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Sample records for quantitative magnetic resonance

  1. Quantitative analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wainai, T; Mashimo, K [Nihon Univ., Tokyo. Coll. of Science and Engineering

    1976-04-01

    Recent papers on the practical quantitative analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) are reviewed. Specifically, the determination of moisture in liquid N/sub 2/O/sub 4/ as an oxidizing agent for rocket propulsion, the analysis of hydroperoxides, the quantitative analysis using a shift reagent, the analysis of aromatic sulfonates, and the determination of acids and bases are reviewed. Attention is paid to the accuracy. The sweeping velocity and RF level in addition to the other factors must be on the optimal condition to eliminate the errors, particularly when computation is made with a machine. Higher sweeping velocity is preferable in view of S/N ratio, but it may be limited to 30 Hz/s. The relative error in the measurement of area is generally 1%, but when those of dilute concentration and integrated, the error will become smaller by one digit. If impurities are treated carefully, the water content on N/sub 2/O/sub 4/ can be determined with accuracy of about 0.002%. The comparison method between peak heights is as accurate as that between areas, when the uniformity of magnetic field and T/sub 2/ are not questionable. In the case of chemical shift movable due to content, the substance can be determined by the position of the chemical shift. Oil and water contents in rape-seed, peanuts, and sunflower-seed are determined by measuring T/sub 1/ with 90 deg pulses.

  2. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, I.

    1958-01-01

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D 2 O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10 -5 on the D 2 O concentration. (author) [fr

  3. Quantitative perfusion imaging in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoellner, F.G.; Gaa, T.; Zimmer, F.; Ong, M.M.; Riffel, P.; Hausmann, D.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Weis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized for its superior tissue contrast while being non-invasive and free of ionizing radiation. Due to the development of new scanner hardware and fast imaging techniques during the last decades, access to tissue and organ functions became possible. One of these functional imaging techniques is perfusion imaging with which tissue perfusion and capillary permeability can be determined from dynamic imaging data. Perfusion imaging by MRI can be performed by two approaches, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. While the first method uses magnetically labelled water protons in arterial blood as an endogenous tracer, the latter involves the injection of a contrast agent, usually gadolinium (Gd), as a tracer for calculating hemodynamic parameters. Studies have demonstrated the potential of perfusion MRI for diagnostics and also for therapy monitoring. The utilization and application of perfusion MRI are still restricted to specialized centers, such as university hospitals. A broad application of the technique has not yet been implemented. The MRI perfusion technique is a valuable tool that might come broadly available after implementation of standards on European and international levels. Such efforts are being promoted by the respective professional bodies. (orig.) [de

  4. Quantitative magnetic resonance micro-imaging methods for pharmaceutical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantle, M D

    2011-09-30

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool in pharmaceutical research is now well established and the current literature covers a multitude of different pharmaceutically relevant research areas. This review focuses on the use of quantitative magnetic resonance micro-imaging techniques and how they have been exploited to extract information that is of direct relevance to the pharmaceutical industry. The article is divided into two main areas. The first half outlines the theoretical aspects of magnetic resonance and deals with basic magnetic resonance theory, the effects of nuclear spin-lattice (T(1)), spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation and molecular diffusion upon image quantitation, and discusses the applications of rapid magnetic resonance imaging techniques. In addition to the theory, the review aims to provide some practical guidelines for the pharmaceutical researcher with an interest in MRI as to which MRI pulse sequences/protocols should be used and when. The second half of the article reviews the recent advances and developments that have appeared in the literature concerning the use of quantitative micro-imaging methods to pharmaceutically relevant research. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-component quantitative magnetic resonance imaging by phasor representation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeldt, Frank J.; Prusova, Alena; Fereidouni, Farzad; Amerongen, Van Herbert; As, Van Henk; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Bader, Arjen N.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a versatile, non-destructive and non-invasive tool in life, material, and medical sciences. When multiple components contribute to the signal in a single pixel, however, it is difficult to quantify their individual contributions and characteristic

  6. Multi-component quantitative magnetic resonance imaging by phasor representation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeldt, F.J.; Prusova, A.; Fereidouni, F.; Amerongen, H.V.; As, H. Van; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Bader, A.N.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a versatile, non-destructive and non-invasive tool in life, material, and medical sciences. When multiple components contribute to the signal in a single pixel, however, it is difficult to quantify their individual contributions and characteristic

  7. Prognostic Value of Quantitative Stress Perfusion Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammut, Eva C; Villa, Adriana D M; Di Giovine, Gabriella; Dancy, Luke; Bosio, Filippo; Gibbs, Thomas; Jeyabraba, Swarna; Schwenke, Susanne; Williams, Steven E; Marber, Michael; Alfakih, Khaled; Ismail, Tevfik F; Razavi, Reza; Chiribiri, Amedeo

    2018-05-01

    This study sought to evaluate the prognostic usefulness of visual and quantitative perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) ischemic burden in an unselected group of patients and to assess the validity of consensus-based ischemic burden thresholds extrapolated from nuclear studies. There are limited data on the prognostic value of assessing myocardial ischemic burden by CMR, and there are none using quantitative perfusion analysis. Patients with suspected coronary artery disease referred for adenosine-stress perfusion CMR were included (n = 395; 70% male; age 58 ± 13 years). The primary endpoint was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, aborted sudden death, and revascularization after 90 days. Perfusion scans were assessed visually and with quantitative analysis. Cross-validated Cox regression analysis and net reclassification improvement were used to assess the incremental prognostic value of visual or quantitative perfusion analysis over a baseline clinical model, initially as continuous covariates, then using accepted thresholds of ≥2 segments or ≥10% myocardium. After a median 460 days (interquartile range: 190 to 869 days) follow-up, 52 patients reached the primary endpoint. At 2 years, the addition of ischemic burden was found to increase prognostic value over a baseline model of age, sex, and late gadolinium enhancement (baseline model area under the curve [AUC]: 0.75; visual AUC: 0.84; quantitative AUC: 0.85). Dichotomized quantitative ischemic burden performed better than visual assessment (net reclassification improvement 0.043 vs. 0.003 against baseline model). This study was the first to address the prognostic benefit of quantitative analysis of perfusion CMR and to support the use of consensus-based ischemic burden thresholds by perfusion CMR for prognostic evaluation of patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Quantitative analysis provided incremental prognostic value to visual assessment and

  8. Quantitative magnetic resonance techniques in the evaluation of intracranial tuberculomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudev, M.K.; Jayakumar, P.N.; Srikanth, S.G.; Nagarajan, K.; Mohanty, A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intracranial tuberculomas using quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) techniques such as T2 relaxometry, magnetization transfer (MT), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Material and Methods: Thirty-three patients with intracranial tuberculomas (histologically confirmed in 22) were evaluated using proton density/T2-weighted, T1-weighted (with and without MT), and echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging sequences. T2 relaxation times, MT ratios (MTR), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated from the center of the lesion, the periphery, perilesional edema, and contralateral normal white matter. The mean and standard deviation values of each variable were calculated and correlated using Pearson's test (P = 0.05). Results: The measured mean values of T2 relaxation time, MTR, and ADC in the center of lesions were 155.5 ms, 14.1, and 1.27x10-3 mm 2 /s, respectively, compared to 117 ms, 23.72, and 0.74x10-3 mm 2 /s in normal white matter, and a T2 relaxation time of 187.45 ms in normal gray matter. Significant inverse correlations were noted between T2 relaxation values and MTR (P<0.001) and between MTR and ADC (P = 0.046). Significant positive correlation was seen between T2 relaxation and ADC values (P = 0.03). Conclusion: Intracranial tuberculomas are characterized by relatively short T2 relaxation times (compared to normal gray matter), decreased MTR, and mostly no restriction of diffusion. A combination of these quantitative parameters could be of help in the noninvasive diagnosis of tuberculomas

  9. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging phantoms: A review and the need for a system phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kathryn E; Ainslie, Maureen; Barker, Alex J; Boss, Michael A; Cecil, Kim M; Charles, Cecil; Chenevert, Thomas L; Clarke, Larry; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L; Finn, Paul; Gembris, Daniel; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Hill, Derek L G; Jack, Clifford R; Jackson, Edward F; Liu, Guoying; Russek, Stephen E; Sharma, Samir D; Steckner, Michael; Stupic, Karl F; Trzasko, Joshua D; Yuan, Chun; Zheng, Jie

    2018-01-01

    The MRI community is using quantitative mapping techniques to complement qualitative imaging. For quantitative imaging to reach its full potential, it is necessary to analyze measurements across systems and longitudinally. Clinical use of quantitative imaging can be facilitated through adoption and use of a standard system phantom, a calibration/standard reference object, to assess the performance of an MRI machine. The International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine AdHoc Committee on Standards for Quantitative Magnetic Resonance was established in February 2007 to facilitate the expansion of MRI as a mainstream modality for multi-institutional measurements, including, among other things, multicenter trials. The goal of the Standards for Quantitative Magnetic Resonance committee was to provide a framework to ensure that quantitative measures derived from MR data are comparable over time, between subjects, between sites, and between vendors. This paper, written by members of the Standards for Quantitative Magnetic Resonance committee, reviews standardization attempts and then details the need, requirements, and implementation plan for a standard system phantom for quantitative MRI. In addition, application-specific phantoms and implementation of quantitative MRI are reviewed. Magn Reson Med 79:48-61, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Blumenkrantz

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging of articular cartilage has recently been recognized as a tool for the characterization of cartilage morphology, biochemistry and function. In this paper advancements in cartilage imaging, computation of cartilage volume and thickness, and measurement of relaxation times (T2 and T1Ρ are presented. In addition, the delayed uptake of Gadolinium DTPA as a marker of proteoglycan depletion is also reviewed. The cross-sectional and longitudinal studies using these imaging techniques show promise for cartilage assessment and for the study of osteoarthritis.

  11. Osteosarcoma subtypes: Magnetic resonance and quantitative diffusion weighted imaging criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitoun, Rania; Shokry, Ahmed M; Ahmed Khaleel, Sahar; Mogahed, Shaimaa M

    2018-03-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a primary bone malignancy, characterized by spindle cells producing osteoid. The objective of this study is to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of different OS subtypes, record their attenuation diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and to point to the relation of their pathologic base and their corresponding ADC value. We performed a retrospective observational lesion-based analysis for 31 pathologically proven osteosarcoma subtypes: osteoblastic (n = 9), fibroblastic (n = 8), chondroblastic (n = 6), para-osteal (n = 3), periosteal (n = 1), telangiectatic (n = 2), small cell (n = 1) and extra-skeletal (n = 1). On conventional images we recorded: bone of origin, epicenter, intra-articular extension, and invasion of articulating bones, skip lesions, distant metastases, pathological fractures, ossified matrix, hemorrhage and necrosis. We measured the mean ADC value for each lesion. Among the included OS lesions, 51.6% originated at the femur, 29% showed intra-articular extension, 16% invaded neighboring bone, 9% were associated with pathological fracture and 25.8% were associated with distant metastases. On MRI, all lesions showed ossified matrix, 35.5% showed hemorrhage and 58% showed necrosis. The mean ADC values for OS lesions ranged from 0.74 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s (recorded for conventional osteoblastic OS) to 1.50 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s (recorded for telangiectatic OS) with an average value of 1.16 ± 0.18 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s. Conventional chondroblastic OS recorded higher values compared to the other two conventional subtypes. Osteosarcoma has different pathologic subtypes which correspondingly vary in their imaging criteria and their ADC values. Copyright © 2018. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of cortical multiple sclerosis pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tardif, Christine L; Bedell, Barry J; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed

    2012-01-01

    pathology. The objective of this study was to characterize the MRI signature of CLs to help interpret the changes seen in vivo and elucidate the factors limiting their visualization. A quantitative 3D high-resolution (350 μm isotropic) MRI study at 3 Tesla of a fixed post mortem cerebral hemisphere from...

  13. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance; Dosages quantitatifs par resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, I [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D{sub 2}O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10{sup -5} on the D{sub 2}O concentration. (author) [French] La determination du titre absolu d'une eau lourde etalon de teneur approximative de 99,8 pour cent de D{sub 2}O a pu etre effectuee par une methode originale de resonance magnetique ('Methode de passage rapide adiabatique') a une precision de 5.10{sup -5} sur le titre de D{sub 2}O. (auteur)

  14. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance; Dosages quantitatifs par resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, I. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D{sub 2}O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10{sup -5} on the D{sub 2}O concentration. (author) [French] La determination du titre absolu d'une eau lourde etalon de teneur approximative de 99,8 pour cent de D{sub 2}O a pu etre effectuee par une methode originale de resonance magnetique ('Methode de passage rapide adiabatique') a une precision de 5.10{sup -5} sur le titre de D{sub 2}O. (auteur)

  15. Association between preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, pain intensity and quantitative sensory testing in patients awaiting lumbar diskectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hegarty, Dominic

    2011-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers important information regarding the morphology, location and size of a herniated disc, which influences the decision to offer lumbar diskectomy (LD). This study aims to examine the association between clinical neurophysiologic indices including pain intensity and quantitative sensory testing (QST), and the degree of lumbar nerve root compromise depicted on magnetic resonance (MR) in patients awaiting LD.

  16. Quantitative perfusion imaging in magnetic resonance imaging; Quantitative Perfusionsbildgebung in der Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoellner, F.G.; Gaa, T.; Zimmer, F. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Computerunterstuetzte Klinische Medizin, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Ong, M.M.; Riffel, P.; Hausmann, D.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Weis, M. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized for its superior tissue contrast while being non-invasive and free of ionizing radiation. Due to the development of new scanner hardware and fast imaging techniques during the last decades, access to tissue and organ functions became possible. One of these functional imaging techniques is perfusion imaging with which tissue perfusion and capillary permeability can be determined from dynamic imaging data. Perfusion imaging by MRI can be performed by two approaches, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. While the first method uses magnetically labelled water protons in arterial blood as an endogenous tracer, the latter involves the injection of a contrast agent, usually gadolinium (Gd), as a tracer for calculating hemodynamic parameters. Studies have demonstrated the potential of perfusion MRI for diagnostics and also for therapy monitoring. The utilization and application of perfusion MRI are still restricted to specialized centers, such as university hospitals. A broad application of the technique has not yet been implemented. The MRI perfusion technique is a valuable tool that might come broadly available after implementation of standards on European and international levels. Such efforts are being promoted by the respective professional bodies. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) zeichnet sich durch einen ueberlegenen Gewebekontrast aus, waehrend sie nichtinvasiv und frei von ionisierender Strahlung ist. Sie bietet Zugang zu Gewebe- und Organfunktion. Eine dieser funktionellen bildgebenden Verfahren ist die Perfusionsbildgebung. Mit dieser Technik koennen u. a. Gewebeperfusion und Kapillarpermeabilitaet aus dynamischen Bilddaten bestimmt werden. Perfusionsbildgebung mithilfe der MRT kann durch 2 Ansaetze, naemlich ''arterial spin labeling'' (ASL) und dynamische kontrastverstaerkte (DCE-)MRT durchgefuehrt werden. Waehrend die erste Methode magnetisch

  17. Preclinical Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) at 7 T: Effective Quantitative Imaging for Rodent Disease Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Chen, Yong; Ma, Dan; Jiang, Yun; Herrmann, Kelsey A.; Vincent, Jason A.; Dell, Katherine M.; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.; Griswold, Mark A.; Flask, Chris A.; Lu, Lan

    2015-01-01

    High field, preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are now commonly used to quantitatively assess disease status and efficacy of novel therapies in a wide variety of rodent models. Unfortunately, conventional MRI methods are highly susceptible to respiratory and cardiac motion artifacts resulting in potentially inaccurate and misleading data. We have developed an initial preclinical, 7.0 T MRI implementation of the highly novel Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) methodology that has been previously described for clinical imaging applications. The MRF technology combines a priori variation in the MRI acquisition parameters with dictionary-based matching of acquired signal evolution profiles to simultaneously generate quantitative maps of T1 and T2 relaxation times and proton density. This preclinical MRF acquisition was constructed from a Fast Imaging with Steady-state Free Precession (FISP) MRI pulse sequence to acquire 600 MRF images with both evolving T1 and T2 weighting in approximately 30 minutes. This initial high field preclinical MRF investigation demonstrated reproducible and differentiated estimates of in vitro phantoms with different relaxation times. In vivo preclinical MRF results in mouse kidneys and brain tumor models demonstrated an inherent resistance to respiratory motion artifacts as well as sensitivity to known pathology. These results suggest that MRF methodology may offer the opportunity for quantification of numerous MRI parameters for a wide variety of preclinical imaging applications. PMID:25639694

  18. Quantitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy signals: the jMRUI software package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefan, D; Andrasescu, A; Cesare, F Di; Popa, E; Lazariev, A; Graveron-Demilly, D; Vescovo, E; Williams, S; Strbak, O; Starcuk, Z; Cabanas, M; Van Ormondt, D

    2009-01-01

    The software package jMRUI with Java-based graphical user interface enables user-friendly time-domain analysis of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and HRMAS-NMR signals. Version 3.x has been distributed in more than 1200 groups or hospitals worldwide. The new version 4.x is a plug-in platform enabling the users to add their own algorithms. Moreover, it offers new functionalities compared to versions 3.x. The quantum-mechanical simulator based on NMR-SCOPE, the quantitation algorithm QUEST and the main MRSI functionalities are described. Quantitation results of signals obtained in vivo from a mouse and a human brain are given

  19. Visual and quantitative assessment of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipola, Petri; Vanninen, Ritva; Manninen, Hannu (Univ. of Eastern Finland, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Clinical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland)), email: petri.sipola@kuh.fi; Leinonen, Ville (Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Neurosurgery, Kuopio (Finland)); Niemelaeinen, Riikka (Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Clinical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)); Aalto, Timo (Kyyhkylae Rehabilitation Center and Hospital, Mikkeli (Finland)); Airaksinen, Olavi (Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine and Univ. of Eastern Finland, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Kuopio (Finland)); Battie, Michele C. (Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis is a common etiology of lumbar radicular symptoms. Quantitative measurements have commonly demonstrated better repeatability than visual assessments. We are not aware of any studies examining the repeatability of quantitative assessment of the lateral canal. Purpose. To evaluate the repeatability of visual assessments and newly developed quantitative measurements of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods. Twenty-eight patients with lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis or prior spinal surgery with recurrent symptoms were imaged with MRI. A radiologist, a neurosurgeon and a spine research trainee graded visually and quantitatively subarticular (n = 188) and foraminal zones (n = 260) of the lateral spinal canal. Quantitative measurements included the minimal subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen. Results. The repeatability of visual assessment at the subarticular zone and foraminal zones between raters varied from 0.45-0.59 and 0.42-0.53, respectively. Similarly, the intraclass correlation coefficients for the quantitative measurements varied from 0.67-0.71 and 0.66-0.76, respectively. The intra-rater repeatability for the visual assessments of the subarticular and foraminal zones was 0.70 and 0.62, respectively, while the corresponding intraclass correlation coefficients for quantitative measurements were 0.83 and 0.81, respectively. Conclusion. Inter-rater repeatability of visual assessments of lateral stenosis is moderate, whereas quantitative measurements of both subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen have substantial reproducibility and may be particularly useful for longitudinal studies and research purposes. The clinical value of these parameters requires further study

  20. Visual and quantitative assessment of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipola, Petri; Vanninen, Ritva; Manninen, Hannu; Leinonen, Ville; Niemelaeinen, Riikka; Aalto, Timo; Airaksinen, Olavi; Battie, Michele C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis is a common etiology of lumbar radicular symptoms. Quantitative measurements have commonly demonstrated better repeatability than visual assessments. We are not aware of any studies examining the repeatability of quantitative assessment of the lateral canal. Purpose. To evaluate the repeatability of visual assessments and newly developed quantitative measurements of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods. Twenty-eight patients with lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis or prior spinal surgery with recurrent symptoms were imaged with MRI. A radiologist, a neurosurgeon and a spine research trainee graded visually and quantitatively subarticular (n = 188) and foraminal zones (n = 260) of the lateral spinal canal. Quantitative measurements included the minimal subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen. Results. The repeatability of visual assessment at the subarticular zone and foraminal zones between raters varied from 0.45-0.59 and 0.42-0.53, respectively. Similarly, the intraclass correlation coefficients for the quantitative measurements varied from 0.67-0.71 and 0.66-0.76, respectively. The intra-rater repeatability for the visual assessments of the subarticular and foraminal zones was 0.70 and 0.62, respectively, while the corresponding intraclass correlation coefficients for quantitative measurements were 0.83 and 0.81, respectively. Conclusion. Inter-rater repeatability of visual assessments of lateral stenosis is moderate, whereas quantitative measurements of both subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen have substantial reproducibility and may be particularly useful for longitudinal studies and research purposes. The clinical value of these parameters requires further study

  1. Assessment of acute myocarditis by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: Comparison of qualitative and quantitative analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbriaco, Massimo; Nappi, Carmela; Puglia, Marta; De Giorgi, Marco; Dell'Aversana, Serena; Cuocolo, Renato; Ponsiglione, Andrea; De Giorgi, Igino; Polito, Maria Vincenza; Klain, Michele; Piscione, Federico; Pace, Leonardo; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2017-10-26

    To compare cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) qualitative and quantitative analysis methods for the noninvasive assessment of myocardial inflammation in patients with suspected acute myocarditis (AM). A total of 61 patients with suspected AM underwent coronary angiography and CMR. Qualitative analysis was performed applying Lake-Louise Criteria (LLC), followed by quantitative analysis based on the evaluation of edema ratio (ER) and global relative enhancement (RE). Diagnostic performance was assessed for each method by measuring the area under the curves (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic analyses. The final diagnosis of AM was based on symptoms and signs suggestive of cardiac disease, evidence of myocardial injury as defined by electrocardiogram changes, elevated troponin I, exclusion of coronary artery disease by coronary angiography, and clinical and echocardiographic follow-up at 3 months after admission to the chest pain unit. In all patients, coronary angiography did not show significant coronary artery stenosis. Troponin I levels and creatine kinase were higher in patients with AM compared to those without (both P quantitative (ER 0.89 and global RE 0.80) analyses were also similar. Qualitative and quantitative CMR analysis methods show similar diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of AM. These findings suggest that a simplified approach using a shortened CMR protocol including only T2-weighted STIR sequences might be useful to rule out AM in patients with acute coronary syndrome and normal coronary angiography.

  2. Quantitative evaluations of left ventricular function obtained by electrocardiographically-gated magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tohru; Iida, Kaname; Sugishita, Yasuro; Anno, Izumi; Akisada, Masayoshi; Matsuda, Mitsuo; Akatsuka, Takao; Koseki, Susumu.

    1989-01-01

    Using electrocardiographically-gated magnetic resonance imaging, regional cardiac function was evaluated in 12 normal volunteers and in 10 cases of old myocardial infarction. The optimal short axis of the left ventricle was selected at the chordae tendineae level. The left ventricle was divided into 12 segments using a computer-aided system, and percentile shortening fraction (%SF) and percentile wall thickening (%WT) were calculated in each segment by the fixed coordinate method. In the normal volunteers, heterogeneity of both %FS and %WT was observed, ranging from 25±13% and 37±13%, respectively in the septal segment, to 49±13% and 60±21%, respectively in the posterior segment. In the cases of myocardial infarction, decreased %FS and %WT were detected at the affected regions. The abnormal regions revealed by %WT tended to be narrower than those revealed by %FS. Thus the MR technique at the optimal axis may be useful for quantitative evaluations of regional cardiac function. (author)

  3. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and studies of degenerative diseases of the developing human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caviness, V.S. Jr.; Phil, D.; Filipek, P.A.; Kennedy, D.N.

    1992-01-01

    The Rett syndrome is a progressive disorder which is associated with regression of psychomotor development and precipitous deceleration of brain growth during the first year of life. General histopathological surveys in postmortem specimens have identified degeneration of subpopulations of neurons of the nigrostriatal system but no other evidence of degenerative process. Magnetic resonance imaging-based morphometry may usefully guide application of rigorous but demanding quantitative histologic search for evidence of neuronal degeneration. The volumes of the principal set of cortical and nuclear structures of principal interest in the disorder may be measured by currently avaiable MRI-based methods. Opimized levels of precision now allow detection of volumetric changes over time in the same brain of approximately 10% at the 95% confidence level. (author)

  4. Quantitative morphologic evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging during and after treatment of childhood leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Glass, John O. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Translational Imaging Research (MS 210), Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Laningham, Fred H. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States); Pui, Ching-Hon [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Medical advances over the last several decades, including CNS prophylaxis, have greatly increased survival in children with leukemia. As survival rates have increased, clinicians and scientists have been afforded the opportunity to further develop treatments to improve the quality of life of survivors by minimizing the long-term adverse effects. When evaluating the effect of antileukemia therapy on the developing brain, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been the preferred modality because it quantifies morphologic changes objectively and noninvasively. Computer-aided detection of changes on neuroimages enables us to objectively differentiate leukoencephalopathy from normal maturation of the developing brain. Quantitative tissue segmentation algorithms and relaxometry measures have been used to determine the prevalence, extent, and intensity of white matter changes that occur during therapy. More recently, diffusion tensor imaging has been used to quantify microstructural changes in the integrity of the white matter fiber tracts. MR perfusion imaging can be used to noninvasively monitor vascular changes during therapy. Changes in quantitative MR measures have been associated, to some degree, with changes in neurocognitive function during and after treatment. In this review, we present recent advances in quantitative evaluation of MR imaging and discuss how these methods hold the promise to further elucidate the pathophysiologic effects of treatment for childhood leukemia. (orig.)

  5. Quantitative morphologic evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging during and after treatment of childhood leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Glass, John O.; Laningham, Fred H.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2007-01-01

    Medical advances over the last several decades, including CNS prophylaxis, have greatly increased survival in children with leukemia. As survival rates have increased, clinicians and scientists have been afforded the opportunity to further develop treatments to improve the quality of life of survivors by minimizing the long-term adverse effects. When evaluating the effect of antileukemia therapy on the developing brain, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been the preferred modality because it quantifies morphologic changes objectively and noninvasively. Computer-aided detection of changes on neuroimages enables us to objectively differentiate leukoencephalopathy from normal maturation of the developing brain. Quantitative tissue segmentation algorithms and relaxometry measures have been used to determine the prevalence, extent, and intensity of white matter changes that occur during therapy. More recently, diffusion tensor imaging has been used to quantify microstructural changes in the integrity of the white matter fiber tracts. MR perfusion imaging can be used to noninvasively monitor vascular changes during therapy. Changes in quantitative MR measures have been associated, to some degree, with changes in neurocognitive function during and after treatment. In this review, we present recent advances in quantitative evaluation of MR imaging and discuss how these methods hold the promise to further elucidate the pathophysiologic effects of treatment for childhood leukemia. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  7. Reproducibility and variability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging markers in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guio, F. De; Jouvent, E.; Biessels, G.J.; Black, S.E.; Brayne, C.; Chen, C.; Cordonnier, C.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Dichgans, M.; Doubal, F.; Duering, M.; Dufouil, C.; Duzel, E.; Fazekas, F.; Hachinski, V.; Ikram, M.A.; Linn, J.; Matthews, P.M.; Mazoyer, B.; Mok, V.; Norrving, B.; O'Brien, J.T.; Pantoni, L.; Ropele, S.; Sachdev, P.; Schmidt, R.; Seshadri, S.; Smith, E.E.; Sposato, L.A.; Stephan, B.; Swartz, R.H.; Tzourio, C.; Buchem, M. van; Lugt, A. van der; Oostenbrugge, R.; Vernooij, M.W.; Viswanathan, A.; Werring, D.; Wollenweber, F.; Wardlaw, J.M.; Chabriat, H.

    2016-01-01

    Brain imaging is essential for the diagnosis and characterization of cerebral small vessel disease. Several magnetic resonance imaging markers have therefore emerged, providing new information on the diagnosis, progression, and mechanisms of small vessel disease. Yet, the reproducibility of these

  8. Reproducibility and variability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging markers in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Guio, F. (François); Jouvent, E. (Eric); G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); S.E. Black (Sandra); C. Brayne (Carol); C. Chen (Christopher); C. Cordonnier (Charlotte); H.F. de Leeuw (Frank); C. Kubisch (Christian); Doubal, F. (Fergus); Duering, M. (Marco); C. Dufouil (Carole); Duzel, E. (Emrah); F. Fazekas (Franz); V. Hachinski (Vladimir); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); J. Linn (Jennifer); P.M. Matthews (P.); B. Mazoyer (Bernard); Mok, V. (Vincent); B. Norrving (Bo); O'Brien, J.T. (John T.); Pantoni, L. (Leonardo); S. Ropele (Stefan); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); S. Seshadri (Sudha); E.E. Smith (Eric); L.A. Sposato (Luciano A); B.C.M. Stephan; Swartz, R.H. (Richard H.); C. Tzourio (Christophe); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); A. van der Lugt (Aad); R.J. van Oostenbrugge (Robert); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); Viswanathan, A. (Anand); D.J. Werring (David); Wollenweber, F. (Frank); J.M. Wardlaw (J.); Chabriat, H. (Hugues)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBrain imaging is essential for the diagnosis and characterization of cerebral small vessel disease. Several magnetic resonance imaging markers have therefore emerged, providing new information on the diagnosis, progression, and mechanisms of small vessel disease. Yet, the reproducibility

  9. Leucoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and high lactate: quantitative magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenweg, M.E.; Pouwels, P.J.W.; Wolf, N.I.; van Wieringen, W.N.; Barkhof, F.; van der Knaap, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    Leucoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and elevated lactate is a white matter disorder caused by DARS2 mutations. The pathology is unknown. We observed striking discrepancies between improvement on longitudinal conventional magnetic resonance images and clinical deterioration

  10. [Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of brain iron deposition: comparison between quantitative susceptibility mapping and transverse relaxation rate (R2*) mapping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ji-Jing; Feng, Yan-Qiu

    2018-03-20

    To evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and transverse relaxation rate (R2*) mapping in the measurement of brain iron deposition. Super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) phantoms and mouse models of Parkinson's disease (PD) related to iron deposition in the substantia nigra (SN) underwent 7.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) scans (Bruker, 70/16) with a multi-echo 3D gradient echo sequence, and the acquired data were processed to obtain QSM and R2*. Linear regression analysis was performed for susceptibility and R2* in the SPIO phantoms containing 5 SPIO concentrations (30, 15, 7.5, 3.75 and 1.875 µg/mL) to evaluate the accuracy of QSM and R2* in quantitative iron analysis. The sensitivities of QSM and R2* mapping in quantitative detection of brain iron deposition were assessed using mouse models of PD induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahy-dropyridine (MPTP) in comparison with the control mice. In SPIO phantoms, QSM provided a higher accuracy than R2* mapping and their goodness-of-fit coefficients (R 2 ) were 0.98 and 0.89, respectively. In the mouse models of PD and control mice, the susceptibility of the SN was significantly higher in the PD models (5.19∓1.58 vs 2.98∓0.88, n=5; Pbrain iron deposition than R2*, and the susceptibility derived by QSM can be a potentially useful biomarker for studying PD.

  11. Rapid and quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging with magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ouri; Huang, Shuning; McMahon, Michael T; Rosen, Matthew S; Farrar, Christian T

    2018-05-13

    To develop a fast magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) method for quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging. We implemented a CEST-MRF method to quantify the chemical exchange rate and volume fraction of the N α -amine protons of L-arginine (L-Arg) phantoms and the amide and semi-solid exchangeable protons of in vivo rat brain tissue. L-Arg phantoms were made with different concentrations (25-100 mM) and pH (pH 4-6). The MRF acquisition schedule varied the saturation power randomly for 30 iterations (phantom: 0-6 μT; in vivo: 0-4 μT) with a total acquisition time of ≤2 min. The signal trajectories were pattern-matched to a large dictionary of signal trajectories simulated using the Bloch-McConnell equations for different combinations of exchange rate, exchangeable proton volume fraction, and water T 1 and T 2 relaxation times. The chemical exchange rates of the N α -amine protons of L-Arg were significantly (P exchange using saturation power method. Similarly, the L-Arg concentrations determined using MRF were significantly (P exchange rate was well fit (R 2  = 0.9186) by a base catalyzed exchange model. The amide proton exchange rate measured in rat brain cortex (34.8 ± 11.7 Hz) was in good agreement with that measured previously with the water exchange spectroscopy method (28.6 ± 7.4 Hz). The semi-solid proton volume fraction was elevated in white (12.2 ± 1.7%) compared to gray (8.1 ± 1.1%) matter brain regions in agreement with previous magnetization transfer studies. CEST-MRF provides a method for fast, quantitative CEST imaging. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Quantitative determination of Quarternary alicyclic carbon atoms in coal and oil using nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 13/C method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonina, T.V.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Randin, O.I.; Shishkov, V.F.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1986-09-01

    Possibility is indicated for utilizing nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for quantitative determination of Quarternary aliphatic carbon atoms in heavy hydrocarbon fractions of oil and coal extracts. C/sub n/, CH, CH/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/ content in coal and oil samples are determined and corresponding resonance lines are referred to individual structural fragments (on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 13/C spectra) of known saturated hydrocarbons. Tests were carried out on chloroform extracts of Irsha-Borodinsk coal, Mungunsk coal and paraffin and cycloparaffin of Sivinsk oil (b.p. over 550 C) fractions. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained using Burker WP 200 spectrometer (50.13 MHz frequency). Results of the tests are given. 11 references.

  13. Determination of scutellarin in breviscapine preparations using quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzuo Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to develop the selection criteria of proton signals for the determination of scutellarin using quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR, which is the main bioactive compound in breviscapine preparations for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease. The methyl singlet signal of 3-(trimethylsilylpropionic-2,2,3,3-d4 acid sodium salt was selected as the internal standard for quantification. The molar concentration of scutellarin was determined by employing different proton signals. To obtain optimum proton signals for the quantification, different combinations of proton signals were investigated according to two selection criteria: the recovery rate of qNMR method and quantitative results compared with those obtained with ultra-performance liquid chromatography. As a result, the chemical shift of H-2′ and H-6′ at δ 7.88 was demonstrated as the most suitable signal with excellent linearity range, precision, and recovery for determining scutellarin in breviscapine preparations from different manufacturers, batch numbers, and dosage forms. Hierarchical cluster analysis was employed to evaluate the determination results. The results demonstrated that the selection criteria of proton signals established in this work were reliable for the qNMR study of scutellarin in breviscapine preparations.

  14. Toward comparability of coronary magnetic resonance angiography: proposal for a standardized quantitative assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirksen, Martijn S.; Lamb, Hildo J.; Geest, Rob van der; Roos, Albert de

    2003-01-01

    A method is proposed for the quantitative assessment of coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) acquisitions. The method is based on four parameters: signal-to-noise ratio (SNR); contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR); vessel length; and vessel-edge definition. A pig model (n=7) was used to illustrate the proposed quantitative analysis method. Three-dimensional gradient-echo coronary MRA was performed with and without exogenous contrast enhancement using a gadolinium-based blood-pool contrast agent (Vistarem, Guerbet, Aulnay-Sous-Bois, France). The acquired images could be well differentiated based on the four parameters. The SNR was calculated as 9.0±1.4 vs 10.4±2.1, the CNR as 6.2±0.8 vs 8.2±0.9, the vessel length as 48.2±11.6 vs 86.5±13.8 mm, and the vessel-edge definition as 4.9±1.5 vs 7.7±3.4. Different coronary MRA techniques can be evaluated objectively with the combined use of SNR, CNR, vessel length, and vessel-edge parameters. (orig.)

  15. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volumetry of Facial Muscles in Healthy Patients with Facial Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Gerd F.; Karamyan, Inna; Klingner, Carsten M.; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not yet been established systematically to detect structural muscular changes after facial nerve lesion. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate quantitative assessment of MRI muscle volume data for facial muscles. Methods: Ten healthy subjects and 5 patients with facial palsy were recruited. Using manual or semiautomatic segmentation of 3T MRI, volume measurements were performed for the frontal, procerus, risorius, corrugator supercilii, orbicularis oculi, nasalis, zygomaticus major, zygomaticus minor, levator labii superioris, orbicularis oris, depressor anguli oris, depressor labii inferioris, and mentalis, as well as for the masseter and temporalis as masticatory muscles for control. Results: All muscles except the frontal (identification in 4/10 volunteers), procerus (4/10), risorius (6/10), and zygomaticus minor (8/10) were identified in all volunteers. Sex or age effects were not seen (all P > 0.05). There was no facial asymmetry with exception of the zygomaticus major (larger on the left side; P = 0.012). The exploratory examination of 5 patients revealed considerably smaller muscle volumes on the palsy side 2 months after facial injury. One patient with chronic palsy showed substantial muscle volume decrease, which also occurred in another patient with incomplete chronic palsy restricted to the involved facial area. Facial nerve reconstruction led to mixed results of decreased but also increased muscle volumes on the palsy side compared with the healthy side. Conclusions: First systematic quantitative MRI volume measures of 5 different clinical presentations of facial paralysis are provided. PMID:25289366

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance provides a quantitative description of protein conformational flexibility on physiologically important time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Loïc; Bouvignies, Guillaume; Markwick, Phineus; Blackledge, Martin

    2011-04-12

    A complete description of biomolecular activity requires an understanding of the nature and the role of protein conformational dynamics. In recent years, novel nuclear magnetic resonance-based techniques that provide hitherto inaccessible detail concerning biomolecular motions occurring on physiologically important time scales have emerged. Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) provide precise information about time- and ensemble-averaged structural and dynamic processes with correlation times up to the millisecond and thereby encode key information for understanding biological activity. In this review, we present the application of two very different approaches to the quantitative description of protein motion using RDCs. The first is purely analytical, describing backbone dynamics in terms of diffusive motions of each peptide plane, using extensive statistical analysis to validate the proposed dynamic modes. The second is based on restraint-free accelerated molecular dynamics simulation, providing statistically sampled free energy-weighted ensembles that describe conformational fluctuations occurring on time scales from pico- to milliseconds, at atomic resolution. Remarkably, the results from these two approaches converge closely in terms of distribution and absolute amplitude of motions, suggesting that this kind of combination of analytical and numerical models is now capable of providing a unified description of protein conformational dynamics in solution.

  17. A semi-quantitative study of transient ischemic attacks by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Feng; Guo Liang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the incidence and morphological findings of transient ischemic attacks (TIA) related-focus by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging(DWI), and the semi-quantitative characteristics of TIA related-focus on DWI manifestation were researched. Methods: A prospective analysis was performed on 39 TIA patients who were admitted to the Pudong New Area People Hospital and who had also undergone DWI scan 3 , and rADC ratio of the lesion was (-25.8 ± 9.01)%, and rAI ratio was(59.9 ± 12.9)% and compared with that of the contralateral side there was significant difference. Conclusion: The incidence of positivity rate of DWI is more than that obtained by conventional MR imaging. The related focus of TIA are very small and the ADC value of the lesion is decreased slightly, but averge intensity is increased highly. These data may be of value in identifying those TIA patients for whom MRI evaluation with DWI is of great clinical utility. (authors)

  18. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging traits as endophenotypes for genetic mapping in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saud Alhusaini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, the field of imaging genomics has combined high-throughput genotype data with quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (QMRI measures to identify genes associated with brain structure, cognition, and several brain-related disorders. Despite its successful application in different psychiatric and neurological disorders, the field has yet to be advanced in epilepsy. In this article we examine the relevance of imaging genomics for future genetic studies in epilepsy from three perspectives. First, we discuss prior genome-wide genetic mapping efforts in epilepsy, considering the possibility that some studies may have been constrained by inherent theoretical and methodological limitations of the genome-wide association study (GWAS method. Second, we offer a brief overview of the imaging genomics paradigm, from its original inception, to its role in the discovery of important risk genes in a number of brain-related disorders, and its successful application in large-scale multinational research networks. Third, we provide a comprehensive review of past studies that have explored the eligibility of brain QMRI traits as endophenotypes for epilepsy. While the breadth of studies exploring QMRI-derived endophenotypes in epilepsy remains narrow, robust syndrome-specific neuroanatomical QMRI traits have the potential to serve as accessible and relevant intermediate phenotypes for future genetic mapping efforts in epilepsy.

  19. Molecular Imaging of Tumors Using a Quantitative T1 Mapping Technique via Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Herrmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM with molecular imaging agents would allow for the specific localization of brain tumors. Prior studies using T1-weighted MR imaging demonstrated that the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 molecular imaging agent labeled heterotopic xenograft models of brain tumors more intensely than non-specific contrast agents using conventional T1-weighted imaging techniques. In this study, we used a dynamic quantitative T1 mapping strategy to more objectively compare intra-tumoral retention of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent over time in comparison to non-targeted control agents. Our results demonstrate that the targeted SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent, a scrambled-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 control agent, and the non-specific clinical contrast agent Optimark™ all enhanced flank tumors of human glioma cells with similar maximal changes on T1 mapping. However, the retention of the agents differs. The non-specific agents show significant recovery within 20 min by an increase in T1 while the specific agent SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 is retained in the tumors and shows little recovery over 60 min. The retention effect is demonstrated by percent change in T1 values and slope calculations as well as by calculations of gadolinium concentration in tumor compared to muscle. Quantitative T1 mapping demonstrates the superior binding and retention in tumors of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent over time compared to the non-specific contrast agent currently in clinical use.

