions in batteries is discussed.

  7. Reviews in fluorescence 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Lakowicz, Joseph R; Geddes, Chris D

    2009-01-01

    This fourth volume in the Springer series summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough for professional researchers, yet also appealing to a wider audience of scientists in related fields.

  8. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  9. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel quantitative light‑induced fluorescence device for monitoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-06

    Aug 6, 2015 ... Background: The FluoreCam system is based on an innovative approach to the ... In total, 11 patients with MIH were diagnosed on a visual MIH scale and ... sensitivity and specificity over traditional techniques .... clinician to record the subject's identification, date of visit, ... versus unaffected enamel.

  11. Analysis of Cell Movement by Simultaneous Quantification of Local Membrane Displacement and Fluorescent Intensities Using Quimp2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosgraaf, Leonard; van Haastert, Peter J. M.; Bretschneider, Till

    The use of fluorescent markers in living cells has increased dramatically in the recent years. The quantitative analysis of the images requires specific analysis software. Previously, the program Quimp was launched for quantitating fluorescent intensities at the membrane or the cortex of the cell.

  12. Quantitative Thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Jean; van der Beek, Peter; Batt, Geoffrey

    2006-05-01

    Thermochronology, the study of the thermal history of rocks, enables us to quantify the nature and timing of tectonic processes. Quantitative Thermochronology is a robust review of isotopic ages, and presents a range of numerical modeling techniques to allow the physical implications of isotopic age data to be explored. The authors provide analytical, semi-analytical, and numerical solutions to the heat transfer equation in a range of tectonic settings and under varying boundary conditions. They then illustrate their modeling approach built around a large number of case studies. The benefits of different thermochronological techniques are also described. Computer programs on an accompanying website at www.cambridge.org/9780521830577 are introduced through the text and provide a means of solving the heat transport equation in the deforming Earth to predict the ages of rocks and compare them directly to geological and geochronological data. Several short tutorials, with hints and solutions, are also included. Numerous case studies help geologists to interpret age data and relate it to Earth processes Essential background material to aid understanding and using thermochronological data Provides a thorough treatise on numerical modeling of heat transport in the Earth's crust Supported by a website hosting relevant computer programs and colour slides of figures from the book for use in teaching

  13. Fluorescence Image Segmentation by using Digitally Reconstructed Fluorescence Images

    OpenAIRE

    Blumer, Clemens; Vivien, Cyprien; Oertner, Thomas G; Vetter, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In biological experiments fluorescence imaging is used to image living and stimulated neurons. But the analysis of fluorescence images is a difficult task. It is not possible to conclude the shape of an object from fluorescence images alone. Therefore, it is not feasible to get good manual segmented nor ground truth data from fluorescence images. Supervised learning approaches are not possible without training data. To overcome this issues we propose to synthesize fluorescence images and call...

  14. Quantitative (real-time) PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, S.E.; McSweeney, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Many nucleic acid-based probe and PCR assays have been developed for the detection tracking of specific microbes within the rumen ecosystem. Conventional PCR assays detect PCR products at the end stage of each PCR reaction, where exponential amplification is no longer being achieved. This approach can result in different end product (amplicon) quantities being generated. In contrast, using quantitative, or real-time PCR, quantification of the amplicon is performed not at the end of the reaction, but rather during exponential amplification, where theoretically each cycle will result in a doubling of product being created. For real-time PCR, the cycle at which fluorescence is deemed to be detectable above the background during the exponential phase is termed the cycle threshold (Ct). The Ct values obtained are then used for quantitation, which will be discussed later

  15. The quantitative Morse theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Loi, Ta Le; Phien, Phan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we give a proof of the quantitative Morse theorem stated by {Y. Yomdin} in \\cite{Y1}. The proof is based on the quantitative Sard theorem, the quantitative inverse function theorem and the quantitative Morse lemma.

  16. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  17. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  18. The enhanced cyan fluorescent protein: a sensitive pH sensor for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poëa-Guyon, Sandrine; Pasquier, Hélène; Mérola, Fabienne; Morel, Nicolas; Erard, Marie

    2013-05-01

    pH is an important parameter that affects many functions of live cells, from protein structure or function to several crucial steps of their metabolism. Genetically encoded pH sensors based on pH-sensitive fluorescent proteins have been developed and used to monitor the pH of intracellular compartments. The quantitative analysis of pH variations can be performed either by ratiometric or fluorescence lifetime detection. However, most available genetically encoded pH sensors are based on green and yellow fluorescent proteins and are not compatible with multicolor approaches. Taking advantage of the strong pH sensitivity of enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), we demonstrate here its suitability as a sensitive pH sensor using fluorescence lifetime imaging. The intracellular ECFP lifetime undergoes large changes (32 %) in the pH 5 to pH 7 range, which allows accurate pH measurements to better than 0.2 pH units. By fusion of ECFP with the granular chromogranin A, we successfully measured the pH in secretory granules of PC12 cells, and we performed a kinetic analysis of intragranular pH variations in living cells exposed to ammonium chloride.

  19. Application of ZigBee technology in the X fluorescence analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haibin; Yang Jian; Cao Bihua; Zhao Xiang

    2010-01-01

    In order to ensure safe and convenient measurement of nuclear radiation, a ZigBee- technology- based X- fluorescence analyzer is developed to be used in laboratories to make quantitative and qualitative analysis of radioactive samples. (authors)

  20. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs

  1. Fluorescence uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.; Crus Castillo, F. de la; Barrera Pinero, R.

    1960-01-01

    An equipment for analysis of uranium by fluorescence was developed in order to determine it at such a low concentration that it can not be determined by the most sensible analytical methods. this new fluorimeter was adapted to measure the fluorescence emitted by the phosphorus sodium fluoride-sodium carbonate-potasium carbonate-uranyl, being excited by ultraviolet light of 3,650 A the intensity of the light emitted was measure with a photomultiplicator RCA 5819 and the adequate electronic equipment. (Author) 19 refs

  2. Evaluation of furocoumarins as photosynthetic inhibitor by chlorophyll a fluorescence assay

    OpenAIRE

    Sampaio, Olívia Moreira; Silva, Maria Fátima das Graças Fernandes da; Veiga, Thiago Andre Moura [UNIFESP; King-Díaz, Beatriz; Lotina-Hennsen, Blas

    2012-01-01

    The evaluations of Chorophyll a fluorescence emitted by superior plants carry structural information and photosynthetic apparatus function. Quantitative analysis apparatus of fluorescence kinetic were measured by energy flows (ABS), (TR), (ET) and (DI), known as phenomenological phenomena of OJIP test. Four furocoumarins were isolated from Ruta graveolens (Rutaceae), and chorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence assays were performed with these compounds to evaluate the photosynthesis inhibition pote...

  3. Active mask segmentation of fluorescence microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa, Gowri; Fickus, Matthew C; Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam D; Kovacević, Jelena

    2009-08-01

    We propose a new active mask algorithm for the segmentation of fluorescence microscope images of punctate patterns. It combines the (a) flexibility offered by active-contour methods, (b) speed offered by multiresolution methods, (c) smoothing offered by multiscale methods, and (d) statistical modeling offered by region-growing methods into a fast and accurate segmentation tool. The framework moves from the idea of the "contour" to that of "inside and outside," or masks, allowing for easy multidimensional segmentation. It adapts to the topology of the image through the use of multiple masks. The algorithm is almost invariant under initialization, allowing for random initialization, and uses a few easily tunable parameters. Experiments show that the active mask algorithm matches the ground truth well and outperforms the algorithm widely used in fluorescence microscopy, seeded watershed, both qualitatively, as well as quantitatively.

  4. X-ray emission spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despujols, J.

    1992-01-01

    Principles of X-ray emission spectrometry are first recalled, then wave-length dispersive and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer are described. They are essentially designed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of elements (Z>10). Sample preparation, calibration, corrections, interferences, accuracy are reviewed. Examples of use in different industries are given. (71 refs.)

  5. Molecular quantification of genes encoding for green-fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felske, A; Vandieken, V; Pauling, B V

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative PCR approach is presented to analyze the amount of recombinant green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes in environmental DNA samples. The quantification assay is a combination of specific PCR amplification and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Gene quantification...... PCR strategy is a highly specific and sensitive way to monitor recombinant DNA in environments like the efflux of a biotechnological plant....

  6. Monitoring by fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolme-Lawes, D.J.; Gifford, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    A fluorimetric detector is described in which the fluorescence excitation source may be 3 H, 14 C, 35 S, 147 Pm or 63 Ni. Such a detector can be adapted for use with flowing liquid systems especially liquid chromatography systems. (U.K.)

  7. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  8. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    not be cited for purposes of advertisement. DISPOSITION INSTRUCTIONS: Destroy this document when no longer needed. Do not return to the... recycling , and can be disposed safely in a landfill. (2) LEDs offer reduced maintenance costs and fewer bulb replacements, significantly reducing... recycling . Several fixtures, ballasts and energy efficient fluorescent bulbs that were determined to be in pristine condition were returned to ATC

  9. Statistical filtering in fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin

    Roč. 406 , č. 20 (2014), s. 4797-4813 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Filtered fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  10. Segmentation and classification of cell cycle phases in fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Ilker; Bunyak, Filiz; Chagin, Vadim; Cardoso, M Christina; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2009-01-01

    Current chemical biology methods for studying spatiotemporal correlation between biochemical networks and cell cycle phase progression in live-cells typically use fluorescence-based imaging of fusion proteins. Stable cell lines expressing fluorescently tagged protein GFP-PCNA produce rich, dynamically varying sub-cellular foci patterns characterizing the cell cycle phases, including the progress during the S-phase. Variable fluorescence patterns, drastic changes in SNR, shape and position changes and abundance of touching cells require sophisticated algorithms for reliable automatic segmentation and cell cycle classification. We extend the recently proposed graph partitioning active contours (GPAC) for fluorescence-based nucleus segmentation using regional density functions and dramatically improve its efficiency, making it scalable for high content microscopy imaging. We utilize surface shape properties of GFP-PCNA intensity field to obtain descriptors of foci patterns and perform automated cell cycle phase classification, and give quantitative performance by comparing our results to manually labeled data.

  11. Measurement of cell volume changes by fluorescence self-quenching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Kiilgaard, J.F.; Litman, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    At high concentrations, certain fluorophores undergo self-quenching, i.e., fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing fluorophore concentration. Accordingly, the self-quenching properties can be used for measuring water volume changes in lipid vesicles. In cells, quantitative determination...... concentrations of the fluorophore calcein suitable for measurement of changes in cell water volume by self-quenching. The relationship between calcein fluorescence intensity, when excited at 490 nm (its excitation maximum), and calcein concentration was investigated in vitro and in various cultured cell types...... to a decrease in calcein fluorescence with high signal-to-noise ratio (>15). Similar results were obtained with the fluorophore BCECF when excited at its isosbestic wavelength (436 nm). The present results demonstrate the usefulness of fluorescence self-quenching to measure rapid changes in cell water volume....

  12. Measuring and interpreting X-ray fluorescence from planetary surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Alan; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Fraser, George; Kolbe, Michael; Krumrey, Michael; Mantero, Alfonso; Mantler, Michael; Peacock, Anthony; Pia, Maria-Grazia; Pullan, Derek; Schneider, Uwe G; Ulm, Gerhard

    2008-11-15

    As part of a comprehensive study of X-ray emission from planetary surfaces and in particular the planet Mercury, we have measured fluorescent radiation from a number of planetary analog rock samples using monochromatized synchrotron radiation provided by the BESSY II electron storage ring. The experiments were carried out using a purpose built X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer chamber developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's national metrology institute. The XRF instrumentation is absolutely calibrated and allows for reference-free quantitation of rock sample composition, taking into account secondary photon- and electron-induced enhancement effects. The fluorescence data, in turn, have been used to validate a planetary fluorescence simulation tool based on the GEANT4 transport code. This simulation can be used as a mission analysis tool to predict the time-dependent orbital XRF spectral distributions from planetary surfaces throughout the mapping phase.

  13. Signal and noise modeling in confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberich, Gerlind; Windoffer, Reinhard; Leube, Rudolf E; Aach, Til

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has revolutionized imaging of subcellular structures in biomedical research by enabling the acquisition of 3D time-series of fluorescently-tagged proteins in living cells, hence forming the basis for an automated quantification of their morphological and dynamic characteristics. Due to the inherently weak fluorescence, CLSM images exhibit a low SNR. We present a novel model for the transfer of signal and noise in CLSM that is both theoretically sound as well as corroborated by a rigorous analysis of the pixel intensity statistics via measurement of the 3D noise power spectra, signal-dependence and distribution. Our model provides a better fit to the data than previously proposed models. Further, it forms the basis for (i) the simulation of the CLSM imaging process indispensable for the quantitative evaluation of CLSM image analysis algorithms, (ii) the application of Poisson denoising algorithms and (iii) the reconstruction of the fluorescence signal.

  14. Who's who in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's sixth Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working lives. This is a unique reference.

  15. Capacity of X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobrauschek, P.; Kregsamer, P.

    1997-01-01

    X-Ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) is a powerful analytical tool for the qualitative and quantitative determination of chemical elements in a sample. Two different detection principles are accepted widely: wavelength dispersive and energy dispersive. Various sources for XRF are discussed: X-ray tubes, accelerators for particle induced XRF, radioactive isotopes, and the use of synchrotron radiation. Applications include environmental, technical, medical, fine art, and forensic studies. Due to the demands of research and application special techniques like total reflection XRF (TXRF) were developed with ultimately achievable detection limits in the femtogram region. The elements detectable by XRF range from Be to U. (author)

  16. X-ray fluorescence in geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutra, C.V.; Gomes, C.B.

    1990-01-01

    This work is about the X-ray fluorescence aplication in geology. It's showing the X-ray origin and excitation. About the instrumentation this work shows the following: X-ray tubes, colimators, analysers crystals, detectors, amplifiers, pulse height selector, and others electronic components. By X-ray fluorescente are done quantitative and qualitative geological analysis and this work shows this analysis and its detection limits. The problems determination is the example. In this work was done yet the comparative analysis of the various instrumental methods in geochemistry. (C.G.) [pt

  17. Recommendations for fluorescence instrument qualification: the new ASTM Standard Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRose, Paul C; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2010-03-01

    Aimed at improving quality assurance and quantitation for modern fluorescence techniques, ASTM International (ASTM) is about to release a Standard Guide for Fluorescence, reviewed here. The guide's main focus is on steady state fluorometry, for which available standards and instrument characterization procedures are discussed along with their purpose, suitability, and general instructions for use. These include the most relevant instrument properties needing qualification, such as linearity and spectral responsivity of the detection system, spectral irradiance reaching the sample, wavelength accuracy, sensitivity or limit of detection for an analyte, and day-to-day performance verification. With proper consideration of method-inherent requirements and limitations, many of these procedures and standards can be adapted to other fluorescence techniques. In addition, procedures for the determination of other relevant fluorometric quantities including fluorescence quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes are briefly introduced. The guide is a clear and concise reference geared for users of fluorescence instrumentation at all levels of experience and is intended to aid in the ongoing standardization of fluorescence measurements.

  18. 5-ALA induced fluorescent image analysis of actinic keratosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong-Jin; Bae, Youngwoo; Choi, Eung-Ho; Jung, Byungjo

    2010-02-01

    In this study, we quantitatively analyzed 5-ALA induced fluorescent images of actinic keratosis using digital fluorescent color and hyperspectral imaging modalities. UV-A was utilized to induce fluorescent images and actinic keratosis (AK) lesions were demarcated from surrounding the normal region with different methods. Eight subjects with AK lesion were participated in this study. In the hyperspectral imaging modality, spectral analysis method was utilized for hyperspectral cube image and AK lesions were demarcated from the normal region. Before image acquisition, we designated biopsy position for histopathology of AK lesion and surrounding normal region. Erythema index (E.I.) values on both regions were calculated from the spectral cube data. Image analysis of subjects resulted in two different groups: the first group with the higher fluorescence signal and E.I. on AK lesion than the normal region; the second group with lower fluorescence signal and without big difference in E.I. between two regions. In fluorescent color image analysis of facial AK, E.I. images were calculated on both normal and AK lesions and compared with the results of hyperspectral imaging modality. The results might indicate that the different intensity of fluorescence and E.I. among the subjects with AK might be interpreted as different phases of morphological and metabolic changes of AK lesions.

  19. Synthesis and Fluorescence Spectra of Triazolylcoumarin Fluorescent Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xian-fu; LI Hong-qi

    2009-01-01

    Much attention is devoted to fluorescent dyes especially those with potential in versatile applications. Reactions under "click" conditions between nonfluorescent 3 - azidocoumarins and terminal alkynes produced 3 -(1, 2, 3- triazol- 1 - yl)cournarins, a novel type of fluorescent dyes with intense fluorescence. The structures of the new coumarins were characterized by 1H NMR, MS, and IR spectra. Fluorescence spectra measurement demonstrated excellent fluorescence performance of the triazolylcoumarins and this click reaction is a promising candidate for bioconjugation and bioimaging applications since both azide and alkynes are quite inert to biological systems.

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmutov, D; Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmutov, D.; Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined.

  2. Fluorescence Imaging Reveals Surface Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirato, Richard; Polichar, Raulf

    1992-01-01

    In technique to detect surface contamination, object inspected illuminated by ultraviolet light to make contaminants fluoresce; low-light-level video camera views fluorescence. Image-processing techniques quantify distribution of contaminants. If fluorescence of material expected to contaminate surface is not intense, tagged with low concentration of dye.

  3. Who's who in fluorescence 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's third Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, photographs, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working livesThe directory provides company contact details with a brief list of fluorescence-related products.

