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Sample records for quantitative magnetic resonance

  1. Quantitative magnetic resonance micro-imaging methods for pharmaceutical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantle, M D

    2011-09-30

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool in pharmaceutical research is now well established and the current literature covers a multitude of different pharmaceutically relevant research areas. This review focuses on the use of quantitative magnetic resonance micro-imaging techniques and how they have been exploited to extract information that is of direct relevance to the pharmaceutical industry. The article is divided into two main areas. The first half outlines the theoretical aspects of magnetic resonance and deals with basic magnetic resonance theory, the effects of nuclear spin-lattice (T(1)), spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation and molecular diffusion upon image quantitation, and discusses the applications of rapid magnetic resonance imaging techniques. In addition to the theory, the review aims to provide some practical guidelines for the pharmaceutical researcher with an interest in MRI as to which MRI pulse sequences/protocols should be used and when. The second half of the article reviews the recent advances and developments that have appeared in the literature concerning the use of quantitative micro-imaging methods to pharmaceutically relevant research. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Towards quantitative magnetic resonance assessment in parenchymal liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runge, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis several advanced magnetic resonance (MR) techniques for quantitative measurements in parenchymal liver disease are studied. In particular, certain important hallmarks of liver disease such as steatosis, fibrosis, iron overload and inflammation are studied. Steatosis or fatty liver dis

  3. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of cortical multiple sclerosis pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tardif, Christine L; Bedell, Barry J; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed

    2012-01-01

    pathology. The objective of this study was to characterize the MRI signature of CLs to help interpret the changes seen in vivo and elucidate the factors limiting their visualization. A quantitative 3D high-resolution (350 μm isotropic) MRI study at 3 Tesla of a fixed post mortem cerebral hemisphere from......Although significant improvements have been made regarding the visualization and characterization of cortical multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cortical lesions (CL) continue to be under-detected in vivo, and we have a limited understanding of the causes of GM...... a patient with MS is presented in combination with matched immunohistochemistry. Type III subpial lesions are characterized by an increase in T1, T2 and M0, and a decrease in MTR in comparison to the normal appearing cortex (NAC). All quantitative MR parameters were associated with cortical GM myelin...

  4. Quantitative in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy using synthetic signal injection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth I Marro

    Full Text Available Accurate conversion of magnetic resonance spectra to quantitative units of concentration generally requires compensation for differences in coil loading conditions, the gains of the various receiver amplifiers, and rescaling that occurs during post-processing manipulations. This can be efficiently achieved by injecting a precalibrated, artificial reference signal, or pseudo-signal into the data. We have previously demonstrated, using in vitro measurements, that robust pseudo-signal injection can be accomplished using a second coil, called the injector coil, properly designed and oriented so that it couples inductively with the receive coil used to acquire the data. In this work, we acquired nonlocalized phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements from resting human tibialis anterior muscles and used pseudo-signal injection to calculate the Pi, PCr, and ATP concentrations. We compared these results to parallel estimates of concentrations obtained using the more established phantom replacement method. Our results demonstrate that pseudo-signal injection using inductive coupling provides a robust calibration factor that is immune to coil loading conditions and suitable for use in human measurements. Having benefits in terms of ease of use and quantitative accuracy, this method is feasible for clinical use. The protocol we describe could be readily translated for use in patients with mitochondrial disease, where sensitive assessment of metabolite content could improve diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Quantitative analysis of brain magnetic resonance imaging for hepatic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syh, Hon-Wei; Chu, Wei-Kom; Ong, Chin-Sing

    1992-06-01

    High intensity lesions around ventricles have recently been observed in T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance images for patients suffering hepatic encephalopathy. The exact etiology that causes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gray scale changes has not been totally understood. The objective of our study was to investigate, through quantitative means, (1) the amount of changes to brain white matter due to the disease process, and (2) the extent and distribution of these high intensity lesions, since it is believed that the abnormality may not be entirely limited to the white matter only. Eleven patients with proven haptic encephalopathy and three normal persons without any evidence of liver abnormality constituted our current data base. Trans-axial, sagittal, and coronal brain MRI were obtained on a 1.5 Tesla scanner. All processing was carried out on a microcomputer-based image analysis system in an off-line manner. Histograms were decomposed into regular brain tissues and lesions. Gray scale ranges coded as lesion were then brought back to original images to identify distribution of abnormality. Our results indicated the disease process involved pallidus, mesencephalon, and subthalamic regions.

  6. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cortical Multiple Sclerosis Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L. Tardif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although significant improvements have been made regarding the visualization and characterization of cortical multiple sclerosis (MS lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cortical lesions (CL continue to be under-detected in vivo, and we have a limited understanding of the causes of GM pathology. The objective of this study was to characterize the MRI signature of CLs to help interpret the changes seen in vivo and elucidate the factors limiting their visualization. A quantitative 3D high-resolution (350 μm isotropic MRI study at 3 Tesla of a fixed post mortem cerebral hemisphere from a patient with MS is presented in combination with matched immunohistochemistry. Type III subpial lesions are characterized by an increase in T1, T2 and M0, and a decrease in MTR in comparison to the normal appearing cortex (NAC. All quantitative MR parameters were associated with cortical GM myelin content, while T1 showed the strongest correlation. The histogram analysis showed extensive overlap between CL and NAC for all MR parameters and myelin content. This is due to the poor contrast in myelin content between CL and NAC in comparison to the variability in myelo-architecture throughout the healthy cortex. This latter comparison is highlighted by the representation of T1 times on cortical surfaces at several laminar depths.

  7. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  8. Quantitative Pulmonary Imaging Using Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washko, George R.; Parraga, Grace; Coxson, Harvey O.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of lung function, including spirometry and body plethesmography, are easy to perform and are the current clinical standard for assessing disease severity. However, these lung functional techniques do not adequately explain the observed variability in clinical manifestations of disease and offer little insight into the relationship of lung structure and function. Lung imaging and the image based assessment of lung disease has matured to the extent that it is common for clinical, epidemiologic, and genetic investigation to have a component dedicated to image analysis. There are several exciting imaging modalities currently being used for the non-invasive study of lung anatomy and function. In this review we will focus on two of them, x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Following a brief introduction of each method we detail some of the most recent work being done to characterize smoking-related lung disease and the clinical applications of such knowledge. PMID:22142490

  9. The reproducibility of quantitative measurements in lumbar magnetic resonance imaging of children from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masharawi, Y; Kjær, Per; Bendix, T

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Quantitative lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements in children were taken twice and analyzed for intra- and intertester reproducibility. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the reproducibility of a variety of lumbar quantitative measurements taken from MRIs of children from the ge...

  10. Assessment of quantitative hypertrophy scores in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy : Magnetic resonance imaging versus echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posma, JL; Blanksma, PK; vanderWall, EE; Hamer, HPM; Mooyaart, EL; Lie, KI

    1996-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and transthoracic echocardiography in quantitative assessment of the extent of hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), we examined 52 consecutive patients with HCM. The Spirito-Maron and Wigle hypert

  11. Assessment of quantitative hypertrophy scores in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy : Magnetic resonance imaging versus echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posma, JL; Blanksma, PK; vanderWall, EE; Hamer, HPM; Mooyaart, EL; Lie, KI

    1996-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and transthoracic echocardiography in quantitative assessment of the extent of hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), we examined 52 consecutive patients with HCM. The Spirito-Maron and Wigle hypert

  12. Structural and Quantitative Analysis of Three C-Glycosylflavones by Variable Temperature Proton Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance is a powerful tool in drug analysis because of its speed, precision, and efficiency. In present study, the application of variable temperature proton quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (VT-1H-qNMR for the calibration of three C-glycosylflavones including orientin, isoorientin, and schaftoside as reference substances was reported. Since there was conformational equilibrium due to the restricted rotation around the C(sp3-C(sp2 bond in C-glycosylflavones, the conformational behaviors were investigated by VT-NMR and verified by molecular mechanics (MM calculation. The VT-1H-qNMR method was validated including the linearity, limit of quantification, precision, and stability. The results were consistent with those obtained from mass balance approach. VT-1H-qNMR can be deployed as an effective tool in analyzing C-glycosylflavones.

  13. Structural and Quantitative Analysis of Three C-Glycosylflavones by Variable Temperature Proton Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Dai, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance is a powerful tool in drug analysis because of its speed, precision, and efficiency. In present study, the application of variable temperature proton quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (VT-1H-qNMR) for the calibration of three C-glycosylflavones including orientin, isoorientin, and schaftoside as reference substances was reported. Since there was conformational equilibrium due to the restricted rotation around the C(sp3)-C(sp2) bond in C-glycosylflavones, the conformational behaviors were investigated by VT-NMR and verified by molecular mechanics (MM) calculation. The VT-1H-qNMR method was validated including the linearity, limit of quantification, precision, and stability. The results were consistent with those obtained from mass balance approach. VT-1H-qNMR can be deployed as an effective tool in analyzing C-glycosylflavones. PMID:28243484

  14. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain in utero: Methods and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anat; Biegon; Chen; Hoffmann

    2014-01-01

    Application of modern magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) techniques to the live fetus in utero is a relatively recent endeavor. The relative advantages and disadvantages of clinical MRI relative to the widely used and accepted ultrasonographic approach are the subject of a continuing debate; however the focus of this review is on the even younger field of quantitative MRI as applied to non-invasive studies of fetal brain development. The techniques covered under this header include structural MRI when followed by quan-titative(e.g., volumetric) analysis, as well as quantita-tive analyses of diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and functional MRI. The majority of the published work re-viewed here reflects information gathered from normal fetuses scanned during the 3rd trimester, with relatively smaller number of studies of pathological samples including common congenital pathologies such as ven-triculomegaly and viral infection.

  15. A combined post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histological study of multiple sclerosis pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasinski, James; Stagg, Charlotte J; Chance, Steven A; Deluca, Gabriele C; Esiri, Margaret M; Chang, Eun-Hyuk; Palace, Jacqueline A; McNab, Jennifer A; Jenkinson, Mark; Miller, Karla L; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2012-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory neurological condition characterized by focal and diffuse neurodegeneration and demyelination throughout the central nervous system. Factors influencing the progression of pathology are poorly understood. One hypothesis is that anatomical connectivity influences the spread of neurodegeneration. This predicts that measures of neurodegeneration will correlate most strongly between interconnected structures. However, such patterns have been difficult to quantify through post-mortem neuropathology or in vivo scanning alone. In this study, we used the complementary approaches of whole brain post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histology to assess patterns of multiple sclerosis pathology. Two thalamo-cortical projection systems were considered based on their distinct neuroanatomy and their documented involvement in multiple sclerosis: lateral geniculate nucleus to primary visual cortex and mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to prefrontal cortex. Within the anatomically distinct thalamo-cortical projection systems, magnetic resonance imaging derived cortical thickness was correlated significantly with both a measure of myelination in the connected tract and a measure of connected thalamic nucleus cell density. Such correlations did not exist between these markers of neurodegeneration across different thalamo-cortical systems. Magnetic resonance imaging lesion analysis depicted clearly demarcated subcortical lesions impinging on the white matter tracts of interest; however, quantitation of the extent of lesion-tract overlap failed to demonstrate any appreciable association with the severity of markers of diffuse pathology within each thalamo-cortical projection system. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging metrics in both white matter tracts were correlated significantly with a histologically derived measure of tract myelination. These data demonstrate for the first time the relevance of functional

  16. Association between preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, pain intensity and quantitative sensory testing in patients awaiting lumbar diskectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hegarty, Dominic

    2011-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers important information regarding the morphology, location and size of a herniated disc, which influences the decision to offer lumbar diskectomy (LD). This study aims to examine the association between clinical neurophysiologic indices including pain intensity and quantitative sensory testing (QST), and the degree of lumbar nerve root compromise depicted on magnetic resonance (MR) in patients awaiting LD.

  17. Monitoring lactic acid production during milk fermentation by in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteille, R; Gaudet, M; Lecanu, B; This, H

    2013-04-01

    When fermenting milk, lactic bacteria convert part of α- and β-lactoses into d- and l- lactic acids, causing a pH decrease responsible for casein coagulation. Lactic acid monitoring during fermentation is essential for the control of dairy gel textural and organoleptic properties, and is a way to evaluate strain efficiency. Currently, titrations are used to follow the quantity of acids formed during jellification of milk but they are not specific to lactic acid. An analytical method without the use of any reagent was investigated to quantify lactic acid during milk fermentation: in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Two methods using in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared: (1) d- and l-lactic acids content determination, using the resonance of their methyl protons, showing an increase from 2.06 ± 0.02 to 8.16 ± 0.74 g/L during 240 min of fermentation; and (2) the determination of the α- and β-lactoses content, decreasing from 42.68 ± 0.02 to 30.76 ± 1.75 g/L for the same fermentation duration. The ratio between the molar concentrations of produced lactic acids and consumed lactoses enabled cross-validation, as the value (2.02 ± 0.18) is consistent with lactic acid bacteria metabolism.

  18. Quantitative perfusion imaging in magnetic resonance imaging; Quantitative Perfusionsbildgebung in der Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoellner, F.G.; Gaa, T.; Zimmer, F. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Computerunterstuetzte Klinische Medizin, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Ong, M.M.; Riffel, P.; Hausmann, D.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Weis, M. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized for its superior tissue contrast while being non-invasive and free of ionizing radiation. Due to the development of new scanner hardware and fast imaging techniques during the last decades, access to tissue and organ functions became possible. One of these functional imaging techniques is perfusion imaging with which tissue perfusion and capillary permeability can be determined from dynamic imaging data. Perfusion imaging by MRI can be performed by two approaches, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. While the first method uses magnetically labelled water protons in arterial blood as an endogenous tracer, the latter involves the injection of a contrast agent, usually gadolinium (Gd), as a tracer for calculating hemodynamic parameters. Studies have demonstrated the potential of perfusion MRI for diagnostics and also for therapy monitoring. The utilization and application of perfusion MRI are still restricted to specialized centers, such as university hospitals. A broad application of the technique has not yet been implemented. The MRI perfusion technique is a valuable tool that might come broadly available after implementation of standards on European and international levels. Such efforts are being promoted by the respective professional bodies. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) zeichnet sich durch einen ueberlegenen Gewebekontrast aus, waehrend sie nichtinvasiv und frei von ionisierender Strahlung ist. Sie bietet Zugang zu Gewebe- und Organfunktion. Eine dieser funktionellen bildgebenden Verfahren ist die Perfusionsbildgebung. Mit dieser Technik koennen u. a. Gewebeperfusion und Kapillarpermeabilitaet aus dynamischen Bilddaten bestimmt werden. Perfusionsbildgebung mithilfe der MRT kann durch 2 Ansaetze, naemlich ''arterial spin labeling'' (ASL) und dynamische kontrastverstaerkte (DCE-)MRT durchgefuehrt werden. Waehrend die erste Methode magnetisch

  19. Finger joint synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis: quantitative assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, Mette; Østergaard, Mikkel; Lorenzen, I

    1999-01-01

    -quantitative score for hypertrophic synovial membrane. PATIENTS AND METHODS: MCP joints of the dominant hand of 37 patients and five controls were examined clinically and by MRI. Laboratory assessments were performed. RESULTS: Median synovial membrane volumes were considerably larger in clinically active rheumatoid......OBJECTIVE: To assess quantitatively, by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the synovial membrane volume in second to fifth metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls, and to compare the synovial membrane volumes with a more easily obtained semi...... with the synovial volumes (Spearman rho = 0.79; P rheumatoid factor and to laboratory markers of inflammation. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that synovial membrane volumes, as determined by MRI, in finger joints are related...

  20. Brain iron deposition in essential tremor: a quantitative 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novellino, Fabiana; Cherubini, Andrea; Chiriaco, Carmelina; Morelli, Maurizio; Salsone, Maria; Arabia, Gennarina; Quattrone, Aldo

    2013-02-01

    Studies have demonstrated brain iron deposition in neurodegenerative disease and in normal aging. Data on this topic are lacking in essential tremor (ET). The aim of our study was to investigate brain iron content in patients with ET, using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2*-relaxometry. We enrolled 24 patients with ET and 25 age-matched healthy controls. Subjects were examined using a 3T MRI scanner. The protocol included conventional MRI sequences and quantitative T2*-relaxometry. Whole-brain voxel-based analyses showed significant differences in T2* values in bilateral globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and in right dentate nucleus (P motor systems outside of the cerebellum/cerebellar pathway and, more specifically, of the globus pallidus. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorders Society.

  1. Quantitative assessment of renal function with magnetic resonance imaging; Quantitative Erfassung der renalen Funktion mit der Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberg, S.O.; Bock, M.; Aumann, S.; Essig, M.; Floemer, F.; Knopp, M.V.; Kaick, G. van [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radiologische Diagnostik und Therapie; Just, A. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). 1. Physiologisches Inst.

    2000-10-01

    Aim. To show the potential of various methods in magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of renal function. Material and Methods. A combined assessment of renal morphology, renal hemodynamics and function is proposed. Various techniques are explained, including multiphasic 3D gadolinium MR angiography, MR phase-contrast flow measurements, quantitative perfusion measurements with intravascular contrast agents, and MR renography and MR urography. The use of these techniques is demonstrated for renovascular diseases. Results. The combined use of these techniques allows renal artery stenosis to be accurately detected and evaluation of renal blood flow, perfusion, glomerular filtration rate, and renal excretion. Based on true quantitative parameters, the hemodynamic and functional significance of the stenosis can be assessed. Renovascular diseases can be differentiated from renoparenchymal disease. Conclusion. For the assessment of renal function, functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques are an important alternative to nuclear medicine. The predictive value regarding the effect of revascularization is currently under investigation. (orig.) [German] Fragestellung. Verschiedene Methoden der Magnetresonanztomographie zur quantitativen Erfassung der Nierenfunktion sollen aufgezeigt werden. Methodik. Es werden MR-Techniken zur kombinierten Beurteilung der renalen Morphologie, Haemodynamik und Funktion der Niere vorgestellt. Zur Anwendung kommen hierbei die multiphasische 3-D-Gadolinium-MR-Angiographie, die MR-Phasenkontrastflussmessung, die quantitative Perfusionsmessung mit intravasalen Kontrastmitteln sowie die MR-Renographie/MR-Urographie. Die Methoden werden exemplarisch am Beispiel renovaskulaerer Erkrankungen demonstriert. Ergebnisse. Mit den vorgestellten Methoden lassen sich Nierenarterienstenosen akkurat detektieren sowie Aenderungen des renalen Blutflusses, der Nierenperfusion, der Filtrationsleistung sowie der renalen Ausscheidung erfassen. Auf der

  2. A quantitative comparison of the TERA modeling and DFT magnetic resonance image reconstruction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M R; Nichols, S T; Constable, R T; Henkelman, R M

    1991-05-01

    The resolution of magnetic resonance images reconstructed using the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) algorithm is limited by the effective window generated by the finite data length. The transient error reconstruction approach (TERA) is an alternative reconstruction method based on autoregressive moving average (ARMA) modeling techniques. Quantitative measurements comparing the truncation artifacts present during DFT and TERA image reconstruction show that the modeling method substantially reduces these artifacts on "full" (256 X 256), "truncated" (256 X 192), and "severely truncated" (256 X 128) data sets without introducing the global amplitude distortion found in other modeling techniques. Two global measures for determining the success of modeling are suggested. Problem areas for one-dimensional modeling are examined and reasons for considering two-dimensional modeling discussed. Analysis of both medical and phantom data reconstructions are presented.

  3. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and studies of degenerative diseases of the developing human brain

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    Caviness, V.S. Jr. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)); Phil, D.; Filipek, P.A.; Kennedy, D.N.

    1992-05-01

    The Rett syndrome is a progressive disorder which is associated with regression of psychomotor development and precipitous deceleration of brain growth during the first year of life. General histopathological surveys in postmortem specimens have identified degeneration of subpopulations of neurons of the nigrostriatal system but no other evidence of degenerative process. Magnetic resonance imaging-based morphometry may usefully guide application of rigorous but demanding quantitative histologic search for evidence of neuronal degeneration. The volumes of the principal set of cortical and nuclear structures of principal interest in the disorder may be measured by currently avaiable MRI-based methods. Opimized levels of precision now allow detection of volumetric changes over time in the same brain of approximately 10% at the 95% confidence level. (author).

  4. Quantitative morphologic evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging during and after treatment of childhood leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Glass, John O. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Translational Imaging Research (MS 210), Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Laningham, Fred H. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States); Pui, Ching-Hon [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Medical advances over the last several decades, including CNS prophylaxis, have greatly increased survival in children with leukemia. As survival rates have increased, clinicians and scientists have been afforded the opportunity to further develop treatments to improve the quality of life of survivors by minimizing the long-term adverse effects. When evaluating the effect of antileukemia therapy on the developing brain, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been the preferred modality because it quantifies morphologic changes objectively and noninvasively. Computer-aided detection of changes on neuroimages enables us to objectively differentiate leukoencephalopathy from normal maturation of the developing brain. Quantitative tissue segmentation algorithms and relaxometry measures have been used to determine the prevalence, extent, and intensity of white matter changes that occur during therapy. More recently, diffusion tensor imaging has been used to quantify microstructural changes in the integrity of the white matter fiber tracts. MR perfusion imaging can be used to noninvasively monitor vascular changes during therapy. Changes in quantitative MR measures have been associated, to some degree, with changes in neurocognitive function during and after treatment. In this review, we present recent advances in quantitative evaluation of MR imaging and discuss how these methods hold the promise to further elucidate the pathophysiologic effects of treatment for childhood leukemia. (orig.)

  5. Multiparametric Classification of Skin from Osteogenesis Imperfecta Patients and Controls by Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Microimaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth G Ashinsky

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to discriminate between skin biopsies from individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI and skin biopsies from individuals without OI. Skin biopsies from nine controls (unaffected and nine OI patients were imaged to generate maps of five separate MR parameters, T1, T2, km, MTR and ADC. Parameter values were calculated over the dermal region and used for univariate and multiparametric classification analysis. A substantial degree of overlap of individual MR parameters was observed between control and OI groups, which limited the sensitivity and specificity of univariate classification. Classification accuracies ranging between 39% and 67% were found depending on the variable of investigation, with T2 yielding the best accuracy of 67%. When several MR parameters were considered simultaneously in a multivariate analysis, the classification accuracies improved up to 89% for specific combinations, including the combination of T2 and km. These results indicate that multiparametric classification by quantitative MRI is able to detect differences between the skin of OI patients and of unaffected individuals, which motivates further study of quantitative MRI for the clinical diagnosis of OI.

  6. Role of Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Parameters in the Evaluation of Treatment Response in Malignant Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Gang Xu; Jun-Fang Xian

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To elaborate the role of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters in the evaluation of treatment response in malignant tumors.Data Sources:Data cited in this review were obtained mainly from PubMed in English from 1999 to 2014,with keywords "dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI," "diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)," "microcirculation," "apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)," "treatment response" and "oncology."Study Selection:Articles regarding principles of DCE-MRI,principles of DWI,clinical applications as well as opportunity and aspiration were identified,retrieved and reviewed.Results:A significant correlation between ADC values and treatment response was reported in most DWI studies.Most quantitative DCE-MRI studies showed a significant correlation between K~s values and treatment response.However,in different tumors and studies,both high and low pretreatment ADC or K~s values were found to be associated with response rate.Both DCE-MRI and DWI demonstrated changes in their parameters hours to days after treatment,showing a decrease in K~ns or an increase in ADC associated with response in most cases.Conclusions:Combinations of quantitative MRI play an important role in the evaluation of treatment response of malignant tumors and hold promise for use as a cancer treatment response biomarker.However,validation is hampered by the lack of reproducibility and standardization.MRI acquisition protocols and quantitative image analysis approaches should be properly addressed prior to further testing the clinical use of quantitative MRI parameters in the assessment of treatments.

  7. Determination of scutellarin in breviscapine preparations using quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzuo Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to develop the selection criteria of proton signals for the determination of scutellarin using quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR, which is the main bioactive compound in breviscapine preparations for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease. The methyl singlet signal of 3-(trimethylsilylpropionic-2,2,3,3-d4 acid sodium salt was selected as the internal standard for quantification. The molar concentration of scutellarin was determined by employing different proton signals. To obtain optimum proton signals for the quantification, different combinations of proton signals were investigated according to two selection criteria: the recovery rate of qNMR method and quantitative results compared with those obtained with ultra-performance liquid chromatography. As a result, the chemical shift of H-2′ and H-6′ at δ 7.88 was demonstrated as the most suitable signal with excellent linearity range, precision, and recovery for determining scutellarin in breviscapine preparations from different manufacturers, batch numbers, and dosage forms. Hierarchical cluster analysis was employed to evaluate the determination results. The results demonstrated that the selection criteria of proton signals established in this work were reliable for the qNMR study of scutellarin in breviscapine preparations.

  8. Quantitative criteria for the diagnosis of the congenital absence of pericardium by cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaione, F; Barison, A; Pescetelli, I; Pali, F; Pizzino, F; Terrizzi, A; Di Lisi, D; Novo, G; Todiere, G; Assennato, P; Novo, S; Aquaro, G D

    2016-03-01

    Congenital absence of the left ventricular pericardium (LCAP) is a rare and poorly known cardiac malformation. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) is generally used for the diagnosis of LCAP because of its high soft tissue contrast, multiplanarity and cine capability, but the diagnosis is usually made by only qualitative criteria. The aim of the present study was to establish quantitative criteria for the accurate diagnosis of LCAP on CMR. We enrolled nine consecutive patients affected by LCAP (mean age 26±8years, 7 males), 13 healthy controls, 13 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), 12 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 13 patients with right ventricular overload (RVO). All patients underwent CMR. The whole-heart volume was measured in end-systole and end-diastole. Whole-heart volume change (WHVC), was the systo-diastolic change of volume, expressed percentage of the end-diastolic volume. The angle of clockwise-rotation of the heart was also measured in the end-diastolic phase of the axial cine stack. The WHVC was significantly higher in LCAP (21.9±5.4), compared to healthy subjects (8.6±2.4, p13%. In LCAP the systo-diastolic WHVC was significantly higher than controls, DCM, HCM and RVO patients and resulted an optimal quantitative criteria for the diagnosis of LCAP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative evaluation of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of focal hepatic lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Jie Sun; Xian-Yue Quan; Fan-Heng Huang; Yi-Kai Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the quantitative analysis of diffusionweighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) in differential diagnosis of focal hepatic lesions.METHODS: DWMRI was performed in 149 hepatic lesions, including hepatocellular carcinoma (34 cases),hepatic metastases (37 cases), cavernous hemangioma (42 cases), hepatic cyst (36 cases). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were evaluated using four different b values in different sequences. The ratio of ADC values of lesion/liver in hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic metastases was also calculated.RESULTS: The mean ADC values of hepatic lesions were as follows: hepatocellular carcinoma (0.95 ± 0.11) × 10-3 mm2/s, hepatic metastasis (1.13 ± 0.21)× 10-3 mm2/s, cavernous hemangioma (1.86±0.36)×10-3 mm2/s,hepatic cyst(3.14±0.31)×10-3 mm2/s. The ratio of ADC values in lesion/liver in hepatocellular carcinoma was 0.91 ±0.11, being significantly different from that in hepatic metastasis (1.21 ± 0.18, P< 0.05).CONCLUSION: ADC values and quantitative analysis of focal hepatic lesions are of significant values in differential diagnosis of focal hepatic lesions.

  10. μ-ViP: Customized virtual phantom for quantitative magnetic resonance micro-imaging at high magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondeau-Mouro, C.; Kovrlija, R.; Gambarota, G.; Saint-Jalmes, H.

    2017-02-01

    The applications of Magnetic Resonance micro-Imaging (MRμI) cover nowadays a wide range of fields. However few of them present quantitative measurements when the sample of interest changes over time or in case of a long acquisition time. In this domain, two challenges have to be overcome: the introduction of a phantom as a reference signal and the guarantee that this signal is stable over the experiment duration while some conditions such as temperature and/or the moisture are varied. The aim of the present study was to implement a dedicated experimental set-up to generate a virtual phantom (ViP) signal in a vertical-bore 11.7 T NMR spectrometer, equipped with a micro-imaging probe. This study shows that the generation of a micro-imaging-dedicated ViP (μ-ViP) signal is of great benefit for on-line quality control of the spectrometer performance during acquisition in the case of real-time experiments. Thus, μViP represents a step towards improvement of the magnetic resonance signal quantification in small samples.

  11. Study on hippocampal volume with quantitative 3T magnetic resonance imaging in Chinese patients with epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Mei-chun; LU Qin-chi; LI Yan-sheng; SHEN Jia-lin

    2012-01-01

    Background It was still rare for the quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research of regional changes in hippocampus sclerosis (HS) in Chinese patients with epilepsy.This study aimed to study the hippocampal volumes (HVs)with quantitative MRI measurement in Chinese patients with epilepsy.Methods Forty-six Chinese patients with epilepsy (intractable epilepsy (IE),n=21; non-intractable epilepsy (NIE),n=25)and 25 normal controls were collected between July 2007 and March 2008.All of the subjects underwent a 3T high-resolution MRI with oblique coronal thin sections oriented perpendicular to the hippocampal long axis.Hippocampal structures were assessed by visual detection,and HVs were quantitatively studied with a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS).Results Our study suggested that there was no significant difference in gender (P >0.05) while the right hippocampal head volume (HHV),hippocampal body volume (HBV),and the whole hippocampal volume (HCV) were greater than the left one (P <0.05),but no significant difference was found in bilateral hippocampal tail volume (HTV) (P >0.05) in normal controls.That unilateral/diffuse (64%/21%) and bilateral/focal (86%/20%) hippocampal atrophy (HA)were significant in IE and NIE patients,respectively.Anterior hippocampus,especially HHV (26% in IE and 20% in NIE) and HBV (29% in IE and 12% in NIE),had more significant atrophy than the HTV (5% in IE and 0% in NIE) in patients with epilepsy.Conclusion By assessing the volumes of the regional hippocampus with 3T MRI,we could better define the range and distribution of HS,since regional or subtle changes in HVs could be detected earlier with 3T MRI.

  12. Probing articular cartilage damage and disease by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Deva D; Neu, Corey P

    2013-01-06

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating disease that reflects a complex interplay of biochemical, biomechanical, metabolic and genetic factors, which are often triggered by injury, and mediated by inflammation, catabolic cytokines and enzymes. An unmet clinical need is the lack of reliable methods that are able to probe the pathogenesis of early OA when disease-rectifying therapies may be most effective. Non-invasive quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) techniques have shown potential for characterizing the structural, biochemical and mechanical changes that occur with cartilage degeneration. In this paper, we review the background in articular cartilage and OA as it pertains to conventional MRI and qMRI techniques. We then discuss how conventional MRI and qMRI techniques are used in clinical and research environments to evaluate biochemical and mechanical changes associated with degeneration. Some qMRI techniques allow for the use of relaxometry values as indirect biomarkers for cartilage components. Direct characterization of mechanical behaviour of cartilage is possible via other specialized qMRI techniques. The combination of these qMRI techniques has the potential to fully characterize the biochemical and biomechanical states that represent the initial changes associated with cartilage degeneration. Additionally, knowledge of in vivo cartilage biochemistry and mechanical behaviour in healthy subjects and across a spectrum of osteoarthritic patients could lead to improvements in the detection, management and treatment of OA.

  13. Effect of arterial deprivation on growing femoral epiphysis: Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging using a piglet model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Jung Eun; Yoo, Won Joon; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Choi, Young Hun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion MRI for the evaluation of femoral head ischemia. Unilateral femoral head ischemia was induced by selective embolization of the medial circumflex femoral artery in 10 piglets. All MRIs were performed immediately (1 hour) and after embolization (1, 2, and 4 weeks). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were calculated for the femoral head. The estimated pharmacokinetic parameters (Kep and Ve from two-compartment model) and semi-quantitative parameters including peak enhancement, time-to-peak (TTP), and contrast washout were evaluated. The epiphyseal ADC values of the ischemic hip decreased immediately (1 hour) after embolization. However, they increased rapidly at 1 week after embolization and remained elevated until 4 weeks after embolization. Perfusion MRI of ischemic hips showed decreased epiphyseal perfusion with decreased Kep immediately after embolization. Signal intensity-time curves showed delayed TTP with limited contrast washout immediately post-embolization. At 1-2 weeks after embolization, spontaneous reperfusion was observed in ischemic epiphyses. The change of ADC (p = 0.043) and Kep (p = 0.043) were significantly different between immediate (1 hour) after embolization and 1 week post-embolization. Diffusion MRI and pharmacokinetic model obtained from the DCE-MRI are useful in depicting early changes of perfusion and tissue damage using the model of femoral head ischemia in skeletally immature piglets.