  20. Supersonic transient magnetic resonance elastography for quantitative assessment of tissue elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Jingfei; Fite, Brett Z; Foiret, Josquin; Ilovitsh, Asaf; Leach, J Kent; Dumont, Erik; Caskey, Charles F; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2017-05-21

    Non-invasive, quantitative methods to assess the properties of biological tissues are needed for many therapeutic and tissue engineering applications. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has historically relied on external vibration to generate periodic shear waves. In order to focally assess a biomaterial or to monitor the response to ablative therapy, the interrogation of a specific region of interest by a focused beam is desirable and transient MRE (t-MRE) techniques have previously been developed to accomplish this goal. Also, strategies employing a series of discrete ultrasound pulses directed to increasing depths along a single line-of-sight have been designed to generate a quasi-planar shear wave. Such 'supersonic' excitations have been applied for ultrasound elasticity measurements. The resulting shear wave is higher in amplitude than that generated from a single excitation and the properties of the media are simply visualized and quantified due to the quasi-planar wave geometry and the opportunity to generate the wave at the site of interest. Here for the first time, we extend the application of supersonic methods by developing a protocol for supersonic transient magnetic resonance elastography (sst-MRE) using an MR-guided focused ultrasound system capable of therapeutic ablation. We apply the new protocol to quantify tissue elasticity in vitro using biologically-relevant inclusions and tissue-mimicking phantoms, compare the results with elasticity maps acquired with ultrasound shear wave elasticity imaging (US-SWEI), and validate both methods with mechanical testing. We found that a modified time-of-flight (TOF) method efficiently quantified shear modulus from sst-MRE data, and both the TOF and local inversion methods result in similar maps based on US-SWEI. With a three-pulse excitation, the proposed sst-MRE protocol was capable of visualizing quasi-planar shear waves propagating away from the excitation location and detecting differences in shear

  1. Supersonic transient magnetic resonance elastography for quantitative assessment of tissue elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Jingfei; Fite, Brett Z.; Foiret, Josquin; Ilovitsh, Asaf; Leach, J. Kent; Dumont, Erik; Caskey, Charles F.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2017-05-01

    Non-invasive, quantitative methods to assess the properties of biological tissues are needed for many therapeutic and tissue engineering applications. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has historically relied on external vibration to generate periodic shear waves. In order to focally assess a biomaterial or to monitor the response to ablative therapy, the interrogation of a specific region of interest by a focused beam is desirable and transient MRE (t-MRE) techniques have previously been developed to accomplish this goal. Also, strategies employing a series of discrete ultrasound pulses directed to increasing depths along a single line-of-sight have been designed to generate a quasi-planar shear wave. Such ‘supersonic’ excitations have been applied for ultrasound elasticity measurements. The resulting shear wave is higher in amplitude than that generated from a single excitation and the properties of the media are simply visualized and quantified due to the quasi-planar wave geometry and the opportunity to generate the wave at the site of interest. Here for the first time, we extend the application of supersonic methods by developing a protocol for supersonic transient magnetic resonance elastography (sst-MRE) using an MR-guided focused ultrasound system capable of therapeutic ablation. We apply the new protocol to quantify tissue elasticity in vitro using biologically-relevant inclusions and tissue-mimicking phantoms, compare the results with elasticity maps acquired with ultrasound shear wave elasticity imaging (US-SWEI), and validate both methods with mechanical testing. We found that a modified time-of-flight (TOF) method efficiently quantified shear modulus from sst-MRE data, and both the TOF and local inversion methods result in similar maps based on US-SWEI. With a three-pulse excitation, the proposed sst-MRE protocol was capable of visualizing quasi-planar shear waves propagating away from the excitation location and detecting differences in shear

  2. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of structural magnetic resonance imaging data in a two-center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalavi, Sima; Simmons, Andrew; Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Barker, Gareth J; Reinders, AAT Simone

    2012-01-01

    Multi-center magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies present an opportunity to advance research by pooling data. However, brain measurements derived from MR-images are susceptible to differences in MR-sequence parameters. It is therefore necessary to determine whether there is an interaction between the sequence parameters and the effect of interest, and to minimise any such interaction by careful choice of acquisition parameters. As an exemplar of the issues involved in multi-center studies, we present data from a study in which we aimed to optimize a set of volumetric MRI-protocols to define a protocol giving data that are consistent and reproducible across two centers and over time. Optimization was achieved based on data quality and quantitative measures, in our case using FreeSurfer and Voxel Based Morphometry approaches. Our approach consisted of a series of five comparisons. Firstly, a single-center dataset was collected, using a range of candidate pulse-sequences and parameters chosen on the basis of previous literature. Based on initial results, a number of minor changes were implemented to optimize the pulse-sequences, and a second single-center dataset was collected. FreeSurfer data quality measures were compared between datasets in order to determine the best performing sequence(s), which were taken forward to the next stage of testing. We subsequently acquired short-term and long-term two-center reproducibility data, and quantitative measures were again assessed to determine the protocol with the highest reproducibility across centers. Effects of a scanner software and hardware upgrade on the reproducibility of the protocols at one of the centers were also evaluated. Assessing the quality measures from the first two datasets allowed us to define artefact-free protocols, all with high image quality as assessed by FreeSurfer. Comparing the quantitative test and retest measures, we found high within-center reproducibility for all protocols, but lower

  3. Quantification of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques : A quantitative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemp, G.J.; Ahmad, R.E.; Nicolay, K.; Prompers, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can give information about cellular metabolism in vivo which is difficult to obtain in other ways. In skeletal muscle, non-invasive 31P MRS measurements of the post-exercise recovery kinetics of pH, [PCr], [Pi] and [ADP] contain valuable information about muscle

  4. Functional and quantitative magnetic resonance myelography of symptomatic stenoses of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, Knut [District Hospital Castle of Werneck, MRI Center of Excellence, Werneck (Germany); Ganslandt, Oliver [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany); Stadlbauer, Andreas [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany); Medical University Vienna, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that functional, quantitative magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) allows standardized diagnosis of symptomatic lumbar spinal stenoses which show at least equal detectability compared to functional myelography and postmyelographic CT (pmCT) based on intra- and postoperative findings. We investigated 43 volunteers and 47 patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenoses using MRM in normal position as well as in flexion and extension in a standard whole-body MR scanner. Twenty volunteers were additionally examined under axial loading. All patients were investigated by functional myelography and pmCT and 10 patients had a functional lumbar MRM postoperatively. Range of motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes in normal position, flexion, extension, and under axial loading (volunteers) were assessed for each segment. Detectability was determined by using intraoperative findings, and postoperative freedom of symptoms was correlated with CSF volume changes in MRM. The ranges of motion in a standard whole-body MR scanner provide adequate scope for investigations into function (flexion and extension) in both volunteers and patients. Axial loading was associated with a mechanism of extension, albeit to a far smaller extent. Detectability of lumbar stenoses was 100 % for MRM, 58 % for conventional myelography, and 68 % for pmCT. Postoperative changes in CSF volume of levels with stenoses in MRM strongly correlated with freedom of symptoms (R = 0.772). This MRM method allows for exact diagnosis and reproducible quantification of stenoses, motion-related changes, and spondylolistheses of the lumbar spine. It may be useful for early detection of alterations in order to avoid neuronal compression. (orig.)

  5. Absolute quantitative analysis for sorbic acid in processed foods using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A method using qHNMR was applied and validated to determine SA in processed foods. ► This method has good accuracy, precision, selectiveness, and linearity. ► The proposed method is more rapid and simple than the conventional method. ► We found that the proposed method is reliable for the accurate determination of SA. ► This method can be used for the monitoring of SA in processed foods. - Abstract: An analytical method using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) spectroscopy was applied and validated for the absolute quantification of sorbic acid (SA) in processed foods. The proposed method showed good linearity. The recoveries for samples spiked at the maximum usage level specified for food in Japan and at 0.13 g kg −1 (beverage: 0.013 g kg −1 ) were larger than 80%, whereas those for samples spiked at 0.063 g kg −1 (beverage: 0.0063 g kg −1 ) were between 56.9 and 83.5%. The limit of quantification was 0.063 g kg −1 for foods (and 0.0063 g kg −1 for beverages containing Lactobacillus species). Analysis of the SA content of commercial processed foods revealed quantities equal to or greater than those measured using conventional steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification. The proposed method was rapid, simple, accurate, and precise, and provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. It could therefore be used as an alternative to the quantification of SA in processed foods using conventional method.

  6. Absolute quantitative analysis for sorbic acid in processed foods using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuki, Takashi, E-mail: ohtsuki@nihs.go.jp [National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko [National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method using qHNMR was applied and validated to determine SA in processed foods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method has good accuracy, precision, selectiveness, and linearity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed method is more rapid and simple than the conventional method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that the proposed method is reliable for the accurate determination of SA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method can be used for the monitoring of SA in processed foods. - Abstract: An analytical method using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) spectroscopy was applied and validated for the absolute quantification of sorbic acid (SA) in processed foods. The proposed method showed good linearity. The recoveries for samples spiked at the maximum usage level specified for food in Japan and at 0.13 g kg{sup -1} (beverage: 0.013 g kg{sup -1}) were larger than 80%, whereas those for samples spiked at 0.063 g kg{sup -1} (beverage: 0.0063 g kg{sup -1}) were between 56.9 and 83.5%. The limit of quantification was 0.063 g kg{sup -1} for foods (and 0.0063 g kg{sup -1} for beverages containing Lactobacillus species). Analysis of the SA content of commercial processed foods revealed quantities equal to or greater than those measured using conventional steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification. The proposed method was rapid, simple, accurate, and precise, and provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. It could therefore be used as an alternative to the quantification of SA in processed foods using conventional method.

  7. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  8. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of structural magnetic resonance imaging data in a two-center study

    OpenAIRE

    Chalavi Sima; Simmons Andrew; Dijkstra Hildebrand; Barker Gareth J; Reinders AAT Simone

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Multi-center magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies present an opportunity to advance research by pooling data. However, brain measurements derived from MR-images are susceptible to differences in MR-sequence parameters. It is therefore necessary to determine whether there is an interaction between the sequence parameters and the effect of interest, and to minimise any such interaction by careful choice of acquisition parameters. As an exemplar of the issues involved in ...

  9. Processing tracking in jMRUI software for magnetic resonance spectra quantitation reproducibility assurance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jabłoński, Michal; Starčuková, Jana; Starčuk jr., Zenon

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, 23 JAN (2017), s. 1-11, č. článku 56. ISSN 1471-2105 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316679 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy * Signal Processing * SQL database * jMRUI Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment OBOR OECD: Medical engineering Impact factor: 2.448, year: 2016

  10. Disturbed Intracardiac Flow Organization After Atrioventricular Septal Defect Correction as Assessed With 4D Flow Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Quantitative Particle Tracing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkoen, Emmeline E.; de Koning, Patrick J. H.; Blom, Nico A.; Kroft, Lucia J. M.; de Roos, Albert; Wolterbeek, Ron; Roest, Arno A. W.; Westenberg, Jos J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Four-dimensional (3 spatial directions and time) velocity-encoded flow magnetic resonance imaging with quantitative particle tracing analysis allows assessment of left ventricular (LV) blood flow organization. Corrected atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) patients have an abnormal left

  11. Myocardial blood flow estimates from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: three quantitative methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrazzo, Cristian; Galea, Nicola; Pacilio, Massimiliano; Altabella, Luisa; Preziosi, Enrico; Carnì, Marco; Ciolina, Federica; Vullo, Francesco; Francone, Marco; Catalano, Carlo; Carbone, Iacopo

    2018-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging can be used to quantitatively assess the myocardial blood flow (MBF), recovering the tissue impulse response function for the transit of a gadolinium bolus through the myocardium. Several deconvolution techniques are available, using various models for the impulse response. The method of choice may influence the results, producing differences that have not been deeply investigated yet. Three methods for quantifying myocardial perfusion have been compared: Fermi function modelling (FFM), the Tofts model (TM) and the gamma function model (GF), with the latter traditionally used in brain perfusion MRI. Thirty human subjects were studied at rest as well as under cold pressor test stress (submerging hands in ice-cold water), and a single bolus of gadolinium weighing 0.1  ±  0.05 mmol kg-1 was injected. Perfusion estimate differences between the methods were analysed by paired comparisons with Student’s t-test, linear regression analysis, and Bland-Altman plots, as well as also using the two-way ANOVA, considering the MBF values of all patients grouped according to two categories: calculation method and rest/stress conditions. Perfusion estimates obtained by various methods in both rest and stress conditions were not significantly different, and were in good agreement with the literature. The results obtained during the first-pass transit time (20 s) yielded p-values in the range 0.20-0.28 for Student’s t-test, linear regression analysis slopes between 0.98-1.03, and R values between 0.92-1.01. From the Bland-Altman plots, the paired comparisons yielded a bias (and a 95% CI)—expressed as ml/min/g—for FFM versus TM, -0.01 (-0.20, 0.17) or 0.02 (-0.49, 0.52) at rest or under stress respectively, for FFM versus GF, -0.05 (-0.29, 0.20) or  -0.07 (-0.55, 0.41) at rest or under stress, and for TM versus GF, -0.03 (-0.30, 0.24) or  -0.09 (-0.43, 0.26) at rest or under stress. With the

  12. Deep Learning for Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting: A New Approach for Predicting Quantitative Parameter Values from Time Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Elisabeth; Körzdörfer, Gregor; Würfl, Tobias; Wetzl, Jens; Lugauer, Felix; Pfeuffer, Josef; Maier, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate methods from deep learning for application to Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF). MRF is a recently proposed measurement technique for generating quantitative parameter maps. In MRF a non-steady state signal is generated by a pseudo-random excitation pattern. A comparison of the measured signal in each voxel with the physical model yields quantitative parameter maps. Currently, the comparison is done by matching a dictionary of simulated signals to the acquired signals. To accelerate the computation of quantitative maps we train a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) on simulated dictionary data. As a proof of principle we show that the neural network implicitly encodes the dictionary and can replace the matching process.

  13. Quantitative characterization of myocardial infarction by cardiovascular magnetic resonance predicts future cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauly John M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can provide quantitative data of the myocardial tissue utilizing high spatial and temporal resolution along with exquisite tissue contrast. Previous studies have correlated myocardial scar tissue with the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmia. This study was conducted to evaluate whether characterization of myocardial infarction by CMR can predict cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM. Results We consecutively studied 86 patients with ICM (LVEF Conclusion Quantification of the scar volume and scar percentage by CMR is superior to LVEDV, LVESV, and LVEF in prognosticating the future likelihood of the development of cardiovascular events in patients with ICM.

  14. Quantitative Assessment of Liver Fat with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Scott B.; Cruite, Irene; Hamilton, Gavin; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is characterized by abnormal and excessive accumulation of lipids within hepatocytes. It is an important feature of diffuse liver disease, and the histological hallmark of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Other conditions associated with steatosis include alcoholic liver disease, viral hepatitis, HIV and genetic lipodystrophies, cystic fibrosis liver disease, and hepatotoxicity from various therapeutic agents. Liver biopsy, the current clinical gold standard for assessment of liver fat, is invasive and has sampling errors, and is not optimal for screening, monitoring, clinical decision making, or well-suited for many types of research studies. Non-invasive methods that accurately and objectively quantify liver fat are needed. Ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) can be used to assess liver fat but have limited accuracy as well as other limitations. Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques can decompose the liver signal into its fat and water signal components and therefore assess liver fat more directly than CT or US. Most magnetic resonance (MR) techniques measure the signal fat-fraction (the fraction of the liver MR signal attributable to liver fat), which may be confounded by numerous technical and biological factors and may not reliably reflect fat content. By addressing the factors that confound the signal fat-fraction, advanced MR techniques measure the proton density fat-fraction (the fraction of the liver proton density attributable to liver fat), which is a fundamental tissue property and a direct measure of liver fat content. These advanced techniques show promise for accurate fat quantification and are likely to be commercially available soon. PMID:22025886

  15. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole; Liu, Kecheng; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Griswold, Mark A

    2013-03-14

    Magnetic resonance is an exceptionally powerful and versatile measurement technique. The basic structure of a magnetic resonance experiment has remained largely unchanged for almost 50 years, being mainly restricted to the qualitative probing of only a limited set of the properties that can in principle be accessed by this technique. Here we introduce an approach to data acquisition, post-processing and visualization--which we term 'magnetic resonance fingerprinting' (MRF)--that permits the simultaneous non-invasive quantification of multiple important properties of a material or tissue. MRF thus provides an alternative way to quantitatively detect and analyse complex changes that can represent physical alterations of a substance or early indicators of disease. MRF can also be used to identify the presence of a specific target material or tissue, which will increase the sensitivity, specificity and speed of a magnetic resonance study, and potentially lead to new diagnostic testing methodologies. When paired with an appropriate pattern-recognition algorithm, MRF inherently suppresses measurement errors and can thus improve measurement accuracy.

  16. A quantitative magnetic resonance histology atlas of postnatal rat brain development with regional estimates of growth and variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Evan; Badea, Alexandra; Watson, Charles; Johnson, G Allan

    2013-05-01

    There has been growing interest in the role of postnatal brain development in the etiology of several neurologic diseases. The rat has long been recognized as a powerful model system for studying neuropathology and the safety of pharmacologic treatments. However, the complex spatiotemporal changes that occur during rat neurodevelopment remain to be elucidated. This work establishes the first magnetic resonance histology (MRH) atlas of the developing rat brain, with an emphasis on quantitation. The atlas comprises five specimens at each of nine time points, imaged with eight distinct MR contrasts and segmented into 26 developmentally defined brain regions. The atlas was used to establish a timeline of morphometric changes and variability throughout neurodevelopment and represents a quantitative database of rat neurodevelopment for characterizing rat models of human neurologic disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Validated ¹H and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods for the Quantitative Determination of Glycerol in Drug Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiaxi; Wang, Pengli; Wang, Qiuying; Wang, Yanan; Jiang, Miaomiao

    2018-05-15

    In the current study, we employed high-resolution proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H and 13 C NMR) for quantitative analysis of glycerol in drug injections without any complex pre-treatment or derivatization on samples. The established methods were validated with good specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, stability, and repeatability. Our results revealed that the contents of glycerol were convenient to calculate directly via the integration ratios of peak areas with an internal standard in ¹H NMR spectra, while the integration of peak heights were proper for 13 C NMR in combination with an external calibration of glycerol. The developed methods were both successfully applied in drug injections. Quantitative NMR methods showed an extensive prospect for glycerol determination in various liquid samples.

  18. High-resolution morphologic and ultrashort time-to-echo quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Won C.; Chang, Eric Y.; Biswas, Reni; Statum, Sheronda; Chung, Christine B. [Veterans Administration San Diego Healthcare System, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Tafur, Monica; Du, Jiang; Healey, Robert [University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Kwack, Kyu-Sung [Ajou University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Wonchon-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Gyeonggi-do, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To implement high-resolution morphologic and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using ultrashort time-to-echo (UTE) techniques in cadavers and volunteers. This study was approved by the institutional review board. TMJs of cadavers and volunteers were imaged on a 3-T MR system. High-resolution morphologic and quantitative sequences using conventional and UTE techniques were performed in cadaveric TMJs. Morphologic and UTE quantitative sequences were performed in asymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers. Morphologic evaluation demonstrated the TMJ structures in open- and closed-mouth position. UTE techniques facilitated the visualization of the disc and fibrocartilage. Quantitative UTE MRI was successfully performed ex vivo and in vivo, reflecting the degree of degeneration. There was a difference in the mean UTE T2* values between asymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers. MRI evaluation of the TMJ using UTE techniques allows characterization of the internal structure and quantification of the MR properties of the disc. Quantitative UTE MRI can be performed in vivo with short scan times. (orig.)

  19. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative analysis of contents of epidermoid and dermoid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeshita, Mikihiko; Kubo, Osami; Hiyama, Hirofumi; Tajika, Yasuhiko; Izawa, Masahiro; Kagawa, Mizuo; Takakura, Kintomo; Kobayashi, Naotoshi; Toyoda, Masako [Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1994-07-01

    The intracapsular cholesterol protein, and calcium contents of epidermoid and dermoid cysts from seven patients were compared with the signal intensities on T[sub 1]-weighted spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) images. All specimens had a paste-like consistency when resected. Epidermoid and dermoid cysts demonstrated a wide range of cholesterol and calcium contents, and epidermoid cysts were not always rich in cholesterol. Five patients had cysts with lower signal intensity than white matter, which contained more than 18.3 mg/g wet weight of protein. One of these patients had the highest cholesterol content of all seven patients (22.25 mg/g wet weight) and another had the highest calcium content (0.75 mg/g wet weight). Two patients had cysts with higher signal intensity than white matter, with protein contents of lower than 4.3 mg/g wet weight. High protein content (>18.3 mg/g wet weight) may decrease signal intensity on T[sub 1]-weighted MR images, while low protein content (<4.3 mg/g wet weight) may increase signal intensity in epidermoid and dermoid cysts with high viscosity (paste-like consistency) contents. (author).

  1. Noninvasive quantitation of human liver steatosis using magnetic resonance and bioassay methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Assignies, Gaspard; Ruel, Martin; Khiat, Abdesslem; Lepanto, Luigi; Kauffmann, Claude; Tang, An [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Departement de Radiologie, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Chagnon, Miguel [Universite de Montreal (UDEM), Departement de Mathematiques et de Statistique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gaboury, Louis [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Departement d' Anatomo-Pathologie, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Boulanger, Yvan [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Departement de Radiologie, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hopital Saint-Luc du CHUM, Departement de Radiologie, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the ability of three magnetic resonance (MR) techniques to detect liver steatosis and to determine which noninvasive technique (MR, bioassays) or combination of techniques is optimal for the quantification of hepatic fat using histopathology as a reference. Twenty patients with histopathologically proven steatosis and 24 control subjects underwent single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS; 3 voxels), dual-echo in phase/out of phase MR imaging (DEI) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) examinations of the liver. Blood or urine bioassays were also performed for steatosis patients. Both MRS and DEI data allowed to detect steatosis with a high sensitivity (0.95 for MRS; 1 for DEI) and specificity (1 for MRS; 0.875 for DEI) but not DWI. Strong correlations were found between fat fraction (FF) measured by MRS, DEI and histopathology segmentation as well as with low density lipoprotein (LDL) and cholesterol concentrations. A Bland-Altman analysis showed a good agreement between the FF measured by MRS and DEI. Partial correlation analyses failed to improve the correlation with segmentation FF when MRS or DEI data were combined with bioassay results. Therefore, FF from MRS or DEI appear to be the best parameters to both detect steatosis and accurately quantify fat liver noninvasively. (orig.)

  2. Optimization of metabolite basis sets prior to quantitation in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: an approach based on quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazariev, A; Graveron-Demilly, D; Allouche, A-R; Aubert-Frécon, M; Fauvelle, F; Piotto, M; Elbayed, K; Namer, I-J; Van Ormondt, D

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is playing an increasingly important role for diagnosis. This technique enables setting up metabolite profiles of ex vivo pathological and healthy tissue. The need to monitor diseases and pharmaceutical follow-up requires an automatic quantitation of HRMAS 1 H signals. However, for several metabolites, the values of chemical shifts of proton groups may slightly differ according to the micro-environment in the tissue or cells, in particular to its pH. This hampers the accurate estimation of the metabolite concentrations mainly when using quantitation algorithms based on a metabolite basis set: the metabolite fingerprints are not correct anymore. In this work, we propose an accurate method coupling quantum mechanical simulations and quantitation algorithms to handle basis-set changes. The proposed algorithm automatically corrects mismatches between the signals of the simulated basis set and the signal under analysis by maximizing the normalized cross-correlation between the mentioned signals. Optimized chemical shift values of the metabolites are obtained. This method, QM-QUEST, provides more robust fitting while limiting user involvement and respects the correct fingerprints of metabolites. Its efficiency is demonstrated by accurately quantitating 33 signals from tissue samples of human brains with oligodendroglioma, obtained at 11.7 tesla. The corresponding chemical shift changes of several metabolites within the series are also analyzed

  3. Optimization of metabolite basis sets prior to quantitation in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: an approach based on quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazariev, A.; Allouche, A.-R.; Aubert-Frécon, M.; Fauvelle, F.; Piotto, M.; Elbayed, K.; Namer, I.-J.; van Ormondt, D.; Graveron-Demilly, D.

    2011-11-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is playing an increasingly important role for diagnosis. This technique enables setting up metabolite profiles of ex vivo pathological and healthy tissue. The need to monitor diseases and pharmaceutical follow-up requires an automatic quantitation of HRMAS 1H signals. However, for several metabolites, the values of chemical shifts of proton groups may slightly differ according to the micro-environment in the tissue or cells, in particular to its pH. This hampers the accurate estimation of the metabolite concentrations mainly when using quantitation algorithms based on a metabolite basis set: the metabolite fingerprints are not correct anymore. In this work, we propose an accurate method coupling quantum mechanical simulations and quantitation algorithms to handle basis-set changes. The proposed algorithm automatically corrects mismatches between the signals of the simulated basis set and the signal under analysis by maximizing the normalized cross-correlation between the mentioned signals. Optimized chemical shift values of the metabolites are obtained. This method, QM-QUEST, provides more robust fitting while limiting user involvement and respects the correct fingerprints of metabolites. Its efficiency is demonstrated by accurately quantitating 33 signals from tissue samples of human brains with oligodendroglioma, obtained at 11.7 tesla. The corresponding chemical shift changes of several metabolites within the series are also analyzed.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of stents. Quantitative in vitro examination at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, Julia; Fachhochschule Jena; Nguyen-Trong, Thien-Hoa; Haehnel, Stefan; Bellemann, Matthias E.; Heiland, Sabine; Neurologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively study MR artifacts of various stents on the basis of in vitro experiments. We were particularly interested whether sequence type and orientation of the stent with respect to the static magnetic field influences the artifact. We examined 18 stents of different material (nitinol, stainless steel, cobalt alloy), different design of the stent meshes (AccuLink, OmniLink, DynaLink, Xact, Protoge, Wallstent Monorail), different diameter (5-10 mm) and different length (18-58 mm) with a turbo spin echo (TSE), a 2D-fast low angle shot (FLASH) and a 3D-FLASH sequence. The MR images were examined qualitatively with respect to possible artifacts. Furthermore we examined the MR data quantitatively: The contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) was determined both within the stent and outside (within the tube); based on these values we calculated the transparency factor P, furthermore we calculated the apparent vascular lumen within the tube and within the stent. The stents made of stainless steel and cobalt alloy displayed severe susceptibility artifacts. Therefore the vessel lumen within the stent could not be assessed. The nitinol stents showed different artifact patterns: The AccuLink and DynaLink stents showed less artifacts compared to the Xact and Protoge stents. Besides the susceptibility artifacts we found artifacts due to RF shielding by the stent mesh, particularly in TSE sequences. A MR control of patients after stenting is possible and may yield diagnostic information when using the AccuLink or DynaLink stents. However, it is important to make sure that the stent is MR safe for the field strength used for the examination. (orig.)

  5. Quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3T based on the principle of reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoelch, Niklaus; Hock, Andreas; Henning, Anke

    2018-05-01

    Quantification of magnetic resonance spectroscopy signals using the phantom replacement method requires an adequate correction of differences between the acquisition of the reference signal in the phantom and the measurement in vivo. Applying the principle of reciprocity, sensitivity differences can be corrected at low field strength by measuring the RF transmitter gain needed to obtain a certain flip angle in the measured volume. However, at higher field strength the transmit sensitivity may vary from the reception sensitivity, which leads to wrongly estimated concentrations. To address this issue, a quantification approach based on the principle of reciprocity for use at 3T is proposed and validated thoroughly. In this approach, the RF transmitter gain is determined automatically using a volume-selective power optimization and complemented with information from relative reception sensitivity maps derived from contrast-minimized images to correct differences in transmission and reception sensitivity. In this way, a reliable measure of the local sensitivity was obtained. The proposed method is used to derive in vivo concentrations of brain metabolites and tissue water in two studies with different coil sets in a total of 40 healthy volunteers. Resulting molar concentrations are compared with results using internal water referencing (IWR) and Electric REference To access In vivo Concentrations (ERETIC). With the proposed method, changes in coil loading and regional sensitivity due to B 1 inhomogeneities are successfully corrected, as demonstrated in phantom and in vivo measurements. For the tissue water content, coefficients of variation between 2% and 3.5% were obtained (0.6-1.4% in a single subject). The coefficients of variation of the three major metabolites ranged from 3.4-14.5%. In general, the derived concentrations agree well with values estimated with IWR. Hence, the presented method is a valuable alternative for IWR, without the need for additional

  6. Quantitative analysis of magnetic resonance imaging susceptibility artifacts caused by neurosurgical biomaterials. Comparison of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 tesla magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Hideki; Inoue, Takashi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Sasaki, Makoto; Konno, Hiromu; Kuzu, Yasutaka; Nishimoto, Hideaki; Ogawa, Akira

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an important diagnostic tool for neurosurgical diseases but susceptibility artifacts caused by biomaterial instrumentation frequently causes difficulty in visualizing postoperative changes. The susceptibility artifacts caused by neurosurgical biomaterials were compared quantitatively by 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Tesla MR imaging. MR imaging of uniform size and shape of pieces ceramic (zirconia), pure titanium, titanium alloy, and cobalt-based alloy was performed at 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Tesla. A linear region of interest was defined across the center of the biomaterial in the transverse direction, and the susceptibility artifact diameter was calculated. Susceptibility artifacts developed around all biomaterials at all magnetic field strengths. The artifact diameters caused by pure titanium, titanium alloy, and cobalt-based alloy increased in the order of 0.5, 1.5, to 3.0 Tesla magnetic fields. The artifact diameter of ceramic was not influenced by magnetic field strength, and was the smallest of all biomaterials at all magnetic field strengths. The artifacts caused by biomaterials except ceramic increase with the magnetic field strength. Ceramic instrumentation will minimize artifacts in all magnetic fields. (author)

  7. Facial Phenotyping by Quantitative Photography Reflects Craniofacial Morphology Measured on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Icelandic Sleep Apnea Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kate; Schwab, Richard J.; Maislin, Greg; Lee, Richard W.W.; Benedikstdsottir, Bryndis; Pack, Allan I.; Gislason, Thorarinn; Juliusson, Sigurdur; Cistulli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: (1) To determine whether facial phenotype, measured by quantitative photography, relates to underlying craniofacial obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk factors, measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); (2) To assess whether these associations are independent of body size and obesity. Design: Cross-sectional cohort. Setting: Landspitali, The National University Hospital, Iceland. Participants: One hundred forty patients (87.1% male) from the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort who had both calibrated frontal and profile craniofacial photographs and upper airway MRI. Mean ± standard deviation age 56.1 ± 10.4 y, body mass index 33.5 ± 5.05 kg/m2, with on-average severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index 45.4 ± 19.7 h-1). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Relationships between surface facial dimensions (photos) and facial bony dimensions and upper airway soft-tissue volumes (MRI) was assessed using canonical correlation analysis. Photo and MRI craniofacial datasets related in four significant canonical correlations, primarily driven by measurements of (1) maxillary-mandibular relationship (r = 0.8, P photography and MRI. This study confirms that facial photographic phenotype reflects underlying aspects of craniofacial skeletal abnormalities associated with OSA. Therefore, facial photographic phenotyping may be a useful tool to assess intermediate phenotypes for OSA, particularly in large-scale studies. Citation: Sutherland K, Schwab RJ, Maislin G, Lee RW, Benedikstdsottir B, Pack AI, Gislason T, Juliusson S, Cistulli PA. Facial phenotyping by quantitative photography reflects craniofacial morphology measured on magnetic resonance imaging in icelandic sleep apnea patients. SLEEP 2014;37(5):959-968. PMID:24790275

  8. Dynamic and quantitative evaluation of degenerative mitral valve disease: a dedicated framework based on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturla, Francesco; Onorati, Francesco; Puppini, Giovanni; Pappalardo, Omar A; Selmi, Matteo; Votta, Emiliano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Redaelli, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Accurate quantification of mitral valve (MV) morphology and dynamic behavior over the cardiac cycle is crucial to understand the mechanisms of degenerative MV dysfunction and to guide the surgical intervention. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging has progressively been adopted to evaluate MV pathophysiology, although a dedicated framework is required to perform a quantitative assessment of the functional MV anatomy. We investigated MV dynamic behavior in subjects with normal MV anatomy (n=10) and patients referred to surgery due to degenerative MV prolapse, classified as fibro-elastic deficiency (FED, n=9) and Barlow's disease (BD, n=10). A CMR-dedicated framework was adopted to evaluate prolapse height and volume and quantitatively assess valvular morphology and papillary muscles (PAPs) function over the cardiac cycle. Multiple comparison was used to investigate the hallmarks associated to MV degenerative prolapse and evaluate the feasibility of anatomical and functional distinction between FED and BD phenotypes. On average, annular dimensions were significantly (Pframework allows for the quantitative and dynamic evaluation of MV apparatus, with quantifiable annular alterations representing the primary hallmark of severe MV degeneration. This may aid surgeons in the evaluation of the severity of MV dysfunction and the selection of the appropriate MV treatment.

  9. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I: a multinational cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey A Willis

    Full Text Available We conducted a prospective multinational study of muscle pathology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I. Thirty eight adult ambulant LGMD2I patients (19 male; 19 female with genetically identical mutations (c.826C>A in the fukutin-related protein (FKRP gene were recruited. In each patient, T1-weighted (T1w imaging was assessed by qualitative grading for 15 individual lower limb muscles and quantitative Dixon imaging was analysed on 14 individual lower limb muscles by region of interest analysis. We described the pattern and appearance of muscle pathology and gender differences, not previously reported for LGMD2I. Diffuse fat infiltration of the gastrocnemii muscles was demonstrated in females, whereas in males fat infiltration was more prominent in the medial than the lateral gastrocnemius (p = 0.05. In the anterior thigh of males, in contrast to females, median fat infiltration in the vastus medialis muscle (45.7% exceeded that in the vastus lateralis muscle (11.2% (p<0.005. MRI is non-invasive, objective and does not rely on patient effort compared to clinical and physical measures that are currently employed. We demonstrated (i that the quantitative Dixon technique is an objective quantitative marker of disease and (ii new observations of gender specific patterns of muscle involvement in LGMD2I.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehnholm, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an electron spin resonance enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (ESREMRI) apparatus able to generate a primary magnetic field during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection. This allows the generation of ESREMRI images of a subject. A primary magnetic field of a second and higher value generated during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection can be used to generate conventional MR images of a subject. The ESREMRI and native MR images so generated may be combined, (or superimposed). (author)

  11. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Tracey A; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Coombs, Anna

    2014-01-01

    -related protein (FKRP) gene were recruited. In each patient, T1-weighted (T1w) imaging was assessed by qualitative grading for 15 individual lower limb muscles and quantitative Dixon imaging was analysed on 14 individual lower limb muscles by region of interest analysis. We described the pattern and appearance......) that the quantitative Dixon technique is an objective quantitative marker of disease and (ii) new observations of gender specific patterns of muscle involvement in LGMD2I....

  12. Analytical applications of a recycled flow nuclear magnetic resonance system: quantitative analysis of slowly relaxing nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, D.A. Jr.; Lee, R.W.K.; Wilkins, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of a recycled flow system for the efficient quantitative analysis of NMR spectra is demonstrated. Requisite conditions are first established for the quantitative flow experiment and then applied to a variety of compounds. An application of the technique to determination of the average polymer chain length for a silicone polymer by quantitative flow 29 Si NMR is also presented. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  13. A quantitative study of ramped radio frequency, magnetization transfer, and slab thickness in three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography in a patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, K C; Blatter, D D; Parker, D L; Du, Y P; Meyer, K J; Bernstein, M A

    1996-06-01

    The authors compare the effectiveness of various magnetic resonance (MR) angiography acquisition strategies in enhancing the visibility of small intracranial vessels. Blood vessel contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in time-of-flight MR angiography was studied as a function of vessel size and several selectable imaging parameters. Contrast-to-noise measurements were made on 257 vessel segments ranging in size from 0.3 mm to 4.2 mm in patients who recently had undergone intraarterial cerebral angiography. Imaging parameters studied included magnetization transfer, spatially variable radio frequency (RF) pulse profile (ramped RF), and imaging slab thickness. The combination of thin slabs (16 slices/slab), ramped RF, and magnetization transfer resulted in the highest CNR for all but the smallest vessel sizes. The smallest vessels (slab (64 slices/slab) with ramped RF and magnetization transfer. Magnetization transfer always improved vessel CNR, but the improvement diminished as the slab thickness was reduced. The CNR increased with a decrease in slab thickness for all but the smallest vessel sizes. Overall, the results provide a quantitative demonstration that inflow enhancement of blood is reduced for small vessels. Thus, whereas magnetization transfer is important at all vessel sizes, it becomes the primary factor in improving the visibility of the smallest vessels.

  14. Magnetic Resonance-based Motion Correction for Quantitative PET in Simultaneous PET-MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges

    2017-07-01

    Motion degrades image quality and quantitation of PET images, and is an obstacle to quantitative PET imaging. Simultaneous PET-MR offers a tool that can be used for correcting the motion in PET images by using anatomic information from MR imaging acquired concurrently. Motion correction can be performed by transforming a set of reconstructed PET images into the same frame or by incorporating the transformation into the system model and reconstructing the motion-corrected image. Several phantom and patient studies have validated that MR-based motion correction strategies have great promise for quantitative PET imaging in simultaneous PET-MR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-invasive quantitation of phosphorus metabolites in human brain and brain tumors by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Shoji; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Chuzo; Roth, K.; Hubesch, B.; Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    In obtaining localized magnetic resonance spectra in the clinical setting, the exact determination of volume of interest (VOI), the relative sensitivity of detection within the VOI, the inhomogeneity of B 1 field, the Q factor of the coil, and saturation factors should be considered. Taking these items into account, a quantitative method for calculating the absolute amount of phosphorus metabolites was developed. Using this method, phosphorus metabolites in the brain were determined in 15 patients with brain tumors - meningioma (8) and astrocytoma (7), and 10 normal volunteers. The integrals for metabolite signals were determined by using the curve-fitting software. The concentrations for ATP, PCr, PDE, inorganic orthophosphate (Pi), and phosphomonosters (PME) were 2.5, 4.9, 11.3, 1.9 and 3.9 mM, respectively, in the normal brain. For the brain tumors, phosphorus metabolites were decreased, except for Pi and PME. These results encourage the clinical use of this method in the quantitative analysis of metabolites of the diseased brain. (Namekawa, K)

  16. The investigations on the use of proton magnetic resonance in the quantitative analysis of organis compounds. Part 1. Review of analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciercierska-Stoklosa, D.

    1976-01-01

    The review of papers on the application of proton magnetic resonance in quantitative analyisis of organic compounds in multicomponent mixtures has been presented. The applied techniques have been described and unified way of presentation of formulas used in calculations has been propsed. The information about precision, accuracy and detectability of the method and the possibility of improving of determination has been given. (author)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  18. Water volume quantitation using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: application to cerebrospinal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecouffe, P.; Huglo, D.; Dubois, P.; Rousseau, J.; Marchandise, X.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitation in proton NMR imaging is applied to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Total intracranial CSF volume was measured from Condon's method: CSF signal was compared with distilled water standard signal in a single sagittal thick slice. Brain signal was reduced to minimum using a 5000/360/400 sequence. Software constraints did not permit easy implementing on imager and uniformity correction was performed on a microcomputer. Accuracy was better than 4%. Total intracranial CSF was found between 91 and 164 ml in 5 healthy volunteers. Extraventricular CSF quantitation appears very improved by this method, but planimetric methods seem better in order to quantify ventricular CSF. This technique is compared to total lung water measurement from proton density according to Mac Lennan's method. Water volume quantitation confirms ability of NMR imaging to quantify biologic parameters but image defects have to be known by strict quality control [fr

  19. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging for stroke research in the pharmaceutical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eis, M.; Neumaier, M.; Pschorn, U.

    1998-01-01

    In conclusion, quantitative NMR imaging is a valuable method for monitoring the volume and degree of severity of cerebral lesions and therapeutic effects over time. Thus, it is an important tool for evaluating the efficacy of cerebroprotective drugs in vivo. (orig.)