  4. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS)

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy and includes chapters on such topics as Förster resonance energy transfer (fret) with fluctuation algorithms, protein corona on nanoparticles by FCS, and FFS approaches to the study of receptors in live cells. Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field Covers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy Contains chapters on such topics as Förster resonance energy transfer (fret) with fluctuation algorithms, protein corona on nanoparticles by FCS, and FFS approaches to the study of receptors in live cells.

  5. Fluorescent quantification of melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Bruno; Matamá, Teresa; Guimarães, Diana; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-11-01

    Melanin quantification is reportedly performed by absorption spectroscopy, commonly at 405 nm. Here, we propose the implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy for melanin assessment. In a typical in vitro assay to assess melanin production in response to an external stimulus, absorption spectroscopy clearly overvalues melanin content. This method is also incapable of distinguishing non-melanotic/amelanotic control cells from those that are actually capable of performing melanogenesis. Therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy is the best method for melanin quantification as it proved to be highly specific and accurate, detecting even small variations in the synthesis of melanin. This method can also be applied to the quantification of melanin in more complex biological matrices like zebrafish embryos and human hair. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Fluorescent nanodiamond for biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milos Nesladek

    2014-01-01

    NV centers in diamond have gained strong interest as a novel tool for quantum information processing, quantum computing and quantum photonics. These applications are based on fluorescent and spin properties of NV-centres. However, in some conditions NV- can lose an electron and turn to NV0. The occupation of NV0 and NV- charge states depend on the position of their ground states with respect to the Fermi level and the mechanism of the charge transfer. Interestingly, that the charge switch has important implications on applications of fluorescent nanodiamond (fND) to nano-biology and nano-medicine. fND can be used for bio-marking and bio-tracking but also for the monitoring of targeted delivery to the cells. In this presentation we review the current state-of-the art for using fND particles for fluorescent bio imaging in cells and discuss the charge transfer and its luminescence stability by using ultra high sensitive spectroscopy methods to study the NV0 and NV- state occupation. (author)

  7. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-05-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters.

  8. Three-dimensional mapping of fluorescent nanoparticles using incoherent digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Takumi; Abe, Ryosuke; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2015-07-15

    Three-dimensional mapping of fluorescent nanoparticles was performed by using incoherent digital holography. The positions of the nanoparticles were quantitatively determined by using Gaussian fitting of the axial- and lateral-diffraction distributions through position calibration from the observation space to the sample space. It was found that the axial magnification was constant whereas the lateral magnification linearly depended on the axial position of the fluorescent nanoparticles. The mapping of multiple fluorescent nanoparticles fixed in gelatin and a single fluorescent nanoparticle manipulated with optical tweezers in water were demonstrated.

  9. Fast globally optimal segmentation of cells in fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeest, Jan-Philip; Rohr, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Accurate and efficient segmentation of cells in fluorescence microscopy images is of central importance for the quantification of protein expression in high-throughput screening applications. We propose a new approach for segmenting cell nuclei which is based on active contours and convex energy functionals. Compared to previous work, our approach determines the global solution. Thus, the approach does not suffer from local minima and the segmentation result does not depend on the initialization. We also suggest a numeric approach for efficiently computing the solution. The performance of our approach has been evaluated using fluorescence microscopy images of different cell types. We have also performed a quantitative comparison with previous segmentation approaches.

  10. Quantitative uranium speciation with U M{sub 4,5}-edge HERFD absorption spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Rossberg, Andre [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures

    2017-06-01

    This report gives a brief description of the quantitative uranium speciation performed by iterative transformation factor analysis (ITFA) of High Energy Resolution X-ray Fluorescence Detection (HERFD) data collected at the M{sub 4,5} edge.

  11. Fluorescent microthermographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

  12. Impact of fluorescent protein fusions on the bacterial flagellar motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, M; Nord, A L; Chamousset, D; van Rijn, E; Beaumont, H J E; Pedaci, F

    2017-10-03

    Fluorescent fusion proteins open a direct and unique window onto protein function. However, they also introduce the risk of perturbation of the function of the native protein. Successful applications of fluorescent fusions therefore rely on a careful assessment and minimization of the side effects, but such insight is still lacking for many applications. This is particularly relevant in the study of the internal dynamics of motor proteins, where both the chemical and mechanical reaction coordinates can be affected. Fluorescent proteins fused to the stator of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor (BFM) have previously been used to unveil the motor subunit dynamics. Here we report the effects on single motors of three fluorescent proteins fused to the stators, all of which altered BFM behavior. The torque generated by individual stators was reduced while their stoichiometry remained unaffected. MotB fusions decreased the switching frequency and induced a novel bias-dependent asymmetry in the speed in the two directions. These effects could be mitigated by inserting a linker at the fusion point. These findings provide a quantitative account of the effects of fluorescent fusions to the stator on BFM dynamics and their alleviation- new insights that advance the use of fluorescent fusions to probe the dynamics of protein complexes.

  13. A portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system for cholecystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Yang, Chaoyu; Gan, Qi; Ma, Rong; Zhang, Zeshu; Chang, Shufang; Shao, Pengfei; Zhang, Shiwu; Liu, Chenhai; Xu, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we proposed a portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system to prevent iatrogenic biliary injuries from occurring during cholecystectomy due to misidentification of the cystic structures. The system consisted of a light source module, a CMOS camera, a Raspberry Pi computer and a 5 inch HDMI LCD. Specifically, the light source module was composed of 690 nm and 850 nm LEDs, allowing the CMOS camera to simultaneously acquire both fluorescence and background images. The system was controlled by Raspberry Pi using Python programming with the OpenCV library under Linux. We chose Indocyanine green(ICG) as a fluorescent contrast agent and then tested fluorescence intensities of the ICG aqueous solution at different concentration levels by our fluorescence microscopic system compared with the commercial Xenogen IVIS system. The spatial resolution of the proposed fluorescence microscopic imaging system was measured by a 1951 USAF resolution target and the dynamic response was evaluated quantitatively with an automatic displacement platform. Finally, we verified the technical feasibility of the proposed system in mouse models of bile duct, performing both correct and incorrect gallbladder resection. Our experiments showed that the proposed system can provide clear visualization of the confluence between the cystic duct and common bile duct or common hepatic duct, suggesting that this is a potential method for guiding cholecystectomy. The proposed portable system only cost a total of $300, potentially promoting its use in resource-limited settings.

  14. High speed fluorescence imaging with compressed ultrafast photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. V.; Mason, J. D.; Beier, H. T.; Bixler, J. N.

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescent lifetime imaging is an optical technique that facilitates imaging molecular interactions and cellular functions. Because the excited lifetime of a fluorophore is sensitive to its local microenvironment,1, 2 measurement of fluorescent lifetimes can be used to accurately detect regional changes in temperature, pH, and ion concentration. However, typical state of the art fluorescent lifetime methods are severely limited when it comes to acquisition time (on the order of seconds to minutes) and video rate imaging. Here we show that compressed ultrafast photography (CUP) can be used in conjunction with fluorescent lifetime imaging to overcome these acquisition rate limitations. Frame rates up to one hundred billion frames per second have been demonstrated with compressed ultrafast photography using a streak camera.3 These rates are achieved by encoding time in the spatial direction with a pseudo-random binary pattern. The time domain information is then reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm, resulting in a cube of data (x,y,t) for each readout image. Thus, application of compressed ultrafast photography will allow us to acquire an entire fluorescent lifetime image with a single laser pulse. Using a streak camera with a high-speed CMOS camera, acquisition rates of 100 frames per second can be achieved, which will significantly enhance our ability to quantitatively measure complex biological events with high spatial and temporal resolution. In particular, we will demonstrate the ability of this technique to do single-shot fluorescent lifetime imaging of cells and microspheres.

  15. Endogenous and exogenous fluorescence of gastrointestinal tumors: initial clinical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Ekaterina; Plamenova, Lilia; Keremedchiev, Momchil; Vladimirov, Borislav; Avramov, Latchezar

    2013-03-01

    The limitations of standard endoscopy for detection and evaluation of cancerous changes in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are significant challenge and initiate development of new diagnostic modalities. Therefore many spectral and optical techniques are applied recently into the clinical practice for obtaining qualitatively and quantitatively new data from gastrointestinal neoplasia with different level of clinical applicability and diagnostic success. One of the most promising approaches is fluorescence detection using naturally existing fluorescent molecules or added fluorescent markers. Deltaaminolevulinic acid / protoporphyrin IX is applied for exogenous fluorescent tumor detection in the upper part of gastrointestinal tract. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. Highpower light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as a source and the excitation light is passed through the light-guide of standard video-endoscopic system to obtain 2-D visualization. Both kinds of spectra - autofluorescence signals and protoporphyrin IX signal are recorded and stored using a fiber-optic microspectrometer, as in endoscopy instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence signals. In such way 1-D detection and 2-D visualization of the lesions' fluorescence are received. The results from in vivo detection show significant differentiation between normal and abnormal tissues in 1-D spectroscopic regime, but only moderate discrimination in 2-D imaging.

  16. New tools for comparing microscopy images : Quantitative analysis of cell types in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a method commonly used to examine individual differences between bacterial cells, yet many studies still lack a quantitative analysis of fluorescence microscopy data. Here we introduce some simple tools that microbiologists can use to analyze and compare their microscopy

  17. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital camera microscope unit and this hybrid instrument was named a fluorescence SEM (FL-SEM). In the labeling of FL-SEM samples, both Fluolid, which is an organic EL dye, and Alexa Fluor, were employed. We successfully demonstrated that the FL-SEM is a simple and practical tool for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

  18. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ''fluorescent cryocooler'' could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance

  19. Compact point-detection fluorescence spectroscopy system for quantifying intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio in brain cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan; Grant, Gerald; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Fangyao; Li, Shuqin; Wilson, Christy; Chen, Kui; Bigner, Darell; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2011-03-01

    We report the development of a compact point-detection fluorescence spectroscopy system and two data analysis methods to quantify the intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio and diagnose brain cancer in an orthotopic brain tumor rat model. Our system employs one compact cw diode laser (407 nm) to excite two primary endogenous fluorophores, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide. The spectra were first analyzed using a spectral filtering modulation method developed previously to derive the intrinsic fluorescence redox ratio, which has the advantages of insensitivty to optical coupling and rapid data acquisition and analysis. This method represents a convenient and rapid alternative for achieving intrinsic fluorescence-based redox measurements as compared to those complicated model-based methods. It is worth noting that the method can also extract total hemoglobin concentration at the same time but only if the emission path length of fluorescence light, which depends on the illumination and collection geometry of the optical probe, is long enough so that the effect of absorption on fluorescence intensity due to hemoglobin is significant. Then a multivariate method was used to statistically classify normal tissues and tumors. Although the first method offers quantitative tissue metabolism information, the second method provides high overall classification accuracy. The two methods provide complementary capabilities for understanding cancer development and noninvasively diagnosing brain cancer. The results of our study suggest that this portable system can be potentially used to demarcate the elusive boundary between a brain tumor and the surrounding normal tissue during surgical resection.

  20. Fluorescence of ceramic color standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Annette; Clare, John F.; Nield, Kathryn M.; Deadman, Andrew; Usadi, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence has been found in color standards available for use in calibration and verification of color measuring instruments. The fluorescence is excited at wavelengths below about 600 nm and emitted above 700 nm, within the response range of silicon photodiodes, but at the edge of the response of most photomultipliers and outside the range commonly scanned in commercial colorimeters. The degree of fluorescence on two of a set of 12 glossy ceramic tiles is enough to introduce significant error when those tiles have been calibrated in one mode of measurement and are used in another. We report the nature of the fluorescence and the implications for color measurement.

  1. Quantitative information in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deconinck, F.

    1985-01-01

    When developing new imaging or image processing techniques, one constantly has in mind that the new technique should provide a better, or more optimal answer to medical tasks than existing techniques do 'Better' or 'more optimal' imply some kind of standard by which one can measure imaging or image processing performance. The choice of a particular imaging modality to answer a diagnostic task, such as the detection of coronary artery stenosis is also based on an implicit optimalisation of performance criteria. Performance is measured by the ability to provide information about an object (patient) to the person (referring doctor) who ordered a particular task. In medical imaging the task is generally to find quantitative information on bodily function (biochemistry, physiology) and structure (histology, anatomy). In medical imaging, a wide range of techniques is available. Each technique has it's own characteristics. The techniques discussed in this paper are: nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray fluorescence, scintigraphy, positron emission tomography, applied potential tomography, computerized tomography, and compton tomography. This paper provides a framework for the comparison of imaging performance, based on the way the quantitative information flow is altered by the characteristics of the modality

  2. Quantitative investment analysis

    CERN Document Server

    DeFusco, Richard

    2007-01-01

    In the "Second Edition" of "Quantitative Investment Analysis," financial experts Richard DeFusco, Dennis McLeavey, Jerald Pinto, and David Runkle outline the tools and techniques needed to understand and apply quantitative methods to today's investment process.

  3. Single-Shot, Volumetrically Illuminated, Three-Dimensional, Tomographic Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Imaging in a Gaseous Free Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Single-shot, volumetrically illuminated, three- dimensional, tomographic laser-induced- fluorescence imaging in a gaseous free jet Benjamin R. Halls...acquisition; (110.6955) Tomographic imaging ; (110.6960) Tomography; (280.2490) Flow diagnostics; (300.2530) Fluorescence , laser-induced...84 (1983). 2. I. van Cruyningen, A. Lozano, and R. K. Hanson, “Quantitative imaging of concentration by planar laser-induced fluorescence ,” Exp

  4. Rigour in quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, Leica Sarah

    2015-07-22

    This article which forms part of the research series addresses scientific rigour in quantitative research. It explores the basis and use of quantitative research and the nature of scientific rigour. It examines how the reader may determine whether quantitative research results are accurate, the questions that should be asked to determine accuracy and the checklists that may be used in this process. Quantitative research has advantages in nursing, since it can provide numerical data to help answer questions encountered in everyday practice.

  5. Determination of the inorganic components in the Brazilian medicinal plants from 'in natura' and capsule forms, using X-ray fluorescence techniques (WD and ED systems). Quantitative inorganic profile definition; Determinacao de componentes inorganicos em plantas medicinais, comercializadas em formas de po (capsulas) e 'in natura', utilizando a tecnica de fluorescencia de raios X por dispersao de comprimento de onda (WDXRF) e por dispersao de energia (EDXRF). Definicao de perfis inorganicos quantitativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Manuel Octavio Marques

    2004-07-01

    The Na, Mg, P, S, CI, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr concentrations in the Stryphnodendron barbatiman (Barbatimao), Malva officinalis (Malva), Salvia officinalis (Salvia), Ginkgo folium (Ginkgo biloba), Echinodorus macrophylius (Chapeu de couro), Paulina cupana (Guarana), Valeriana officinalis (Valeriana), Cordia salicifolia (Porangaba), Calendula officinalis (Calendula), Solidago microglossa (Arnica), Arnica montana (Arnica) and Schinus molle (Aroeira) species were concentrations. The specimens were sampled 'in natura' (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) and capsule (powder) forms from different commercial labels. The elemental determination was outlined by wavelength dispersive (WDXRF) and energy dispersive (EDXRF) X-ray fluorescence techniques using, respectively, linear regression and fundamental parameter methods. The repeatability and accuracy of the methods were evaluated using the certified reference material NIST 1547 - 'Peach Leaves'. Statistical treatments, such as Chauvenet and Cochrane, ANOVA and Z-score tests, were applied. A quantitative inorganic profile was obtained for each specie from 'in natura' and capsule forms. Different inorganic compositions were observed in the different parts (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) of the Schinus molle (Aroeira), Arnica montana (Arnica), Calendula officinalis (Calendula) and Echinodorus macrophylius (Chapeu de couro) species. (author)

  6. Determination of the inorganic components in the Brazilian medicinal plants from 'in natura' and capsule forms, using X-ray fluorescence techniques (WD and ED systems). Quantitative inorganic profile definition; Determinacao de componentes inorganicos em plantas medicinais, comercializadas em formas de po (capsulas) e 'in natura', utilizando a tecnica de fluorescencia de raios X por dispersao de comprimento de onda (WDXRF) e por dispersao de energia (EDXRF). Definicao de perfis inorganicos quantitativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Manuel Octavio Marques

    2004-07-01

    The Na, Mg, P, S, CI, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr concentrations in the Stryphnodendron barbatiman (Barbatimao), Malva officinalis (Malva), Salvia officinalis (Salvia), Ginkgo folium (Ginkgo biloba), Echinodorus macrophylius (Chapeu de couro), Paulina cupana (Guarana), Valeriana officinalis (Valeriana), Cordia salicifolia (Porangaba), Calendula officinalis (Calendula), Solidago microglossa (Arnica), Arnica montana (Arnica) and Schinus molle (Aroeira) species were concentrations. The specimens were sampled 'in natura' (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) and capsule (powder) forms from different commercial labels. The elemental determination was outlined by wavelength dispersive (WDXRF) and energy dispersive (EDXRF) X-ray fluorescence techniques using, respectively, linear regression and fundamental parameter methods. The repeatability and accuracy of the methods were evaluated using the certified reference material NIST 1547 - 'Peach Leaves'. Statistical treatments, such as Chauvenet and Cochrane, ANOVA and Z-score tests, were applied. A quantitative inorganic profile was obtained for each specie from 'in natura' and capsule forms. Different inorganic compositions were observed in the different parts (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) of the Schinus molle (Aroeira), Arnica montana (Arnica), Calendula officinalis (Calendula) and Echinodorus macrophylius (Chapeu de couro) species. (author)

  7. Bias in the Cq value observed with hydrolysis probe based quantitative PCR can be corrected with the estimated PCR efficiency value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuomi, Jari Michael; Voorbraak, Frans; Jones, Douglas L.; Ruijter, Jan M.