  14. Absolute quantification for benzoic acid in processed foods using quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-09-15

    The absolute quantification method of benzoic acid (BA) in processed foods using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed and validated. BA levels were determined using proton signals (δ(H) 7.53 and 7.98) referenced to 2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulfonate-d(6) sodium salt (DSS-d(6)) after simple solvent extraction from processed foods. All recoveries from several kinds of processed foods, spiked at their specified maximum Japanese usage levels (0.6-2.5 g kg(-1)) and at 0.13 g kg(-1) and 0.063 g kg(-1), were greater than 80%. The limit of quantification was confirmed as 0.063 g kg(-1) in processed foods, which was sufficiently low for the purposes of monitoring BA. The accuracy of the proposed method is equivalent to the conventional method using steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The proposed method was both rapid and simple. Moreover, it provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. Therefore, the proposed method is a useful and practical tool for determining BA levels in processed foods.

  15. Absolute quantitative analysis for sorbic acid in processed foods using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-07-13

    An analytical method using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) spectroscopy was applied and validated for the absolute quantification of sorbic acid (SA) in processed foods. The proposed method showed good linearity. The recoveries for samples spiked at the maximum usage level specified for food in Japan and at 0.13 g kg(-1) (beverage: 0.013 g kg(-1)) were larger than 80%, whereas those for samples spiked at 0.063 g kg(-1) (beverage: 0.0063 g kg(-1)) were between 56.9 and 83.5%. The limit of quantification was 0.063 g kg(-1) for foods (and 0.0063 g kg(-1) for beverages containing Lactobacillus species). Analysis of the SA content of commercial processed foods revealed quantities equal to or greater than those measured using conventional steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification. The proposed method was rapid, simple, accurate, and precise, and provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. It could therefore be used as an alternative to the quantification of SA in processed foods using conventional method.

  16. Quantitative Imaging of Cell-Permeable Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agents Using X-Ray Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Endres

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The inability to transduce cellular membranes is a limitation of current magnetic resonance imaging probes used in biologic and clinical settings. This constraint confines contrast agents to extracellular and vascular regions of the body, drastically reducing their viability for investigating processes and cycles in developmental biology. Conversely, a contrast agent with the ability to permeate cell membranes could be used in visualizing cell patterning, cell fate mapping, gene therapy, and, eventually, noninvasive cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we describe the synthesis and quantitative imaging of four contrast agents with the capability to cross cell membranes in sufficient quantity for detection. Each agent is based on the conjugation of a Gd(III chelator with a cellular transduction moiety. Specifically, we coupled Gd(III–diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid DTPA and Gd(III–1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid with an 8–amino acid polyarginine oligomer and an amphipathic stilbene molecule, 4-amino-4'-(N,N-dimethylaminostilbene. The imaging modality that provided the best sensitivity and spatial resolution for direct detection of the contrast agents is synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF. Unlike optical microscopy, SR-XRF provides two-dimensional images with resolution 103 better than 153Gd gamma counting, without altering the agent by organic fluorophore conjugation. The transduction efficiency of the intracellular agents was evaluated by T1 analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the efficacy of each chelate-transporter combination.

  17. Quantitative 3D Analysis of Plant Roots Growing in Soil Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Metzner, Ralf; Kochs, Johannes; Postma, Johannes A; Pflugfelder, Daniel; Bühler, Jonas; Schurr, Ulrich; Jahnke, Siegfried

    2016-03-01

    Precise measurements of root system architecture traits are an important requirement for plant phenotyping. Most of the current methods for analyzing root growth require either artificial growing conditions (e.g. hydroponics), are severely restricted in the fraction of roots detectable (e.g. rhizotrons), or are destructive (e.g. soil coring). On the other hand, modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are noninvasive and allow high-quality three-dimensional imaging of roots in soil. Here, we present a plant root imaging and analysis pipeline using MRI together with an advanced image visualization and analysis software toolbox named NMRooting. Pots up to 117 mm in diameter and 800 mm in height can be measured with the 4.7 T MRI instrument used here. For 1.5 l pots (81 mm diameter, 300 mm high), a fully automated system was developed enabling measurement of up to 18 pots per day. The most important root traits that can be nondestructively monitored over time are root mass, length, diameter, tip number, and growth angles (in two-dimensional polar coordinates) and spatial distribution. Various validation measurements for these traits were performed, showing that roots down to a diameter range between 200 μm and 300 μm can be quantitatively measured. Root fresh weight correlates linearly with root mass determined by MRI. We demonstrate the capabilities of MRI and the dedicated imaging pipeline in experimental series performed on soil-grown maize (Zea mays) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants.

  18. Propofol allows precise quantitative arterial spin labelling functional magnetic resonance imaging in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Karen M; Blau, Christoph W; Kelly, Michael E; O'Herlihy, Colm; O'Connell, P R; Jones, James F X; Kerskens, Christian M

    2010-07-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques highlight cerebral vascular responses which are coupled to changes in neural activation. However, two major difficulties arise when employing these techniques in animal studies. First is the disturbance of cerebral blood flow due to anaesthesia and second is the difficulty of precise reproducible quantitative measurements. These difficulties were surmounted in the current study by using propofol and quantitative arterial spin labelling (QASL) to measure relative cerebral blood volume of labelled water (rCBV(lw),) mean transit time (MTT) and capillary transit time (CTT). The ASL method was applied to measure the haemodynamic response in the primary somatosensory cortex following forepaw stimulation in the rat. Following stimulation an increase in signal intensity and rCBV(lw) was recorded, this was accompanied by a significant decrease in MTT (1.97+/-0.06s to 1.44+/-0.04s) and CTT (1.76+/-0.06s to 1.39+/-0.07s). Two animals were scanned repeatedly on two different experimental days. Stimulation in the first animal was applied to the same forepaw during the initial and repeat scan. In the second animal stimulation was applied to different forepaws on the first and second days. The control and activated ASL signal intensities, rCBVlw on both days were almost identical in both animals. The basal MTT and CTT during the second scan were also very similar to the values obtained during the first scan. The MTT recorded from the animal that underwent stimulation to the same paw during both scanning sessions was very similar on the first and second days. In conclusion, propofol induces little physiological disturbance and holds potential for longitudinal QASL fMRI studies.

  19. Molecular Imaging of Tumors Using a Quantitative T1 Mapping Technique via Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Herrmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM with molecular imaging agents would allow for the specific localization of brain tumors. Prior studies using T1-weighted MR imaging demonstrated that the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 molecular imaging agent labeled heterotopic xenograft models of brain tumors more intensely than non-specific contrast agents using conventional T1-weighted imaging techniques. In this study, we used a dynamic quantitative T1 mapping strategy to more objectively compare intra-tumoral retention of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent over time in comparison to non-targeted control agents. Our results demonstrate that the targeted SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent, a scrambled-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 control agent, and the non-specific clinical contrast agent Optimark™ all enhanced flank tumors of human glioma cells with similar maximal changes on T1 mapping. However, the retention of the agents differs. The non-specific agents show significant recovery within 20 min by an increase in T1 while the specific agent SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 is retained in the tumors and shows little recovery over 60 min. The retention effect is demonstrated by percent change in T1 values and slope calculations as well as by calculations of gadolinium concentration in tumor compared to muscle. Quantitative T1 mapping demonstrates the superior binding and retention in tumors of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA3 agent over time compared to the non-specific contrast agent currently in clinical use.

  20. Supersonic transient magnetic resonance elastography for quantitative assessment of tissue elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Jingfei; Fite, Brett Z.; Foiret, Josquin; Ilovitsh, Asaf; Leach, J. Kent; Dumont, Erik; Caskey, Charles F.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2017-05-01

    Non-invasive, quantitative methods to assess the properties of biological tissues are needed for many therapeutic and tissue engineering applications. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has historically relied on external vibration to generate periodic shear waves. In order to focally assess a biomaterial or to monitor the response to ablative therapy, the interrogation of a specific region of interest by a focused beam is desirable and transient MRE (t-MRE) techniques have previously been developed to accomplish this goal. Also, strategies employing a series of discrete ultrasound pulses directed to increasing depths along a single line-of-sight have been designed to generate a quasi-planar shear wave. Such ‘supersonic’ excitations have been applied for ultrasound elasticity measurements. The resulting shear wave is higher in amplitude than that generated from a single excitation and the properties of the media are simply visualized and quantified due to the quasi-planar wave geometry and the opportunity to generate the wave at the site of interest. Here for the first time, we extend the application of supersonic methods by developing a protocol for supersonic transient magnetic resonance elastography (sst-MRE) using an MR-guided focused ultrasound system capable of therapeutic ablation. We apply the new protocol to quantify tissue elasticity in vitro using biologically-relevant inclusions and tissue-mimicking phantoms, compare the results with elasticity maps acquired with ultrasound shear wave elasticity imaging (US-SWEI), and validate both methods with mechanical testing. We found that a modified time-of-flight (TOF) method efficiently quantified shear modulus from sst-MRE data, and both the TOF and local inversion methods result in similar maps based on US-SWEI. With a three-pulse excitation, the proposed sst-MRE protocol was capable of visualizing quasi-planar shear waves propagating away from the excitation location and detecting differences in shear

  1. Leucoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and high lactate: quantitative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenweg, Marianne E; Pouwels, Petra J W; Wolf, Nicole I; van Wieringen, Wessel N; Barkhof, Frederik; van der Knaap, Marjo S

    2011-11-01

    Leucoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and elevated lactate is a white matter disorder caused by DARS2 mutations. The pathology is unknown. We observed striking discrepancies between improvement on longitudinal conventional magnetic resonance images and clinical deterioration and between large areas of high signal on diffusion-weighted imaging and small areas with low apparent diffusion coefficient values. These observations prompted a longitudinal and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study. We investigated eight patients (two males, mean age 27 years). Maps of T(2) relaxation times, fractional anisotropy, apparent diffusion coefficients, signal on diffusion-weighted imaging, and axial and radial diffusivities were generated. Brain metabolites, obtained by chemical shift imaging, were quantified. Data analysis focused on: (i) white matter with low apparent diffusion coefficient; (ii) white matter with high T(2) values; (iii) white matter with intermediate T(2) values; and (iv) normal-appearing white matter. The areas were compared with similarly located areas in eight matched controls. In five patients, T(2)-weighted images, spectroscopy, apparent diffusion coefficient maps and diffusion-weighted imaging maps were compared with those obtained 5-7 years ago. In white matter with low apparent diffusion coefficient, axial and radial diffusivities were decreased and fractional anisotropy was high. T(2) values were intermediate. These areas with truly restricted diffusion were small and often observed at the periphery of areas with high T(2) values. In the white matter with high and intermediate T(2) values, apparent diffusion coefficients and axial and radial diffusivities were increased and fractional anisotropy decreased. The signal on diffusion-weighted imaging was highest in white matter with high T(2) values, an effect of T(2) shinethrough. Chemical shift imaging in both white matter types showed increased lactate, increased myo

  2. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of structural magnetic resonance imaging data in a two-center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalavi Sima

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-center magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies present an opportunity to advance research by pooling data. However, brain measurements derived from MR-images are susceptible to differences in MR-sequence parameters. It is therefore necessary to determine whether there is an interaction between the sequence parameters and the effect of interest, and to minimise any such interaction by careful choice of acquisition parameters. As an exemplar of the issues involved in multi-center studies, we present data from a study in which we aimed to optimize a set of volumetric MRI-protocols to define a protocol giving data that are consistent and reproducible across two centers and over time. Methods Optimization was achieved based on data quality and quantitative measures, in our case using FreeSurfer and Voxel Based Morphometry approaches. Our approach consisted of a series of five comparisons. Firstly, a single-center dataset was collected, using a range of candidate pulse-sequences and parameters chosen on the basis of previous literature. Based on initial results, a number of minor changes were implemented to optimize the pulse-sequences, and a second single-center dataset was collected. FreeSurfer data quality measures were compared between datasets in order to determine the best performing sequence(s, which were taken forward to the next stage of testing. We subsequently acquired short-term and long-term two-center reproducibility data, and quantitative measures were again assessed to determine the protocol with the highest reproducibility across centers. Effects of a scanner software and hardware upgrade on the reproducibility of the protocols at one of the centers were also evaluated. Results Assessing the quality measures from the first two datasets allowed us to define artefact-free protocols, all with high image quality as assessed by FreeSurfer. Comparing the quantitative test and retest measures, we found high within

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking detects quantitative wall motion during dobutamine stress.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuster, A.; Kutty, S.; Padiyath, A.; Parish, V.; Gribben, P.; Danford, D.A.; Makowski, M.R.; Bigalke, B.; Beerbaum, P.B.J.; Nagel, E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dobutamine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (DS-CMR) is an established tool to assess hibernating myocardium and ischemia. Analysis is typically based on visual assessment with considerable operator dependency. CMR myocardial feature tracking (CMR-FT) is a recently introduced tec

  4. Functional and quantitative magnetic resonance myelography of symptomatic stenoses of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, Knut [District Hospital Castle of Werneck, MRI Center of Excellence, Werneck (Germany); Ganslandt, Oliver [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany); Stadlbauer, Andreas [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany); Medical University Vienna, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that functional, quantitative magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) allows standardized diagnosis of symptomatic lumbar spinal stenoses which show at least equal detectability compared to functional myelography and postmyelographic CT (pmCT) based on intra- and postoperative findings. We investigated 43 volunteers and 47 patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenoses using MRM in normal position as well as in flexion and extension in a standard whole-body MR scanner. Twenty volunteers were additionally examined under axial loading. All patients were investigated by functional myelography and pmCT and 10 patients had a functional lumbar MRM postoperatively. Range of motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes in normal position, flexion, extension, and under axial loading (volunteers) were assessed for each segment. Detectability was determined by using intraoperative findings, and postoperative freedom of symptoms was correlated with CSF volume changes in MRM. The ranges of motion in a standard whole-body MR scanner provide adequate scope for investigations into function (flexion and extension) in both volunteers and patients. Axial loading was associated with a mechanism of extension, albeit to a far smaller extent. Detectability of lumbar stenoses was 100 % for MRM, 58 % for conventional myelography, and 68 % for pmCT. Postoperative changes in CSF volume of levels with stenoses in MRM strongly correlated with freedom of symptoms (R = 0.772). This MRM method allows for exact diagnosis and reproducible quantification of stenoses, motion-related changes, and spondylolistheses of the lumbar spine. It may be useful for early detection of alterations in order to avoid neuronal compression. (orig.)

  5. Absolute quantitative analysis for sorbic acid in processed foods using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuki, Takashi, E-mail: ohtsuki@nihs.go.jp [National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko [National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method using qHNMR was applied and validated to determine SA in processed foods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method has good accuracy, precision, selectiveness, and linearity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed method is more rapid and simple than the conventional method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that the proposed method is reliable for the accurate determination of SA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method can be used for the monitoring of SA in processed foods. - Abstract: An analytical method using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) spectroscopy was applied and validated for the absolute quantification of sorbic acid (SA) in processed foods. The proposed method showed good linearity. The recoveries for samples spiked at the maximum usage level specified for food in Japan and at 0.13 g kg{sup -1} (beverage: 0.013 g kg{sup -1}) were larger than 80%, whereas those for samples spiked at 0.063 g kg{sup -1} (beverage: 0.0063 g kg{sup -1}) were between 56.9 and 83.5%. The limit of quantification was 0.063 g kg{sup -1} for foods (and 0.0063 g kg{sup -1} for beverages containing Lactobacillus species). Analysis of the SA content of commercial processed foods revealed quantities equal to or greater than those measured using conventional steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification. The proposed method was rapid, simple, accurate, and precise, and provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. It could therefore be used as an alternative to the quantification of SA in processed foods using conventional method.

  6. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  7. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of normal human brain and glioma:a quantitive in vivo study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Zhi-yong; YAMAKI Toshiaki; WANG Yun-jie

    2005-01-01

    Background In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides a noninvasive method of examining a wide variety of cerebral metabolites in both healthy subjects and patients with various brain diseases.Absolute metabolite concentrations have been determined using external and internal standards with known concentrations.When an external standard is placed beside the head, variations in signal amplitudes due to B1 field inhomogeneity and static field inhomogeneity may occur.Hence an internal standard is preferable.The purpose of this study was to quantitatively analyze the metabolite concentrations in normal adult brains and gliomas by in vivo proton MRS using the fully relaxed water signal as an internal standard.Methods Between January 1998 and October 2001, 28 healthy volunteers and 16 patients with gliomas were examined by in vivo proton MRS.Single-voxel spectra were acquired using the point-resolved spectroscopic pulse sequence with a 1.5 T scanner (TR/TE/Ave=3000 ms/30 ms/64).Results The calculated concentrations of N-acetyl-asparatate (NAA), creatine (Cre), choline (Cho), and water (H2O) in the normal hemispheric white matter were (23.59±2.62) mmol/L, (13.06±1.8) mmol/L, (4.28±0.8) mmol/L, and (47 280.96±5414.85) mmol/L, respectively.The metabolite concentrations were not necessarily uniform in different parts of the brain.The concentrations of NAA and Cre decreased in all gliomas (P<0.001).The ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/H2O showed a significant difference between the normal brain and gliomas, and also between the high and low grades (P<0.001).Conclusions Quantitative analysis of in vivo proton MR spectra using the fully relaxed water signal as an internal standard is useful.The concentrations of NAA and the ratios of NAA/H2O and NAA/Cho conduce to discriminating between the glioma and normal brain, and also between the low-grade glioma and high-grade glioma.

  8. Rapid spin-lattice relaxation time mapping incorporating flip angle calibration in quantitative magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongliang Zu; Qi Liu; Yanming Yu; Song Gao; Shanglian Bao

    2008-01-01

    Driven equilibrium single pulse observation of T1(DESPOT1)is a rapid spin-lattice relaxation constant(T1)mapping technique in magnetic resonance imaging(MRI).However,DESPOT1 is very sensitive to flip angle(FA)inhomogeneity,resulting in T1 inaccuracy.Here,a five-point DESPOTl method is proposed to reduce the sensitivity to FA inhomogeneity through FA measurement and calibra-tion.Phantom and in vivo experiments are performed to validate the technique.As a result.a rapid and accurate T1 mapping is acquired by using the proposed five-point DESPOT1 method.

  9. Assessment of Renal Hemodynamics and Oxygenation by Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Quantitative Invasive Physiological Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantow, Kathleen; Arakelyan, Karen; Seeliger, Erdmann; Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In vivo assessment of renal perfusion and oxygenation under (patho)physiological conditions by means of noninvasive diagnostic imaging is conceptually appealing. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative parametric mapping of the magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation times T 2* and T 2 are thought to provide surrogates of renal tissue oxygenation. The validity and efficacy of this technique for quantitative characterization of local tissue oxygenation and its changes under different functional conditions have not been systematically examined yet and remain to be established. For this purpose, the development of an integrative multimodality approaches is essential. Here we describe an integrated hybrid approach (MR-PHYSIOL) that combines established quantitative physiological measurements with T 2* (T 2) mapping and MR-based kidney size measurements. Standardized reversible (patho)physiologically relevant interventions, such as brief periods of aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia, are used for detailing the relation between the MR-PHYSIOL parameters, in particular between renal T 2* and tissue oxygenation.

  10. Quantitative characterization of myocardial infarction by cardiovascular magnetic resonance predicts future cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauly John M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can provide quantitative data of the myocardial tissue utilizing high spatial and temporal resolution along with exquisite tissue contrast. Previous studies have correlated myocardial scar tissue with the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmia. This study was conducted to evaluate whether characterization of myocardial infarction by CMR can predict cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM. Results We consecutively studied 86 patients with ICM (LVEF Conclusion Quantification of the scar volume and scar percentage by CMR is superior to LVEDV, LVESV, and LVEF in prognosticating the future likelihood of the development of cardiovascular events in patients with ICM.

  11. Current and emerging quantitative magnetic resonance imaging methods for assessing and predicting the response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramson RG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Richard G Abramson,1,2,9 Lori R Arlinghaus,1,2 Jared A Weis,1,2 Xia Li,1,2 Adrienne N Dula,1,2 Eduard Y Chekmenev,1–4,9 Seth A Smith,1–3,5 Michael I Miga,1–3,6 Vandana G Abramson,7,9 Thomas E Yankeelov1–3,5,8,91Institute of Imaging Science, 2Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, 4Department of Biochemistry, 5Department of Physics, 6Department of Neurosurgery, 7Department of Medical Oncology, 8Department of Cancer Biology, 9Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville,TN, USAAbstract: Reliable early assessment of breast cancer response to neoadjuvant therapy (NAT would provide considerable benefit to patient care and ongoing research efforts, and demand for accurate and noninvasive early-response biomarkers is likely to increase. Response assessment techniques derived from quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI hold great potential for integration into treatment algorithms and clinical trials. Quantitative MRI techniques already available for assessing breast cancer response to neoadjuvant therapy include lesion size measurement, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Emerging yet promising techniques include magnetization transfer MRI, chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI, magnetic resonance elastography, and hyperpolarized MR. Translating and incorporating these techniques into the clinical setting will require close attention to statistical validation methods, standardization and reproducibility of technique, and scanning protocol design.Keywords: treatment response, presurgical treatment, neoadjuvant chemotherapy

  12. A quantitative magnetic resonance histology atlas of postnatal rat brain development with regional estimates of growth and variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Evan; Badea, Alexandra; Watson, Charles; Johnson, G Allan

    2013-05-01

    There has been growing interest in the role of postnatal brain development in the etiology of several neurologic diseases. The rat has long been recognized as a powerful model system for studying neuropathology and the safety of pharmacologic treatments. However, the complex spatiotemporal changes that occur during rat neurodevelopment remain to be elucidated. This work establishes the first magnetic resonance histology (MRH) atlas of the developing rat brain, with an emphasis on quantitation. The atlas comprises five specimens at each of nine time points, imaged with eight distinct MR contrasts and segmented into 26 developmentally defined brain regions. The atlas was used to establish a timeline of morphometric changes and variability throughout neurodevelopment and represents a quantitative database of rat neurodevelopment for characterizing rat models of human neurologic disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Closed-form solution of the convolution integral in the magnetic resonance dispersion model for quantitative assessment of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, S; Janssen, A J E M; Lavini, C; de la Rosette, J J; Wijkstra, H; Mischi, M

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis and treatment is still limited due to the lack of reliable imaging methods for cancer localization. Based on the fundamental role played by angiogenesis in cancer growth and development, several dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging methods have been developed to probe tumor angiogenic vasculature. In DCE magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pharmacokinetic modeling allows estimating quantitative parameters related to the physiology underlying tumor angiogenesis. In particular, novel magnetic resonance dispersion imaging (MRDI) enables quantitative assessment of the microvascular architecture and leakage, by describing the intravascular dispersion kinetics of an extravascular contrast agent with a dispersion model. According to this model, the tissue contrast concentration at each voxel is given by the convolution between the intravascular concentration, described as a Brownian motion process according to the convective-dispersion equation, with the interstitium impulse response, represented by a mono-exponential decay, and describing the contrast leakage in the extravascular space. In this work, an improved formulation of the MRDI method is obtained by providing an analytical solution for the convolution integral present in the dispersion model. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by means of dedicated simulations in terms of estimation accuracy, precision, and computation time. Moreover, a preliminary clinical validation was carried out in five patients with proven PCa. The proposed method allows for a reduction by about 40% of computation time without any significant change in estimation accuracy and precision, and in the clinical performance.

  14. High-resolution morphologic and ultrashort time-to-echo quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Won C.; Chang, Eric Y.; Biswas, Reni; Statum, Sheronda; Chung, Christine B. [Veterans Administration San Diego Healthcare System, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Tafur, Monica; Du, Jiang; Healey, Robert [University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Kwack, Kyu-Sung [Ajou University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Wonchon-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Gyeonggi-do, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To implement high-resolution morphologic and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using ultrashort time-to-echo (UTE) techniques in cadavers and volunteers. This study was approved by the institutional review board. TMJs of cadavers and volunteers were imaged on a 3-T MR system. High-resolution morphologic and quantitative sequences using conventional and UTE techniques were performed in cadaveric TMJs. Morphologic and UTE quantitative sequences were performed in asymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers. Morphologic evaluation demonstrated the TMJ structures in open- and closed-mouth position. UTE techniques facilitated the visualization of the disc and fibrocartilage. Quantitative UTE MRI was successfully performed ex vivo and in vivo, reflecting the degree of degeneration. There was a difference in the mean UTE T2* values between asymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers. MRI evaluation of the TMJ using UTE techniques allows characterization of the internal structure and quantification of the MR properties of the disc. Quantitative UTE MRI can be performed in vivo with short scan times. (orig.)

  15. Cardiac dysfunction in the diabetic rat: quantitative evaluation using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenezy Mohammed D

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In particular, type 1 diabetes compromises the cardiac function of individuals at a relatively early age due to the protracted course of abnormal glucose homeostasis. The functional abnormalities of diabetic myocardium have been attributed to the pathological changes of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Methods In this study, we used high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to evaluate the left ventricular functional characteristics of streptozotocin treated diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats (8 weeks disease duration in comparison with age/sex matched controls. Results Our analyses of EKG gated cardiac MRI scans of the left ventricle showed a 28% decrease in the end-diastolic volume and 10% increase in the end-systolic volume of diabetic hearts compared to controls. Mean stroke volume and ejection fraction in diabetic rats were decreased (48% and 28%, respectively compared to controls. Further, dV/dt changes were suggestive of phase sensitive differences in left ventricular kinetics across the cardiac cycle between diabetic and control rats. Conclusion Thus, the MRI analyses of diabetic left ventricle suggest impairment of diastolic and systolic hemodynamics in this rat model of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Our studies also show that in vivo MRI could be used in the evaluation of cardiac dysfunction in this rat model of type 1 diabetes.

  16. Quantitation of mitral regurgitation with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Eric V; Lee, James; Branch, Kelley R; Hamilton-Craig, Christian

    2016-12-01

    In this review discuss the application of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) to the evaluation and quantification of mitral regurgitation and provide a systematic literature review for comparisons with echocardiography. Using the 2015 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses methodology, we searched Medline and PubMed for original research articles published since 2000 that provided data on the quantification of mitral regurgitation by CMR. We identified 220 articles of which 33 were included. Four main techniques of mitral regurgitation quantification were identified. Reproducibility varied substantially between papers but was high overall for all techniques. However, quantification differed between the techniques studied. When compared with two-dimensional echocardiography, mitral regurgitation fraction and regurgitant volume measured by CMR were comparable but typically lower. CMR has high reproducibility for the quantification of mitral regurgitation in experienced centres, but further technological refinement is needed. An integrated and standardised approach that combines multiple techniques is recommended for optimal reproducibility and precise mitral regurgitation quantification. Definitive outcome studies using CMR as a basis for treatment are lacking but needed.

  17. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging volumetry distinguishes delusional disorder from late-onset schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R J; Almeida, O; Levy, R; Graves, P; Graves, M

    1994-10-01

    Late paraphrenia is recognised as a heterogeneous disorder. This is reflected by the division of such patients into schizophrenia and delusional disorder in ICD-10. Earlier imaging studies have suggested that major structural abnormalities may be associated with the onset of psychosis in later life. Fifty late paraphrenics and 35 age-matched healthy controls underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging of the whole brain in the coronal plane. Measurements were made of intracranial and brain volumes and the volumes of the intracerebral and extracerebral cerebrospinal fluid spaces. No differences in intracranial, brain or extracerebral cerebrospinal fluid volumes between patients and controls were found. Late paraphrenic patients had greater lateral and third ventricle volumes than controls and the left lateral ventricle was larger than the right. When the patients were divided into appropriate ICD-10 diagnoses: paranoid schizophrenia (n = 31) and delusional disorder (n = 16), lateral ventricle volumes in the delusional disorder patients were much greater than those of the schizophrenics and almost twice those of controls. Structural brain differences underly diagnostic heterogeneity within late paraphrenia. The brains of late onset schizophrenics are only subtly different from those of healthy elderly individuals.

  18. Sensor fusion of electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetorelaxometry data for quantitative magnetic nanoparticle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coene, A.; Leliaert, J.; Crevecoeur, G.; Dupré, L.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetorelaxometry (MRX) imaging and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) are two non-invasive techniques capable of recovering the magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) distribution. Both techniques solve an ill-posed inverse problem in order to find the spatial MNP distribution. A lot of research has been done on increasing the stability of these inverse problems with the main objective to improve the quality of MNP imaging. In this paper a proof of concept is presented in which the sensor data of both techniques is fused into EPR–MRX, with the intention to stabilize the inverse problem. First, both techniques are compared by reconstructing several phantoms with different sizes for various noise levels and calculating stability, sensitivity and reconstruction quality parameters for these cases. This study reveals that both techniques are sensitive to different information from the MNP distributions and generate complementary measurement data. As such, their merging might stabilize the inverse problem. In a next step we investigated how both techniques need to be combined to reduce their respective drawbacks, such as a high number of required measurements and reduced stability, and to improve MNP reconstructions. We were able to stabilize both techniques, increase reconstruction quality by an average of 5% and reduce measurement times by 88%. These improvements could make EPR–MRX a valuable and accurate technique in a clinical environment.

  19. Noninvasive quantitation of human liver steatosis using magnetic resonance and bioassay methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Assignies, Gaspard; Ruel, Martin; Khiat, Abdesslem; Lepanto, Luigi; Kauffmann, Claude; Tang, An [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Departement de Radiologie, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Chagnon, Miguel [Universite de Montreal (UDEM), Departement de Mathematiques et de Statistique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gaboury, Louis [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Departement d' Anatomo-Pathologie, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Boulanger, Yvan [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Departement de Radiologie, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hopital Saint-Luc du CHUM, Departement de Radiologie, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the ability of three magnetic resonance (MR) techniques to detect liver steatosis and to determine which noninvasive technique (MR, bioassays) or combination of techniques is optimal for the quantification of hepatic fat using histopathology as a reference. Twenty patients with histopathologically proven steatosis and 24 control subjects underwent single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS; 3 voxels), dual-echo in phase/out of phase MR imaging (DEI) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) examinations of the liver. Blood or urine bioassays were also performed for steatosis patients. Both MRS and DEI data allowed to detect steatosis with a high sensitivity (0.95 for MRS; 1 for DEI) and specificity (1 for MRS; 0.875 for DEI) but not DWI. Strong correlations were found between fat fraction (FF) measured by MRS, DEI and histopathology segmentation as well as with low density lipoprotein (LDL) and cholesterol concentrations. A Bland-Altman analysis showed a good agreement between the FF measured by MRS and DEI. Partial correlation analyses failed to improve the correlation with segmentation FF when MRS or DEI data were combined with bioassay results. Therefore, FF from MRS or DEI appear to be the best parameters to both detect steatosis and accurately quantify fat liver noninvasively. (orig.)

  20. Quantitative myocardial perfusion magnetic resonance imaging: the impact of pulsatile flow on contrast agent bolus dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graafen, Dirk; Hamer, Julia; Weber, Stefan; Schreiber, Laura M, E-mail: graafen@uni-mainz.de [Section of Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University Medical Center, Mainz (Germany)

    2011-08-21

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be quantified using T{sub 1}-weighted first-pass magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with a tracer-kinetic model, like MMID4. This procedure requires the knowledge of an arterial input function which is usually estimated from the left ventricle (LV). Dispersion of the contrast agent bolus may occur between the LV and the tissue of interest. The aim of this study was to investigate the dispersion under conditions of physiological pulsatile blood flow, and to simulate its effect on MBF quantification. The dispersion was simulated in coronary arteries using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. Simulations were accomplished on straight vessels with stenosis of different degrees and shapes. The results show that dispersion is more pronounced under resting conditions than during hyperemia. Stenosis leads to a reduction of dispersion. In consequence, dispersion results in a systematic MBF underestimation between -0.4% and -9.3%. The relative MBF error depends not only on the dispersion but also on the actual MBF itself. Since MBF under rest is more underestimated than under stress, myocardial perfusion reserve is overestimated between 0.1% and 4.5%. Considering other sources of errors in myocardial perfusion MRI, systematic errors of MBF by bolus dispersion are relatively small.