  20. Cerebrovascular reactivity by quantitative magnetic resonance angiography with a co2 challenge. Validation as a new imaging biomarker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caputi, Luigi; Ghielmetti, Francesco; Faragò, Giuseppe; Longaretti, Fabio; Lamperti, Massimo; Anzola, Gian Paolo; Carriero, Maria Rita; Charbel, Fady T.; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Parati, Eugenio; Ciceri, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) is essential in cerebrovascular diseases, as exhausted CVR may enhance the risk of cerebral ischemic events. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) with a vasodilatory stimulus is currently used for CVR evaluation. Scanty data are available for Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Angiography (QMRA), which supplies higher spatial resolution and quantitative cerebral blood flow values. Aims of our pilot study were: (a) to assess safety and feasibility of CO 2 administration during QMRA, (b) evaluation of CVR under QMRA compared to TCD, and (c) quantitative evaluation of blood flow from the major intracranial arterial vessels both at rest and after CO 2 . CVR during 5% CO 2 air breathing was measured with TCD as a reference method and compared with QMRA. Fifteen healthy subjects (age 60.47 ± 2.24; male 11/15) were evaluated at rest and during CO 2 challenge. Feasibility and safety of QMRA under CO 2 were ensured in all subjects. CVR from middle cerebral artery territory was not statistically different between TCD and MRI (p > 0.05). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) increased during QMRA and TCD (MAP p = 0.007 and p = 0.001; HR p = 0.043 and p = 0.068, respectively). Blood flow values from all intracranial vessels increased after CO 2 inhalation (p < 0.001). CO 2 administration during QMRA sessions is safe and feasible. Good correlation in terms of CVR was obtained comparing TCD and QMRA. Blood flow values significantly increased from all intracranial arterial vessels after CO 2 . Studies regarding CVR in physiopathological conditions might consider the utilization of QMRA both in routine clinical settings and in research projects

  1. Quantitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy signals: the jMRUI software package

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stefan, D.; Di Cesare, F.; Andrasescu, A.; Popa, E.; Lazariev, A.; Vescovo, E.; Štrbák, Oliver; Williams, S.; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Cabanas, M.; van Ormondt, D.; Graveron-Demilly, D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 10 (2009), 104035:1-9 ISSN 0957-0233 Grant - others:EC 6FP(XE) MRTN-CT-2006-035801 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : MR spectroscopy * MRS * MRSI * HRMAS-NMR * jMRUI software package * Java * plug-ins * quantitation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.317, year: 2009

  2. Quantitative evaluation of tongue atrophy on midsagittal magnetic resonance images (MRIs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Akio; Oishi, Tomonari; Murai, Yoshiyuki; Tsukamoto, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Masato

    1992-01-01

    This study was undertaken mainly to establish the quantitative parameter to evaluate the tongue atrophy on midsagittal MRIs and to show the clinical usefulness of such quantitative evaluation. Midsagittal MRIs of the tongue of consecutive 103 patients were analyzed. They were classified into 67 patients showing normal size (group without atrophy), 11 patients showing atrophy (group with atrophy) and 25 patients showing unsatifactory MRIs with artifacts based on the routine evaluation. The patients in the group without atrophy did not show any pathologic processes to produce tongue atrophy on clinical findings. The area and perimeter of tongue and oral cavity, and the ratio of tongue area to oral cavity area and the ratio of tongue perimeter to oral cavity perimeter on midsagittal MRIs were obtained in each patient of groups with and without atrophy by using quantitative image analysis system. In the group without atrophy, regression analysis of the data on age was made and the 95% confidence interval of the data for age was obtained. No evidence that the tongue becomes atrophic with aging was obtained in the group without atrophy. Patients in the group with atrophy were best separated from those in the group without atrophy statistically when the ratio of tongue area to oral cavity area was regressed on age. Among 11 patients in the group with atrophy, 6 patients were not regarded as having tongue atrophy on clinical neurological examinations. Therefore, the evaluation of midsagittal MRIs is clinically useful. (author)

  3. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  4. The acellular matrix (ACM) for bladder tissue engineering: A quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hai-Ling Margaret; Loai, Yasir; Beaumont, Marine; Farhat, Walid A

    2010-08-01

    Bladder acellular matrices (ACMs) derived from natural tissue are gaining increasing attention for their role in tissue engineering and regeneration. Unlike conventional scaffolds based on biodegradable polymers or gels, ACMs possess native biomechanical and many acquired biologic properties. Efforts to optimize ACM-based scaffolds are ongoing and would be greatly assisted by a noninvasive means to characterize scaffold properties and monitor interaction with cells. MRI is well suited to this role, but research with MRI for scaffold characterization has been limited. This study presents initial results from quantitative MRI measurements for bladder ACM characterization and investigates the effects of incorporating hyaluronic acid, a natural biomaterial useful in tissue-engineering and regeneration. Measured MR relaxation times (T(1), T(2)) and diffusion coefficient were consistent with increased water uptake and glycosaminoglycan content observed on biochemistry in hyaluronic acid ACMs. Multicomponent MRI provided greater specificity, with diffusion data showing an acellular environment and T(2) components distinguishing the separate effects of increased glycosaminoglycans and hydration. These results suggest that quantitative MRI may provide useful information on matrix composition and structure, which is valuable in guiding further development using bladder ACMs for organ regeneration and in strategies involving the use of hyaluronic acid.

  5. Quantification of Representative Ciguatoxins in the Pacific Using Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Kato

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The absolute quantification of five toxins involved in ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP in the Pacific was carried out by quantitative 1H-NMR. The targeted toxins were ciguatoxin-1B (CTX1B, 52-epi-54-deoxyciguatoxin-1B (epideoxyCTX1B, ciguatoxin-3C (CTX3C, 51-hydroxyciguatoxin-3C (51OHCTX3C, and ciguatoxin-4A (CTX4A. We first calibrated the residual protons of pyridine-d5 using certified reference material, 1,4-BTMSB-d4, prepared the toxin solutions with the calibrated pyridin-d5, measured the 1H-NMR spectra, and quantified the toxin using the calibrated residual protons as the internal standard. The absolute quantification was carried out by comparing the signal intensities between the selected protons of the target toxin and the residual protons of the calibrated pyridine-d5. The proton signals residing on the ciguatoxins (CTXs to be used for quantification were carefully selected for those that were well separated from adjacent signals including impurities and that exhibited an effective intensity. To quantify CTX1B and its congeners, the olefin protons in the side chain were judged appropriate for use. The quantification was achievable with nano-molar solutions. The probable errors for uncertainty, calculated on respective toxins, ranged between 3% and 16%. The contamination of the precious toxins with nonvolatile internal standards was thus avoided. After the evaporation of pyridine-d5, the calibrated CTXs were ready for use as the reference standard in the quantitative analysis of ciguatoxins by LC/MS.

  6. Quantification of Representative Ciguatoxins in the Pacific Using Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Yasumoto, Takeshi

    2017-10-12

    The absolute quantification of five toxins involved in ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) in the Pacific was carried out by quantitative ¹H-NMR. The targeted toxins were ciguatoxin-1B (CTX1B), 52-epi-54-deoxyciguatoxin-1B (epideoxyCTX1B), ciguatoxin-3C (CTX3C), 51-hydroxyciguatoxin-3C (51OHCTX3C), and ciguatoxin-4A (CTX4A). We first calibrated the residual protons of pyridine- d ₅ using certified reference material, 1,4-BTMSB- d ₄, prepared the toxin solutions with the calibrated pyridin- d ₅, measured the ¹H-NMR spectra, and quantified the toxin using the calibrated residual protons as the internal standard. The absolute quantification was carried out by comparing the signal intensities between the selected protons of the target toxin and the residual protons of the calibrated pyridine- d ₅. The proton signals residing on the ciguatoxins (CTXs) to be used for quantification were carefully selected for those that were well separated from adjacent signals including impurities and that exhibited an effective intensity. To quantify CTX1B and its congeners, the olefin protons in the side chain were judged appropriate for use. The quantification was achievable with nano-molar solutions. The probable errors for uncertainty, calculated on respective toxins, ranged between 3% and 16%. The contamination of the precious toxins with nonvolatile internal standards was thus avoided. After the evaporation of pyridine- d ₅, the calibrated CTXs were ready for use as the reference standard in the quantitative analysis of ciguatoxins by LC/MS.

  7. Chemical purity using quantitative "1H-nuclear magnetic resonance: a hierarchical Bayesian approach for traceable calibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toman, Blaza; Nelson, Michael A.; Lippa, Katrice A.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical purity assessment using quantitative "1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a method based on ratio references of mass and signal intensity of the analyte species to that of chemical standards of known purity. As such, it is an example of a calculation using a known measurement equation with multiple inputs. Though multiple samples are often analyzed during purity evaluations in order to assess measurement repeatability, the uncertainty evaluation must also account for contributions from inputs to the measurement equation. Furthermore, there may be other uncertainty components inherent in the experimental design, such as independent implementation of multiple calibration standards. As such, the uncertainty evaluation is not purely bottom up (based on the measurement equation) or top down (based on the experimental design), but inherently contains elements of both. This hybrid form of uncertainty analysis is readily implemented with Bayesian statistical analysis. In this article we describe this type of analysis in detail and illustrate it using data from an evaluation of chemical purity and its uncertainty for a folic acid material. (authors)

  8. Quantitative and qualitative differences in subcutaneous adipose tissue stores across lipodystrophy types shown by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Attar, Salam A; Pollex, Rebecca L; Robinson, John F; Miskie, Brooke A; Walcarius, Rhonda; Little, Cynthia Harper; Rutt, Brian K; Hegele, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Lipodystrophies are characterized by redistributed subcutaneous fat stores. We previously quantified subcutaneous fat by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the legs of two patients with familial partial lipodystrophy subtypes 2 and 3 (FPLD2 and FPLD3, respectively). We now extend the MRI analysis across the whole body of patients with different forms of lipodystrophy. We studied five subcutaneous fat stores (supraclavicular, abdominal, gluteal, thigh and calf) and the abdominal visceral fat stores in 10, 2, 1, 1 and 2 female subjects with, respectively, FPLD2, FPLD3, HIV-related partial lipodystrophy (HIVPL), acquired partial lipodystrophy (APL), congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) and in six normal control subjects. Compared with normal controls, FPLD2 subjects had significantly increased supraclavicular fat, with decreased abdominal, gluteal, thigh and calf subcutaneous fat. FPLD3 subjects had increased supraclavicular and abdominal subcutaneous fat, with less severe reductions in gluteal, thigh and calf fat compared to FPLD2 subjects. The repartitioning of fat in the HIVPL subject closely resembled that of FPLD3 subjects. APL and CGL subjects had reduced upper body, gluteal and thigh subcutaneous fat; the APL subject had increased, while CGL subjects had decreased subcutaneous calf fat. Visceral fat was markedly increased in FPLD2 and APL subjects. Semi-automated MRI-based adipose tissue quantification indicates differences between various lipodystrophy types in these studied clinical cases and is a potentially useful tool for extended quantitative phenomic analysis of genetic metabolic disorders. Further studies with a larger sample size are essential for confirming these preliminary findings

  9. Determination of avermectins by the internal standard recovery correction - high performance liquid chromatography - quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Huang, Ting; Li, Hongmei; Dai, Xinhua; Quan, Can; He, Yajuan

    2017-09-01

    Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (qNMR) is widely used to determine the purity of organic compounds. For the compounds with lower purity especially molecular weight more than 500, qNMR is at risk of error for the purity, because the impurity peaks are likely to be incompletely separated from the peak of major component. In this study, an offline ISRC-HPLC-qNMR (internal standard recovery correction - high performance liquid chromatography - qNMR) was developed to overcome this problem. It is accurate by excluding the influence of impurity; it is low-cost by using common mobile phase; and it extends the applicable scope of qNMR. In this method, a mix solution of the sample and an internal standard was separated by HPLC with common mobile phases, and only the eluents of the analyte and the internal standard were collected in the same tube. After evaporation and re-dissolution, it was determined by qNMR. A recovery correction factor was determined by comparison of the solutions before and after these procedures. After correction, the mass fraction of analyte was constant and it was accurate and precise, even though the sample loss varied during these procedures, or even in bad resolution of HPLC. Avermectin B 1 a with the purity of ~93% and the molecular weight of 873 was analyzed. Moreover, the homologues of avermectin B 1 a were determined based on the identification and quantitative analysis by tandem mass spectrometry and HPLC, and the results were consistent with the results of traditional mass balance method. The result showed that the method could be widely used for the organic compounds, and could further promote qNMR to become a primary method in the international metrological systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessing agreement between preclinical magnetic resonance imaging and histology: An evaluation of their image qualities and quantitative results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elschner, Cindy; Korn, Paula; Hauptstock, Maria; Schulz, Matthias C.; Range, Ursula; Jünger, Diana; Scheler, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    One consequence of demographic change is the increasing demand for biocompatible materials for use in implants and prostheses. This is accompanied by a growing number of experimental animals because the interactions between new biomaterials and its host tissue have to be investigated. To evaluate novel materials and engineered tissues the use of non-destructive imaging modalities have been identified as a strategic priority. This provides the opportunity for studying interactions repeatedly with individual animals, along with the advantages of reduced biological variability and decreased number of laboratory animals. However, histological techniques are still the golden standard in preclinical biomaterial research. The present article demonstrates a detailed method comparison between histology and magnetic resonance imaging. This includes the presentation of their image qualities as well as the detailed statistical analysis for assessing agreement between quantitative measures. Exemplarily, the bony ingrowth of tissue engineered bone substitutes for treatment of a cleft-like maxillary bone defect has been evaluated. By using a graphical concordance analysis the mean difference between MRI results and histomorphometrical measures has been examined. The analysis revealed a slightly but significant bias in the case of the bone volume (biasHisto−MRI:Bone volume=2.40 %, p<0.005) and a clearly significant deviation for the remaining defect width (biasHisto−MRI:Defect width=−6.73 %, p≪0.005). But the study although showed a considerable effect of the analyzed section position to the quantitative result. It could be proven, that the bias of the data sets was less originated due to the imaging modalities, but mainly on the evaluation of different slice positions. The article demonstrated that method comparisons not always need the use of an independent animal study, additionally. PMID:28666026

  11. Short TE quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordery, R.J.; Godbolt, A.; Rossor, M.N.; MacManus, D.; Waldman, A.D.

    2006-01-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a fatal neurodegerative disorder. Clinical diagnosis is difficult in the early stages as the disease often presents with non-specific psychiatric and neurological symptoms. To investigate the diagnostic potential of quantitative short TE in vivo MRS, and the nature and anatomical distribution of biochemical abnormalities in vCJD, localised single-voxel spectra (TE/TR 30 ms/2,000 ms) were acquired from three brain regions: thalami, caudate nuclei and frontal white matter. Metabolite concentrations and ratios from three patients with definite or probable vCJD were compared with eight normal age-matched controls. Abnormal signal on T2-weighted MRI was apparent in the pulvinar region in all vCJD patients; this region also showed greatly increased myo-inositol [MI] (mean 2.5-fold, P=0.01) and decreased N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA; mean 2-fold, P=0.01). Two patients also showed increased [MI] (z=17, 11; one with decreased NAA, z=-12) in normal-appearing caudate nuclei. The magnitude of metabolite abnormalities in the thalami in moderately advanced vCJD suggests a potential role in earlier diagnosis. Short TE protocols allow the measurement of MI, which adds discriminant power to the MRS examination. (orig.)

  12. Short TE quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordery, R.J.; Godbolt, A.; Rossor, M.N. [University College London, Dementia Research Group, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Division of Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); MacManus, D. [University College London, NMR Research Unit, Department of Clinical Neurology,Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Waldman, A.D. [University College London, Dementia Research Group, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Division of Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Charing Cross Hospital, Department of Imaging, London (United Kingdom); National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Dementia Research Group, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a fatal neurodegerative disorder. Clinical diagnosis is difficult in the early stages as the disease often presents with non-specific psychiatric and neurological symptoms. To investigate the diagnostic potential of quantitative short TE in vivo MRS, and the nature and anatomical distribution of biochemical abnormalities in vCJD, localised single-voxel spectra (TE/TR 30 ms/2,000 ms) were acquired from three brain regions: thalami, caudate nuclei and frontal white matter. Metabolite concentrations and ratios from three patients with definite or probable vCJD were compared with eight normal age-matched controls. Abnormal signal on T2-weighted MRI was apparent in the pulvinar region in all vCJD patients; this region also showed greatly increased myo-inositol [MI] (mean 2.5-fold, P=0.01) and decreased N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA; mean 2-fold, P=0.01). Two patients also showed increased [MI] (z=17, 11; one with decreased NAA, z=-12) in normal-appearing caudate nuclei. The magnitude of metabolite abnormalities in the thalami in moderately advanced vCJD suggests a potential role in earlier diagnosis. Short TE protocols allow the measurement of MI, which adds discriminant power to the MRS examination. (orig.)

  13. Quantitative evaluation of susceptibility effects caused by dental materials in head magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strocchi, S.; Ghielmi, M.; Basilico, F.; Macchi, A.; Novario, R.; Ferretti, R.; Binaghi, E.

    2016-03-01

    This work quantitatively evaluates the effects induced by susceptibility characteristics of materials commonly used in dental practice on the quality of head MR images in a clinical 1.5T device. The proposed evaluation procedure measures the image artifacts induced by susceptibility in MR images by providing an index consistent with the global degradation as perceived by the experts. Susceptibility artifacts were evaluated in a near-clinical setup, using a phantom with susceptibility and geometric characteristics similar to that of a human head. We tested different dentist materials, called PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI, Keramit NP, ILOR F, Zirconia and used different clinical MR acquisition sequences, such as "classical" SE and fast, gradient, and diffusion sequences. The evaluation is designed as a matching process between reference and artifacts affected images recording the same scene. The extent of the degradation induced by susceptibility is then measured in terms of similarity with the corresponding reference image. The matching process involves a multimodal registration task and the use an adequate similarity index psychophysically validated, based on correlation coefficient. The proposed analyses are integrated within a computer-supported procedure that interactively guides the users in the different phases of the evaluation method. 2-Dimensional and 3-dimensional indexes are used for each material and each acquisition sequence. From these, we drew a ranking of the materials, averaging the results obtained. Zirconia and ILOR F appear to be the best choice from the susceptibility artefacts point of view, followed, in order, by PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI and Keramit NP.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging hyper-acute ischemic stroke patients comparison with 1.5T and 3.0T units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Eun Hoe [Dept. of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Il Bong; Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Perfusion magnetic resonance image of biological mechanism are independent of magnetic field strength in hyper acute ischemic stroke. 3.0 T magnetic field, however, does affect the SNRs (signal to noise ratio) and artifacts of PMRI (perfusion magnetic resonance image), which basically will influence the quantitative of PMRI. In this study, the effects of field strength on PMRI are analyzed. The effects of the diseases also are discussed. PMRI in WM (white matter), GM (gray matter), hyper acute ischemic stroke were companied with 1.5 T and 3.0 T on SNR. PMRI also was compared to the SI difference after setting ROI (region of interest) in left and right b side of the brain. In conclusion, the SNRs and SI of the 3.0 T PMRI showed higher than those at 1.5 T. In summary, PMRI studies at 3.0 T is provided significantly improved perfusion evaluation when comparing with 1.5 T.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging hyper-acute ischemic stroke patients comparison with 1.5T and 3.0T units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Eun Hoe; Moon, Il Bong; Dong, Kyung Rae

    2017-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance image of biological mechanism are independent of magnetic field strength in hyper acute ischemic stroke. 3.0 T magnetic field, however, does affect the SNRs (signal to noise ratio) and artifacts of PMRI (perfusion magnetic resonance image), which basically will influence the quantitative of PMRI. In this study, the effects of field strength on PMRI are analyzed. The effects of the diseases also are discussed. PMRI in WM (white matter), GM (gray matter), hyper acute ischemic stroke were companied with 1.5 T and 3.0 T on SNR. PMRI also was compared to the SI difference after setting ROI (region of interest) in left and right b side of the brain. In conclusion, the SNRs and SI of the 3.0 T PMRI showed higher than those at 1.5 T. In summary, PMRI studies at 3.0 T is provided significantly improved perfusion evaluation when comparing with 1.5 T

  16. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography [fr

  18. Quantitative Multi-Parametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Tumor Response to Photodynamic Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J L Schreurs

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize response to photodynamic therapy (PDT in a mouse cancer model using a multi-parametric quantitative MRI protocol and to identify MR parameters as potential biomarkers for early assessment of treatment outcome.CT26.WT colon carcinoma tumors were grown subcutaneously in the hind limb of BALB/c mice. Therapy consisted of intravenous injection of the photosensitizer Bremachlorin, followed by 10 min laser illumination (200 mW/cm2 of the tumor 6 h post injection. MRI at 7 T was performed at baseline, directly after PDT, as well as at 24 h, and 72 h. Tumor relaxation time constants (T1 and T2 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were quantified at each time point. Additionally, Gd-DOTA dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI was performed to estimate transfer constants (Ktrans and volume fractions of the extravascular extracellular space (ve using standard Tofts-Kermode tracer kinetic modeling. At the end of the experiment, tumor viability was characterized by histology using NADH-diaphorase staining.The therapy induced extensive cell death in the tumor and resulted in significant reduction in tumor growth, as compared to untreated controls. Tumor T1 and T2 relaxation times remained unchanged up to 24 h, but decreased at 72 h after treatment. Tumor ADC values significantly increased at 24 h and 72 h. DCE-MRI derived tracer kinetic parameters displayed an early response to the treatment. Directly after PDT complete vascular shutdown was observed in large parts of the tumors and reduced uptake (decreased Ktrans in remaining tumor tissue. At 24 h, contrast uptake in most tumors was essentially absent. Out of 5 animals that were monitored for 2 weeks after treatment, 3 had tumor recurrence, in locations that showed strong contrast uptake at 72 h.DCE-MRI is an effective tool for visualization of vascular effects directly after PDT. Endogenous contrast parameters T1, T2, and ADC, measured at 24 to 72 h after PDT, are

  19. Technological challenges in Magnetic Resonance Imaging: enhancing sensitivity, moving to quantitative imaging and searching for disease biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retico, A.

    2018-02-01

    Diagnostic imaging based on the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance phenomenon has increasingly spread in the recent few decades, mainly owing to its exquisite capability in depicting a contrast between soft tissues, to its generally non-invasive nature, and to the priceless advantage of using non-ionizing radiation. Magnetic Resonance (MR)-based acquisition techniques allow gathering information on the structure (through Magnetic Resonance Imaging— MRI), the metabolic composition (through Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy—MRS), and the functioning (through functional MRI —fMRI) of the human body. MR investigations are the methods of choice for studying the brain in vivo, including anatomy, structural wiring and functional connectivity, in healthy and pathological conditions. Alongside the efforts of the clinical research community in extending the acquisition protocols to allow the exploration of a large variety of pathologies affecting diverse body regions, some relevant technological improvements are on the way to maximize the impact of MR in medical diagnostic. The development of MR scanners operating at ultra-high magnetic field (UHF) strength (>= 7 tesla), is pushing forward the spatial resolution of MRI and the spectral resolution of MRS, and it is increasing the specificity of fMRI to grey matter signal. UHF MR systems are currently in use for research purposes only; nevertheless, UHF technological advances are positively affecting MR investigations at clinical field strengths. To overcome the current major limitation of MRI, which is mostly based on contrast between tissues rather than on absolute measurements of physical quantities, a new acquisition modality is under development, which is referred as Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting technique. Finally, as neuroimaging data acquired worldwide are reaching the typical size of Big Data, dedicated technical solutions are required to mine large amount of information and to identify specific biomarkers of

  20. No Difference on Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patellofemoral Cartilage Composition Between Patients With Patellofemoral Pain and Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Rianne A; Oei, Edwin H G; Bron, Esther E; van Tiel, Jasper; van Veldhoven, Peter L J; Klein, Stefan; Verhaar, Jan A N; Krestin, Gabriel P; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2016-05-01

    Retropatellar cartilage damage has been suggested as an etiological factor for patellofemoral pain (PFP), a common knee condition among young and physically active individuals. To date, there is no conclusive evidence for an association between cartilage defects and PFP. Nowadays, advanced quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques enable estimation of cartilage composition. To investigate differences in patellofemoral cartilage composition between patients with PFP and healthy control subjects using quantitative MRI. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients with PFP and healthy control subjects underwent 3.0-T MRI including delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage and T1ρ and T2 mapping. Differences in relaxation times of patellofemoral cartilage were compared between groups by linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, sports participation, and time of image acquisition. This case-control study included 64 patients and 70 controls. The mean (±SD) age was 23.2 ± 6.4 years and the mean body mass index was 22.9 ± 3.4 kg/m(2); 56.7% were female. For delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage, the mean T1GD relaxation times of patellar (657.8 vs 669.4 ms) and femoral cartilage (661.6 vs 659.8 ms) did not significantly differ between patients and controls. In addition, no significant difference was found in mean T1ρ relaxation times of patellar (46.9 vs 46.0 ms) and femoral cartilage (50.8 vs 50.2 ms) and mean T2 relaxation times of patellar (33.2 vs 32.9 ms) and femoral cartilage (36.7 vs 36.6 ms) between patients and controls. Analysis of prespecified medial and lateral subregions within the patellofemoral cartilage also revealed no significant differences. There was no difference in composition of the patellofemoral cartilage, estimated with multiple quantitative MRI techniques, between patients with PFP and healthy control subjects. However, clinically relevant differences could not be ruled out for T1

  1. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Magnetic resonance (MR) defecography is a special ... with you. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MR defecography helps assess pelvic ...

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  3. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radio waves and a computer to evaluate the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct for disease. It is ... of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic systems, including the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct . Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  5. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2015:chap 17. Litt H, Carpenter JP. Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of imaging a body in which nuclear magnetic resonance is excited in a region including part of the body, and the free induction decay signal is measured, a known quantity of a material of known nuclear magnetic resonance properties, for example a bag of water, is included in the region so as to enhance the measured free induction decay signal. This then reduces the generation of noise during subsequent processing of the signal. (author)

  9. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hormuth II, David A; Weis, Jared A; Barnes, Stephanie L; Miga, Michael I; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Rericha, Erin C; Quaranta, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Reaction–diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction–diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction–diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error 0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice <0.81) and higher local (CCC <0.33) level errors over the same time period. The in silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction–diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions. (paper)

  10. Hypertrophic changes of the teres minor muscle in rotator cuff tears: quantitative evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikukawa, Kenshi; Ide, Junji; Kikuchi, Ken; Morita, Makoto; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Ogata, Hiroomi

    2014-12-01

    Few reports have assessed the teres minor (TM) muscle in rotator cuff tears. This study aimed to quantitatively analyze the morphologic changes of the TM muscle in patients with or without rotator cuff tears by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective study consisted of 279 subjects classified on the basis of interpretations of conventional MRI observations into 6 groups: no cuff tear; partial-thickness supraspinatus (SSP) tear; full-thickness SSP tear; SSP and subscapularis tears; SSP and infraspinatus (ISP) tears; and SSP, ISP, and subscapularis tears. With use of ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA) for oblique sagittal MRI, we measured the areas of ISP, TM, and anatomic external rotation (ISP + TM) muscles on the most lateral side in which the scapular spine was in contact with the scapular body. The occupational ratios of the TM muscle area to the anatomic external rotation muscle area were calculated. Ratios above the maximum of the 95% confidence intervals of the occupational ratio in the no-tear group were defined as hypertrophy of the TM muscle. Occupational ratios of the TM muscle in the no-tear group followed a normal distribution, and ratios >0.288 were defined as hypertrophic. Hypertrophic changes of the TM muscle were confirmed in rotator cuff tears involving the ISP tendon. A negative correlation was found between the occupational ratios of TM and ISP (P muscle appeared hypertrophic in rotator cuff tears involving the ISP, and the progression of ISP muscle atrophy seemed to induce the development of this compensatory hypertrophy. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative T2* magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of iron deposition in the brain of β-thalassemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghpoor, S; Ghahari, A; Morteza, A; Khalilzadeh, O; Shakourirad, A; Alinaghizadeh, M R

    2012-09-01

    Iron overload is a common clinical problem in patients with β-thalassemia major. The purpose of this study was to assess the presence of excess iron in certain areas of the brain (thalamus, midbrain, adenohypophysis and basal ganglia) in patients with β-thalassemia major and evaluate the association with serum ferritin and liver iron content. A cross-sectional study on 53 patients with β-thalassemia major and 40 healthy controls was carried out. All patients and healthy controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of the brain and liver. Multiecho fast gradient echo sequence was used and T2* values were calculated based on the Brompton protocol. Correlations between T2* values in the brain with T2* values in the liver as well as serum ferritin levels were investigated. There were no significant differences between patients and healthy controls with respect to age and sex. Patients had significantly lower T2* values in basal ganglia (striatum), thalamus and adenohypophysis compared to controls while there were no differences in the midbrain (red nucleus). There were no significant correlations between liver T2* values or serum ferritin with T2* values of basal ganglia (striatum), thalamus and adenohypophysis in patients or healthy controls. There were no significant correlations between T2* values of adenohypophysis and thalamus or basal ganglia (striatum) while these variables were significantly correlated in healthy controls. Serum ferritin and liver iron content may not be good indicators of brain iron deposition in patients with β thalassemia major. Nevertheless, the quantitative T2* MRI technique is useful for evaluation of brain iron overload in β thalassemia major patients.

  12. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and innovative technique that affords anatomic images in multiple planes and that may provide information about tissue characterization. The magnetic resonance images are obtained by placing the patient or the area of interest within a powerful, highly uniform, static magnetic field. Magnetized protons (hydrogen nuclei) within the patient align like small magnets in this field. Radiofrequency pulses are then used to create an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the main field. Magnetic resonance images differ from those produced by x-rays: the latter are associated with absorption of x-ray energy while magnetic resonance images are based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. Proton characteristics vary according to the tissue under examination and reflect its physical and chemical properties. To resolve issues regarding safety and efficacy, the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a consensus conference about MRI Oct 26 through 28, 1987. At the NIH, the Consensus Development Conference brings together investigators in the biomedical sciences, clinical investigators, practicing physicians, and consumer and special interest groups to make a scientific assessment of technologies, including drugs, devices, and procedures, and to seek agreement on their safety and effectiveness

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to include the effect of a magnetic object in a subject under investigation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) apparatus is operable at more than one radio frequency (RF) frequency. The apparatus allows normal practice as far as obtaining an NMR response or image from a given nuclear species is concerned, but, in addition, interrogates the nuclear spin system at a frequency which is different from the resonance frequency normally used for the given nuclear species, as determined from the applied magnetic field. The magnetic field close to a magnetised or magnetisable object is modified and the given nuclear species gives a response at the different frequency. Thus detection of a signal at the frequency indicates the presence of the chosen nuclei close to the magnetised or magnetisable object. Applications include validation of an object detection or automatic shape inspection system in the presence of magnetic impurities, and the detection of magnetic particles which affect measurement of liquid flow in a pipe. (author)

  16. Development of a universal dual-bolus injection scheme for the quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfakih Khaled

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dual-bolus protocol enables accurate quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF by first-pass perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. However, despite the advantages and increasing demand for the dual-bolus method for accurate quantification of MBF, thus far, it has not been widely used in the field of quantitative perfusion CMR. The main reasons for this are that the setup for the dual-bolus method is complex and requires a state-of-the-art injector and there is also a lack of post processing software. As a solution to one of these problems, we have devised a universal dual-bolus injection scheme for use in a clinical setting. The purpose of this study is to show the setup and feasibility of the universal dual-bolus injection scheme. Methods The universal dual-bolus injection scheme was tested using multiple combinations of different contrast agents, contrast agent dose, power injectors, perfusion sequences, and CMR scanners. This included 3 different contrast agents (Gd-DO3A-butrol, Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, 4 different doses (0.025 mmol/kg, 0.05 mmol/kg, 0.075 mmol/kg and 0.1 mmol/kg, 2 different types of injectors (with and without "pause" function, 5 different sequences (turbo field echo (TFE, balanced TFE, k-space and time (k-t accelerated TFE, k-t accelerated balanced TFE, turbo fast low-angle shot and 3 different CMR scanners from 2 different manufacturers. The relation between the time width of dilute contrast agent bolus curve and cardiac output was obtained to determine the optimal predefined pause duration between dilute and neat contrast agent injection. Results 161 dual-bolus perfusion scans were performed. Three non-injector-related technical errors were observed (1.9%. No injector-related errors were observed. The dual-bolus scheme worked well in all the combinations of parameters if the optimal predefined pause was used. Linear regression analysis showed that the optimal duration for the predefined

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus is described including a magnet system which is capable of providing a steady magnetic field along an axis, and is constructed so as to define a plurality of regions along the axis in each of which the field is substantially homogeneous so that in each region an imaging operation may be separately carried out. Iron shields increase the field homogeneity. In use, each patient lies on a wheeled trolley which is provided with magnetic field gradient coils and an RF coil system, some of the coils being movable to facilitate positioning of the patient, and there are terminals for connection to a common computing and control facility. (author)

  18. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system

  19. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  20. Physiological Background of Differences in Quantitative Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Between Acute Malignant and Benign Vertebral Body Fractures: Correlation of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient With Quantitative Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using the 2-Compartment Exchange Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geith, Tobias; Biffar, Andreas; Schmidt, Gerwin; Sourbron, Steven; Dietrich, Olaf; Reiser, Maximilian; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in vertebral bone marrow of benign and malignant fractures is related to the volume of the interstitial space, determined with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with acute benign (n = 24) and malignant (n = 19) vertebral body fractures were examined at 1.5 T. A diffusion-weighted single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequence (b = 100 to 600 s/mm) and DCE turbo-FLASH sequence were evaluated. Regions of interest were manually selected for each fracture. Apparent diffusion coefficient was determined with a monoexponential decay model. The DCE magnetic resonance imaging concentration-time curves were analyzed using a 2-compartment tracer-kinetic model. Apparent diffusion coefficient showed a significant positive correlation with interstitial volume in the whole study population (Pearson r = 0.66, P correlation between ADC and the permeability-surface area product could be observed when analyzing the whole study population (Spearman rs = 0.40, P = 0.008), but not when separately examining the subgroups. Plasma flow showed a significant correlation with ADC in benign fractures (Pearson r = 0.23, P = 0.03). Plasma volume did not show significant correlations with ADC. The results support the hypothesis that the ADC of a lesion is inversely correlated to its cellularity. This explains previous observations that ADC is reduced in more malignant lesions.

  1. Imaging by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duroure, J.F.; Serpolay, H.; Vallens, D.

    1995-01-01

    Here are described the advanced technology for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: reduction of acquisition times, and rebuilding times, images quality improvement. The tendency is to open the machines at low and middle field, on a market being at 10% of NMR I sales, with economical, scientifical and ergonomic reasons broadly developed by constructors

  2. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueterjans, H.

    1987-01-01

    Contributions by various authors who are working in the field of NMR imaging present the current status and the perspectives of in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, explaining not only the scientific and medical aspects, but also technical and physical principles as well as questions concerning practical organisation and training, and points of main interest for further research activities. (orig./TRV) [de

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarises the aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) considered by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel and makes recommendations on its introduction in Australia with particular regard to the need for thorough evaluation of its cost effectiveness. Topics covered are: principles of the technique, equipment required, installation, costs, reliability, performance parameters, clinical indications, training and staff requirements, and safety considerations

  5. Quantitative analysis of retinol and retinol palmitate in vitamin tablets using {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Hae; Kim, Hye Kyong; Wilson, Erica G.; Erkelens, Cornelis; Trijzelaar, Ben; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-06-04

    {sup 1}H-NMR spectrometry was applied to the quantitative analysis of Vitamin A in four different types of vitamin tablets without any chromatographic purification or saponification. The experiment was performed analysing the H-15 resonance, which appears at {delta} 4.32 for retinol and {delta} 4.69 for retinol palmitate, well separated from other resonances in the {sup 1}H-NMR spectrum. Compounds were quantified using the relative ratio of the integral of the H-15 signal to that of a known amount of internal standard (200 {mu}g/ml), anthracene. In order to evaluate the feasibility of avoiding the saponification of retinol palmitate in the preparation of samples, several solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide, n-hexane, methanol, water, and 0.1 M of HCl were tested as possible extraction solvents. Among these, dimethylsulfoxide showed the best yield of retinol palmitate. This method, using dimethylsulfoxide extraction and {sup 1}H-NMR, allows rapid and simple quantitation of retinol palmitate in tablets avoiding tedious saponification.

  6. Quantitative analysis of retinol and retinol palmitate in vitamin tablets using 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Hae; Kim, Hye Kyong; Wilson, Erica G.; Erkelens, Cornelis; Trijzelaar, Ben; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-01-01

    1 H-NMR spectrometry was applied to the quantitative analysis of Vitamin A in four different types of vitamin tablets without any chromatographic purification or saponification. The experiment was performed analysing the H-15 resonance, which appears at δ 4.32 for retinol and δ 4.69 for retinol palmitate, well separated from other resonances in the 1 H-NMR spectrum. Compounds were quantified using the relative ratio of the integral of the H-15 signal to that of a known amount of internal standard (200 μg/ml), anthracene. In order to evaluate the feasibility of avoiding the saponification of retinol palmitate in the preparation of samples, several solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide, n-hexane, methanol, water, and 0.1 M of HCl were tested as possible extraction solvents. Among these, dimethylsulfoxide showed the best yield of retinol palmitate. This method, using dimethylsulfoxide extraction and 1 H-NMR, allows rapid and simple quantitation of retinol palmitate in tablets avoiding tedious saponification

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  10. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  16. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brainstem Volumes, Plaques, and Surface Area in the Occipital Regions of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alper, F.; Kantarci, M.; Altunkaynak, E.; Varoglu, A. O.; Karaman, A.; Oral, E.; Okur, A. [Ataturk Univ., Erzurum (Turkey). Depts. of Radiology, Histology, Neurology and Embryology, Psychiatry

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To determine brainstem volumes, number of plaques, and surface areas in the occipital lobes of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), and to investigate whether there is any correlation between brainstem volume and the number/surface areas of plaque in the occipital lobes. Material and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained on 14 relapsing-remitting (RR) and 13 secondary progressive (SP) MS patients and 26 female control subjects. The Cavalieri method was used by modern design stereology to measure brainstem volume. The point-counting grid was used to evaluate sclerotic plaque surface areas in the occipital lobe. The number of plaques in the imaging section was calculated. Results: Brainstem volumes for RR and SP with multiple sclerosis and control subjects were 3647 mm{sup 3} , 3515 mm{sup 3} , and 4517 mm{sup 3} , respectively. Mean number of plaques in the right-left occipital lobe was found to be 2.7-3.4 in RR-MS and 5.2-2.8 in SP-MS. Mean plaque surface area in the right-left occipital lobe was determined to be 58.52-88.24 mm{sup 2} in RR MS and 124.3-64.82 mm{sup 2} in SP MS. Brainstem volumes were significantly reduced in both groups of patients with MS compared to controls ( P <0.01). Conclusion: Magnetic-resonance-estimated volume and surface area values in multiple sclerosis may facilitate our understanding of the clinical situation of patients and provide a simple index for evaluating therapeutic efficiency.

  17. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brainstem Volumes, Plaques, and Surface Area in the Occipital Regions of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alper, F.; Kantarci, M.; Altunkaynak, E.; Varoglu, A. O.; Karaman, A.; Oral, E.; Okur, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine brainstem volumes, number of plaques, and surface areas in the occipital lobes of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), and to investigate whether there is any correlation between brainstem volume and the number/surface areas of plaque in the occipital lobes. Material and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained on 14 relapsing-remitting (RR) and 13 secondary progressive (SP) MS patients and 26 female control subjects. The Cavalieri method was used by modern design stereology to measure brainstem volume. The point-counting grid was used to evaluate sclerotic plaque surface areas in the occipital lobe. The number of plaques in the imaging section was calculated. Results: Brainstem volumes for RR and SP with multiple sclerosis and control subjects were 3647 mm 3 , 3515 mm 3 , and 4517 mm 3 , respectively. Mean number of plaques in the right-left occipital lobe was found to be 2.7-3.4 in RR-MS and 5.2-2.8 in SP-MS. Mean plaque surface area in the right-left occipital lobe was determined to be 58.52-88.24 mm 2 in RR MS and 124.3-64.82 mm 2 in SP MS. Brainstem volumes were significantly reduced in both groups of patients with MS compared to controls ( P <0.01). Conclusion: Magnetic-resonance-estimated volume and surface area values in multiple sclerosis may facilitate our understanding of the clinical situation of patients and provide a simple index for evaluating therapeutic efficiency

  18. Magnetic resonance instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR), while opening new vistas to diagnostic medicine, utilizes equipment that is unfamiliar to most clinicians. Beyond learning to cope with new terms, such as spin-echo, T1, T2, and spin density, health care professionals are faced with the inclusion of magnetic and radiofrequency effects in their facilities produced by a complex array of devices. It is the purpose of this chapter to outline the components of an MR imaging system, to discuss their functions, and to note the variations in equipment commercially available

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The basic principles for the interpretation of MR images are developed. The book is divided into five chapters: introduction, tissue, parameters, acquisition parameters, contribution to diagnosis, and practical management of an MR examination. Eight exercises allow the reader to test the knowledge he has acquired. Signal localization and MR artefacts are reviewed in an appendix

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  3. 1H MAS NMR (magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance) techniques for the quantitative determination of hydrogen types in solid catalysts and supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gordon J; Afeworki, Mobae; Calabro, David C; Chase, Clarence E; Smiley, Randolph J

    2004-06-01

    Distinct hydrogen species are present in important inorganic solids such as zeolites, silicoaluminophosphates (SAPOs), mesoporous materials, amorphous silicas, and aluminas. These H species include hydrogens associated with acidic sites such as Al(OH)Si, non-framework aluminum sites, silanols, and surface functionalities. Direct and quantitative methodology to identify, measure, and monitor these hydrogen species are key to monitoring catalyst activity, optimizing synthesis conditions, tracking post-synthesis structural modifications, and in the preparation of novel catalytic materials. Many workers have developed several techniques to address these issues, including 1H MAS NMR (magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance). 1H MAS NMR offers many potential advantages over other techniques, but care is needed in recognizing experimental limitations and developing sample handling and NMR methodology to obtain quantitatively reliable data. A simplified approach is described that permits vacuum dehydration of multiple samples simultaneously and directly in the MAS rotor without the need for epoxy, flame sealing, or extensive glovebox use. We have found that careful optimization of important NMR conditions, such as magnetic field homogeneity and magic angle setting are necessary to acquire quantitative, high-resolution spectra that accurately measure the concentrations of the different hydrogen species present. Details of this 1H MAS NMR methodology with representative applications to zeolites, SAPOs, M41S, and silicas as a function of synthesis conditions and post-synthesis treatments (i.e., steaming, thermal dehydroxylation, and functionalization) are presented.