    2010-01-01

    For real-time monitoring of PCR amplification of DNA, quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays use various fluorescent reporters. DNA binding molecules and hybridization reporters (primers and probes) only fluoresce when bound to DNA and result in the non-cumulative increase in observed fluorescence.

  8. Quantitation: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    Single photon emission tomography may be used quantitatively if its limitations are recognized and quantitation is made in relation to some reference area on the image. Relative quantitation is discussed in outline in relation to the liver, brain and pituitary, thyroid, adrenals, and heart. (U.K.)

  9. Fluorescing macerals from wood precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, S A; Bensley, D F

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary investigation into the origin of wood-derived macerals has established the existence of autofluorescent maceral precursors in the secondary xylem of swamp-inhabiting plant species. The optical character and fluorescent properties of microtomed thin-sections of modern woods from the Florida Everglades and Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia are compared to the character and properties of their peatified equivalents from various Everglades and Okefenokee peat horizons and their lignitic equivalents from the Brandon lignite of Vermont and the Trail Ridge lignitic peat from northern Florida. The inherent fluorescence of woody cell walls is believed to be caused by lignin though other cell wall components may contribute. The fluorescence spectra for several wood and cell types had a ..gamma../sub m//sub a//sub x/ of 452 nm and Q value of 0.00. The color as observed in blue light and the spectral geometry as measured in UV light of peatified and lignitic woody cell walls (potential textinites) may change progressively during early coalification. Cell wall-derived maceral material is shown to maintain its fluorescing properties after being converted to a structureless material, perhaps a corpohuminite or humodetrinite precursor. Fluorescing xylem cell contents, such as condensed tannins or essential oils, can maintain the fluorescent character through early coalification. Xylem cell walls and xylem cell contents are shown to provide fluorescing progenitor materials which would not require subsequent infusion with 'lipid' materials to account for their fluorescence as phytoclast material or as macerals in coal. 35 references.

  10. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  11. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  12. Integrated optical measurement system for fluorescence spectroscopy in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2001-01-01

    A transportable miniaturized fiber-pigtailed measurement system is presented which allows quantitative fluorescence detection in microliquid handling systems. The microliquid handling chips are made in silica on silicon technology and the optical functionality is monolithically integrated with th...... with two dyes, fluorescein, and Bodipy 650/665 X, showed good linear behavior over a wide range of concentrations. Minimally detected concentrations were 250 pM for fluorescein and 100 nM for Bodipy....

  13. BlobFinder, a tool for fluorescence microscopy image cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Allalou, Amin; Wählby, Carolina

    2009-01-01

    Images can be acquired at high rates with modern fluorescence microscopy hardware, giving rise to a demand for high-speed analysis of image data. Digital image cytometry, i.e., automated measurements and extraction of quantitative data from images of cells, provides valuable information for many types of biomedical analysis. There exists a number of different image analysis software packages that can be programmed to perform a wide array of useful measurements. However, the multi-application ...

  14. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  15. Fluorescent multiplex cell flow systems and methods

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen; Abuelela, Ayman F.; Mohammad, Amal Jehad

    2017-01-01

    scanning system emits multiple electromagnetic wavelengths simultaneously it cause multiple fluorescent labels having different excitation wavelength maximums to fluoresce. The system can simultaneously capture real-time fluorescence images from at least

  16. Human thyroid specimen imaging by fluorescent x-ray computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Yu, Quanwen; Yashiro, Toru; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yasuo; Itai, Yuji; Akatsuka, Takao

    1999-09-01

    Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (FXCT) is being developed to detect non-radioactive contrast materials in living specimens. The FXCT system consists of a silicon (111) channel cut monochromator, an x-ray slit and a collimator for fluorescent x ray detection, a scanning table for the target organ and an x-ray detector for fluorescent x-ray and transmission x-ray. To reduce Compton scattering overlapped on the fluorescent K(alpha) line, incident monochromatic x-ray was set at 37 keV. The FXCT clearly imaged a human thyroid gland and iodine content was estimated quantitatively. In a case of hyperthyroidism, the two-dimensional distribution of iodine content was not uniform, and thyroid cancer had a small amount of iodine. FXCT can be used to detect iodine within thyroid gland quantitatively and to delineate its distribution.

  17. Near-Membrane Refractometry Using Supercritical Angle Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstein, Maia; Roy, Lopamudra; Oheim, Martin

    2017-05-09

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and its variants are key technologies for visualizing the dynamics of single molecules or organelles in live cells. Yet truly quantitative TIRF remains problematic. One unknown hampering the interpretation of evanescent-wave excited fluorescence intensities is the undetermined cell refractive index (RI). Here, we use a combination of TIRF excitation and supercritical angle fluorescence emission detection to directly measure the average RI in the "footprint" region of the cell during image acquisition. Our RI measurement is based on the determination on a back-focal plane image of the critical angle separating evanescent and far-field fluorescence emission components. We validate our method by imaging mouse embryonic fibroblasts and BON cells. By targeting various dyes and fluorescent-protein chimeras to vesicles, the plasma membrane, as well as mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, we demonstrate local RI measurements with subcellular resolution on a standard TIRF microscope, with a removable Bertrand lens as the only modification. Our technique has important applications for imaging axial vesicle dynamics and the mitochondrial energy state or detecting metabolically more active cancer cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Auto fluorescence of intervertebral disc tissue: a new diagnostic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoell, T; Huschak, G; Beier, A; Hüttmann, G; Minkus, Y; Holzhausen, H J; Meisel, H J

    2006-08-01

    The paper reports on auto fluorescence phenomena of inter-vertebral human discs. It systematically investigates the auto fluorescence effects of ex vivo disc specimen and reports on surgical cases to demonstrate the potential value of the new method. The paper offers biologic explanations of the phenomenon and discusses the potential value of the UV auto fluorescence technique as a diagnostic tool. Intra- and postoperative observations are made by a surgical microscope with an integrated UV light source. Quantitative measurements were carried out using a photon counter and a spectrometer ex vivo. The auto fluorescence phenomenon allows the differentiation of traumatized and degenerated disc tissue intraoperatively in some cases, it allows the differentiation of bony and collagen endplate in cervical disc surgery. The source of the auto fluorescent light emission are amino acids of the collagen molecules. The proteoglycan components and the liquid components of the disc do not show relevant auto fluorescence. Emission wavelength of disc material is equivalent to color perception. It differs due to different collagen composition of the intervertebral disc components from yellow-green to blue-green and can be visualized in situ by naked eye.UV-auto fluorescence of inter-vertebral discs is a new clinical tool that has the potential to differentiate disc material from the anatomical surrounding, to distinguish between different fractions of the disc and to give information on the quality and status of the disc material. Since the technology has just emerged, it needs further investigations to quantify the clinical observations reported in this paper.

  19. Quantitative phase imaging with scanning holographic microscopy: an experimental assesment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada Yoshitaka

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper demonstrates experimentally how quantitative phase information can be obtained in scanning holographic microscopy. Scanning holography can operate in both coherent and incoherent modes, simultaneously if desired, with different detector geometries. A spatially integrating detector provides an incoherent hologram of the object's intensity distribution (absorption and/or fluorescence, for example, while a point detector in a conjugate plane of the pupil provides a coherent hologram of the object's complex amplitude, from which a quantitative measure of its phase distribution can be extracted. The possibility of capturing simultaneously holograms of three-dimensional specimens, leading to three-dimensional reconstructions with absorption contrast, reflectance contrast, fluorescence contrast, as was previously demonstrated, and quantitative phase contrast, as shown here for the first time, opens up new avenues for multimodal imaging in biological studies.

  20. Fluorescent standards for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belko, N.; Kavalenka, S.; Samtsov, M.

    2016-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is an evolving technique for treatment of various oncological diseases. This method employs photosensitizers - species that lead to death of tumor cells after the photoactivation. For further development and novel applications of photodynamic therapy new photosensitizers are required. After synthesis of a new photosensitizer it is important to know its concentration in different biological tissues after its administration and distribution. The concentration is frequently measured by the extraction method, which has some disadvantages, e.g. it requires many biological test subjects that are euthanized during the measurement. We propose to measure the photosensitizer concentration in tissue by its fluorescence. For this purpose fluorescent standards were developed. The standards are robust and simple to produce; their fluorescence signal does not change with time. The fluorescence intensity of fluorescent standards seems to depend linearly on the dye concentration. A set of standards thus allow the calibration of a spectrometer. Finally, the photosensitizer concentration can be determined by the fluorescence intensity after comparing the corresponding spectrum with spectra of the set of fluorescent standards. A biological test subject is not euthanized during this kind of experiment. We hope this more humane technique can be used in future instead of the extraction method.

  1. Open source tools for fluorescent imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nicholas A

    2012-01-01

    As microscopy becomes increasingly automated and imaging expands in the spatial and time dimensions, quantitative analysis tools for fluorescent imaging are becoming critical to remove both bottlenecks in throughput as well as fully extract and exploit the information contained in the imaging. In recent years there has been a flurry of activity in the development of bio-image analysis tools and methods with the result that there are now many high-quality, well-documented, and well-supported open source bio-image analysis projects with large user bases that cover essentially every aspect from image capture to publication. These open source solutions are now providing a viable alternative to commercial solutions. More importantly, they are forming an interoperable and interconnected network of tools that allow data and analysis methods to be shared between many of the major projects. Just as researchers build on, transmit, and verify knowledge through publication, open source analysis methods and software are creating a foundation that can be built upon, transmitted, and verified. Here we describe many of the major projects, their capabilities, and features. We also give an overview of the current state of open source software for fluorescent microscopy analysis and the many reasons to use and develop open source methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fluorescent visualization of a spreading surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallest, David W; Lichtenberger, Adele M; Fox, Christopher J; Daniels, Karen E, E-mail: kdaniel@ncsu.ed [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    The spreading of surfactants on thin films is an industrially and medically important phenomenon, but the dynamics are highly nonlinear and visualization of the surfactant dynamics has been a long-standing experimental challenge. We perform the first quantitative, spatiotemporally resolved measurements of the spreading of an insoluble surfactant on a thin fluid layer. During the spreading process, we directly observe both the radial height profile of the spreading droplet and the spatial distribution of the fluorescently tagged surfactant. We find that the leading edge of a spreading circular layer of surfactant forms a Marangoni ridge in the underlying fluid, with a trough trailing the ridge as expected. However, several novel features are observed using the fluorescence technique, including a peak in the surfactant concentration that trails the leading edge, and a flat, monolayer-scale spreading film that differs from concentration profiles predicted by current models. Both the Marangoni ridge and the surfactant leading edge can be described to spread as R{approx}t{sup {delta}}. We find spreading exponents {delta}{sub H}{approx}0.30 and {delta}{sub {Gamma}}{approx}0.22 for the ridge peak and surfactant leading edge, respectively, which are in good agreement with theoretical predictions of {delta}=1/4. In addition, we observe that the surfactant leading edge initially leads the peak of the Marangoni ridge, with the peak later catching up to the leading edge.

  3. Fluorescence molecular tomography in the presence of background fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soubret, Antoine; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography is an emerging imaging technique that resolves the bio-distribution of engineered fluorescent probes developed for in vivo reporting of specific cellular and sub-cellular targets. The method can detect fluorochromes in picomole amounts or less, imaged through entire animals, but the detection sensitivity and imaging performance drop in the presence of background, non-specific fluorescence. In this study, we carried out a theoretical and an experimental investigation on the effect of background fluorescence on the measured signal and on the tomographic reconstruction. We further examined the performance of three subtraction methods based on physical models of photon propagation, using experimental data on phantoms and small animals. We show that the data pre-processing with subtraction schemes can improve image quality and quantification when non-specific background florescence is present

  4. Determination of silver in ancient coins by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pairatana, C.

    1976-01-01

    45 coins of late Ayudhaya and Bangkok periods was analyzed quantitatively by x-ray fluorescence technique using radioisotopic sources Pm - 147/A1 and Am - 241. The fluorescence x-rays were detected by Lithium drifted silicon detector and 1024 channels pulse height analyzer. The procedure was laid a stress on non-destructive methods which could be utilized for analysing various kinds of antiquities and work of arts such as metals, alloys, pottery, ceramics, paper, textile, wood etc

  5. Facile method for CLSM imaging unfunctionalized Au nanoparticles through fluorescent channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Lan; Wei Wei; Li Juan; Sun, Zhiwei; Wang Hongfang; Zhang Xiuzhi; Chen Yueyue

    2009-01-01

    The microscopic visualization of metal nanoparticles has become a useful tool for the investigation of their applications in cell labeling and the study of their bio-effects. In the current study, we have developed a facile method with confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) to observe unfunctionalized Au nanoparticles through fluorescent channels. The sharp reflected signal and photostable property of the metal nanoparticles makes the present method very ideal for fluorescent co-localization, real-time imaging, and further quantitative analysis.

  6. Dual purpose scanner for thyroid imaging in the fluorescence and emission modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charleston, D.; Beck, R.; Yasillo, N.; Atkins, F.; Cooper, M.; Kirchner, P.

    1981-01-01

    Quantitative elemental analysis by the use of stimulated fluorescence x-rays has been applied in an imaging modality whereby the relative concentration of iodine-127 in the thyroid can be mapped, and total iodine in the gland estimated for the diagnosis of malignant and benign nodules. To further the development of fluorescence imaging of the thyroid, three areas of work are described which include theoretical studies, empirical studies and hardware development, and clinical feasibility studies

  7. X-ray fluorescence analysis for trace element determination in foodstuff chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildanger, W.

    The physical fundamentals of X-ray fluorescence analysis are given and the routine spectrometers described. The basic principles are given of analytical methods used in qualitative and quantitative fluorescence analyses. Examples are given of the use of the method in a number of fields and the possibility and usefulness is discussed for the determination of trace elements in foodstuffs. The preparation of samples, preliminary concentration of components and calibration methods are discussed. (M.K.)

  8. [A new method of processing quantitative PCR data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Bing-Shen; Li, Guang-Yun; Chen, Shi-Min; Huang, Xiang-Yan; Chen, Ying-Jian; Xu, Jun

    2003-05-01

    Today standard PCR can't satisfy the need of biotechnique development and clinical research any more. After numerous dynamic research, PE company found there is a linear relation between initial template number and cycling time when the accumulating fluorescent product is detectable.Therefore,they developed a quantitative PCR technique to be used in PE7700 and PE5700. But the error of this technique is too great to satisfy the need of biotechnique development and clinical research. A better quantitative PCR technique is needed. The mathematical model submitted here is combined with the achievement of relative science,and based on the PCR principle and careful analysis of molecular relationship of main members in PCR reaction system. This model describes the function relation between product quantity or fluorescence intensity and initial template number and other reaction conditions, and can reflect the accumulating rule of PCR product molecule accurately. Accurate quantitative PCR analysis can be made use this function relation. Accumulated PCR product quantity can be obtained from initial template number. Using this model to do quantitative PCR analysis,result error is only related to the accuracy of fluorescence intensity or the instrument used. For an example, when the fluorescence intensity is accurate to 6 digits and the template size is between 100 to 1,000,000, the quantitative result accuracy will be more than 99%. The difference of result error is distinct using same condition,same instrument but different analysis method. Moreover,if the PCR quantitative analysis system is used to process data, it will get result 80 times of accuracy than using CT method.

  9. Quantitative analysis chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Wansuk; Lee, Choongyoung; Jun, Kwangsik; Hwang, Taeksung

    1995-02-01

    This book is about quantitative analysis chemistry. It is divided into ten chapters, which deal with the basic conception of material with the meaning of analysis chemistry and SI units, chemical equilibrium, basic preparation for quantitative analysis, introduction of volumetric analysis, acid-base titration of outline and experiment examples, chelate titration, oxidation-reduction titration with introduction, titration curve, and diazotization titration, precipitation titration, electrometric titration and quantitative analysis.

  10. Ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots for the detection of mercury ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yusha; Mei, Jing; Bai, Jianliang; Chen, Xu; Ren, Lili

    2018-05-01

    A novel ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots has been synthesized via bonding rhodamine B hydrazide to the carbon dots surface by an amide reaction. The ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor showed only a single blue fluorescence emission around 450 nm. While, as mercury ion was added, due to the open-ring of rhodamine moiety bonded on the CDs surface, the orange emission of the open-ring rhodamine would increase obviously according to the concentration of mercury ion, resulting in the distinguishable dual emissions at 450 nm and 575 nm under a single 360 excitation wavelength. Meanwhile, the ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots we prepared is more sensitive to qualitative and semi-quantitative detection of mercury ion in the range of 0–100 μM, because fluorescence changes gradually from blue to orange emission under 365 nm lamp with the increasing of mercury ion in the tested solution.

  11. Characterization of a new series of fluorescent probes for imaging membrane order.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna M Kwiatek

    Full Text Available Visualization and quantification of lipid order is an important tool in membrane biophysics and cell biology, but the availability of environmentally sensitive fluorescent membrane probes is limited. Here, we present the characterization of the novel fluorescent dyes PY3304, PY3174 and PY3184, whose fluorescence properties are sensitive to membrane lipid order. In artificial bilayers, the fluorescence emission spectra are red-shifted between the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. Using ratiometric imaging we demonstrate that the degree of membrane order can be quantitatively determined in artificial liposomes as well as live cells and intact, live zebrafish embryos. Finally, we show that the fluorescence lifetime of the dyes is also dependent on bilayer order. These probes expand the current palate of lipid order-sensing fluorophores affording greater flexibility in the excitation/emission wavelengths and possibly new opportunities in membrane biology.