  1. Quantitative 3D breast magnetic resonance imaging fibroglandular tissue analysis and correlation with qualitative assessments: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Richard; Mema, Eralda; Guo, Xiaotao; Mango, Victoria; Desperito, Elise; Ha, Jason; Wynn, Ralph; Zhao, Binsheng

    2016-04-01

    The amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) has been linked to breast cancer risk based on mammographic density studies. Currently, the qualitative assessment of FGT on mammogram (MG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is prone to intra and inter-observer variability. The purpose of this study is to develop an objective quantitative FGT measurement tool for breast MRI that could provide significant clinical value. An IRB approved study was performed. Sixty breast MRI cases with qualitative assessment of mammographic breast density and MRI FGT were randomly selected for quantitative analysis from routine breast MRIs performed at our institution from 1/2013 to 12/2014. Blinded to the qualitative data, whole breast and FGT contours were delineated on T1-weighted pre contrast sagittal images using an in-house, proprietary segmentation algorithm which combines the region-based active contours and a level set approach. FGT (%) was calculated by: [segmented volume of FGT (mm(3))/(segmented volume of whole breast (mm(3))] ×100. Statistical correlation analysis was performed between quantified FGT (%) on MRI and qualitative assessments of mammographic breast density and MRI FGT. There was a significant positive correlation between quantitative MRI FGT assessment and qualitative MRI FGT (r=0.809, n=60, Pqualitative MRI FGT assessment and mammographic density assessment (r=0.725, n=60, Pqualitative assessment categories of FGT correlated with the calculated mean quantitative FGT (%) of 4.61% (95% CI, 0-12.3%), 8.74% (7.3-10.2%), 18.1% (15.1-21.1%), 37.4% (29.5-45.3%). Quantitative measures of FGT (%) were computed with data derived from breast MRI and correlated significantly with conventional qualitative assessments. This quantitative technique may prove to be a valuable tool in clinical use by providing computer generated standardized measurements with limited intra or inter-observer variability.

  2. Left ventricular modelling: a quantitative functional assessment tool based on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, C. A.; Votta, E.; Corsi, C.; De Marchi, D.; Tarroni, G.; Stevanella, M.; Lombardi, M.; Parodi, O.; Caiani, E. G.; Redaelli, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present the development and testing of a semi-automated tool to support the diagnosis of left ventricle (LV) dysfunctions from cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). CMR short-axis images of the LVs were obtained in 15 patients and processed to detect endocardial and epicardial contours and compute volume, mass and regional wall motion (WM). Results were compared with those obtained from manual tracing by an expert cardiologist. Nearest neighbour tracking and finite-element theory were merged to calculate local myocardial strains and torsion. The method was tested on a virtual phantom, on a healthy LV and on two ischaemic LVs with different severity of the pathology. Automated analysis of CMR data was feasible in 13/15 patients: computed LV volumes and wall mass correlated well with manually extracted data. The detection of regional WM abnormalities showed good sensitivity (77.8%), specificity (85.1%) and accuracy (82%). On the virtual phantom, computed local strains differed by less than 14 per cent from the results of commercial finite-element solver. Strain calculation on the healthy LV showed uniform and synchronized circumferential strains, with peak shortening of about 20 per cent at end systole, progressively higher systolic wall thickening going from base to apex, and a 10° torsion. In the two pathological LVs, synchronicity and homogeneity were partially lost, anomalies being more evident for the more severely injured LV. Moreover, LV torsion was dramatically reduced. Preliminary testing confirmed the validity of our approach, which allowed for the fast analysis of LV function, even though future improvements are possible. PMID:22670208

  3. The cavernous sinus in cluster headache - a quantitative structural magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkink, Enrico B; Schoonman, Guus G; van Vliet, Jorine A; Bakels, Hannah S; Sneeboer, Marjolein Am; Haan, Joost; van Buchem, Mark A; Ferrari, Michel D; Kruit, Mark C

    2017-03-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that a constitutionally narrow cavernous sinus might predispose individuals to cluster headache. Cavernous sinus dimensions, however, have never been assessed. Methods In this case-control study, we measured the dimensions of the cavernous sinus, skull base, internal carotid and pituitary gland with high-resolution T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in 25 episodic, 24 chronic and 13 probable cluster headache patients, 8 chronic paroxysmal hemicrania patients and 22 headache-free controls. Dimensions were compared between groups, correcting for age, sex and transcranial diameter. Results On qualitative inspection, no relevant pathology or anatomic variants that were previously associated with cluster headache or chronic paroxysmal hemicranias were observed in the cavernous sinus or paracavernous structures. The left-to-right transcranial diameter at the temporal fossa level (mean ± SD) was larger in the headache groups (episodic cluster headache: 147.5 ± 7.3 mm, p = 0.044; chronic cluster headache: 150.2 ± 7.3 mm, p cluster headache: 146.0 ± 5.3 mm, p = 0.012; and chronic paroxysmal hemicrania: 145.2 ± 9.4 mm, p = 0.044) compared with controls (140.2 ± 8.0 mm). After adjusting for transcranial diameter and correcting for multiple comparisons, there were no differences in the dimensions of the cavernous sinus and surrounding structures between headache patients and controls. Conclusion Patients with cluster headache or chronic paroxysmal hemicrania had wider skulls than headache-free controls, but the proportional dimensions of the cavernous sinus were similar.

  4. Quantitative Evaluation of Left Ventricular Wall Motion in Patient with Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Using Magnetic Resonance Tagging Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Tadashi; Nakano, Takahiro; Tsutsumi, Masakazu; Kawasaki, Shingo; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Tokuda, Masataka

    Left ventricular wall motions during systole were investigated from a mechanical perspective by using a magnetic resonance tagging technique. Subjects were 7 patients with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). First, by analyzing strain in the left ventricular wall, cardiac contractility was evaluated in the patients with CABG. Next, by calculating displacement in the myocardial wall, paradoxical movements following CABG were quantitatively evaluated. Strain analysis showed local decreases in circumferential strain in 4 of 7 subjects. The results of displacement analysis clarified that following CABG, the degree of radial displacement was small in the septal wall and large in the lateral wall, and circumferential displacement towards the septal wall occurred in the anterior and posterior walls. Since this behavior was seen in both reduced and normal cardiac contractility groups, paradoxical movements in the present patients were not caused by reduced cardiac contractility, but rather by rigid-body motion of the entire heart.

  5. A Preliminary Application of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Quantitatively Assessing Hepatic Fat and the Efficacy of Anti-obesity Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunseung Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases cause insulin resistance and may develop into metabolic diseases such as steatohepatitis or type II diabetes. Standard histopathological examinations are routinely used to measure hepatic fat in order to assess and treat liver diseases, but this method is invasive, complicated, and time-consuming. Here, we present a noninvasive technique, localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS, for quantitatively measuring hepatic fat in vivo and in situ. This method allowed us to create a relatively high-resolution time series from the same mouse. Further, it enabled us to examine the efficacy of cryptotanshinone (Ct treatment in male mice with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; MRS clearly showed that mice treated with Ct experienced a dramatic reduction in hepatic fat content compared with control mice. Thus, the localized MRS technique shows promise as a tool for in vivo assessments of drug efficacy against liver fat diseases and for early-stage disease prevention

  6. Multimodal quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of thalamic development and aging across the human lifespan: implications to neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Khader M; Walimuni, Indika S; Abid, Humaira; Frye, Richard E; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2011-11-16

    The human brain thalami play essential roles in integrating cognitive, sensory, and motor functions. In multiple sclerosis (MS), quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) measurements of the thalami provide important biomarkers of disease progression, but late development and aging confound the interpretation of data collected from patients over a wide age range. Thalamic tissue volume loss due to natural aging and its interplay with lesion-driven pathology has not been investigated previously. In this work, we used standardized thalamic volumetry combined with diffusion tensor imaging, T2 relaxometry, and lesion mapping on large cohorts of controls (N = 255, age range = 6.2-69.1 years) and MS patients (N = 109, age range = 20.8-68.5 years) to demonstrate early age- and lesion-independent thalamic neurodegeneration.

  7. Facial Phenotyping by Quantitative Photography Reflects Craniofacial Morphology Measured on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Icelandic Sleep Apnea Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kate; Schwab, Richard J.; Maislin, Greg; Lee, Richard W.W.; Benedikstdsottir, Bryndis; Pack, Allan I.; Gislason, Thorarinn; Juliusson, Sigurdur; Cistulli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: (1) To determine whether facial phenotype, measured by quantitative photography, relates to underlying craniofacial obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk factors, measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); (2) To assess whether these associations are independent of body size and obesity. Design: Cross-sectional cohort. Setting: Landspitali, The National University Hospital, Iceland. Participants: One hundred forty patients (87.1% male) from the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort who had both calibrated frontal and profile craniofacial photographs and upper airway MRI. Mean ± standard deviation age 56.1 ± 10.4 y, body mass index 33.5 ± 5.05 kg/m2, with on-average severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index 45.4 ± 19.7 h-1). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Relationships between surface facial dimensions (photos) and facial bony dimensions and upper airway soft-tissue volumes (MRI) was assessed using canonical correlation analysis. Photo and MRI craniofacial datasets related in four significant canonical correlations, primarily driven by measurements of (1) maxillary-mandibular relationship (r = 0.8, P photography and MRI. This study confirms that facial photographic phenotype reflects underlying aspects of craniofacial skeletal abnormalities associated with OSA. Therefore, facial photographic phenotyping may be a useful tool to assess intermediate phenotypes for OSA, particularly in large-scale studies. Citation: Sutherland K, Schwab RJ, Maislin G, Lee RW, Benedikstdsottir B, Pack AI, Gislason T, Juliusson S, Cistulli PA. Facial phenotyping by quantitative photography reflects craniofacial morphology measured on magnetic resonance imaging in icelandic sleep apnea patients. SLEEP 2014;37(5):959-968. PMID:24790275

  8. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Tracey A; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Coombs, Anna

    2014-01-01

    -related protein (FKRP) gene were recruited. In each patient, T1-weighted (T1w) imaging was assessed by qualitative grading for 15 individual lower limb muscles and quantitative Dixon imaging was analysed on 14 individual lower limb muscles by region of interest analysis. We described the pattern and appearance......) that the quantitative Dixon technique is an objective quantitative marker of disease and (ii) new observations of gender specific patterns of muscle involvement in LGMD2I....

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Intracranial Hypotension: Diagnostic Value of Combined Qualitative Signs and Quantitative Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Kerim; Gunbey, Hediye Pinar; Tomak, Leman; Ozmen, Zafer; Incesu, Lutfi

    2017-07-13

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of combination quantitative metrics (mamillopontine distance [MPD], pontomesencephalic angle, and mesencephalon anterior-posterior/medial-lateral diameter ratios) with qualitative signs (dural enhancement, subdural collections/hematoma, venous engorgement, pituitary gland enlargements, and tonsillar herniations) provides a more accurate diagnosis of intracranial hypotension (IH). The quantitative metrics and qualitative signs of 34 patients and 34 control subjects were assessed by 2 independent observers. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of quantitative metrics and qualitative signs, and for the diagnosis of IH, optimum cutoff values of quantitative metrics were found with ROC analysis. Combined ROC curve was measured for the quantitative metrics, and qualitative signs combinations in determining diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were found, and the best model combination was formed. Whereas MPD and pontomesencephalic angle were significantly lower in patients with IH when compared with the control group (P quantitative metrics, the highest individual distinctive power was MPD with AUC of 0.947. The best accuracy in the diagnosis of IH was obtained by combination of dural enhancement, venous engorgement, and MPD with an AUC of 1.00. This study showed that the combined use of dural enhancement, venous engorgement, and MPD had diagnostic accuracy of 100 % for the diagnosis of IH. Therefore, a more accurate IH diagnosis can be provided with combination of quantitative metrics with qualitative signs.

  10. Magnetic Resonance-based Motion Correction for Quantitative PET in Simultaneous PET-MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges

    2017-07-01

    Motion degrades image quality and quantitation of PET images, and is an obstacle to quantitative PET imaging. Simultaneous PET-MR offers a tool that can be used for correcting the motion in PET images by using anatomic information from MR imaging acquired concurrently. Motion correction can be performed by transforming a set of reconstructed PET images into the same frame or by incorporating the transformation into the system model and reconstructing the motion-corrected image. Several phantom and patient studies have validated that MR-based motion correction strategies have great promise for quantitative PET imaging in simultaneous PET-MR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Semi-quantitative assessment of right ventricular function in comparison to a 3D volumetric approach: A cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijveldt, Robin; Germans, Tjeerd; McCann, Gerald; Beek, Aernout; Rossum, van Albert

    2008-01-01

    Right ventricular (RV) volume measurements with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is considered the gold standard, but acquisition and analysis remain timeconsuming. The aim of our study was therefore to investigate the accuracy and performance of a semi-quantitative assessment of RV function

  12. Semi-quantitative assessment of right ventricular function in comparison to a 3D volumetric approach: A cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijveldt, Robin; Germans, Tjeerd; McCann, Gerald; Beek, Aernout; Rossum, van Albert

    2008-01-01

    Right ventricular (RV) volume measurements with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is considered the gold standard, but acquisition and analysis remain timeconsuming. The aim of our study was therefore to investigate the accuracy and performance of a semi-quantitative assessment of RV function

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  14. Starch biosynthesis and intermediary metabolism in maize kernels. Quantitative analysis of metabolite flux by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glawischnig, Erich; Gierl, Alfons; Tomas, Adriana; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2002-12-01

    The seeds of cereals represent an important sink for metabolites during the accumulation of storage products, and seeds are an essential component of human and animal nutrition. Understanding the metabolic interconversions (networks) underpinning storage product formation could provide the foundation for effective metabolic engineering of these primary nutritional sources. In this paper, we describe the use of retrobiosynthetic nuclear magnetic resonance analysis to establish the metabolic history of the glucose (Glc) units of starch in maize (Zea mays) kernels. Maize kernel cultures were grown with [U-(13)C(6)]Glc, [U-(13)C(12)]sucrose, or [1,2-(13)C(2)]acetate as supplements. After 19 d, starch was hydrolyzed, and the isotopomer composition of the resulting Glc was determined by quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. [1,2-(13)C(2)]Acetate was not incorporated into starch. [U-(13)C(6)]Glc or [U-(13)C(12)]sucrose gave similar labeling patterns of polysaccharide Glc units, which were dominated by [1,2,3-(13)C(3)]- and [4,5,6-(13)C(3)]-isotopomers, whereas the [U-(13)C(6)]-, [3,4,5,6-(13)C(4)]-, [1,2-(13)C(2)]-, [5,6-(13)C(2)], [3-(13)C(1)], and [4-(13)C(1)]-isotopomers were present at lower levels. These isotopomer compositions indicate that there is extensive recycling of Glc before its incorporation into starch, via the enzymes of glycolytic, glucogenic, and pentose phosphate pathways. The relatively high abundance of the [5,6-(13)C(2)]-isotopomer can be explained by the joint operation of glycolysis/glucogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway.

  15. Cerebrovascular reactivity by quantitative magnetic resonance angiography with a co{sub 2} challenge. Validation as a new imaging biomarker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caputi, Luigi, E-mail: lcaputi@istituto-besta.it [Department of Cerebrovascular Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute C. Besta, Via Celoria 11, 20133 Milan (Italy); Ghielmetti, Francesco, E-mail: Francesco.Ghielmetti@istituto-besta.it [Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute C. Besta, Via Celoria 11, 20133 Milan (Italy); Faragò, Giuseppe, E-mail: Giuseppe.Farago@istituto-besta.it [Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute C. Besta, Via Celoria 11, 20133 Milan (Italy); Longaretti, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.longaretti@libero.it [Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute C. Besta, Via Celoria 11, 20133 Milan (Italy); Lamperti, Massimo, E-mail: docmassimomd@gmail.com [Department of Neuroanesthesia and Intensive Care, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute C. Besta, Via Celoria 11, 20133 Milan (Italy); Anzola, Gian Paolo, E-mail: gpanzola@speedyposta.it [Service of Neurology, S. Orsola Hospital, Fondazione Poliambulanza, Via Vittorio Emanuele II 27, 25122 Brescia (Italy); Carriero, Maria Rita, E-mail: MariaRita.Carriero@istituto-besta.it [Department of Cerebrovascular Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute C. Besta, Via Celoria 11, 20133 Milan (Italy); Charbel, Fady T., E-mail: fcharbel@uic.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Bruzzone, Maria Grazia, E-mail: Maria.Bruzzone@istituto-besta.it [Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute C. Besta, Via Celoria 11, 20133 Milan (Italy); Parati, Eugenio, E-mail: Eugenio.Parati@istituto-besta.it [Department of Cerebrovascular Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute C. Besta, Via Celoria 11, 20133 Milan (Italy); Ciceri, Elisa, E-mail: Elisa.Ciceri@istituto-besta.it [Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute C. Besta, Via Celoria 11, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    Assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) is essential in cerebrovascular diseases, as exhausted CVR may enhance the risk of cerebral ischemic events. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) with a vasodilatory stimulus is currently used for CVR evaluation. Scanty data are available for Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Angiography (QMRA), which supplies higher spatial resolution and quantitative cerebral blood flow values. Aims of our pilot study were: (a) to assess safety and feasibility of CO{sub 2} administration during QMRA, (b) evaluation of CVR under QMRA compared to TCD, and (c) quantitative evaluation of blood flow from the major intracranial arterial vessels both at rest and after CO{sub 2}. CVR during 5% CO{sub 2} air breathing was measured with TCD as a reference method and compared with QMRA. Fifteen healthy subjects (age 60.47 ± 2.24; male 11/15) were evaluated at rest and during CO{sub 2} challenge. Feasibility and safety of QMRA under CO{sub 2} were ensured in all subjects. CVR from middle cerebral artery territory was not statistically different between TCD and MRI (p > 0.05). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) increased during QMRA and TCD (MAP p = 0.007 and p = 0.001; HR p = 0.043 and p = 0.068, respectively). Blood flow values from all intracranial vessels increased after CO{sub 2} inhalation (p < 0.001). CO{sub 2} administration during QMRA sessions is safe and feasible. Good correlation in terms of CVR was obtained comparing TCD and QMRA. Blood flow values significantly increased from all intracranial arterial vessels after CO{sub 2}. Studies regarding CVR in physiopathological conditions might consider the utilization of QMRA both in routine clinical settings and in research projects.

  16. QUANTITATIVE MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE AND ITS CLINICAL APPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojuan; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage is one of the most essential tissues for healthy joint function and is compromised in degenerative and traumatic joint diseases. There have been tremendous advances during the past decade using quantitative MRI techniques as a non-invasive tool for evaluating cartilage, with a focus on assessing cartilage degeneration during osteoarthritis (OA). In this review, after a brief overview of cartilage composition and degeneration, we discuss techniques that grade and quantify morphologic changes as well as the techniques that quantify changes in the extracellular matrix. The basic principles, in vivo applications, advantages and challenges for each technique are discussed. Recent studies using the OA Initiative (OAI) data are also summarized. Quantitative MRI provides non-invasive measures of cartilage degeneration at the earliest stages of joint degeneration, which is essential for efforts towards prevention and early intervention in OA. PMID:24115571

  17. Comparative analysis of fecal fat quantitation via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) and gravimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpi-Steiner, Nichole L; Ward, Jennie N; Kumar, Vivek; McConnell, Joseph P

    2009-02-01

    Fecal-fat is typically measured by extracting lipid from homogenized feces with subsequent gravimetric/titrimetric analyses that are time-consuming and involve toxic solvents. Accordingly, an efficient and more safe method to quantitate fecal-fat is needed. The present objective was to adapt CEM SmartTrac technology (i.e. (1)H NMR) to rapidly (fecal-fat and compare (1)H NMR and gravimetric performance characteristics. (1)H NMR and gravimetric measurements of stool-fat were conducted using excess stool samples (72 h collection; n=107) homogenized to semi-liquid consistency prior to analyses. The (1)H NMR method demonstrated acceptable linearity (R(2)=0.9999) and recovery (mean=105%) with imprecision (intra-assay CV=1.2-6.5%; inter-assay CV=1.8-5.8%) comparable to or better than gravimetry (intra-assay CV=1.0-17.2%; inter-assay CV=3.8-6.5%). Excellent correlation between fecal-fat quantitation by (1)H NMR and gravimetry (n=107; R(2)=0.983; y=1.0173x-0.6859) was exhibited; moreover, (1)H NMR demonstrated good sensitivity (92.3%), specificity (94.5%), negative-predictive value (92.9%) and positive-predictive value (94.1%) for malabsorption using the reference cut-off of fat/24 h. These data demonstrate that (1)H NMR permits rapid and safe quantitation of fecal-fat while maintaining acceptable performance characteristics, thereby supporting the utility of (1)H NMR as an alternative method to gravimetry for fecal-fat quantitation.

  18. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  19. The acellular matrix (ACM) for bladder tissue engineering: A quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hai-Ling Margaret; Loai, Yasir; Beaumont, Marine; Farhat, Walid A

    2010-08-01

    Bladder acellular matrices (ACMs) derived from natural tissue are gaining increasing attention for their role in tissue engineering and regeneration. Unlike conventional scaffolds based on biodegradable polymers or gels, ACMs possess native biomechanical and many acquired biologic properties. Efforts to optimize ACM-based scaffolds are ongoing and would be greatly assisted by a noninvasive means to characterize scaffold properties and monitor interaction with cells. MRI is well suited to this role, but research with MRI for scaffold characterization has been limited. This study presents initial results from quantitative MRI measurements for bladder ACM characterization and investigates the effects of incorporating hyaluronic acid, a natural biomaterial useful in tissue-engineering and regeneration. Measured MR relaxation times (T(1), T(2)) and diffusion coefficient were consistent with increased water uptake and glycosaminoglycan content observed on biochemistry in hyaluronic acid ACMs. Multicomponent MRI provided greater specificity, with diffusion data showing an acellular environment and T(2) components distinguishing the separate effects of increased glycosaminoglycans and hydration. These results suggest that quantitative MRI may provide useful information on matrix composition and structure, which is valuable in guiding further development using bladder ACMs for organ regeneration and in strategies involving the use of hyaluronic acid.

  20. Toward a quantitative analysis of in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic signals using the continuous Morlet wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvichakorn, A.; Ratiney, H.; Bucur, A.; Cavassila, S.; Antoine, J. P.

    2009-10-01

    We apply the Morlet wavelet transform (MWT) for quantitatively analyzing proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic (MRS) signals, more precisely signals acquired at short echo time. These signals contain many resonating components whose frequencies are characteristic of the observed metabolites, and amplitudes are directly related to the concentrations of these metabolites. With these powerful properties, in vivo MRS can be considered as a unique non-invasive tool to explore biochemical compounds of living tissues. However, the analysis and quantification of these metabolite contributions are difficult due to the low signal-to-noise ratio, the number of overlapping frequencies and the contamination of the signal of interest with water and a baseline originating from macromolecules and lipids. The baseline is a major obstacle for MRS quantification as its shape and intensity are generally not known a priori. In this paper, we present the methodology to quantify the signals by the MWT. We assess the ability of the proposed method to recover parameters such as metabolite amplitudes, frequencies and damping factors while facing successively quantification challenges arising from the non-Lorentzian lineshapes, overlapping frequencies, and noise or baseline. Tests of the method are performed on simulated signals alone or combined with either in vitro acquisition and/or in vivo macromolecular signal acquired on a horizontal 4.7 T scanner. In presence of the macromolecules, the amplitude parameter is correctly derived by the method, thanks to the time-scale representation of the wavelet which enables us to distinguish the two signals by their time decays and without any additional pre-processing.

  1. Quantitation and localization of regional body fat distribution--a comparison between magnetic resonance imaging and somatometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R C; Kramsch, D M; Lee, P L; Colletti, P; Jiao, Q

    1996-03-01

    The emerging concept that various fat compartments are metabolically active and play separate and decisive roles in the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis, hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes and stroke, has given obesity research a new direction. Of particular interest is the relative amount of intra-abdominal fat thought to be responsible for the metabolic complications. We studied the precise fat distribution and its correlations with the metabolic parameters in 44 non-human primates (Macaca fascicularis). Intra-abdominal, subcutaneous, and total abdominal fat (IAF, SAF, TAF) were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and somatometry. Quantitative computer analyses of abdominal MRI scans revealed predominant IAF distribution. Box plot analysis of IAF and SAF revealed wide diversity in the amounts of fat, especially in monkeys with body mass index (BMI) < 30 kg/m2. Primates with similar BMI in each quartile revealed an extensive heterogeneity in IAF as well as SAF. Numerous significant correlations within site-specific somatometric measurements as well as within the MRI determinants of abdominal fat were seen. However, only body weight correlated with IAF and skinfolds could predict SAF. After adjusting for body weight, partial correlation analysis showed a significant correlation (P < 0.05) between total cholesterol and IAF. MRI revealed considerable heterogeneity of IAF, SAF and TAF in cohort of primates believed to be homogeneous by somatometric definition. Male cynomolgus monkeys appear to be a valuable model for a systematic evaluation of fat. Individuals with identical body weight and height may show a diverse pattern of fat distribution.

  2. Validation of Body Condition Indices and Quantitative Magnetic Resonance in Estimating Body Composition in a Small Lizard

    Science.gov (United States)

    WARNER, DANIEL A.; JOHNSON, MARIA S.; NAGY, TIM R.

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of body condition are typically used to assess an individual’s quality, health, or energetic state. Most indices of body condition are based on linear relationships between body length and mass. Although these indices are simple to obtain, nonlethal, and useful indications of energetic state, their accuracy at predicting constituents of body condition (e.g., fat and lean mass) are often unknown. The objectives of this research were to (1) validate the accuracy of another simple and noninvasive method, quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR), at estimating body composition in a small-bodied lizard, Anolis sagrei, and (2) evaluate the accuracy of two indices of body condition (based on length–mass relationships) at predicting body fat, lean, and water mass. Comparisons of results from QMR scans to those from chemical carcass analysis reveal that QMR measures body fat, lean, and water mass with excellent accuracy in male and female lizards. With minor calibration from regression equations, QMR will be a reliable method of estimating body composition of A. sagrei. Body condition indices were positively related to absolute estimates of each constituent of body composition, but these relationships showed considerable variation around regression lines. In addition, condition indices did not predict fat, lean, or water mass when adjusted for body mass. Thus, our results emphasize the need for caution when interpreting body condition based upon linear measurements of animals. Overall, QMR provides an alternative noninvasive method for accurately measuring fat, lean, and water mass in these small-bodied animals. PMID:28035770

  3. Chemical purity using quantitative (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance: a hierarchical Bayesian approach for traceable calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, Blaza; Nelson, Michael A; Lippa, Katrice A

    2016-01-01

    Chemical purity assessment using quantitative (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a method based on ratio references of mass and signal intensity of the analyte species to that of chemical standards of known purity. As such, it is an example of a calculation using a known measurement equation with multiple inputs. Though multiple samples are often analyzed during purity evaluations in order to assess measurement repeatability, the uncertainty evaluation must also account for contributions from inputs to the measurement equation. Furthermore, there may be other uncertainty components inherent in the experimental design, such as independent implementation of multiple calibration standards. As such, the uncertainty evaluation is not purely bottom up (based on the measurement equation) or top down (based on the experimental design), but inherently contains elements of both. This hybrid form of uncertainty analysis is readily implemented with Bayesian statistical analysis. In this article we describe this type of analysis in detail and illustrate it using data from an evaluation of chemical purity and its uncertainty for a folic acid material.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  5. Assessing agreement between preclinical magnetic resonance imaging and histology: An evaluation of their image qualities and quantitative results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elschner, Cindy; Korn, Paula; Hauptstock, Maria; Schulz, Matthias C; Range, Ursula; Jünger, Diana; Scheler, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    One consequence of demographic change is the increasing demand for biocompatible materials for use in implants and prostheses. This is accompanied by a growing number of experimental animals because the interactions between new biomaterials and its host tissue have to be investigated. To evaluate novel materials and engineered tissues the use of non-destructive imaging modalities have been identified as a strategic priority. This provides the opportunity for studying interactions repeatedly with individual animals, along with the advantages of reduced biological variability and decreased number of laboratory animals. However, histological techniques are still the golden standard in preclinical biomaterial research. The present article demonstrates a detailed method comparison between histology and magnetic resonance imaging. This includes the presentation of their image qualities as well as the detailed statistical analysis for assessing agreement between quantitative measures. Exemplarily, the bony ingrowth of tissue engineered bone substitutes for treatment of a cleft-like maxillary bone defect has been evaluated. By using a graphical concordance analysis the mean difference between MRI results and histomorphometrical measures has been examined. The analysis revealed a slightly but significant bias in the case of the bone volume [Formula: see text] and a clearly significant deviation for the remaining defect width [Formula: see text] But the study although showed a considerable effect of the analyzed section position to the quantitative result. It could be proven, that the bias of the data sets was less originated due to the imaging modalities, but mainly on the evaluation of different slice positions. The article demonstrated that method comparisons not always need the use of an independent animal study, additionally.

  6. Deferasirox, deferiprone and desferrioxamine treatment in thalassemia major patients: cardiac iron and function comparison determined by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Alessia; Meloni, Antonella; Capra, Marcello; Cianciulli, Paolo; Prossomariti, Luciano; Malaventura, Cristina; Putti, Maria Caterina; Lippi, Alma; Romeo, Maria Antonietta; Bisconte, Maria Grazia; Filosa, Aldo; Caruso, Vincenzo; Quarta, Antonella; Pitrolo, Lorella; Missere, Massimiliano; Midiri, Massimo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Positano, Vincenzo; Lombardi, Massimo; Maggio, Aurelio

    2011-01-01

    Background Oral deferiprone was suggested to be more effective than subcutaneous desferrioxamine for removing heart iron. Oral once-daily chelator deferasirox has recently been made commercially available but its long-term efficacy on cardiac iron and function has not yet been established. Our study aimed to compare the effectiveness of deferasirox, deferiprone and desferrioxamine on myocardial and liver iron concentrations and bi-ventricular function in thalassemia major patients by means of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging. Design and Methods From the first 550 thalassemia subjects enrolled in the Myocardial Iron Overload in Thalassemia network, we retrospectively selected thalassemia major patients who had been receiving one chelator alone for longer than one year. We identified three groups of patients: 24 treated with deferasirox, 42 treated with deferiprone and 89 treated with desferrioxamine. Myocardial iron concentrations were measured by T2* multislice multiecho technique. Biventricular function parameters were quantitatively evaluated by cine images. Liver iron concentrations were measured by T2* multiecho technique. Results The global heart T2* value was significantly higher in the deferiprone (34±11ms) than in the deferasirox (21±12 ms) and the desferrioxamine groups (27±11 ms) (P=0.0001). We found higher left ventricular ejection fractions in the deferiprone and the desferrioxamine versus the deferasirox group (P=0.010). Liver iron concentration, measured as T2* signal, was significantly lower in the desferrioxamine versus the deferiprone and the deferasirox group (P=0.004). Conclusions The cohort of patients treated with oral deferiprone showed less myocardial iron burden and better global systolic ventricular function compared to the patients treated with oral deferasirox or subcutaneous desferrioxamine. PMID:20884710

  7. Quantitative characterization and identification of lymph nodes and nasopharingeal carcinoma by coregistered magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Fabio; Montin, Eros; Potepan, Paolo; Mainardi, Luca T

    2012-01-01

    In this study we developed a technique to improve the identification of carcinoma and pathological lymph nodes in cases of Nasopharingeal Carcinoma (NPC), through a quantitative characterization of the tissues based on MR images: 3D VIBE (Volumetric Interpolated Breath-hold Examination) T1-CE (Contrast Enhanced), T1, T2 and Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) for b-values 0,300,500,700,1000. The procedure included two phases: 1) coregistration of volumes and 2) tissue characterization. Concerning the first phase, the DICOM images were reassembled spatially and resampled with isotropic 0.5mm resolution. Coregistration was performed by two multiresolution rigid transformations, merging head and neck volumes, plus a final multiresolution non rigid transformation. The anatomical 3D CE-VIBE volume was taken as reference. The procedure for tissue characterization is semi automated and it required a radiologist to identify an example of tissue from the primary tumor and a metastatic lymph node. We generated a 8-dimensional membership function to perform a fuzzy-like identification of these tissues. The result of this procedure was the generation of two maps, which showed complementary characterization of lymph nodes and carcinoma. A few example will be shown to evidence the potentiality of this method in identification and characterization of NPC lesions.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging hyper-acute ischemic stroke patients comparison with 1.5T and 3.0T units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Eun Hoe [Dept. of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Il Bong; Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Perfusion magnetic resonance image of biological mechanism are independent of magnetic field strength in hyper acute ischemic stroke. 3.0 T magnetic field, however, does affect the SNRs (signal to noise ratio) and artifacts of PMRI (perfusion magnetic resonance image), which basically will influence the quantitative of PMRI. In this study, the effects of field strength on PMRI are analyzed. The effects of the diseases also are discussed. PMRI in WM (white matter), GM (gray matter), hyper acute ischemic stroke were companied with 1.5 T and 3.0 T on SNR. PMRI also was compared to the SI difference after setting ROI (region of interest) in left and right b side of the brain. In conclusion, the SNRs and SI of the 3.0 T PMRI showed higher than those at 1.5 T. In summary, PMRI studies at 3.0 T is provided significantly improved perfusion evaluation when comparing with 1.5 T.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Elastography of the Liver: Qualitative and Quantitative Comparison of Gradient Echo and Spin Echo Echoplanar Imaging Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Mathilde; Besa, Cecilia; Bou Ayache, Jad; Yasar, Temel Kaya; Bane, Octavia; Fung, Maggie; Ehman, Richard L; Taouli, Bachir

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 2-dimensional (2D) gradient recalled echo (GRE) and 2D spin echo echoplanar imaging (SE-EPI) magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) sequences of the liver in terms of image quality and quantitative liver stiffness (LS) measurement. This prospective study involved 50 consecutive subjects (male/female, 33/17; mean age, 58 years) who underwent liver magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T including 2 MRE sequences, 2D GRE, and 2D SE-EPI (acquisition time 56 vs 16 seconds, respectively). Image quality scores were assessed by 2 independent observers based on wave propagation and organ coverage on the confidence map (range, 0-15). A third observer measured LS on stiffness maps (in kilopascal). Mean LS values, regions of interest size (based on confidence map), and image quality scores between SE-EPI and GRE-MRE were compared using paired nonparametric Wilcoxon test. Reproducibility of LS values between the 2 sequences was assessed using intraclass coefficient correlation, coefficient of variation, and Bland-Altman limits of agreement. T2* effect on image quality was assessed using partial Spearman correlation. There were 4 cases of failure with GRE-MRE and none with SE-EPI-MRE. Image quality scores and region of interest size were significantly higher using SE-EPI-MRE versus GRE-MRE (P < 0.0001 for both measurements and observers). Liver stiffness measurements were not significantly different between the 2 sequences (3.75 ± 1.87 kPa vs 3.55 ± 1.51 kPa, P = 0.062), were significantly correlated (intraclass coefficient correlation, 0.909), and had excellent reproducibility (coefficient of variation, 10.2%; bias, 0.023; Bland-Altman limits of agreement, -1.19; 1.66 kPa). Image quality scores using GRE-MRE were significantly correlated with T2* while there was no correlation for SE-EPI-MRE. Our data suggest that SE-EPI-MRE may be a better alternative to GRE-MRE. The diagnostic performance of SE-EPI-MRE for detection of liver fibrosis needs

  10. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety ...