  4. Quantitative assessment of left ventricular function with dual-source CT in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: initial findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, S.; Johnson, T.R.C.; Wintersperger, B.J.; Minaifar, N.; Bhargava, A.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.; Nikolaou, K. [University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography are currently regarded as standard modalities for the quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction. With the recent introduction of dual-source computedtomography (DSCT), the increased temporal resolution of 83 ms should also improve the assessment of cardiac function in CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of DSCT in the assessment of left ventricular functional parameters with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as standard of reference. Fifteen patients (two female, 13 male; mean age 50.8 {+-} 19.2 years) underwent CT and MRI examinations on a DSCT (Somatom Definition; Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) and a 3.0-Tesla MR scanner (Magnetom Trio; Siemens Medical Solutions), respectively. Multiphase axial CT images were analysed with a semiautomatic region growing algorithms (Syngo Circulation; Siemens Medical Solutions) by two independent blinded observers. In MRI, dynamic cine loops of short axis slices were evaluated with semiautomatic contour detection software (ARGUS; Siemens Medical Solutions) independently by two readers. End-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), ejection fraction (EF) and stroke volume (SV) were determined for both modalities, and correlation coefficient, systematic error, limits of agreement and inter-observer variability were assessed. In DSCT, EDV and ESV were 135.8 {+-} 41.9 ml and 54.9 {+-} 29.6 ml, respectively, compared with 132.1 {+-} 40.8 ml EDV and 57.6 {+-} 27.3 ml ESV in MRI. Thus, EDV was overestimated by 3.7 ml (limits of agreement -46.1/+53.6), while ESV was underestimated by 2.6 ml (-36.6/+31.4). Mean EF was 61.6 {+-} 12.4% in DSCT and 57.9 {+-} 9.0% in MRI, resulting in an overestimation of EF by 3.8% with limits of agreement at -14.7 and +22.2%. Rank correlation rho values were 0.81 for EDV (P = 0.0024), 0.79 for ESV (P = 0.0031) and 0.64 for EF (P = 0.0168). The kappa value of inter

  5. Quantitative assessment of left ventricular function with dual-source CT in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: initial findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, S.; Johnson, T.R.C.; Wintersperger, B.J.; Minaifar, N.; Bhargava, A.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.; Nikolaou, K.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography are currently regarded as standard modalities for the quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction. With the recent introduction of dual-source computedtomography (DSCT), the increased temporal resolution of 83 ms should also improve the assessment of cardiac function in CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of DSCT in the assessment of left ventricular functional parameters with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as standard of reference. Fifteen patients (two female, 13 male; mean age 50.8 ± 19.2 years) underwent CT and MRI examinations on a DSCT (Somatom Definition; Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) and a 3.0-Tesla MR scanner (Magnetom Trio; Siemens Medical Solutions), respectively. Multiphase axial CT images were analysed with a semiautomatic region growing algorithms (Syngo Circulation; Siemens Medical Solutions) by two independent blinded observers. In MRI, dynamic cine loops of short axis slices were evaluated with semiautomatic contour detection software (ARGUS; Siemens Medical Solutions) independently by two readers. End-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), ejection fraction (EF) and stroke volume (SV) were determined for both modalities, and correlation coefficient, systematic error, limits of agreement and inter-observer variability were assessed. In DSCT, EDV and ESV were 135.8 ± 41.9 ml and 54.9 ± 29.6 ml, respectively, compared with 132.1 ± 40.8 ml EDV and 57.6 ± 27.3 ml ESV in MRI. Thus, EDV was overestimated by 3.7 ml (limits of agreement -46.1/+53.6), while ESV was underestimated by 2.6 ml (-36.6/+31.4). Mean EF was 61.6 ± 12.4% in DSCT and 57.9 ± 9.0% in MRI, resulting in an overestimation of EF by 3.8% with limits of agreement at -14.7 and +22.2%. Rank correlation rho values were 0.81 for EDV (P = 0.0024), 0.79 for ESV (P 0.0031) and 0.64 for EF (P = 0.0168). The kappa value of inter-observer variability were

  6. Introduction lecture to magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, J.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture deals with all that is common either to electron paramagnetic resonance (E.P.R.) or to nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). It will present, in an as elementary form as possible, the main concepts used in magnetic resonance emphasizing some aspects, specific for interface science. (orig./BHO)

  7. Quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the normal liver and malignant hepatic lesions at 3.0 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischbach, F.; Thormann, M.; Ricke, J.; Schirmer, T.; Freund, T.; Bruhn, H.

    2008-01-01

    This comparative study of tumour patients and volunteers aimed at differentiating liver parenchyma from neoplastic lesions by using localised 1 H MRS at 3.0 T as an adjunct to MRI. In total 186 single-voxel proton spectra of the liver were acquired at 3.0 T using the body transmit receive coil. Consecutive stacks of breath-hold spectra were acquired in the PRESS technique at a short echo time of 35 ms and a repetition time of 2,000 ms. Processing of the spectra included spectral alignment with the software package SAGE and quantitative processing with LCModel. The resulting metabolite concentrations were presented in arbitrary units relative to the internal water. In general, the spectra showed four main groups of resonances originating from the methyl protons (0.8-1.1 ppm) and methylene protons of the lipids (1.1-1.5 ppm; 2.0-2.2 ppm) as well as the methyl protons of choline-containing compounds (CCC) at 3.2 ppm. Overall, the CCC and lipid values in malignant liver tumours showed no significant differences to liver parenchyma. On average, total lipid measurements in normal liver parenchyma increased with age, while those of the CCC did not show pertinent changes. Significant differences between the contents of CCC in malignant liver tumours and normal liver parenchyma were not observed, because in patients and volunteers normal liver tissue showed a large variability in the content of CCC. (orig.)

  8. Synovial response to intraarticular injections of hyaluronate in frozen shoulder. A quantitative assessment with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Kazuya; Mashitori, Hirotaka; Ohno, Wataru; Hamada, Jun'ichiro; Sakai, Hiroya; Saotome, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the response of frozen shoulder (FS) to intraarticular injections of high-molecular-weight sodium hyaluronate (HA), a mixture of 2.5 ml of HA and 1.5 ml of 1% lidocaine was injected into the glenohumeral joint of 11 patients with FS, 8 of whom received five weekly injections. The patients were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score (JOA score) before the first injection, 1 week after the first injection, and 1 week after the final injection. Following each clinical evaluation, the patients underwent dynamic magnetic resonance imaging enhanced with Gd-DTPA, and the coefficient of enhancement (CE) in the glenohumeral synovium was calculated, with the examiners blinded to the clinical information. The JOA score tended to be greater and the CE smaller after injection than before injection. The changes in the CE following both single and repeated injections were negatively correlated with changes in the JOA score. Thus, clinical improvement in patients with FS was associated with a decrease in the CE. Because the CE depends on the degree of synovitis, the therapeutic effect of intraarticular HA injection for FS results, at least in part, from suppression of synovitis in the glenohumeral joint through an antiinflammatory effect. (author)

  9. Using quantitative magnetic resonance methods to understand better the gel-layer formation on polymer-matrix tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikac, Urša; Kristl, Julijana; Baumgartner, Saša

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful, non-invasive technique that can help improve our understanding of the hydrogel layer formed on swellable, polymer-matrix tablets, as well as the layer's properties and its influence on drug release. In this paper, the authors review the NMR and MRI investigations of hydrophilic, swellable polymers published since 1994. The review covers NMR studies on the properties of water and drugs within hydrated polymers. In addition, MRI studies using techniques for determining the different moving-front positions within the swollen tablets, the polymer concentration profiles across them, the influence of the incorporated drug, and so on, are presented. Some complementary methods are also briefly presented and discussed. Using MRI, the formation of a hydrogel along with simultaneous determination of the drug's position within it can be observed non-invasively. However, the MRI parameters can influence the signal's intensity and therefore they need to be considered carefully in order to prevent any misinterpretation of the results. MRI makes possible an in situ investigation of swollen-matrix tablets and provides valuable information that can lead, when combined with other techniques, to a better understanding of polymeric systems and a more effective development of optimal dosage forms.

  10. Quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in malignant breast lesions using different b value combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, Line B. [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiation Biology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, P.O. Box 4959, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 1078, Oslo (Norway); Fangberget, Anne [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Division of Diagnostics and Intervention, Norwegian Radium Hospital, P.O. Box 4959, Oslo (Norway); Geier, Oliver [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Physics, The Interventional Centre, Division of Diagnostics and Intervention, P.O. Box 4950, Oslo (Norway); Seierstad, Therese [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Division of Diagnostics and Intervention, Norwegian Radium Hospital, P.O. Box 4959, Oslo (Norway); Buskerud University College, Department of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 7053, Drammen (Norway)

    2013-04-15

    To explore how apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) in malignant breast lesions are affected by selection of b values in the monoexponential model and to compare ADCs with diffusion coefficients (Ds) obtained from the biexponential model. Twenty-four women (mean age 51.3 years) with locally advanced breast cancer were included in this study. Pre-treatment diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed using a 1.5-T system with b values of 0, 50, 100, 250 and 800 s/mm{sup 2}. Thirteen different b value combinations were used to derive individual monoexponential ADC maps. All b values were used in the biexponential model. Median ADC (including all b values) and D were 1.04 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (range 0.82-1.61 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) and 0.84 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (range 0.17-1.56 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s), respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between ADCs and Ds. For clinically relevant b value combinations, maximum deviation between ADCs including and excluding low b values (<100 s/mm{sup 2}) was 11.8 %. Selection of b values strongly affects ADCs of malignant breast lesions. However, by excluding low b values, ADCs approach biexponential Ds, demonstrating that microperfusion influences the diffusion signal. Thus, care should be taken when ADC calculation includes low b values. (orig.)

  11. Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Transparencias en inglés de la asignatura "Resonancia Magnética Nuclear Avanzada" (Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) (36643) que se imparte en el Máster de Química Médica como asignatura optativa de 3 créditos ECTS. En esta asignatura se completa el estudio iniciado en la asignatura de quinto curso de la licenciatura en Química "Determinación estructural" (7448) y en la del Grado de Química de tercer curso "Determinación estructural de los compuestos orgánicos" (26030) en lo referente a té...

  12. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  13. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremin, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic imaging, have been the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's been used to study the structure of various compounds in chemistry and physics, and in the mid-1970 to produce images of rabbits and eventually of the human hand and head. The images are produced by making use of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen ion, or proton, that is present in biological material to record the density distribution of protons in cellular water and lipids. An exploration of the end-results of complicated free induction decay signals, that have been digitized and frequency-analysed by mathematical computerized techniques to produce an image of tissue density, is given. At present NMR produces images comparable to those of early computed tomography

  15. Regional brain metabolite abnormalities in inherited prion disease and asymptomatic gene carriers demonstrated in vivo by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, A.D.; Cordery, R.J.; Godbolt, A.; Rossor, M.N. [University College London, Dementia Research Group, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Division of Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); MacManus, D.G. [University College London, NMR Research Unit, Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Collinge, J. [University College London, MRC Prion Unit, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    Inherited prion diseases are caused by mutations in the gene which codes for prion protein (PrP), leading to proliferation of abnormal PrP isomers in the brain and neurodegeneration; they include Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). We studied two patients with symptomatic inherited prion disease (P102L) and two pre-symptomatic P102L gene carriers using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Short echo time spectra were acquired from the thalamus, caudate region and frontal white matter, metabolite levels and ratios were measured and z-scores calculated for individual patients relative to age-matched normal controls. MRS data were compared with structural magnetic resonance imaging. One fCJD case had generalised atrophy and showed increased levels of myo-inositol (MI) in the thalamus (z=3.7). The other had decreased levels of N-acetylaspartate (z=4) and diffuse signal abnormality in the frontal white matter. Both asymptomatic gene carriers had normal imaging, but increased frontal white matter MI (z=4.3, 4.1), and one also had increased MI in the caudate (z=5.3). Isolated MI abnormalities in asymptomatic gene carriers are a novel finding and may reflect early glial proliferation, prior to significant neuronal damage. MRS provides potential non-invasive surrogate markers of early disease and progression in inherited prion disease. (orig.)

  16. Regional brain metabolite abnormalities in inherited prion disease and asymptomatic gene carriers demonstrated in vivo by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldman, A.D.; Cordery, R.J.; Godbolt, A.; Rossor, M.N.; MacManus, D.G.; Collinge, J.

    2006-01-01

    Inherited prion diseases are caused by mutations in the gene which codes for prion protein (PrP), leading to proliferation of abnormal PrP isomers in the brain and neurodegeneration; they include Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). We studied two patients with symptomatic inherited prion disease (P102L) and two pre-symptomatic P102L gene carriers using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Short echo time spectra were acquired from the thalamus, caudate region and frontal white matter, metabolite levels and ratios were measured and z-scores calculated for individual patients relative to age-matched normal controls. MRS data were compared with structural magnetic resonance imaging. One fCJD case had generalised atrophy and showed increased levels of myo-inositol (MI) in the thalamus (z=3.7). The other had decreased levels of N-acetylaspartate (z=4) and diffuse signal abnormality in the frontal white matter. Both asymptomatic gene carriers had normal imaging, but increased frontal white matter MI (z=4.3, 4.1), and one also had increased MI in the caudate (z=5.3). Isolated MI abnormalities in asymptomatic gene carriers are a novel finding and may reflect early glial proliferation, prior to significant neuronal damage. MRS provides potential non-invasive surrogate markers of early disease and progression in inherited prion disease. (orig.)

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  18. Estimation of pulmonary artery pressure in patients with primary pulmonary hypertension by quantitative analysis of magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, T I; Boxt, L M; Katz, J; Reagan, K; Barst, R J

    1994-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance (MR) images for estimating mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) was tested by comparing main pulmonary artery (MPA) and middescending thoracic aorta (AO) caliber in 12 patients with primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) with measurements made in eight other patients who were observed for diseases other than heart disease (controls). The ratio MPA/AO and the ratios of vessel caliber normalized to body surface area (MPAI and AOI, respectively) were computed. The PAP was obtained in all PPH patients and compared with caliber measurements. The PPH MPA (3.6 +/- 0.8 cm) was significantly larger than the control MPA (2.9 +/- 0.3 cm, p = 0.02); the PPH MPAI (2.8 +/- 0.7 cm/M2) was significantly greater than the control MPA (1.7 +/- 0.2 cm/M2, p < 0.0001). Control AO (2.2 +/- 0.3 cm) was significantly greater than PPH AO (1.6 +/- 0.4 cm, p < 0.0001); there was no significant difference between control AOI (1.3 +/- 0.2 cm/M2) and PPH AOI (1.2 +/- 0.2 cm/M2, p = 0.25). The PPH MPA/AO (2.3 +/- 0.6) was significantly greater than the control MPA/AO (1.3 +/- 0.1, p < 0.0001); overlap between MPA in the two groups was eliminated by indexing values to AO caliber (MPA/AO). Among PPH patients there was strong correlation between PAP and MPA/AO (PAP = 24 x MPA/AO + 3.7, r = 0.7, p < 0.01). Increased MPA/AO denotes the presence of pulmonary hypertension and may be used to estimate PAP.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Guo, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most widely used instrumental methods, with applications ranging from the characterization of pure compounds by high-resolution NMR to the diagnosis of disease by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To give some idea of the wide-spread use of NMR, a computer search for the period 1985-1987 turned up over 500 books and review articles and over 7000 literature citations, not including papers in which NMR was used together with other spectroscopic methods for the routine identification of organic compounds. Consequently, they have by necessity been somewhat selective in the topics they have chosen to cover and in the articles they have cited. In this review, which covers the published literature for the approximate period Sept 1985-Aug 1987, they have focused on new developments and applications of interest to the chemist. First they review recent developments in instrumentation and techniques. Although there have not been any major break-throughs in NMR instrumentation during the past two years, significant refinements have been reported which optimize instrumentation for the demanding multiple pulse experiments in routine use today. Next they review new developments in methods for processing NMR data, followed by reviews of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments

  20. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  1. The Combined Quantification and Interpretation of Multiple Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Metrics Enlightens Longitudinal Changes Compatible with Brain Repair in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnier, Guillaume; Maréchal, Benedicte; Fartaria, Mário João; Falkowskiy, Pavel; Marques, José P; Simioni, Samanta; Schluep, Myriam; Du Pasquier, Renaud; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Krueger, Gunnar; Granziera, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative and semi-quantitative MRI (qMRI) metrics provide complementary specificity and differential sensitivity to pathological brain changes compatible with brain inflammation, degeneration, and repair. Moreover, advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metrics with overlapping elements amplify the true tissue-related information and limit measurement noise. In this work, we combined multiple advanced MRI parameters to assess focal and diffuse brain changes over 2 years in a group of early-stage relapsing-remitting MS patients. Thirty relapsing-remitting MS patients with less than 5 years disease duration and nine healthy subjects underwent 3T MRI at baseline and after 2 years including T1, T2, T2* relaxometry, and magnetization transfer imaging. To assess longitudinal changes in normal-appearing (NA) tissue and lesions, we used analyses of variance and Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Multivariate linear regression was used to assess the correlation between clinical outcome and multiparametric MRI changes in lesions and NA tissue. In patients, we measured a significant longitudinal decrease of mean T2 relaxation times in NA white matter ( p  = 0.005) and a decrease of T1 relaxation times in the pallidum ( p  decrease in T1 relaxation time ( p -value  0.4, p  < 0.05). In summary, the combination of multiple advanced MRI provided evidence of changes compatible with focal and diffuse brain repair at early MS stages as suggested by histopathological studies.

  2. Real-Time Monitoring of Chemical Changes in Three Kinds of Fermented Milk Products during Fermentation Using Quantitative Difference Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Kwon, Yeondae; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2018-02-14

    Fermented milk products are rising in popularity throughout the world as a result of their health benefits, including improving digestion, normalizing the function of the immune system, and aiding in weight management. This study applies an in situ quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance method to monitor chemical changes in three kinds of fermented milk products, Bulgarian yogurt, Caspian Sea yogurt, and kefir, during fermentation. As a result, the concentration changes in nine organic compounds, α/β-lactose, α/β-galactose, lactic acid, citrate, ethanol, lecithin, and creatine, were monitored in real time. This revealed three distinct metabolic processes in the three fermented milk products. Moreover, pH changes were also determined by variations in the chemical shift of citric acid during the fermentation processes. These results can be applied to estimate microbial metabolism in various flora and help guide the fermentation and storage of various fermented milk products to improve their quality, which may directly influence human health.

  3. A comparative uncertainty study of the calibration of macrolide antibiotic reference standards using quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance and mass balance methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuyu; Hu Changqin

    2007-01-01

    This study introduces the general method of quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) for the calibration of reference standards of macrolide antibiotics. Several qNMR experimental conditions were optimized including delay, which is an important parameter of quantification. Three kinds of macrolide antibiotics were used to validate the accuracy of the qNMR method by comparison with the results obtained by the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The purities of five common reference standards of macrolide antibiotics were measured by the 1 H qNMR method and the mass balance method, respectively. The analysis results of the two methods were compared. The qNMR is quick and simple to use. In a new medicine research and development process, qNMR provides a new and reliable method for purity analysis of the reference standard

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  7. Precision of 3.0 Tesla quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage morphology in a multicentre clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, F; Buck, R J; Burstein, D; Charles, H C; Crim, J; Hudelmaier, M; Hunter, D J; Hutchins, G; Jackson, C; Kraus, V Byers; Lane, N E; Link, T M; Majumdar, L S; Mazzuca, S; Prasad, P V; Schnitzer, T J; Taljanovic, M S; Vaz, A; Wyman, B; Le Graverand, M-P Hellio

    2008-12-01

    Quantitative MRI (qMRI) of cartilage morphology is a promising tool for disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD) development. Recent studies at single sites have indicated that measurements at 3.0 Tesla (T) are more reproducible (precise) than those at 1.5 T. Precision errors and stability in multicentre studies with imaging equipment from various vendors have, however, not yet been evaluated. A total of 158 female participants (97 Kellgren and Lawrence grade (KLG) 0, 31 KLG 2 and 30 KLG 3) were imaged at 7 clinical centres using Siemens Magnetom Trio and GE Signa Excite magnets. Double oblique coronal acquisitions were obtained at baseline and at 3 months, using water excitation spoiled gradient echo sequences (1.0x0.31x0.31 mm3 resolution). Segmentation of femorotibial cartilage morphology was performed using proprietary software (Chondrometrics GmbH, Ainring, Germany). The precision error (root mean square coefficient of variation (RMS CV)%) for cartilage thickness/volume measurements ranged from 2.1%/2.4% (medial tibia) to 2.9%/3.3% (lateral weight-bearing femoral condyle) across all participants. No significant differences in precision errors were observed between KLGs, imaging sites, or scanner manufacturers/types. Mean differences between baseline and 3 months ranged from <0.1% (non-significant) in the medial to 0.94% (p<0.01) in the lateral femorotibial compartment, and were 0.33% (p<0.02) for the total femorotibial subchondral bone area. qMRI performed at 3.0 T provides highly reproducible measurements of cartilage morphology in multicentre clinical trials with equipment from different vendors. The technology thus appears sufficiently robust to be recommended for large-scale multicentre trials.

  8. Quantitative Renal Cortical Perfusion in Human Subjects with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles: Influence of T1 Shortening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morell, A.; Ahlstrom, H.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Abildgaard, A.; Bock, M.; Bjoernerud, A. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Uppsala Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2008-10-15

    Background: Using conventional contrast agents, the technique of quantitative perfusion by observing the transport of a bolus with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is limited to the brain due to extravascular leakage. Purpose: To perform quantitative perfusion measurements in humans with an intravascular contrast agent, and to estimate the influence of the T1 relaxivity of the contrast agent on the first-pass response. Material and Methods: Renal cortical perfusion was measured quantitatively in six patients with unilateral renal artery stenosis using a rapid gradient double-echo sequence in combination with an intravenous bolus injection of NC100150 Injection, an intravascular contrast agent based on iron-oxide nanoparticles. The influence of T1 relaxivity was measured by comparing perfusion results based on single- and double-echo data. Results: The mean values of cortical blood flow, cortical blood volume, and mean transit time in the normal kidneys were measured to 339+-60 ml/min/100 g, 41+-8 ml/100 g, and 7.3+-1.0 s, respectively, based on double-echo data. The corresponding results based on single-echo data, which are not compensated for the T1 relaxivity, were 254+-47 ml/min/100 g, 27+-3 ml/100 g, and 6+-1.2 s, respectively. Conclusion: The use of a double-echo sequence enabled elimination of confounding T1 effects and consequent systematic underestimation of the perfusion.

  9. Investigation into the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of choroidal melanoma through magnetic resonance imaging and B-scan ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papayiannis V

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Vassilis Papayiannis,1 Konstantinos T Tsaousis,2,3 Constantinos A Kouskouras,4 Afroditi Haritanti,4 Vasilios F Diakonis,5 Ioannis T Tsinopoulos2 1Department of Radiology, Papageorgiou General Hospital, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 3John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 4Department of Radiology, AHEPA Aristotle University Hospital of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 5Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA Objective: To investigate the homogeneity and vascularity of choroidal melanoma through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and brightness modulation (B-mode ultrasound scan and their correlation with dimensions of tumor, as well as to measure the sensitivity of both modalities in retinal detachment (RD detection.Materials and methods: This retrospective chart review included patients diagnosed with choroidal melanoma. All these patients underwent MRI scans using T2-weighted (T2-WI and T1-weighted (T1-WI sequences, before and after an intravenous injection of paramagnetic contrast material. The patients were also examined using a B-mode ultrasound scan, and the results from both modalities were compared (tumor homogeneity, tumor height, tumor base diameter, and tumor vascularity.Results: Forty-two patients (mean age =65.33±12.51 years with choroidal melanoma were included in the study. Homogeneity was confirmed in 16 patients through ultrasound scan, in 19 patients through T1-WI sequence, in 21 patients through T2-WI sequence, and in 25 patients through T1-WI sequence + contrast (gadolinium. Patients with homogenous tumors presented with lower (P=0.0045 mean height than that of those with nonhomogenous tumors, whereas no statistically significant difference was found for base diameter measurements (P=0.056. Patients with tumors of high vascularity presented with greater mean height (P=0.000638 and

  10. Investigation into the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of choroidal melanoma through magnetic resonance imaging and B-scan ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papayiannis, Vassilis; Tsaousis, Konstantinos T; Kouskouras, Constantinos A; Haritanti, Afroditi; Diakonis, Vasilios F; Tsinopoulos, Ioannis T

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the homogeneity and vascularity of choroidal melanoma through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and brightness modulation (B-mode) ultrasound scan and their correlation with dimensions of tumor, as well as to measure the sensitivity of both modalities in retinal detachment (RD) detection. This retrospective chart review included patients diagnosed with choroidal melanoma. All these patients underwent MRI scans using T2-weighted (T2-WI) and T1-weighted (T1-WI) sequences, before and after an intravenous injection of paramagnetic contrast material. The patients were also examined using a B-mode ultrasound scan, and the results from both modalities were compared (tumor homogeneity, tumor height, tumor base diameter, and tumor vascularity). Forty-two patients (mean age=65.33±12.51 years) with choroidal melanoma were included in the study. Homogeneity was confirmed in 16 patients through ultrasound scan, in 19 patients through T1-WI sequence, in 21 patients through T2-WI sequence, and in 25 patients through T1-WI sequence + contrast (gadolinium). Patients with homogenous tumors presented with lower ( P =0.0045) mean height than that of those with nonhomogenous tumors, whereas no statistically significant difference was found for base diameter measurements ( P =0.056). Patients with tumors of high vascularity presented with greater mean height ( P =0.000638) and greater mean base diameter compared with those with tumors of low vascularity ( P =0.019543). RD was detected in 26 patients through T1-WI sequence, in 13 patients through T2-WI sequence, in 26 patients through T1-WI sequence + contrast, and in 32 patients through ultrasound scan, which proved to be the most sensitive modality. The height of choroidal melanoma was positively correlated with tumor's homogeneity. Melanomas of greater height were found to be less homogenous, due to increased degeneration and higher occurrence of intratumoral hemorrhage. In addition, choroidal melanoma's height was also

  11. Low rank magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Gal; Weizman, Lior; Tal, Assaf; Eldar, Yonina C

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) is a relatively new approach that provides quantitative MRI using randomized acquisition. Extraction of physical quantitative tissue values is preformed off-line, based on acquisition with varying parameters and a dictionary generated according to the Bloch equations. MRF uses hundreds of radio frequency (RF) excitation pulses for acquisition, and therefore high under-sampling ratio in the sampling domain (k-space) is required. This under-sampling causes spatial artifacts that hamper the ability to accurately estimate the quantitative tissue values. In this work, we introduce a new approach for quantitative MRI using MRF, called Low Rank MRF. We exploit the low rank property of the temporal domain, on top of the well-known sparsity of the MRF signal in the generated dictionary domain. We present an iterative scheme that consists of a gradient step followed by a low rank projection using the singular value decomposition. Experiments on real MRI data demonstrate superior results compared to conventional implementation of compressed sensing for MRF at 15% sampling ratio.

  12. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  13. Magnetic resonance in neuroborreliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustymowicz, A.; Zajkowska, J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is commonly used in diagnosing infections of the central nervous system. The aim of the study is to evaluate central nervous system changes in neuroborreliosis patients. MR examinations were performed in 44 patients with clinical symptoms, epidemiology and laboratory tests results of neuroborreliosis. Abnormalities were detected in 22 patients. Most of them presented cortico-subcortical atrophy (86%). In 9 cases foci of increased signal in T2-weighted and FLAIR images were observed in white matter. They were single or multiple, located subcorticaly and paraventriculary. In 2 subjects areas of increased signal were found in the brain stem. Central nervous system abnormalities detected with MR are not specific for Lyme disease. They can suggest demyelinating lesions and/or gliosis observed in many nervous system disorders (SM, ADEM, lacunar infarcts). (author)

  14. Cine magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.; Sechtem, U.P.; Pflugfelder, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance (MR) is a fast MR imaging process with referencing of the imaging data to the electrocardiogram (ECG) so that images corresponding to 21-msec segments of the cardiac cycle are acquired. A series of such images, each corresponding to a 21-msec segment of the cardiac cycle, can be laced together for viewing in the cine format at a framing rate of 20 to 40 frames per second. Since cine angiograms of the heart are usually done at 30 frames per second, this technique achieves a temporal resolution adequate for the evluation of central cardiovascular function. The major application of this technique is to depict central cardiovascular function and blood flow

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... for an MRI exam contains a metal called gadolinium . Gadolinium can be used in patients with iodine ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, ... Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  18. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R. (Florence Univ. (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R.

    1994-01-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs

  20. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Ewald; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Windischberger, Christian; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods are non-invasive techniques to provide detailed, multi-parametric information on human anatomy, function and metabolism. Sensitivity, specificity, spatial and temporal resolution may, however, vary depending on hardware (e.g., field strength, gradient strength and speed) and software (optimised measurement protocols and parameters for the various techniques). Furthermore, multi-modality imaging may enhance specificity to better characterise complex disease patterns. Positron emission tomography (PET) is an interesting, largely complementary modality, which might be combined with MR. Despite obvious advantages, combining these rather different physical methods may also pose challenging problems. At this early stage, it seems that PET quality may be preserved in the magnetic field and, if an adequate detector material is used for the PET, MR sensitivity should not be significantly degraded. Again, this may vary for the different MR techniques, whereby functional and metabolic MR is more susceptible than standard anatomical imaging. Here we provide a short introduction to MR basics and MR techniques, also discussing advantages, artefacts and problems when MR hardware and PET detectors are combined. In addition to references for more detailed descriptions of MR fundamentals and applications, we provide an early outlook on this novel and exciting multi-modality approach to PET/MR. (orig.)

  2. [Quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images during chemoradiation therapy for cancer of the cervix uteri: Prognostic role of pretreatment diffusion coefficient values].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuzhyk, S A

    2015-01-01

    to carry out a quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI) in cancer of the cervix uteri (CCU) and to estimate the possibility of using pretreatment measured diffusion coefficient (MDC) to predict chemoradiation therapy (CRT). The investigation prospectively enrolled 46 women with morphologically verified Stages IB-IVB CCU. All the women underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic organs before and after treatment. A semiautomatic method was used to determine tumor signal intensity (SI) on DWI at b 1000 s/mm2 (SI b1000) and tumor MDC. The reproducibility of MDC measurements was assessed in 16 randomly selected women. The investigators compared the pretreatment quantitative DWI measures in complete and incomplete regression (CR and IR) groups and the presence and absence of tumor progression during a follow-up. An association of MDC with progression-free and overall survivals (PFS and OS) was determined in the patients. A semiautomatic tumor segmentation framework could determine the pretreatment quantitative DMI measures with minimal time spent and high reproducibility. The mean tumor MDC was 0.82 +/- 0.14 x 10(-3) mm2/s. CR and IR were established in 28 and 18 women, respectively. The MDC < or = 0.83 x 10(-3) mm2/s predicted CR with a sensitivity of 64.3% and a specificity of 77.8% (p=0.007). The median follow-up was 47 months (range, 3-82 months). With the MDC < or = 0.86 x 10(-3) mm2/s, 5-year PFS was 74.1% versus 42.1% with a higher MDC (p=0.023) and 5-year OS was 70.4 and 40.6%, respectively (p=0.021). The survival difference was insignificant in relation to the degree of tumor regression. The pretreatment IS at b1000 was of no prognostic value. The pretreatment tumor MDC may serve as a biomarker for predicting the efficiency of CRT for CCU.

  3. Quantitative description of the morphology and ossification center in the axial skeleton of 20-week gestation formalin-fixed human fetuses using magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabert, Steren; Villalobos, Manuel; Ulloa, Patricia; Salas, Rodrigo; Tejos, Cristian; San Martin, Sebastian; Pereda, Jaime

    2012-03-01

    Human tissues are usually studied using a series of two-dimensional visualizations of in vivo or cutout specimens. However, there is no precise anatomical description of some of the processes of human fetal development. The purpose of our study is to develop a quantitative description of the normal axial skeleton by means of high-resolution three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) images, collected from six normal 20-week-old human fetuses fixed in formaldehyde. Fetuses were collected after spontaneous abortion and subsequently fixed with formalin. They were imaged using a 1.5 T MR scanner with an isotropic spatial resolution of 200 µm. The correct tissue discrimination between ossified and cartilaginous bones was confirmed by comparing the images achieved by MR scans and computerized axial tomographies. The vertebral column was segmented out from each image using a specially developed semi-automatic algorithm. Vertebral body dimensions and inter-vertebral distances were larger in the lumbar region, in agreement with the beginning of the ossification process from the thoracolumbar region toward the sacral and cephalic ends. In this article, we demonstrate the feasibility of using MR images to study the ossification process in formalin-fixed fetal tissues. A quantitative description of the ossification centers of vertebral bodies and arches is presented. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Semi-quantitative assessment of right ventricular function in comparison to a 3D volumetric approach: A cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijveldt, Robin; Germans, Tjeerd; Rossum, Albert C. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands, Utrecht (Netherlands); McCann, Gerald P. [University Hospitals Leicester, Department of Cardiology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Beek, Aernout M. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-11-15

    Right ventricular (RV) volume measurements with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is considered the gold standard, but acquisition and analysis remain time-consuming. The aim of our study was therefore to investigate the accuracy and performance of a semi-quantitative assessment of RV function in CMR, compared to the standard quantitative approach. Seventy-five subjects with pulmonary hypertension (15), anterior myocardial infarction (15), inferior myocardial infarction (15), Brugada syndrome (15) and normal subjects (15) underwent cine CMR. RV end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes were determined to calculate RV ejection fraction (EF). Four-chamber cine images were used to measure tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE). RV fractional shortening (RVFS) was calculated by dividing TAPSE by the RV end-diastolic length. RV EF correlated significantly with TAPSE (r = 0.62, p < 0.01) and RVFS (r = 0.67, p < 0.01). Sensitivity to predict RV dysfunction was comparable between TAPSE and RVFS, with higher specificity for RVFS, but comparable areas under the ROC curve. Intra- and inter-observer variability of RV EF was better than TAPSE (3%/4% versus 7%/15%, respectively). For routine screening in clinical practice, TAPSE and RVFS seem reliable and easy methods to identify patients with RV dysfunction. The 3D volumetric approach is preferred to assess RV function for research purposes or to evaluate treatment response. (orig.)

  5. A novel non-destructive manner for quantitative determination of plumpness of live Eriocheir sinensis using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lingling; Zhang, Hongcai; Chen, Shunsheng

    2018-03-01

    The present study investigated the quantitative and non-destructive determination of Eriocheir sinensis' plumpness during four mature stages using low field-nuclear magnetic resonance (LF- 1 H NMR). Normalized lipid volume of live E. sinensis was calculated from Sept to Dec using 3D LF- 1 H nuclear magnetic imaging (MRI) and the validity of proposed technique was compared and verified with traditional Soxhlet extraction and live dissection method, respectively. The results showed the plumpness of female E. sinensis was higher than that of male ones from Sept to Dec and the highest plumpness of male and female E. sinensis reached 99,436.44 and 109,207.15mm 3 in Oct. The normalized lipid volume of live male and female E. sinensis had a positive correlation with lipid content. This proposed method with short assay time, favorable selectivity, and accuracy demonstrated its application potential in grading regulation and quality evaluation of live E. sinensis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  7. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkman, David J; Nunes, Rita G

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging has been the single biggest innovation in magnetic resonance imaging in the last decade. The use of multiple receiver coils to augment the time consuming Fourier encoding has reduced acquisition times significantly. This increase in speed comes at a time when other approaches to acquisition time reduction were reaching engineering and human limits. A brief summary of spatial encoding in MRI is followed by an introduction to the problem parallel imaging is designed to solve. There are a large number of parallel reconstruction algorithms; this article reviews a cross-section, SENSE, SMASH, g-SMASH and GRAPPA, selected to demonstrate the different approaches. Theoretical (the g-factor) and practical (coil design) limits to acquisition speed are reviewed. The practical implementation of parallel imaging is also discussed, in particular coil calibration. How to recognize potential failure modes and their associated artefacts are shown. Well-established applications including angiography, cardiac imaging and applications using echo planar imaging are reviewed and we discuss what makes a good application for parallel imaging. Finally, active research areas where parallel imaging is being used to improve data quality by repairing artefacted images are also reviewed. (invited topical review)

  8. Noncontrast Magnetic Resonance Lymphography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivé, Lionel; Derhy, Sarah; El Mouhadi, Sanaâ; Monnier-Cholley, Laurence; Menu, Yves; Becker, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Different imaging techniques have been used for the investigation of the lymphatic channels and lymph glands. Noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) lymphography has significant advantages in comparison with other imaging modalities. Noncontrast MR lymphography uses very heavily T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences which obtain a nearly complete signal loss in tissue background and specific display of lymphatic vessels with a long T2 relaxation time. The raw data can be processed with different algorithms such as maximum intensity projection algorithm to obtain an anatomic representation. Standard T2-weighted MR images easily demonstrate the location of edema. It appears as subcutaneous infiltration of soft tissue with a classical honeycomb pattern. True collection around the muscular area may be demonstrated in case of severe lymphedema. Lymph nodes may be normal in size, number, and signal intensity; in other cases, lymph nodes may be smaller in size or number of lymph nodes may be restricted. MR lymphography allows a classification of lymphedema in aplasia (no collecting vessels demonstrated); hypoplasia (a small number of lymphatic vessels), and numerical hyperplasia or hyperplasia (with an increased number of lymphatic vessels of greater and abnormal diameter). Noncontrast MR lymphography is a unique noninvasive imaging modality for the diagnosis of lymphedema. It can be used for positive diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and specific evaluation of lymphedema severity. It may also be used for follow-up evaluation after treatment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A.A. de; Doornbos, J.; Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Matheijssen, N.A.A.; Laarse, A. van der; Krauss, X.H.; Blokland, J.A.k.; Manger Cats, V.; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.

    1991-01-01

    The cardiovascular applications of MRI in coronary artery disease have considerably increased in recent years. Although many applications overlap those of other more cost-effective techniques, such as echocardiography, radionuclide angiography, and CT, MRI offers unique features not shared by the conventional techniques. Technical advantages are the excellent spatial resolution, the characterization of myocardial tissue, and the potential for three-dimensional imaging. This allows the accurate assessment of left ventricular mass and volume, the differentiation of infarcted tissue from normal myocardial tissue, and the determination of systolic wall thickening and regional wall motion abnormalities. Also inducible myocardial ischemia using pharmacological stress (dipyramidole or dobutamine) may be assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Future technical developments include real-time imaging and noninvasive visualization of the coronary arteries. These advantages will have a major impact on the application of MRI in coronary artery disease, potentially unsurpassed by other techniques and certainly justifying the expenses. Consequently, the clinical use of MRI for the detection of coronary artery disease largely depends on the progress of technical developments. (author). 134 refs.; 10 figs.; 2 tabs

  10. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  11. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  12. Quantitative T2 magnetic resonance imaging compared to morphological grading of the early cervical intervertebral disc degeneration: an evaluation approach in asymptomatic young adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of quantitative T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for quantifying early cervical intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration in asymptomatic young adults by correlating the T2 value with Pfirrmann grade, sex, and anatomic level. METHODS: Seventy asymptomatic young subjects (34 men and 36 women; mean age, 22.80±2.11 yr; range, 18-25 years underwent 3.0-T MRI to obtain morphological data (one T1-fast spin echo (FSE and three-plane T2-FSE, used to assign a Pfirrmann grade (I-V and for T2 mapping (multi-echo spin echo. T2 values in the nucleus pulposus (NP, n = 350 and anulus fibrosus (AF, n = 700 were obtained. Differences in T2 values between sexes and anatomic level were evaluated, and linear correlation analysis of T2 values versus degenerative grade was conducted. FINDINGS: Cervical IVDs of healthy young adults were commonly determined to be at Pfirrmann grades I and II. T2 values of NPs were significantly higher than those of AF at all anatomic levels (P0.05. T2 values decreased linearly with degenerative grade. Linear correlation analysis revealed a strong negative association between the Pfirrmann grade and the T2 values of the NP (P = 0.000 but not the T2 values of the AF (P = 0.854. However, non-degenerated discs (Pfirrmann grades I and II showed a wide range of T2 relaxation time. T2 values according to disc degeneration level classification were as follows: grade I (>62.03 ms, grade II (54.60-62.03 ms, grade III (<54.60 ms. CONCLUSIONS: T2 quantitation provides a more sensitive and robust approach for detecting and characterizing the early stage of cervical IVD degeneration and to create a reliable quantitative in healthy young adults.

  13. Comparison of contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqua Alessia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Contrast MRA (C-MRA is the standard for quantitative analysis of thoracic vessels. We evaluated a noncontrast MRA (NC-MRA sequence (3-D EKG and navigator-gated SSFP for quantitative evaluation of the thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries in young patients with congenital heart disease. Objective : To compare contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects. Methods : Measurements of thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries were obtained from C-MRA and NC-MRA images in 51 patients, ages 2-35 years. Vessel diameters were compared using correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. Interobserver variability was assessed using percent variation. Results : C-MRA and NC-MRA measurements were highly correlated (r = 0.91-0.98 except for the right pulmonary artery (r = 0.74, 0.78. Agreement of measurements was excellent (mean difference -0.07 to -0.53 mm; mean % difference -1.8 to -4.9% except for the right pulmonary artery which was less good (mean difference 0.73, -1.38 mm; -3, -10%. Interobserver variability ranged from 5% to 8% for aortic and from 10% to 16% for pulmonary artery measures. The worse agreement and greater variability of the pulmonary artery measures appears due to difficulty standardizing the measurements in patients with abnormal and irregular vessels. Conclusion : These data indicate that C-MRA and NC-MRA measures are comparable and could be used interchangeably, avoiding administration of contrast in selected patients.

  14. Quantitative T2 magnetic resonance imaging compared to morphological grading of the early cervical intervertebral disc degeneration: an evaluation approach in asymptomatic young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun; Huang, Minghua; Han, Zhihua; Shao, Lixin; Xie, Yan; Wu, Jianhong; Zhang, Yan; Xin, Hongkui; Ren, Aijun; Guo, Yong; Wang, Deli; He, Qing; Ruan, Dike

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of quantitative T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantifying early cervical intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration in asymptomatic young adults by correlating the T2 value with Pfirrmann grade, sex, and anatomic level. Seventy asymptomatic young subjects (34 men and 36 women; mean age, 22.80±2.11 yr; range, 18-25 years) underwent 3.0-T MRI to obtain morphological data (one T1-fast spin echo (FSE) and three-plane T2-FSE, used to assign a Pfirrmann grade (I-V)) and for T2 mapping (multi-echo spin echo). T2 values in the nucleus pulposus (NP, n = 350) and anulus fibrosus (AF, n = 700) were obtained. Differences in T2 values between sexes and anatomic level were evaluated, and linear correlation analysis of T2 values versus degenerative grade was conducted. Cervical IVDs of healthy young adults were commonly determined to be at Pfirrmann grades I and II. T2 values of NPs were significantly higher than those of AF at all anatomic levels (P0.05). T2 values decreased linearly with degenerative grade. Linear correlation analysis revealed a strong negative association between the Pfirrmann grade and the T2 values of the NP (P = 0.000) but not the T2 values of the AF (P = 0.854). However, non-degenerated discs (Pfirrmann grades I and II) showed a wide range of T2 relaxation time. T2 values according to disc degeneration level classification were as follows: grade I (>62.03 ms), grade II (54.60-62.03 ms), grade III (T2 quantitation provides a more sensitive and robust approach for detecting and characterizing the early stage of cervical IVD degeneration and to create a reliable quantitative in healthy young adults.