  12. Smart optical probes for near-infrared fluorescence imaging of Alzheimer's disease pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Skoch, Jesse; Hills, Ivory D.; Swager, Timothy M.; Nesterov, Evgueni E.

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent probes for amyloid-beta (Aβ) are an exciting option for molecular imaging in Alzheimer's disease research and may translate to clinical diagnostics. However, Aβ-targeted optical probes often suffer from poor specificity and slow clearance from the brain. We are designing smart optical probes that emit characteristic fluorescence signal only when bound to Aβ. We synthesized a family of dyes and tested Aβ-binding sensitivity with fluorescence spectroscopy and tissue-staining. Select compounds exhibited Aβ-dependent changes in fluorescence quantum yield, lifetime, and emission spectra that may be imaged microscopically or in vivo using new lifetime and spectral fluorescence imaging techniques. Smart optical probes that turn on when bound to Aβ will improve amyloid detection and may enable quantitative molecular imaging in vivo. (orig.)

  13. Quantitative Algebraic Reasoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardare, Radu Iulian; Panangaden, Prakash; Plotkin, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantitative analogue of equational reasoning which we call quantitative algebra. We define an equality relation indexed by rationals: a =ε b which we think of as saying that “a is approximately equal to b up to an error of ε”. We have 4 interesting examples where we have a quantitative...... equational theory whose free algebras correspond to well known structures. In each case we have finitary and continuous versions. The four cases are: Hausdorff metrics from quantitive semilattices; pWasserstein metrics (hence also the Kantorovich metric) from barycentric algebras and also from pointed...

  14. Quantitative autoradiography of neurochemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, T.C.; Biegon, A.; Bleisch, W.V.

    1982-01-01

    Several new methods have been developed that apply quantitative autoradiography to neurochemistry. These methods are derived from the 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) technique of Sokoloff (1), which uses quantitative autoradiography to measure the rate of glucose utilization in brain structures. The new methods allow the measurement of the rate of cerbral protein synthesis and the levels of particular neurotransmitter receptors by quantitative autoradiography. As with the 2DG method, the new techniques can measure molecular levels in micron-sized brain structures; and can be used in conjunction with computerized systems of image processing. It is possible that many neurochemical measurements could be made by computerized analysis of quantitative autoradiograms

  15. [Ph-Sensor Properties of a Fluorescent Protein from Dendronephthya sp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, A A; Chertkova, R V; Martynov, V I

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescent proteins are now widely applicable for monitoring pH changes in live cells. Here, we have shown that a fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. (DendFP) exhibits a pronounced pH-sensitivity. Unlike most of known genetically encoded pH-sensors, fluorescence of the protein is not quenched upon medium acidification, but is shifting from the red to green spectral range. Therefore, quantitative measurements of intracellular pH are feasible by ratiometric comparison of emission intensities in the red and green spectral ranges, which makes DendFP advantageous compared with other genetically encoded pH-sensors.

  16. Selective nonspecific solvation under dielectric saturation and fluorescence spectra of dye solutions in binary solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshiev, N G; Kiselev, M B

    1991-09-01

    The influence of selective nonspecific solvation on the fluorescence spectra of three substitutedN-methylphthalimides in a binary solvent system consisting of a nonpolar (n-heptane) and a polar (pyridine) component has been studied under conditions close to dielectric saturation. The substantially nonlinearity of the effect is confirmation that the spectral shifts of fluorescence bands depend on the number of polar solvent molecules involved in solvating the dye molecule. The measured fluorescence spectral shifts determined by substituting one nonpolar solvent molecula with a polar one in the proximity of the dye molecule agree quantitatively with the forecasts of the previously proposed semiempirical theory which describes this nonlinear solvation phenomenon.

  17. A quantitative characterization of the yeast heterotrimeric G protein cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tau-Mu; Kitano, Hiroaki; Simon, Melvin I.

    2003-01-01

    The yeast mating response is one of the best understood heterotrimeric G protein signaling pathways. Yet, most descriptions of this system have been qualitative. We have quantitatively characterized the heterotrimeric G protein cycle in yeast based on direct in vivo measurements. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to monitor the association state of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-Gα and Gβγ-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and we found that receptor-mediated G protein activation produced a loss of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Quantitative time course and dose–response data were obtained for both wild-type and mutant cells possessing an altered pheromone response. These results paint a quantitative portrait of how regulators such as Sst2p and the C-terminal tail of α-factor receptor modulate the kinetics and sensitivity of G protein signaling. We have explored critical features of the dynamics including the rapid rise and subsequent decline of active G proteins during the early response, and the relationship between the G protein activation dose–response curve and the downstream dose–response curves for cell-cycle arrest and transcriptional induction. Fitting the data to a mathematical model produced estimates of the in vivo rates of heterotrimeric G protein activation and deactivation in yeast. PMID:12960402

  18. Instructive for disposal of fluorescent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar Vargas, Gerlin

    2014-01-01

    An instructive is established for the management system of waste fluorescent lamps, ensuring the storage, collection, transportation, and final disposal. The lamp is changed by an official of the Seccion de Matenimiento Construccion of the Oficina de Servicios Generales or is produced with the support of an official of the unit. The fluorescent should be deposited in stock of materials of the building maintenance section or unit specified with the help of a staff and in appropriate conditions. The fluorescent lamp is transported according to the guidelines in the manual. A responsible company is contracted by la Vicerrectoria de Administracion of the Universidad de Costa Rica dedicated to the transport and proper handling of fluorescent lamps [es

  19. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    GROWTH OF TOMATO CHALLENGED WITH PHTOPATHOGENS ... This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth .... the 5 days old culture in starch agar with Lugol's.

  20. Comparative assessment of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging in an animal model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppert, Jennifer K; Dickinson, Daniel J; Pani, Ariel M; Higgins, Christopher D; Steward, Annette; Ahringer, Julie; Kuhn, Jeffrey R; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-11-07

    Fluorescent protein tags are fundamental tools used to visualize gene products and analyze their dynamics in vivo. Recent advances in genome editing have expedited the precise insertion of fluorescent protein tags into the genomes of diverse organisms. These advances expand the potential of in vivo imaging experiments and facilitate experimentation with new, bright, photostable fluorescent proteins. Most quantitative comparisons of the brightness and photostability of different fluorescent proteins have been made in vitro, removed from biological variables that govern their performance in cells or organisms. To address the gap, we quantitatively assessed fluorescent protein properties in vivo in an animal model system. We generated transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strains expressing green, yellow, or red fluorescent proteins in embryos and imaged embryos expressing different fluorescent proteins under the same conditions for direct comparison. We found that mNeonGreen was not as bright in vivo as predicted based on in vitro data but is a better tag than GFP for specific kinds of experiments, and we report on optimal red fluorescent proteins. These results identify ideal fluorescent proteins for imaging in vivo in C. elegans embryos and suggest good candidate fluorescent proteins to test in other animal model systems for in vivo imaging experiments. © 2016 Heppert et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  1. Fluorescent Nanodiamonds in Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitura, Katarzyna Anna; Włodarczyk, Elżbieta

    2018-04-18

    Nanoparticles have an extended surface and a large surface area, which is the ratio of the size of the surfacearea to the volume. A functionalized surface can give rise to more modifications and therefore allows this nanomaterial to have new properties. Fluorescent molecules contain fluorophore, which is capable of being excited via the absorption of light energy at a specific wavelength and subsequently emitting radiation energy of a longer wavelength. A chemically modified surface of nanodiamond (ND; by carboxylation) demonstrated biocompatibility with DNA, cytochrome C, and antigens. In turn, fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) belong to a group of new nanomaterials. Their surface can be modified by joining functional groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl, or amino, after which they can be employed as a fluorescence agent. Their fluorescent properties result from defects in the crystal lattice. FNDs reach dimensions of 4-100 nm, have attributes such as photostability, long fluorescence lifetimes (10 ns), and fluorescence emission between 600 and 700 nm. They are also nontoxic, chemically inert, biocompatible, and environmentally harmless. The main purpose of this article was to present the medical applications of various types of modified NDs.

  2. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  3. FLUORESCENCE DIAGNOSIS FOR RECURRENT BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Ulyanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical case of successful use of local fluorescence spectroscopy combined with fluorescence imaging during cystoscopy for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer is represented in the article. Histological study of fluorescent foci confirmed tumor growth (urothelial carcinoma in all areas with high levels of diagnostic parameter. In the fluorescent focus with low diagnostic parameter inflammation was detected.

  4. Quantitative analysis of myocardial tissue with digital autofluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jensen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The opportunity offered by whole slide scanners of automated histological analysis implies an ever increasing importance of digital pathology. To go beyond the importance of conventional pathology, however, digital pathology may need a basic histological starting point similar to that of hematoxylin and eosin staining in conventional pathology. This study presents an automated fluorescence-based microscopy approach providing highly detailed morphological data from unstained microsections. This data may provide a basic histological starting point from which further digital analysis including staining may benefit. Methods: This study explores the inherent tissue fluorescence, also known as autofluorescence, as a mean to quantitate cardiac tissue components in histological microsections. Data acquisition using a commercially available whole slide scanner and an image-based quantitation algorithm are presented. Results: It is shown that the autofluorescence intensity of unstained microsections at two different wavelengths is a suitable starting point for automated digital analysis of myocytes, fibrous tissue, lipofuscin, and the extracellular compartment. The output of the method is absolute quantitation along with accurate outlines of above-mentioned components. The digital quantitations are verified by comparison to point grid quantitations performed on the microsections after Van Gieson staining. Conclusion: The presented method is amply described as a prestain multicomponent quantitation and outlining tool for histological sections of cardiac tissue. The main perspective is the opportunity for combination with digital analysis of stained microsections, for which the method may provide an accurate digital framework.

  5. Application of magnetic carriers to two examples of quantitative cell analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Chen; Qian, Zhixi; Choi, Young Suk; David, Allan E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, 212 Ross Hall, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Todd, Paul, E-mail: pwtodd@hotmail.com [Techshot, Inc., 7200 Highway 150, Greenville, IN 47124 (United States); Hanley, Thomas R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, 212 Ross Hall, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The use of magnetophoretic mobility as a surrogate for fluorescence intensity in quantitative cell analysis was investigated. The objectives of quantitative fluorescence flow cytometry include establishing a level of labeling for the setting of parameters in fluorescence activated cell sorters (FACS) and the determination of levels of uptake of fluorescently labeled substrates by living cells. Likewise, the objectives of quantitative magnetic cytometry include establishing a level of labeling for the setting of parameters in flowing magnetic cell sorters and the determination of levels of uptake of magnetically labeled substrates by living cells. The magnetic counterpart to fluorescence intensity is magnetophoretic mobility, defined as the velocity imparted to a suspended cell per unit of magnetic ponderomotive force. A commercial velocimeter available for making this measurement was used to demonstrate both applications. Cultured Gallus lymphoma cells were immunolabeled with commercial magnetic beads and shown to have adequate magnetophoretic mobility to be separated by a novel flowing magnetic separator. Phagocytosis of starch nanoparticles having magnetic cores by cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, a CHO line, was quantified on the basis of magnetophoretic mobility. - Highlights: • Commercial particle tracking velocimetry measures magnetophoretic mobility of labeled cells. • Magnetically labeled tumor cells were shown to have adequate mobility for capture in a specific sorter. • The kinetics of nonspecific endocytosis of magnetic nanomaterials by CHO cells was characterized. • Magnetic labeling of cells can be used like fluorescence flow cytometry for quantitative cell analysis.

  6. Simultaneous determination of glycols based on fluorescence anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Sanchez, F.; Navas Diaz, A.; Lopez Guerrero, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Simultaneous determination of non-fluorescent glycols in mixtures without separation or chemical transformation steps is described. Two methods based in the measure of fluorescence anisotropy of a probe such as fluorescein dissolved in the analyte or analyte mixtures are described. In the first method, the anisotropy spectra of pure and mixtures of analytes are used to quantitative determination (if the fluorophor concentration is in a range where fluorescence intensity is proportional to concentration). In the second method, a calibration curve anisotropy-concentration based on the application of the Perrin equation is established. The methods presented here are capable of directly resolving binary mixtures of non-fluorescent glycols on the basis of differences on the fluorescence anisotropy of a fluorescence tracer. Best analytical performances were obtained by application of the method based on Perrin equation. This method is simple, rapid and allows the determination of mixtures of glycols with reasonable accuracy and precision. Detection limits are limited by the quantum yield and anisotropy values of the tracer in the solvents. Recovery values are related to the differences in anisotropy values of the tracer in the pure solvents. Mixtures of glycerine/ethylene glycol (GL/EG), ethylene glycol/1,2-propane diol (EG/1,2-PPD) and polyethylene glycol 400/1,2-propane diol (PEG 400/1,2-PPD) were analysed and recovery values are within 95-120% in the Perrin method. Relative standard deviation are in the range 1.3-2.9% and detection limits in the range 3.9-8.9%

  7. Site-specific confocal fluorescence imaging of biological microstructures in a turbid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saloma, Caesar; Palmes-Saloma, Cynthia; Kondoh, Hisato

    1998-01-01

    Normally transparent biological structures in a turbid medium are imaged using a laser confocal microscope and multiwavelength site-specific fluorescence labelling. The spatial filtering capability of the detector pinhole in the confocal microscope limits the number of scattered fluorescent photons that reach the photodetector. Simultaneous application of different fluorescent markers on the same sample site minimizes photobleaching by reducing the excitation time for each marker. A high-contrast grey-level image is also produced by summing confocal images of the same site taken at different fluorescence wavelengths. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to obtain the quantitative behaviour of confocal fluorescence imaging in turbid media. Confocal images of the following samples were also obtained: (i) 15 μm diameter fluorescent spheres placed 1.16 mm deep beneath an aqueous suspension of 0.0823 μm diameter polystyrene latex spheres, and (ii) hindbrain of a whole-mount mouse embryo (age 10 days) that was stained to fluoresce at 515 nm and 580 nm peak wavelengths. Expression of RNA transcripts of a gene within the embryo hindbrain was detected by a fluorescence-based whole-mount in situ hybridization procedure that we recently tested. (author)

  8. Fluorescent property of 3-hydroxymethyl imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine and pyrimidine derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velázquez-Olvera Stephania

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines and pyrimidines are important organic fluorophores which have been investigated as biomarkers and photochemical sensors. The effect on the luminescent property by substituents in the heterocycle and phenyl rings, have been studied as well. In this investigation, series of 3-hydroxymethyl imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines and pyrimidines were synthesized and evaluated in relation to fluorescence emission, based upon the hypothesis that the hydroxymethyl group may act as an enhancer of fluorescence intensity. Results Compounds of both series emitted light in organic solvents dilutions as well as in acidic and alkaline media. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy determined that both fused heterocycles fluoresced more intensely than the parent unsubstituted imidazo[1,2-a]azine fluorophore. In particular, 3-hydroxymethyl imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines fluoresced more intensely than 3-hydroxymethyl imidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidines, the latter emitting blue light at longer wavelengths, whereas the former emitted purple light. Conclusion It was concluded that in most cases the hydroxymethyl moiety did act as an enhancer of the fluorescence intensity, however, a comparison made with the fluorescence emitted by 2-aryl imidazo[1,2-a]azines revealed that in some cases the hydroxymethyl substituent decreased the fluorescence intensity.

  9. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan; Acuna, Guillermo; Kim, Seungkyeum; Vietz, Carolin; Tseng, Derek; Chae, Jongjae; Shir, Daniel; Luo, Wei; Tinnefeld, Philip; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-01-01

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  10. Fluorescence and phosphorescence of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarev, Stanislav L., E-mail: bondarev@imaph.bas-net.by [Minsk State Higher Radioengineering College, 220005 Minsk (Belarus); Knyukshto, Valeri N. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-10-15

    Rutin is one of the most promising flavonoid from a pharmacological and biochemical point of view. Here we have explored its spectroscopic and photophysical properties at room temperature and 77 K using steady-state absorption-luminescence methods and pulse spectroscopy equipment. By excitation into the absorption band 1 of rutin in methanol at room temperature the normal Stokes' shifted fluorescence with a maximum at 415 nm and quantum yield of 2×10{sup −4} was revealed. However, by excitation into the bands 2 and 3 any emission wasn’t observed. At 77 K in ethanol glass we have observed fluorescence at 410 nm and phosphorescence at 540 nm for the first time. As a result the adequate energetic scheme including the lowest electronic excited singlet at 26000 cm{sup −1} and triplet at 19600 cm{sup −1} states was proposed. -- Highlights: • Rutin fluorescence and phosphorescence at 77 K were revealed for the first time. • Room temperature fluorescence is determined by maximum at 415 nm and yield of 2×10{sup −4}. • Violation of Vavilov–Kasha rule by excitation into the absorption bands 2 and 3. • Fluorescence and phosphorescence in rutin are caused by the allowed π, π{sup (⁎)} transitions.

  11. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  12. Light emitting diode excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sean J; JiJi, Renée D

    2002-12-01

    An excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence instrument has been developed using a linear array of light emitting diodes (LED). The wavelengths covered extend from the upper UV through the visible spectrum: 370-640 nm. Using an LED array to excite fluorescence emission at multiple excitation wavelengths is a low-cost alternative to an expensive high power lamp and imaging spectrograph. The LED-EEM system is a departure from other EEM spectroscopy systems in that LEDs often have broad excitation ranges which may overlap with neighboring channels. The LED array can be considered a hybrid between a spectroscopic and sensor system, as the broad LED excitation range produces a partially selective optical measurement. The instrument has been tested and characterized using fluorescent dyes: limits of detection (LOD) for 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)-anthracene and rhodamine B were in the mid parts-per-trillion range; detection limits for the other compounds were in the low parts-per-billion range (LED-EEMs were analyzed using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), which allowed the mathematical resolution of the individual contributions of the mono- and dianion fluorescein tautomers a priori. Correct identification and quantitation of six fluorescent dyes in two to six component mixtures (concentrations between 12.5 and 500 ppb) has been achieved with root mean squared errors of prediction (RMSEP) of less than 4.0 ppb for all components.