  13. Quantitative evaluation of susceptibility effects caused by dental materials in head magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strocchi, S.; Ghielmi, M.; Basilico, F.; Macchi, A.; Novario, R.; Ferretti, R.; Binaghi, E.

    2016-03-01

    This work quantitatively evaluates the effects induced by susceptibility characteristics of materials commonly used in dental practice on the quality of head MR images in a clinical 1.5T device. The proposed evaluation procedure measures the image artifacts induced by susceptibility in MR images by providing an index consistent with the global degradation as perceived by the experts. Susceptibility artifacts were evaluated in a near-clinical setup, using a phantom with susceptibility and geometric characteristics similar to that of a human head. We tested different dentist materials, called PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI, Keramit NP, ILOR F, Zirconia and used different clinical MR acquisition sequences, such as "classical" SE and fast, gradient, and diffusion sequences. The evaluation is designed as a matching process between reference and artifacts affected images recording the same scene. The extent of the degradation induced by susceptibility is then measured in terms of similarity with the corresponding reference image. The matching process involves a multimodal registration task and the use an adequate similarity index psychophysically validated, based on correlation coefficient. The proposed analyses are integrated within a computer-supported procedure that interactively guides the users in the different phases of the evaluation method. 2-Dimensional and 3-dimensional indexes are used for each material and each acquisition sequence. From these, we drew a ranking of the materials, averaging the results obtained. Zirconia and ILOR F appear to be the best choice from the susceptibility artefacts point of view, followed, in order, by PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI and Keramit NP.

  14. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  15. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  16. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of the olfactory system in Kallmann syndrome: correlation with a clinical smell test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Versiani, Beatriz R; Diniz, Paula Rejane B; Junior, Jorge Elias; de Castro, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    To measure olfactory bulbs and sulci using dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences and specific measurement tools in Kallmann syndrome (KS) patients with a well-established genotype and phenotype, as well as correlate MRI findings with a clinical smell test. MRI was performed in 21 patients with KS and 16 healthy volunteers; olfactory dysfunction was assessed using the Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), a qualitative suprathreshold olfaction test. Coronal turbo spin echo T2-weighted and volumetric T1-weighted gradient echo sequences were acquired in a 1.5T system. ImageJ software was used to obtain olfactory bulb volumes and olfactory sulcus depths and lengths. Data were analyzed with SPSS 15.0 and the Kappa index was used to evaluate the agreement between the UPSIT and MRI. The UPSIT showed 14 patients with anosmia and 6 with moderate hyposmia. Eighteen patients (85%) presented altered rhinencephalon structures in the MRI. Sixteen patients (76%) presented olfactory bulb aplasia (14/16 bilaterally), and these patients presented a total of 16 aplastic sulci. There was moderate agreement between the MRI quantitative evaluation and the UPSIT (overall Kappa = 0.55), but when considering the presence of aplastic bulbs and anosmia, we found almost perfect agreement (Kappa = 0.87). Three patients had normal rhinencephalon structures, including one with a KAL1 gene mutation. Olfactory bulb and sulcus aplasia were the most common findings in KS patients. We objectively demonstrated agreement between MRI findings and the smell test, especially the presence of bulb aplasia and anosmia. Therefore, our findings help ascertain MRI accuracy in the diagnosis of KS, differentiating patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with an apparently normal or difficult to evaluate sense of smell. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormuth, David A., II; Weis, Jared A.; Barnes, Stephanie L.; Miga, Michael I.; Rericha, Erin C.; Quaranta, Vito; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    Reaction-diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction-diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction-diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error 0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction-diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions.

  18. Hypertrophic changes of the teres minor muscle in rotator cuff tears: quantitative evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikukawa, Kenshi; Ide, Junji; Kikuchi, Ken; Morita, Makoto; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Ogata, Hiroomi

    2014-12-01

    Few reports have assessed the teres minor (TM) muscle in rotator cuff tears. This study aimed to quantitatively analyze the morphologic changes of the TM muscle in patients with or without rotator cuff tears by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective study consisted of 279 subjects classified on the basis of interpretations of conventional MRI observations into 6 groups: no cuff tear; partial-thickness supraspinatus (SSP) tear; full-thickness SSP tear; SSP and subscapularis tears; SSP and infraspinatus (ISP) tears; and SSP, ISP, and subscapularis tears. With use of ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA) for oblique sagittal MRI, we measured the areas of ISP, TM, and anatomic external rotation (ISP + TM) muscles on the most lateral side in which the scapular spine was in contact with the scapular body. The occupational ratios of the TM muscle area to the anatomic external rotation muscle area were calculated. Ratios above the maximum of the 95% confidence intervals of the occupational ratio in the no-tear group were defined as hypertrophy of the TM muscle. Occupational ratios of the TM muscle in the no-tear group followed a normal distribution, and ratios >0.288 were defined as hypertrophic. Hypertrophic changes of the TM muscle were confirmed in rotator cuff tears involving the ISP tendon. A negative correlation was found between the occupational ratios of TM and ISP (P muscle appeared hypertrophic in rotator cuff tears involving the ISP, and the progression of ISP muscle atrophy seemed to induce the development of this compensatory hypertrophy. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantitative and qualitative differences in subcutaneous adipose tissue stores across lipodystrophy types shown by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little Cynthia

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipodystrophies are characterized by redistributed subcutaneous fat stores. We previously quantified subcutaneous fat by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the legs of two patients with familial partial lipodystrophy subtypes 2 and 3 (FPLD2 and FPLD3, respectively. We now extend the MRI analysis across the whole body of patients with different forms of lipodystrophy. Methods We studied five subcutaneous fat stores (supraclavicular, abdominal, gluteal, thigh and calf and the abdominal visceral fat stores in 10, 2, 1, 1 and 2 female subjects with, respectively, FPLD2, FPLD3, HIV-related partial lipodystrophy (HIVPL, acquired partial lipodystrophy (APL, congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL and in six normal control subjects. Results Compared with normal controls, FPLD2 subjects had significantly increased supraclavicular fat, with decreased abdominal, gluteal, thigh and calf subcutaneous fat. FPLD3 subjects had increased supraclavicular and abdominal subcutaneous fat, with less severe reductions in gluteal, thigh and calf fat compared to FPLD2 subjects. The repartitioning of fat in the HIVPL subject closely resembled that of FPLD3 subjects. APL and CGL subjects had reduced upper body, gluteal and thigh subcutaneous fat; the APL subject had increased, while CGL subjects had decreased subcutaneous calf fat. Visceral fat was markedly increased in FPLD2 and APL subjects. Conclusion Semi-automated MRI-based adipose tissue quantification indicates differences between various lipodystrophy types in these studied clinical cases and is a potentially useful tool for extended quantitative phenomic analysis of genetic metabolic disorders. Further studies with a larger sample size are essential for confirming these preliminary findings.

  20. Quantitative magnetic resonance analysis and a morphometric predictive model reveal lean body mass changes in migrating Nearctic-Neotropical passerines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewagen, Chad L; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2011-04-01

    Most studies of lean mass dynamics in free-living passerine birds have focused on Old World species at geographical barriers where they are challenged to make the longest non-stop flight of their migration. We examined lean mass variation in New World passerines in an area where the distribution of stopover habitat does not require flights to exceed more than a few hours and most migrants stop flying well before fat stores near exhaustion. We used either quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) analysis or a morphometric model to measure or estimate, respectively, the fat and lean body mass of migrants during stopovers in New York, USA. With these data, we examined (1) variance in total body mass explained by lean body mass, (2) hourly rates of fat and lean body mass change in single-capture birds, and (3) net changes in fat and lean mass in recaptured birds. Lean mass contributed to 50% of the variation in total body mass among white-throated sparrows Zonotrichia albicollis and hermit thrushes Catharus guttatus. Lean mass of refueling gray catbirds Dumetella carolinensis and white-throated sparrows, respectively, increased 1.123 and 0.320 g h(-1). Lean mass of ovenbirds Seiurus aurocapillus accounted for an estimated 33-40% of hourly gains in total body mass. On average 35% of the total mass gained among recaptured birds was lean mass. Substantial changes in passerine lean mass are not limited to times when birds are forced to make long, non-stop flights across barriers. Protein usage during migration is common across broad taxonomic groups, migration systems, and migration strategies.

  1. Quantitative prediction of radio frequency induced local heating derived from measured magnetic field maps in magnetic resonance imaging: A phantom validation at 7 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Jiaen [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Schmitter, Sebastian [Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); He, Bin, E-mail: binhe@umn.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Electrical Properties Tomography (EPT) technique utilizes measurable radio frequency (RF) coil induced magnetic fields (B1 fields) in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system to quantitatively reconstruct the local electrical properties (EP) of biological tissues. Information derived from the same data set, e.g., complex numbers of B1 distribution towards electric field calculation, can be used to estimate, on a subject-specific basis, local Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR plays a significant role in RF pulse design for high-field MRI applications, where maximum local tissue heating remains one of the most constraining limits. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the feasibility of such B1-based local SAR estimation, expanding on previously proposed EPT approaches. To this end, B1 calibration was obtained in a gelatin phantom at 7 T with a multi-channel transmit coil, under a particular multi-channel B1-shim setting (B1-shim I). Using this unique set of B1 calibration, local SAR distribution was subsequently predicted for B1-shim I, as well as for another B1-shim setting (B1-shim II), considering a specific set of parameter for a heating MRI protocol consisting of RF pulses plaid at 1% duty cycle. Local SAR results, which could not be directly measured with MRI, were subsequently converted into temperature change which in turn were validated against temperature changes measured by MRI Thermometry based on the proton chemical shift.

  2. Reproducibility and accuracy of quantitative assessment of articular cartilage volume measurements with 3.0 tesla magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Wei; SHENG Jing; CHEN Wen-hua; TIAN Jian-ming; ZHANG Li-rong; WANG Dong-qing

    2011-01-01

    Background Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) of articular cartilage represents a powerful tool in osteoarthritis research, but has so far been confined to a field strength of 1.5 T. The aim of the study was to determine the reproducibility and accuracy of qMRI assessments of the knee cartilage volume by comparing quantitative swine cartilage volumes of the sagittal (sag) multi echo data imagine combination water-excitation (MEDICwe) sequence and the fast low-angle shoot water-excitation (FLASHwe) sequence at 3.0-T MRI to directly measured volumes (DMV) of the surgically removed articular cartilage.Methods Test-retest MRI was acquired in 20 swine knees. Two sag FLASHwe sequences and two sag MEDICwe sequences (spatial resolution 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm × 1.0 mm of 3-dimension (3D) were acquired at 3-T MRI in a knee.Articular cartilage volume was calculated from 3D reformations of the MRI by using a manual program. Calculated volumes were compared with DMV of the surgically removed articular cartilage. Knee joint cartilage plates were quantified paired in order.Results In the knee joint of swine, reproducibility errors (paired analysis) for cartilage volume were 2.5% to 3.2% with sag FLASHwe, and 1.6% to 3.0% with sag MEDICwe. Correlation coefficients between results obtained with qMRI and DMV ranged from 0.90 to 0.98 for cartilage volume. Systematic pairwise difference between results obtained with qMRI and DMV ranged from -1.1% to 2.8%. Random pairwise differences between results obtained with qMRI and DMV ranged from (2.9 ±2.4)% to (6.8±4.5)%.Conclusions FLASHwe and MEDICwe sequences permit highly accurate and reproducible analysis of cartilage volume in the knee joints of swine at 3-T MRI. Cartilage volume reproducibility for the MEDICwe data is slightly higher than the FLASHwe data.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... if possible, or removed prior to the MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio ...

  6. Quantitative and qualitative differences in subcutaneous adipose tissue stores across lipodystrophy types shown by magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Little Cynthia; Walcarius Rhonda; Miskie Brooke A; Robinson John F; Pollex Rebecca L; Al-Attar Salam A; Rutt Brian K; Hegele Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Lipodystrophies are characterized by redistributed subcutaneous fat stores. We previously quantified subcutaneous fat by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the legs of two patients with familial partial lipodystrophy subtypes 2 and 3 (FPLD2 and FPLD3, respectively). We now extend the MRI analysis across the whole body of patients with different forms of lipodystrophy. Methods We studied five subcutaneous fat stores (supraclavicular, abdominal, gluteal, thigh and calf) and...

  7. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  8. Physiological Background of Differences in Quantitative Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Between Acute Malignant and Benign Vertebral Body Fractures: Correlation of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient With Quantitative Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using the 2-Compartment Exchange Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geith, Tobias; Biffar, Andreas; Schmidt, Gerwin; Sourbron, Steven; Dietrich, Olaf; Reiser, Maximilian; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in vertebral bone marrow of benign and malignant fractures is related to the volume of the interstitial space, determined with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with acute benign (n = 24) and malignant (n = 19) vertebral body fractures were examined at 1.5 T. A diffusion-weighted single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequence (b = 100 to 600 s/mm) and DCE turbo-FLASH sequence were evaluated. Regions of interest were manually selected for each fracture. Apparent diffusion coefficient was determined with a monoexponential decay model. The DCE magnetic resonance imaging concentration-time curves were analyzed using a 2-compartment tracer-kinetic model. Apparent diffusion coefficient showed a significant positive correlation with interstitial volume in the whole study population (Pearson r = 0.66, P correlation between ADC and the permeability-surface area product could be observed when analyzing the whole study population (Spearman rs = 0.40, P = 0.008), but not when separately examining the subgroups. Plasma flow showed a significant correlation with ADC in benign fractures (Pearson r = 0.23, P = 0.03). Plasma volume did not show significant correlations with ADC. The results support the hypothesis that the ADC of a lesion is inversely correlated to its cellularity. This explains previous observations that ADC is reduced in more malignant lesions.

  9. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  10. Single spin magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to remain perfectly still and follow breath-holding instructions while the images are being recorded. If you ... Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Videos related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Sponsored ...

  15. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  1. FLASH proton density imaging for improved surface coil intensity correction in quantitative and semi-quantitative SSFP perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielles-Vallespin, Sonia; Kellman, Peter; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Arai, Andrew E

    2015-02-17

    A low excitation flip angle (α coil intensity correction (SCIC) of the saturation-recovery (SR) prepared high flip angle (α = 40-50°) SSFP myocardial perfusion images. The different SSFP off-resonance response for these two flip angles might lead to suboptimal SCIC when there is a spatial variation in the background B0-field. The low flip angle SSFP-PD frames are more prone to parallel imaging banding artifacts in the presence of off-resonance. The use of FLASH-PD frames would eliminate both the banding artifacts and the uneven frequency response in the presence of off-resonance in the surface coil inhomogeneity estimate and improve homogeneity of semi-quantitative and quantitative perfusion measurements. B0-field maps, SSFP and FLASH-PD frames were acquired in 10 healthy volunteers to analyze the SSFP off-resonance response. Furthermore, perfusion scans preceded by both FLASH and SSFP-PD frames from 10 patients with no myocardial infarction were analyzed semi-quantitatively and quantitatively (rest n = 10 and stress n = 1). Intra-subject myocardial blood flow (MBF) coefficient of variation (CoV) over the whole left ventricle (LV), as well as intra-subject peak contrast (CE) and upslope (SLP) standard deviation (SD) over 6 LV sectors were investigated. In the 6 out of 10 cases where artifacts were apparent in the LV ROI of the SSFP-PD images, all three variability metrics were statistically significantly lower when using the FLASH-PD frames as input for the SCIC (CoVMBF-FLASH = 0.3 ± 0.1, CoVMBF-SSFP = 0.4 ± 0.1, p = 0.03; SDCE-FLASH = 10 ± 2, SDCE-SSFP = 32 ± 7, p = 0.01; SDSLP-FLASH = 0.02 ± 0.01, SDSLP-SSFP = 0.06 ± 0.02, p = 0.03). Example rest and stress data sets from the patient pool demonstrate that the low flip angle SSFP protocol can exhibit severe ghosting artifacts originating from off-resonance banding artifacts at the edges of the field of view that parallel imaging is

  2. Quantitative magnetic resonance methods for in vivo investigation of the human liver and spleen. Technical aspects and preliminary clinical results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C

    1996-01-01

    This project was initiated with the introduction of magnetic resonance (MR) in Denmark in order to evaluate the possibilities of this technique as a diagnostic aid in non-focal liver and splenic diseases. The signal intensities in the MR image are sensitive to the longitudinal relaxation (T1...... sequences with different repetition times was chosen, because motion effects were partly refocused. Multi-acquisition was used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the heavily saturated experiments with short repetition times, to further reduce the sensitivity to motion. To test the quality of this pulse...... sequence, phantom experiments were performed, and sensitivity to motion was tested by measuring with and without respiratory synchronization. Respiratory synchronization gave a marked improvement in focal liver diseases, whereas no difference was found in non-focal diseases. Standard imaging sequences...

  3. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brainstem Volumes, Plaques, and Surface Area in the Occipital Regions of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alper, F.; Kantarci, M.; Altunkaynak, E.; Varoglu, A. O.; Karaman, A.; Oral, E.; Okur, A. [Ataturk Univ., Erzurum (Turkey). Depts. of Radiology, Histology, Neurology and Embryology, Psychiatry

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To determine brainstem volumes, number of plaques, and surface areas in the occipital lobes of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), and to investigate whether there is any correlation between brainstem volume and the number/surface areas of plaque in the occipital lobes. Material and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained on 14 relapsing-remitting (RR) and 13 secondary progressive (SP) MS patients and 26 female control subjects. The Cavalieri method was used by modern design stereology to measure brainstem volume. The point-counting grid was used to evaluate sclerotic plaque surface areas in the occipital lobe. The number of plaques in the imaging section was calculated. Results: Brainstem volumes for RR and SP with multiple sclerosis and control subjects were 3647 mm{sup 3} , 3515 mm{sup 3} , and 4517 mm{sup 3} , respectively. Mean number of plaques in the right-left occipital lobe was found to be 2.7-3.4 in RR-MS and 5.2-2.8 in SP-MS. Mean plaque surface area in the right-left occipital lobe was determined to be 58.52-88.24 mm{sup 2} in RR MS and 124.3-64.82 mm{sup 2} in SP MS. Brainstem volumes were significantly reduced in both groups of patients with MS compared to controls ( P <0.01). Conclusion: Magnetic-resonance-estimated volume and surface area values in multiple sclerosis may facilitate our understanding of the clinical situation of patients and provide a simple index for evaluating therapeutic efficiency.

  4. Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Uecker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The main disadvantage of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are its long scan times and, in consequence, its sensitivity to motion. Exploiting the complementary information from multiple receive coils, parallel imaging is able to recover images from under-sampled k-space data and to accelerate the measurement. Because parallel magnetic resonance imaging can be used to accelerate basically any imaging sequence it has many important applications. Parallel imaging brought a fundamental shift in image reconstruction: Image reconstruction changed from a simple direct Fourier transform to the solution of an ill-conditioned inverse problem. This work gives an overview of image reconstruction from the perspective of inverse problems. After introducing basic concepts such as regularization, discretization, and iterative reconstruction, advanced topics are discussed including algorithms for auto-calibration, the connection to approximation theory, and the combination with compressed sensing.

  5. Quantitative assessment of left ventricular function with dual-source CT in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: initial findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, S.; Johnson, T.R.C.; Wintersperger, B.J.; Minaifar, N.; Bhargava, A.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.; Nikolaou, K. [University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography are currently regarded as standard modalities for the quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction. With the recent introduction of dual-source computedtomography (DSCT), the increased temporal resolution of 83 ms should also improve the assessment of cardiac function in CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of DSCT in the assessment of left ventricular functional parameters with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as standard of reference. Fifteen patients (two female, 13 male; mean age 50.8 {+-} 19.2 years) underwent CT and MRI examinations on a DSCT (Somatom Definition; Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) and a 3.0-Tesla MR scanner (Magnetom Trio; Siemens Medical Solutions), respectively. Multiphase axial CT images were analysed with a semiautomatic region growing algorithms (Syngo Circulation; Siemens Medical Solutions) by two independent blinded observers. In MRI, dynamic cine loops of short axis slices were evaluated with semiautomatic contour detection software (ARGUS; Siemens Medical Solutions) independently by two readers. End-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), ejection fraction (EF) and stroke volume (SV) were determined for both modalities, and correlation coefficient, systematic error, limits of agreement and inter-observer variability were assessed. In DSCT, EDV and ESV were 135.8 {+-} 41.9 ml and 54.9 {+-} 29.6 ml, respectively, compared with 132.1 {+-} 40.8 ml EDV and 57.6 {+-} 27.3 ml ESV in MRI. Thus, EDV was overestimated by 3.7 ml (limits of agreement -46.1/+53.6), while ESV was underestimated by 2.6 ml (-36.6/+31.4). Mean EF was 61.6 {+-} 12.4% in DSCT and 57.9 {+-} 9.0% in MRI, resulting in an overestimation of EF by 3.8% with limits of agreement at -14.7 and +22.2%. Rank correlation rho values were 0.81 for EDV (P = 0.0024), 0.79 for ESV (P = 0.0031) and 0.64 for EF (P = 0.0168). The kappa value of inter

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This presentation will describe the operational principles, design basics, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  7. Magnetic resonance signal intensity ratio of gray/white matter in children; Quantitative assessment in developing brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maezawa, Mariko (Tokyo Saiseikai Central Hospital (Japan)); Seki, Tohru; Imura, Soichi; Akiyama, Kazunori; Takikawa, Itsuro; Yuasa, Yuji

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 87 children with various clinical entities were used to determine the signal intensity ratio of gray/white matter in T[sub 1]-weighted and T[sub 2]-weighted images using a 1.5 T MR scanner. Signal intensity ratio changes in both T[sub 1]- and T[sub 2]-weighted images correlated well with advancing age (y=0.9349-0.001575, r=0.584, P<0.0001 in T[sub 1]-weighted images; y=0.9798+0.002854, r=0.723, P<0.0001 in T[sub 2]-weighted images), but the correlation was more linear when we included only normally developed (34) children (y=0.9689-0.001967, r=-0.654, P<0.0001 in T[sub 1]-weighted images; y=0.9882+0.002965, r=0.747, P<0.0001 in T[sub 2]-weighted images). Abnormal ratios were observed in patients with congenital hydrocephalus, inherited metabolic diseases and cerebral palsy. Although the gray/white matter differentiation would not delineate the myelination itself, measurement of the signal intensity ratio of gray/white matters is a practical way to evaluate delayed myelination in a busy MR center. (author).

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance ... if possible, or removed prior to the MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  10. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imager)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoshinori [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1995-05-01

    MRI is a widely used diagnostic imaging modality because it has excellent diagnostic capabilities, is safe to use and generates images not affected by bone artifacts. Images are obtained by utilizing the phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) by which protons located in a static magnetic field absorb radio frequency (RF) pulses with a specific frequency and release a part of the energy as a NMR signal. Potentially MRI has the ability to provide functional and metabolic information (such as flow, temperature, diffusion, neuron activity) in addition to morphological information. This paper describes the imaging principles and provides a general outline of some applications: flow imaging, metabolite imaging and temperature imaging. (J.P.N.).

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  12. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping-Based Microscopy of Magnetic Resonance Venography (QSM-mMRV for In Vivo Morphologically and Functionally Assessing Cerebromicrovasculature in Rat Stroke Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chi Hsieh

    Full Text Available Abnormal cerebral oxygenation and vessel structure is a crucial feature of stroke. An imaging method with structural and functional information is necessary for diagnosis of stroke. This study applies QSM-mMRV (quantitative susceptibility mapping-based microscopic magnetic resonance venography for noninvasively detecting small cerebral venous vessels in rat stroke model. First, susceptibility mapping is optimized and calculated from magnetic resonance (MR phase images of a rat brain. Subsequently, QSM-mMRV is used to simultaneously provide information on microvascular architecture and venous oxygen saturation (SvO2, both of which can be used to evaluate the physiological and functional characteristics of microvascular changes for longitudinally monitoring and therapeutically evaluating a disease model. Morphologically, the quantification of vessel sizes using QSM-mMRV was 30% smaller than that of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI, which eliminated the overestimation of conventional SWI. Functionally, QSM-mMRV estimated an average SvO2 ranging from 73% to 85% for healthy rats. Finally, we also applied QSM to monitor the revascularization of post-stroke vessels from 3 to 10 days after reperfusion. QSM estimations of SvO2 were comparable to those calculated using the pulse oximeter standard metric. We conclude that QSM-mMRV is useful for longitudinally monitoring blood oxygen and might become clinically useful for assessing cerebrovascular diseases.

  13. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping-Based Microscopy of Magnetic Resonance Venography (QSM-mMRV) for In Vivo Morphologically and Functionally Assessing Cerebromicrovasculature in Rat Stroke Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Meng-Chi; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Liao, Min-Chiao; Yang, Jenq-Lin; Su, Chia-Hao; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal cerebral oxygenation and vessel structure is a crucial feature of stroke. An imaging method with structural and functional information is necessary for diagnosis of stroke. This study applies QSM-mMRV (quantitative susceptibility mapping-based microscopic magnetic resonance venography) for noninvasively detecting small cerebral venous vessels in rat stroke model. First, susceptibility mapping is optimized and calculated from magnetic resonance (MR) phase images of a rat brain. Subsequently, QSM-mMRV is used to simultaneously provide information on microvascular architecture and venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), both of which can be used to evaluate the physiological and functional characteristics of microvascular changes for longitudinally monitoring and therapeutically evaluating a disease model. Morphologically, the quantification of vessel sizes using QSM-mMRV was 30% smaller than that of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), which eliminated the overestimation of conventional SWI. Functionally, QSM-mMRV estimated an average SvO2 ranging from 73% to 85% for healthy rats. Finally, we also applied QSM to monitor the revascularization of post-stroke vessels from 3 to 10 days after reperfusion. QSM estimations of SvO2 were comparable to those calculated using the pulse oximeter standard metric. We conclude that QSM-mMRV is useful for longitudinally monitoring blood oxygen and might become clinically useful for assessing cerebrovascular diseases.

  14. Quantitative determination Of etimicin sulfate by nuclear magnetic resonance%核磁共振法测定硫酸依替米星含量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于小波; 相秉仁; 王国华; 宋喆; 沈文斌

    2011-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of etimicin sulfate were reported by nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR).The 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectra of etimicin sulfate have been assigned by means of 1D and 2D spectroscopy including DEPT, COSY, HSQC and HMBC.On the basis of assignment, a novel approach was developed for the determination of purity of etimicin sulfate by proton-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR)using p-hydroquinone as internal standard.The result showed that the purity of etimicin was 59.19%, and its relative standard deviations(RSD) was 0.24%, this method was relative accuracy, precision, and ease of application.%通过核磁共振法对硫酸依替米星进行定性和定量分析.利用一维及二维核磁共振谱(DEPT、COSY、HSQC、HMBC),对H-NMR谱和C-NMR谱信号进行完整归属.在此基础上,采用氢核磁共振定量法,以对苯二酚为内标,测得硫酸依替米星中依替米星的含量为59.19%,RSD为0.24%,方法准确可靠,简便快速.

  15. Regional brain metabolite abnormalities in inherited prion disease and asymptomatic gene carriers demonstrated in vivo by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, A.D.; Cordery, R.J.; Godbolt, A.; Rossor, M.N. [University College London, Dementia Research Group, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Division of Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); MacManus, D.G. [University College London, NMR Research Unit, Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Collinge, J. [University College London, MRC Prion Unit, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    Inherited prion diseases are caused by mutations in the gene which codes for prion protein (PrP), leading to proliferation of abnormal PrP isomers in the brain and neurodegeneration; they include Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). We studied two patients with symptomatic inherited prion disease (P102L) and two pre-symptomatic P102L gene carriers using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Short echo time spectra were acquired from the thalamus, caudate region and frontal white matter, metabolite levels and ratios were measured and z-scores calculated for individual patients relative to age-matched normal controls. MRS data were compared with structural magnetic resonance imaging. One fCJD case had generalised atrophy and showed increased levels of myo-inositol (MI) in the thalamus (z=3.7). The other had decreased levels of N-acetylaspartate (z=4) and diffuse signal abnormality in the frontal white matter. Both asymptomatic gene carriers had normal imaging, but increased frontal white matter MI (z=4.3, 4.1), and one also had increased MI in the caudate (z=5.3). Isolated MI abnormalities in asymptomatic gene carriers are a novel finding and may reflect early glial proliferation, prior to significant neuronal damage. MRS provides potential non-invasive surrogate markers of early disease and progression in inherited prion disease. (orig.)