  15. Semiautomatic determination of arterial input functions for quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Julius; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Yoo Na; Yi, Chin A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a semiautomatic detection method for the arterial input functions (AIFs) using Kendall coefficient of concordance (KCC) for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in non-small cell lung cancer patients. We prospectively enrolled 28 patients (17 men, 11 women; mean age, 62 years) who had biopsy-proven non-small cell lung cancer. All enrolled patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the entire thorax. For the quantitative measurement of pharmacokinetic parameters, K and ve, of the lung cancers, AIFs were determined in 2 different ways: a manual method that involved 3 independent thoracic radiologists selecting a region of interest (ROI) within the aortic arch in the 2D coronal plane and a semiautomatic method that used in-house software to establish a KCC score, which provided a measure of similarity to typical AIF pattern. Three independent readers selected voxel clusters with high KCC scores calculated 3-dimensionally across planes in the data set. K and ve were correlated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and Bland-Altman plots were used to examine agreement across methods and reproducibility within a method. Arterial input functions were determined using the data from ROI volumes that were significantly larger in the semiautomatic method (mean ± SD, 3360 ± 768 mm) than in the manual method (677 ± 380 mm) (P < 0.001). K showed very strong agreement (ICC, 0.927) and ve showed moderately strong agreement (ICC, 0.718) between the semiautomatic and manual methods. The reproducibility for K (ICCmanual, 0.813 and ICCsemiautomatic, 0.998; P < 0.001) and ve (ICCmanual, 0.455 and ICCsemiautomatic, 0.985, P < 0.001) was significantly better with the semiautomatic method than the manual method. We found semiautomated detection using KCC to be a robust method for determining the AIF. This method allows for larger ROIs specified in 3D across planes

  16. Clinically Relevant Subregions of Articular Cartilage of the Hip for Analysis and Reporting Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowiec, Rachel K; Lucas, Erin P; Wilson, Katharine J; Saroki, Adriana J; Ho, Charles P

    2014-01-01

    Before quantitative imaging techniques can become clinically valuable, the method, and more specifically, the regions of locating and reporting these values should be standardized toward reproducibility comparisons across centers and longitudinal follow-up of individual patients. The purpose of this technical note is to describe a rigorous and reproducible method of locating, analyzing, and reporting quantitative MRI values in hip articular cartilage with an approach that is consistent with current orthopedic literature. To demonstrate this localization and documentation, 3 patients (age, 23 ± 5.1 years; 2 males, 1 female) who presented with symptomatic mixed-type femoroacetabular impingement (α angle, 63.3° ± 2.1°; center edge angle, 39° ± 4.2°) were evaluated with T2-mapping at 3 T MRI prior to hip arthroscopy. Manual segmentation was performed and cartilage of the acetabulum and femur was divided into 12 subregions adapted from the geographic zone method. Bone landmarks in the acetabulum and femur, identifiable both in arthroscopy and MR images, were manually selected and the coordinates exported for division of cartilage. Mean T2 values in each zone are presented. The current work outlines a standardized system to locate and describe quantitative mapping values that could aid in surgical decision making, planning, and the noninvasive longitudinal follow-up of implemented cartilage preservation and restoration techniques.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast material will be ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the technologist or scheduler before the exam. ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  8. A quantitative analysis of the diurnal evolution of Ionospheric Alfvén resonator magnetic resonance features and calculation of changing IAR parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Hebden

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Resonance features of the Ionospheric Alfvén Resonator (IAR can be observed in pulsation magnetometer data from Sodankylä, Finland using dynamic spectra visualizations. IAR resonance features were identified on 13 of 30 days in October 1998, with resonance structures lasting for 3 or more hours over 10 intervals. The diurnal evolution of the harmonic features was quantified for these 10 intervals using a manual cursor-clicking technique. The resonance features displayed strong linear relationships between harmonic frequency and harmonic number for all of the time intervals studied, enabling a homogeneous cavity model for the IAR to be adopted to interpret the data. This enabled the diurnal variation of the effective size of the IAR to be obtained for each of the 10 time intervals. The average effective size was found to be 530 km, and to have an average variation of 32% over each time interval: small compared to the average variation in Alfvén velocity of 61%. Thus the diurnal variation of the harmonics is chiefly caused by the changing plasma density within the IAR due to changing insolation. This study confirms Odzimek (2004 that the dominating factor affecting the IAR eigenfrequencies is the variation in the Alfvén velocity at the F-layer ion-density peak, with the changing IAR size affecting the IAR eigenfrequencies to a smaller extent. Another IAR parameter was derived from the analysis of the IAR resonance features associated with the phase matching structure of the standing waves in the IAR. This parameter varied over the time intervals studied by 20% on average, possibly due to changing ionospheric conductivity. Keywords. Ionosphere (Auroral ionosphere;Wave propagation – Radio science (Electromagnetic noise and interference

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Chapter 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M. O. [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    In Chapter 14, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance were presented, along with an introduction to image forming processes. In this chapter, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be reviewed, beginning with the hardware needed and its impact on image quality. The acquisition processes and image reconstruction will be discussed, as well as the artefacts that are possible, with discussion of the important area of safety and bioeffects completing the chapter.

  10. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyer, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The spectroscopy of nuclear magnetic resonance constitutes a major analytical technique in biological and organic analysis. This technique appears now in the programme of preparatory classes and its teaching is developed in the second year of DEUG. The following article reviews on the nuclear magnetic resonance and on the possibilities it offers to bring to the fore the physico-chemical properties of molecules. (N.C.)

  11. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus including a coil for generating a gradient field in a plane perpendicular to a static magnetic field, means for controlling the operation of the coil to rotationally shift in angular steps the gradient direction of the gradient field at an angle pitch of some multiple of the unit index angle through a plurality of rotations to assume all the shift positions of the gradient direction, a rough image reconstructor for reconstructing a rough tomographic image on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals acquired during a rotation of the second gradient magnetic field, a rough image display for depicting the rough tomographic image, a final image reconstructor for reconstructing a final tomographic image on the basis of all nuclear magnetic resonance signals corresponding to all of the expected rotation shift positions acquired during a plurality of rotations and a final image display for depicting the final tomographic image

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance and earth magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance concerns nuclei whose spin is different from 0. These nuclei exposed to a magnetic field is comparable to a peg top spinning around its axis while being moved by a precession movement called Larmor precession. This article presents an experiment whose aim is to reveal nuclear magnetism of nuclei by observing Larmor precession phenomena due to the earth magnetic field. The earth magnetic field being too weak, it is necessary to increase the magnetization of the sample during a polarization phase. First the sample is submitted to a magnetic field B perpendicular to the earth magnetic field B 0 , then B is cut off and the nuclei move back to their equilibrium position by executing a precession movement due to B 0 field. (A.C.)

  14. Region-specific effects on brain metabolites of hypoxia and hyperoxia overlaid on cerebral ischemia in young and old rats: a quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliani Patricia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both hypoxia and hyperoxia, deregulating the oxidative balance, may play a role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders underlain by cerebral ischemia. In the present study, quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to evaluate regional metabolic alterations, following a 24-hour hypoxic or hyperoxic exposure on the background of ischemic brain insult, in two contrasting age-groups of rats: young - 3 months old and aged - 24 months old. Methods Cerebral ischemia was induced by ligation of the right common carotid artery. Concentrations of eight metabolites (alanine, choline-containing compounds, total creatine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, lactate, myo-inositol and N-acetylaspartate were quantified from extracts in three different brain regions (fronto-parietal and occipital cortices and the hippocampus from both hemispheres. Results In the control normoxic condition, there were significant increases in lactate and myo-inositol concentrations in the hippocampus of the aged rats, compared with the respective values in the young ones. In the ischemia-hypoxia condition, the most prevalent changes in the brain metabolites were found in the hippocampal regions of both young and aged rats; but the effects were more evident in the aged animals. The ischemia-hyperoxia procedure caused less dedicated changes in the brain metabolites, which may reflect more limited tissue damage. Conclusions We conclude that the hippocampus turns out to be particularly susceptible to hypoxia overlaid on cerebral ischemia and that old age further increases this susceptibility.

  15. Restoration of myocardial blood flow following percutaneous coronary balloon dilatation and stent implantation: Assessment with qualitative and quantitative contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensky, P.R.; Samani, N.J.; Horsfield, M.A.; Cherryman, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To examine the serial use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate regional myocardial perfusion changes following percutaneous coronary angioplasty and stent implantation (PTCA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six patients with single vessel coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent contrast-enhanced first pass MRI immediately prior to (visit A) and within 7 days after (visit B) PTCA. Three sequential short axis slices were obtained after gadodiamide (Gd) bolus (0.025 mmol/kg -1 ) at rest and during adenosine. Each short axis was divided radially into eight regions of interest (ROIs). ROIs were anatomically assigned to a coronary artery territory (CAT). Stress and rest qualitative and quantitative (unidirectional extraction fraction constant (K i ); index of myocardial perfusion reserve (MPRI) = stressK i / restK i ) perfusion parameters were determined for ROI supplied by remote and stenosed/stented vessels for each visit. RESULTS: In stented ROIs the number of ROIs demonstrating normal perfusion, as opposed to reversible perfusion deficits, increased. Qualitative perfusion assessment in remote CATs was unchanged. MPRI in stenotic CATs was lower than in remote CATs at visit A (P < 0.001). Following PTCA, MPRI increased in stented CATs (P < 0.001) but was unchanged in remote CATs. CONCLUSION: Restoration of myocardial perfusion following PTCA can be delineated with qualitative and quantitative perfusion MRI. Although at present the investigation is technically complex and not perfectly sensitive or specific, MRI has the potential to be a valuable tool for patient follow-up and evaluation of revascularization strategy efficacy. Sensky, P.R. et al. (2002)

  16. Quantitative correlational study of microbubble-enhanced ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging of glioma and early response to radiotherapy in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chen [Department of Ultrasound, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310022 (China); Lee, Dong-Hoon; Zhang, Kai; Li, Wenxiao; Zhou, Jinyuan [Division of MR Research, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Mangraviti, Antonella; Tyler, Betty [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Su, Lin; Zhang, Yin; Zhang, Bin; Wong, John; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Velarde, Esteban; Ding, Kai, E-mail: kding1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy remains a major treatment method for malignant tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard modality for assessing glioma treatment response in the clinic. Compared to MRI, ultrasound imaging is low-cost and portable and can be used during intraoperative procedures. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively compare contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and MRI of irradiated gliomas in rats and to determine which quantitative ultrasound imaging parameters can be used for the assessment of early response to radiation in glioma. Methods: Thirteen nude rats with U87 glioma were used. A small thinned skull window preparation was performed to facilitate ultrasound imaging and mimic intraoperative procedures. Both CEUS and MRI with structural, functional, and molecular imaging parameters were performed at preradiation and at 1 day and 4 days postradiation. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the correlations between MRI and CEUS parameters and the changes between pre- and postradiation imaging. Results: Area under the curve (AUC) in CEUS showed significant difference between preradiation and 4 days postradiation, along with four MRI parameters, T{sub 2}, apparent diffusion coefficient, cerebral blood flow, and amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) (all p < 0.05). The APTw signal was correlated with three CEUS parameters, rise time (r = − 0.527, p < 0.05), time to peak (r = − 0.501, p < 0.05), and perfusion index (r = 458, p < 0.05). Cerebral blood flow was correlated with rise time (r = − 0.589, p < 0.01) and time to peak (r = − 0.543, p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI can be used for the assessment of radiotherapy treatment response and CEUS with AUC as a new technique and can also be one of the assessment methods for early response to radiation in glioma.

  17. Quantitative assessment of changes in carotid plaques during cilostazol administration using three-dimensional ultrasonography and non-gated magnetic resonance plaque imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Mao; Ohba, Hideki; Mori, Kiyofumi; Narumi, Shinsuke; Katsura, Noriyuki; Ohura, Kazumasa; Terayama, Yasuo [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurology and Gerontology, Morioka (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke [Iwate Medical University, Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Morioka (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Cilostazol, an antiplatelet agent, is reported to induce the regression of atherosclerotic changes. However, its effects on carotid plaques are unknown. Hence, we quantitatively investigated the changes that occur within carotid plaques during cilostazol administration using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonography (US) and non-gated magnetic resonance (MR) plaque imaging. We prospectively examined 16 consecutive patients with carotid stenosis. 3D-US and T1-weighted MR plaque imaging were performed at baseline and 6 months after initiating cilostazol therapy (200 mg/day). We measured the volume and grayscale median (GSM) of the plaques from 3D-US data. We also calculated the contrast ratio (CR) of the carotid plaque against the adjacent muscle and areas of the intraplaque components: fibrous tissue, lipid, and hemorrhage components. The plaque volume on US decreased significantly (median at baseline and 6 months, 0.23 and 0.21 cm{sup 3}, respectively; p = 0.03). In the group exhibiting a plaque volume reduction of more than 10%, GSM on US increased significantly (24.8 and 71.5, respectively; p = 0.04) and CR on MRI decreased significantly (1.13 and 1.04, respectively; p = 0.02). In this group, in addition, the percent area of the fibrous component on MRI increased significantly (68.6% and 79.4%, respectively; p = 0.02), while those of the lipid and hemorrhagic components decreased (24.9% and 20.5%, respectively; p = 0.12) (1.0% and 0.0%, respectively; p = 0.04). There were no substantial changes in intraplaque characteristics in either US or MRI in the other group. 3D-US and MR plaque imaging can quantitatively detect changes in the size and composition of carotid plaques during cilostazol therapy. (orig.)

  18. Reliability of a novel, semi-quantitative scale for classification of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Simona; Cioni, Giovanni; Klingels, Katrjin; Ortibus, Els; Van Gestel, Leen; Rose, Stephen; Boyd, Roslyn N; Feys, Hilde; Guzzetta, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    To describe the development of a novel rating scale for classification of brain structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to assess its interrater and intrarater reliability. The scale consists of three sections. Section 1 contains descriptive information about the patient and MRI. Section 2 contains the graphical template of brain hemispheres onto which the lesion is transposed. Section 3 contains the scoring system for the quantitative analysis of the lesion characteristics, grouped into different global scores and subscores that assess separately side, regions, and depth. A larger interrater and intrarater reliability study was performed in 34 children with CP (22 males, 12 females; mean age at scan of 9 y 5 mo [SD 3 y 3 mo], range 4 y-16 y 11 mo; Gross Motor Function Classification System level I, [n=22], II [n=10], and level III [n=2]). Very high interrater and intrarater reliability of the total score was found with indices above 0.87. Reliability coefficients of the lobar and hemispheric subscores ranged between 0.53 and 0.95. Global scores for hemispheres, basal ganglia, brain stem, and corpus callosum showed reliability coefficients above 0.65. This study presents the first visual, semi-quantitative scale for classification of brain structural MRI in children with CP. The high degree of reliability of the scale supports its potential application for investigating the relationship between brain structure and function and examining treatment response according to brain lesion severity in children with CP. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Permanent cosmetics or tattoos Dentures/teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets Medication patch (i. ... or longer. You’ll be told ahead of time just how long your scan is expected to ...

  20. Orbital benign and malignant lymphoproliferative disorders: Differentiation using semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hao; Xu, Xiao-Quan; Liu, Hu; Hong, Xun-Ning; Shi, Hai-Bin; Wu, Fei-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) in differentiating benign from malignant orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (OLPDs). Methods: Thirty-nine patients with orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (21 malignant and 18 benign) underwent DCE-MRI scan for pre-treatment evaluation from March 2013 to December 2015. Both semi-quantitative (TTP, AUC, Slope max ) and quantitative (K trans , k ep , v e ) parameters were calculated, and compared between two groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were used to determine the diagnostic value of each significant parameter. Results: Malignant OLPDs showed significantly higher k ep , lower v e , and lower AUC than benign OLPDs, while no significant differences were found on K trans , TTP and Slope max . ROC analyses indicated that v e exhibited the best diagnostic performance in predicting malignant OLPDs (cutoff value, 0.211; area under the curve, 0.896; sensitivity, 76.2%; specificity, 94.9%), followed by k ep (cutoff value, 0.853; area under the curve, 0.839; sensitivity, 85.7%; specificity, 89.9%). Conclusion: DCE-MRI and specially its derived quantitative parameters of k ep and v e are promising metrics for differentiating malignant from benign OLPDs.

  1. Orbital benign and malignant lymphoproliferative disorders: Differentiation using semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hao; Xu, Xiao-Quan [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Liu, Hu [Department of Ophthalmology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Hong, Xun-Ning; Shi, Hai-Bin [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wu, Fei-Yun, E-mail: wfydd_njmu@163.com [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2017-03-15

    Objectives: To assess the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) in differentiating benign from malignant orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (OLPDs). Methods: Thirty-nine patients with orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (21 malignant and 18 benign) underwent DCE-MRI scan for pre-treatment evaluation from March 2013 to December 2015. Both semi-quantitative (TTP, AUC, Slope{sub max}) and quantitative (K{sup trans}, k{sub ep}, v{sub e}) parameters were calculated, and compared between two groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were used to determine the diagnostic value of each significant parameter. Results: Malignant OLPDs showed significantly higher k{sub ep}, lower v{sub e}, and lower AUC than benign OLPDs, while no significant differences were found on K{sup trans}, TTP and Slope{sub max}. ROC analyses indicated that v{sub e} exhibited the best diagnostic performance in predicting malignant OLPDs (cutoff value, 0.211; area under the curve, 0.896; sensitivity, 76.2%; specificity, 94.9%), followed by k{sub ep} (cutoff value, 0.853; area under the curve, 0.839; sensitivity, 85.7%; specificity, 89.9%). Conclusion: DCE-MRI and specially its derived quantitative parameters of k{sub ep} and v{sub e} are promising metrics for differentiating malignant from benign OLPDs.

  2. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR Study for the Detection and Quantitation of Cholesterol in HSV529 Therapeutic Vaccine Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahima Khatun

    Full Text Available This study describes the NMR-based method to determine the limit of quantitation (LOQ and limit of detection (LOD of cholesterol, a process-related impurity in the replication-deficient Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV type 2 candidate vaccine HSV529. Three signature peaks from the 1D 1H NMR of a cholesterol reference spectrum were selected for the identification of cholesterol. The LOQ for a cholesterol working standard was found to be 1 μg/mL, and the LOD was found to be 0.1 μg/mL. The identity of cholesterol, separated from the formulation of growth supplement by thin layer chromatography (TLC, was confirmed by 1D 1H NMR and 2D 1H-13C HSQC NMR. The three signature peaks of cholesterol were detected only in a six-times concentrated sample of HSV529 candidate vaccine sample and not in the single dose HSV529 vaccine sample under similar experimental conditions. Taken together, the results demonstrated that NMR is a direct method that can successfully identify and quantify cholesterol in viral vaccine samples, such as HSV529, and as well as in the growth supplement used during the upstream stages of HSV529 manufacturing. Keywords: Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2, Viral vaccine, NMR, Residuals, LOD and LOQ, TLC, Growth supplement

  4. Qualitative and quantitative assessments of knee magnetic resonance imaging: Comparison with 1.5T and 3.0T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Eun Hoe [Dept. of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    This study aims to conduct an analysis in order to compare the differences in the generation of artifacts occurring due to the difference between 1.5 T and 3.0 T MRI equipment with three types of pulse sequence applied to the knee MRI. with data on 121 patients transmitted to PACS, this study qualitatively analyzed SNRs and carried out a qualitative evaluation, dividing AC, ACL and PCL into three steps. In the quantitative analysis, The SNRs of 3.0 T MRI showed a more significant result, which was higher than that measured in the 1.5 T MRI (p<0.05). In the qualitative analysis, also showed similar to results when compared with 1.5 T (p<0.05). In conclusion, the increased signal to noise ratio at 3.0 T resulted in a better visibility of the majority of AC, ACL, PCL structures as compared to 1.5 T equipment. This study will become the guidelines for musculoskeletal system when examining the patients in knee MRI using the two types of equipment in the clinical setting in the future.

  5. The Combined Quantification and Interpretation of Multiple Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Metrics Enlightens Longitudinal Changes Compatible with Brain Repair in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Bonnier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveQuantitative and semi-quantitative MRI (qMRI metrics provide complementary specificity and differential sensitivity to pathological brain changes compatible with brain inflammation, degeneration, and repair. Moreover, advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI metrics with overlapping elements amplify the true tissue-related information and limit measurement noise. In this work, we combined multiple advanced MRI parameters to assess focal and diffuse brain changes over 2 years in a group of early-stage relapsing-remitting MS patients.MethodsThirty relapsing-remitting MS patients with less than 5 years disease duration and nine healthy subjects underwent 3T MRI at baseline and after 2 years including T1, T2, T2* relaxometry, and magnetization transfer imaging. To assess longitudinal changes in normal-appearing (NA tissue and lesions, we used analyses of variance and Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Multivariate linear regression was used to assess the correlation between clinical outcome and multiparametric MRI changes in lesions and NA tissue.ResultsIn patients, we measured a significant longitudinal decrease of mean T2 relaxation times in NA white matter (p = 0.005 and a decrease of T1 relaxation times in the pallidum (p < 0.05, which are compatible with edema reabsorption and/or iron deposition. No longitudinal changes in qMRI metrics were observed in controls. In MS lesions, we measured a decrease in T1 relaxation time (p-value < 2.2e−16 and a significant increase in MTR (p-value < 1e−6, suggesting repair mechanisms, such as remyelination, increased axonal density, and/or a gliosis. Last, the evolution of advanced MRI metrics—and not changes in lesions or brain volume—were correlated to motor and cognitive tests scores evolution (Adj-R2 > 0.4, p < 0.05. In summary, the combination of multiple advanced MRI provided evidence of changes compatible with focal and diffuse brain repair at

  6. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, Louise; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Thomsen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics...

  7. Evaluation of bone involvement in patients with Gaucher disease: a semi-quantitative magnetic resonance imaging method (using ROI estimation of bone lesion) as an alternative method to semi-quantitative methods used so far.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komninaka, Veroniki; Kolomodi, Dionysia; Christoulas, Dimitrios; Marinakis, Theodoros; Papatheodorou, Athanasios; Repa, Konstantina; Voskaridou, Ersi; Revenas, Konstantinos; Terpos, Evangelos

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate bone involvement in patients with Gaucher disease (GD) and to propose a novel semi-quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging. MRI of the lumbar spine, femur, and tibia was performed in 24 patients with GD and 24 healthy controls. We also measured circulating levels of C-C motif ligand-3 (CCL-3) chemokine, C-telopeptide of collagen type-1 (CTX), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform type-b (TRACP-5b). We used the following staging based on MRI data: stage I: region of interest (ROI) 1/2 of normal values and bone infiltration up to 30%; stage II: ROI 1/3 of normal values and bone infiltration from 30 to 60%; stage III: ROI 1/4 of normal values and bone infiltration from 60% to 80%; and stage IV: detection of epiphyseal infiltration, osteonecrosis and deformity regardless of the ROI's values. All but two patients had abnormal MRI findings: 9 (37.5%), 6 (25%), 3 (12.5%), and 4 (16.7%) had stages I-IV, respectively. Patients with GD had elevated chitotriosidase, serum TRACP-5b, and CCL-3 levels (P < 0.001). We propose an easily reproducible semi-quantitative scoring system and confirm that patients with GD have abnormal MRI bone findings and enhanced osteoclast activity possibly due to elevated CCL-3. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Quantitative circumferential strain analysis using adenosine triphosphate-stress/rest 3-T tagged magnetic resonance to evaluate regional contractile dysfunction in ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Masashi, E-mail: m.nakamura1230@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Shitsukawa, Toon-city, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Kido, Tomoyuki [Department of Radiology, Saiseikai Matsuyama Hospital, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Kido, Teruhito; Tanabe, Yuki; Matsuda, Takuya; Nishiyama, Yoshiko; Miyagawa, Masao; Mochizuki, Teruhito [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Shitsukawa, Toon-city, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Infarcted segments could be differentiated from non-ischemic and ischemic segments with high sensitivity and specificity under at rest conditions. • The time-to-peak circumferential strain values in infarcted segments were more significantly delayed than those in non-ischemic and ischemic segments. • Both circumferential strain and circumferential systolic strain rate values under ATP-stress conditions were significantly lower in ischemic segments than in non-ischemic segments. • Subtracting stress and rest circumferential strain had a higher diagnostic capability for ischemia relative to only utilizing rest or ATP-stress circumferential strain values. • A circumferential strain analysis using tagged MR can quantitatively assess contractile dysfunction in ischemic and infarcted myocardium. - Abstract: Purpose: We evaluated whether a quantitative circumferential strain (CS) analysis using adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-stress/rest 3-T tagged magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can depict myocardial ischemia as contractile dysfunction during stress in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). We evaluated whether it can differentiate between non-ischemia, myocardial ischemia, and infarction. We assessed its diagnostic performance in comparison with ATP-stress myocardial perfusion MR and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE)-MR imaging. Methods: In 38 patients suspected of having CAD, myocardial segments were categorized as non-ischemic (n = 485), ischemic (n = 74), or infarcted (n = 49) from the results of perfusion MR and LGE-MR. The peak negative CS value, peak circumferential systolic strain rate (CSR), and time-to-peak CS were measured in 16 segments. Results: A cutoff value of −12.0% for CS at rest allowed differentiation between infarcted and other segments with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 76%, accuracy of 76%, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.81. Additionally, a cutoff value of 477.3 ms for time-to-peak CS at rest

  9. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, R.

    1981-01-01

    This review starts with the basic principles of resonance phenomena in physical systems. Especially, the connection is shown between the properties of these systems and Fourier transforms. Next, we discuss the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. Starting from the general properties of physical systems showing resonance phenomena and from the special properties of nuclear spin systems, the main part of this paper reviews pulse and Fourier methods in nuclear magnetic resonance. Among pulse methods, an introduction will be given to spin echoes, and, apart from the principle of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, an introduction to the technical problems of this method, e.g. resolution in the frequency domain, aliasing, phase and intensity errors, stationary state of the spin systems for repetitive measurements, proton decoupling, and application of Fourier methods to systems in a nonequilibrium state. The last section is devoted to special applications of Fourier methods and recent developments, e.g. measurement of relaxation times, solvent peak suppression, 'rapid scan'-method, methods for suppressing the effects of dipolar coupling in solids, two-dimensional Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, and spin mapping or zeugmatography. (author)

  10. Reducing the Effects of Background Noise during Auditory Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Speech Processing: Qualitative and Quantitative Comparisons between Two Image Acquisition Schemes and Noise Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Graham A.; Hall, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The intense sound generated during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) complicates studies of speech and hearing. This experiment evaluated the benefits of using active noise cancellation (ANC), which attenuates the level of the scanner sound at the participant's ear by up to 35 dB around the peak at 600 Hz. Method: Speech and…

  11. Magnetic resonance and porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.; Strange, J.

    1998-01-01

    Mention the words magnetic resonance to your medical advisor and he or she will immediately think of a multi-million pound scanner that peers deep into the brain. A chemist, on the other hand, will imagine a machine that costs several hundred thousand pounds and produces high-resolution spectra for chemical analysis. Food technologists will probably think of a bench-top instrument for determining moisture content, while an oil prospector will envisage a device that can be operated several kilometres down an oil well. To a physicist the term is more likely to conjure up a mental picture of nuclear spins precessing in a magnetic field. These examples illustrate the diverse aspects of a phenomenon discovered by physicists over 50 years ago. Electron spin resonance was first discovered by Russian scientists, and nuclear magnetic resonance was discovered in the US shortly afterwards by Ed Purcell at Harvard University and Felix Bloch at Stanford University. Today, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the most widely used technique. Modern NMR machines are making it possible to probe microstructure and molecular movement in materials as diverse as polymers, cements, rocks, soil and foods. NMR allows the distribution of different components in a material to be determined with a resolution approaching 1μm, although the signal can be sensitive to even smaller lengthscales. In this article the authors describe how physicists are still developing magnetic resonance to exploit a range of new applications. (UK)

  12. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  13. Principles of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynarik, V.; Tkac, I.; Srbecky, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe and explain the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of the text is devoted to the phenomenon of magnetic resonance (the interaction of RF magnetic field with the set of magnetic moments in the homogeneous magnetic field) and to relaxation processes. Then, the creation of MR image is described (slice selection, phase and frequency encoding of spatial information). The basic and the most frequently used techniques are explained (spin echo, gradient echo). The way the repetition and echo times influence the image quality and contrast (T1 or T2 weighing) is described. The part with the technical description of the MR equipment is included in the review. The MR imagination examination are compared with X-ray computer tomography technique

  14. OPTIMAL EXPERIMENT DESIGN FOR MAGNETIC RESONANCE FINGERPRINTING

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Bo; Haldar, Justin P.; Setsompop, Kawin; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) fingerprinting is an emerging quantitative MR imaging technique that simultaneously acquires multiple tissue parameters in an efficient experiment. In this work, we present an estimation-theoretic framework to evaluate and design MR fingerprinting experiments. More specifically, we derive the Cram��r-Rao bound (CRB), a lower bound on the covariance of any unbiased estimator, to characterize parameter estimation for MR fingerprinting. We then formulate an optimal experi...

  15. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8...

  16. Comparison of rest and adenosine stress quantitative and semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance in patients with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas A; Qayyum, Faiza; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2017-01-01

    software. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that absolute quantitative data correlated stronger to maxSI (rest: r=0.296, p=.193; stress: r=0.583, p=0.011; myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR): r=0.789, pr=0.683, p=0.004) than to upslope (rest: r=0.420, p=0.......058; stress: r=0.096, p=0.704; MPR: r=0.682, p=0.004; and Δ MBF: r=0.055, p=0.804). Absolute quantified MP was able to distinguish between ischemic and non-ischemic territories at rest (left anterior descending artery (LAD): 103.1±11.3mL/100g/min vs. 206.3±98.5mL/100g/min; p=0.001, right coronary artery (RCA......: 206.6±105.1mL/100g/min vs. 273.8±78.0mL/100g/min; p=0.186). The correlation between global maxSI and positron emission tomography data was non-significant at rest and borderline significant at stress (r=0.265, p=0.382 and r=0.601, p=0.050, respectively). Quantified MP may be useful in patients...

  17. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  18. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M.; Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M.

    2012-01-01

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: ► An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. ► Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. ► Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. ► Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  19. Quantitative 1H and hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging: Comparison in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and healthy never-smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owrangi, Amir M.; Wang, Jian X.; Wheatley, Andrew; McCormack, David G.; Parraga, Grace

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the relationship between short echo time pulmonary 1 H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal intensity (SI) and 3 He MRI apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC), high-resolution computed tomography (CT) measurements of emphysema, and pulmonary function measurements. Materials and methods: Nine healthy never-smokers and 11 COPD subjects underwent same-day plethysmography, spirometry, short echo time ((TE) = 1.2 ms) 1 H and diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized 3 He MRI (b = 1.6 s/cm 2 ) at 3.0 T. In addition, for COPD subjects only, CT densitometry was also performed. Results: Mean 1 H SI was significantly greater for never-smokers (12.1 ± 1.1 arbitrary units (AU)) compared to COPD subjects (10.9 ± 1.3 AU, p = 0.04). The 1 H SI AP-gradient was also significantly greater for never-smokers (0.40 AU/cm, R 2 = 0.94) compared to COPD subjects (0.29 AU/cm, R 2 = 0.968, p = 0.05). There was a significant correlation between 1 H SI and 3 He ADC (r = −0.58, p = 0.008) and significant correlations between 1 H MR SI and CT measurements of emphysema (RA 950 , r = −0.69, p = 0.02 and HU 15 , r = 0.66, p = 0.03). Conclusions: The significant and moderately strong relationship between 1 H SI and 3 He ADC, as well as between 1 H SI and CT measurements of emphysema suggests that these imaging methods and measurements may be quantifying similar tissue changes in COPD and that pulmonary 1 H SI may be used to monitor emphysema as a complement to CT and noble gas MRI

  20. Minimum joint space width (mJSW) of patellofemoral joint on standing ''skyline'' radiographs: test-retest reproducibility and comparison with quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoni, Paolo; Jamali, Sanaa; Alvarez Miezentseva, Victoria; Albert, Adelin; Totterman, Saara; Schreyer, Edward; Tamez-Pena, Jose G.; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Gillet, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    To assess the intraobserver, interobserver, and test-retest reproducibility of minimum joint space width (mJSW) measurement of medial and lateral patellofemoral joints on standing ''skyline'' radiographs and to compare the mJSW of the patellofemoral joint to the mean cartilage thickness calculated by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI). A couple of standing ''skyline'' radiographs of the patellofemoral joints and MRI of 55 knees of 28 volunteers (18 females, ten males, mean age, 48.5 ± 16.2 years) were obtained on the same day. The mJSW of the patellofemoral joint was manually measured and Kellgren and Lawrence grade (KLG) was independently assessed by two observers. The mJSW was compared to the mean cartilage thickness of patellofemoral joint calculated by qMRI. mJSW of the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint showed an excellent intraobserver agreement (interclass correlation (ICC) = 0.94 and 0.96), interobserver agreement (ICC = 0.90 and 0.95) and test-retest agreement (ICC = 0.92 and 0.96). The mJSW measured on radiographs was correlated to mean cartilage thickness calculated by qMRI (r = 0.71, p < 0.0001 for the medial PFJ and r = 0.81, p < 0.0001 for the lateral PFJ). However, there was a lack of concordance between radiographs and qMRI for extreme values of joint width and KLG. Radiographs yielded higher joint space measures than qMRI in knees with a normal joint space, while qMRI yielded higher joint space measures than radiographs in knees with joint space narrowing and higher KLG. Standing ''skyline'' radiographs are a reproducible tool for measuring the mJSW of the patellofemoral joint. The mJSW of the patellofemoral joint on radiographs are correlated with, but not concordant with, qMRI measurements. (orig.)

  1. Volume Tracking: A new method for quantitative assessment and visualization of intracardiac blood flow from three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-component magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Töger, Johannes; Carlsson, Marcus; Söderlind, Gustaf; Arheden, Håkan; Heiberg, Einar

    2011-01-01

    Functional and morphological changes of the heart influence blood flow patterns. Therefore, flow patterns may carry diagnostic and prognostic information. Three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-directional phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (4D PC-CMR) can image flow patterns with unique detail, and using new flow visualization methods may lead to new insights. The aim of this study is to present and validate a novel visualization method with a quantitative potential for blood flow from 4D PC-CMR, called Volume Tracking, and investigate if Volume Tracking complements particle tracing, the most common visualization method used today. Eight healthy volunteers and one patient with a large apical left ventricular aneurysm underwent 4D PC-CMR flow imaging of the whole heart. Volume Tracking and particle tracing visualizations were compared visually side-by-side in a visualization software package. To validate Volume Tracking, the number of particle traces that agreed with the Volume Tracking visualizations was counted and expressed as a percentage of total released particles in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Two independent observers described blood flow patterns in the left ventricle using Volume Tracking visualizations. Volume Tracking was feasible in all eight healthy volunteers and in the patient. Visually, Volume Tracking and particle tracing are complementary methods, showing different aspects of the flow. When validated against particle tracing, on average 90.5% and 87.8% of the particles agreed with the Volume Tracking surface in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Inflow patterns in the left ventricle varied between the subjects, with excellent agreement between observers. The left ventricular inflow pattern in the patient differed from the healthy subjects. Volume Tracking is a new visualization method for blood flow measured by 4D PC-CMR. Volume Tracking complements and provides incremental information compared to particle

  2. Quantitative {sup 1}H and hyperpolarized {sup 3}He magnetic resonance imaging: Comparison in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and healthy never-smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owrangi, Amir M., E-mail: aowrangi@robats.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Canada N6A 5K8 (Canada); Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Wang, Jian X., E-mail: jxwang@robats.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Canada N6A 5K8 (Canada); Applied Science Laboratories, General Electric Healthcare (Canada); Wheatley, Andrew, E-mail: awheat@imaging.robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Canada N6A 5K8 (Canada); McCormack, David G., E-mail: David.Mccormack@lhsc.on.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Canada N6A 5K8 (Canada); Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Parraga, Grace, E-mail: gparraga@robats.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Canada N6A 5K8 (Canada); Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the relationship between short echo time pulmonary {sup 1}H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal intensity (SI) and {sup 3}He MRI apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC), high-resolution computed tomography (CT) measurements of emphysema, and pulmonary function measurements. Materials and methods: Nine healthy never-smokers and 11 COPD subjects underwent same-day plethysmography, spirometry, short echo time ((TE) = 1.2 ms) {sup 1}H and diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized {sup 3}He MRI (b = 1.6 s/cm{sup 2}) at 3.0 T. In addition, for COPD subjects only, CT densitometry was also performed. Results: Mean {sup 1}H SI was significantly greater for never-smokers (12.1 ± 1.1 arbitrary units (AU)) compared to COPD subjects (10.9 ± 1.3 AU, p = 0.04). The {sup 1}H SI AP-gradient was also significantly greater for never-smokers (0.40 AU/cm, R{sup 2} = 0.94) compared to COPD subjects (0.29 AU/cm, R{sup 2} = 0.968, p = 0.05). There was a significant correlation between {sup 1}H SI and {sup 3}He ADC (r = −0.58, p = 0.008) and significant correlations between {sup 1}H MR SI and CT measurements of emphysema (RA{sub 950}, r = −0.69, p = 0.02 and HU{sub 15}, r = 0.66, p = 0.03). Conclusions: The significant and moderately strong relationship between {sup 1}H SI and {sup 3}He ADC, as well as between {sup 1}H SI and CT measurements of emphysema suggests that these imaging methods and measurements may be quantifying similar tissue changes in COPD and that pulmonary {sup 1}H SI may be used to monitor emphysema as a complement to CT and noble gas MRI.

  3. Quantitative assessment of fatty infiltration and muscle volume of the rotator cuff muscles using 3-dimensional 2-point Dixon magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Noboru; Oguro, Sota; Okuda, Shigeo; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Nagura, Takeo

    2017-10-01

    In patients with rotator cuff tears, muscle degeneration is known to be a predictor of irreparable tears and poor outcomes after surgical repair. Fatty infiltration and volume of the whole muscles constituting the rotator cuff were quantitatively assessed using 3-dimensional 2-point Dixon magnetic resonance imaging. Ten shoulders with a partial-thickness tear, 10 shoulders with an isolated supraspinatus tear, and 10 shoulders with a massive tear involving supraspinatus and infraspinatus were compared with 10 control shoulders after matching age and sex. With segmentation of muscle boundaries, the fat fraction value and the volume of the whole rotator cuff muscles were computed. After reliabilities were determined, differences in fat fraction, muscle volume, and fat-free muscle volume were evaluated. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliabilities were regarded as excellent for fat fraction and muscle volume. Tendon rupture adversely increased the fat fraction value of the respective rotator cuff muscle (P tear group, muscle volume was significantly decreased in the infraspinatus (P = .035) and increased in the teres minor (P = .039). With subtraction of fat volume, a significant decrease of fat-free volume of the supraspinatus muscle became apparent with a massive tear (P = .003). Three-dimensional measurement could evaluate fatty infiltration and muscular volume with excellent reliabilities. The present study showed that chronic rupture of the tendon adversely increases the fat fraction of the respective muscle and indicates that the residual capacity of the rotator cuff muscles might be overestimated in patients with severe fatty infiltration. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlation of X-Ray Computed Tomography with Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods for Pre-Clinical Measurement of Adipose and Lean Tissues in Living Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew N. Metzinger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous obesity studies have coupled murine models with non-invasive methods to quantify body composition in longitudinal experiments, including X-ray computed tomography (CT or quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (QMR. Both microCT and QMR have been separately validated with invasive techniques of adipose tissue quantification, like post-mortem fat extraction and measurement. Here we report a head-to-head study of both protocols using oil phantoms and mouse populations to determine the parameters that best align CT data with that from QMR. First, an in vitro analysis of oil/water mixtures was used to calibrate and assess the overall accuracy of microCT vs. QMR data. Next, experiments were conducted with two cohorts of living mice (either homogenous or heterogeneous by sex, age and genetic backgrounds to assess the microCT imaging technique for adipose tissue segmentation and quantification relative to QMR. Adipose mass values were obtained from microCT data with three different resolutions, after which the data were analyzed with different filter and segmentation settings. Strong linearity was noted between the adipose mass values obtained with microCT and QMR, with optimal parameters and scan conditions reported herein. Lean tissue (muscle, internal organs was also segmented and quantified using the microCT method relative to the analogous QMR values. Overall, the rigorous calibration and validation of the microCT method for murine body composition, relative to QMR, ensures its validity for segmentation, quantification and visualization of both adipose and lean tissues.

  5. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31 P, 13 C, 1 H (and possibly 19 F and 23 Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  6. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    From a basic physics perspective, the study of spin relaxation by which thermal ..... clei like 13C, 15N, and 31P were soon added to the list because of their ubiquity in organic ... siveness, ranging from qualitative to quantitative. More signifi- cantly .... 1946 to about 1973 or 74, some interesting topics such as NMR in oriented ...