  13. AUTOMATED CELL SEGMENTATION WITH 3D FLUORESCENCE MICROSCOPY IMAGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jun; Wang, Fusheng; Teodoro, George; Liang, Yanhui; Zhu, Yangyang; Tucker-Burden, Carol; Brat, Daniel J

    2015-04-01

    A large number of cell-oriented cancer investigations require an effective and reliable cell segmentation method on three dimensional (3D) fluorescence microscopic images for quantitative analysis of cell biological properties. In this paper, we present a fully automated cell segmentation method that can detect cells from 3D fluorescence microscopic images. Enlightened by fluorescence imaging techniques, we regulated the image gradient field by gradient vector flow (GVF) with interpolated and smoothed data volume, and grouped voxels based on gradient modes identified by tracking GVF field. Adaptive thresholding was then applied to voxels associated with the same gradient mode where voxel intensities were enhanced by a multiscale cell filter. We applied the method to a large volume of 3D fluorescence imaging data of human brain tumor cells with (1) small cell false detection and missing rates for individual cells; and (2) trivial over and under segmentation incidences for clustered cells. Additionally, the concordance of cell morphometry structure between automated and manual segmentation was encouraging. These results suggest a promising 3D cell segmentation method applicable to cancer studies.

  14. An automated protocol for performance benchmarking a widefield fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halter, Michael; Bier, Elianna; DeRose, Paul C; Cooksey, Gregory A; Choquette, Steven J; Plant, Anne L; Elliott, John T

    2014-11-01

    Widefield fluorescence microscopy is a highly used tool for visually assessing biological samples and for quantifying cell responses. Despite its widespread use in high content analysis and other imaging applications, few published methods exist for evaluating and benchmarking the analytical performance of a microscope. Easy-to-use benchmarking methods would facilitate the use of fluorescence imaging as a quantitative analytical tool in research applications, and would aid the determination of instrumental method validation for commercial product development applications. We describe and evaluate an automated method to characterize a fluorescence imaging system's performance by benchmarking the detection threshold, saturation, and linear dynamic range to a reference material. The benchmarking procedure is demonstrated using two different materials as the reference material, uranyl-ion-doped glass and Schott 475 GG filter glass. Both are suitable candidate reference materials that are homogeneously fluorescent and highly photostable, and the Schott 475 GG filter glass is currently commercially available. In addition to benchmarking the analytical performance, we also demonstrate that the reference materials provide for accurate day to day intensity calibration. Published 2014 Wiley Periodicals Inc. Published 2014 Wiley Periodicals Inc. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  15. Quantitative film radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, G.; Dobie, D.; Fugina, J.; Hernandez, J.; Logan, C.; Mohr, P.; Moss, R.; Schumacher, B.; Updike, E.; Weirup, D.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernible by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudo-color images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. This report discusses: the method; film processor monitoring and control; verifying film and processor performance; and correction of scatter effects

  16. Fluorescence imaging of tryptophan and collagen cross-links to evaluate wound closure ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Farinelli, Bill; Anderson, R. R.; Franco, Walfre

    2016-02-01

    Wound size is a key parameter in monitoring healing. Current methods to measure wound size are often subjective, time-consuming and marginally invasive. Recently, we developed a non-invasive, non-contact, fast and simple but robust fluorescence imaging (u-FEI) method to monitor the healing of skin wounds. This method exploits the fluorescence of native molecules to tissue as functional and structural markers. The objective of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using variations in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan and cross-links of collagen to evaluate proliferation of keratinocyte cells and quantitate size of wound during healing, respectively. Circular dermal wounds were created in ex vivo human skin and cultured in different media. Two serial fluorescence images of tryptophan and collagen cross-links were acquired every two days. Histology and immunohistology were used to validate correlation between fluorescence and epithelialization. Images of collagen cross-links show fluorescence of the exposed dermis and, hence, are a measure of wound area. Images of tryptophan show higher fluorescence intensity of proliferating keratinocytes forming new epithelium, as compared to surrounding keratinocytes not involved in epithelialization. These images are complementary since collagen cross-links report on structure while tryptophan reports on function. HE and immunohistology show that tryptophan fluorescence correlates with newly formed epidermis. We have established a fluorescence imaging method for studying epithelialization processes during wound healing in a skin organ culture model, our approach has the potential to provide a non-invasive, non-contact, quick, objective and direct method for quantitative measurements in wound healing in vivo.

  17. Quantitative multiphoton imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada

    2014-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs for label-free multidimensional high-resolution in vivo imaging have been introduced to the market several years ago. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechanooptical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as a CARS module. Non-fluorescent lipids and water, mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged in vivo with submicron resolution in human skin. Sensitive and rapid detectors allow single photon counting and the construction of 3D maps where the number of detected photons per voxel is depicted. Intratissue concentration profiles from endogenous as well exogenous substances can be generated when the number of detected photons can be correlated with the number of molecules with respect to binding and scattering behavior. Furthermore, the skin ageing index SAAID based on the ratio elastin/collagen as well as the epidermis depth based on the onset of SHG generation can be determined.

  18. Fluorescence confocal microscopy for pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzi, Moira; Piana, Simonetta; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Foroni, Monica; Ferrari, Guglielmo; Gardini, Giorgio; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy is a non-invasive method of optical imaging that may provide microscopic images of untreated tissue that correspond almost perfectly to hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Nowadays, following two confocal imaging systems are available: (1) reflectance confocal microscopy, based on the natural differences in refractive indices of subcellular structures within the tissues; (2) fluorescence confocal microscopy, based on the use of fluorochromes, such as acridine orange, to increase the contrast epithelium-stroma. In clinical practice to date, confocal microscopy has been used with the goal of obviating the need for excision biopsies, thereby reducing the need for pathological examination. The aim of our study was to test fluorescence confocal microscopy on different types of surgical specimens, specifically breast, lymph node, thyroid, and colon. The confocal images were correlated to the corresponding histological sections in order to provide a morphologic parallel and to highlight current limitations and possible applications of this technology for surgical pathology practice. As a result, neoplastic tissues were easily distinguishable from normal structures and reactive processes such as fibrosis; the use of fluorescence enhanced contrast and image quality in confocal microscopy without compromising final histologic evaluation. Finally, the fluorescence confocal microscopy images of the adipose tissue were as accurate as those of conventional histology and were devoid of the frozen-section-related artefacts that can compromise intraoperative evaluation. Despite some limitations mainly related to black/white images, which require training in imaging interpretation, this study confirms that fluorescence confocal microscopy may represent an alternative to frozen sections in the assessment of margin status in selected settings or when the conservation of the specimen is crucial. This is the first study to employ fluorescent confocal microscopy on

  19. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Biryukova, T.; Sukhinina, A.; Vdovin, Yu

    2010-11-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 - 645 nm and 340 - 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy.

  20. Measurement of in vitro microtubule polymerization by turbidity and fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirigian, Matthew; Mukherjee, Kamalika; Bane, Susan L; Sackett, Dan L

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin polymerization may be conveniently monitored by the increase in turbidity (optical density, or OD) or by the increase in fluorescence intensity of diamidino-phenylindole. The resulting data can be a quantitative measure of microtubule (MT) assembly, but some care is needed in interpretation, especially of OD data. Buffer formulations used for the assembly reaction significantly influence the polymerization, both by altering the critical concentration for polymerization and by altering the exact polymer produced-for example, by increasing the production of sheet polymers in addition to MT. Both the turbidity and the fluorescence methods are useful for demonstrating the effect of MT-stabilizing or -destabilizing additives. 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Reusable Xerogel Containing Quantum Dots with High Fluorescence Retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Yong Liang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Although various analytical methods have been established based on quantum dots (QDs, most were conducted in solution, which is inadequate for storage/transportation and rapid analysis. Moreover, the potential environmental problems caused by abandoned QDs cannot be ignored. In this paper, a reusable xerogel containing CdTe with strong emission is established by introducing host–guest interactions between QDs and polymer matrix. This xerogel shows high QDs loading capacity without decrease or redshift in fluorescence (the maximum of loading is 50 wt % of the final xerogel, which benefits from the steric hindrance of β-cyclodextrin (βCD molecules. Host–guest interactions immobilize QDs firmly, resulting in the excellent fluorescence retention of the xerogel. The good detecting performance and reusability mean this xerogel could be employed as a versatile analysis platform (for quantitative and qualitative analyses. In addition, the xerogel can be self-healed by the aid of water.

  2. Quantitative analysis of myocardial tissue with digital autofluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas; Holten-Rossing, Henrik; Svendsen, Ida M H

    2016-01-01

    to that of hematoxylin and eosin staining in conventional pathology. This study presents an automated fluorescence-based microscopy approach providing highly detailed morphological data from unstained microsections. This data may provide a basic histological starting point from which further digital analysis including...... staining may benefit. METHODS: This study explores the inherent tissue fluorescence, also known as autofluorescence, as a mean to quantitate cardiac tissue components in histological microsections. Data acquisition using a commercially available whole slide scanner and an image-based quantitation algorithm......BACKGROUND: The opportunity offered by whole slide scanners of automated histological analysis implies an ever increasing importance of digital pathology. To go beyond the importance of conventional pathology, however, digital pathology may need a basic histological starting point similar...

  3. Biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color encoder: modulation of fluorescence emission via DNA structural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takahiro; Ogura, Yusuke; Yamada, Kenji; Ohno, Yuko; Tanida, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color (B/F) encoder for optical readout of biomolecular information is proposed. In the B/F encoder, a set of fluorescence wavelengths and their intensity levels are used for coding of a biomolecular signal. A hybridization chain reaction of hairpin DNAs labeled with fluorescent reporters was performed to generate the fluorescence color codes. The fluorescence is modulated via fluorescence resonance energy transfer, which is controlled by DNA structural changes. The results demonstrate that fluorescent color codes can be configured based on two wavelengths and five intensities using the B/F encoder, and the assigned codes can be retrieved via fluorescence measurements. PMID:25071950

  4. Pollution detection using the spectral fluorescent signatures (SFS technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Del Carmen Martín

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work has been developed in the Applied Physics Department at the University of Vigo within the line of research based on the treatment of the degraded water by pollutants through the use of microalgae, reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases through the absorption of CO2 in the process and the reuse of biomass as biofuel. Remote sensing techniques have contributed to a great extent to the development of oil pollution monitoring systems. However, the available detection methods, mainly designed for spaceborne and airborne long distance inspection, are too expensive and complex to be used in an operational way by relatively unskilled personnel. In the framework of DEOSOM project (European AMPERA project, an innovative water monitoring method was proposed, in two steps: early oil spill detection using a portable shipborne laser-induced fluorescence LIDAR (LIF/LIDAR, and analysis of suspicious water samples in laboratory using the Spectral Fluorescent Signature (SFS technique. This work is focused on the second technique. This system aims to optimize the production of microalgae for biofuel and contaminant cleaning applications and was developed and tested in photo-bioreactors in the University of Vigo within the EnerBioAlgae project (SUDOE. In this project, the SFS technique was used as a diagnostic tool employing the fluorescence analyzer INSTANT-SCREENER M53UVC. The Spectral Fluorescence Signature technique (SFS is based on compounds fluorescence properties. The fluorescence intensity of a sample is measured at different excitation and emission wavelengths to produce a 3-dimensional fluorescence matrix, which can also be presented as a 2-dimensional color image where the color shows the intensity of the fluorescence. These matrices offer qualitative and quantitative information, since they can be useful for the identification of different substances from their characteristic excitation and emission spectra of fluorescence. They also

  5. Spectroscopic studies of fluorescent complexes of tyrosine 8-hydroxyquinoline and tyrosine-8-hydroxyquinaldine in aqueous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakhrani, M.A.; Kazi, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    A new method has been developed by preparing complexes involving condensation of tyrosine with 8-hydroxyquinoline (Oxine) and 8-hydroxyquinaldine (Quinaldine) respectively, producing fluorescent products. The products obtained have been investigated for identification and quantitative estimation using different spectroscopic techniques including fluorescence activity of newly synthesized products. 8-hydroxyquinaldine and 8-hydroxyquinoline (Oxine) condensed with tyrosine separately produced water soluble fluorescent complexes. The complexes have been investigated for identification and quantitative estimation of amino acids. Identification of amino acids in nano mole or below than nano mole has become possible by present fluorometric activity of these complexes involving different excitation and emission wavelengths. The fluorometric activity of complexes has been observed to be 100 to 1000 times higher than assay method involving ninhydrin and amino acid analyzer. The method adopted in our laboratory is rapid, versatile with good reproducibility and provides excellent results for adoption by analytical, agricultural and biomedical laboratories to estimate amino acids and metals in composite matrix. (author)

  6. A Nanodiamond-peptide Bioconjugate for Fluorescence and ODMR Microscopy of a Single Actin Filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genjo, Takuya; Sotoma, Shingo; Tanabe, Ryotaro; Igarashi, Ryuji; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the importance of conformational changes in actin filaments induced by mechanical stimulation of a cell has been increasingly recognized, especially in terms of mechanobiology. Despite its fundamental importance, however, long-term observation of a single actin filament by fluorescent microscopy has been difficult because of the low photostability of traditional fluorescent molecules. This paper reports a novel molecular labeling system for actin filaments using fluorescent nanodiamond (ND) particles harboring nitrogen-vacancy centers; ND has flexible chemical modifiability, extremely high photostability and biocompatibility, and provides a variety of physical information quantitatively via optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements. We performed the chemical surface modification of an ND with the actin filament-specific binding peptide Lifeact and observed colocalization of pure Lifeact-modified ND and actin filaments by the ODMR selective imaging protocol, suggesting the capability of long-term observation and quantitative analysis of a single molecule by using an ND particle.

  7. Chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence, of niobium in high-strength plate steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iozzi, F.B.; Dias, M.J.P.

    1981-01-01

    The use of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry in quantitative analysis of niobium in steels, as an alternative solution for optical emission spectrometry, in the rapid chemical control of steel fabrication by LD type converters, is presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. The X-ray fluorescent method for determination of total sulphur in bituminous coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widowska-Kusmierska, J.; Siess, K.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescent technique for the determination of total sulphur covering concentrations from 0,1 to 10% has been applied for bituminous coals showing a great variability in qualitative and quantitative composition of mineral matter (ash). The described method is a quick one giving results during one hour. The obtained good accuracy of determinations gives prospects for wide industrial application. (author)

  9. Fluorescent discrimination between traces of chemical warfare agents and their mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz de Greñu, Borja; Moreno, Daniel; Torroba, Tomás; Berg, Alexander; Gunnars, Johan; Nilsson, Tobias; Nyman, Rasmus; Persson, Milton; Pettersson, Johannes; Eklind, Ida; Wästerby, Pär

    2014-03-19

    An array of fluorogenic probes is able to discriminate between nerve agents, sarin, soman, tabun, VX and their mimics, in water or organic solvent, by qualitative fluorescence patterns and quantitative multivariate analysis, thus making the system suitable for the in-the-field detection of traces of chemical warfare agents as well as to differentiate between the real nerve agents and other related compounds.

  10. Determination of organic compounds in medicinal plants, commercialized in capsulated forms and 'in natura' by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF). Determination of quantitative inorganic profiles; Determinacao de componentes organicos em plantas medicinais, comercializadas em forma de po (capsulas) e 'in natura', utilizando a tecnica de fluorescencia de raios X por dispersao de comprimento de onda (WDXRF). Determinacao de perfis inorganicos quantitativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Manuel Octavio M; Sato, Ivone Mulako; Salvador, Vera Lucia R [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Quimica e Meio Ambiente

    2005-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence technique was used to determine major and trace elements for five Brazilian commercial medicinal plants. The bromobutane (Barbatimao), Ginkgo folium (Ginkgo biloba), Echinodorus macrophyllus (Chapeu de couro), Valeriana officinalis (Valeriana), Cordia salicifolia (Porangaba) samples were collected from three to six different commercial suppliers. The species were collected 'in natura' (leaves, flowers, barks and roots) and capsulated forms. The samples were grinded in liquid N{sub 2} atmosphere and double layer pressed pellet were prepared. The elements Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb e Sr concentrations were determined by individual calibration curves. The precision and accuracy of method were evaluated by certified reference material, NIST 1547 - Peach Leaves and the Chauvenet, Cochrane, ANOVA and Z-score statistical tests were applied. Each specimen presented a distinct inorganic profile and a great variation in its composition was observed. The inorganic profile will contribute for the elaboration of a quality and security guide to assure the phytotherapics commercialization. Moreover, these profiles could be used as complementary data to active farmaco compounds profiles for specimen's ratification. (author)

  11. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of Literature on x-ray fluorescence spectrometry starts with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. It is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is subdivided according to spectra, equipment, applications and absorption analysis

  12. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, N.B.

    1977-01-01

    The principle, instrument and procedure of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry are described. It is a rapid, simple and sensitive method for the trace analysis of elements from sodium to uranium in powder, liquid or metal samples. (M.G.B.)

  13. A fluorescent probe for ecstasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroni, D; Biavardi, E; Genovese, D; Rampazzo, E; Prodi, L; Dalcanale, E

    2015-08-18

    A nanostructure formed by the insertion in silica nanoparticles of a pyrene-derivatized cavitand, which is able to specifically recognize ecstasy in water, is presented. The absence of effects from interferents and an efficient electron transfer process occurring after complexation of ecstasy, makes this system an efficient fluorescent probe for this popular drug.