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  17. Comparison of computed tomographic and magnetic resonance perfusion measurements in acute ischemic stroke: back-to-back quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Longting; Bivard, Andrew; Levi, Christopher R; Parsons, Mark W

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP) and computed tomographic perfusion (CTP) are being increasingly applied in acute stroke trials and clinical practice, yet the comparability of their perfusion values is not well validated. The aim of this study was to validate the comparability of CTP and MRP measures. A 3-step approach was used. Step 1 was a derivation step, where we analyzed 45 patients with acute ischemic stroke who had both CTP and MRP performed within 2 hours of each other and within 9 hours of stroke onset. In this step, we derived the optimal perfusion map with the least difference between MRP and CTP. In step 2, the optimal map was validated on whole-brain perfusion data of 15 patients. Step 3 was to apply the optimal perfusion map to define cross-modality reperfusion from acute CTP to 24-hour MRP in 45 patients and, in turn, to assess how accurately this predicted 3-month clinical outcome. Among 8 different perfusion maps included in this study, time to peak of the residual function (T(max)) was the only one with a nonsignificant difference between CTP and MRP in delineating perfusion defects. This was validated on whole-brain perfusion data, showing high concordance of T(max) between the 2 modalities (concordance correlation coefficient of Lin, >0.91); the best concordance was at 6 s. At T(max)>6 s threshold, MRP and CTP reached substantial agreement in mismatch classification (κ >0.61). Cross-modality reperfusion calculated by T(max)>6 s strongly predicted good functional outcome at 3 months (area under the curve, 0.979; P<0.05). MRP and CTP can be used interchangeably if one uses T(max) measurement. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Suitable image parameters and analytical method for quantitatively measuring cerebral blood flow volume with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handa H

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine suitable image parameters and an analytical method for phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow volume. This was done by constructing an experimental model and applying the results to a clinical application. The experimental model was constructed from the aorta of a bull and circulating isotonic saline. The image parameters of PC-MRI (repetition time, flip angle, matrix, velocity rate encoding, and the use of square pixels were studied with percent flow volume (the ratio of actual flow volume to measured flow volume. The most suitable image parameters for accurate blood flow measurement were as follows: repetition time, 50 msec; flip angle, 20 degrees; and a 512 x 256 matrix without square pixels. Furthermore, velocity rate encoding should be set ranging from the maximum flow velocity in the vessel to five times this value. The correction in measuring blood flow was done with the intensity of the region of interest established in the background. With these parameters for PC-MRI, percent flow volume was greater than 90%. Using the image parameters for PC-MRI and the analytical method described above, we evaluated cerebral blood flow volume in 12 patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries. The results were compared with conventional xenon computed tomography. The values found with both methods showed good correlation. Thus, we concluded that PC-MRI was a noninvasive method for evaluating cerebral blood flow in patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries.

  19. Quantitative assessment of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony using cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: Inter-study reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowallick, Johannes T; Morton, Geraint; Lamata, Pablo; Jogiya, Roy; Kutty, Shelby; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Lotz, Joachim; Chiribiri, Amedeo; Nagel, Eike; Schuster, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    To determine the inter-study reproducibility of left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony measures based on standard cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) cine images. Steady-state free precession (SSFP) LV short-axis stacks and three long-axes were acquired on the same day at three time points. Circumferential strain systolic dyssynchrony indexes (SDI), area-SDI as well as circumferential and radial uniformity ratio estimates (CURE and RURE, respectively) were derived from CMR myocardial feature-tracking (CMR-FT) based on the tracking of three SSFP short-axis planes. Furthermore, 4D-LV-analysis based on SSFP short-axis stacks and longitudinal planes was performed to quantify 4D-volume-SDI. A single-centre London teaching hospital. 16 healthy volunteers. Inter-study reproducibility between the repeated exams. CURE and RURE as well as 4D-volume-SDI showed good inter-study reproducibility (coefficient of variation [CoV] 6.4%-12.9%). Circumferential strain and area-SDI showed higher variability between the repeated measurements (CoV 24.9%-37.5%). Uniformity ratio estimates showed the lowest inter-study variability (CoV 6.4%-8.5%). Derivation of LV mechanical dyssynchrony measures from standard cine images is feasible using CMR-FT and 4D-LV-analysis tools. Uniformity ratio estimates and 4D-volume-SDI showed good inter-study reproducibility. Their clinical value should next be explored in patients who potentially benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles ... Videos related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Sponsored ...

  1. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  2. Certification of the reference material of water content in water saturated 1-octanol by Karl Fischer coulometry, Karl Fischer volumetry and quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Ma, Kang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jia; Sun, Guohua; Li, Hongmei

    2012-10-15

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) of water content are widely used in the calibration and validation of Karl Fischer coulometry and volumetry. In this study, the water content of the water saturated 1-octanol (WSO) CRM was certified by Karl Fischer coulometry, volumetry and quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (Q NMR). The water content recovery by coulometry was 99.76% with a diaphragm-less electrode and Coulomat AG anolyte. The relative bias between the coulometry and volumetry results was 0.06%. In Q NMR, the water content of WSO is traceable to the International System (SI) of units through the purity of internal standard. The relative bias of water content in WSO between Q NMR and volumetry was 0.50%. The consistency of results for these three independent methods improves the accuracy of the certification of the RM. The certified water content of the WSO CRM was 4.76% with an expanded uncertainty of 0.09%.

  3. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of stents. Quantitative in vitro examination at 3 Tesla; Magnetresonanztomographie von Stents. Quantitative MR-Untersuchungen in vitro bei 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Julia [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Sektion Experimentelle Radiologie; Fachhochschule Jena (Germany). Fachbereich Medizintechnik; Nguyen-Trong, Thien-Hoa; Haehnel, Stefan [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Neuroradiologie; Bellemann, Matthias E. [Fachhochschule Jena (Germany). Fachbereich Medizintechnik; Heiland, Sabine [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Sektion Experimentelle Radiologie; Neurologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Neuroradiologie

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively study MR artifacts of various stents on the basis of in vitro experiments. We were particularly interested whether sequence type and orientation of the stent with respect to the static magnetic field influences the artifact. We examined 18 stents of different material (nitinol, stainless steel, cobalt alloy), different design of the stent meshes (AccuLink, OmniLink, DynaLink, Xact, Protoge, Wallstent Monorail), different diameter (5-10 mm) and different length (18-58 mm) with a turbo spin echo (TSE), a 2D-fast low angle shot (FLASH) and a 3D-FLASH sequence. The MR images were examined qualitatively with respect to possible artifacts. Furthermore we examined the MR data quantitatively: The contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) was determined both within the stent and outside (within the tube); based on these values we calculated the transparency factor P, furthermore we calculated the apparent vascular lumen within the tube and within the stent. The stents made of stainless steel and cobalt alloy displayed severe susceptibility artifacts. Therefore the vessel lumen within the stent could not be assessed. The nitinol stents showed different artifact patterns: The AccuLink and DynaLink stents showed less artifacts compared to the Xact and Protoge stents. Besides the susceptibility artifacts we found artifacts due to RF shielding by the stent mesh, particularly in TSE sequences. A MR control of patients after stenting is possible and may yield diagnostic information when using the AccuLink or DynaLink stents. However, it is important to make sure that the stent is MR safe for the field strength used for the examination. (orig.)

  6. Semiautomatic determination of arterial input functions for quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Julius; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Yoo Na; Yi, Chin A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a semiautomatic detection method for the arterial input functions (AIFs) using Kendall coefficient of concordance (KCC) for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in non-small cell lung cancer patients. We prospectively enrolled 28 patients (17 men, 11 women; mean age, 62 years) who had biopsy-proven non-small cell lung cancer. All enrolled patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the entire thorax. For the quantitative measurement of pharmacokinetic parameters, K and ve, of the lung cancers, AIFs were determined in 2 different ways: a manual method that involved 3 independent thoracic radiologists selecting a region of interest (ROI) within the aortic arch in the 2D coronal plane and a semiautomatic method that used in-house software to establish a KCC score, which provided a measure of similarity to typical AIF pattern. Three independent readers selected voxel clusters with high KCC scores calculated 3-dimensionally across planes in the data set. K and ve were correlated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and Bland-Altman plots were used to examine agreement across methods and reproducibility within a method. Arterial input functions were determined using the data from ROI volumes that were significantly larger in the semiautomatic method (mean ± SD, 3360 ± 768 mm) than in the manual method (677 ± 380 mm) (P methods. The reproducibility for K (ICCmanual, 0.813 and ICCsemiautomatic, 0.998; P method than the manual method. We found semiautomated detection using KCC to be a robust method for determining the AIF. This method allows for larger ROIs specified in 3D across planes as opposed to manually selected ROIs restricted to the 2D coronal images seen by the reader and provides increased reproducibility that is comparable with manual specification.

  7. Monitoring anti-interleukin 6 receptor antibody treatment for rheumatoid arthritis by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the hand and power Doppler ultrasonography of the finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamishima, Tamotsu; Terae, Satoshi [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sapporo (Japan); Tanimura, Kazuhide; Shimizu, Masato; Matsuhashi, Megumi; Fukae, Jun; Hagiwara, Hiromi; Narita, Akihiro; Aoki, Yuko [Hokkaido Medical Center for Rheumatic Diseases, Sapporo (Japan); Kon, Yujiro [St Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Kosaka, Naoki [Tokeidai Memorial Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Atsumi, Tatsuya [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sapporo (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    To compare quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS) with conventional measures of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with the anti-interleukin 6 (anti-IL 6) receptor antibody tocilizumab in terms of responsiveness at a few months to disease activity and ability to predict structural damage at 1 year. A cohort of patients with RA (n = 29) was evaluated clinically including disease activity score 28 (DAS28) and by semiquantitative (SQ-) and quantitative (Q-) PDUS (bilateral metacarpophalangeal joints) and MRI (one hand and wrist) at initiation of treatment with anti-IL 6 receptor antibody agents and after 2 and 5 months. Conventional radiography for both hands and wrists was performed at baseline and at 12 months. Responsiveness was assessed by standardized response means (SRM). Areas under the curve (AUC) for measures at baseline, 2 and 5 months were correlated with structural damage at 1 year. Among the laboratory and clinical parameters, DAS28-ESR was the most responsive with a large effect size of SRM. Structural damage progressions for radiography and MR erosion were correlated with AUC of MR bone erosion and Q-PDUS, respectively. In the evaluation of disease activity in RA patients in the first few months after starting anti-IL 6 receptor antibody tocilizumab treatment, the semiquantitative MR bone erosion score of the hand and quantitative value for power Doppler signal in the finger joint were both responsive and predictive of structural damage progression at 1 year. (orig.)

  8. High field magnetic resonance microscopy of the human hippocampus in Alzheimer's disease: quantitative imaging and correlation with iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antharam, Vijay; Collingwood, Joanna F; Bullivant, John-Paul; Davidson, Mark R; Chandra, Saurav; Mikhaylova, Albina; Finnegan, Mary E; Batich, Christopher; Forder, John R; Dobson, Jon

    2012-01-16

    We report R(2) and R(2) in human hippocampus from five unfixed post-mortem Alzheimer's disease (AD) and three age-matched control cases. Formalin-fixed tissues from opposing hemispheres in a matched AD and control were included for comparison. Imaging was performed in a 600MHz (14T) vertical bore magnet at MR microscopy resolution to obtain R(2) and R(2) (62 μm×62 μm in-plane, 80 μm slice thickness), and R(1) at 250 μm isotropic resolution. R(1), R(2) and R(2) maps were computed for individual slices in each case, and used to compare subfields between AD and controls. The magnitudes of R(2) and R(2) changed very little between AD and control, but their variances in the Cornu Ammonis and dentate gyrus were significantly higher in AD compared for controls (piron and MRI parameters, each tissue block was cryosectioned at 30 μm in the imaging plane, and iron distribution was mapped using synchrotron microfocus X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. A positive correlation of R(2) and R(2)* with iron was demonstrated. While studies with fixed tissues are more straightforward to conduct, fixation can alter iron status in tissues, making measurement of unfixed tissue relevant. To our knowledge, these data represent an advance in quantitative imaging of hippocampal subfields in unfixed tissue, and the methods facilitate direct analysis of the relationship between MRI parameters and iron. The significantly increased variance in AD compared for controls warrants investigation at lower fields and in-vivo, to determine if this parameter is clinically relevant.

  9. Investigation into the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of choroidal melanoma through magnetic resonance imaging and B-scan ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papayiannis, Vassilis; Tsaousis, Konstantinos T; Kouskouras, Constantinos A; Haritanti, Afroditi; Diakonis, Vasilios F; Tsinopoulos, Ioannis T

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the homogeneity and vascularity of choroidal melanoma through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and brightness modulation (B-mode) ultrasound scan and their correlation with dimensions of tumor, as well as to measure the sensitivity of both modalities in retinal detachment (RD) detection. This retrospective chart review included patients diagnosed with choroidal melanoma. All these patients underwent MRI scans using T2-weighted (T2-WI) and T1-weighted (T1-WI) sequences, before and after an intravenous injection of paramagnetic contrast material. The patients were also examined using a B-mode ultrasound scan, and the results from both modalities were compared (tumor homogeneity, tumor height, tumor base diameter, and tumor vascularity). Forty-two patients (mean age=65.33±12.51 years) with choroidal melanoma were included in the study. Homogeneity was confirmed in 16 patients through ultrasound scan, in 19 patients through T1-WI sequence, in 21 patients through T2-WI sequence, and in 25 patients through T1-WI sequence + contrast (gadolinium). Patients with homogenous tumors presented with lower (P=0.0045) mean height than that of those with nonhomogenous tumors, whereas no statistically significant difference was found for base diameter measurements (P=0.056). Patients with tumors of high vascularity presented with greater mean height (P=0.000638) and greater mean base diameter compared with those with tumors of low vascularity (P=0.019543). RD was detected in 26 patients through T1-WI sequence, in 13 patients through T2-WI sequence, in 26 patients through T1-WI sequence + contrast, and in 32 patients through ultrasound scan, which proved to be the most sensitive modality. The height of choroidal melanoma was positively correlated with tumor's homogeneity. Melanomas of greater height were found to be less homogenous, due to increased degeneration and higher occurrence of intratumoral hemorrhage. In addition, choroidal melanoma's height was also

  10. Magnetic resonance urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyendecker, John R; Gianini, John W

    2009-07-01

    Excellent contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation make magnetic resonance urography (MRU) a promising technique for noninvasively evaluating the entire urinary tract. While MRU currently lags behind CT urography (CTU) in spatial resolution and efficiency, new hardware and sequence developments have contributed to a resurgence of interest in MRU techniques. By combining unenhanced sequences with multiphase contrast-enhanced and excretory phase imaging, a comprehensive assessment of the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and surrounding structures is possible with image quality rivaling that obtained with other techniques. At the same time, formidable challenges remain to be overcome and further clinical validation is necessary before MRU can replace other forms of urography. In this article, we demonstrate the current potential of MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations and current status of this evolving technique.

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  12. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  13. Quantitative analysis of the reconstruction errors of the currently popular algorithm of magnetic resonance electrical property tomography at the interfaces of adjacent tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Song; Xu, Chao; Deng, Guanhua; Wang, Jiajia; Liu, Feng; Xin, Sherman Xuegang

    2016-06-01

    This work quantitatively analyzed the reconstruction errors (REs) of electrical property (EP) images using a currently popular algorithm of magnetic resonance electrical property tomography (MREPT), which occurred along the tissue interfaces. Transmitted magnetic fields B1+ were acquired at 3 T using a birdcage coil loaded with a phantom consisting of various adjacent tissues. Homogeneous Helmholtz was employed to calculate the EP maps by Laplacian computation of central differences. The maps of absolute REs (aREs) and relative REs (rREs) were calculated. The maximum and mean rREs, in addition to rRE distributions at the interfaces, were presented. Reconstructed EP maps showed various REs along different interface boundaries. Among all the investigated tissue interfaces, the kidney-fat interface presented the maximum mean rREs for both conductivity and relative permittivity. The minimum mean rRE of conductivity was observed at the spleen-muscle interface, and the minimum mean rRE of relative permittivity was detected along the lung-heart interface. The mean rREs ranged from 0.3986 to 36.11 for conductivity and 0.2218 to 11.96 for relative permittivity. Overall, this research indicates that different REs occur at various tissue boundaries, as shown by the currently popular algorithm of MREPT. Thus, REs should be considered when applying MREPT to reconstruct the EP distributions inside the human body. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Head-to-Head Comparison of Ultra-High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Diode Array Detection versus Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for the Quantitative Analysis of the Silymarin Complex in Silybum marianum Fruit Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheilari, Antigoni; Sturm, Sonja; Intelmann, Daniel; Seger, Christoph; Stuppner, Hermann

    2016-02-24

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) spectroscopy is known as an excellent alternative to chromatography-based mixture analysis. NMR spectroscopy is a non-destructive method, needs only limited sample preparation, and can be readily automated. A head-to-head comparison of qNMR to an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (uHPLC-DAD)-based quantitative analysis of six flavonolignan congeners (silychristin, silydianin, silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A, and isosilybin B) of the Silybum marianum silymarin complex is presented. Both assays showed similar performance characteristics (linear range, accuracy, precision, and limits of quantitation) with analysis times below 30 min/sample. The assays were applied to industrial S. marianum extracts (AC samples) and to extracts locally prepared from S. marianum fruits (PL samples). An assay comparison by Bland-Altman plots (relative method bias AC samples, -0.1%; 2SD range, ±5.1%; relative method bias PL samples, -0.3%; 2SD range, ±7.8%) and Passing-Bablok regression analysis (slope and intercept for AC and PL samples not significantly different from 1.00 and 0.00, respectively; Spearman's coefficient of rank correlation, >0.99) did show that qNMR and uHPLC-DAD can be used interchangeably to quantitate flavonolignans in the silymarin complex.

  15. Comparison of contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqua Alessia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Contrast MRA (C-MRA is the standard for quantitative analysis of thoracic vessels. We evaluated a noncontrast MRA (NC-MRA sequence (3-D EKG and navigator-gated SSFP for quantitative evaluation of the thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries in young patients with congenital heart disease. Objective : To compare contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects. Methods : Measurements of thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries were obtained from C-MRA and NC-MRA images in 51 patients, ages 2-35 years. Vessel diameters were compared using correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. Interobserver variability was assessed using percent variation. Results : C-MRA and NC-MRA measurements were highly correlated (r = 0.91-0.98 except for the right pulmonary artery (r = 0.74, 0.78. Agreement of measurements was excellent (mean difference -0.07 to -0.53 mm; mean % difference -1.8 to -4.9% except for the right pulmonary artery which was less good (mean difference 0.73, -1.38 mm; -3, -10%. Interobserver variability ranged from 5% to 8% for aortic and from 10% to 16% for pulmonary artery measures. The worse agreement and greater variability of the pulmonary artery measures appears due to difficulty standardizing the measurements in patients with abnormal and irregular vessels. Conclusion : These data indicate that C-MRA and NC-MRA measures are comparable and could be used interchangeably, avoiding administration of contrast in selected patients.

  16. Quantitative T2 magnetic resonance imaging compared to morphological grading of the early cervical intervertebral disc degeneration: an evaluation approach in asymptomatic young adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of quantitative T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for quantifying early cervical intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration in asymptomatic young adults by correlating the T2 value with Pfirrmann grade, sex, and anatomic level. METHODS: Seventy asymptomatic young subjects (34 men and 36 women; mean age, 22.80±2.11 yr; range, 18-25 years underwent 3.0-T MRI to obtain morphological data (one T1-fast spin echo (FSE and three-plane T2-FSE, used to assign a Pfirrmann grade (I-V and for T2 mapping (multi-echo spin echo. T2 values in the nucleus pulposus (NP, n = 350 and anulus fibrosus (AF, n = 700 were obtained. Differences in T2 values between sexes and anatomic level were evaluated, and linear correlation analysis of T2 values versus degenerative grade was conducted. FINDINGS: Cervical IVDs of healthy young adults were commonly determined to be at Pfirrmann grades I and II. T2 values of NPs were significantly higher than those of AF at all anatomic levels (P0.05. T2 values decreased linearly with degenerative grade. Linear correlation analysis revealed a strong negative association between the Pfirrmann grade and the T2 values of the NP (P = 0.000 but not the T2 values of the AF (P = 0.854. However, non-degenerated discs (Pfirrmann grades I and II showed a wide range of T2 relaxation time. T2 values according to disc degeneration level classification were as follows: grade I (>62.03 ms, grade II (54.60-62.03 ms, grade III (<54.60 ms. CONCLUSIONS: T2 quantitation provides a more sensitive and robust approach for detecting and characterizing the early stage of cervical IVD degeneration and to create a reliable quantitative in healthy young adults.

  17. Pediatric magnetic resonance urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard A; Grattan-Smith, J Damien; Little, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is a powerful clinical tool that fuses anatomic information with functional data in a single test without the use of ionizing radiation. This article provides an overview of the technical aspects, as well as common clinical applications with an emphasis on the evaluation of hydronephrosis. A fluid challenge is an essential part of our MRU protocol and enables the definition of compensated or decompensated kidneys within the spectrum of hydronephrosis. This classification may have prognostic implications when surgery is being considered. In addition, underlying uropathy can be identified on the anatomical scans and renal scarring can be seen on both the anatomical and dynamic scans. MRU can identify and categorize dysmorphic kidneys in vivo and may provide insight into congenital abnormalities seen in conjunction with vesicoureteric reflux. MRU is still in its infancy and as the technique develops and becomes widely available, it seems likely that it will supplant renal scintigraphy in the evaluation of renal tract disorders in children. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  19. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metallic objects from being attracted by the powerful magnet of the MR system, you will typically receive ... teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets Medication patch (i.e., transdermal patch) that contains ...

  1. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination.

  3. High-resolution multi-parametric quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the human cervical spinal cord at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massire, Aurélien; Taso, Manuel; Besson, Pierre; Guye, Maxime; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Callot, Virginie

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative MRI techniques have the potential to characterize spinal cord tissue impairments occurring in various pathologies, from both microstructural and functional perspectives. By enabling very high image resolution and enhanced tissue contrast, ultra-high field imaging may offer further opportunities for such characterization. In this study, a multi-parametric high-resolution quantitative MRI protocol is proposed to characterize in vivo the human cervical spinal cord at 7T. Multi-parametric quantitative MRI acquizitions including T1, T2(*) relaxometry mapping and axial diffusion MRI were performed on ten healthy volunteers with a whole-body 7T system using a commercial prototype coil-array dedicated to cervical spinal cord imaging. Automatic cord segmentation and multi-parametric data registration to spinal cord templates enabled robust regional studies within atlas-based WM tracts and GM horns at the C3 cervical level. T1 value, cross-sectional area and GM/WM ratio evolutions along the cervical cord were also reported. An original correction method for B1(+)-biased T1 mapping sequence was additionally proposed and validated on phantom. As a result, relaxometry and diffusion parameters derived from high-resolution quantitative MRI acquizitions were reported at 7T for the first time. Obtained images, with unmatched resolutions compared to lower field investigations, provided exquisite anatomical details and clear delineation of the spinal cord substructures within an acquisition time of 30min, compatible with clinical investigations. Regional statistically significant differences were highlighted between WM and GM based on T1 and T2* maps (pquantitative MRI is feasible and lays the groundwork for future clinical investigations of degenerative spinal cord pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... ray, CT and ultrasound. top of page How is the procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... the area being scanned include: Metallic spinal rod Plates, pins, screws, or metal mesh used to repair ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... bore which can be more comfortable for larger size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines ... Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... bore which can be more comfortable for larger size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines ... for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  15. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 4

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 4 deals with the relaxation, irradiation, and other dynamical effects that is specific to systems having resolved structure in their magnetic resonance spectra. This book discusses the anisotropic rotation of molecules in liquids by NMR quadrupolar relaxation; rotational diffusion constants; alternating linewidth effect; and theoretical formulations of the problem. The line shapes in high-resolution NMR; matrix representations of the equations of motion; matrix representations of the equations of motion; and intramolecular hydrogen bonds are also delibera

  17. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Walter A; Truwit, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    Neurosurgeons have become reliant on image-guidance to perform safe and successful surgery both time-efficiently and cost-effectively. Neuronavigation typically involves either rigid (frame-based) or skull-mounted (frameless) stereotactic guidance derived from computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that is obtained days or immediately before the planned surgical procedure. These systems do not accommodate for brain shift that is unavoidable once the cranium is opened and cerebrospinal fluid is lost. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) systems ranging in strength from 0.12 to 3 Tesla (T) have been developed in part because they afford neurosurgeons the opportunity to accommodate for brain shift during surgery. Other distinct advantages of ioMRI include the excellent soft tissue discrimination, the ability to view the surgical site in three dimensions, and the ability to "see" tumor beyond the surface visualization of the surgeon's eye, either with or without a surgical microscope. The enhanced ability to view the tumor being biopsied or resected allows the surgeon to choose a safe surgical corridor that avoids critical structures, maximizes the extent of the tumor resection, and confirms that an intraoperative hemorrhage has not resulted from surgery. Although all ioMRI systems allow for basic T1- and T2-weighted imaging, only high-field (>1.5 T) MRI systems are capable of MR spectroscopy (MRS), MR angiography (MRA), MR venography (MRV), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and brain activation studies. By identifying vascular structures with MRA and MRV, it may be possible to prevent their inadvertent injury during surgery. Biopsying those areas of elevated phosphocholine on MRS may improve the diagnostic yield for brain biopsy. Mapping out eloquent brain function may influence the surgical path to a tumor being resected or biopsied. The optimal field strength for an ioMRI-guided surgical system and the best configuration for that system are as yet

  18. Intraindividual quantitative and qualitative comparison of gadopentetate dimeglumine and gadobutrol in time-resolved contrast-enhanced 4-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography in minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadizadeh, Dariusch Reza; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus; Weibrecht, Martin; Perkuhn, Michael; Boschewitz, Jack Maria; Keil, Vera Catharina; Träber, Frank; Kukuk, Guido Matthias; Schild, Hans Heinz; Willinek, Winfried Albert

    2014-07-01

    The concentration and relaxivities of contrast agents affect quantitative and qualitative image quality in contrast-enhanced time-resolved 4-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (4D-MRA). Gadobutrol has a high relaxivity and is the only gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent approved for clinical use at a 1 M concentration. This promises to confer superior bolus characteristics by generating a steeper and shorter bolus with a higher peak Gd concentration. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively examine bolus characteristics of 1 M gadobutrol compared with 0.5 M gadopentetate dimeglumine and to evaluate image quality in thoracoabdominal 4D-MRA. A total of 7 Goettingen minipigs received dynamic computed tomography (CT) on a clinical 64-slice CT (transverse slices, 80 kV, 20 seconds, 0.3 s/dynamic frame) and 4D-MRA (time-resolved imaging with stochastic trajectories; 1. transverse slices, 30 seconds, 0.49 s/frame; 2. coronal slices, 70 seconds, 1.3 s/frame) on a 1.5-T clinical whole-body magnetic resonance imaging under general anesthesia using gadopentetate dimeglumine and gadobutrol in an intraindividual comparative study. Computed tomography attenuations were converted into Gd concentrations on the basis of previous phantom experiments. Quantitative analysis included measurements of the full width at half maximum, time-to-peak intervals, and peak of each bolus in dynamic CT and transverse 4D-MRA. These studies were carried out at equivalent contrast agent flow rates of 1 mL/s. Quantitative analysis (7 arteries and veins) and qualitative image analysis were performed on coronal thoracoabdominal 4D-MRA studies carried out at flow rates of 1 mL/s and, in the case of gadopentetate dimeglumine, also at molarity-adjusted flow rates of 2 mL/s. The bolus in both transverse 4D-MRA and dynamic CT was significantly narrower (full width at half maximum), earlier (time to peak), and higher (signal intensity enhancement in 4D-MRA, Gd concentration in dynamic CT) when

  19. Correlation of X-ray computed tomography with quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance methods for pre-clinical measurement of adipose and lean tissues in living mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzinger, Matthew N; Miramontes, Bernadette; Zhou, Peng; Liu, Yueying; Chapman, Sarah; Sun, Lucy; Sasser, Todd A; Duffield, Giles E; Stack, M Sharon; Leevy, W Matthew

    2014-10-08

    Numerous obesity studies have coupled murine models with non-invasive methods to quantify body composition in longitudinal experiments, including X-ray computed tomography (CT) or quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (QMR). Both microCT and QMR have been separately validated with invasive techniques of adipose tissue quantification, like post-mortem fat extraction and measurement. Here we report a head-to-head study of both protocols using oil phantoms and mouse populations to determine the parameters that best align CT data with that from QMR. First, an in vitro analysis of oil/water mixtures was used to calibrate and assess the overall accuracy of microCT vs. QMR data. Next, experiments were conducted with two cohorts of living mice (either homogenous or heterogeneous by sex, age and genetic backgrounds) to assess the microCT imaging technique for adipose tissue segmentation and quantification relative to QMR. Adipose mass values were obtained from microCT data with three different resolutions, after which the data were analyzed with different filter and segmentation settings. Strong linearity was noted between the adipose mass values obtained with microCT and QMR, with optimal parameters and scan conditions reported herein. Lean tissue (muscle, internal organs) was also segmented and quantified using the microCT method relative to the analogous QMR values. Overall, the rigorous calibration and validation of the microCT method for murine body composition, relative to QMR, ensures its validity for segmentation, quantification and visualization of both adipose and lean tissues.

  20. Region-specific effects on brain metabolites of hypoxia and hyperoxia overlaid on cerebral ischemia in young and old rats: a quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliani Patricia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both hypoxia and hyperoxia, deregulating the oxidative balance, may play a role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders underlain by cerebral ischemia. In the present study, quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to evaluate regional metabolic alterations, following a 24-hour hypoxic or hyperoxic exposure on the background of ischemic brain insult, in two contrasting age-groups of rats: young - 3 months old and aged - 24 months old. Methods Cerebral ischemia was induced by ligation of the right common carotid artery. Concentrations of eight metabolites (alanine, choline-containing compounds, total creatine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, lactate, myo-inositol and N-acetylaspartate were quantified from extracts in three different brain regions (fronto-parietal and occipital cortices and the hippocampus from both hemispheres. Results In the control normoxic condition, there were significant increases in lactate and myo-inositol concentrations in the hippocampus of the aged rats, compared with the respective values in the young ones. In the ischemia-hypoxia condition, the most prevalent changes in the brain metabolites were found in the hippocampal regions of both young and aged rats; but the effects were more evident in the aged animals. The ischemia-hyperoxia procedure caused less dedicated changes in the brain metabolites, which may reflect more limited tissue damage. Conclusions We conclude that the hippocampus turns out to be particularly susceptible to hypoxia overlaid on cerebral ischemia and that old age further increases this susceptibility.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging; Imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanel, F. [Centre Hospitalier, 40 - Mont-de -Marsan (France); Clerc, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Theolier, S. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 - Lyon (France); Verdenet, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-04-01

    The last improvements in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are detailed here, society by society with an expose of their different devices. In the future the different technological evolutions will be on a faster acquisition, allowing to reduce the examination time, on the development of a more acute cardiac imaging, of a functional neuro-imaging and an interactive imaging for intervention. With the contrast products, staying a longer time in the vascular area, the angiography will find its place. Finally, the studies on magnetic fields should allow to increase the volume to examine. (N.C.).

  2. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of breast lesions: the influence of different fat-suppression techniques on quantitative measurements and their reproducibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muertz, P.; Tsesarskiy, M.; Kowal, A.; Traeber, F.; Willinek, W.A.; Leutner, C.C.; Schmiedel, A.; Schild, H.H. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Gieseke, J. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different fat-suppression techniques on quantitative measurements and their reproducibility when applied to diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of breast lesions. Twenty-five patients with different types of breast lesions were examined on a clinical 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Two diffusion-weighted sequences with different fat-suppression methods were applied: one with spectral presaturation by inversion recovery (SPIR), and one with short-TI inversion recovery (STIR). The acquisition of both sequence variants was repeated with modified shim volume. Lesion-to-background contrast (LBC), apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) ADC(0,1000) and ADC(50,1000), and their coefficients of variation (CV) were determined. In four patients, the image quality of DWI with SPIR was insufficient. In the other 21 patients, 46 regions of interest (ROI), including 11 malignant and 35 benign lesions, were analysed. The LBC, ADC(0,1000) and ADC(50,1000) values, which did not differ between initial and repeated measurements, were significantly higher for STIR than for SPIR. The mean CV improved from 10.8 % to 4.0 % (P = 0.0047) for LBC, from 6.3 % to 2.9 % (P = 0.0041) for ADC(0,1000), and from 6.3 % to 2.6 % (P = 0.0049) for ADC(50,1000). For STIR compared to SPIR fat suppression, improved lesion conspicuity, higher ADC values, and better measurement reproducibility were found in breast DWI. circle Quality of fat suppression influences quantitative DWI breast lesion measurements. circle In breast DWI, STIR fat suppression worked more reliably than SPIR. (orig.)