  8. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  16. In vitro quantitative ((1))H and ((19))F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging studies of fluvastatin™ in Lescol® XL tablets in a USP-IV dissolution cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qilei; Gladden, Lynn; Avalle, Paolo; Mantle, Michael

    2011-12-20

    Swellable polymeric matrices are key systems in the controlled drug release area. Currently, the vast majority of research is still focused on polymer swelling dynamics. This study represents the first quantitative multi-nuclear (((1))H and ((19))F) fast magnetic resonance imaging study of the complete dissolution process of a commercial (Lescol® XL) tablet, whose formulation is based on the hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) polymer under in vitro conditions in a standard USP-IV (United States Pharmacopeia apparatus IV) flow-through cell that is incorporated into high field superconducting magnetic resonance spectrometer. Quantitative RARE ((1))H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ((19))F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging methods have been used to give information on: (i) dissolution media uptake and hydrodynamics; (ii) active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) mobilisation and dissolution; (iii) matrix swelling and dissolution and (iv) media activity within the swelling matrix. In order to better reflect the in vivo conditions, the bio-relevant media Simulated Gastric Fluid (SGF) and Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIF) were used. A newly developed quantitative ultra-fast MRI technique was applied and the results clearly show the transport dynamics of media penetration and hydrodynamics along with the polymer swelling processes. The drug dissolution and mobility inside the gel matrix was characterised, in parallel to the ((1))H measurements, by ((19))F NMR spectroscopy and MRI, and the drug release profile in the bulk solution was recorded offline by UV spectrometer. We found that NMR spectroscopy and 1D-MRI can be uniquely used to monitor the drug dissolution/mobilisation process within the gel layer, and the results from ((19))F NMR spectra indicate that in the gel layer, the physical mobility of the drug changes from "dissolved immobilised drug" to "dissolved mobilised drug". Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  17. Optically transmitted and inductively coupled electric reference to access in vivo concentrations for quantitative proton-decoupled ¹³C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Pavan, Matteo; Heinzer-Schweizer, Susanne; Boesiger, Peter; Henning, Anke

    2012-01-01

    This report describes our efforts on quantification of tissue metabolite concentrations in mM by nuclear Overhauser enhanced and proton decoupled (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the Electric Reference To access In vivo Concentrations (ERETIC) method. Previous work showed that a calibrated synthetic magnetic resonance spectroscopy-like signal transmitted through an optical fiber and inductively coupled into a transmit/receive coil represents a reliable reference standard for in vivo (1) H magnetic resonance spectroscopy quantification on a clinical platform. In this work, we introduce a related implementation that enables simultaneous proton decoupling and ERETIC-based metabolite quantification and hence extends the applicability of the ERETIC method to nuclear Overhauser enhanced and proton decoupled in vivo (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition, ERETIC signal stability under the influence of simultaneous proton decoupling is investigated. The proposed quantification method was cross-validated against internal and external reference standards on human skeletal muscle. The ERETIC signal intensity stability was 100.65 ± 4.18% over 3 months including measurements with and without proton decoupling. Glycogen and unsaturated fatty acid concentrations measured with the ERETIC method were in excellent agreement with internal creatine and external phantom reference methods, showing a difference of 1.85 ± 1.21% for glycogen and 1.84 ± 1.00% for unsaturated fatty acid between ERETIC and creatine-based quantification, whereas the deviations between external reference and creatine-based quantification are 6.95 ± 9.52% and 3.19 ± 2.60%, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain What's in this article? What ...

  19. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quibilan, E.I.

    The basis for the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ability of certain nuclei possessing both intrinsic angular momentum or ''spin'' I and magnetic moment to absorb electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency range. In principle, there are approximately 200 nuclei which may be investigated using the NMR technique. The NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum provides a variety of qualitative and quantitative analytical applications. The most obvious applications consist of the measurements of nuclear properties, such as spin number and nuclear magnetic moment. In liquids, the fine structure of resonance spectra provides a tool for chemical identification and molecular structure analysis. Other applications include the measurements of self-diffusion coefficients, magnetic fields and field homogeneity, inter-nuclear distances, and, in some cases, the water content of biological materials. (author)

  1. Magnetic resonance for wireless power transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, SYR

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance has been a cornerstone of nonradiative wireless power transfer (WPT) since the late 19th century. However, some researchers have the misconception that magnetic resonance for WPT was developed recently. This article traces some early work of Tesla and other researchers related to the use of magnetic resonance in WPT. Included are some examples of magnetic resonance-based WPT projects conducted by researchers in the biomedical and power electronics communities over the last ...

  2. Volume Tracking: A new method for quantitative assessment and visualization of intracardiac blood flow from three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-component magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arheden Håkan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional and morphological changes of the heart influence blood flow patterns. Therefore, flow patterns may carry diagnostic and prognostic information. Three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-directional phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (4D PC-CMR can image flow patterns with unique detail, and using new flow visualization methods may lead to new insights. The aim of this study is to present and validate a novel visualization method with a quantitative potential for blood flow from 4D PC-CMR, called Volume Tracking, and investigate if Volume Tracking complements particle tracing, the most common visualization method used today. Methods Eight healthy volunteers and one patient with a large apical left ventricular aneurysm underwent 4D PC-CMR flow imaging of the whole heart. Volume Tracking and particle tracing visualizations were compared visually side-by-side in a visualization software package. To validate Volume Tracking, the number of particle traces that agreed with the Volume Tracking visualizations was counted and expressed as a percentage of total released particles in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Two independent observers described blood flow patterns in the left ventricle using Volume Tracking visualizations. Results Volume Tracking was feasible in all eight healthy volunteers and in the patient. Visually, Volume Tracking and particle tracing are complementary methods, showing different aspects of the flow. When validated against particle tracing, on average 90.5% and 87.8% of the particles agreed with the Volume Tracking surface in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Inflow patterns in the left ventricle varied between the subjects, with excellent agreement between observers. The left ventricular inflow pattern in the patient differed from the healthy subjects. Conclusion Volume Tracking is a new visualization method for blood flow measured by 4D PC-CMR. Volume Tracking

  3. Quantitative assessment of primary mitral regurgitation using left ventricular volumes obtained with new automated three-dimensional transthoracic echocardiographic software: A comparison with 3-Tesla cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Franck; Marechaux, Sylvestre; Iacuzio, Laura; Schouver, Elie Dan; Castel, Anne Laure; Toledano, Manuel; Rusek, Stephane; Dor, Vincent; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Dreyfus, Gilles

    2018-03-30

    Quantitative assessment of primary mitral regurgitation (MR) using left ventricular (LV) volumes obtained with three-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (3D TTE) recently showed encouraging results. Nevertheless, 3D TTE is not incorporated into everyday practice, as current LV chamber quantification software products are time consuming. To investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of new automated fast 3D TTE software (HeartModel A.I. ; Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA, USA) for the quantification of LV volumes and MR severity in patients with isolated degenerative primary MR; and to compare regurgitant volume (RV) obtained with 3D TTE with a cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) reference. Fifty-three patients (37 men; mean age 64±12 years) with at least mild primary isolated MR, and having comprehensive 3D TTE and CMR studies within 24h, were eligible for inclusion. MR RV was calculated using the proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) method and the volumetric method (total LV stroke volume minus aortic stroke volume) with either CMR or 3D TTE. Inter- and intraobserver reproducibility of 3D TTE was excellent (coefficient of variation≤10%) for LV volumes. MR RV was similar using CMR and 3D TTE (57±23mL vs 56±28mL; P=0.22), but was significantly higher using the PISA method (69±30mL; P<0.05 compared with CMR and 3D TTE). The PISA method consistently overestimated MR RV compared with CMR (bias 12±21mL), while no significant bias was found between 3D TTE and CMR (bias 2±14mL). Concordance between echocardiography and CMR was higher using 3D TTE MR grading (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]=0.89) than with PISA MR grading (ICC=0.78). Complete agreement with CMR grading was more frequent with 3D TTE than with the PISA method (76% vs 63%). 3D TTE RV assessment using the new generation of automated software correlates well with CMR in patients with isolated degenerative primary MR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolic alterations produced by 3-nitropropionic acid in rat striata and cultured astrocytes: quantitative in vitro 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.; Wan, Y.L.; Goh, C.C.; Tsai, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative high resolution in vitro 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed to study the metabolic effects of 3-nitropropionic acid associated with aging from perchloric acid extracts of rat striata. Systemic injection of 3-nitropropionic acid in rats at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day for seven consecutive days significantly impaired energy metabolism in rats one, four and eight months of age, as evidenced by a marked elevation of succinate and lactate levels. However, a significant decrease in N-acetyl-l-aspartate level, a neuronal marker, was observed in four- and eight-month-old rats but not in one-month-old rats. This would indicate that rats at four to eight months are more susceptible to 3-nitropropionic acid than those at one month. A significant decrease in GABA level was observed in four-month-old 3-nitropropionic acid-treated rats, which is consistent with the literature that GABAergic neurons are particularly vulnerable to 3-nitropropionic acid treatment. In addition, glutamine and glutamate levels were markedly decreased at four and eight months in 3-nitropropionic acid-treated rats. Since glutamine is synthesized predominantly in glia, the observation above suggests that 3-nitropropionic acid intoxication may involve perturbation of energy metabolism, glial injury and consequent neuronal damage. Astrocytes which are essential in the metabolism of glutamate and glutamine were used to further assess 3-nitropropionic acid-induced toxicity. Glial proliferation, mitochondrial metabolism and glutamine synthetase activity were all reduced by 3-nitropropionic acid treatment with a concomitant increase, in a dose-dependent manner, of lactate levels, suggesting that 3-nitropropionic acid is also detrimental to astrocytes in vivo and thus may affect metabolic interaction between neurons and glia.These results not only imply that 3-nitropropionic acid blocks energy metabolism prior to exerting neurotoxic damage but also demonstrate that the degree of

  5. Main component analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C quantitative spectra of hydrogenation products of tars from Kansk-Achinsk Achinsk and Cheremkhovsk coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushnarev, D.F.; Polonov, V.M.; Donskikh, V.I.; Rokhina, E.F.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1986-03-01

    Possibility is discussed of examining nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C quantitative spectra of coal tar hydrogenation products using main component factorial analysis and applying special mathematical methods of processing experimental data. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of hydrogenation products of low temperature Cheremkhovsk coal carbonization tar and rapid pyrolysis Kansk-Achinsk coal tar were obtained on a WP-200SY (Bruker) spectrometer at 50.3 and 200.1 MHz, respectively. Data processing was carried out on an ODRA-1304 computer. Comparative correlation of parameters are given of tars and hydrogenation products which consist of hydrogenation of aromatic cycles and destruction of alkyl substituents, and factorial loads on structural parameters of tar hydrogenation products. 11 references.

  6. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.; Staedtisches Rudolf-Virchow Krankenhaus, Berlin

    1985-01-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness. (orig.) [de

  7. Limits to magnetic resonance microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, Paul; Mansfield, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The last quarter of the twentieth century saw the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grow from a laboratory demonstration to a multi-billion dollar worldwide industry. There is a clinical body scanner in almost every hospital of the developed nations. The field of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), after mostly being abandoned by researchers in the first decade of MRI, has become an established branch of the science. This paper reviews the development of MRM over the last decade with an emphasis on the current state of the art. The fundamental principles of imaging and signal detection are examined to determine the physical principles which limit the available resolution. The limits are discussed with reference to liquid, solid and gas phase microscopy. In each area, the novel approaches employed by researchers to push back the limits of resolution are discussed. Although the limits to resolution are well known, the developments and applications of MRM have not reached their limit. (author)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrugia, M.E. [Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.e.farrugia@doctors.org.uk; Bydder, G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States); Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D. [OCMR, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrugia, M.E.; Bydder, G.M.; Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders

  10. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  11. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging as marker of synovial membrane regeneration and recurrence of synovitis after arthroscopic knee joint synovectomy: a one year follow up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Ejbjerg, B; Stoltenberg, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: By repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study synovial membrane regeneration and recurrence of synovitis after arthroscopic knee joint synovectomy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other (non-RA) causes of persistent knee joint synovitis. METHODS: Contrast enhanced...... at two months. No significant differences between volumes in RA and non-RA knees were seen. Synovial membrane volumes at two months were significantly inversely correlated with the duration of clinical remission, for all knees considered together (Spearman's correlation r(s)=-0.67; p

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in food applications: a critical appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divakar, S.

    1998-01-01

    Usefulness of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in food applications is presented in this review. Some of the basic concepts of NMR pertaining to one-dimensional and two-dimensional techniques, solid-state NMR and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are discussed. Food applications dealt with encompass such diverse areas like nature and state of water in foods, detection and quantitation of important constituents of foods, intact food systems and NMR related to food biology. (author)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  14. Nanodiamond graphitization: a magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panich, A M; Shames, A I; Sergeev, N A; Olszewski, M; McDonough, J K; Mochalin, V N; Gogotsi, Y

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of the high-temperature nanodiamond-to-onion transformation. 1 H, 13 C NMR and EPR spectra of the initial nanodiamond samples and those annealed at 600, 700, 800 and 1800 ° C were measured. For the samples annealed at 600 to 800 ° C, our NMR data reveal the early stages of the surface modification, as well as a progressive increase in sp 2 carbon content with increased annealing temperature. Such quantitative experimental data were recorded for the first time. These findings correlate with EPR data on the sensitivity of the dangling bond EPR line width to air content, progressing with rising annealing temperature, that evidences consequent graphitization of the external layers of the diamond core. The sample annealed at 1800 ° C shows complete conversion of nanodiamond particles into carbon onions. (paper)

  15. The nuclear magnetic resonance well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yumin; Shen Huitang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristic of the nuclear magnetic resonance logging is described at first. Then its development and its principle is presented. Compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, the magnet techniques is the first question that we must solve in the manufacture of the NMR well logging

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging at Rikshospitalet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the first 18 months of operations of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) unit at Rikshospitalet, 1453 NMR examinations have been performed on 1431 patients. 64% of the time has been devoted to examinations of the central nervous system and spine in children and adults, 9% of the time has been used on non-neuroradiology pediatric patients, while the rest of the time has been spent equally on ear, nose and throat, thoracic (including cardiac) and abdominal examinations in adult patients. The indications for doing NMR at Rikshospitalet are listed and discussed, and it is concluded that NMR has proved to be useful at several conditions in most organ systems. 15 refs

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, K.

    1993-01-01

    Diagnosis and research in psychiatry are increasingly availing themselves of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In comparison to computed tomography (CT), this offers the combined benefits of no exposure to radiation, high resolution, artefact-free display of structures near bone, and a sharp contrast between the grey and white brain matter, with freedom to select the section. With the exception of very anxious patients, MRI will gradually replace CT scans for a wide range of differential diagnostic investigations. Its superiority in systematic studies of psychiatric patients with discrete cerebral parenchyma lesions is already considered proven. This is illustrated on the basis of research into schizophrenia and alcoholism. (orig.) [de

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  19. Quantitative measurement of portal blood flow by magnetic resonance phase contrast. Comparative study of flow phantom and Doppler ultrasound in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Masatoshi; Kimoto, Shin; Hamazaki, Keisuke; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Hiraki, Yoshio.

    1994-01-01

    A non-invasive method for measuring portal blood flow by magnetic resonance (MR) phase contrast was evaluated in a flow phantom and 20 healthy volunteers. In a flow phantom study, the flow volumes and mean flow velocities measured by MR phase contrast showed close correlations with those measured by electromagnetic flow-metry. In 20 healthy volunteers, the cross-sectional areas, flow volumes and mean flow velocities measured by MR phase contrast correlated well with those measured by the Doppler ultrasound method. Portal blood flow averaged during the imaging time could be measured under natural breathing conditions by using a large number of acquisitions without the limitations imposed on the Doppler ultrasound method. MR phase contrast is considered to be useful for the non-invasive measurement of portal blood flow. (author)

  20. Resonant and nonresonant magnetic scattering (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWhan, D.B.; Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.; Siddons, D.P.

    1992-01-01

    The tunability and the polarization of synchrotron radiation open up new possibilities for the study of magnetism. Studies on magnetic materials performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source are reviewed, and they fall into four areas: structure, evolution of magnetic order, separation of L and S, and resonance effects. In the vicinity of atomic absorption edges, the Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonant magnetic scattering are all related resonance effects which measure the spin-polarized density of states. The production and analysis of polarized beams are discussed in the context of the study of magnetism with synchrotron radiation

  1. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  2. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro.

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukai, Eiichiro [National Hospital of Nagoya (Japan); Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro

    1989-06-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author).

  5. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Melanie M

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been recognized as one of the most important tools in medical diagnosis and research. However, MRI is also well placed to image chemical reactions and processes, determine the concentration of chemical species, and look at how chemistry couples with environmental factors, such as flow and heterogeneous media. This tutorial review will explain how magnetic resonance imaging works, reviewing its application in chemistry and its ability to directly visualise chemical processes. It will give information on what resolution and contrast are possible, and what chemical and physical parameters can be measured. It will provide examples of the use of MRI to study chemical systems, its application in chemical engineering and the identification of contrast agents for non-clinical applications. A number of studies are presented including investigation of chemical conversion and selectivity in fixed-bed reactors, temperature probes for catalyst pellets, ion mobility during tablet dissolution, solvent dynamics and ion transport in Nafion polymers and the formation of chemical waves and patterns.

  7. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of brain diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging comparison with 1.5 T and 3.0 T units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Eun Hoe [Dept. of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    DWI of biological effects are independent of magnetic field strength in various regions. High field strength, however, does affect the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and artifacts of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) images, which ultimately will influence the quantitative of diffusion imaging . In this study, the effects of field strength on DWI are reviewed. The effects of the diseases also are discussed. Comparing DWI in cerebellum, WM, GM, Hyperacute region measurements both as a function of field strength (1.5 T and 3.0 T). Overall, the SNR of the DWI roughly doubled going from 1.5 T to 3.0 T. In summary, DWI studies at 3.0 T is provided significantly improved DWI measurements relative to studies at 1.5 T.

  8. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of amount of fibroglandular breast tissue with magnetic resonance imaging: comparison to automated quantitative assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wengert, G.J.; Helbich, T.H.; Woitek, R.; Kapetas, P.; Clauser, P.; Baltzer, P.A.; Vogl, W.D.; Weber, M.; Meyer-Baese, A.; Pinker, Katja

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the inter-/intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of the amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to investigate whether FGT assessment benefits from an automated, observer-independent, quantitative MRI measurement by comparing both approaches. Eighty women with no imaging abnormalities (BI-RADS 1 and 2) were included in this institutional review board (IRB)-approved prospective study. All women underwent un-enhanced breast MRI. Four radiologists independently assessed FGT with MRI by subjective visual estimation according to BI-RADS. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT with MRI was performed using a previously described measurement system. Inter-/intra-observer agreements of qualitative and quantitative FGT measurements were assessed using Cohen's kappa (k). Inexperienced readers achieved moderate inter-/intra-observer agreement and experienced readers a substantial inter- and perfect intra-observer agreement for subjective visual estimation of FGT. Practice and experience reduced observer-dependency. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT was successfully performed and revealed only fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.209-0.497) with subjective visual estimations of FGT. Subjective visual estimation of FGT with MRI shows moderate intra-/inter-observer agreement, which can be improved by practice and experience. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurements of FGT are necessary to allow a standardized risk evaluation. (orig.)

  9. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of amount of fibroglandular breast tissue with magnetic resonance imaging: comparison to automated quantitative assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengert, G.J.; Helbich, T.H.; Woitek, R.; Kapetas, P.; Clauser, P.; Baltzer, P.A. [Medical University of Vienna/ Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Vogl, W.D. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Computational Imaging Research Lab, Wien (Austria); Weber, M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Pediatric Radiology, Wien (Austria); Meyer-Baese, A. [State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Pinker, Katja [Medical University of Vienna/ Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Services, New York City, NY (United States)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the inter-/intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of the amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to investigate whether FGT assessment benefits from an automated, observer-independent, quantitative MRI measurement by comparing both approaches. Eighty women with no imaging abnormalities (BI-RADS 1 and 2) were included in this institutional review board (IRB)-approved prospective study. All women underwent un-enhanced breast MRI. Four radiologists independently assessed FGT with MRI by subjective visual estimation according to BI-RADS. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT with MRI was performed using a previously described measurement system. Inter-/intra-observer agreements of qualitative and quantitative FGT measurements were assessed using Cohen's kappa (k). Inexperienced readers achieved moderate inter-/intra-observer agreement and experienced readers a substantial inter- and perfect intra-observer agreement for subjective visual estimation of FGT. Practice and experience reduced observer-dependency. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT was successfully performed and revealed only fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.209-0.497) with subjective visual estimations of FGT. Subjective visual estimation of FGT with MRI shows moderate intra-/inter-observer agreement, which can be improved by practice and experience. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurements of FGT are necessary to allow a standardized risk evaluation. (orig.)

  10. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging: hazard, risk and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Pradeep; Suri, S.; Singh, P.

    2001-01-01

    The hazard and risk associated with magnetic resonance imaging is a matter of concern. In 1982, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA issued guidelines to Hospital's Investigational Review Board (IRBs) in 'Guidelines for Evaluating Electromagnetic Exposure Risks for Trials of Clinical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)'. In 1997, the Berufsgenossenschaft (BG), professional association for precision engineering and electronics of Germany, in their preliminary proposal for safety limits extended their concerns on static magnetic field. Owing to both time varying and static magnetic fields applied in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) this became of immediate concern to user community to assess the potential hazard and risk associated with the NMR system

  12. Quantitative in vivo detection of brain cell death after hypoxia ischemia using the lipid peak at 1.3 ppm of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, So Yoon; Yoo, Hye Soo; Lee, Jang Hoon; Sung, Dong Kyung; Jung, Yu Jin; Sung, Se In; Lim, Keun Ho; Chang, Yun Sil; Lee, Jung Hee; Kim, Ki Soo; Park, Won Soon

    2013-07-01

    This study was performed to determine the accuracy of proton magnetic spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) lipid peak as a noninvasive tool for quantitative in vivo detection of brain cell death. Seven day-old Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to 8% oxygen following a unilateral carotid artery ligation. For treatment, cycloheximide was given immediately after hypoxic ischemia (HI). Lipid peak was measured using (1)H-MRS at 24 hr after HI, and then brains were harvested for fluorocytometric analyses with annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescent probe JC-1, and for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) and lactate. Increased lipid peak at 1.3 ppm measured with (1)H-MRS, apoptotic and necrotic cells, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) at 24 hr after HI were significantly improved with cycloheximide treatment. Significantly reduced brain ATP and increased lactate levels observed at 24 hr after HI showed a tendency to improve without statistical significance with cycloheximide treatment. Lipid peak at 1.3 ppm showed significant positive correlation with both apoptotic and necrotic cells and loss of ΔΨ, and negative correlation with normal live cells. Lipid peak at 1.3 ppm measured by (1)H-MRS might be a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for quantitative in vivo detection of brain cell death after HI.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yusaku; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Akaneya, Yukio; Mitui, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    We studied eighteen patients affected by Parkinsonism with symptoms of tremor, bradykinesia, or rigidity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients ranged in age from 34 to 80 years (mean 62.8±11.6 years), and the duration of their disease had been 3.8±3.2 years. MRI examinations were performed with Shimazu and Siemens superconducting magnets, operating at 0.5 and 1.5 T magnetic fields, respectively. Both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin echo (SE) pulse sequences were used. In eight patients (44.4%), MRI demonstrated bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia. The most common abnormality identified was multiple, bilateral lacunar infarcts in the lateral portion of the putamen. The average size of the lacunar infarction of the putamen was less than half that of the entire putamen. Patients with multiple lacunar infarction were significantly older than the other patients and had lower Yahr's scores. The clinical symptoms of patients with bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia were compatible with the diagnosis of arteriosclerotic Parkinsonism of akinetic rigid type. It has been suggested that multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia may have led to Parkinsonism in these patients. (author)

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.; MacDonald, J.; Hutchison, S.; Eastwood, L.M.; Redpath, T.W.T.; Mallard, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method of deriving three dimensional image information from an object using nuclear magnetic resonance signals comprises subjecting the object to a continuous, static magnetic field and carrying out the following set of sequential steps: 1) exciting nuclear spins in a selected volume (90deg pulse); 2) applying non-aligned first, second and third gradients of the magnetic field; 3) causing the spins to rephase periodically by reversal of the first gradient to produce spin echoes, and applying pulses of the second gradient prior to every read-out of an echo signal from the object, to differently encode the spin in the second gradient direction for each read-out signal. The above steps 1-3 are then successively repeated with different values of gradient of the third gradient, there being a recovery interval between the repetition of successive sets of steps. Alternate echoes only are read out, the other echoes being time-reversed and ignored for convenience. The resulting signals are appropriately sampled, set out in an array and subjected to three dimensional Fourier transformation. (author)

  15. Semi-quantitative Assessment of Brain Maturation by Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neonates with Clinically Mild Hypoxic-ischemic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Sun, Qin-Li; Zhang, Yu-Miao; Li, Yan-Yan; Li, Huan; Hou, Xin; Yu, Bo-Lang; Zhou, Xi-Hui; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mild hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) injury is becoming the major type in neonatal brain diseases. The aim of this study was to assess brain maturation in mild HIE neonatal brains using total maturation score (TMS) based on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Totally, 45 neonates with clinically mild HIE and 45 matched control neonates were enrolled. Gestated age, birth weight, age after birth and postmenstrual age at magnetic resonance (MR) scan were homogenous in the two groups. According to MR findings, mild HIE neonates were divided into three subgroups: Pattern I, neonates with normal MR appearance; Pattern II, preterm neonates with abnormal MR appearance; Pattern III, full-term neonates with abnormal MR appearance. TMS and its parameters, progressive myelination (M), cortical infolding (C), involution of germinal matrix tissue (G), and glial cell migration bands (B), were employed to assess brain maturation and compare difference between HIE and control groups. Results: The mean of TMS was significantly lower in mild HIE group than it in the control group (mean ± standard deviation [SD] 11.62 ± 1.53 vs. 12.36 ± 1.26, P < 0.001). In four parameters of TMS scores, the M and C scores were significantly lower in mild HIE group. Of the three patterns of mild HIE, Pattern I (10 cases) showed no significant difference of TMS compared with control neonates, while Pattern II (22 cases), III (13 cases) all had significantly decreased TMS than control neonates (mean ± SD 10.56 ± 0.93 vs. 11.48 ± 0.55, P < 0.05; 12.59 ± 1.28 vs. 13.25 ± 1.29, P < 0.05). It was M, C, and GM scores that significantly decreased in Pattern II, while for Pattern III, only C score significantly decreased. Conclusions: The TMS system, based on conventional MRI, is an effective method to detect delayed brain maturation in clinically mild HIE. The conventional MRI can reveal the different retardations in subtle structures and development processes

  16. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz; Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D.

    2010-01-01

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  17. Transition metal nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregosin, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Transition metal NMR spectroscopy has progressed enormously in recent years. New methods, and specifically solid-state methods and new pulse sequences, have allowed access to data from nuclei with relatively low receptivities with the result that chemists have begun to consider old and new problems, previously unapproachable. Moreover, theory, computational science in particular, now permits the calculation of not just 13 C, 15 N and other light nuclei chemical shifts, but heavy main-group element and transition metals as well. These two points, combined with increasing access to high field pulsed spectrometer has produced a wealth of new data on the NMR transition metals. A new series of articles concerned with measuring, understanding and using the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the metals of Group 3-12 is presented. (author)

  18. Gaucher's disease: Magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Gomez-Pereda, R.; Blasco, A.; Ros, L.

    1996-01-01

    The objective is to assess the role of magnetic resonance (MR) in determining the initial extension of Gaucher's disease and its complications. A retrospective study of eight patients diagnosed as having Gaucher's disease was carried out using MR. The study focused on pelvis, hip, femur, spine, liver parenchyma and splenic parenchyma. Infiltration of the cancellous portion of the vertebral bodies was observed in all but one of the patients. Three patients presented small hemangiomas in dorsal and lumbar vertebral bodies. Pelvic bone involvement was homogeneous in four cases and spotty in two, while the pelvic marrow was normal in the two patients with no vertebral infiltration. A vascular necrosis of the femoral head was detected in two cases. MR is very useful in determining the initial extension, in the early diagnosis of complications and in managing the posttreatment marrow response to assess the therapeutic efficacy. 16 refs

  19. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, Peter C.; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages

  20. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.brugger@meduniwien.ac.at; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, K.; Lotx, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now accepted as an effective method of investigating a wide range of disorders, especially of the brain and spine. A short introduction on image contrast in MRI is given and the advantages and disadvantages for the different diseases of the brain is discussed. Excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging capabilities and lack of ionising radiation are conspicuous advantages, and it is now established as the investigation of choice in a large number of clinical conditions, especially when the central nervous system is involved. However, it remains only one of a series of imaging modalities. A confident provisional clinical diagnosis is essential for establishing an imaging protocol and the intention should always be to reach a definitive diagnosis in the least invasive and most cost-effective way. 7 figs., 19 refs

  2. Post-Processing of Dynamic Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Exams of the Liver: Explanation and Potential Clinical Applications for Color-Coded Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Bos, I.C. Van den; Hussain, S.M.; Pattynama, P.M.; Vogel, M.W.; Kr estin, G.P.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain and illustrate the current status and potential applications of automated and color-coded post-processing techniques for the analysis of dynamic multiphasic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver. Post-processing of these images on dedicated workstations allows the generation of time-intensity curves (TIC) as well as color-coded images, which provides useful information on (neo)-angiogenesis within a liver lesion, if necessary combined with information on enhancement patterns of the surrounding liver parenchyma. Analysis of TIC and color-coded images, which are based on pharmacokinetic modeling, provides an easy-to-interpret schematic presentation of tumor behavior, providing additional characteristics for adequate differential diagnosis. Inclusion of TIC and color-coded images as part of the routine abdominal MRI workup protocol may help to further improve the specificity of MRI findings, but needs to be validated in clinical decision-making situations. In addition, these tools may facilitate the diagnostic workup of disease for detection, characterization, staging, and monitoring of antitumor therapy, and hold incremental value to the widely used tumor response criteria

  3. Maximum toe flexor muscle strength and quantitative analysis of human plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles by a magnetic resonance imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Yamauchi, Junichiro; Otsuka, Mitsuo; Tottori, Nobuaki; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Isaka, Tadao

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the relationships between the maximum isometric toe flexor muscle strength (TFS) and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles and to identify the major determinant of maximum TFS among CSA of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles. Twenty six young healthy participants (14 men, 12 women; age, 20.4 ± 1.6 years) volunteered for the study. TFS was measured by a specific designed dynamometer, and CSA of plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To measure TFS, seated participants optimally gripped the bar with their toes and exerted maximum force on the dynamometer. For each participant, the highest force produced among three trials was used for further analysis. To measure CSA, serial T1-weighted images were acquired. TFS was significantly correlated with CSA of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles. Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses identified that the major determinant of TFS was CSA of medial parts of plantar intrinsic muscles (flexor hallucis brevis, flexor digitorum brevis, quadratus plantae, lumbricals and abductor hallucis). There was no significant difference between men and women in TFS/CSA. CSA of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles is one of important factors for determining the maximum TFS in humans.

  4. Use of quantitative diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to predict human papilloma virus status in patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahira, Mitsuhiko; Saito, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kuba, Kiyomi; Sugasawa, Masashi

    2014-05-01

    Although identification of human papilloma virus (HPV) status in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is essential in predicting treatment response, no imaging modality can currently determine whether a tumor is HPV-related. In this retrospective study, 26 patients with OPSCC confined to the lateral wall or the base of tongue underwent neck magnetic resonance imaging, using T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) in a region of interest covering the largest available primary tumor area of OPSCC on a single slice of the ADC map were calculated using two b values (0 and 1,000 s/mm(2)). Mean and minimum ADCs were compared with HPV status, using p16 immunohistochemistry as a surrogate marker for HPV infection. Mean and minimum ADCs for HPV(+) OPSCC were significantly lower than those for HPV(-) OPSCC. A cut-off value of mean ADC for HPV(+) OPSCC of 1.027 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s yielded sensitivity and specificity of 83.33 and 78.57%, respectively. In conclusion, the present study indicates that ADC could be used to predict HPV status in patients with OPSCC.

  5. Reduced NAA-levels in the NAWM of patients with MS is a feature of progression. A study with quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Enein, Fahmy; Krssák, Martin; Höftberger, Romana; Prayer, Daniela; Kristoferitsch, Wolfgang

    2010-07-20

    Reduced N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) levels in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may visualize axonal damage even in the normal appearing white matter (NAWM). Demyelination and axonal degeneration are a hallmark in multiple sclerosis (MS). To define the extent of axonal degeneration in the NAWM in the remote from focal lesions in patients with relapsing-remitting (RRMS) and secondary progressive MS (SPMS). 37 patients with clinical definite MS (27 with RRMS, 10 with SPMS) and 8 controls were included. We used 2D (1)H-MR-chemical shift imaging (TR = 1500ms, TE = 135ms, nominal resolution 1ccm) operating at 3Tesla to assess the metabolic pattern in the fronto-parietal NAWM. Ratios of NAA to creatine (Cr) and choline (Cho) and absolute concentrations of the metabolites in the NAWM were measured in each voxel matching exclusively white matter on the anatomical T2 weighted MR images. No significant difference of absolute concentrations for NAA, Cr and Cho or metabolite ratios were found between RRMS and controls. In SPMS, the NAA/Cr ratio and absolute concentrations for NAA and Cr were significantly reduced compared to RRMS and to controls. In our study SPMS patients, but not RRMS patients were characterized by low NAA levels. Reduced NAA-levels in the NAWM of patients with MS is a feature of progression.

  6. Detection of hemodynamic impairment using magnetic resonance angiography in patients with internal carotid artery stenoocclusive disease. Comparison with quantitative brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Ryonoshin; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2008-01-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to acetazolamideis a key parameter in determining the severity of hemodynamic impairment in patients with major cerebral artery occlusive disease. The aim of the present study is to validate the accuracy of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for detecting hemodynamic impairment by correlating detectability of the middle cerebral artery obtained by MRA with CVR measured by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusive disease. Ninety-four patients with chronic ICA occlusion underwent single slab three-dimensional time-of-flight MRA and SPECT. SPECT-CVR was calculated by measured cerebral blood flow before and after acetazolamide challenge. CVR was significantly lower in patients without detection of any portion (M1, M2 or M3) of the MCA than in those with detection of all portions. When SPECT-CVR lower than the mean- 2 standard deviation (SD) obtained in normal subjects was defined as reduced and the SPECT-CVR was assumed as the true determinant of hemodynamic impairment, MRA provided 92% sensitivity and 73% specificity, with 96% negative predictive value for detecting patients with reduced CVR. The present MRA method is effective for the identification of patients with hemodynamic impairment. (author)

  7. Pace of macrophage recruitment during different stages of soft tissue infection: Semi-quantitative evaluation by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Seong; Sohn, Jin Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Laboratory for Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Jung, Hyun-Don; Kim, Sang-Tae [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Kyoung Geun [Korea University College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Division of Biotechnology, Seoul (Korea); Kang, Hee Jung [Hallym University College of Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Anyang (Korea)

    2008-10-15

    We describe the pace of recruitment of iron-oxide-labeled macrophages to the site of different stages of infection by in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Peritoneal macrophages were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide ex vivo and administered through the tail vein 6 (acute) or 48 (subacute) h after bacterial inoculation. The legs of the mice were imaged sequentially on a 4.7-T MR unit before and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48 and 72 h after macrophage administration. The band-shaped lower signal intensity zone around the abscess on T2*-weighted GRE images became more obvious due to recruited macrophages up until 24 h after injection in the subacute and 48 h after injection in the acute group, indicating that the relative SI of the abscess wall decreased more rapidly and the pace of recruitment of macrophages was faster in the subacute than in the acute group. Chemokine antibody arrays of mouse sera detected increased concentration of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 beginning at 12 h and increased interleukin-13 at 18 h. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor began to increase at 96 h after infection. This difference in pace of recruitment may result from the release of chemokines. (orig.)

  8. Pace of macrophage recruitment during different stages of soft tissue infection: Semi-quantitative evaluation by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Seong; Sohn, Jin Young; Jung, Hyun-Don; Kim, Sang-Tae; Lee, Kyoung Geun; Kang, Hee Jung

    2008-01-01

    We describe the pace of recruitment of iron-oxide-labeled macrophages to the site of different stages of infection by in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Peritoneal macrophages were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide ex vivo and administered through the tail vein 6 (acute) or 48 (subacute) h after bacterial inoculation. The legs of the mice were imaged sequentially on a 4.7-T MR unit before and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48 and 72 h after macrophage administration. The band-shaped lower signal intensity zone around the abscess on T2*-weighted GRE images became more obvious due to recruited macrophages up until 24 h after injection in the subacute and 48 h after injection in the acute group, indicating that the relative SI of the abscess wall decreased more rapidly and the pace of recruitment of macrophages was faster in the subacute than in the acute group. Chemokine antibody arrays of mouse sera detected increased concentration of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 beginning at 12 h and increased interleukin-13 at 18 h. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor began to increase at 96 h after infection. This difference in pace of recruitment may result from the release of chemokines. (orig.)

  9. An integrated system for dissolution studies and magnetic resonance imaging of controlled release, polymer-based dosage forms-a tool for quantitative assessment of hydrogel formation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinowski, Piotr; Dorozyński, Przemysław; Jachowicz, Renata; Weglarz, Władysław P

    2008-11-04

    Controlled release (CR) dosage forms are often based on polymeric matrices, e.g., sustained-release tablets and capsules. It is crucial to visualise and quantify processes of the hydrogel formation during the standard dissolution study. A method for imaging of CR, polymer-based dosage forms during dissolution study in vitro is presented. Imaging was performed in a non-invasive way by means of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was designed to simulate in vivo conditions regarding temperature, volume, state and composition of dissolution media. Two formulations of hydrodynamically balanced systems (HBS) were chosen as model CR dosage forms. HBS release active substance in stomach while floating on the surface of the gastric content. Time evolutions of the diffusion region, hydrogel formation region and "dry core" region were obtained during a dissolution study of L-dopa as a model drug in two simulated gastric fluids (i.e. in fed and fasted state). This method seems to be a very promising tool for examining properties of new formulations of CR, polymer-based dosage forms or for comparison of generic and originator dosage forms before carrying out bioequivalence studies.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  12. Single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Assess diagnostic utility of combined magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University ...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence

  14. Magnetic resonance: discovery, investigations, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessenikh, Aleksandr V

    2009-01-01

    The history of the development of the theoretical ideas and experimental methods of magnetic resonance, as well as the applications of these methods in modern natural science, technology, and medicine, are outlined, with allowance for the contribution of Russian researchers. An assessment of some promising trends of studies and applications of magnetic resonance is given. (from the history of physics)

  15. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjian, V.

    1987-01-01

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes [fr

  16. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypophysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malla Huesh, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary diseases represent with wide variety of symptoms in regard with changes in the endocrine function. Magnetic resonance imaging has a crucial role in detecting the morphologic appearance in physiologic conditions, malformative diseases and acquired pathologies. The MR-imaging is established as the method of choice in assessing the changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The pituitary gland is a complex structure with an important role in the homeostasis of the organism even though it is so small? It is surrounded by bony structures, vessels, nerves and the brain parenchyma. It consists of three parts - anterior called - adenohypophysis, posterior - neurohypophysis and pituitary stalk. The anterior part comprises about 75% of the gland. Computed tomography (CT) has a limited role in detecting the pituitary gland. It is mainly used in cases of elevated intracranial pressure due to suspected apoplexy. The gland's small size, relation to other structures and its soft tissue characteristic make it an accessible region of interest for detecting with MR-imaging. The lack of ionizing energy and the technical advances in the MR-methods are responsible for the creating images with better spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio. The examination is carried out on a standard protocol. It is important that thin slices are executed in sagittal and coronal planes. Performing a sequence, regarding the brain parenchyma is essential, since many malformations of the pituitary gland are associated with other congenital conditions. The examination starts with a T1W sequence to assess the normal anatomic condition of the gland. The intensity of the adenohypophysis is compared to the one in the pons. It is hypointense, whereas the neurohypophysis is hyperintense, due to the lipid neurosecretory granules transported along the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. T2W-images in coronal plane are used to evaluate the hypothalamus, pituitary stalk, optic chiasm, olfactory

  18. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Maximum Likelihood Reconstruction for Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Setsompop, Kawin; Ye, Huihui; Cauley, Stephen F; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a statistical estimation framework for magnetic resonance (MR) fingerprinting, a recently proposed quantitative imaging paradigm. Within this framework, we present a maximum likelihood (ML) formalism to estimate multiple MR tissue parameter maps directly from highly undersampled, noisy k-space data. A novel algorithm, based on variable splitting, the alternating direction method of multipliers, and the variable projection method, is developed to solve the resulting optimization problem. Representative results from both simulations and in vivo experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach yields significantly improved accuracy in parameter estimation, compared to the conventional MR fingerprinting reconstruction. Moreover, the proposed framework provides new theoretical insights into the conventional approach. We show analytically that the conventional approach is an approximation to the ML reconstruction; more precisely, it is exactly equivalent to the first iteration of the proposed algorithm for the ML reconstruction, provided that a gridding reconstruction is used as an initialization.