  14. Erythrocyte fluorescence and lead intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K G

    1976-01-01

    Blood samples from people exposed to inorganic lead were examined by fluorescence microscopy for excess erythrocyte porphyrin. With continued lead absorption, fluorescent erythrocytes appeared in the circulation of workers handling this metal or its compounds, and they progressively increased in number and brilliance. These changes ensued if the blood lead concentration was maintained above 2-42 mumol/l (50 mug/100 ml), and preceded any material fall in the haemoglobin value. At one factory, 62-5% of 81 symptomless workers showed erythrocyte fluorescence attributable to the toxic effects of lead. Excess fluorocytes were found in blood samples from a child with pica and three of her eight siblings. These four were subsequently shown to have slightly increased blood lead concentrations (2-03 to 2-32 mumol/l). Fluorescence microscopy for excess erythrocyte porphyrin is a sensitive method for the detection of chronic lead intoxication. A relatively slight increase in the blood lead is associated with demonstrabel changes in erythrocyte porphyrin content. The procedure requires little blood, and may be performed upon stored samples collected for lead estimation. The results are not readily influenced by contamination, and provide good confirmatory evidence for the absorption of biochemically active lead. PMID:963005

  15. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateu, Batirtze Prats; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B; Toca-Herrera, José L; Kainz, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins. (paper)

  16. A ratiometric nanoprobe based on silver nanoclusters and carbon dots for the fluorescent detection of biothiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuming; Lin, Bixia; Yu, Ying; Cao, Yujuan; Guo, Manli; Shui, Lingling

    2018-04-01

    Ratiometric fluorescent probes could eliminate the influence from experimental factors and improve the detection accuracy. In this article, a ratiometric nanoprobe was constructed based on silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) with nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) and used for the detection of biothiols. The fluorescence peak of AgNCs was observed at 650 nm with excitation wavelength at 370 nm. In order to construct the ratiometric fluorescent probe, NCDs with the excitation and emission wavelengths at 370 nm and 450 nm were selected. After adding AgNCs, the fluorescence of NCDs was quenched. The mechanism of the fluorescence quenching was studied by fluorescence, UV-Vis absorption and the fluorescence lifetime spectra. The results indicated that the quenching could be ascribed to the inner filter effect (IFE). With the addition of biothiols, the fluorescence of AgNCs at 650 nm decreased due to the breakdown of AgNCs, and the fluorescence of NCDs at 450 nm recovered accordingly. Thus, the relationship between the ratio of the fluorescence intensities (I450/I650) and biothiol concentration was used to establish the determination method for biothiols. Cysteine (Cys) was taken as the model of biothiols, and the working curve for Cys was I450/I650 = 0.60CCys - 1.86 (CCys: μmol/L) with the detection limit of 0.14 μmol/L (S/N = 3). Then, the method was used for the detection of Cys in human urine and serum samples with satisfactory accuracy and recovery ratios. Furthermore, the probe could be applied for the visual semi-quantitative determination of Cys by naked eyes.

  17. High-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus helicase inhibitors using fluorescence-quenching phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Hidenori; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Fujita, Osamu; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi; Miyata, Ryo; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Noda, Naohiro

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a novel high-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase inhibitors using the fluorescence-quenching phenomenon via photoinduced electron transfer between fluorescent dyes and guanine bases. We prepared double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a 5'-fluorescent-dye (BODIPY FL)-labeled strand hybridized with a complementary strand, the 3'-end of which has guanine bases. When dsDNA is unwound by helicase, the dye emits fluorescence owing to its release from the guanine bases. Our results demonstrate that this assay is suitable for quantitative assay of HCV NS3 helicase activity and useful for high-throughput screening for inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied this assay to the screening for NS3 helicase inhibitors from cell extracts of microorganisms, and found several cell extracts containing potential inhibitors.

  18. Fluorescent assay for oxytetracycline based on a long-chain aptamer assembled onto reduced graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Huimin; Gao, Sheng; Liu, Meng; Chang, Yangyang; Fan, Xinfei; Quan, Xie [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education, China), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

    2013-07-15

    We report on a fluorescent assay for oxytetracycline (OTC) using a fluorescein-labeled long-chain aptamer assembled onto reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The π-π stacking interaction between aptamer and rGO causes the fluorescence of the label to be almost completely quenched via energy transfer so that the system has very low background fluorescence. The addition of OTC leads to the formation of G-quadruplex OTC complexes and prevents the adsorption of labeled aptamer on the surface of rGO. As a result, fluorescence is restored, and this effect allows for a quantitative assay of OTC over the 0.1–2 μM concentration range and with a detection limit of 10 nM. This method is simple, rapid, selective and sensitive. It may be applied to other small molecule analytes by applying appropriate aptamers. (author)

  19. Fluorescent assay for oxytetracycline based on a long-chain aptamer assembled onto reduced graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Huimin; Gao, Sheng; Liu, Meng; Chang, Yangyang; Fan, Xinfei; Quan, Xie

    2013-01-01

    We report on a fluorescent assay for oxytetracycline (OTC) using a fluorescein-labeled long-chain aptamer assembled onto reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The π-π stacking interaction between aptamer and rGO causes the fluorescence of the label to be almost completely quenched via energy transfer so that the system has very low background fluorescence. The addition of OTC leads to the formation of G-quadruplex OTC complexes and prevents the adsorption of labeled aptamer on the surface of rGO. As a result, fluorescence is restored, and this effect allows for a quantitative assay of OTC over the 0.1–2 μM concentration range and with a detection limit of 10 nM. This method is simple, rapid, selective and sensitive. It may be applied to other small molecule analytes by applying appropriate aptamers. (author)

  20. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  1. Quantitative secondary electron detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Jyoti; Joy, David C.; Nayak, Subuhadarshi

    2018-05-08

    Quantitative Secondary Electron Detection (QSED) using the array of solid state devices (SSD) based electron-counters enable critical dimension metrology measurements in materials such as semiconductors, nanomaterials, and biological samples (FIG. 3). Methods and devices effect a quantitative detection of secondary electrons with the array of solid state detectors comprising a number of solid state detectors. An array senses the number of secondary electrons with a plurality of solid state detectors, counting the number of secondary electrons with a time to digital converter circuit in counter mode.

  2. [Methods of quantitative proteomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylov, A T; Zgoda, V G

    2007-01-01

    In modern science proteomic analysis is inseparable from other fields of systemic biology. Possessing huge resources quantitative proteomics operates colossal information on molecular mechanisms of life. Advances in proteomics help researchers to solve complex problems of cell signaling, posttranslational modification, structure and functional homology of proteins, molecular diagnostics etc. More than 40 various methods have been developed in proteomics for quantitative analysis of proteins. Although each method is unique and has certain advantages and disadvantages all these use various isotope labels (tags). In this review we will consider the most popular and effective methods employing both chemical modifications of proteins and also metabolic and enzymatic methods of isotope labeling.

  3. Rare earth aerosol analysis by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citron, I.M.; Mausner, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of four lanthanides in air filter samples is described. The method involves simultaneous quantitative determinations of La, Ce, Pr, and Nd at the microgram level by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry without chemical separation of these rare earths and without serious interferences from the dust matrices on the filters. The method has been used successfully to analyze some air filter samples collected at a rare earth processing refinery in Illinois. A description of the development of the method is given as well as the results obtained by using this method on the air filter samples. The reproducibility of the results was generally +-5%

  4. A Discontinuous Galerkin Model for Fluorescence Loss in Photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Valdemar; Schroll, Achim; Wüstner, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) is a modern microscopy method for visualization of transport processes in living cells. This paper presents the simulation of FLIP sequences based on a calibrated reaction–di usion system de ned on segmented cell images. By the use of a discontinuous...... of the nuclear membrane for GFP passage, directly from the FLIP image series. Thus, we present for the rst time, to our knowledge, a quantitative computational FLIP method for inferring several molecular transport parameters in parallel from FLIP image data acquired at commercial microscope systems....

  5. Structural design of intrinsically fluorescent oxysterols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nåbo, Lina J; Modzel, Maciej; Krishnan, Kathiresan

    2018-01-01

    Oxysterols are oxidized derivatives of cholesterol with many important biological functions. Trafficking of oxysterols in and between cells is not well studied, largely due to the lack of appropriate oxysterol analogs. Intrinsically fluorescent oxysterols present a new route towards direct...... observation of intracellular oxysterol trafficking by fluorescence microscopy. We characterize the fluorescence properties of the existing fluorescent 25-hydroxycholesterol analog 25-hydroxycholestatrienol, and propose a new probe with an extended conjugated system. The location of both probes inside...

  6. Comparative study of the fluorescence intensity of dental composites and human teeth submitted to artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Tatiana; Takahashi, Marcos Kenzo; Brum, Rafeal Torres; Rached, Rodrigo Nunes; Souza, Evelise M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the fluorescence of resin composites and human teeth, and to determine the stability of fluorescence after aging. Ten specimens were built using a 1 mm thick increment of dentin composite overlapped by a 0.5 mm thick increment of enamel composite. Ten sound human molars were sectioned and silicon carbide-polished to obtain enamel and dentin slabs 1.5 mm in thickness. Fluorescence measurements were carried out by a fluorescence spectrophotometer before and after thermocycling (2000 cycles, 5°C and 55°C). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures and Tukey's test were performed at a significance level of 5%. Most of the tested composites showed significant differences in fluorescence both before and after aging (P 0.05), and was the only composite that showed comparable results of fluorescence to the tooth structure before and after thermocycling. With the exception of Filtek Supreme, there were significant reductions in fluorescence intensity for all the tested composites (P < 0.05).

  7. Graphene oxide based photoinduced charge transfer label-free near-infrared fluorescent biosensor for dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Long; Yan, Xiu-Ping; Meng, Kang; Wang, Shu-Feng

    2011-11-15

    While the super fluorescence quenching capacity of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively employed to develop fluorescent sensors, their own unique fluorescence and its potential for chemo-/biosensing have seldom been explored. Here we report a GO-based photoinduced charge transfer (PCT) label-free near-infrared (near-IR) fluorescent biosensor for dopamine (DA). The multiple noncovalent interactions between GO and DA and the ultrafast decay at the picosecond range of the near-IR fluorescence of GO resulted in effective self-assembly of DA molecules on the surface of GO, and significant fluorescence quenching, allowing development of a PCT-based biosensor with direct readout of the near-IR fluorescence of GO for selective and sensitive detection of DA. The developed method gave a detection limit of 94 nM and a relative standard deviation of 2.0% for 11 replicate detections of 2.0 μM DA and was successfully applied to the determination of DA in biological fluids with quantitative recovery (98-115%).

  8. Dual-Color Fluorescence Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Live Cancer Cells Using Conjugated Polymer Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Minjie; Sun, Bin; Liu, Yun; Shen, Qun-Dong; Jiang, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth in biological applications of nanomaterials brings about pressing needs for exploring nanomaterial-cell interactions. Cationic blue-emissive and anionic green-emissive conjugated polymers are applied as dual-color fluorescence probes to the surface of negatively charged magnetic nanoparticles through sequentially electrostatic adsorption. These conjugated polymers have large extinction coefficients and high fluorescence quantum yield (82% for PFN and 62% for ThPFS). Thereby, one can visualize trace amount (2.7 μg/mL) of fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles within cancer cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fluorescence labeling by the conjugated polymers is also validated for quantitative determination of the internalized nanoparticles in each individual cell by flow cytometry analysis. Extensive overlap of blue and green fluorescence signals in the cytoplasm indicates that both conjugated polymer probes tightly bind to the surface of the nanoparticles during cellular internalization. The highly charged and fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles non-specifically bind to the cell membranes, followed by cellular uptake through endocytosis. The nanoparticles form aggregates inside endosomes, which yields a punctuated staining pattern. Cellular internalization of the nanoparticles is dependent on the dosage and time. Uptake efficiency can be enhanced three-fold by application of an external magnetic field. The nanoparticles are low cytotoxicity and suitable for simultaneously noninvasive fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging application. PMID:26931282

  9. Quantitative Decision Support Requires Quantitative User Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Is it conceivable that models run on 2007 computer hardware could provide robust and credible probabilistic information for decision support and user guidance at the ZIP code level for sub-daily meteorological events in 2060? In 2090? Retrospectively, how informative would output from today’s models have proven in 2003? or the 1930’s? Consultancies in the United Kingdom, including the Met Office, are offering services to “future-proof” their customers from climate change. How is a US or European based user or policy maker to determine the extent to which exciting new Bayesian methods are relevant here? or when a commercial supplier is vastly overselling the insights of today’s climate science? How are policy makers and academic economists to make the closely related decisions facing them? How can we communicate deep uncertainty in the future at small length-scales without undermining the firm foundation established by climate science regarding global trends? Three distinct aspects of the communication of the uses of climate model output targeting users and policy makers, as well as other specialist adaptation scientists, are discussed. First, a brief scientific evaluation of the length and time scales at which climate model output is likely to become uninformative is provided, including a note on the applicability the latest Bayesian methodology to current state-of-the-art general circulation models output. Second, a critical evaluation of the language often employed in communication of climate model output, a language which accurately states that models are “better”, have “improved” and now “include” and “simulate” relevant meteorological processed, without clearly identifying where the current information is thought to be uninformative and misleads, both for the current climate and as a function of the state of the (each) climate simulation. And thirdly, a general approach for evaluating the relevance of quantitative climate model output

  10. Forensic application of total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for elemental characterization of ink samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhara, Sangita; Misra, N.L.; Maind, S.D.; Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of applying Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence for qualitative and quantitative differentiation of documents printed with rare earth tagged and untagged inks has been explored in this paper. For qualitative differentiation, a very small amount of ink was loosened from the printed documents by smoothly rubbing with a new clean blade without destroying the manuscript. 50 μL of Milli-Q water was put on this loose powder, on the manuscript, and was agitated by sucking and releasing the suspension two to three times with the help of a micropipette. The resultant dispersion was deposited on quartz sample support for Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence spectrum of tagged and untagged inks could be clearly differentiated. In order to see the applicability of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence for quantitative determinations of rare earths and also to countercheck such determinations in ink samples, the amounts of rare earth in painted papers with single rare earth tagged inks were determined by digesting the painted paper in HNO 3 /HClO 4 , mixing this solution with the internal standard and recording their Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence spectra after calibration of the instrument. The results thus obtained were compared with those obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and were found in good agreement. The average precision of the Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence determinations was 5.5% (1σ) and the average deviation of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence determined values with that of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry was 7.3%. These studies have shown that Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence offers a promising and potential application in forensic work of this nature.

  11. Forensic application of total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for elemental characterization of ink samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhara, Sangita [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Misra, N.L., E-mail: nlmisra@barc.gov.i [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Maind, S.D. [NAA Unit of Central Forensic Science Laboratory Hyderabad at Analytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kumar, Sanjukta A. [Analytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Chattopadhyay, N. [NAA Unit of Central Forensic Science Laboratory Hyderabad at Analytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Aggarwal, S.K. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2010-02-15

    The possibility of applying Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence for qualitative and quantitative differentiation of documents printed with rare earth tagged and untagged inks has been explored in this paper. For qualitative differentiation, a very small amount of ink was loosened from the printed documents by smoothly rubbing with a new clean blade without destroying the manuscript. 50 muL of Milli-Q water was put on this loose powder, on the manuscript, and was agitated by sucking and releasing the suspension two to three times with the help of a micropipette. The resultant dispersion was deposited on quartz sample support for Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence spectrum of tagged and untagged inks could be clearly differentiated. In order to see the applicability of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence for quantitative determinations of rare earths and also to countercheck such determinations in ink samples, the amounts of rare earth in painted papers with single rare earth tagged inks were determined by digesting the painted paper in HNO{sub 3}/HClO{sub 4}, mixing this solution with the internal standard and recording their Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence spectra after calibration of the instrument. The results thus obtained were compared with those obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and were found in good agreement. The average precision of the Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence determinations was 5.5% (1sigma) and the average deviation of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence determined values with that of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry was 7.3%. These studies have shown that Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence offers a promising and potential application in forensic work of this nature.

  12. Plasmonic enhancement of ultraviolet fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiaojin

    Plasmonics relates to the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and conduction electrons at metallic interfaces or in metallic nanostructures. Surface plasmons are collective electron oscillations at a metal surface, which can be manipulated by shape, texture and material composition. Plasmonic applications cover a broad spectrum from visible to near infrared, including biosensing, nanolithography, spectroscopy, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and so on. However, there remains a gap in this activity in the ultraviolet (UV, research. Motivating factors in the study of UV Plasmonics are the direct access to biomolecular resonances and native fluorescence, resonant Raman scattering interactions, and the potential for exerting control over photochemical reactions. This dissertation aims to fill in the gap of Plasmonics in the UV with efforts of design, fabrication and characterization of aluminium (Al) and magnesium (Mg) nanostructures for the application of label-free bimolecular detection via native UV fluorescence. The first contribution of this dissertation addresses the design of Al nanostructures in the context of UV fluorescence enhancement. A design method that combines analytical analysis with numerical simulation has been developed. Performance of three canonical plasmonic structures---the dipole antenna, bullseye nanoaperture and nanoaperture array---has been compared. The optimal geometrical parameters have been determined. A novel design of a compound bullseye structure has been proposed and numerically analyzed for the purpose of compensating for the large Stokes shift typical of UV fluorescence. Second, UV lifetime modification of diffusing molecules by Al nanoapertures has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Lifetime reductions of ~3.5x have been observed for the high quantum yield (QY) laser dye p-terphenyl in a 60 nm diameter aperture with 50 nm undercut. Furthermore, quantum-yield-dependence of lifetime reduction has been

  13. Elemental analysis of air particulate samples in Jakarta area by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumiarti; Yusuf, M.; Mellawati, June; Menry, Yulizon; Surtipanti S

    1998-01-01

    Determination of elements in air particulate samples collected from Jakarta, especially from industrial area Pulo Gadung, also from residence, office, and recreation sites had been carried out. The samples collected periodically from August through December 1996. The elements were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry method. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were done using QXAS AXIL (Quantitative X-ray Analysis System of x-ray Spectra by Iterative Least squares fitting) and QAES (Quantitative Analyses of Environmental Samples) package program. Results of the analyses showed that the content of heavy metal elements in air particulate samples from all areas studied were still below the maximum permissible concentration. (authors)

  14. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  15. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy Imaging-Guided Confocal Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Desheng; Kaldaras, Leonora; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an integrated spectroscopy system combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging with confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy for two-dimensional interfaces. This spectroscopy approach is capable of both multiple molecules simultaneously sampling and in situ confocal fluorescence dynamics analyses of individual molecules of interest. We have demonstrated the calibration with fluorescent microspheres, and carried out single-molecule spectroscop...