  3. Quantitative assessment of changes in carotid plaques during cilostazol administration using three-dimensional ultrasonography and non-gated magnetic resonance plaque imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Mao; Ohba, Hideki; Mori, Kiyofumi; Narumi, Shinsuke; Katsura, Noriyuki; Ohura, Kazumasa; Terayama, Yasuo [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurology and Gerontology, Morioka (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke [Iwate Medical University, Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Morioka (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Cilostazol, an antiplatelet agent, is reported to induce the regression of atherosclerotic changes. However, its effects on carotid plaques are unknown. Hence, we quantitatively investigated the changes that occur within carotid plaques during cilostazol administration using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonography (US) and non-gated magnetic resonance (MR) plaque imaging. We prospectively examined 16 consecutive patients with carotid stenosis. 3D-US and T1-weighted MR plaque imaging were performed at baseline and 6 months after initiating cilostazol therapy (200 mg/day). We measured the volume and grayscale median (GSM) of the plaques from 3D-US data. We also calculated the contrast ratio (CR) of the carotid plaque against the adjacent muscle and areas of the intraplaque components: fibrous tissue, lipid, and hemorrhage components. The plaque volume on US decreased significantly (median at baseline and 6 months, 0.23 and 0.21 cm{sup 3}, respectively; p = 0.03). In the group exhibiting a plaque volume reduction of more than 10%, GSM on US increased significantly (24.8 and 71.5, respectively; p = 0.04) and CR on MRI decreased significantly (1.13 and 1.04, respectively; p = 0.02). In this group, in addition, the percent area of the fibrous component on MRI increased significantly (68.6% and 79.4%, respectively; p = 0.02), while those of the lipid and hemorrhagic components decreased (24.9% and 20.5%, respectively; p = 0.12) (1.0% and 0.0%, respectively; p = 0.04). There were no substantial changes in intraplaque characteristics in either US or MRI in the other group. 3D-US and MR plaque imaging can quantitatively detect changes in the size and composition of carotid plaques during cilostazol therapy. (orig.)

  4. Inter-observer agreement and diagnostic accuracy of myocardial perfusion reserve quantification by cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3 Tesla in comparison to quantitative coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuye, Katharina; Buckert, Dominik; Schaaf, Lisa; Walcher, Thomas; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Bernhardt, Peter

    2013-03-27

    Quantification of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) at 1.5 Tesla has been shown to correlate to invasive evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD) and to yield good inter-observer agreement. However, little is known about quantitative adenosine-perfusion CMR at 3 Tesla and no data about inter-observer agreement is available. Aim of our study was to evaluate inter-observer agreement and to assess the diagnostic accuracy in comparison to quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Fifty-three patients referred for coronary x-ray angiography were previously examined in a 3 Tesla whole-body scanner. Adenosine and rest perfusion CMR were acquired for the quantification of MPR in all segments. Two blinded and independent readers analyzed all images. QCA was performed in case of coronary stenosis. QCA data was used to assess diagnostic accuracy of the MPR measurements. Inter-observer agreement was high for all myocardial perfusion territories (ρ = 0.92 for LAD, ρ = 0.93 for CX and RCA perfused segments). Compared to QCA receiver-operating characteristics yielded an area under the curve of 0.78 and 0.73 for RCA, 0.66 and 0.69 for LAD, and 0.52 and 0.53 for LCX perfused territories. Inter-observer agreement of MPR quantification at 3 Tesla CMR is very high for all myocardial segments. Diagnostic accuracy in comparison to QCA yields good values for the RCA and LAD perfused territories, but moderate values for the posterior LCX perfused myocardial segments.

  5. Direct Analysis of Free and Sulfite-Bound Carbonyl Compounds in Wine by Two-Dimensional Quantitative Proton and Carbon Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolantonaki, Maria; Magiatis, Prokopios; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2015-11-03

    Recent developments that have accelerated 2D NMR methods and improved quantitation have made these methods accessible analytical procedures, and the large signal dispersion allows for the analysis of complex samples. Few natural samples are as complex as wine, so the application to challenges in wine analysis look promising. The analysis of carbonyl compounds in wine, key oxidation products, is complicated by a multitude of kinetically reversible adducts, such as acetals and sulfonates, so that sample preparation steps can generate complex interferences. These challenges could be overcome if the compounds could be quantified in situ. Here, two-dimensional ((1)H-(1)H) homonuclear and heteronuclear ((13)C-(1)H) single quantum correlations (correlation spectroscopy, COSY, and heteronuclear single quantum coherence, HSQC) nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of undiluted wine samples were observed at natural abundance. These techniques achieve simultaneous direct identification and quantitation of acetaldehyde, pyruvic acid, acetoin, methylglyoxal, and α-ketoglutaric acid in wine with only a small addition of D2O. It was also possible to observe and sometimes quantify the sulfite, hydrate, and acetal forms of the carbonyl compounds. The accuracy of the method was tested in wine samples by spiking with a mixture of all analytes at different concentrations. The method was applied to 15 wine samples of various vintages and grape varieties. The application of this method could provide a powerful tool to better understand the development, evolution, and perception of wine oxidation and insight into the impact of these sulfite bound carbonyls on antimicrobial and antioxidant action by SO2.

  6. Quantitative correlational study of microbubble-enhanced ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging of glioma and early response to radiotherapy in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chen [Department of Ultrasound, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310022 (China); Lee, Dong-Hoon; Zhang, Kai; Li, Wenxiao; Zhou, Jinyuan [Division of MR Research, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Mangraviti, Antonella; Tyler, Betty [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Su, Lin; Zhang, Yin; Zhang, Bin; Wong, John; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Velarde, Esteban; Ding, Kai, E-mail: kding1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy remains a major treatment method for malignant tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard modality for assessing glioma treatment response in the clinic. Compared to MRI, ultrasound imaging is low-cost and portable and can be used during intraoperative procedures. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively compare contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and MRI of irradiated gliomas in rats and to determine which quantitative ultrasound imaging parameters can be used for the assessment of early response to radiation in glioma. Methods: Thirteen nude rats with U87 glioma were used. A small thinned skull window preparation was performed to facilitate ultrasound imaging and mimic intraoperative procedures. Both CEUS and MRI with structural, functional, and molecular imaging parameters were performed at preradiation and at 1 day and 4 days postradiation. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the correlations between MRI and CEUS parameters and the changes between pre- and postradiation imaging. Results: Area under the curve (AUC) in CEUS showed significant difference between preradiation and 4 days postradiation, along with four MRI parameters, T{sub 2}, apparent diffusion coefficient, cerebral blood flow, and amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) (all p < 0.05). The APTw signal was correlated with three CEUS parameters, rise time (r = − 0.527, p < 0.05), time to peak (r = − 0.501, p < 0.05), and perfusion index (r = 458, p < 0.05). Cerebral blood flow was correlated with rise time (r = − 0.589, p < 0.01) and time to peak (r = − 0.543, p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI can be used for the assessment of radiotherapy treatment response and CEUS with AUC as a new technique and can also be one of the assessment methods for early response to radiation in glioma.

  7. Quantitative correlational study of microbubble-enhanced ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging of glioma and early response to radiotherapy in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Mangraviti, Antonella; Su, Lin; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Yin; Zhang, Bin; Li, Wenxiao; Tyler, Betty; Wong, John; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Velarde, Esteban; Zhou, Jinyuan; Ding, Kai

    2015-08-01

    Radiotherapy remains a major treatment method for malignant tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard modality for assessing glioma treatment response in the clinic. Compared to MRI, ultrasound imaging is low-cost and portable and can be used during intraoperative procedures. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively compare contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and MRI of irradiated gliomas in rats and to determine which quantitative ultrasound imaging parameters can be used for the assessment of early response to radiation in glioma. Thirteen nude rats with U87 glioma were used. A small thinned skull window preparation was performed to facilitate ultrasound imaging and mimic intraoperative procedures. Both CEUS and MRI with structural, functional, and molecular imaging parameters were performed at preradiation and at 1 day and 4 days postradiation. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the correlations between MRI and CEUS parameters and the changes between pre- and postradiation imaging. Area under the curve (AUC) in CEUS showed significant difference between preradiation and 4 days postradiation, along with four MRI parameters, T2, apparent diffusion coefficient, cerebral blood flow, and amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) (all p correlated with three CEUS parameters, rise time (r = - 0.527, p correlated with rise time (r = - 0.589, p < 0.01) and time to peak (r = - 0.543, p < 0.05). MRI can be used for the assessment of radiotherapy treatment response and CEUS with AUC as a new technique and can also be one of the assessment methods for early response to radiation in glioma.

  8. Reliability of a novel, semi-quantitative scale for classification of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Simona; Cioni, Giovanni; Klingels, Katrjin; Ortibus, Els; Van Gestel, Leen; Rose, Stephen; Boyd, Roslyn N; Feys, Hilde; Guzzetta, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    To describe the development of a novel rating scale for classification of brain structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to assess its interrater and intrarater reliability. The scale consists of three sections. Section 1 contains descriptive information about the patient and MRI. Section 2 contains the graphical template of brain hemispheres onto which the lesion is transposed. Section 3 contains the scoring system for the quantitative analysis of the lesion characteristics, grouped into different global scores and subscores that assess separately side, regions, and depth. A larger interrater and intrarater reliability study was performed in 34 children with CP (22 males, 12 females; mean age at scan of 9 y 5 mo [SD 3 y 3 mo], range 4 y-16 y 11 mo; Gross Motor Function Classification System level I, [n=22], II [n=10], and level III [n=2]). Very high interrater and intrarater reliability of the total score was found with indices above 0.87. Reliability coefficients of the lobar and hemispheric subscores ranged between 0.53 and 0.95. Global scores for hemispheres, basal ganglia, brain stem, and corpus callosum showed reliability coefficients above 0.65. This study presents the first visual, semi-quantitative scale for classification of brain structural MRI in children with CP. The high degree of reliability of the scale supports its potential application for investigating the relationship between brain structure and function and examining treatment response according to brain lesion severity in children with CP. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  9. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  10. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of Growth Plates around the Knees of Adolescent Soccer Players by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zmago Krajnc

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate growth plates around the knees in adolescent soccer players utilizing the diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI. Methods. The knees and adjacent growth plates of eleven 14-year-old male soccer players were evaluated by MRI before (end of season’s summer break and after two months of intense soccer training. MRI evaluation was conducted in coronal plane by PD-FSE and DWI. All images were screened for any major pathological changes. Later, central growth plate surface area (CGPSA was measured and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values were calculated in two most central coronal slices divided into four regions: distal femur medial (DFM, distal femur lateral (DFL, proximal tibia medial (PTM, and proximal tibia lateral (PTL. Results. No gross pathology was diagnosed on MRI. CGPSA was not significantly reduced: DFM 278 versus 272, DFL 265 versus 261, PTM 193 versus 192, and PTL 214 versus 210. ADC decrease was statistically significant only for PTM: DFM 1.27 versus 1.22, DFL 1.37 versus 1.34, PTM 1.13 versus 1.03 (p=0.003, and PTL 1.28 versus 1.22. Conclusions. DWI measurements indicate increased cellularity in growth plates around knees in footballers most prominent in PTM after intense training. No detectable differences on a standard PD-FSE sequence were observed.

  12. Comparison of Myocardial Perfusion Estimates From Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Four Quantitative Analysis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Nathan A.; DiBella, Edward V. R.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI has been used to quantify myocardial perfusion in recent years. Published results have varied widely, possibly depending on the method used to analyze the dynamic perfusion data. Here, four quantitative analysis methods (two-compartment modeling, Fermi function modeling, model-independent analysis, and Patlak plot analysis) were implemented and compared for quantifying myocardial perfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data were acquired in 20 human subjects at rest with low-dose (0.019 ± 0.005 mmol/kg) bolus injections of gadolinium. Fourteen of these subjects were also imaged at adenosine stress (0.021 ± 0.005 mmol/kg). Aggregate rest perfusion estimates were not significantly different between all four analysis methods. At stress, perfusion estimates were not significantly different between two-compartment modeling, model-independent analysis, and Patlak plot analysis. Stress estimates from the Fermi model were significantly higher (~20%) than the other three methods. Myocardial perfusion reserve values were not significantly different between all four methods. Model-independent analysis resulted in the lowest model curve-fit errors. When more than just the first pass of data was analyzed, perfusion estimates from two-compartment modeling and model-independent analysis did not change significantly, unlike results from Fermi function modeling. PMID:20577976

  13. Intra-individual comparison of different gadolinium-based contrast agents in the quantitative evaluation of C6 glioma with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Gang; Lou, Xin; Chen, Zhiye; Ma, Lin

    2017-01-01

    This experiment aimed to compare the ionic (Gadodiamide, Gd-DTPA-BMA) and non-ionic (Gadopentetate dimeglumine, Gd-DTPA) gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) in the quantitative evaluation of C6 glioma with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). A C6 glioma model was established in 12 Wistar rats, and magnetic resonance (MR) scans were performed six days after tumor implantation. Imaging was performed using a 3.0-T MR scanner with a 7-inch handmade circular coil. Pre-contrast T1 mapping and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1WI after a bolus injection (0.2 mL s(-1)) of GBCA at 0.4 mmol kg(-1) were performed. Each rat received two DCE-MRI scans, 24 h apart. The first and second scans were performed using Gd-DTPA-BMA and Gd-DTPA, respectively. Image data were processed using the Patlak model. Both K (trans) and V p maps were generated. Tumors were manually segmented on all 3D K (trans) and V p maps. Pixel counts and mean values were recorded for use in a paired t-test. Three radiologists independently performed the tumor segmentation and value calculation. The agreements from different observers were subjective to the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Readers demonstrated that the pixel counts of tumors in K (trans) maps were higher with Gd-DTPA-BMA than with Gd-DTPA (P0.05, all readers). The pixel counts of tumors in V p maps, as well as V p values, showed no obvious difference between the two agents (P>0.05, all readers). Excellent interobserver measurement reproducibility and reliability were demonstrated in the ICC tests. The Gd-DTPA-BMA contrast agent had significantly higher pixel counts of glioma in the K (trans) maps, and an increased tendency for average K (trans) values, indicating that DCE-MRI with Gd-DTPA-BMA may be more suitable and sensitive for the evaluation of glioma.

  14. Comparison of rest and adenosine stress quantitative and semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance in patients with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas A; Qayyum, Faiza; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to compare absolute quantified myocardial perfusion (MP) to semi-quantitative measurements of MP using MRI for detection of ischemia. Twenty-nine patients underwent rest and stress MP imaging obtained by 1.5T MRI and analyzed using own developed software and by commercial available...... software. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that absolute quantitative data correlated stronger to maxSI (rest: r=0.296, p=.193; stress: r=0.583, p=0.011; myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR): r=0.789, prest: r=0.420, p=0.......058; stress: r=0.096, p=0.704; MPR: r=0.682, p=0.004; and Δ MBF: r=0.055, p=0.804). Absolute quantified MP was able to distinguish between ischemic and non-ischemic territories at rest (left anterior descending artery (LAD): 103.1±11.3mL/100g/min vs. 206.3±98.5mL/100g/min; p=0.001, right coronary artery (RCA...

  15. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, Louise; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Thomsen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics...

  16. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.;

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper review...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8......Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...

  17. Comparison of rest and adenosine stress quantitative and semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance in patients with ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Abbas A; Qayyum, Faiza; Larsson, Henrik B W; Kjaer, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip; Vejlstrup, Niels G; Kastrup, Jens

    The aim was to compare absolute quantified myocardial perfusion (MP) to semi-quantitative measurements of MP using MRI for detection of ischemia. Twenty-nine patients underwent rest and stress MP imaging obtained by 1.5T MRI and analyzed using own developed software and by commercial available software. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that absolute quantitative data correlated stronger to maxSI (rest: r=0.296, p=.193; stress: r=0.583, p=0.011; myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR): r=0.789, prest: r=0.420, p=0.058; stress: r=0.096, p=0.704; MPR: r=0.682, p=0.004; and Δ MBF: r=0.055, p=0.804). Absolute quantified MP was able to distinguish between ischemic and non-ischemic territories at rest (left anterior descending artery (LAD): 103.1±11.3mL/100g/min vs. 206.3±98.5mL/100g/min; p=0.001, right coronary artery (RCA): 124.1±45.2mL/100g/min vs. 241.3±81.7mL/100g/min; prest and borderline significant at stress (r=0.265, p=0.382 and r=0.601, p=0.050, respectively). Quantified MP may be useful in patients for detection of ischemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative circumferential strain analysis using adenosine triphosphate-stress/rest 3-T tagged magnetic resonance to evaluate regional contractile dysfunction in ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Masashi, E-mail: m.nakamura1230@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Shitsukawa, Toon-city, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Kido, Tomoyuki [Department of Radiology, Saiseikai Matsuyama Hospital, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Kido, Teruhito; Tanabe, Yuki; Matsuda, Takuya; Nishiyama, Yoshiko; Miyagawa, Masao; Mochizuki, Teruhito [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Shitsukawa, Toon-city, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Infarcted segments could be differentiated from non-ischemic and ischemic segments with high sensitivity and specificity under at rest conditions. • The time-to-peak circumferential strain values in infarcted segments were more significantly delayed than those in non-ischemic and ischemic segments. • Both circumferential strain and circumferential systolic strain rate values under ATP-stress conditions were significantly lower in ischemic segments than in non-ischemic segments. • Subtracting stress and rest circumferential strain had a higher diagnostic capability for ischemia relative to only utilizing rest or ATP-stress circumferential strain values. • A circumferential strain analysis using tagged MR can quantitatively assess contractile dysfunction in ischemic and infarcted myocardium. - Abstract: Purpose: We evaluated whether a quantitative circumferential strain (CS) analysis using adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-stress/rest 3-T tagged magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can depict myocardial ischemia as contractile dysfunction during stress in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). We evaluated whether it can differentiate between non-ischemia, myocardial ischemia, and infarction. We assessed its diagnostic performance in comparison with ATP-stress myocardial perfusion MR and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE)-MR imaging. Methods: In 38 patients suspected of having CAD, myocardial segments were categorized as non-ischemic (n = 485), ischemic (n = 74), or infarcted (n = 49) from the results of perfusion MR and LGE-MR. The peak negative CS value, peak circumferential systolic strain rate (CSR), and time-to-peak CS were measured in 16 segments. Results: A cutoff value of −12.0% for CS at rest allowed differentiation between infarcted and other segments with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 76%, accuracy of 76%, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.81. Additionally, a cutoff value of 477.3 ms for time-to-peak CS at rest

  19. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8...

  20. "PALPATION BY IMAGING": MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Pei-yi Gao

    2006-01-01

    Elasticity is an important physical property of human tissues.There is a tremendous difference in elasticity between normal and pathological tissues.Noninvasive evaluation of the elasticity of human tissues would be valuable for clinical practice.Magnetic resonance elastography(MRE)is a recently developed noninvasive imaging technique that can directly visualize and quantitatively measure tissue elasticity.This article reviewed the MRE technique and its current status.

  1. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  2. Reducing the Effects of Background Noise during Auditory Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Speech Processing: Qualitative and Quantitative Comparisons between Two Image Acquisition Schemes and Noise Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Graham A.; Hall, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The intense sound generated during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) complicates studies of speech and hearing. This experiment evaluated the benefits of using active noise cancellation (ANC), which attenuates the level of the scanner sound at the participant's ear by up to 35 dB around the peak at 600 Hz. Method: Speech and…

  3. Reducing the Effects of Background Noise during Auditory Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Speech Processing: Qualitative and Quantitative Comparisons between Two Image Acquisition Schemes and Noise Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Graham A.; Hall, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The intense sound generated during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) complicates studies of speech and hearing. This experiment evaluated the benefits of using active noise cancellation (ANC), which attenuates the level of the scanner sound at the participant's ear by up to 35 dB around the peak at 600 Hz. Method: Speech and…

  4. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  5. Quantitative {sup 1}H and hyperpolarized {sup 3}He magnetic resonance imaging: Comparison in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and healthy never-smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owrangi, Amir M., E-mail: aowrangi@robats.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Canada N6A 5K8 (Canada); Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Wang, Jian X., E-mail: jxwang@robats.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Canada N6A 5K8 (Canada); Applied Science Laboratories, General Electric Healthcare (Canada); Wheatley, Andrew, E-mail: awheat@imaging.robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Canada N6A 5K8 (Canada); McCormack, David G., E-mail: David.Mccormack@lhsc.on.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Canada N6A 5K8 (Canada); Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Parraga, Grace, E-mail: gparraga@robats.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Canada N6A 5K8 (Canada); Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the relationship between short echo time pulmonary {sup 1}H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal intensity (SI) and {sup 3}He MRI apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC), high-resolution computed tomography (CT) measurements of emphysema, and pulmonary function measurements. Materials and methods: Nine healthy never-smokers and 11 COPD subjects underwent same-day plethysmography, spirometry, short echo time ((TE) = 1.2 ms) {sup 1}H and diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized {sup 3}He MRI (b = 1.6 s/cm{sup 2}) at 3.0 T. In addition, for COPD subjects only, CT densitometry was also performed. Results: Mean {sup 1}H SI was significantly greater for never-smokers (12.1 ± 1.1 arbitrary units (AU)) compared to COPD subjects (10.9 ± 1.3 AU, p = 0.04). The {sup 1}H SI AP-gradient was also significantly greater for never-smokers (0.40 AU/cm, R{sup 2} = 0.94) compared to COPD subjects (0.29 AU/cm, R{sup 2} = 0.968, p = 0.05). There was a significant correlation between {sup 1}H SI and {sup 3}He ADC (r = −0.58, p = 0.008) and significant correlations between {sup 1}H MR SI and CT measurements of emphysema (RA{sub 950}, r = −0.69, p = 0.02 and HU{sub 15}, r = 0.66, p = 0.03). Conclusions: The significant and moderately strong relationship between {sup 1}H SI and {sup 3}He ADC, as well as between {sup 1}H SI and CT measurements of emphysema suggests that these imaging methods and measurements may be quantifying similar tissue changes in COPD and that pulmonary {sup 1}H SI may be used to monitor emphysema as a complement to CT and noble gas MRI.

  6. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging identifies focal regions of intramyocardial fibrosis in patients with severe aortic valve disease: Correlation with quantitative histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigri, Marcelo; Azevedo, Clerio F; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Schraibman, Vladimir; Tarasoutchi, Flavio; Pommerantzeff, Pablo M; Brandão, Carlos Manuel; Sampaio, Roney O; Parga, José R; Avila, Luiz F; Spina, Guilherme S; Grinberg, Max

    2009-02-01

    Chronic aortic valve disease (AVD) is characterized by progressive accumulation of interstitial myocardial fibrosis (MF). However, assessment of MF accumulation has only been possible through histologic analyses of endomyocardial biopsies. We sought to evaluate contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (ce-MRI) as a noninvasive method to identify the presence of increased MF in patients with severe AVD. Seventy patients scheduled to undergo aortic valve replacement surgery were examined by cine and ce-MRI in a 1.5-T scanner. Cine images were used for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, and function. Delayed-enhancement images were used to characterize the regions of MF. In addition, histologic analyses of myocardial samples obtained during aortic valve replacement surgery were used for direct quantification of interstitial MF. Ten additional subjects who died of noncardiac causes served as controls for the quantitative histologic analyses. Interstitial MF determined by histopathologic analysis was higher in patients with AVD than in controls (2.7% +/- 2.0% vs 0.6% +/- 0.2%, P = .001). When compared with histopathologic results, ce-MRI demonstrated a sensitivity of 74%, a specificity of 81%, and an accuracy of 76% to identify AVD patients with increased interstitial MF. There was a significant inverse correlation between interstitial MF and LV ejection fraction (r = -0.67, P < .0001). Accordingly, patients with identifiable focal regions of MF by ce-MRI exhibited worse LV systolic function than those without MF (45% +/- 14% vs 65% +/- 14%, P < .0001). Contrast-enhanced MRI allows for the noninvasive detection of focal regions of MF in patients with severe AVD. Moreover, patients with identifiable MF by ce-MRI exhibited worse LV functional parameters.

  7. Correlation of X-Ray Computed Tomography with Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods for Pre-Clinical Measurement of Adipose and Lean Tissues in Living Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew N. Metzinger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous obesity studies have coupled murine models with non-invasive methods to quantify body composition in longitudinal experiments, including X-ray computed tomography (CT or quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (QMR. Both microCT and QMR have been separately validated with invasive techniques of adipose tissue quantification, like post-mortem fat extraction and measurement. Here we report a head-to-head study of both protocols using oil phantoms and mouse populations to determine the parameters that best align CT data with that from QMR. First, an in vitro analysis of oil/water mixtures was used to calibrate and assess the overall accuracy of microCT vs. QMR data. Next, experiments were conducted with two cohorts of living mice (either homogenous or heterogeneous by sex, age and genetic backgrounds to assess the microCT imaging technique for adipose tissue segmentation and quantification relative to QMR. Adipose mass values were obtained from microCT data with three different resolutions, after which the data were analyzed with different filter and segmentation settings. Strong linearity was noted between the adipose mass values obtained with microCT and QMR, with optimal parameters and scan conditions reported herein. Lean tissue (muscle, internal organs was also segmented and quantified using the microCT method relative to the analogous QMR values. Overall, the rigorous calibration and validation of the microCT method for murine body composition, relative to QMR, ensures its validity for segmentation, quantification and visualization of both adipose and lean tissues.

  8. Quantitative assessment of fatty infiltration and muscle volume of the rotator cuff muscles using 3-dimensional 2-point Dixon magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Noboru; Oguro, Sota; Okuda, Shigeo; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Nagura, Takeo

    2017-10-01

    In patients with rotator cuff tears, muscle degeneration is known to be a predictor of irreparable tears and poor outcomes after surgical repair. Fatty infiltration and volume of the whole muscles constituting the rotator cuff were quantitatively assessed using 3-dimensional 2-point Dixon magnetic resonance imaging. Ten shoulders with a partial-thickness tear, 10 shoulders with an isolated supraspinatus tear, and 10 shoulders with a massive tear involving supraspinatus and infraspinatus were compared with 10 control shoulders after matching age and sex. With segmentation of muscle boundaries, the fat fraction value and the volume of the whole rotator cuff muscles were computed. After reliabilities were determined, differences in fat fraction, muscle volume, and fat-free muscle volume were evaluated. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliabilities were regarded as excellent for fat fraction and muscle volume. Tendon rupture adversely increased the fat fraction value of the respective rotator cuff muscle (P tear group, muscle volume was significantly decreased in the infraspinatus (P = .035) and increased in the teres minor (P = .039). With subtraction of fat volume, a significant decrease of fat-free volume of the supraspinatus muscle became apparent with a massive tear (P = .003). Three-dimensional measurement could evaluate fatty infiltration and muscular volume with excellent reliabilities. The present study showed that chronic rupture of the tendon adversely increases the fat fraction of the respective muscle and indicates that the residual capacity of the rotator cuff muscles might be overestimated in patients with severe fatty infiltration. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative study of liver magnetic resonance spectroscopy quality at 3T using body and phased array coils with physical analysis and clinical evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xu

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the quality difference of short echo time (TE breathhold 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS of the liver at 3.0T using the body and phased array coils, respectively. In total, 20 pairs of single-voxel proton spectra of the liver were acquired at 3.0T using the phased array and body coils as receivers. Consecutive stacks of breathhold spectra were acquired using the point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS technique at a short TE of 30 ms and a repetition time (TR of 1500 ms. The first spectroscopy sequence was "copied" for the second acquisition to ensure identical voxel positioning. The MRS prescan adjustments of shimming and water suppression, signal-to noise ratio (SNR, and major liver quantitative information were compared between paired spectra. Theoretical calculation of the SNR and homogeneity of the region of interest (ROI, 2 cm×2 cm×2 cm using different coils loaded with 3D liver electromagnetic model of real human body was implemented in the theoretical analysis. The theoretical analysis showed that, inside the ROI, the SNR of the phase array coil was 2.8387 times larger than that of body coil and the homogeneity of the phase array coil and body coil was 80.10% and 93.86%, respectively. The experimental results showed excellent correlations between the paired data (all r > 0.86. Compared with the body coil group, the phased array group had slightly worse shimming effect and better SNR (all P values 0.05. The theoretical analysis and clinical experiment showed that the phased array coil was superior to the body coil with respect to 3.0T breathhold hepatic proton MRS.

  10. magnetic resonance imaging,etc.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张福基

    1998-01-01

    magnetic resonance imaging n.[1984] a noninvasive diagnostic technique that produces computerized images of internal body tissues and is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of atoms within he body induced by the application of radio waves磁共振成像(指一种非侵害 性诊断技术,能生成内部身体组织的计算机化影像,其依据是应用无线电波 感生体内原子并使之产磁共振)

  11. Advances in magnetic resonance 8

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 8 describes the magnetic resonance in spin polarization and saturation transfer. This book discusses the theory of chemically induced dynamic spin polarization; basic results for the radical-pair mechanism; and optical spin polarization in molecular crystals. The theory of optical electronic polarization (OEP); NMR in flowing systems; and applications of NMR in a flowing liquid are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the saturation transfer spectroscopy; studies of spin labels in the intermediate and fast motion regions; and spin-density matrix and

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book introduces the fundamentals and principles of MRI, its capabilities and various techniques of application. Appropriate background for MRI is provided, including basic nuclear magnetic phenomena, modifications required for imaging, the current state of clinical knowledge and a survey of the future potential for in vivo MRI.

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this is the case, you will be given instructions for your child about not eating or drinking several hours prior ... MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety Videos related to Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! ... Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ... ray, CT and ultrasound. top of page How is the procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance imaging ( ... address): From (your name): Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full ... address): From (your name): Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Image Wavelet Enhancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    1Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico−DF, 09340, Mexico email:arog@xanum.uam.mx. Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics...Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico-DF

  19. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance ... allergic reaction than iodinated contrast material. Tell your doctor about any health problems, recent surgeries or allergies ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  6. Quantitative Ultrasound for Staging of Hepatic Steatosis in Patients on Home Parenteral Nutrition Validated with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijers, Gerrit; Wanten, Geert; Thijssen, Johan M; van der Graaf, Marinette; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-03-01

    Patients on home parenteral nutrition are at risk for developing liver dysfunction, which is due partly to the accumulation of lipids in the liver (steatosis) and may progress to end-stage liver disease with overt liver failure. Therefore, a timely diagnosis with easy access to repeated assessment of the degree of liver steatosis is of great importance. A pilot study was performed in 14 patients on long-term home parenteral nutrition using the computer-aided ultrasound method. Ultrasound radio frequency data were acquired using a phased array transducer and were converted into conventional B-mode images. All patients were subjected to proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurement of liver fat content for reference. Computer-aided ultrasound parameters similar to those in a previous validation study in cows revealed significant correlations with fat content measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The most significant parameters were the residual attenuation coefficient (R = 0.95, p ultrasound for staging of hepatic steatosis.

  7. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  8. Volume Tracking: A new method for quantitative assessment and visualization of intracardiac blood flow from three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-component magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arheden Håkan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional and morphological changes of the heart influence blood flow patterns. Therefore, flow patterns may carry diagnostic and prognostic information. Three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-directional phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (4D PC-CMR can image flow patterns with unique detail, and using new flow visualization methods may lead to new insights. The aim of this study is to present and validate a novel visualization method with a quantitative potential for blood flow from 4D PC-CMR, called Volume Tracking, and investigate if Volume Tracking complements particle tracing, the most common visualization method used today. Methods Eight healthy volunteers and one patient with a large apical left ventricular aneurysm underwent 4D PC-CMR flow imaging of the whole heart. Volume Tracking and particle tracing visualizations were compared visually side-by-side in a visualization software package. To validate Volume Tracking, the number of particle traces that agreed with the Volume Tracking visualizations was counted and expressed as a percentage of total released particles in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Two independent observers described blood flow patterns in the left ventricle using Volume Tracking visualizations. Results Volume Tracking was feasible in all eight healthy volunteers and in the patient. Visually, Volume Tracking and particle tracing are complementary methods, showing different aspects of the flow. When validated against particle tracing, on average 90.5% and 87.8% of the particles agreed with the Volume Tracking surface in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Inflow patterns in the left ventricle varied between the subjects, with excellent agreement between observers. The left ventricular inflow pattern in the patient differed from the healthy subjects. Conclusion Volume Tracking is a new visualization method for blood flow measured by 4D PC-CMR. Volume Tracking

  9. Nonlinear magnetization dynamics of antiferromagnetic spin resonance induced by intense terahertz magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Mukai, Y; Yamamoto, T; Kageyama, H; Tanaka, K

    2016-01-01

    We report on the nonlinear magnetization dynamics of a HoFeO3 crystal induced by a strong terahertz magnetic field resonantly enhanced with a split ring resonator and measured with magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. The terahertz magnetic field induces a large change (~40%) in the spontaneous magnetization. The frequency of the antiferromagnetic resonance decreases in proportion to the square of the magnetization change. A modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with a phenomenological nonlinear damping term quantitatively reproduced the nonlinear dynamics.