  20. Optimal experiment design for magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo Zhao; Haldar, Justin P; Setsompop, Kawin; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) fingerprinting is an emerging quantitative MR imaging technique that simultaneously acquires multiple tissue parameters in an efficient experiment. In this work, we present an estimation-theoretic framework to evaluate and design MR fingerprinting experiments. More specifically, we derive the Cramér-Rao bound (CRB), a lower bound on the covariance of any unbiased estimator, to characterize parameter estimation for MR fingerprinting. We then formulate an optimal experiment design problem based on the CRB to choose a set of acquisition parameters (e.g., flip angles and/or repetition times) that maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio efficiency of the resulting experiment. The utility of the proposed approach is validated by numerical studies. Representative results demonstrate that the optimized experiments allow for substantial reduction in the length of an MR fingerprinting acquisition, and substantial improvement in parameter estimation performance.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the transplanted kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennerholm, S.; Backman, U.; Bohman, S.O.; Hemmingsson, A.; Nyman, R.; Uppsala Univ. Hospital; Huddinge Hospital

    1990-01-01

    In this study, long-term renal transplants were investigated with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and the results were correlated to histopathology and graft function. Seventeen patients were investigated with MR one to 10 years after transplantation and with simultaneous ultrasonographically guided cortical needle biopsy and function tests. Histopathology included semiquantitative grading of degree of fibrosis and quantitation of ratios of tubular structures to interstitial tissue. The correlation between the histopathological assessment of interstitial fibrosis and graft function was good. Poor differentiation between the renal cortex and the renal medulla at MR imaging was correlated to high degree of interstitial fibrosis in the kidney transplants as well as to reduced graft function. MR examination may thus be of value in the evaluation of long-term renal transplants with chronic functional changes. (orig./MG)

  2. Quantitative Visualization of Dynamic Tracer Transportation in the Extracellular Space of Deep Brain Regions Using Tracer-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jin; Wang, Wei; Quan, Xianyue; Liang, Wen; Li, Zhiming; Han, Hongbin; Chen, Deji

    2017-01-01

    Background This study assessed an innovative tracer-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system to visualize the dynamic transportation of tracers in regions of deep brain extracellular space (ECS) and to measure transportation ability and ECS structure. Material/Methods Gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) was the chosen tracer and was injected into the caudate nucleus and thalamus. Real-time dynamic transportation of Gd-DTPA in ECS was observed and the results were verified by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Using Transwell assay across the blood-brain barrier, a modified diffusion equation was further simplified. Effective diffusion coefficient D* and tortuosity λ were calculated. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis were used to investigate the extracellular matrix contributing to ECS structure. Results Tracers injected into the caudate nucleus were transported to the ipsilateral frontal and temporal cortices away from the injection points, while both of them injected into the thalamus were only distributed on site. Although the caudate nucleus was closely adjacent to the thalamus, tracer transportation between partitions was not observed. In addition, D* and the λ showed statistically significant differences between partitions. ECS was shown to be a physiologically partitioned system, and its division is characterized by the unique distribution territory and transportation ability of substances located in it. Versican and Tenascin R are possible contributors to the tortuosity of ECS. Conclusions Tracer-based MRI will improve our understanding of the brain microenvironment, improve the techniques for local delivery of drugs, and highlight brain tissue engineering fields in the future. PMID:28866708

  3. Bone marrow edema pattern in advanced hip osteoarthritis: quantitative assessment with magnetic resonance imaging and correlation with clinical examination, radiographic findings, and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Schwartz, Stephanie A.; Graham, Anna R.; Benjamin, James B.; Gmitro, Arthur F.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Hunter, Tim B.; Resnick, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    To correlate the amount of bone marrow edema (BME) calculated by magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) with clinical findings, histopathology, and radiographic findings, in patients with advanced hip osteoarthritis(OA). The study was approved by The Institutional Human Subject Protection Committee. Coronal MRI of hips was acquired in 19 patients who underwent hip replacement. A spin echo (SE) sequence with four echoes and separate fast spin echo (FSE) proton density (PD)-weighted SE sequences of fat (F) and water (W) were acquired with water and fat suppression, respectively. T2 and water:fat ratio calculations were made for the outlined regions of interest. The calculated MRI values were correlated with the clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic findings. Analyses of variance were done on the MRI data for W/(W + F) and for T2 values (total and focal values) for the symptomatic and contralateral hips. The values were significantly higher in the study group. Statistically significant correlations were found between pain and total W/(W + F), pain and focal T2 values, and the number of microfractures and calculated BME for the focal W/(W + F) in the proximal femora. Statistically significant correlations were found between the radiographic findings and MRI values for total W/(W + F), focal W/(W + F) and focal T2 and among the radiographic findings, pain, and hip movement. On histopathology, only a small amount of BME was seen in eight proximal femora. The amount of BME in the OA hip, as measured by MRI, correlates with the severity of pain, radiographic findings, and number of microfractures. (orig.)

  4. Quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pregnant women: cross-sectional analysis of physiological parameters throughout pregnancy and the impact of the supine position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Alexia; Cornette, Jerome; Johnson, Mark R; Karamermer, Yusuf; Springeling, Tirza; Opic, Petra; Moelker, Adriaan; Krestin, Gabriel P; Steegers, Eric; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien; van Geuns, Robert-Jan M

    2011-06-27

    There are physiological reasons for the effects of positioning on hemodynamic variables and cardiac dimensions related to altered intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic pressures. This problem is especially evident in pregnant women due to the additional aorto-caval compression by the enlarged uterus. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of postural changes on cardiac dimensions and function during mid and late pregnancy using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Healthy non-pregnant women, pregnant women at 20th week of gestation and at 32nd week of gestation without history of cardiac disease were recruited to the study and underwent CMR in supine and left lateral positions. Cardiac hemodynamic parameters and dimensions were measured and compared between both positions. Five non-pregnant women, 6 healthy pregnant women at mid pregnancy and 8 healthy pregnant women at late pregnancy were enrolled in the study. In the group of non-pregnant women left ventricular (LV) cardiac output (CO) significantly decreased by 9% (p=0.043) and right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume (EDV) significantly increased by 5% (p=0.043) from the supine to the left lateral position. During mid pregnancy LV ejection fraction (EF), stroke volume (SV), left atrium lateral diameter and left atrial supero-inferior diameter increased significantly from the supine position to the left lateral position: 8%, 27%, 5% and 11%, respectively (ppregnancy a significant increment of LV EF, EDV, SV and CO was observed in the left lateral position: 11%, 21%, 35% and 24% (ppregnancy positional changes affect significantly cardiac hemodynamic parameters and dimensions. Pregnant women who need serial studies by CMR should be imaged in a consistent position. From as early as 20 weeks the left lateral position should be preferred on the supine position because it positively affects venous return, SV and CO.

  5. Quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pregnant women: cross-sectional analysis of physiological parameters throughout pregnancy and the impact of the supine position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moelker Adriaan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are physiological reasons for the effects of positioning on hemodynamic variables and cardiac dimensions related to altered intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic pressures. This problem is especially evident in pregnant women due to the additional aorto-caval compression by the enlarged uterus. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of postural changes on cardiac dimensions and function during mid and late pregnancy using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Methods Healthy non-pregnant women, pregnant women at 20th week of gestation and at 32nd week of gestation without history of cardiac disease were recruited to the study and underwent CMR in supine and left lateral positions. Cardiac hemodynamic parameters and dimensions were measured and compared between both positions. Results Five non-pregnant women, 6 healthy pregnant women at mid pregnancy and 8 healthy pregnant women at late pregnancy were enrolled in the study. In the group of non-pregnant women left ventricular (LV cardiac output (CO significantly decreased by 9% (p = 0.043 and right ventricular (RV end-diastolic volume (EDV significantly increased by 5% (p = 0.043 from the supine to the left lateral position. During mid pregnancy LV ejection fraction (EF, stroke volume (SV, left atrium lateral diameter and left atrial supero-inferior diameter increased significantly from the supine position to the left lateral position: 8%, 27%, 5% and 11%, respectively (p Conclusions During pregnancy positional changes affect significantly cardiac hemodynamic parameters and dimensions. Pregnant women who need serial studies by CMR should be imaged in a consistent position. From as early as 20 weeks the left lateral position should be preferred on the supine position because it positively affects venous return, SV and CO.

  6. Quantitative Visualization of Dynamic Tracer Transportation in the Extracellular Space of Deep Brain Regions Using Tracer-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jin; Wang, Wei; Quan, Xianyue; Liang, Wen; Li, Zhiming; Chen, Deji; Han, Hongbin

    2017-09-03

    BACKGROUND This study assessed an innovative tracer-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system to visualize the dynamic transportation of tracers in regions of deep brain extracellular space (ECS) and to measure transportation ability and ECS structure. MATERIAL AND METHODS Gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) was the chosen tracer and was injected into the caudate nucleus and thalamus. Real-time dynamic transportation of Gd-DTPA in ECS was observed and the results were verified by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Using Transwell assay across the blood-brain barrier, a modified diffusion equation was further simplified. Effective diffusion coefficient D* and tortuosity λ were calculated. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis were used to investigate the extracellular matrix contributing to ECS structure. RESULTS Tracers injected into the caudate nucleus were transported to the ipsilateral frontal and temporal cortices away from the injection points, while both of them injected into the thalamus were only distributed on site. Although the caudate nucleus was closely adjacent to the thalamus, tracer transportation between partitions was not observed. In addition, D* and the λ showed statistically significant differences between partitions. ECS was shown to be a physiologically partitioned system, and its division is characterized by the unique distribution territory and transportation ability of substances located in it. Versican and Tenascin R are possible contributors to the tortuosity of ECS. CONCLUSIONS Tracer-based MRI will improve our understanding of the brain microenvironment, improve the techniques for local delivery of drugs, and highlight brain tissue engineering fields in the future.

  7. Force detection of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugar, D.; Zueger, O.; Hoen, S.; Yannoni, C.S.; Vieth, H.M.; Kendrick, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Micromechanical sensing of magnetic force was used to detect nuclear magnetic resonance with exceptional sensitivity and spatial resolution. With a 900 angstrom thick silicon nitride cantilever capable of detecting subfemtonewton forces, a single shot sensitivity of 1.6 x 10 13 protons was achieved for an ammonium nitrate sample mounted on the cantilever. A nearby millimeter-size iron particle produced a 600 tesla per meter magnetic field gradient, resulting in a spatial resolution of 2.6 micrometers in one dimension. These results suggest that magnetic force sensing is a viable approach for enhancing the sensitivity and spatial resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging

  8. The Combined Quantification and Interpretation of Multiple Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Metrics Enlightens Longitudinal Changes Compatible with Brain Repair in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnier, G.; Marechal, B.; Fartaria, M.J.; Marques, J.P.; Simioni, S.; Schluep, M.; Du Pasquier, R.; Thiran, J.-P.; Krueger, G.; Granziera, C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Quantitative and semi-quantitative MRI (qMRI) metrics provide complementary specificity and differential sensitivity to pathological brain changes compatible with brain inflammation, degeneration and repair. Moreover, advanced MRI metrics with overlapping elements amplify the true

  9. Magnetic resonance elastometry using a single-sided permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Carl S; Marble, Andrew E; Ono, Yuu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a magnetic resonance method of measuring material elasticity using a single-sided magnet with a permanent static field gradient. This method encodes sample velocity in a reciprocal space using Hahn spin-echoes with variable timing. The experimental results show a strong correlation between magnetic resonance signal attenuation and elasticity when an oscillating force is applied on the sample. This relationship in turn provides us with information about the displacement velocity experienced by the sample, which is inversely proportional to Young's modulus. The proposed method shows promise in offering a portable and cost-effective magnetic resonance elastography system. (paper)

  10. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  11. Magnetic resonance angiography: Physical principles and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausmann, R.; Mueller, E.

    1992-01-01

    Within the last four years magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) developed very rapidly towards a well accepted screening technique for vascular examinations as a fast add-on to conventional MR. This review describes the basic physical principles as well as the different methods like time-of-flight and phase-sensitive MRA for visualization of blood vessels. Different applications of 3D, 2D sequential and 3D multivolume MRA are shown from various regions of the head and body. A short outlock to quantitative flow measurments is given in the last chapter including some interesting applications of these techniques which show the still expanding potential of magnetic resonance. (orig.) [de

  12. Magnetic resonance in obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jena, A.; Khushu, S.; Kakar, A.K.; Mishra, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    Twelve cases of obstructive jaundice in whom ultrasound failed to demonstrate the site and/or the cause of obstruction of the biliary tract were examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), correctly diagnosing the site and cause of obstruction in 10 of 12 surgically proven cases. In one case of cholangiocarcinoma, the site of obstruction was well shown on MR but a definite cause could not be ascertained. In another patient who developed intermittent jaundice following surgery for choledochal cyst, MR demonstrated a solitary stone in the common hepatic duct. Surgical confirmation could not be achieved as the patient was lost to follow up. There were 6 cases of choledocholithiasis, 3 cases of gall bladder carcinoma and one case each of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. It is believed that MRI will provide obstructive jaundice and will be able to minimize the use of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in view of its ability to perform multiplanar imaging in multiple sequences. 11 refs., figs., 1 tab

  13. Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI. (orig.) [de

  14. Endometrial cancer: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, R; Gui, B; Maresca, G; Fanfani, F; Bonomo, L

    2005-01-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy of the female genital tract. Clinically, patients with endometrial carcinoma present with abnormal uterine bleeding. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endometrial carcinoma is disease staging and treatment planning. MRI has been shown to be the most valuable imaging mod-ality in this task, compared with endovaginal ultrasound and computed tomography, because of its intrinsic contrast resolution and multiplanar capability. MRI protocol includes axial T1-weighted images; axial, sagittal, and coronal T2-weighted images; and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. MR examination is usually performed in the supine position with a phased array multicoil using a four-coil configuration. Endometrial carcinoma is isointense with the normal endometrium and myometrium on noncontrast T1-weighted images and has a variable appearance on T2-weighted images demonstrating heterogeneous signal intensity. The appearance of noninvasive endometrial carcinoma on MRI is characterized by a normal or thickened endometrium, with an intact junctional zone and a sharp tumor-myometrium interface. Invasive endometrial carcinoma is characterized disruption or irregularity of the junctional zone by intermediate signal intensity mass on T2-weighted images. Invasion of the cervical stroma is diagnosed when the low signal intensity cervical stroma is disrupted by the higher signal intensity endometrial carcinoma. MRI in endometrial carcinoma performs better than other imaging modalities in disease staging and treatment planning. Further, the accuracy and the cost of MRI are equivalent to those of surgical staging.

  15. Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, L W; Bakker, C J G

    2003-01-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed. (topical review)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurolupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, A.M.; Colson, F.; Tebib, J.; Noel, E.; Bouvier, M.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was assessed in the management of neuropsychiatric manifestations occurring in 6 SLE patients. The MRI scans were normal in 3 cases and was associated with remission of the symptoms except for a patient who experienced a chorea at the time of the examination. Abnormal MRI scans always revealed more lesions than CT scan. 2 different patterns of abnormalities seem to correspond to 2 specific disorders. In 2 patients with clinical presentation suggesting a cortical ischemia by vascular thrombosis, both MRI scans showed areas of abnormal high signal intensities located in the subcortical white matter. In one last patient, MRI scan revealed multiple focal areas of high signal intensities (on T 1 weighter scans) disseminated not only in the deep white matter but also in the gray one. These lesions could be depend upon demyelinisation which may occur by a local vascular process. This serie confirms the interest of MRI in the management of SLE brain involvement as well as it points out some problem of interpretation. This suggest further comparative studies especially at the real onset and during the course of neuro-psychiatric manifestations. At last, the coronal sections may be more informative for the diagnosis and patholophysiology than the horizontal ones [fr

  17. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotti, G.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  18. Myositis ossificans: magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosda, R.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Concepcion, L.; Galant, J.

    1999-01-01

    Myositis ossificans is characterized by a benign, self-limiting, ossifying mass of the white tissue. In the present report, we describe the magnetic resonance (MR) images in three cases of myositis ossificans in pediatric patients, correlating the MR findings with those obtained with other radiological studies. The lesions were detected in three patients, two boys and one girl, ranging in age between 10 and 14 years. The nature of the lesion was confirmed histologically in all three cases. The MR images were obtained using superconductive units at 0.5 Teslas, with T1 and T2-weighted spin-echo and STIR sequences. In two patients, gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images were also obtained. As in any process of maturation, the proliferation/maturation ratio depends on the moment in the course of the lesion, which affects its MR features,. In acute phases, the soft tissue mass with an intraosseous, perilesional adematous reaction predominates, while annular calcification and lesser edema are characteristic of subacute episode. Myositis ossificans is very rare in children. The inflammatory response may present a radiological pattern difficult to distinguish from that of aggressive tumor or infection, especially in the acute phase. (Author) 7 refs

  19. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazacu, A.; Ciubotaru, A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the clinical management strategy of patients with congenital heart disease. The development of new cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques allows comprehensive assessment of complex cardiac anatomy and function and provides information about the long-term residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. It overcomes many of the limitations of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. This review evaluates the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging modality in the management of subject with congenital heart disease (CHD). (authors)

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging by visual stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yukiko; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hashida, Masahiro

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated functional magnetic resonance images obtained in 8 healthy subjects in response to visual stimulation using a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging system with multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging. Activation in the visual cortex was clearly demonstrated by the multi-slice experiment with a task-related change in signal intensity. In addition to the primary visual cortex, other areas were also activated by a complicated visual task. Multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging offers high temporal resolution and allows the three-dimensional analysis of brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a useful noninvasive method of mapping brain function. (author)

  1. NMR magnetic field controller for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, G.; Anacker, M.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance controller for magnetic fields, which can also be used for pulsed NMR investigations, is described. A longtime stability of 10 -7 is achieved. The control signal is generated by a modified time sharing circuit with resonance at the first side band of the 2 H signal. An exact calibration of the magnetic field is achieved by the variation of the H 1 - or of the time-sharing frequency. (author)

  2. Radiographic evaluation of vessel count and density with quantitative magnetic resonance imaging during external breast expansion in Asian women: A prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Yujin; Kwon, Heeyeon; Pak, Changsik; Lee, Hobin; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Heo, Chan Yeong

    2016-12-01

    Breast augmentation with fat transfer does not bear the risks associated with silicone implantation. The method can potentially be especially useful in Asian women, who often reject augmentation mammoplasty with implants. This prospective clinical trial evaluated the effects of external breast expansion on breast density and vessel count using magnetic resonance imaging. Thirty-four enrolled patients were instructed to apply one of two devices, the conventional BRAVA device (used in the AESTES trial) or a novel external expansion device (EVERA) designed for Asian women, continuously for 8 h per day for 12 weeks. For external expansion, the pressure was set to 25 mmHg. Follow-up examinations were performed for 4 weeks after completion of the expansion. The ratio between the fibroglandular and adipose tissues of the breast was measured using T1-weighted MRI, and the number of vessels in the breast tissue was determined before and after the treatment by contrast MRI. Additionally, the volume of the breast was measured by laser scanning before, during, and after the device application. The obtained measurements were compared within and between the groups at different time points. Six patients dropped out, while 28 completed the trial without major side effects or adverse events. External expansion significantly increased breast vessel count in both the EVERA and AESTES groups (p = 0.019, p = 0.022). However, it did not significantly change breast density in either group (p = 0.186, p = 0.638). No significant intergroup differences were noted in vessel count (p = 0.874) or density (p = 0.482). Breast volume increases after 12 weeks of application were statistically significant in both groups, with mean changes of 81 ± 22 cc (AESTES) and 98 ± 30 cc (EVERA) (p Asian women. Level II, therapeutic study. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  4. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  5. Studies of magnetic resonance in anemia of hematies falciformes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lores Guevara, Manuel Arsenio; Balcom, Bruce John; Cabal Mirabal, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance applications to the study of Sickle Cell Disease are analyzed using classical procedures and Unilateral Magnetic Resonance. Hemoglobin and whole blood samples were obtained from healthy individual and patients with Sickle Cell Anemia to be used as samples. Classical pulse sequence as spin echo and inversion recovery were used in the experimental studies, the STEPR method was used for EPR spectrometric determinations. The results show the possibility of NMR methods to follow the molecular process causing the disease and allows to present quantitative procedures to estimate the clinical state of the patients and the results of clinical options. We present the Unilateral Magnetic Resonance as a new method to study Sickle Cell disease considering its portability and new possibilities as new image method

  6. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans

  7. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  8. Fifty years of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Valderrama, Juan Crisostomo

    1997-01-01

    Short information about the main developments of nuclear magnetic resonance during their fifty existence years is presented. Beside two examples of application (HETCOR and INADEQUATE) to the structural determination of organic compounds are described

  9. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pykett, I.L.; Newhouse, J.H.; Buonanno, F.S.; Brady, T.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Kistler, J.P.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    The physical principles which underlie the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are presented in this primer. The major scanning methods are reviewed, and the principles of technique are discussed. A glossary of NMR terms is included

  10. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  11. The role of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) is accepted as the gold standard, there is a place for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of obstructive biliary disorders. Aim: To compare the findings of MRCP with ...

  12. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

  13. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mild sedative prior to the examination. For more information about Magnetic Resonance Angiography of MRA or any ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  14. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Trackbed Moisture Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    In this initial phase, conducted from March 2015 through December 2016, Vista Clara and its subcontractor Zetica Rail successfully developed and tested a man-portable, non-invasive spot-check nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) moisture sensor that dire...

  16. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Weiping; Wang Qi; Zhou Xin

    2013-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the basic principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Protein's structures and functions and dynamics studied by liquid NMR are elaborated; methods for enhancing the resolution of solid state NMR and its applications are discussed; the principle of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is interpreted, and applications in different aspects are reviewed. Finally, the progress of NMR is commented. (authors)

  18. Concepts and indications of abdominal magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murillo Viera, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    A literature review and conceptualization was performed of the main indications of magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen and the characteristic findings for each sequence, according to organ and pathology. The radiologist has had in mind main indications for magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen, with the purpose to guide the clinician in the choice of imaging modality that works best for the patient at diagnosis [es

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of muscle tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, A.A.; Fisher, D.R.; Heiner, J.P.; Keene, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance scans were obtained on 17 patients with acute, subacute, or chronic muscle tears. These patients presented with complaints of persistent pain or a palpable mass. Magnetic resonance findings were characterized according to alterations in muscle shape and the presence of abnormal high signal within the injured muscle. These areas of high signal were noted on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans and were presumed to represent areas of intramuscular hemorrhage. (orig.)

  20. Clinical magnetic resonance: imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.; Bydder, Graeme; Griffiths, John; Iles, Richard; Styles, Peter

    1990-01-01

    This book begins with a readable, comprehensive but non-mathematical introduction to the basic underlying principles of magnetic resonance. Further chapters include information on the theory and principles of MRI and MRS, the interpretation of MR images, the clinical applications and scope of MRI and MRS, practical aspects of spectroscopy and magnetic resonance, and also the practical problems associated with the siting, safety and operation of large MRI and MRS equipment. (author)

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burl, M.; Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the rate of flow of a liquid in a selected region of a body by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are described. The method includes a sequence of applying a first magnetic pulse effective to excite nuclear magnetic resonance of a chosen nucleus within the liquid preferentially in a slice of the body which includes the selected region. A period of time (tsub(D)) is waited and then a second magnetic pulse is applied which is effective to excite nuclear magnetic resonance of the nuclei preferentially in the slice, and the free induction decay signal is measured. The whole sequence is repeated for different values of the period of time (tsub(D)). The variation in the value of the measured signal with tsub(D) is then related to the rate of flow of the liquid through the slice. (author)

  2. Resonance double magnetic bremsstrahlung in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomin, P.I.; Kholodov, R.I.

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of resonance double magnetic bremsstrahlung in the approximation of weakly excited electron states in a strong external magnetic field is analyzed. The differential probability of this process in the Breit-Wigner form is obtained. The probability of double magnetic bremsstrahlung (second-order process of perturbation theory) is compared with the probability of magnetic bremsstrahlung (first-order process of perturbation theory)

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. Your child will lie on a moveable examination ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  9. Magnetic islands created by resonant helical windings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, A.S.; Heller, M.V.; Caldas, I.L.

    1986-01-01

    The triggering of disruptive instabilities by resonant helical windings in large aspect-ratio tokamaks is associated to destruction of magnetic surfaces. The Chirikov condition is applied to estimate analytically the helical winding current thresholds for ergodization of the magnetic field lines. (Autor) [pt

  10. Topical questions in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.; Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL; Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines a number of practical questions concerning magnetic resonance imaging. These include the choice of operating magnetic field strength, the problem of siting and screening, a procedure for securing precise slice selection and the use of paramagnetic contrast agents. (author). 5 refs

  11. Basis of the nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahceli, S.

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this book which is translated from English language is to explain the physical and mathematical basis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There are nine chapters covering different aspects of NMR. In the firs chapter fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics are given at a level suitable for readers to understand NMR fully. The remaining chapters discuss the magnetic properties of nucleus, the interactions between atoms and molecules, continuous wave NMR, pulsed NMR, nuclear magnetic relaxation and NMR of liquids

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging: effects of magnetic field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, L.E.; Arakawa, M.; Hoenninger, J.; McCarten, B.; Watts, J.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images of the head, abdomen, and pelvis of normal adult men were obtained using varying magnetic field strength, and measurements of T1 and T2 relaxations and of signal-to-noise (SN) ratios were determined. For any one spin echo sequence, gray/white matter contrast decreases and muscle/fat contrast increases with field. SN levels rise rapidly up to 3.0 kgauss and then change more slowly, actually dropping for muscle. The optimum field for magnetic resonance imaging depends on tissue type, body part, and imaging sequence, so that it does not have a unique value. Magnetic resonance systems that operate in the 3.0-5.0 kgauss range achieve most or all of the gains that can be achieved by higher magnetic fields

  15. Role of quantitative chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging and chemical shift subtraction technique in discriminating adenomatous from non adenomatous adrenal solid lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed H. Afifi

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The signal intensity index and adrenal to spleen ratio are the most reliable quantitative chemical shift MRI methods in differentiation of adrenal adenomas from other non-adenomatous adrenal solid lesions. Chemical shift subtraction MRI is a recent technique that gives highly confident discrimination between two categories of pathology without using of any reference organ.

  16. Quantitative measurement of hepatic fibrosis with gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection: A comparative study on aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index and fibrosis-4 index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Guy Mok; Kim, Youe Ree; Cho, Eun Young; Lee, Young Hwan; Yoon, Kwon Ha; Ryu, Jong Hyun; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2017-01-01

    To quantitatively measure hepatic fibrosis on gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients and identify the correlations with aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) and fibrosis-4 index (FIB-4) values. This study on gadoxetic acid-enhanced 3T MR imaging included 81 patients with CHB infection. To quantitatively measure hepatic fibrosis, MR images were analyzed with an aim to identify inhomogeneous signal intensities calculated from a coefficient of variation (CV) map in the liver parenchyma. We also carried out a comparative analysis between APRI and FIB-4 based on metaregression results. The diagnostic performance of the CV map was evaluated using a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. In the MR images, the mean CV values in control, groups I, II, and III based on APRI were 4.08 ± 0.92, 4.24 ± 0.80, 5.64 ± 1.11, and 5.73 ± 1.28, respectively (p < 0.001). In CHB patients grouped by FIB-4, the mean CV values of groups A, B, and C were 4.22 ± 0.95, 5.40 ± 1.19, and 5.71 ± 1.17, respectively (p < 0.001). The mean CV values correlated well with APRI (r = 0.392, p < 0.001) and FIB-4 (r = 0.294, p < 0.001). In significant fibrosis group, ROC curve analysis yielded an area under the curve of 0.875 using APRI and 0.831 using FIB-4 in HB, respectively. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging for calculating a CV map showed moderate correlation with APRI and FIB-4 values and could be employed to quantitatively measure hepatic fibrosis in patients with CHB

  17. Quantitative measurement of hepatic fibrosis with gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection: A comparative study on aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index and fibrosis-4 index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Guy Mok; Kim, Youe Ree; Cho, Eun Young; Lee, Young Hwan; Yoon, Kwon Ha [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jong Hyun; Kim, Tae Hoon [Imaging Science Research Center, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To quantitatively measure hepatic fibrosis on gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients and identify the correlations with aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) and fibrosis-4 index (FIB-4) values. This study on gadoxetic acid-enhanced 3T MR imaging included 81 patients with CHB infection. To quantitatively measure hepatic fibrosis, MR images were analyzed with an aim to identify inhomogeneous signal intensities calculated from a coefficient of variation (CV) map in the liver parenchyma. We also carried out a comparative analysis between APRI and FIB-4 based on metaregression results. The diagnostic performance of the CV map was evaluated using a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. In the MR images, the mean CV values in control, groups I, II, and III based on APRI were 4.08 ± 0.92, 4.24 ± 0.80, 5.64 ± 1.11, and 5.73 ± 1.28, respectively (p < 0.001). In CHB patients grouped by FIB-4, the mean CV values of groups A, B, and C were 4.22 ± 0.95, 5.40 ± 1.19, and 5.71 ± 1.17, respectively (p < 0.001). The mean CV values correlated well with APRI (r = 0.392, p < 0.001) and FIB-4 (r = 0.294, p < 0.001). In significant fibrosis group, ROC curve analysis yielded an area under the curve of 0.875 using APRI and 0.831 using FIB-4 in HB, respectively. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging for calculating a CV map showed moderate correlation with APRI and FIB-4 values and could be employed to quantitatively measure hepatic fibrosis in patients with CHB.

  18. Diagnostic apparatus employing nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, K.; Yamada, N.; Yoshitome, E.; Matsuura, H.

    1987-01-01

    An NMR diagnostic apparatus is described comprising means for applying a primary magnetic field to a subject; means for applying RF pulses to the subject to give nuclear magnetic resonance to the nuclei of atoms in the subject; means for applying gradient magnetic fields to project an NMR signal of the nuclei at least in one direction; means for observing the NMR signal projected by the gradient magnetic fields applying means; and arithmetic means for constructing a distribution of information on resonance energy as an image from an output signal from the observing means; wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means comprises means for applying the gradient magnetic fields at a predetermined time and for not applying the gradient magnetic fields at another predetermined time, during the time period of one view; and wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means further comprises means for measuring the NMR signal during the predetermined time when the gradient magnetic fields are applied, and means for measuring the intensity of the primary magnetic field during the other predetermined time when no gradient magnetic fields are applied

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vision or seizures help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... moveable examination table that slides into the center of the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  20. Embroidered Coils for Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Newton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging is a widely used technique for medical and materials imaging. Even though the objects being imaged are often irregularly shaped, suitable coils permitting the measurement of the radio-frequency signal in these systems are usually made of solid copper. One problem often encountered is how to ensure the coils are both in close proximity and conformal to the object being imaged. Whilst embroidered conductive threads have previously been used as antennae in mobile telecommunications applications, they have not previously been reported for use within magnetic resonance. In this paper we show that an embroidered single loop coil can be used in a commercial unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance system as an alternative to a solid copper. Data is presented showing the determination of both longitudinal (T1 and effective transverse (T2eff relaxation times for a flat fabric coil and the same coil conformed to an 8 cm diameter cylinder. We thereby demonstrate the principles required for the wider use of fabric based conformal coils within nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Renal Lesion Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Karadeli

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: The technique has the advantage that it is non-invasive without need for gadolinium administration, takes about 2 minute. This method provides qualitative and quantitative infomation on tissue characterization. DA-MRI and ADC values are important for characterization of renal lesions. Especially, utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the patients with risk for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF could be beneficial. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(1: 27-36

  2. A Compressed Sensing Framework for Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Mike; Puy, Gilles; Vandergheynst, Pierre; Wiaux, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by the recently proposed Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) technique, we develop a principled compressed sensing framework for quantitative MRI. The three key components are: a random pulse excitation sequence following the MRF technique; a random EPI subsampling strategy and an iterative projection algorithm that imposes consistency with the Bloch equations. We show that theoretically, as long as the excitation sequence possesses an appropriate form of persistent excitation, w...

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, a Powerful Tool in Cultural Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Noemi Proietti; Donatella Capitani; Valeria Di Tullio

    2018-01-01

    In this paper five case studies illustrating applications of NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) in the field of cultural heritage, are reported. Different issues were afforded, namely the investigation of advanced cleaning systems, the quantitative mapping of moisture in historic walls, the investigation and evaluation of restoration treatments on porous stones, the stratigraphy of wall paintings, and the detection of CO2 in lapis lazuli. Four of these case studies deal with the use of portable...

  4. Quantitation of blood-brain barrier defect by magnetic resonance imaging and gadolinium-DTPA in patients with multiple sclerosis and brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Stubgaard, M; Frederiksen, J L

    1990-01-01

    In this study quantitation of the degree of deficiency of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in patients with multiple sclerosis or brain tumors, by using MRI, is shown to be possible. As a measure of permeability of the BBB to Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) the flux per unit of distribution volume per unit...... of brain mass was used. This quantity was found by introducing the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1) as a measure of concentration of Gd-DTPA in the brain tissue in the mathematical model for the transcapillary transport over the BBB. High accordance between the observed data points and the model was found...

  5. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn; Creber, Sarah A.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Johns, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  6. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  7. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, N.X.

    1986-01-01

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  8. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziener, Christian Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic ... the radiologist if your child has any serious health problems or has recently had surgery. Some conditions, ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, ... to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI is ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... material called gadolinium, which is less likely to cause an allergic reaction than iodinated contrast material. Tell ... magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the radiologist know about them. ... MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not completely surround you. ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... distort images of the facial area or brain, so the radiologist should be aware of them. Parents ... MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not completely surround you. ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if your child has asthma. The contrast ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... the MRI equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... an MRI scan, but this is rare. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... lodged in the eyes are particularly important. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so the radiologist should be ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie ... your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. Your child will ... skin irritation at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... regular daily routine and have him/her take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... fluid spaces within the brain (ventricles) causes of epilepsy (seizure) hemorrhage in selected trauma patients certain chronic ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... two-way intercom. Many MRI centers allow a parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... the exam if your child has a known allergy to contrast material. Your child should wear loose, ...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mala; Tanna, Neil; Margolies, Laurie

    2014-12-01

    Silicone breast implants have significantly evolved since their introduction half a century ago, yet implant rupture remains a common and expected complication, especially in patients with earlier-generation implants. Magnetic resonance imaging is the primary modality for assessing the integrity of silicone implants and has excellent sensitivity and specificity, and the Food and Drug Administration currently recommends periodic magnetic resonance imaging screening for silent silicone breast implant rupture. Familiarity with the types of silicone implants and potential complications is essential for the radiologist. Signs of intracapsular rupture include the noose, droplet, subcapsular line, and linguine signs. Signs of extracapsular rupture include herniation of silicone with a capsular defect and extruded silicone material. Specific sequences including water and silicone suppression are essential for distinguishing rupture from other pathologies and artifacts. Magnetic resonance imaging provides valuable information about the integrity of silicone implants and associated complications.

  3. Identification and Quantitation of Phenylalanine in the Brain of Patients with Phenylketonuria by Means of Localized in Vivo1H Magnetic-Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreis, R.; Pietz, J.; Penzien, J.; Herschkowitz, N.; Boesch, C.

    Localized proton MR spectroscopy was used to identify phenylalanine (PHE) and to quantitate its cerebral concentration in patients with type I phenylketonuria (PKU). Data acquisition was optimized for the detection of low-concentration metabolites, using a short TE (20 ms) double Hahn-echo localization sequence for large volumes within the head coil and for smaller volumes using a surface coil, Previously described methods to quantitate localized MR spectra were extended to cover the case of low-concentration metabolites, unevenly distributed in three brain compartments and measured in difference spectra only. PHE content was determined in difference spectra of four PKU patients with respect to normals and in one patient before and after an oral load of L-PHE, PHE concentrations of 0.3 to 0.6 mmol/kg brain tissue were obtained, resulting in a concentration gradient for PHE between blood and brain tissue of 2.4 to 3.0, No significant changes were found for the abundant metabolites in gray or white matter. Previously reported MRI changes were confirmed to be due to increased cerebro-spinal-fluid-like spaces.

  4. Quali-quantitative characterization of the volatile constituents in Cordia verbenacea D.C. essential oil exploiting advanced chromatographic approaches and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarrone, Danilo; Giuffrida, Daniele; Rotondo, Archimede; Micalizzi, Giuseppe; Zoccali, Mariosimone; Pantò, Sebastiano; Donato, Paola; Rodrigues-das-Dores, Rosana Goncalves; Mondello, Luigi

    2017-11-17

    Cordia verbenacea D.C. (Boraginaceae, Varronia curassavica Jacq. synonym) is a medicinal plant, native from Brazil, especially the leaves are used in folk medicine. The aim of this study was to extend the characterization of the volatile fraction of the essential oil obtained from this plant, by using GC-FID, GC-MS, and chiral GC. Moreover, to further clarify the composition of the volatile fraction, preparative multidimensional-GC (prep-MDGC) was used to collect unknown compounds, followed by NMR characterization. Specifically, the chemical characterization, both qualitative and quantitative, of the volatile fraction of the essential oil obtained from Cordia verbenacea cultivated in the Minas Gerais area (central area of Brazil) was investigated for the first time. The principal components from a quantitative point of view were α-pinene (25.32%; 24.48g/100g) and α-santalene (17.90%; 17.30g/100g), belonging to the terpenes family. Chiral-GC data are reported for the enantiomeric distribution of 7 different components. Last, to obtain the complete characterization of the essential oil constituents, prep-MDGC analysis was used to attain the isolation of two compounds, not present in the principal MS databases, which were unambiguously identified by NMR investigation as (E)-α-santalal and (E)-α-bergamotenal, reported for the first time in Cordia verbenacea essential oil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of cartilage repair after microfracture (MF) treatment for adult unstable osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in the ankle: correlations with clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Hongyue; Lu, Rong; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Shuang; Shang, Xiliang; Li, Hong; Hua, Yinghui

    2014-01-01

    To quantitatively evaluate cartilage repair after microfracture (MF) for ankle osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) using MRI and analyse correlations between MRI and clinical outcome. Forty-eight patients were recruited and underwent MR imaging, including 3D-DESS, T2-mapping and T2-STIR sequences, and completed American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scoring. Thickness index, T2 index of repair tissue (RT) and volume of subchondral bone marrow oedema (BME) were calculated. Subjects were divided into two groups: group A (3-12 months post-op), and group B (12-24 months post-op). Student's t test was used to compare the MRI and AOFAS score between two groups and Pearson's correlation coefficient to analyse correlations between them. Thickness index and AOFAS score of group B were higher than group A (P < 0.001, P < 0.001). T2 index and BME of group B were lower than group A (P < 0.001, P = 0.012). Thickness index, T2 index and BME were all correlated with AOFAS score (r = 0.416, r = -0.475, r = -0.353), but BME was correlated with neither thickness index nor T2 index. Significant improvement from MF can be expected on the basis of the outcomes of quantitative MRI and AOFAS score. MRI was correlated with AOFAS score. BME is insufficient as an independent predictor to evaluate repair quality, but reduction of BME can improve the patient's clinical outcome. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: new applications in the quantification and assessment of polysaccharide-based vaccine intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido, Raine; Velez, Herman; Verez, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance has become the choice for structural studies, identity assays and simultaneous quantification of active pharmaceutical ingredient of different polysaccharide-based vaccine. In the last two decades, the application of quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance had an increasing impact to support several quantification necessities. The technique involves experiments with several modified parameters in order to obtain spectra with quantifiable signals. The present review is supported by some recent relevant reports and it discusses several applications of NMR in carbohydrate-based vaccines. Moreover, it emphasizes and describes several parameters and applications of quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

  7. Magnetic resonance enterography in pediatric celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Gonca; Doganay, Selim; Sevinc, Eylem; Deniz, Kemal; Chavhan, Govind; Gorkem, Sureyya B; Karacabey, Neslihan; Dogan, Mehmet S; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Aslan, Duran

    To assess if magnetic resonance enterography is capable of showing evidence/extent of disease in pediatric patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease by comparing with a control group, and to correlate the magnetic resonance enterography findings with anti-endomysial antibody level, which is an indicator of gluten-free dietary compliance. Thirty-one pediatric patients (mean age 11.7±3.1 years) with biopsy-proven celiac disease and 40 pediatric patients as a control group were recruited in the study. The magnetic resonance enterography images of both patients with celiac disease and those of the control group were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists in a blinded manner for the mucosal pattern, presence of wall thickening, luminal distention of the small bowel, and extra-intestinal findings. Patient charts were reviewed to note clinical features and laboratory findings. The histopathologic review of the duodenal biopsies was re-conducted. The mean duration of the disease was 5.6±1.8 years (range: 3-7.2 years). In 24 (77%) of the patients, anti-endomysial antibody levels were elevated (mean 119.2±66.6RU/mL). Magnetic resonance enterography revealed normal fold pattern in all the patients. Ten (32%) patients had enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes. Although a majority of the patients had elevated anti-endomysial antibody levels indicating poor dietary compliance, magnetic resonance enterography did not show any mucosal abnormality associated with the inability of magnetic resonance enterography to detect mild/early changes of celiac disease in children. Therefore, it may not be useful for the follow-up of pediatric celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of cartilage repair after microfracture treatment for full-thickness cartilage defect models in rabbit knee joints: correlations with histological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Hongyue; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Shuang; Li, Hong; Hua, Yinghui; Chen, Zhongqing

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate repair tissue (RT) after microfracture treatment for full-thickness cartilage defect models using quantitative MRI and investigate the correlations between MRI and histological findings. The animal experiment was approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee of our college. Thirty-six full-thickness cartilage defect models in rabbit knee joints were assigned to the microfracture or joint debridement group (as control). Each group consisted of 3-week, 5-week, and 7-week subgroups. MR imaging, including a three-dimensional double-echo steady-state sequence (3D-DESS), and T2 mapping were performed at 3, 5, and 7 weeks postoperatively. The thickness and T2 indices of RT were calculated. After MRI scans at each time point, operation sites were removed to make hematoxylin-eosin (H and E)-stained sections. Histological results were evaluated using the modified O'Driscoll score system. Comparisons were made between the two groups with respect to the MRI and histological findings, and correlation analysis was performed within each group. The thickness index and histological O'Driscoll score of RT in the two groups increased over time, while the T2 index decreased. The thickness index and histological O'Driscoll score of the microfracture group were higher than in the joint debridement group at each time point. The T2 index of the microfracture group was lower than in the joint debridement group at 3 weeks (P = 0.006), while it was higher than in the joint debridement group at 5 and 7 weeks (P = 0.025 and 0.025). The thickness index was positively correlated with the histological O'Driscoll score in both groups (microfracture: r s = 0.745, P s = 0.680, P = 0.002). The T2 index was negatively correlated with the histological O'Driscoll score in both groups (microfracture: r s = -0.715, P = 0.002; joint debridement: r s = -0.826, P < 0.001). Significant improvement over time after microfracture can be expected on the basis of the quantitative MRI finding and

  9. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of cartilage repair after microfracture treatment for full-thickness cartilage defect models in rabbit knee joints: correlations with histological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Hongyue; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Shuang [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Li, Hong; Hua, Yinghui [Fudan University, Department of Sports Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Chen, Zhongqing [Fudan University, Department of Pathology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2014-11-26

    To evaluate repair tissue (RT) after microfracture treatment for full-thickness cartilage defect models using quantitative MRI and investigate the correlations between MRI and histological findings. The animal experiment was approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee of our college. Thirty-six full-thickness cartilage defect models in rabbit knee joints were assigned to the microfracture or joint debridement group (as control). Each group consisted of 3-week, 5-week, and 7-week subgroups. MR imaging, including a three-dimensional double-echo steady-state sequence (3D-DESS), and T2 mapping were performed at 3, 5, and 7 weeks postoperatively. The thickness and T2 indices of RT were calculated. After MRI scans at each time point, operation sites were removed to make hematoxylin-eosin (H and E)-stained sections. Histological results were evaluated using the modified O'Driscoll score system. Comparisons were made between the two groups with respect to the MRI and histological findings, and correlation analysis was performed within each group. The thickness index and histological O'Driscoll score of RT in the two groups increased over time, while the T2 index decreased. The thickness index and histological O'Driscoll score of the microfracture group were higher than in the joint debridement group at each time point. The T2 index of the microfracture group was lower than in the joint debridement group at 3 weeks (P = 0.006), while it was higher than in the joint debridement group at 5 and 7 weeks (P = 0.025 and 0.025). The thickness index was positively correlated with the histological O'Driscoll score in both groups (microfracture: r{sub s} = 0.745, P < 0.001; joint debridement: r{sub s} = 0.680, P = 0.002). The T2 index was negatively correlated with the histological O'Driscoll score in both groups (microfracture: r{sub s} = -0.715, P = 0.002; joint debridement: r{sub s} = -0.826, P < 0.001). Significant improvement over time after

  10. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of cartilage repair after microfracture (MF) treatment for adult unstable osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in the ankle: correlations with clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Hongyue; Lu, Rong; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Shuang [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shang, Xiliang; Li, Hong; Hua, Yinghui [Fudan University, Department of Sports Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2014-08-15

    To quantitatively evaluate cartilage repair after microfracture (MF) for ankle osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) using MRI and analyse correlations between MRI and clinical outcome. Forty-eight patients were recruited and underwent MR imaging, including 3D-DESS, T2-mapping and T2-STIR sequences, and completed American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scoring. Thickness index, T2 index of repair tissue (RT) and volume of subchondral bone marrow oedema (BME) were calculated. Subjects were divided into two groups: group A (3-12 months post-op), and group B (12-24 months post-op). Student's t test was used to compare the MRI and AOFAS score between two groups and Pearson's correlation coefficient to analyse correlations between them. Thickness index and AOFAS score of group B were higher than group A (P < 0.001, P < 0.001). T2 index and BME of group B were lower than group A (P < 0.001, P = 0.012). Thickness index, T2 index and BME were all correlated with AOFAS score (r = 0.416, r = -0.475, r = -0.353), but BME was correlated with neither thickness index nor T2 index. Significant improvement from MF can be expected on the basis of the outcomes of quantitative MRI and AOFAS score. MRI was correlated with AOFAS score. BME is insufficient as an independent predictor to evaluate repair quality, but reduction of BME can improve the patient's clinical outcome. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, Andrew; Merrilees, Stephen; Mitchell, Nicola; Hill, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Andrew [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: andrewh@adhb.govt.nz; Merrilees, Stephen [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: smerrilees@adhb.govt.nz; Mitchell, Nicola [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: nmit010@ec.auckland.ac.nz; Hill, Andrew [Department of Vascular Surgery, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: ahill@adhb.govt.nz

    2008-07-15

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions.