  16. Extending Quantitative Easing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallett, Andrew Hughes; Fiedler, Salomon; Kooths, Stefan

    The notes in this compilation address the pros and cons associated with the extension of ECB quantitative easing programme of asset purchases. The notes have been requested by the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs as an input for the February 2017 session of the Monetary Dialogue....

  17. Quantitative Moessbauer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of Moessbauer data, as in the measurement of Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ concentration, has not been possible because of the different mean square velocities (x 2 ) of Moessbauer nuclei at chemically different sites. A method is now described which, based on Moessbauer data at several temperatures, permits the comparison of absorption areas at (x 2 )=0. (Auth.)

  18. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography: Principles and Potential for Pharmaceutical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Stuker

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence microscopic imaging is widely used in biomedical research to study molecular and cellular processes in cell culture or tissue samples. This is motivated by the high inherent sensitivity of fluorescence techniques, the spatial resolution that compares favorably with cellular dimensions, the stability of the fluorescent labels used and the sophisticated labeling strategies that have been developed for selectively labeling target molecules. More recently, two and three-dimensional optical imaging methods have also been applied to monitor biological processes in intact biological organisms such as animals or even humans. These whole body optical imaging approaches have to cope with the fact that biological tissue is a highly scattering and absorbing medium. As a consequence, light propagation in tissue is well described by a diffusion approximation and accurate reconstruction of spatial information is demanding. While in vivo optical imaging is a highly sensitive method, the signal is strongly surface weighted, i.e., the signal detected from the same light source will become weaker the deeper it is embedded in tissue, and strongly depends on the optical properties of the surrounding tissue. Derivation of quantitative information, therefore, requires tomographic techniques such as fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT, which maps the three-dimensional distribution of a fluorescent probe or protein concentration. The combination of FMT with a structural imaging method such as X-ray computed tomography (CT or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI will allow mapping molecular information on a high definition anatomical reference and enable the use of prior information on tissue’s optical properties to enhance both resolution and sensitivity. Today many of the fluorescent assays originally developed for studies in cellular systems have been successfully translated for experimental studies in animals. The opportunity of monitoring molecular

  19. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Impinging Underexpanded Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was designed to create a simplified simulation of the flow through a hole in the surface of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle and the subsequent impingement of the flow on internal structures. In addition to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization, pressure measurements were recorded on the surface of an impingement target. The PLIF images themselves provide quantitative spatial information about structure of the impinging jets. The images also help in the interpretation of impingement surface pressure profiles by highlighting the flow structures corresponding to distinctive features of these pressure profiles. The shape of the pressure distribution along the impingement surface was found to be double-peaked in cases with a sufficiently high jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio so as to have a Mach disk, as well as in cases where a flow feature called a recirculation bubble formed at the impingement surface. The formation of a recirculation bubble was in turn found to depend very sensitively upon the jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio. The pressure measured at the surface was typically less than half the nozzle plenum pressure at low jet pressure ratios and decreased with increasing jet pressure ratios. Angled impingement cases showed that impingement at a 60deg angle resulted in up to a factor of three increase in maximum pressure at the plate compared to normal incidence.

  20. Monitoring of petroleum hydrocarbon pollution in surface waters by a direct comparison of fluorescence spectroscopy and remote sensing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Domenico, L.; Crisafi, E. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Messina (Italy). Thalassografic Inst.); Magazzu, G. (Lecce Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Biology); Puglisi, A. (Mediterranean Oceanological Centre (CEOM), Palermo (Italy)); La Rosa, A. (Air-Survey, Italy s.r.l., Catania (Italy))

    1994-10-01

    Oil pollution levels were estimated using simultaneous acquisition of data from remote sensing by helicopter and fluorescence spectroscopy on surface samples. Laboratory quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons was used to calibrate remotely sensed data. The data were treated using a computer to generate a colour-coded map not attainable with conventional methods representing seawater pollution. Results were in good agreement and indicated that remotely sensed data together with those achieved by fluorescence spectroscopy are applicable for monitoring hydrocarbon pollution. (author)

  1. Monitoring of petroleum hydrocarbon pollution in surface waters by a direct comparison of fluorescence spectroscopy and remote sensing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Domenico, L.; Crisafi, E.; La Rosa, A.

    1994-01-01

    Oil pollution levels were estimated using simultaneous acquisition of data from remote sensing by helicopter and fluorescence spectroscopy on surface samples. Laboratory quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons was used to calibrate remotely sensed data. The data were treated using a computer to generate a colour-coded map not attainable with conventional methods representing seawater pollution. Results were in good agreement and indicated that remotely sensed data together with those achieved by fluorescence spectroscopy are applicable for monitoring hydrocarbon pollution. (author)

  2. Critical Quantitative Inquiry in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Frances K.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter briefly traces the development of the concept of critical quantitative inquiry, provides an expanded conceptualization of the tasks of critical quantitative research, offers theoretical explanation and justification for critical research using quantitative methods, and previews the work of quantitative criticalists presented in this…

  3. Fluorescent scattering by molecules embedded in small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Studies are reported in these areas: double resonance in fluorescent and Raman scattering; surface enhanced Raman scattering; fluorescence by molecules embedded in small particles; fluorescence by a liquid droplet; and fluorescence by conical pits in surfaces

  4. Elementary analysis by means of the x fluorescence and energy dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jbeli, H.

    1988-10-01

    Three actualisation reports are shown, in the three first chapters, concerning the following subjects: x fluorescence principle, energy dispersive X ray spectroscopy and excitation spectrum characteristics. The matrice effects, the energy equivalence concept, and the correction methods of the interelement effects, related to a calibration curve, are discussed. For the last ones, it is shown that they are supplied to rough values. Quantitative analysis results are shown. A new possibility has been added to those of data processing program usually applied in quantitative analysis. In the second method applied in quantitative analysis, standard samples are used. In both methods an error appreciation analysis is carried out. It is shown that energy dispersive X fluorescence analysis can be applied to thin layers composition and thickness characterization [fr

  5. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A; Vdovin, Yu; Biryukova, T

    2010-01-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 – 645 nm and 340 – 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy

  6. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy for neoplasms control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratchenko, I. A.; Kristoforova, Yu. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of malignant skin tumors diagnosis was performed involving two setups for native tissues fluorescence control in visible and near infrared regions. Combined fluorescence analysis for skin malignant melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed. Autofluorescence spectra of normal skin and oncological pathologies stimulated by 457 nm and 785 nm lasers were registered for 74 skin tissue samples. Spectra of 10 melanomas and 27 basal cell carcinomas were registered ex vivo. Skin tumors analysis was made on the basis of autofluorescence spectra intensity and curvature for analysis of porphyrins, lipo-pigments, flavins and melanin. Separation of melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed on the basis of discriminant analysis. Overall accuracy of basal cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas separation in current study reached 86.5% with 70% sensitivity and 92.6% specificity.

  8. New Fluorescence Probes for Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jurek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Steady state fluorescence measurements have been used for the investigation of interaction between the bovine serum albumin (BSA and fluorescence probes: 3-hydroxy-2,4- bis[(3-methyl-1,3-benzoxazol-2(3H-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ6, 3-hydroxy- 2,4-bis[(3-methyl-1,3-benzothiazol-2(3H-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ7 and 3-hydroxy-2,4-bis[(1,3,3-trimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ8. The binding constant between bovine serum albumin and squarine dyes has been determined by using both the Benesi-Hildebrand and Stern-Volmer equations. The negative value of free energy change indicates the existence of a spontaneous complexation process of BSA with squarine dyes.

  9. Multi Spectral Fluorescence Imager (MSFI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Genetic transformation with in vivo reporter genes for fluorescent proteins can be performed on a variety of organisms to address fundamental biological questions. Model organisms that may utilize an ISS imager include unicellular organisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), and invertebrates (Caenorhabditis elegans). The multispectral fluorescence imager (MSFI) will have the capability to accommodate 10 cm x 10 cm Petri plates, various sized multi-well culture plates, and other custom culture containers. Features will include programmable temperature and light cycles, ethylene scrubbing (less than 25 ppb), CO2 control (between 400 ppm and ISS-ambient levels in units of 100 ppm) and sufficient airflow to prevent condensation that would interfere with imaging.

  10. X-ray fluorescence holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu, Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-03-07

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy.

  11. X-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy. (topical review)

  12. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  13. An operational fluorescence system for crop assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Charles; Belanger, Marie-Christine; Viau, Alain A.; Chamberland, Martin; Roy, Simon

    2004-03-01

    The development of precision farming requires new tools for plant nutritional stress monitoring. An operational fluorescence system has been designed for vegetation status mapping and stress detection at plant and field scale. The instrument gives relative values of fluorescence at different wavelengths induced by the two-excitation sources. Lightinduced fluorescence has demonstrated successful crop health monitoring and plant nutritional stress detection capabilities. The spectral response of the plants has first been measured with an hyperspectral imager using laser-induced fluorescence. A tabletop imaging fluorometer based on flash lamp technology has also been designed to study the spatial distribution of fluorescence on plant leaves. For field based non-imaging system, LED technology is used as light source to induce fluorescence of the plant. The operational fluorescence system is based on ultraviolet and blue LED to induce fluorescence. Four narrow fluorescence bands centered on 440, 520, 690 and 740nm are detected. The instrument design includes a modular approach for light source and detector. It can accommodate as many as four different light sources and six bands of fluorescence detection. As part of the design for field application, the instrument is compatible with a mobile platform equipped with a GPS and data acquisition system. The current system developed by Telops/GAAP is configured for potato crops fluorescence measurement but can easily be adapted for other crops. This new instrument offers an effective and affordable solution for precision farming.

  14. Synthesis of novel fluorescent probe Tb(III)-7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin complex for sensing of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, Belal H.M.; Azab, Hassan A.; Fathalla, Walid; Ali, Sherin A.M.

    2013-01-01

    New fluorescent probe Tb(III) (7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin)2(SCN) (C2H5OH)(H2O) was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of 7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin (CMMC) and Tb(III)–CMMC complex have been measured in different solvents. The interactions of Tb(III)–CMMC complex with calf thymus nucleic acid (CT-DNA) have been investigated using steady state fluorescence measurements. The changes in the fluorescence intensity have been used for the quantitative determination of DNA with LOD of 3.45 ng in methanol–water (9:1, v/v). The association constants of DNA with Tb(III)–CMMC complex was found to be 2.62×1010 M −1 . - Highlights: ► New fluorescent probe Terbium (III)-7-carboxy methoxy-4-methylcoumarin complex has been synthesized and characterized. ► FTIR spectrum of Tb(III)-complex shows a characteristic band for thiocyanate group. ► DNA interaction with Terbium (III)-7-carboxy methoxy-4-methylcoumarin has been studied by fluorescence techniques. ► The change in the fluorescence intensity has been used for the quantitative determination of DNA. ► The result was better than most of the well-known methods including the ethidium bromide method.

  15. Feasibility of the simultaneous determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons based on two-dimensional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Renjie; Dong, Guimei; Sun, Xueshan; Yang, Yanrong; Yu, Yaping; Liu, Haixue; Zhang, Weiyu

    2018-02-01

    A new approach for quantitative determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in environment was proposed based on two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in conjunction with multivariate method. 40 mixture solutions of anthracene and pyrene were prepared in the laboratory. Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra of all samples were collected. And 2D fluorescence correlation spectra were calculated under the excitation perturbation. The N-way partial least squares (N-PLS) models were developed based on 2D fluorescence correlation spectra, showing a root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) of 3.50 μg L- 1 and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 4.42 μg L- 1 for anthracene and of 3.61 μg L- 1 and 4.29 μg L- 1 for pyrene, respectively. Also, the N-PLS models were developed for quantitative analysis of anthracene and pyrene using EEM fluorescence spectra. The RMSEC and RMSEP were 3.97 μg L- 1 and 4.63 μg L- 1 for anthracene, 4.46 μg L- 1 and 4.52 μg L- 1 for pyrene, respectively. It was found that the N-PLS model using 2D fluorescence correlation spectra could provide better results comparing with EEM fluorescence spectra because of its low RMSEC and RMSEP. The methodology proposed has the potential to be an alternative method for detection of PAHs in environment.

  16. Synthesis of novel fluorescent probe Tb(III)-7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin complex for sensing of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Belal H.M., E-mail: belalhussein102@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Azab, Hassan A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Fathalla, Walid [Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Port-Said University, Port-Said (Egypt); Ali, Sherin A.M. [Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt)

    2013-02-15

    New fluorescent probe Tb(III) (7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin)2(SCN) (C2H5OH)(H2O) was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of 7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin (CMMC) and Tb(III)-CMMC complex have been measured in different solvents. The interactions of Tb(III)-CMMC complex with calf thymus nucleic acid (CT-DNA) have been investigated using steady state fluorescence measurements. The changes in the fluorescence intensity have been used for the quantitative determination of DNA with LOD of 3.45 ng in methanol-water (9:1, v/v). The association constants of DNA with Tb(III)-CMMC complex was found to be 2.62 Multiplication-Sign 1010 M{sup -1}. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New fluorescent probe Terbium (III)-7-carboxy methoxy-4-methylcoumarin complex has been synthesized and characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FTIR spectrum of Tb(III)-complex shows a characteristic band for thiocyanate group. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA interaction with Terbium (III)-7-carboxy methoxy-4-methylcoumarin has been studied by fluorescence techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The change in the fluorescence intensity has been used for the quantitative determination of DNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result was better than most of the well-known methods including the ethidium bromide method.

  17. Simultaneous correlative scanning electron and high-NA fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Liv

    Full Text Available Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown.

  18. In vitro evaluation of fluorescence glucose biosensor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloraefy, Mamdouh; Pfefer, T Joshua; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Sapsford, Kim E

    2014-07-08

    Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensors, and characterized biosensor performance using these test methods. The biosensors were based on competitive binding between dextran and glucose to concanavalin A and incorporated long-wavelength fluorescence dye pairs. Testing characteristics included spectral response, linearity, sensitivity, limit of detection, kinetic response, reversibility, stability, precision, and accuracy. The biosensor demonstrated a fluorescence change of 45% in the presence of 400 mg/dL glucose, a mean absolute relative difference of less than 11%, a limit of detection of 25 mg/dL, a response time of 15 min, and a decay in fluorescence intensity of 72% over 30 days. The battery of tests presented here for objective, quantitative in vitro evaluation of FRET glucose biosensors performance have the potential to form the basis of future consensus standards. By implementing these test methods for a long-visible-wavelength biosensor, we were able to demonstrate strengths and weaknesses with a new level of thoroughness and rigor.

  19. RNA Imaging with Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of both the copy number and spatial distribution of large fractions of the transcriptome in single-cells could revolutionize our understanding of a variety of cellular and tissue behaviors in both healthy and diseased states. Single-molecule Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (smFISH)—an approach where individual RNAs are labeled with fluorescent probes and imaged in their native cellular and tissue context—provides both the copy number and spatial context of RNAs but has been limited in the number of RNA species that can be measured simultaneously. Here we describe Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (MERFISH), a massively parallelized form of smFISH that can image and identify hundreds to thousands of different RNA species simultaneously with high accuracy in individual cells in their native spatial context. We provide detailed protocols on all aspects of MERFISH, including probe design, data collection, and data analysis to allow interested laboratories to perform MERFISH measurements themselves. PMID:27241748

  20. [Development of a Fluorescence Probe for Live Cell Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Aya

    2017-01-01

     Probes that detect specific biological materials are indispensable tools for deepening our understanding of various cellular phenomena. In live cell imaging, the probe must emit fluorescence only when a specific substance is detected. In this paper, we introduce a new probe we developed for live cell imaging. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity is higher in tumor cells than in normal cells and is involved in the development of resistance to various anticancer drugs. We previously reported the development of a general strategy for the synthesis of probes for detection of GST enzymes, including fluorogenic, bioluminogenic, and 19 F-NMR probes. Arylsulfonyl groups were used as caging groups during probe design. The fluorogenic probes were successfully used to quantitate very low levels of GST activity in cell extracts and were also successfully applied to the imaging of microsomal MGST1 activity in living cells. The bioluminogenic and 19 F-NMR probes were able to detect GST activity in Escherichia coli cells. Oligonucleotide-templated reactions are powerful tools for nucleic acid sensing. This strategy exploits the target strand as a template for two functionalized probes and provides a simple molecular mechanism for multiple turnover reactions. We developed a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction-triggered fluorescent probe. The probe completed its reaction within 30 s of initiation and amplified the fluorescence signal from 0.5 pM target oligonucleotide by 1500 fold under isothermal conditions. Additionally, we applied the oligonucleotide-templated reaction for molecular releasing and peptide detection.