  10. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrugia, M.E. [Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.e.farrugia@doctors.org.uk; Bydder, G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States); Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D. [OCMR, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders.

  12. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.

    1985-12-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness.

  13. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to char...... a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging....

  14. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  17. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  18. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of hemochromatosis arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eustace, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Buff, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, C. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); MacMathuana, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Gilligan, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Ennis, J.T. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    1994-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of hemochromatosis arthropathy of the knees of ten patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis. Both modalities enabled visualisation of bony degenerative changes; magnetic resonance imaging enabled additional visualization of deformity of both cartilage and menisci. Magnetic resonance imaging failed reliably to confirm the presence of intra-articular iron in the patients studied. No correlation was observed between synovial fluid magnetic resonance signal values, corresponding serum ferritin levels, or the severity of the observed degenerative changes. (orig.)

  20. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of amount of fibroglandular breast tissue with magnetic resonance imaging: comparison to automated quantitative assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengert, G.J.; Helbich, T.H.; Woitek, R.; Kapetas, P.; Clauser, P.; Baltzer, P.A. [Medical University of Vienna/ Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Vogl, W.D. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Computational Imaging Research Lab, Wien (Austria); Weber, M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Pediatric Radiology, Wien (Austria); Meyer-Baese, A. [State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Pinker, Katja [Medical University of Vienna/ Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Services, New York City, NY (United States)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the inter-/intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of the amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to investigate whether FGT assessment benefits from an automated, observer-independent, quantitative MRI measurement by comparing both approaches. Eighty women with no imaging abnormalities (BI-RADS 1 and 2) were included in this institutional review board (IRB)-approved prospective study. All women underwent un-enhanced breast MRI. Four radiologists independently assessed FGT with MRI by subjective visual estimation according to BI-RADS. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT with MRI was performed using a previously described measurement system. Inter-/intra-observer agreements of qualitative and quantitative FGT measurements were assessed using Cohen's kappa (k). Inexperienced readers achieved moderate inter-/intra-observer agreement and experienced readers a substantial inter- and perfect intra-observer agreement for subjective visual estimation of FGT. Practice and experience reduced observer-dependency. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT was successfully performed and revealed only fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.209-0.497) with subjective visual estimations of FGT. Subjective visual estimation of FGT with MRI shows moderate intra-/inter-observer agreement, which can be improved by practice and experience. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurements of FGT are necessary to allow a standardized risk evaluation. (orig.)

  1. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of brain diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging comparison with 1.5 T and 3.0 T units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Eun Hoe [Dept. of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    DWI of biological effects are independent of magnetic field strength in various regions. High field strength, however, does affect the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and artifacts of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) images, which ultimately will influence the quantitative of diffusion imaging . In this study, the effects of field strength on DWI are reviewed. The effects of the diseases also are discussed. Comparing DWI in cerebellum, WM, GM, Hyperacute region measurements both as a function of field strength (1.5 T and 3.0 T). Overall, the SNR of the DWI roughly doubled going from 1.5 T to 3.0 T. In summary, DWI studies at 3.0 T is provided significantly improved DWI measurements relative to studies at 1.5 T.

  2. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Section on Experimental Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D. [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  3. Semi-quantitative Assessment of Brain Maturation by Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neonates with Clinically Mild Hypoxic-ischemic Encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Gao; Qin-Li Sun; Yu-Miao Zhang; Yan-Yan Li; Huan Li; Xin Hou; Bo-Lang Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Mild hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) injury is becoming the major type in neonatal brain diseases.The aim of this study was to assess brain maturation in mild HIE neonatal brains using total maturation score (TMS) based on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Methods:Totally,45 neonates with clinically mild HIE and 45 matched control neonates were enrolled.Gestated age,birth weight,age after birth and postmenstrual age at magnetic resonance (MR) scan were homogenous in the two groups.According to MR findings,mild HIE neonates were divided into three subgroups:Pattern Ⅰ,neonates with normal MR appearance; Pattern Ⅱ,preterm neonates with abnormal MR appearance; Pattern Ⅲ,full-term neonates with abnormal MR appearance.TMS and its parameters,progressive myelination (M),cortical infolding (C),involution of germinal matrix tissue (G),and glial cell migration bands (B),were employed to assess brain maturation and compare difference between HIE and control groups.Results:The mean of TMS was significantly lower in mild HIE group than it in the control group (mean ± standard deviation [SD] 11.62 ± 1.53 vs.12.36 ± 1.26,P < 0.001).In four parameters of TMS scores,the M and C scores were significantly lower in mild HIE group.Of the three patterns of mild HIE,Pattern Ⅰ (10 cases) showed no significant difference of TMS compared with control neonates,while Pattern Ⅱ (22 cases),Ⅲ (13 cases) all had significantly decreased TMS than control neonates (mean ± SD 10.56 ± 0.93 vs.11.48 ± 0.55,P < 0.05; 12.59 ± 1.28 vs.13.25 ± 1.29,P < 0.05).It was M,C,and GM scores that significantly decreased in Pattern Ⅱ,while for Pattern Ⅲ,only C score significantly decreased.Conclusions:The TMS system,based on conventional MRI,is an effective method to detect delayed brain maturation in clinically mild HIE.The conventional MRI can reveal the different retardations in subtle structures and development processes among the different patterns of

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  5. Delayed Methylene Blue Improves Lesion Volume, Multi-Parametric Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurements, and Behavioral Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Justin Alexander; Boggs, Robert Cole; Manga, Hemanth; Huang, Shiliang; Shen, Qiang; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a primary cause of death and disability in both civilian and military populations worldwide. There is a critical need for the development of neuroprotective agents that can circumvent damage and provide functional recovery. We previously showed that methylene blue (MB), a U.S. Food and Drug Administration–grandfathered drug with energy-enhancing and antioxidant properties, given 1 and 3 h post-TBI, had neuroprotective effects in rats. This study aimed to further investigate the neuroprotection of delayed MB treatment (24 h postinjury) post-TBI as measured by lesion volume and functional outcomes. Comparisons were made with vehicle and acute MB treatment. Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral studies were performed at 1 and 3 h and 2, 7, and 14 days after an impact to the primary forelimb somatosensory cortex. We found that delaying MB treatment 24 h postinjury still minimized lesion volume and functional deficits, compared to vehicle-treated animals. The data further support the potential for MB as a neuroprotective treatment, especially when medical teatment is not readily available. MB has an excellent safety profile and is clinically approved for other indications. MB clinical trials on TBI can thus be readily explored. PMID:25961471

  6. Delayed Methylene Blue Improves Lesion Volume, Multi-Parametric Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurements, and Behavioral Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley Watts, Lora; Long, Justin Alexander; Boggs, Robert Cole; Manga, Hemanth; Huang, Shiliang; Shen, Qiang; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a primary cause of death and disability in both civilian and military populations worldwide. There is a critical need for the development of neuroprotective agents that can circumvent damage and provide functional recovery. We previously showed that methylene blue (MB), a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-grandfathered drug with energy-enhancing and antioxidant properties, given 1 and 3 h post-TBI, had neuroprotective effects in rats. This study aimed to further investigate the neuroprotection of delayed MB treatment (24 h postinjury) post-TBI as measured by lesion volume and functional outcomes. Comparisons were made with vehicle and acute MB treatment. Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral studies were performed at 1 and 3 h and 2, 7, and 14 days after an impact to the primary forelimb somatosensory cortex. We found that delaying MB treatment 24 h postinjury still minimized lesion volume and functional deficits, compared to vehicle-treated animals. The data further support the potential for MB as a neuroprotective treatment, especially when medical teatment is not readily available. MB has an excellent safety profile and is clinically approved for other indications. MB clinical trials on TBI can thus be readily explored.

  7. [Quantitative Analysis of Wall Shear Stress for Human Carotid Bifurcation at Cardiac Phases by the Use of Phase Contrast Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Computational Fluid Dynamics Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saho, Tatsunori; Onishi, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    Detailed strategy for regional hemodynamics is significant for knowledge of plaque development on vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to derive relation between atherosclerosis and hemodynamics at human carotid bifurcation by the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and to provide more accurate hemodynamic information. Blood velocity datasets at common carotid artery were obtained by phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (PC cine MRI). Carotid bifurcation model was computed for systolic, mid-diastolic, and end-diastolic phase. Comparison of wall shear stress (WSS) was performed for each cardiac phase. PC cine MRI provided velocity measurement for common carotid artery with various cardiac phases. The blood velocity had acute variation from 0.21 m/s to 1.07 m/s at systolic phase. The variation of WSS during cardiac phase was presented at carotid bifurcation model. High shear stress area was observed at dividing wall for all cardiac phases. The systole-diastole WSS ratio was 10.15 at internal carotid side of bifurcation. And low shear stress (cine MRI was allowed to determine an accurate analysis condition. This led to the representation of hemodynamics in vivo.

  8. An integrated system for dissolution studies and magnetic resonance imaging of controlled release, polymer-based dosage forms-a tool for quantitative assessment of hydrogel formation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinowski, Piotr; Dorozyński, Przemysław; Jachowicz, Renata; Weglarz, Władysław P

    2008-11-04

    Controlled release (CR) dosage forms are often based on polymeric matrices, e.g., sustained-release tablets and capsules. It is crucial to visualise and quantify processes of the hydrogel formation during the standard dissolution study. A method for imaging of CR, polymer-based dosage forms during dissolution study in vitro is presented. Imaging was performed in a non-invasive way by means of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was designed to simulate in vivo conditions regarding temperature, volume, state and composition of dissolution media. Two formulations of hydrodynamically balanced systems (HBS) were chosen as model CR dosage forms. HBS release active substance in stomach while floating on the surface of the gastric content. Time evolutions of the diffusion region, hydrogel formation region and "dry core" region were obtained during a dissolution study of L-dopa as a model drug in two simulated gastric fluids (i.e. in fed and fasted state). This method seems to be a very promising tool for examining properties of new formulations of CR, polymer-based dosage forms or for comparison of generic and originator dosage forms before carrying out bioequivalence studies.

  9. Pace of macrophage recruitment during different stages of soft tissue infection: Semi-quantitative evaluation by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Seong; Sohn, Jin Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Laboratory for Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Jung, Hyun-Don; Kim, Sang-Tae [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Kyoung Geun [Korea University College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Division of Biotechnology, Seoul (Korea); Kang, Hee Jung [Hallym University College of Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Anyang (Korea)

    2008-10-15

    We describe the pace of recruitment of iron-oxide-labeled macrophages to the site of different stages of infection by in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Peritoneal macrophages were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide ex vivo and administered through the tail vein 6 (acute) or 48 (subacute) h after bacterial inoculation. The legs of the mice were imaged sequentially on a 4.7-T MR unit before and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48 and 72 h after macrophage administration. The band-shaped lower signal intensity zone around the abscess on T2*-weighted GRE images became more obvious due to recruited macrophages up until 24 h after injection in the subacute and 48 h after injection in the acute group, indicating that the relative SI of the abscess wall decreased more rapidly and the pace of recruitment of macrophages was faster in the subacute than in the acute group. Chemokine antibody arrays of mouse sera detected increased concentration of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 beginning at 12 h and increased interleukin-13 at 18 h. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor began to increase at 96 h after infection. This difference in pace of recruitment may result from the release of chemokines. (orig.)

  10. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  11. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  12. Enhancement of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Metasurfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slobozhanyuk, Alexey P; Poddubny, Alexander N; Raaijmakers, AJE; van den Berg, CAT; Kozachenko, Alexander V; Dubrovina, Irina A; Melchakova, Irina V; Kivshar, Yuri S; Belov, Pavel A

    2016-01-01

    It is revealed that the unique properties of ultrathin metasurface resonators can improve magnetic resonance imaging dramatically. A metasurface formed when an array of metallic wires is placed inside a scanner under the studied object and a substantial enhancement of the radio-frequency magnetic

  13. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  16. Magnetic resonance methods in fetal neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailath-Pokorny, M; Kasprian, G; Mitter, C; Schöpf, V; Nemec, U; Prayer, D

    2012-10-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an established clinical adjunct for the in-vivo evaluation of human brain development. Normal fetal brain maturation can be studied with MRI from the 18th week of gestation to term and relies primarily on T2-weighted sequences. Recently diffusion-weighted sequences have gained importance in the structural assessment of the fetal brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides quantitative information about water motion and tissue microstructure and has applications for both developmental and destructive brain processes. Advanced magnetic resonance techniques, such as spectroscopy, might be used to demonstrate metabolites that are involved in brain maturation, though their development is still in the early stages. Using fetal MRI in addition to prenatal ultrasound, morphological, metabolic, and functional assessment of the fetus can be achieved. The latter is not only based on observation of fetal movements as an indirect sign of activity of the fetal brain but also on direct visualization of fetal brain activity, adding a new component to fetal neurology. This article provides an overview of the MRI methods used for fetal neurologic evaluation, focusing on normal and abnormal early brain development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water motion in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2001-01-01

    This Thesis treats one of the new techniques in plant science i.e. nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRi) applied to water motion in plants. It is a challenge, however, to measure this motion in intact plants quantitatively, because plants impose specific problems when studied using

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water motion in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2001-01-01

    This Thesis treats one of the new techniques in plant science i.e. nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRi) applied to water motion in plants. It is a challenge, however, to measure this motion in intact plants quantitatively, because plants impose specific problems when studied using NMRi. At high

  19. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled.

  20. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of amount of fibroglandular breast tissue with magnetic resonance imaging: comparison to automated quantitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengert, G J; Helbich, T H; Woitek, R; Kapetas, P; Clauser, P; Baltzer, P A; Vogl, W-D; Weber, M; Meyer-Baese, A; Pinker, Katja

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the inter-/intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of the amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to investigate whether FGT assessment benefits from an automated, observer-independent, quantitative MRI measurement by comparing both approaches. Eighty women with no imaging abnormalities (BI-RADS 1 and 2) were included in this institutional review board (IRB)-approved prospective study. All women underwent un-enhanced breast MRI. Four radiologists independently assessed FGT with MRI by subjective visual estimation according to BI-RADS. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT with MRI was performed using a previously described measurement system. Inter-/intra-observer agreements of qualitative and quantitative FGT measurements were assessed using Cohen's kappa (k). Inexperienced readers achieved moderate inter-/intra-observer agreement and experienced readers a substantial inter- and perfect intra-observer agreement for subjective visual estimation of FGT. Practice and experience reduced observer-dependency. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT was successfully performed and revealed only fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.209-0.497) with subjective visual estimations of FGT. Subjective visual estimation of FGT with MRI shows moderate intra-/inter-observer agreement, which can be improved by practice and experience. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurements of FGT are necessary to allow a standardized risk evaluation. • Subjective FGT estimation with MRI shows moderate intra-/inter-observer agreement in inexperienced readers. • Inter-observer agreement can be improved by practice and experience. • Automated observer-independent quantitative measurements can provide reliable and standardized assessment of FGT with MRI.

  1. Bone marrow edema pattern in advanced hip osteoarthritis: quantitative assessment with magnetic resonance imaging and correlation with clinical examination, radiographic findings, and histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Schwartz, Stephanie A. [The University of Arizona HSC, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Graham, Anna R. [The University of Arizona HSC, Department of Pathology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Benjamin, James B. [University Orthopaedic Specialists, Tucson, AZ (United States); Gmitro, Arthur F.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Hunter, Tim B. [The University of Arizona, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Resnick, Donald L. [University of California, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-05-15

    To correlate the amount of bone marrow edema (BME) calculated by magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) with clinical findings, histopathology, and radiographic findings, in patients with advanced hip osteoarthritis(OA). The study was approved by The Institutional Human Subject Protection Committee. Coronal MRI of hips was acquired in 19 patients who underwent hip replacement. A spin echo (SE) sequence with four echoes and separate fast spin echo (FSE) proton density (PD)-weighted SE sequences of fat (F) and water (W) were acquired with water and fat suppression, respectively. T2 and water:fat ratio calculations were made for the outlined regions of interest. The calculated MRI values were correlated with the clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic findings. Analyses of variance were done on the MRI data for W/(W + F) and for T2 values (total and focal values) for the symptomatic and contralateral hips. The values were significantly higher in the study group. Statistically significant correlations were found between pain and total W/(W + F), pain and focal T2 values, and the number of microfractures and calculated BME for the focal W/(W + F) in the proximal femora. Statistically significant correlations were found between the radiographic findings and MRI values for total W/(W + F), focal W/(W + F) and focal T2 and among the radiographic findings, pain, and hip movement. On histopathology, only a small amount of BME was seen in eight proximal femora. The amount of BME in the OA hip, as measured by MRI, correlates with the severity of pain, radiographic findings, and number of microfractures. (orig.)

  2. Quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pregnant women: cross-sectional analysis of physiological parameters throughout pregnancy and the impact of the supine position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moelker Adriaan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are physiological reasons for the effects of positioning on hemodynamic variables and cardiac dimensions related to altered intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic pressures. This problem is especially evident in pregnant women due to the additional aorto-caval compression by the enlarged uterus. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of postural changes on cardiac dimensions and function during mid and late pregnancy using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Methods Healthy non-pregnant women, pregnant women at 20th week of gestation and at 32nd week of gestation without history of cardiac disease were recruited to the study and underwent CMR in supine and left lateral positions. Cardiac hemodynamic parameters and dimensions were measured and compared between both positions. Results Five non-pregnant women, 6 healthy pregnant women at mid pregnancy and 8 healthy pregnant women at late pregnancy were enrolled in the study. In the group of non-pregnant women left ventricular (LV cardiac output (CO significantly decreased by 9% (p = 0.043 and right ventricular (RV end-diastolic volume (EDV significantly increased by 5% (p = 0.043 from the supine to the left lateral position. During mid pregnancy LV ejection fraction (EF, stroke volume (SV, left atrium lateral diameter and left atrial supero-inferior diameter increased significantly from the supine position to the left lateral position: 8%, 27%, 5% and 11%, respectively (p Conclusions During pregnancy positional changes affect significantly cardiac hemodynamic parameters and dimensions. Pregnant women who need serial studies by CMR should be imaged in a consistent position. From as early as 20 weeks the left lateral position should be preferred on the supine position because it positively affects venous return, SV and CO.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Tomography of tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M. (Montreal Neurological Inst., Quebec (Canada))

    1983-10-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography.

  4. Use of magnetic resonance urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, L T; Frager, D; Subramanium, A; Lowe, F C

    1998-10-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is a new technique that uses heavily weighted T2 coronal images with fat suppression pulse. Urine appears white on MRU, resembling an intravenous urogram (IVU). Contrast agents are not necessary. This study describes the use of MRU in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with hematuria. One hundred six patients with microscopic or gross hematuria and 6 normal volunteers underwent MRU between 1992 and 1995. A modified, heavily weighted T2 technique with intravenous administration of furosemide and ureteral compression was used. Thirty-two patients had other imaging techniques as well for comparison. MRU provided high-resolution images in almost all cases; 73 (69%) had a normal MRU. Significant findings in the 33 patients with abnormalities included renal cysts in 17 (51%), renal cell carcinoma in 6 (18%), transitional cell carcinoma in 5 (15%), ureteropelvic junction obstruction in 3 (9%), and stones causing obstruction in 6 (18%). Five patients with renal failure also had good visualization of the entire urinary tract. MRU was comparable to other imaging modalities except in identifying nonobstructing calculi. MRU provides an alternative to conventional imaging of the urinary tract, especially in those patients who have contraindications to ionizing radiation and contrast agents. Improvements in resolution, technique, and cost have to be addressed before it can be used regularly in urologic practice.

  5. Magnetic resonance images of hematospermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Norio; Miki, Kenta; Kato, Nobuki; Furuta, Nozomu; Ohishi, Yukihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Kondo, Naoya; Tashiro, Kazuya

    1998-12-01

    We performed MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in the pelvic region of 70 cases with hematospermia and conducted a study on the abnormal MRI findings to which hematospermia could be attributed. We conducted a study on the morphological anomaly and change in the signal intensity in the prostate gland and of the seminal vesicle as well as on the presence or absence of dilation in the plexus venous surrounding the deferent duct or the prostate gland out of the abnormal MRI findings. As for the seminal vesicle, the patients whose seminal vesicle was seen in higher intensity than the prostate gland in T1 weighted images were diagnosed as having hemorrhagic focus and the patients whose seminal vesicle was seen in low intensity both in T1 and T2 weighted images were diagnosed as having fibrosis caused by chronic inflammation. Abnormal MRI findings were seen in 40 out of the 70 cases (57%). Anomaly in the prostate gland was indicated in 6 (9%) cases. Abnormality in the seminal vesicle was indicated in 30 cases (43%) including hemorrhage of seminal vesicle in 25 cases, chronic inflammation in five cases and cyst of seminal vesicle in one case. In conducting an examination of the patients with hematospermia, MRI is the nonivasive and reproducible method and it is possible to identify the hemorrhagic region. Therefore, MRI is thought to be useful to identify the causal organs of hematospermia. (author)

  6. Aortic dissection: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amparo, E G; Higgins, C B; Hricak, H; Sollitto, R

    1985-05-01

    Fifteen patients with suspected or known aortic dissection were imaged with magnetic resonance (MR). Thirteen of these patients were eventually shown to have dissection. In most instances the diagnosis was established by aortography and/or computed tomography (CT) prior to the MR study. Surgical proof (6/13) and/or aortographic proof (10/13) were available in 11/13 patients with aortic dissection. MR demonstrated the intimal flap and determined whether the dissection was type A or type B. In addition, MR: differentiated between the true and false lumens; determined the origins of the celiac, superior mesenteric, and renal arteries from the true or false lumen in the cases where the dissection extended into the abdominal aorta (8/12); allowed post-surgical surveillance of the dissection; and identified aortoannular ectasia in the three patients who had Marfan syndrome. In addition to the 13 cases with dissection, there were two cases in whom the diagnosis of dissection was excluded by MR. Our early experience suggests that MR can serve as the initial imaging test in clinically suspected cases of aortic dissection and that the information provided by MR is sufficient to manage many cases. Additionally, MR obviates the use of iodinated contrast media.

  7. Magnetic resonance in Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotti, G.; Scialfa, G.; Biondi, A.; Landoni, L.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-07-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres.

  8. Bone geometry in response to long-term tennis playing and its relationship with muscle volume: a quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study in tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducher, G; Courteix, D; Même, S; Magni, C; Viala, J F; Benhamou, C L

    2005-10-01

    The benefit of impact-loading activity for bone strength depends on whether the additional bone mineral content (BMC) accrued at loaded sites is due to an increased bone size, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) or both. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the aim of this study was to characterize the geometric changes of the dominant radius in response to long-term tennis playing and to assess the influence of muscle forces on bone tissue by investigating the muscle-bone relationship. Twenty tennis players (10 men and 10 women, mean age: 23.1+/-4.7 years, with 14.3+/-3.4 years of playing) were recruited. The total bone volume, cortical volume, sub-cortical volume and muscle volume were measured at both distal radii by MRI. BMC was assessed by DXA and was divided by the total bone volume to derive vBMD. Grip strength was evaluated with a dynamometer. Significant side-to-side differences (P<0.0001) were found in muscle volume (+9.7%), grip strength (+13.3%), BMC (+13.5%), total bone volume (+10.3%) and sub-cortical volume (+20.6%), but not in cortical volume (+2.6%, ns). The asymmetry in total bone volume explained 75% of the variance in BMC asymmetry (P<0.0001). vBMD was slightly higher on the dominant side (+3.3%, P<0.05). Grip strength and muscle volume correlated with all bone variables (except vBMD) on both sides (r=0.48-0.86, P<0.05-0.0001) but the asymmetries in muscle parameters did not correlate with those in bone parameters. After adjustment for muscle volume or grip strength, BMC was still greater on the dominant side. This study showed that the greater BMC induced by long-term tennis playing at the dominant radius was associated to a marked increase in bone size and a slight improvement in volumetric BMD, thereby improving bone strength. In addition to the muscle contractions, other mechanical stimuli seemed to exert a direct effect on bone tissue, contributing to the specific bone response to tennis

  9. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  10. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eckardt

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a “large-scale” state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule.

  11. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  12. Renal relevant radiology: renal functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Behzad; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Lilach O

    2014-02-01

    Because of its noninvasive nature and provision of quantitative measures of a wide variety of physiologic parameters, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows great potential for research and clinical applications. Over the past decade, application of functional MRI extended beyond detection of cerebral activity, and techniques for abdominal functional MRI evolved. Assessment of renal perfusion, glomerular filtration, interstitial diffusion, and parenchymal oxygenation turned this modality into an essential research and potentially diagnostic tool. Variations in many renal physiologic markers can be detected using functional MRI before morphologic changes become evident in anatomic magnetic resonance images. Moreover, the framework of functional MRI opened a window of opportunity to develop novel pathophysiologic markers. This article reviews applications of some well validated functional MRI techniques, including perfusion, diffusion-weighted imaging, and blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, as well as some emerging new techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography, which might evolve into clinically useful tools.

  13. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... I-131 Therapy Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  14. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  15. single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-03

    Mar 3, 2011 ... magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- ..... this study, it is important to note that there were distinct differences in the .... Applications of MRS in the. 13. evaluation ...

  16. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  17. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  18. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Markovich, Dmitry; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    All-dielectric "magnetic light" nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here a new approach for increasing magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer nanoantenna. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of magnetic polarizability, tailoring the later in the dynamical range of 100 % and enhancement up to 36 % relative to performances of standalone spherical particles....

  19. Torque-mixing Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losby, Joseph; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Grandmont, Dylan; Diao, Zhu; Belov, Miro; Burgess, Jacob; Compton, Shawn; Hiebert, Wayne; Vick, Doug; Mohammad, Kaveh; Salimi, Elham; Bridges, Gregory; Thomson, Douglas; Freeman, Mark

    A universal, mechanical torque method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy is presented. In analogy to resonance detection by induction, a signal proportional to the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment can be measured as a pure mechanical torque in broadband, frequency-swept spectroscopy. Comprehensive electron spin resonance of a single-crystal, mesoscopic yttrium iron garnet disk at room temperature are presented to demonstrate the method. The rich detail allows analysis of even complex 3D spin textures.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  8. Quantitation of blood-brain barrier defect by magnetic resonance imaging and gadolinium-DTPA in patients with multiple sclerosis and brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Stubgaard, M; Frederiksen, J L;

    1990-01-01

    In this study quantitation of the degree of deficiency of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in patients with multiple sclerosis or brain tumors, by using MRI, is shown to be possible. As a measure of permeability of the BBB to Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) the flux per unit of distribution volume per unit......, and the results were comparable to results obtained from similar studies using positron emission tomography. The improved possibility of quantitating the defect of the BBB by MRI may give new information about pathogenesis or etiology, and leads to improved methods in monitoring the efficacy of treatments...

  9. Simulation of Magnetic Resonance for Wireless Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available André Kurs et al. et al. (2007 in Science 317, 83 titled Wireless Power Transfer via Strongly Coupled Magnetic Resonances, proposed a feasible scheme to near-field transfer electric energy. Here in this report we take note of our simulation on COMSOL 4.1.085 to repeat his counterpart in Chapter 4 of his master thesis. Due to huge requirement on memory size, my simulation fails to align with Kurs', but basic steps and setup instructions are given. Very importantly, every scholar with electromagnetic background would simply take this as magnetic inducing current in closed loops, exactly as we did. Yet, this imparts more essence on resonance. A look into coupled-mode theory will find this takes advantage of near-field magnetic field to transfer energy. A transformer, a true product of magnetic induction, if simply detached by a distance would greatly reduce its transfer efficiency, whereas magnetic resonance DOES NOT! So this is more than only magnetic induction. Although coupled-mode theory is still not physical enough to illustrate readers, neither does magnetic induction in Maxwell's equations give its simple picture! Coupled-mode theory perhaps is a simple way out quantitatively and mathematically.

  10. Evaluating the systemic right ventricle by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: short axis or axial slices?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bom, T. van der; Romeih, S.; Groenink, M.; Pieper, P.G.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Helbing, W.A.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Mulder, B.J.; Bouma, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate differences in functional parameters and reproducibility between short axis and axial slice orientation in the quantitative evaluation of the systemic right ventricle by cardiovascular magnetic resonance. DESIGN: Cross-sectional evaluation comparing two methods (Bland-Altman).

  11. Comparing localized and nonlocalized dynamic (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in exercising muscle at 7T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerspeer, M.; Robinson, S.; Nabuurs, C.I.H.C.; Scheenen, T.W.; Schoisengeier, A.; Unger, E.; Kemp, G.J.; Moser, E.

    2012-01-01

    By improving spatial and anatomical specificity, localized spectroscopy can enhance the power and accuracy of the quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. Localized and nonlocalized dynamic (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a surface coil was compared during aerobic

  12. Comparing localized and nonlocalized dynamic (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in exercising muscle at 7T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerspeer, M.; Robinson, S.; Nabuurs, C.I.H.C.; Scheenen, T.W.; Schoisengeier, A.; Unger, E.; Kemp, G.J.; Moser, E.

    2012-01-01

    By improving spatial and anatomical specificity, localized spectroscopy can enhance the power and accuracy of the quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. Localized and nonlocalized dynamic (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a surface coil was compared during aerobic

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  14. Quantitative measurement of hepatic fibrosis with gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection: A comparative study on aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index and fibrosis-4 index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Guy Mok; Kim, Youe Ree; Cho, Eun Young; Lee, Young Hwan; Yoon, Kwon Ha [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jong Hyun; Kim, Tae Hoon [Imaging Science Research Center, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To quantitatively measure hepatic fibrosis on gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients and identify the correlations with aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) and fibrosis-4 index (FIB-4) values. This study on gadoxetic acid-enhanced 3T MR imaging included 81 patients with CHB infection. To quantitatively measure hepatic fibrosis, MR images were analyzed with an aim to identify inhomogeneous signal intensities calculated from a coefficient of variation (CV) map in the liver parenchyma. We also carried out a comparative analysis between APRI and FIB-4 based on metaregression results. The diagnostic performance of the CV map was evaluated using a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. In the MR images, the mean CV values in control, groups I, II, and III based on APRI were 4.08 ± 0.92, 4.24 ± 0.80, 5.64 ± 1.11, and 5.73 ± 1.28, respectively (p < 0.001). In CHB patients grouped by FIB-4, the mean CV values of groups A, B, and C were 4.22 ± 0.95, 5.40 ± 1.19, and 5.71 ± 1.17, respectively (p < 0.001). The mean CV values correlated well with APRI (r = 0.392, p < 0.001) and FIB-4 (r = 0.294, p < 0.001). In significant fibrosis group, ROC curve analysis yielded an area under the curve of 0.875 using APRI and 0.831 using FIB-4 in HB, respectively. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging for calculating a CV map showed moderate correlation with APRI and FIB-4 values and could be employed to quantitatively measure hepatic fibrosis in patients with CHB.

  15. Quantitation of blood-brain barrier defect by magnetic resonance imaging and gadolinium-DTPA in patients with multiple sclerosis and brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Stubgaard, M; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini;

    1990-01-01

    In this study quantitation of the degree of deficiency of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in patients with multiple sclerosis or brain tumors, by using MRI, is shown to be possible. As a measure of permeability of the BBB to Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) the flux per unit of distribution volume per unit...

  16. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rossum Albert C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR examinations.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of iliotibial band syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, E F; Pope, T; Martin, D F; Curl, W W

    1994-01-01

    Seven cases of iliotibial band syndrome and the pathoanatomic findings of each, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, are presented. These findings were compared with magnetic resonance imaging scans of 10 age- and sex-matched control knees without evidence of lateral knee pain. Magnetic resonance imaging signal consistent with fluid was seen deep to the iliotibial band in the region of the lateral femoral epicondyle in five of the seven cases. Additionally, when compared with the control group, patients with iliotibial band syndrome demonstrated a significantly thicker iliotibial band over the lateral femoral epicondyle (P iliotibial band in the disease group was 5.49 +/- 2.12 mm, as opposed to 2.52 +/- 1.56 mm in the control group. Cadaveric dissections were performed on 10 normal knees to further elucidate the exact nature of the area under the iliotibial band. A potential space, i.e., a bursa, was found between the iliotibial band and the knee capsule. This series suggests that magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates objective evidence of iliotibial band syndrome and can be helpful when a definitive diagnosis is essential. Furthermore, correlated with anatomic dissection, magnetic resonance imaging identifies this as a problem within a bursa beneath the iliotibial band and not a problem within the knee joint.