  13. Magnetic elliptical polarization of Schumann resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentman, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of orthogonal, horizontal components of the magnetic field in the ELF range obtained during September 1985 show that the Schumann resonance eigenfrequencies determined separately for the north-south and east-west magnetic components differ by as much as 0.5 Hz, suggesting that the underlying magnetic signal is not linearly polarized at such times. The high degree of magnetic ellipticity found suggests that the side multiplets of the Schumann resonances corresponding to azimuthally inhomogeneous normal modes are strongly excited in the highly asymmetric earth-ionosphere cavity. The dominant sense of polarization over the measurement passband is found to be right-handed during local daylight hours, and to be left-handed during local nighttime hours. 16 references

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of bentonite systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Furo, Istvan (Industrial NMR Centre and Div. of Physical Chemistry, Dept. of Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-09-15

    This report summarizes results from a set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on Ca and Na montmorillonite samples interacting with water. The primary goal with these studies was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during and after different physical processes such as swelling and sedimentation and on the time scale from minutes to years. Additionally, we also studied the distribution of foreign particles (such as native minerals as well as magnetic model particles) within bentonite systems and performed some diffusion NMR experiments with the aim of characterizing the state of colloids that form after clay dissolution. Both natural montmorillonites and purified and ion-exchanged montmorillonite clays were investigated. The primary variables were clay composition and water ionic strength. Bulk samples confined in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated. A critical issue for the stability of clay buffer layer in deep underground repository is to prevent or minimize the release of clay particles into the water phase. In our experiments, the most significant particle losses were found for Na-MX80 clay exposed to water with low ionic strength. With increasing the concentration of CaCl{sub 2} in the water phase both swelling and particle release are slowed down but not completely eliminated due probably to gradual change of water ion content via ion exchange with the clay itself. For natural MX80 samples, in spite of significant swelling expansion, no clay particle release above the sensitivity limit of 0.001 volume% was observed. Ca-MX80 exhibited the smallest expansion and no trace of clay particle released into the aqueous phase

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of bentonite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Furo, Istvan

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes results from a set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on Ca and Na montmorillonite samples interacting with water. The primary goal with these studies was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during and after different physical processes such as swelling and sedimentation and on the time scale from minutes to years. Additionally, we also studied the distribution of foreign particles (such as native minerals as well as magnetic model particles) within bentonite systems and performed some diffusion NMR experiments with the aim of characterizing the state of colloids that form after clay dissolution. Both natural montmorillonites and purified and ion-exchanged montmorillonite clays were investigated. The primary variables were clay composition and water ionic strength. Bulk samples confined in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated. A critical issue for the stability of clay buffer layer in deep underground repository is to prevent or minimize the release of clay particles into the water phase. In our experiments, the most significant particle losses were found for Na-MX80 clay exposed to water with low ionic strength. With increasing the concentration of CaCl 2 in the water phase both swelling and particle release are slowed down but not completely eliminated due probably to gradual change of water ion content via ion exchange with the clay itself. For natural MX80 samples, in spite of significant swelling expansion, no clay particle release above the sensitivity limit of 0.001 volume% was observed. Ca-MX80 exhibited the smallest expansion and no trace of clay particle released into the aqueous phase

  16. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Flavia Martins; Setti, Marcela; Vianna, Evandro Miguelote; Domingues, Romulo Cortes; Meohas, Walter; Rezende, Jose Francisco; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. Materials And Methods: Fifty-five patients with musculoskeletal tumors (27 malignant and 28 benign) were studied. The examinations were performed in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner with standard protocol, and single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 135 msec echo time. The dynamic contrast study was performed using T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence after intravenous gadolinium injection. Time signal intensity curves and slope values were calculated. The statistical analysis was performed with the Levene's test, followed by a Student's t-test, besides the Pearson's chi-squared and Fischer's exact tests. Results: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were, respectively, 87.5%, 92.3% and 90.9% (p < 0.0001). Statistically significant difference was observed in the slope (%/min) between benign (mean, 27.5%/min) and malignant (mean, 110.9%/min) lesions (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The time-intensity curve and slope values using dynamic-enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in association with the presence of choline peak demonstrated by single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy study are useful in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. (author)

  17. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry II. Purity of phosphorus-based agrochemicals glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine) and profenofos (O-(4-bromo-2-chlorophenyl) O-ethyl S-propyl phosphorothioate) measured by 1H and 31P QNMR spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saed Al Deen, Tareq; Brynn Hibbert, D.; Hook, James M.; Wells, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    The purities of the widely-used herbicide glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine), and the insecticide profenofos (O-(4-bromo-2-chlorophenyl) O-ethyl S-propyl phosphorothioate) were determined by 1 H and 31 P quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (QNMR) spectrometry using an internal standard. QNMR does not need a standard reference of the same target analyte, in contrast to chromatographic methods, but only a compound containing the nucleus of interest. Sodium acetate and sodium phosphate of known purity were chosen as internal standards for 1 H NMR and 31 P NMR), respectively for the water soluble glyphosate and a single internal standard, trimethyl phosphate for both 1 H and 31 P NMR quantitative analysis of the organic soluble profenofos. These standards have NMR peaks that do not interfere with those of the analyte, they are chemically inert and are soluble in the deuterated solvent. The average purity of glyphosate obtained by 1 H NMR (97.07%, σ=0.68) agreed with that by 31 P NMR (96.53%, σ=0.90; ANOVA, P=0.074) for the five batches provided by the manufacturer according to the procedures for chemical registration in Australia. The standard deviations of seven independent analyses of a single batch by 1 H NMR and 31 P NMR were σ=0.24% and σ=0.33%, respectively, values which confirm the exceptional precision of the method. The purity of profenofos by 1 H NMR (94.63%, σ=0.14) also agreed with that by 31 P NMR (94.62%, σ=0.59; ANOVA, P=0.97). Uncertainty budgets for the measured purities of glyphosate and profenofos show that the uncertainty in the purity of the internal standard is a major contributor to the uncertainty of the result. NMR was also used to establish the impurity profile of both compounds, and quantify the impurities present

  18. Evaluation of magnetic resonance velocimetry for steady flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, D N; Biancheri, C L; Pettigrew, R I; Peifer, J W; Markou, C P; Engels, H

    1990-11-01

    Whole body magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has recently become an important diagnostic tool for cardiovascular diseases. The technique of magnetic resonance phase velocity encoding allows the quantitative measurement of velocity for an arbitrary component direction. A study was initiated to determine the ability and accuracy of MR velocimetry to measure a wide range of flow conditions including flow separation, three-dimensional secondary flow, high velocity gradients, and turbulence. A steady flow system pumped water doped with manganese chloride through a variety of test sections. Images were produced using gradient echo sequences on test sections including a straight tube, a curved tube, a smoothly converging-diverging nozzle, and an orifice. Magnetic resonance measurements of laminar and turbulent flows were depicted as cross-sectional velocity profiles. MR velocity measurements revealed such flow behavior as spatially varying velocity, recirculation and secondary flows over a wide range of conditions. Comparisons made with published experimental laser Doppler anemometry measurements and theoretical calculations for similar flow conditions revealed excellent accuracy and precision levels. The successful measurement of velocity profiles for a variety of flow conditions and geometries indicate that magnetic resonance imaging is an accurate, non-contacting velocimeter.

  19. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of skeletal muscle fatty degenerative changes using whole-body Dixon nuclear magnetic resonance imaging for an important reduction of the acquisition time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, Pierre-Yves; Marty, Benjamin; Robert, Benjamin; Shukelovitch, Alexey; Carlier, Robert Y; Azzabou, Noura; Carlier, Pierre G

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, MRI has proven its usefulness for the diagnostic workup of patients with musculo-skeletal diseases, and also shown great promise as a non-invasive, quantitative outcome measure in clinical studies. The characterization of patterns of fatty degenerative lesions, which now plays an important part in the diagnosis of some diseases, is typically performed by the radiologist on routine T1-weighted images. We propose to rationalize acquisitions and reduce patients' time in the scanner by allowing radiologists to perform the qualitative grading of the muscles on images derived from fat/water acquisitions. These maps are color-coded, where the different colors correspond to classes of fatty infiltration degree. This allows a quick visual assessment of the muscles, equivalent to the standard method. Using the weighted Kappa agreement test, the agreement between the proposed method and the traditional one, as well as the reproducibility of the results with two raters, was measured on twenty patients suffering from various neuromuscular pathologies. The presented comparisons show that the use of color coded fat fraction maps is statistically equivalent to using the traditional T1-weighted images when performing visual assessment of degenerative lesions with fatty infiltrations in patients with neuromuscular disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cell water balance of white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) during its post-harvest lifetime studied by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donker, H C; Van As, H

    1999-04-19

    A combination of quantitative water density and T2 MRI and changes therein observed after infiltration with 'invisible' Gd-DTPA solution was used to study cell water balances, cell water potentials and cell integrity. This method was applied to reveal the evolution and mechanism of redistribution of water in harvested mushrooms. Even when mushrooms did not lose water during the storage period, a redistribution of water was observed from stipe to cap and gills. When the storage condition resulted in a net loss of water, the stipe lost more water than the cap. The water density in the gill increased, probably due to development of spores. Deterioration effects (i.e. leakage of cells, decrease in osmotic water potential) were found in the outer stipe. They were not found in the cap, even at prolonged storage at 293 K and R.H.=70%. The changes in osmotic potential were partly accounted for by changes in the mannitol concentration. Changes in membrane permeability were also indicated. Cells in the cap had a constant low membrane (water) permeability. They developed a decreasing osmotic potential (more negative), whereas the osmotic potential in the outer stipe increased, together with the permeability of cells.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ill effects on pregnant women or their unborn babies. However, because the unborn baby will be in a strong magnetic field, pregnant ... intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 hours after contrast medium is ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... epilepsy (seizure) hemorrhage in selected trauma patients certain chronic conditions, such as multiple sclerosis disorders of the ... a very small chance of irritation of your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some ... Images related to Magnetic ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ...

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalpe, I.O.

    1984-01-01

    A brief survey of the working principle of the NMR technique in diagnostical medicine is given. Its clinical usefulness for locating tumors, diagnosing various other diseases, such as some mental illnesses and multiple sclerosis, and its possibilities for studying biochemical processes in vivo are mentioned. The price of NMR image scanners and the problems of the strong magnetic field around the machines are mentioned

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... MRI equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the ... use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the ... use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to see, hear and speak with your child at all times using a two-way intercom. Many MRI centers allow a parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... able to see, hear and speak with you at all times using a two-way intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a ...

  13. Quantitative assessment of synovial inflammation by dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. A study of the effect of intra-articular methylprednisolone on the rate of early synovial enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Henriksen, O

    1996-01-01

    The effect of temporary inflammatory suppression on synovial membrane enhancement, as determined by dynamic and static gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was studied. MRI of 18 arthritic knees was performed before and 1, 7, 30 and 180 days after intra-articular methylpredn......The effect of temporary inflammatory suppression on synovial membrane enhancement, as determined by dynamic and static gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was studied. MRI of 18 arthritic knees was performed before and 1, 7, 30 and 180 days after intra...

  14. Magnetic resonance investigation of magnetic-labeled baker's yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy Morais, J.P.M.; Azevedo, R.B.; Silva, L.P.; Lacava, Z.G.M.; Bao, S.N.; Silva, O.; Pelegrini, F.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Safarik, I.; Safarikova, M.; Morais, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the interaction of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (5 and 10 nm core-size) with Saccharomyces cerevisae was investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs revealed magnetite nanoparticles attached externally to the cell wall. The MR data support the strong interaction among the nanoparticles supported by the cells. A remarkable shift in the resonance field was used as signature of particle attachment to the cell wall

  15. Recent trends in high spin sensitivity magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Aharon; Twig, Ygal; Ishay, Yakir

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic resonance is a very powerful methodology that has been employed successfully in many applications for about 70 years now, resulting in a wealth of scientific, technological, and diagnostic data. Despite its many advantages, one major drawback of magnetic resonance is its relatively poor sensitivity and, as a consequence, its bad spatial resolution when examining heterogeneous samples. Contemporary science and technology often make use of very small amounts of material and examine heterogeneity on a very small length scale, both of which are well beyond the current capabilities of conventional magnetic resonance. It is therefore very important to significantly improve both the sensitivity and the spatial resolution of magnetic resonance techniques. The quest for higher sensitivity led in recent years to the development of many alternative detection techniques that seem to rival and challenge the conventional ;old-fashioned; induction-detection approach. The aim of this manuscript is to briefly review recent advances in the field, and to provide a quantitative as well as qualitative comparison between various detection methods with an eye to future potential advances and developments. We first offer a common definition of sensitivity in magnetic resonance to enable proper quantitative comparisons between various detection methods. Following that, up-to-date information about the sensitivity capabilities of the leading recently-developed detection approaches in magnetic resonance is provided, accompanied by a critical comparison between them and induction detection. Our conclusion from this comparison is that induction detection is still indispensable, and as such, it is very important to look for ways to significantly improve it. To do so, we provide expressions for the sensitivity of induction-detection, derived from both classical and quantum mechanics, that identify its main limiting factors. Examples from current literature, as well as a description of

  16. resonant inverter supplied interior permanent magnet (ipm)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    [5] Zhenyue Hong, “DC-voltage link resonant inverters”, Department of Electrical and. Electronic Engineering University of. Canterbury, New Zealand. [6] Kalyan Kumar Halder, Naruttam Kumar Roy and B.C. Ghosh, “Position Sensorless. Control for an Interior Permanent Magnet. Synchronous Motor SVM Drive with ANN.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    1996-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing

  18. Pharyngeal branchial cyst: magnetic resonance findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerezal, L.; Canga, A. [Department of Radiology of the ' Santa Cruz' Hospital Liencres, Cantabria (Spain); Morales, C. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology of the ' Sierrallana' Hospital Torrelavega, Cantabria (Spain); Abascal, F.; Usamentiaga, E.; Bustamante, M. [Department of Radiology of the University Hospital ' Marques de Valdecilla' , Av. de Valdecilla s/n Santander 39008 (Spain); Olcinas, O. [Department of Pathology of the University Hospital ' Marques de Valdecilla' , Av. de Valdecilla s/n Santander 39008 (Spain)

    1998-11-01

    An unusual case of pharyngeal cyst in a 25-year-old man studied by Magnetic Resonance (MR) is described. Anatomic location and pathological findings indicated the second branchial pouch origin. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Pharyngeal branchial cyst: magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerezal, L.; Canga, A.; Morales, C.; Abascal, F.; Usamentiaga, E.; Bustamante, M.; Olcinas, O.

    1998-01-01

    An unusual case of pharyngeal cyst in a 25-year-old man studied by Magnetic Resonance (MR) is described. Anatomic location and pathological findings indicated the second branchial pouch origin. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soernes, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system

  1. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography in meningovascular syphilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, J [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain); Soriano, G [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain); Zubieta, J L [Servicio de Neuroradiologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain); Delgado, G [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain); Villanueva, J A [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain)

    1994-04-01

    Meningovascular neurosyphilis (MN) is an unusual cause of stroke in young adults. The clinical manifestations include prodromal symptoms weeks or months before definitive stroke. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings and examination of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of MN with basilar artery irregularities demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography. (orig.)

  3. Cryogenic Preamplifiers for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Daniel H.; Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Petersen, Jan R.

    2018-01-01

    Pursuing the ultimate limit of detection in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires cryogenics to decrease the thermal noise of the electronic circuits. As cryogenic coils for MRI are slowly emerging cryogenic preamplifiers are required to fully exploit their potential. A cryogenic preamplifier...

  4. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of xanthomatous meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Y.; Tsubokawa, T.; Tanaka, A.; Koshinaga, M.; Nemoto, N.

    1993-01-01

    A case of meningioma with extensive xanthomatous metaplasia occurring in the left frontal convexity of a 37-year-old woman is reported. The tumour was demonstrated as a hypodense mass with minimal enhancement on CT. Our findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging may provide a clue to the diagnosis of meningiomas with extensive xanthomatous metaplasia when CT is less specific. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  7. Vascular anatomy in angiography for magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charry Lopez, Marco Luciano; Rivera Gomez, Juan Enrique

    1998-01-01

    A review of basic anatomical concepts and main variants, as well as some anatomical anomalies of the central nervous system vascularity, these concepts are considered essential for the interpretation of magnetic resonance angiography with time-of-flight (TOF) and phase-contrast (PC) methods

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in obstetric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, J C; Lowe, T W; Santos-Ramos, R; Cunningham, F G; Parkey, R

    1985-01-01

    Five patients with abnormal pregnancies were examined with ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR). Three had a malformed fetus, 1 had a molar pregnancy, and 1 had an ovarian mass. Both maternal and fetal structures were clearly shown, although fetal motion may have resulted in image degradation in some cases. The authors suggest that MR may be useful in obstetric diagnosis.

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive ... possibility that you’re pregnant tell your doctor as well. On the day of your exam, it’s ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in sudden deafness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Hugo Valter Lisboa; Barros, Flavia Alencar; Penido, Norma de Oliveira; Souza, Ana Claudia Valerio de; Yamaoka, Wellington Yugo; Yamashita, Helio

    2005-01-01

    The etiology of sudden deafness can remain undetermined despite extensive investigation. This study addresses the value of magnetic resonance imaging in the analysis of sudden deafness patients.Study Design: transversal cohort.Material And Method: In a prospective study, 49 patients attended at otolaryngology emergency room of Federal University of Sao Paulo - Escola Paulista de Medicina, from April 2001 to May 2003, were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging.Results: Magnetic Resonance abnormalities were seen in 23 (46.9%) patients and revealed two tumors suggestive of meningioma, three vestibular schwannomas, thirteen microangiopathic changes of the brain and five (21.7%) pathological conditions of the labyrinth.Conclusion: Sudden deafness should be approached as a symptom common to different diseases. The presence of cerebellopontine angle tumors in 10.2% of our cases, among other treatable causes, justifies the recommendation of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance use, not only to study the auditory peripheral pathway, but to study the whole auditory pathway including the brain. (author)

  11. Magnetic resonance studies of solid polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenk, R.

    1969-01-01

    This paper is a review of the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to solid polymers. In the first, theoretical part, the elements of the theory of NMR, which are necessary for the study of the properties of solid polymers are discussed: the moments method, nuclear relaxation and the distribution of correlation times. In the second part the experimental results are presented. (author) [fr

  12. Appropriateness of computed tomography and magnetic resonance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are an essential part of modern healthcare. Marked increases in clinical demand for these imaging modalities are straining healthcare expenditure and threatening health system sustainability. The number of CT and MRI scans requested in ...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nederveen, D.; Bakker, C.J.G.; Scholten, F.G.; Feldberg, N.A.M.; Postma, J.H.; Vis, H. van der

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen patients suspected of having meniscal lesions, were examined bt magnetic resonance (MR) and arthroscopy, MR and arthroscopy corelate well for meniscal and cruciate ligament lesions. Damage of the articular cartilage was, however, not detected by MR (author). 15 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  14. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma shown by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, S.R.; Birzgalis, A.R.; Ramsden, R.T.

    1994-01-01

    Intralabyrinthine schwannomas are rare benign tumours which present with progressive or fluctuant audiovestibular symptoms and may mimic Menieres disease. The size and position of these lesions make preoperative diagnosis unusual and most are discovered incidentally at labyrinthectomy. A case is reported which was diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed at surgery. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of semicircular canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarbati, A; Leclercq, F; Zancanaro, C; Antonakis, K

    1992-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of the first investigation of the semicircular canals in a living, small animal by means of high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging. This procedure is noninvasive and allows identification of the endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces yielding a morphology quite consistent with direct anatomical examination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1506290

  16. Magnetic resonance angiography in meningovascular syphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, J.; Soriano, G.; Zubieta, J.L.; Delgado, G.; Villanueva, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Meningovascular neurosyphilis (MN) is an unusual cause of stroke in young adults. The clinical manifestations include prodromal symptoms weeks or months before definitive stroke. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings and examination of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of MN with basilar artery irregularities demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography. (orig.)

  17. Nonlinear nuclear magnetic resonance in ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurgaliev, T.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of nonlinear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been studied theoretically by taking into account the interaction between NMR and FMR in the ferromagnets. The Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equations, describing the electron and nuclear magnetization behaviour in ferromagnets are presented in an integral form for a weakly excited electronic system. The stationary solution of these equations has been analysed in the case of equal NMR and FMR frequencies: the criteria for the appearance of two stable dynamic states is found and the high-frequency magnetic susceptibility for these systems is investigated. 2 figs., 8 refs

  18. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  19. Magnetic resonance study of maghemite-based magnetic fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, L.C.; Lacava, B.M.; Skeff Neto, K.; Pelegrini, F.; Morais, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on the magnetic resonance (MR) data (X-band experiment) of 10.2 nm average diameter maghemite nanoparticle in the temperature range of 100-230 K. Maghemite nanoparticles were suspended as low-pH ionic magnetic fluid containing 2.3x10 17 particles/cm 3 . The temperature dependence of both resonance linewidth and resonance field of the zero-field-cooled sample as well as the resonance field of the field-cooled sample (angular variation experiment) was analyzed using well-established methodology. Information regarding particle size, particle clusterization and surface magnetic anisotropy were obtained from the analysis of the MR data. The number of magnetic sites per particle from the MR data is in excellent agreement with the number provided by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data. The demagnetizing field value obtained from the MR data indicates cluster of particles containing on average 1.42 particles. The MR angular variation data suggest that magnetoelastic effect accounts for the non-linearity observed for the surface component of the magnetic anisotropy

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha

    1998-01-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  2. Vortex flow during early and late left ventricular filling in normal subjects: quantitative characterization using retrospectively-gated 4D flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance and three-dimensional vortex core analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaz, Mohammed S M; Calkoen, Emmeline E; Westenberg, Jos J M; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Roest, Arno A W; van der Geest, Rob J

    2014-09-27

    LV diastolic vortex formation has been suggested to critically contribute to efficient blood pumping function, while altered vortex formation has been associated with LV pathologies. Therefore, quantitative characterization of vortex flow might provide a novel objective tool for evaluating LV function. The objectives of this study were 1) assess feasibility of vortex flow analysis during both early and late diastolic filling in vivo in normal subjects using 4D Flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) with retrospective cardiac gating and 3D vortex core analysis 2) establish normal quantitative parameters characterizing 3D LV vortex flow during both early and late ventricular filling in normal subjects. With full ethical approval, twenty-four healthy volunteers (mean age: 20±10 years) underwent whole-heart 4D Flow CMR. The Lambda2-method was used to extract 3D LV vortex ring cores from the blood flow velocity field during early (E) and late (A) diastolic filling. The 3D location of the center of vortex ring core was characterized using cylindrical cardiac coordinates (Circumferential, Longitudinal (L), Radial (R)). Comparison between E and A filling was done with a paired T-test. The orientation of the vortex ring core was measured and the ring shape was quantified by the circularity index (CI). Finally, the Spearman's correlation between the shapes of mitral inflow pattern and formed vortex ring cores was tested. Distinct E- and A-vortex ring cores were observed with centers of A-vortex rings significantly closer to the mitral valve annulus (E-vortex L=0.19±0.04 versus A-vortex L=0.15±0.05; p=0.0001), closer to the ventricle's long-axis (E-vortex: R=0.27±0.07, A-vortex: R=0.20±0.09, p=0.048) and more elliptical in shape (E-vortex: CI=0.79±0.09, A-vortex: CI=0.57±0.06; vortex. The circumferential location and orientation relative to LV long-axis for both E- and A-vortex ring cores were similar. Good to strong correlation was found between vortex shape and

  3. Proton Density Fat-Fraction of Rotator Cuff Muscles Is Associated With Isometric Strength 10 Years After Rotator Cuff Repair: A Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampinos, Dimitrios C; Holwein, Christian; Buchmann, Stefan; Baum, Thomas; Ruschke, Stefan; Gersing, Alexandra S; Sutter, Reto; Imhoff, Andreas B; Rummeny, Ernst J; Jungmann, Pia M

    2017-07-01

    Quantitative muscle fat-fraction magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques correlate with semiquantitative Goutallier scores with failure after rotator cuff (RC) repair. To investigate the relationship of proton density fat fraction (PDFF) of the RC muscles with semiquantitative MR scores, cartilage T2 relaxation times, and clinical isometric strength measurements in patients 10 years after unilateral RC repair. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Bilateral shoulder MR imaging was performed in 13 patients (11 male, 2 female; age, 72 ± 8 years) 10.9 ± 0.4 years after unilateral autologous periosteal flap augmented RC repair (total shoulders assessed, N = 26). Goutallier classification, muscle atrophy, RC tendon integrity, and cartilage defects were determined based on morphological MR sequences. A paracoronal 2D multi-slice multi-echo sequence was used for quantitative cartilage T2 mapping. A chemical shift-encoding-based water-fat separation technique (based on a 6-echo 3D spoiled gradient echo sequence) was used for quantification of the PDFF of RC muscles. Isometric shoulder abduction strength was measured clinically. Mean and SD, Pearson correlation, and partial Spearman correlation were calculated. There were 6 RC full-thickness retears in ipsilateral shoulders and 6 RC full-thickness tears in contralateral shoulders. Isometric shoulder abduction strength was not significantly different between ipsilateral and contralateral shoulders (50 ± 24 N vs 54 ± 24 N; P = .159). The mean PDFF of RC muscles was 11.7% ± 10.4% (ipsilateral, 14.2% ± 8.5%; contralateral, 9.2% ± 7.8%; P = .002). High supraspinatus PDFF correlated significantly with higher Goutallier scores ( R = 0.75, P isometric muscle strength ( R = -0.49, P = .011). This correlation remained significant after adjustment for muscle area measurements and tendon rupture ( R = -0.41, P = .048). More severe cartilage defects at the humerus were significantly associated with higher supraspinatus

  4. Magnetic resonance: safety measures and biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordillo, I.; Lafuente, J.; Fernandez, C.; Barbero, M.J.; Cascon, E.

    1997-01-01

    The biological effects of electromagnetic fields is currently a subject of great controversy. For this reason, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy are constantly under investigation. The source of the risk in MRI is associated with the three types of electromagnetic radiation to which the patient is exposed: the static magnetic field, variable (gradient) magnetic fields and radiofrequency fields. Each is capable of producing significant biological effects when employed at sufficient intensity. Patients exposed to risk sources are those situated within the lines of force of the magnetic field, ellipsoid lines that are arranged around the magnet, representing the strength of the surrounding field. To date, at the intensity normally utilized in MRI(<2T) and respecting the field limit recommendations established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use of this technique no adverse secondary biological effects have been reported. The known biological effects and other possible secondary effects are reviewed, and the recommended safety measures are discussed. (Author)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author)

  6. The market for magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, L.

    1990-01-01

    The medical market is, at present, the most dominant market for low T c superconductors. Indeed, without magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there would hardly be a low T c superconductor market at all. According to the author, any development that can expand the medical market for MRI machines would be a welcome one. This paper reports how the recent advances in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are such a development. While the principle of MRS has bee around as long as MRI, only recently have advances in technique, computer programming and magnet technology allowed MRS to advance to a point where it may become an important technology-one that could increase the medical market for superconductors. The author discussed how MRS can be used to analyze oil core samples for their oil content, oil/water ratios, how the oil is bound and how to extract it

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  8. Magnetic resonance in food science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hills, B.P.

    1994-01-01

    Imaging protocols suitable for obtaining quantitative maps of NMR parameters in heterogenous food materials are first considered; it is followed by a discussion of the interpretation of the NMR parameter maps in terms of mass and heat transport and associated physico-chemical changes in the food material, leading to an analysis of the effect of food microstructure on water proton relaxation and diffusion and of the molecular mechanisms of water proton relaxation in biopolymer systems. Finally, high resolution NMR protocols suitable for following composition changes in food materials are discussed. 13 fig., 86 ref

  9. Transcranial magnetic stimulation assisted by neuronavigation of magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viesca, N. Angeline; Alcauter, S. Sarael; Barrios, A. Fernando; González, O. Jorge J.; Márquez, F. Jorge A.

    2012-10-01

    Technological advance has improved the way scientists and doctors can learn about the brain and treat different disorders. A non-invasive method used for this is Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) based on neuron excitation by electromagnetic induction. Combining this method with functional Magnetic Resonance Images (fMRI), it is intended to improve the localization technique of cortical brain structures by designing an extracranial localization system, based on Alcauter et al. work.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in otolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradzki, J.; Paprzycki, W.

    1993-01-01

    In the paper authors describe fundamental physical properties of a phenomenon of the radio-frequency excitation and relaxation of nuclei ordered in a strong magnetic field and the usefulness of MRI in medical diagnostic procedures. Basic interpretations principles of MR imaging due to signal intensity differences between organs and tissues in T 1 - and T 2 - weighted sequences and proton density are presented. Both, literature review and experience of authors suggest application of MRI in otolaryngology, it is illustrated by a lot of examples. The MR imaging studies were compared with results obtained from CT in otolaryngology field. (author)

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine What's in this article? ...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorramdin, A. [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Isapour, Gh. [Department of Materials and Engineering, Hakim Sabzevari University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants. - Highlights: • This paper studies the physics of MRI as a powerful diagnostic technique. • MRI uses the differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. • The relaxation times can be shortened by the use of a magnetic contrast agent. • The magnetic nanoparticles act as contrast agents, helping to increase the resolution. • Different synthesis methods can influence the magnetic resonance behavior.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting with short relaxation intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, Thomas; Doneva, Mariya; Koken, Peter; Sommer, Karsten; Meineke, Jakob; Börnert, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a technique for improving the performance of Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) in repetitive sampling schemes, in particular for 3D MRF acquisition, by shortening relaxation intervals between MRF pulse train repetitions. A calculation method for MRF dictionaries adapted to short relaxation intervals and non-relaxed initial spin states is presented, based on the concept of stationary fingerprints. The method is applicable to many different k-space sampling schemes in 2D and 3D. For accuracy analysis, T 1 and T 2 values of a phantom are determined by single-slice Cartesian MRF for different relaxation intervals and are compared with quantitative reference measurements. The relevance of slice profile effects is also investigated in this case. To further illustrate the capabilities of the method, an application to in-vivo spiral 3D MRF measurements is demonstrated. The proposed computation method enables accurate parameter estimation even for the shortest relaxation intervals, as investigated for different sampling patterns in 2D and 3D. In 2D Cartesian measurements, we achieved a scan acceleration of more than a factor of two, while maintaining acceptable accuracy: The largest T 1 values of a sample set deviated from their reference values by 0.3% (longest relaxation interval) and 2.4% (shortest relaxation interval). The largest T 2 values showed systematic deviations of up to 10% for all relaxation intervals, which is discussed. The influence of slice profile effects for multislice acquisition is shown to become increasingly relevant for short relaxation intervals. In 3D spiral measurements, a scan time reduction of 36% was achieved, maintaining the quality of in-vivo T1 and T2 maps. Reducing the relaxation interval between MRF sequence repetitions using stationary fingerprint dictionaries is a feasible method to improve the scan efficiency of MRF sequences. The method enables fast implementations of 3D spatially

  14. Musculoskeletal applications of magnetic resonance imaging: Council on Scientific Affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, S.E.; Fisher, C.F.; Fulmer, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging provides superior contrast, resolution, and multiplanar imaging capability, allowing excellent definition of soft-tissue and bone marrow abnormalities. For these reasons, magnetic resonance imaging has become a major diagnostic imaging method for the evaluation of many musculoskeletal disorders. The applications of magnetic resonance imaging for musculoskeletal diagnosis are summarized and examples of common clinical situations are given. General guidelines are suggested for the musculoskeletal applications of magnetic resonance imaging

  15. Physics of Magnetic Resonance. Chapter 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hee Kwon [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), a property of nuclei in a magnetic field where they are able to absorb applied radiofrequency (RF) energy and subsequently release it at a specific frequency, goes back many decades to the early 1900s. Physicist Isidor I. Rabi, fascinated by the work of Otto Stern and Walther Gerlach which demonstrated that particles have intrinsic quantum properties, delved into the magnetic properties of nuclei, and in 1938 Rabi discovered the phenomenon of NMR. Several years later, in 1946, Felix Bloch and Edward Purcell refined the methods and successfully measured the NMR signal from liquids and solids. For their discoveries, Rabi received the Nobel Prize for physics in 1944 and Bloch and Purcell in 1952. While Rabi, Bloch, Purcell and other physicists working in this field had laid the foundations, a major discovery that transformed the NMR phenomenon for imaging was not made until 1973, when Paul Lauterbur developed a method for spatially encoding the NMR signal by utilizing linear magnetic field gradients. About the same time, Peter Mansfield had also discovered a means of determining the spatial structure of solids by introducing a linear gradient across the object. The idea of applying magnetic field gradients to induce spatially varying resonance frequencies to resolve the spatial distribution of magnetization was a major milestone and the beginning of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For their work, Lauterbur and Mansfield were awarded the Nobel Prize for medicine in 2003. Since its discovery, MRI has quickly become one of the most important medical imaging devices available to physicians today. Unlike other imaging modalities, such as X ray and computed tomography, MRI does not involve ionizing radiation. MRI also offers superior soft tissue contrast that is not possible with other imaging modalities. Furthermore, in MRI, the desired level of image contrast among different tissues can often be precisely controlled

  16. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ...] Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Public Workshop.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to discuss factors affecting the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging...

  17. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abbreviations used: BOLD, Blood oxygenation level dependent; CBF, cerebral blood flow; fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging; EPI, eco-planar imaging; FOV, field of view; MRI, Magnetic resonance imaging; MRS, magnetic resonance spectroscopy;. PET, position emission tomography; rCBF, regional cerebral ...

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance in ferromagnetic terbium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, C.L.T.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic properties of terbium were studied by the method of zero field nuclear magnetic resonance at 1.5 to 4 and 85 to 160 0 K. Two unconventional experimental techniques have been employed: the swept frequency and the swept temperature technique. Near 4 0 K, triplet resonance line structures were found and interpreted in terms of the magnetic domain and wall structures of ferromagnetic terbium. In the higher temperature range, temperature dependence of the resonance frequency and the quadrupole splitting were measured. The former provides a measurement of the temperature dependence of the magnetization M, and it agrees with bulk M measurements as well as the latest spin wave theory of M(T) (Brooks 1968). The latter agrees well with a calculation using a very general single ion density matrix for collective excitations (Callen and Shtrikman 1965). In addition, the small temperature-independent contribution to the electric field gradient at the nucleus due to the lattice and conduction electrons was untangled from the P(T) data. Also an anomalous and unexplained relaxation phenomenon was also observed

  19. Brain Delivery of Drug and MRI Contrast Agent: Detection and Quantitative Determination of Brain Deposition of CPT-Glu Using LC-MS/MS and Gd-DTPA Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanor, Kayann; Lee, Phil; Kiptoo, Paul; Choi, In-Young; Sherry, Erica B.; Eagle, Cheyenne Sun; Williams, Todd D.; Siahaan, Teruna J.

    2015-01-01

    Successful treatment and diagnosis of neurological diseases depend on reliable delivery of molecules across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which restricts penetration of pharmaceutical drugs and diagnostic agents into the brain. Thus, developing new non-invasive strategies to improve drug delivery across the BBB is critically needed. This study was aimed at evaluating the activity of HAV6 peptide (Ac-SHAVSS-NH2) in improving brain delivery of camptothecin-glutamate (CPT-Glu) conjugate and gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agent in Sprague-Dawley rats. Brain delivery of both CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA was evaluated in an in situ rat brain perfusion model in the presence and absence of HAV6 peptide (1.0 mM). Gd-DTPA (0.6 mmol/kg) was intravenously (i.v.) administered with and without HAV6 peptide (0.019 mmol/kg) in rats. The detection and quantification of CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA in the brain were carried out by LC-MS/MS and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively. Rats perfused with CPT-Glu in combination with HAV6 had significantly higher deposition of drug in the brain compared to CPT-Glu alone. MRI results also showed that administration of Gd-DTPA in the presence of HAV6 peptide led to significant accumulation of Gd-DTPA in various regions of the brain in both the in situ rat brain perfusion and in vivo studies. All observations taken together indicate that HAV6 peptide can disrupt the BBB and enhance delivery of small molecules into the brain. PMID:26705088

  20. Brain Delivery of Drug and MRI Contrast Agent: Detection and Quantitative Determination of Brain Deposition of CPT-Glu Using LC-MS/MS and Gd-DTPA Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanor, Kayann; Lee, Phil; Kiptoo, Paul; Choi, In-Young; Sherry, Erica B; Eagle, Cheyenne Sun; Williams, Todd D; Siahaan, Teruna J

    2016-02-01

    Successful treatment and diagnosis of neurological diseases depend on reliable delivery of molecules across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which restricts penetration of pharmaceutical drugs and diagnostic agents into the brain. Thus, developing new noninvasive strategies to improve drug delivery across the BBB is critically needed. This study was aimed at evaluating the activity of HAV6 peptide (Ac-SHAVSS-NH2) in improving brain delivery of camptothecin-glutamate (CPT-Glu) conjugate and gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agent in Sprague-Dawley rats. Brain delivery of both CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA was evaluated in an in situ rat brain perfusion model in the presence and absence of HAV6 peptide (1.0 mM). Gd-DTPA (0.6 mmol/kg) was intravenously (iv) administered with and without HAV6 peptide (0.019 mmol/kg) in rats. The detection and quantification of CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA in the brain were carried out by LC-MS/MS and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively. Rats perfused with CPT-Glu in combination with HAV6 had significantly higher deposition of drug in the brain compared to CPT-Glu alone. MRI results also showed that administration of Gd-DTPA in the presence of HAV6 peptide led to significant accumulation of Gd-DTPA in various regions of the brain in both the in situ rat brain perfusion and in vivo studies. All observations taken together indicate that HAV6 peptide can disrupt the BBB and enhance delivery of small molecules into the brain.