  1. In Vitro Evaluation of Fluorescence Glucose Biosensor Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamdouh Aloraefy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensors, and characterized biosensor performance using these test methods. The biosensors were based on competitive binding between dextran and glucose to concanavalin A and incorporated long-wavelength fluorescence dye pairs. Testing characteristics included spectral response, linearity, sensitivity, limit of detection, kinetic response, reversibility, stability, precision, and accuracy. The biosensor demonstrated a fluorescence change of 45% in the presence of 400 mg/dL glucose, a mean absolute relative difference of less than 11%, a limit of detection of 25 mg/dL, a response time of 15 min, and a decay in fluorescence intensity of 72% over 30 days. The battery of tests presented here for objective, quantitative in vitro evaluation of FRET glucose biosensors performance have the potential to form the basis of future consensus standards. By implementing these test methods for a long-visible-wavelength biosensor, we were able to demonstrate strengths and weaknesses with a new level of thoroughness and rigor.

  2. Single photon counting fluorescence lifetime detection of pericellular oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Neveen A; Lee, David A; Knight, Martin M

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy offers a non-invasive method for quantifying local oxygen concentrations. However, existing methods are either invasive, require custom-made systems, or show limited spatial resolution. Therefore, these methods are unsuitable for investigation of pericellular oxygen concentrations. This study describes an adaptation of commercially available equipment which has been optimized for quantitative extracellular oxygen detection with high lifetime accuracy and spatial resolution while avoiding systematic photon pile-up. The oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye, tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) chloride hexahydrate [Ru(bipy)(3)](2+), was excited using a two-photon excitation laser. Lifetime was measured using a Becker & Hickl time-correlated single photon counting, which will be referred to as a TCSPC card. [Ru(bipy)(3)](2+) characterization studies quantified the influences of temperature, pH, cellular culture media and oxygen on the fluorescence lifetime measurements. This provided a precisely calibrated and accurate system for quantification of pericellular oxygen concentration based on measured lifetimes. Using this technique, quantification of oxygen concentrations around isolated viable chondrocytes, seeded in three-dimensional agarose gel, revealed a subpopulation of cells that exhibited significant spatial oxygen gradients such that oxygen concentration reduced with increasing proximity to the cell. This technique provides a powerful tool for quantifying spatial oxygen gradients within three-dimensional cellular models.

  3. Fluorescence quenching of fluorescein by Merocyanine 540 in liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toprak, Mahmut; Meryem Aydin, Burcu; Arik, Mustafa; Onganer, Yavuz

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescence quenching of fluorescein (FL) by merociyanine 540 (MC540) was examined in L-egg lecithin phosphatidycholine (PC) liposomes using spectroscopic methods. The type of quenching mechanism (dynamic or static) was evaluated using the Stern-Volmer plots. Findings were also supported by the temperature studies and florescence decay measurements. The Stern-Volmer equation was utilized to calculate bimolecular quenching constants (K q ). Furthermore, the bimolecular quenching constant of the quencher in the liposomes (K SV ), partition coefficient (K p ), binding constant (K), and corresponding thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG were calculated. The quenching property was also used in determining quantitatively (K p ) the partition coefficient of Merociyanini 540 in PC liposome.The obtained data indicated that static quenching occurred in the system and the K SV values decreased with increasing lipid concentration. In addition, thermodynamic analysis suggested that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding were the main acting forces between fluorescein and merociyanine 540 molecules in the medium. - Highlights: → Fluorescence quenching of FL by MC540 in liposome system was analyzed. → Fluorescence quenching mechanism of FL by MC540 was consistent with the static model. → Binding FL to MC540 was spontaneous and carried out by hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces.

  4. Applied quantitative finance

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Cathy; Overbeck, Ludger

    2017-01-01

    This volume provides practical solutions and introduces recent theoretical developments in risk management, pricing of credit derivatives, quantification of volatility and copula modeling. This third edition is devoted to modern risk analysis based on quantitative methods and textual analytics to meet the current challenges in banking and finance. It includes 14 new contributions and presents a comprehensive, state-of-the-art treatment of cutting-edge methods and topics, such as collateralized debt obligations, the high-frequency analysis of market liquidity, and realized volatility. The book is divided into three parts: Part 1 revisits important market risk issues, while Part 2 introduces novel concepts in credit risk and its management along with updated quantitative methods. The third part discusses the dynamics of risk management and includes risk analysis of energy markets and for cryptocurrencies. Digital assets, such as blockchain-based currencies, have become popular b ut are theoretically challenging...

  5. Quantitative skeletal scintiscanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haushofer, R.

    1982-01-01

    330 patients were examined by skeletal scintiscanning with sup(99m)Tc pyrophosphate and sup(99m)methylene diphosphonate in the years between 1977 and 1979. Course control examinations were carried out in 12 patients. The collective of patients presented with primary skeletal tumours, metastases, inflammatory and degenerative skeletal diseases. Bone scintiscanning combined with the ''region of interest'' technique was found to be an objective and reproducible technique for quantitative measurement of skeletal radioactivity concentrations. The validity of nuclear skeletal examinations can thus be enhanced as far as diagnosis, course control, and differential diagnosis are concerned. Quantitative skeletal scintiscanning by means of the ''region of interest'' technique has opened up a new era in skeletal diagnosis by nuclear methods. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Quantitative FDG in depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chua, P.; O`Keefe, G.J.; Egan, G.F.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Mckay, W.J.; Morris, P.L.P.; Burrows, G.D. [Austin Hospital, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Dept of Psychiatry and Centre for PET

    1998-03-01

    Full text: Studies of regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRGlu) using positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with affective disorders have consistently demonstrated reduced metabolism in the frontal regions. Different quantitative and semi-quantitative rCMRGlu regions of interest (ROI) comparisons, e.g. absolute metabolic rates, ratios of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to ipsilateral hemisphere cortex, have been reported. These studies suffered from the use of a standard brain atlas to define ROls, whereas in this case study, the individual``s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan was registered with the PET scan to enable accurate neuroanatomical ROI definition for the subject. The patient is a 36-year-old female with a six-week history of major depression (HAM-D = 34, MMSE = 28). A quantitative FDG PET study and an MRI scan were performed. Six MRI-guided ROls (DLPFC, PFC, whole hemisphere) were defined. The average rCMRGlu in the DLPFC (left = 28.8 + 5.8 mol/100g/min; right = 25.6 7.0 mol/100g/min) were slightly reduced compared to the ipsilateral hemispherical rate (left = 30.4 6.8 mol/100g/min; right = 29.5 7.2 mol/100g/min). The ratios of DLPFC to ipsilateral hemispheric rate were close to unity (left = 0.95 0.29; right 0.87 0.32). The right to left DLPFC ratio did not show any significant asymmetry (0.91 0.30). These results do not correlate with earlier published results reporting decreased left DLPFC rates compared to right DLPFC, although our results will need to be replicated with a group of depressed patients. Registration of PET and MRI studies is necessary in ROI-based quantitative FDG PET studies to allow for the normal anatomical variation among individuals, and thus is essential for accurate comparison of rCMRGlu between individuals.

  7. Quantitative FDG in depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, P.; O'Keefe, G.J.; Egan, G.F.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Mckay, W.J.; Morris, P.L.P.; Burrows, G.D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Studies of regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRGlu) using positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with affective disorders have consistently demonstrated reduced metabolism in the frontal regions. Different quantitative and semi-quantitative rCMRGlu regions of interest (ROI) comparisons, e.g. absolute metabolic rates, ratios of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to ipsilateral hemisphere cortex, have been reported. These studies suffered from the use of a standard brain atlas to define ROls, whereas in this case study, the individual''s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan was registered with the PET scan to enable accurate neuroanatomical ROI definition for the subject. The patient is a 36-year-old female with a six-week history of major depression (HAM-D = 34, MMSE = 28). A quantitative FDG PET study and an MRI scan were performed. Six MRI-guided ROls (DLPFC, PFC, whole hemisphere) were defined. The average rCMRGlu in the DLPFC (left = 28.8 + 5.8 mol/100g/min; right = 25.6 7.0 mol/100g/min) were slightly reduced compared to the ipsilateral hemispherical rate (left = 30.4 6.8 mol/100g/min; right = 29.5 7.2 mol/100g/min). The ratios of DLPFC to ipsilateral hemispheric rate were close to unity (left = 0.95 0.29; right 0.87 0.32). The right to left DLPFC ratio did not show any significant asymmetry (0.91 0.30). These results do not correlate with earlier published results reporting decreased left DLPFC rates compared to right DLPFC, although our results will need to be replicated with a group of depressed patients. Registration of PET and MRI studies is necessary in ROI-based quantitative FDG PET studies to allow for the normal anatomical variation among individuals, and thus is essential for accurate comparison of rCMRGlu between individuals

  8. Quantitative traits and diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzJohn, Richard G

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative traits have long been hypothesized to affect speciation and extinction rates. For example, smaller body size or increased specialization may be associated with increased rates of diversification. Here, I present a phylogenetic likelihood-based method (quantitative state speciation and extinction [QuaSSE]) that can be used to test such hypotheses using extant character distributions. This approach assumes that diversification follows a birth-death process where speciation and extinction rates may vary with one or more traits that evolve under a diffusion model. Speciation and extinction rates may be arbitrary functions of the character state, allowing much flexibility in testing models of trait-dependent diversification. I test the approach using simulated phylogenies and show that a known relationship between speciation and a quantitative character could be recovered in up to 80% of the cases on large trees (500 species). Consistent with other approaches, detecting shifts in diversification due to differences in extinction rates was harder than when due to differences in speciation rates. Finally, I demonstrate the application of QuaSSE to investigate the correlation between body size and diversification in primates, concluding that clade-specific differences in diversification may be more important than size-dependent diversification in shaping the patterns of diversity within this group.

  9. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy in multiple-scattering environments: an application to biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio

    1999-07-01

    Over the past few years, there has been significant research activity devoted to the application of fluorescence spectroscopy to strongly scattering media, where photons propagate diffusely. Much of this activity focused on fluorescence as a source of contrast enhancement in optical tomography. Our efforts have emphasized the quantitative recovery of fluorescence parameters for spectroscopy. Using a frequency-domain diffusion-based model, we have successfully recovered the lifetime, the absolute quantum yield, the fluorophore concentration, and the emission spectrum of the fluorophore, as well as the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients at the emission wavelength of the medium in different measurements. In this contribution, we present a sensitive monitor of the binding between ethidium bromide and bovine cells in fresh milk. The spectroscopic contrast was the approximately tenfold increase in the ethidium bromide lifetime upon binding to DNA. The measurement clearly demonstrated that we could quantitatively measure the density of cells in the milk, which is an application vital to the tremendous economic burden of bovine subclinical mastitis detection. Furthermore, we may in principle use the spirit of this technique as a quantitative monitor of the binding of fluorescent drugs inside tissues. This is a first step towards lifetime spectroscopy in tissues.

  10. Seeing the electroporative uptake of cell-membrane impermeable fluorescent molecules and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kisoo; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Soon-Geul; Lee, Won Gu

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents direct visualization of uptake directionality for cell-membrane impermeant fluorescent molecules and fluorescence-doped nanoparticles at a single-cell level during electroporation. To observe directly the uptake direction, we used microchannel-type electroporation that can generate a relatively symmetric and uniform electric field. For all the image frames during electroporation, fluorescence intensities that occurred at cell membranes in both uptake directions toward the electrodes have been sequentially recorded and quantitatively analyzed pixel by pixel. In our experiments, we found that fluorescent molecules, even not labeled to target biomolecules, had their own uptake direction with different intensities. It is also observed that the uptake intensity toward the cell membrane had a maximal value at a certain electric voltage, not at the highest value of voltages applied. The results also imply that the uptake direction of fluorescence-doped nanoparticles can be determined by a net surface charge of uptake materials and sizes in the electroporative environments. In summary, we performed a quantitative screening and direct visualization of uptake directionality for a set of fluorescent molecules and fluorescence-doped nanoparticles using electric-pulsation. Taking a closer look at the uptake direction of exogenous materials will help researchers to understand an unknown uptake phenomenon in which way foreign materials are inclined to move, and furthermore to design functional nanoparticles for electroporative gene delivery.This paper presents direct visualization of uptake directionality for cell-membrane impermeant fluorescent molecules and fluorescence-doped nanoparticles at a single-cell level during electroporation. To observe directly the uptake direction, we used microchannel-type electroporation that can generate a relatively symmetric and uniform electric field. For all the image frames during electroporation, fluorescence intensities

  11. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence studies of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide interacting with individual tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, Erin J.; Austin, Christopher J. D.; Aitken, Jade B.; Vogt, Stefan; Jolliffe, Katrina A.; Harris, Hugh H.; Rendina, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    The first example of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging of cultured mammalian cells in cyclic peptide research is reported. The study reports the first quantitative analysis of the incorporation of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide and its effects on the biodistribution of endogenous elements (for example, K and Cl) within individual tumor cells. The first example of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging of cultured mammalian cells in cyclic peptide research is reported. The study reports the first quantitative analysis of the incorporation of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide and its effects on the biodistribution of endogenous elements (for example, K and Cl) within individual tumor cells

  12. Quantitative studies of antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper

    antimicrobial peptides interact with phospholipid membranes. Motivated by that fact, the scope of this thesis is to study these antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions. In particular, we attempt to study these interactions with a quantitative approach. For that purpose, we consider the three...... a significant problem for quantitative studies of antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions; namely that antimicrobial peptides adsorb to surfaces of glass and plastic. Specifically, we demonstrate that under standard experimental conditions, this effect is significant for mastoparan X, melittin...... lead to inaccurate conclusions, or even completely wrong conclusions, when interpreting the FCS data. We show that, if all of the pitfalls are avoided, then FCS is a technique with a large potential for quantitative studies of antimicrobial peptide-induced leakage of fluorescent markers from large...

  13. [Quantitative data analysis for live imaging of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seno, Shigeto

    Bone tissue is a hard tissue, it was difficult to observe the interior of the bone tissue alive. With the progress of microscopic technology and fluorescent probe technology in recent years, it becomes possible to observe various activities of various cells forming bone society. On the other hand, the quantitative increase in data and the diversification and complexity of the images makes it difficult to perform quantitative analysis by visual inspection. It has been expected to develop a methodology for processing microscopic images and data analysis. In this article, we introduce the research field of bioimage informatics which is the boundary area of biology and information science, and then outline the basic image processing technology for quantitative analysis of live imaging data of bone.

  14. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Walters, Jamie D.; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. ► Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. ► Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  15. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  16. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J.

    2005-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores

  17. Multispectral open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrooz, Ali; Waterman, Peter; Vasquez, Kristine O; Meganck, Jeff; Peterson, Jeffrey D; Faqir, Ilias; Kempner, Joshua

    2017-08-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence imaging informs decisions regarding surgical margins by detecting and localizing signals from fluorescent reporters, labeling targets such as malignant tissues. This guidance reduces the likelihood of undetected malignant tissue remaining after resection, eliminating the need for additional treatment or surgery. The primary challenges in performing open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging come from the weak intensity of the fluorescence signal in the presence of strong surgical and ambient illumination, and the auto-fluorescence of non-target components, such as tissue, especially in the visible spectral window (400-650 nm). In this work, a multispectral open-air fluorescence imaging system is presented for translational image-guided intraoperative applications, which overcomes these challenges. The system is capable of imaging weak fluorescence signals with nanomolar sensitivity in the presence of surgical illumination. This is done using synchronized fluorescence excitation and image acquisition with real-time background subtraction. Additionally, the system uses a liquid crystal tunable filter for acquisition of multispectral images that are used to spectrally unmix target fluorescence from non-target auto-fluorescence. Results are validated by preclinical studies on murine models and translational canine oncology models.

  18. Highly Sensitive Fluorescence Probe Based on Functional SBA-15 for Selective Detection of Hg2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaoyu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An inorganic–organic hybrid fluorescence chemosensor (DA/SBA-15 was prepared by covalent immobilization of a dansylamide derivative into the channels of mesoporous silica material SBA-15 via (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES groups. The primary hexagonally ordered mesoporous structure of SBA-15 was preserved after the grafting procedure. Fluorescence characterization shows that the obtained inorganic–organic hybrid composite is highly selective and sensitive to Hg2+ detection, suggesting the possibility for real-time qualitative or quantitative detection of Hg2+ and the convenience for potential application in toxicology and environmental science.

  19. The MicroAnalysis Toolkit: X-ray Fluorescence Image Processing Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    The MicroAnalysis Toolkit is an analysis suite designed for the processing of x-ray fluorescence microprobe data. The program contains a wide variety of analysis tools, including image maps, correlation plots, simple image math, image filtering, multiple energy image fitting, semi-quantitative elemental analysis, x-ray fluorescence spectrum analysis, principle component analysis, and tomographic reconstructions. To be as widely useful as possible, data formats from many synchrotron sources can be read by the program with more formats available by request. An overview of the most common features will be presented.

  20. Analysis of selected elements in tobacco by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid method for the determination of 16 elements in tobacco by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry has been developed. The method is accurate and precise, and requires only 9 min per sample for quantitation. Sample preparation consists of placing a portion of dried, ground tobacco in a sample cup, and pressing at 25 tons pressure to make a compressed pellet. This pellet is then automatically analyzed by X-ray fluorescence for 16 elements. The results are stored on a computer disk for future recall and report generation. The elements are: Al, Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, S, Si, Sr, Ti and Zn