  18. Embroidered Coils for Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Newton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging is a widely used technique for medical and materials imaging. Even though the objects being imaged are often irregularly shaped, suitable coils permitting the measurement of the radio-frequency signal in these systems are usually made of solid copper. One problem often encountered is how to ensure the coils are both in close proximity and conformal to the object being imaged. Whilst embroidered conductive threads have previously been used as antennae in mobile telecommunications applications, they have not previously been reported for use within magnetic resonance. In this paper we show that an embroidered single loop coil can be used in a commercial unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance system as an alternative to a solid copper. Data is presented showing the determination of both longitudinal (T1 and effective transverse (T2eff relaxation times for a flat fabric coil and the same coil conformed to an 8 cm diameter cylinder. We thereby demonstrate the principles required for the wider use of fabric based conformal coils within nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging.

  19. Magnetic Field Gradient Waveform Monitoring for Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui

    Linear magnetic field gradients have played a central role in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) since Fourier Transform MRI was proposed three decades ago. Their primary function is to encode spatial information into MR signals. Magnetic field gradients are also used to sensitize the image contrast to coherent and/or incoherent motion, to selectively enhance an MR signal, and to minimize image artifacts. Modern MR imaging techniques increasingly rely on the implementation of complex gradient waveforms for the manipulation of spin dynamics. However, gradient system infidelities caused by eddy currents, gradient amplifier imperfections and group delays, often result in image artifacts and other errors (e.g., phase and intensity errors). This remains a critical problem for a wide range of MRI techniques on modern commercial systems, but is of particular concern for advanced MRI pulse sequences. Measuring the real magnetic field gradients, i.e., characterizing eddy currents, is critical to addressing and remedying this problem. Gradient measurement and eddy current calibration are therefore a general topic of importance to the science of MRI. The Magnetic Field Gradient Monitor (MFGM) idea was proposed and developed specifically to meet these challenges. The MFGM method is the heart of this thesis. MFGM methods permit a variety of magnetic field gradient problems to be investigated and systematically remedied. Eddy current effects associated with MR compatible metallic pressure vessels were analyzed, simulated, measured and corrected. The appropriate correction of eddy currents may enable most MR/MRI applications with metallic pressure vessels. Quantitative imaging (1D/2D) with model pressure vessels was successfully achieved by combining image reconstruction with MFGM determined gradient waveform behaviour. Other categories of MR applications with metallic vessels, including diffusion measurement and spin echo SPI T2 mapping, cannot be realized solely by MFGM guided

  20. Magnetic resonance of magnetic fluid and magnetoliposome preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Paulo C. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil)]. E-mail: pcmor@unb.br; Santos, Judes G. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Skeff Neto, K. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Pelegrini, Fernando [Universidade Federal de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil); Cuyper, Marcel de [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Interdisciplinary Research Centre, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2005-05-15

    In this study, magnetic resonance was used to investigate lauric acid-coated magnetite-based magnetic fluid particles and particles which are surrounded by a double layer of phospholipid molecules (magnetoliposomes). The data reveal the presence of monomers and dimers in both samples. Whereas evidence for a thermally induced disruption of dimers is found in the magnetic fluid, apparently, the bilayer phospholipid envelop prevents the dissociation in the magnetoliposome samples.

  1. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams; however, ...

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    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic ... the radiologist if your child has any serious health problems or has recently had surgery. Some conditions, ...

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  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or potentially pose a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many ... of the body being studied. If a contrast material will be used in the MRI exam, a ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or potentially pose a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many ... is positioned around the head. If a contrast material will be used in the MRI exam, a ...

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    Full Text Available ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

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  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... the exam if your child has a known allergy to contrast material. Your child should wear loose, ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... evaluate infections assess blood flow to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is ... routine and have him/her take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require your ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, ... to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI is ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if your child has asthma. The contrast ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

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  13. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridjonsson, E. O.; Creber, S. A.; Vrouwenvelder, J. S.; Johns, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  14. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  16. Magnetic Microparticle Aggregation For Viscosity Determination By Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Rui; Cima, Michael J.; Weissleder, Ralph; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Micron-sized magnetic particles were induced to aggregate when placed in homogeneous magnetic fields, like those of magnetic resonance (MR) imagers and relaxometers, and then spontaneously returned to their dispersed state when removed from the field. Associated with the aggregation and dispersion of the magnetic particles were time dependent increases and decreases in the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of the water. Magnetic nanoparticles, with far smaller magnetic moments per particle, did not undergo magnetically induced aggregation, and exhibited time independent values of T2. The rate of T2 change associated with magnetic micro-particle aggregation was used to determine the viscosity of liquid samples, providing a method that can be of particular advantage for determining the viscosity of small volumes of potentially biohazardous samples of blood or blood plasma. PMID:18306403

  17. An open source image processing method to quantitatively assess tissue growth after non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging in human bone marrow stromal cell seeded 3D polymeric scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leferink, Anne M; Fratila, Raluca M; Koenrades, Maaike A; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Velders, Aldrik; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring extracellular matrix (ECM) components is one of the key methods used to determine tissue quality in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds for regenerative medicine and clinical purposes. This is even more important when multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) are used, as it could offer a method to understand in real time the dynamics of stromal cell differentiation and eventually steer it into the desired lineage. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a promising tool to overcome the challenge of a limited transparency in opaque 3D scaffolds. Technical limitations of MRI involve non-uniform background intensity leading to fluctuating background signals and therewith complicating quantifications on the retrieved images. We present a post-imaging processing sequence that is able to correct for this non-uniform background intensity. To test the processing sequence we investigated the use of MRI for in vitro monitoring of tissue growth in three-dimensional poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) scaffolds. Results showed that MRI, without the need to use contrast agents, is a promising non-invasive tool to quantitatively monitor ECM production and cell distribution during in vitro culture in 3D porous tissue engineered constructs.

  18. An open source image processing method to quantitatively assess tissue growth after non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging in human bone marrow stromal cell seeded 3D polymeric scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Leferink

    Full Text Available Monitoring extracellular matrix (ECM components is one of the key methods used to determine tissue quality in three-dimensional (3D scaffolds for regenerative medicine and clinical purposes. This is even more important when multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs are used, as it could offer a method to understand in real time the dynamics of stromal cell differentiation and eventually steer it into the desired lineage. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is a promising tool to overcome the challenge of a limited transparency in opaque 3D scaffolds. Technical limitations of MRI involve non-uniform background intensity leading to fluctuating background signals and therewith complicating quantifications on the retrieved images. We present a post-imaging processing sequence that is able to correct for this non-uniform background intensity. To test the processing sequence we investigated the use of MRI for in vitro monitoring of tissue growth in three-dimensional poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate-poly(butylene terephthalate (PEOT/PBT scaffolds. Results showed that MRI, without the need to use contrast agents, is a promising non-invasive tool to quantitatively monitor ECM production and cell distribution during in vitro culture in 3D porous tissue engineered constructs.

  19. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of cartilage repair after microfracture (MF) treatment for adult unstable osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in the ankle: correlations with clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Hongyue; Lu, Rong; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Shuang [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shang, Xiliang; Li, Hong; Hua, Yinghui [Fudan University, Department of Sports Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2014-08-15

    To quantitatively evaluate cartilage repair after microfracture (MF) for ankle osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) using MRI and analyse correlations between MRI and clinical outcome. Forty-eight patients were recruited and underwent MR imaging, including 3D-DESS, T2-mapping and T2-STIR sequences, and completed American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scoring. Thickness index, T2 index of repair tissue (RT) and volume of subchondral bone marrow oedema (BME) were calculated. Subjects were divided into two groups: group A (3-12 months post-op), and group B (12-24 months post-op). Student's t test was used to compare the MRI and AOFAS score between two groups and Pearson's correlation coefficient to analyse correlations between them. Thickness index and AOFAS score of group B were higher than group A (P < 0.001, P < 0.001). T2 index and BME of group B were lower than group A (P < 0.001, P = 0.012). Thickness index, T2 index and BME were all correlated with AOFAS score (r = 0.416, r = -0.475, r = -0.353), but BME was correlated with neither thickness index nor T2 index. Significant improvement from MF can be expected on the basis of the outcomes of quantitative MRI and AOFAS score. MRI was correlated with AOFAS score. BME is insufficient as an independent predictor to evaluate repair quality, but reduction of BME can improve the patient's clinical outcome. (orig.)

  20. Effect of energy and momentum conservation on fluid resonances for resonant magnetic perturbations in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Peter; Heyn, Martin F.; Kernbichler, Winfried [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, TU Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Ivanov, Ivan B. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, TU Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); St. Petersburg State University, Institute of Physics, Ulyanovskaya 1, Petrodvoretz 198504 (Russian Federation); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina, Leningrad Oblast (Russian Federation); Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, TU Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology,” Ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, the impact of momentum and energy conservation of the collision operator in the kinetic description for Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in a tokamak is studied. The particle conserving differential collision operator of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type is supplemented with integral parts such that energy and momentum are conserved. The application to RMP penetration in a tokamak shows that energy conservation in the electron collision operator is important for the quantitative description of plasma shielding effects at the resonant surface. On the other hand, momentum conservation in the ion collision operator does not significantly change the results.

  1. Comparison of Quantitative Assessment of BLADE and Isotropic Three-Dimensional Fast Spin Echo Cube (3D T2 SPACE Sequences with Conventional Protocols of wrist Joint at 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghibi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the wrist joint is a useful method in the diagnosis of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC, ligaments and tendons, peripheral nerves, cartilage and carpal tunnel syndrome. However, the evaluation of these small anatomical structures is a topic of investigation. In some instances, the diagnostic indices of MRI in tears and other lesions of cartilage and ligamentous structures are relatively low, so the protocols should be optimized. Objectives In this study, we aim to compare new MRI protocols of 3D T2SPACE, PD BLADE and T2 BLADE with the conventional protocols, including T2 FSE, PD FSE, and T1 FSE in case of signal intensity. Patients and Methods Twenty patients with a history of wrist trauma or suspected wrist lesions were referred by orthopedic hand surgeons and enrolled into the study. All the protocols were carried out on all patients and the images were assessed quantitatively by measurement of signal to noise ratio (SNR and contrast to noise ratio (CNR. Then, these parameters were compared between different protocols. SPSS ver.18 was used for the statistical analyses. Results SNR of the cartilage, TFCC on 3D T2SPACE and T1 FSE was better than other sequences (P < 0.001. SNR of the bone on PD BLADE was significantly higher (P < 0.001 than that of conventional protocols. PD BLADE images showed significantly higher bone- cartilage CNR and bone- TFCC CNR (P < 0.001 to P < 0.001. CNR of cartilage-TFCC on T1 FSE was better than other sequences, but no significant statistical differences were seen. Conclusion High-resolution MR images of the wrist using 3D T2SPACE, PD BLADE and T2 BLADE were superior to those using conventional sequences quantitatively. High-SNR and CNR MR imaging with SPACE and BLADE would be a promising method to diagnose wrist lesions.

  2. Correlation of structural abnormalities of the wrist and metacarpophalangeal joints evaluated by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging and conventional radiographs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan Hee; Srikhum, Waraporn; Burghardt, Andrew J; Virayavanich, Warapat; Imboden, John B; Link, Thomas M; Li, Xiaojuan

    2015-07-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) hands, we applied high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) and 3 Tesla (3 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which are new methods for erosion detection and bone marrow edema (BME) quantification. We compared the erosion measurements between these techniques with conventional radiographs (CR) in order to examine their significance for evaluating structural abnormalities. In 16 RA patients, HR-pQCT of metacarpophalangeal and wrist joints, 3 T MRI of wrist joints, as well as CR in both hands and feet were performed. Ten patients had 1-year follow-up CR. CRs were graded according to the modified Sharp score (MSS). Bone erosions were evaluated in HR-pQCT and MRI. BME pattern was quantified from MRI for volume, signal change and total burden. The erosion detection sensitivity of MRI was 85.7% and CR was 60.9% when HR-pQCT was considered as a reference method. The smallest dimensions of erosion detected by HR-pQCT, MRI and CR were 0.09, 0.14 and 0.66 cm, respectively. Baseline total MSS was correlated with HR-pQCT erosion measures, MRI erosion measures and MRI BME volume (P < 0.05). The mean difference between baseline and 1-year follow-up MSS (delta MSS) was 1.2. A trend was observed toward a correlation between delta MSS and MRI BME volume and burden. This study demonstrates that HR-pQCT detects more and smaller bone erosions compared to MRI and CR. In addition, 3 T MRI can provide quantitative measurement of BME. Combination of HR-pQCT and MRI modalities may provide powerful tools to evaluate joint inflammation and bone damage in RA. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Ledbetter, Micah; Theis, Thomas; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectr...

  4. Extraction of chili, black pepper, and ginger with near-critical CO2, propane, and dimethyl ether: analysis of the extracts by quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchpole, Owen J; Grey, John B; Perry, Nigel B; Burgess, Elaine J; Redmond, Wayne A; Porter, Noel G

    2003-08-13

    Ginger, black pepper, and chili powder were extracted using near-critical carbon dioxide, propane, and dimethyl ether on a laboratory scale to determine the overall yield and extraction efficiency for selected pungent components. The temperature dependency of extraction yield and efficiency was also determined for black pepper and chili using propane and dimethyl ether. The pungency of the extracts was determined by using an NMR technique developed for this work. The volatiles contents of ginger and black pepper extracts were also determined. Extraction of all spice types was carried out with acetone to compare overall yields. Subcritical dimethyl ether was as effective at extracting the pungent principles from the spices as supercritical carbon dioxide, although a substantial amount of water was also extracted. Subcritical propane was the least effective solvent. All solvents quantitatively extracted the gingerols from ginger. The yields of capsaicins obtained by supercritical CO(2) and dimethyl ether were similar and approximately double that extracted by propane. The yield of piperines obtained by propane extraction of black pepper was low at approximately 10% of that achieved with dimethyl ether and CO(2), but improved with increasing extraction temperature.

  5. Quantitative assessment of synovial inflammation by dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. A study of the effect of intra-articular methylprednisolone on the rate of early synovial enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Henriksen, O;

    1996-01-01

    The effect of temporary inflammatory suppression on synovial membrane enhancement, as determined by dynamic and static gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was studied. MRI of 18 arthritic knees was performed before and 1, 7, 30 and 180 days after intra-articular methylpredn......The effect of temporary inflammatory suppression on synovial membrane enhancement, as determined by dynamic and static gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was studied. MRI of 18 arthritic knees was performed before and 1, 7, 30 and 180 days after intra...

  6. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in high-risk smokers and smoking-related COPD: correlations with pulmonary function tests and quantitative computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; Guan, Yu; Fan, Li; Liu, Shi-Yuan; Yu, Hong; Zhao, Li-Ming; Li, Bing

    2014-09-01

    The study aimed to prospectively evaluate correlations between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR perfusion imaging, pulmonary function tests (PFT) and volume quantitative CT in smokers with or without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to determine the value of DCE-MR perfusion imaging and CT volumetric imaging on the assessment of smokers. According to the ATS/ERS guidelines, 51 male smokers were categorized into five groups: At risk for COPD (n = 8), mild COPD (n = 9), moderate COPD (n = 12), severe COPD (n = 10), and very severe COPD (n = 12). Maximum slope of increase (MSI), positive enhancement integral (PEI), etc. were obtained from MR perfusion data. The signal intensity ratio (RSI) of the PDs and normal lung was calculated (RSI = SIPD/SInormal). Total lung volume (TLV), total emphysema volume (TEV) and emphysema index (EI) were obtained from volumetric CT data. For "at risk for COPD," the positive rate of PDs on MR perfusion images was higher than that of abnormal changes on non-enhanced CT images (p < 0.05). Moderate-to-strong positive correlations were found between all the PFT parameters and SIPD, or RSI (r range 0.445∼0.683, p ≤ 0.001). TEV and EI were negatively correlated better with FEV1/FVC than other PFT parameters (r range -0.48 --0.63, p < 0.001). There were significant differences in RSI and SIPD between "at risk for COPD" and "very severe COPD," and between "mild COPD" and "very severe COPD". Thus, MR perfusion imaging may be a good approach to identify early evidence of COPD and may have potential to assist in classification of COPD.

  7. Recent trends in high spin sensitivity magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Aharon; Twig, Ygal; Ishay, Yakir

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic resonance is a very powerful methodology that has been employed successfully in many applications for about 70 years now, resulting in a wealth of scientific, technological, and diagnostic data. Despite its many advantages, one major drawback of magnetic resonance is its relatively poor sensitivity and, as a consequence, its bad spatial resolution when examining heterogeneous samples. Contemporary science and technology often make use of very small amounts of material and examine heterogeneity on a very small length scale, both of which are well beyond the current capabilities of conventional magnetic resonance. It is therefore very important to significantly improve both the sensitivity and the spatial resolution of magnetic resonance techniques. The quest for higher sensitivity led in recent years to the development of many alternative detection techniques that seem to rival and challenge the conventional ;old-fashioned; induction-detection approach. The aim of this manuscript is to briefly review recent advances in the field, and to provide a quantitative as well as qualitative comparison between various detection methods with an eye to future potential advances and developments. We first offer a common definition of sensitivity in magnetic resonance to enable proper quantitative comparisons between various detection methods. Following that, up-to-date information about the sensitivity capabilities of the leading recently-developed detection approaches in magnetic resonance is provided, accompanied by a critical comparison between them and induction detection. Our conclusion from this comparison is that induction detection is still indispensable, and as such, it is very important to look for ways to significantly improve it. To do so, we provide expressions for the sensitivity of induction-detection, derived from both classical and quantum mechanics, that identify its main limiting factors. Examples from current literature, as well as a description of

  8. Magnetic resonance as a technique to magnetic biosensors characterization in Neocapritermes opacus termites

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, J. F.; Wajnberg, E.; Esquivel, D. M. S.; Alves, O. C.

    2005-07-01

    This experimental study quantitatively correlates the saturation magnetization obtained from hysteresis curves (SQUID measurements) to the second integral of the magnetic resonance (MR) spectra of Neocapritermes opacus termites. Termites were submitted to an iron private diet, feeding them with pure cellulose for up to four days. This diet cleans their guts of ingested detrital material, eliminating non-biogenic soil-derived magnetite from the ensuing analyses. A clear relation between total magnetic moment (emu) from SQUID measurements and the signal intensity (absorption area) from MR is given.

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Therapy November 8 is the International Day of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  10. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings...

  11. Modelling Strategies for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    This thesis collects research done on several models for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging (fMRI) data. Several extensions for unsupervised factor analysis type decompositions including explicit delay modelling as well as handling of spatial and temporal smoothness...

  12. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  13. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD proje...

  14. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Giovanni; Tortora, Fabio; Baldelli, Roberto; Cocchiara, Francesco; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Sbardella, Emilia; Simeoli, Chiara; Caranci, Ferdinando; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria

    2017-03-01

    Adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary tumor represents about 10 % of pituitary adenomas and at the time of diagnosis most of them are microadenomas. Transsphenoidal surgery is the first-line treatment of Cushing's disease and accurate localization of the tumor within the gland is essential for selectively removing the lesion and preserving normal pituitary function. Magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging modality for the detection of pituitary tumors, but adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary microadenomas are not correctly identified in 30-50 % of cases, because of their size, location, and enhancing characteristics. Several recent studies were performed with the purpose of better localizing the adrenocorticotropin-secreting microadenomas through the use in magnetic resonance imaging of specific sequences, reduced contrast medium dose and high-field technology. Therefore, an improved imaging technique for pituitary disease is mandatory in the suspect of Cushing's disease. The aims of this paper are to present an overview of pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of Cushing's disease and to provide a magnetic resonance imaging protocol to be followed in case of suspicion adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute tendon ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daffner, R.H.; Lupetin, A.R.; Dash, N.; Riemer, B.L.

    1986-11-01

    The diagnosis of acute tendon ruptures of the extensor mechanism of the knee or the Achilles tendon of the ankle may usually be made by clinical means. Massive soft tissue swelling accompanying these injuries often obscures the findings, however. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can rapidly demonstrate these tendon ruptures. Examples of the use of MRI for quadriceps tendon, and Achilles tendon rupture are presented.

  16. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance: physics and terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Christopher T; Robson, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is the branch of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) whose acquisition methods are adapted to surmount the particular challenges caused by motion of the heart and blood in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging is supremely flexible; it can produce images showing the spatial distribution of diverse tissue characteristics, for example, proton density, T(1), T(2), T(2)(⁎), fat concentration, flow rate, and diffusion parameters. The image contrast may usefully be modified by intravenous infusion of contrast agents. Magnetic resonance imaging permits 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional acquisitions with arbitrary slice orientation. Unfortunately, MRI's flexibility is matched by a remarkable complexity not only in its fundamental principles but also in the optimization of applications in the clinic. This article attempts to demystify the basic principles of CMR and provides a primer on the terminology used in CMR. Complete confidence in the principles of CMR is not essential to use the technology. Nevertheless, knowledge of the principal terminology of MRI is a valuable first step when seeking to understand and apply modern methods in a clinical or research setting. Thus, the article closes with a glossary of terminology and references to high-quality educational resources. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Breast magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mi Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Despite the high sensitivity of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pathologic confirmation by biopsy is essential because of limited specificity. MRI-guided biopsy is required in patients with lesions only seen on MRI. We review preprocedural considerations and the technique of MRI-guided biopsy, challenging situations and trouble-shooting, and correlation of radiologic and pathologic findings.

  18. Was magnetic resonance imaging scan contraindicated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khizar

    2010-01-01

    An intravenous drug abuser with a retained needle posed a management problem at a neurosurgical unit, having declined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on safety grounds. However, later, having been assessed by the senior radiologist, she went though the MRI scan safely.

  19. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  20. Biliary ascariasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A Hashmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old girl presented with features of biliary obstruction. Magnetic resonance cholangi-pancreatography revealed typical linear signals in common bile duct, which appears like Ascaris lumbricoides. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic removal of the worm.

  1. Sports health magnetic resonance imaging challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Gary A; Stadnick, Michael E; Awh, Mark H

    2010-11-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Biomedical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaśpar, Jan; Hána, Karel; Smrčka, Pavel; Brada, Jiří; Beneš, Jiří; Šunka, Pavel

    2007-11-01

    The basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging covering physical principles and basic imaging techniques will be presented as a strong tool in biomedical engineering. Several applications of MRI in biomedical research practiced at the MRI laboratory of the FBMI CTU including other laboratory instruments and activities are introduced.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    2001-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing rad

  4. Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Principles and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, Lara M

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Principles and Applications. Carr J. C., Carroll T. J., Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg/New York, 2012. 412 pp. Price $179.00. ISBN 978-1-4419-1685-3 (hardcover). © 2013 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in syringomyelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.J. Tanghe (Hervé)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBased on an own material of 19 patients with syringomyelia and on the related literature a survey is given on the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, postoperative evaluation and the dynamics of CSF and cyst fluids, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The following conclusions can be

  6. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  7. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD proje...

  8. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  9. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-01

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters-shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  10. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yumin, E-mail: ymhou@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-12-15

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  11. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  14. The working principle of magnetic resonance therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Brizhik, Larissa; Fermi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe briefly the basic aspects of magnetic resonance therapy, registered as TMR therapy. Clinical studies have shown that application of this therapy significantly accelerates wound healing and, in particular, healing of the diabetic foot disease. To understand the working principle of this therapy, we analyze relevant to it biological effects produced by magnetic fields. Based on these data, we show that there is a hierarchy of the possible physical mechanisms, which can produce such effects. The mutual interplay between the mechanisms can lead to a synergetic outcome delayed in time, which can affect the physiological state of the organism. In particular, we show that soliton mediated charge transport during the redox processes in living organisms is sensitive to magnetic fields, so that such fields can facilitate redox processes in particular, and can stimulate the healing effect of the organism in general. This and other non-thermal resonant mechanisms of the biological effects of mag...

  15. Magnetic-resonance velocity mapping of the central circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise

    1994-01-01

    In magnetic-resonance (MR) velocity mapping there exists a linear relationship between the velocity and signal in each element of a tomographic image. The technique can be used for quantitative measurements of linear velocities (m s-1) and flow rates (1 min-1). By using cinematographic images...... the flow profile during the cardiac cycle can be determined. This allows quantification of forward flow, regurgitant volume and regurgitant fraction in cases of heart-valve insufficiency. In valvular stenosis the transvalvular pressure gradient and valve area can be determined. Magnetic-resonance velocity...... mapping may also provide information about diastolic function of left ventricular function. Together with other MR imaging techniques, velocity mapping gives an accurate assessment of the severity of aortic dissection. Recent studies indicate that MR velocity mapping provides quantification of renal blood...

  16. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in oncology: state of the art*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Schuch, Alice; Hochhegger, Bruno; Gross, Jefferson Luiz; Chojniak, Rubens; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    In the investigation of tumors with conventional magnetic resonance imaging, both quantitative characteristics, such as size, edema, necrosis, and presence of metastases, and qualitative characteristics, such as contrast enhancement degree, are taken into consideration. However, changes in cell metabolism and tissue physiology which precede morphological changes cannot be detected by the conventional technique. The development of new magnetic resonance imaging techniques has enabled the functional assessment of the structures in order to obtain information on the different physiological processes of the tumor microenvironment, such as oxygenation levels, cellularity and vascularity. The detailed morphological study in association with the new functional imaging techniques allows for an appropriate approach to cancer patients, including the phases of diagnosis, staging, response evaluation and follow-up, with a positive impact on their quality of life and survival rate. PMID:25741058

  17. Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting with short relaxation intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, Thomas; Doneva, Mariya; Koken, Peter; Sommer, Karsten; Meineke, Jakob; Börnert, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a technique for improving the performance of Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) in repetitive sampling schemes, in particular for 3D MRF acquisition, by shortening relaxation intervals between MRF pulse train repetitions. A calculation method for MRF dictionaries adapted to short relaxation intervals and non-relaxed initial spin states is presented, based on the concept of stationary fingerprints. The method is applicable to many different k-space sampling schemes in 2D and 3D. For accuracy analysis, T1 and T2 values of a phantom are determined by single-slice Cartesian MRF for different relaxation intervals and are compared with quantitative reference measurements. The relevance of slice profile effects is also investigated in this case. To further illustrate the capabilities of the method, an application to in-vivo spiral 3D MRF measurements is demonstrated. The proposed computation method enables accurate parameter estimation even for the shortest relaxation intervals, as investigated for different sampling patterns in 2D and 3D. In 2D Cartesian measurements, we achieved a scan acceleration of more than a factor of two, while maintaining acceptable accuracy: The largest T1 values of a sample set deviated from their reference values by 0.3% (longest relaxation interval) and 2.4% (shortest relaxation interval). The largest T2 values showed systematic deviations of up to 10% for all relaxation intervals, which is discussed. The influence of slice profile effects for multislice acquisition is shown to become increasingly relevant for short relaxation intervals. In 3D spiral measurements, a scan time reduction of 36% was achieved, maintaining the quality of in-vivo T1 and T2 maps. Reducing the relaxation interval between MRF sequence repetitions using stationary fingerprint dictionaries is a feasible method to improve the scan efficiency of MRF sequences. The method enables fast implementations of 3D spatially resolved

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorramdin, A. [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Isapour, Gh. [Department of Materials and Engineering, Hakim Sabzevari University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants. - Highlights: • This paper studies the physics of MRI as a powerful diagnostic technique. • MRI uses the differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. • The relaxation times can be shortened by the use of a magnetic contrast agent. • The magnetic nanoparticles act as contrast agents, helping to increase the resolution. • Different synthesis methods can influence the magnetic resonance behavior.

  19. Brain Delivery of Drug and MRI Contrast Agent: Detection and Quantitative Determination of Brain Deposition of CPT-Glu Using LC-MS/MS and Gd-DTPA Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanor, Kayann; Lee, Phil; Kiptoo, Paul; Choi, In-Young; Sherry, Erica B.; Eagle, Cheyenne Sun; Williams, Todd D.; Siahaan, Teruna J.

    2015-01-01

    Successful treatment and diagnosis of neurological diseases depend on reliable delivery of molecules across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which restricts penetration of pharmaceutical drugs and diagnostic agents into the brain. Thus, developing new non-invasive strategies to improve drug delivery across the BBB is critically needed. This study was aimed at evaluating the activity of HAV6 peptide (Ac-SHAVSS-NH2) in improving brain delivery of camptothecin-glutamate (CPT-Glu) conjugate and gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agent in Sprague-Dawley rats. Brain delivery of both CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA was evaluated in an in situ rat brain perfusion model in the presence and absence of HAV6 peptide (1.0 mM). Gd-DTPA (0.6 mmol/kg) was intravenously (i.v.) administered with and without HAV6 peptide (0.019 mmol/kg) in rats. The detection and quantification of CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA in the brain were carried out by LC-MS/MS and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively. Rats perfused with CPT-Glu in combination with HAV6 had significantly higher deposition of drug in the brain compared to CPT-Glu alone. MRI results also showed that administration of Gd-DTPA in the presence of HAV6 peptide led to significant accumulation of Gd-DTPA in various regions of the brain in both the in situ rat brain perfusion and in vivo studies. All observations taken together indicate that HAV6 peptide can disrupt the BBB and enhance delivery of small molecules into the brain. PMID:26705088

  20. [Magnetic resonance compatibility research for coronary mental stents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Li; Wang, Shuo; Shang, Ruyao; Wang, Chunren

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to research magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents, and to evaluate the magnetic resonance compatibility based on laboratory testing results. Coronary stents magnetic resonance compatibility test includes magnetically induced displacement force test, magnetically induced torque test, radio frequency induced heating and evaluation of MR image. By magnetic displacement force and torque values, temperature, and image distortion values to determine metal coronary stent demagnetization effect. The methods can be applied to test magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents and evaluate its demagnetization effect.

  1. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance contains three articles which review quite fundamentally different aspects of coherent spectroscopy. An enormous variety of effects can be observed when optical and spin resonances are coupled, usually by a combination of radio frequency and laser irradiation. The first article reviews these effects and pays particular attention to developing a theoretical framework which is as similar as possible for the optical and spin cases. Subsequent articles examine deuterium relaxation in molecular solids, and the spatiotemporal growth of multiple spin coheren

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging and its applicability in veterinary cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, José Manuel de Seiça

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a technique whereby images are created by the manipulation of hydrogen atoms in magnetic fields; it is based on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (MR), which is non-invasive and non-ionising (Constantine, Shan, Flamm, & Sivananthan, 2004). Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) uses the same principle: application of magnetic-field gradients that are adjusted to highlight desired tissue characteristics, producing a variety of sequences that all...

  3. Resonantly detecting axion-mediated forces with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2014-10-17

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 10(9) and 10(12) GeV or axion masses between 10(-6) and 10(-3) eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance.

  4. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus)......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus...

  5. High speed functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, A M

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the except where indicated by reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to October 2001. This thesis documents the implementation and application of a novel high-speed imaging technique, the multi-slice, echo shifted, echo planar imaging technique. This was implemented on the Nottingham 3 T imaging system, for functional magnetic resonance imaging. The technique uses echo shifting over the slices in a multi-slice echo planar imaging acquisition scheme, making the echo time longer than the repetition time per slice. This allows for rapid volumar sampling of the blood oxygen level dependent effect in the human brain. The new high-speed technique was used to investigate the variability of measuring the timing differences between haemodynamic responses, at the same cortical location, to simple cued motor tasks. The technique was also used in an investigation into motor cortex functional connect...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  7. In vivo magnetic resonance diffusion measurement in the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J;

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of water self-diffusion in the brain in 25 patients with multiple sclerosis was performed by magnetic resonance imaging. Quantitative diffusion measurements were obtained using single spin-echo pulse sequences with pulsed magnetic field gradients of different magnitude. Twenty...

  8. Introduction to Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    It is quite possible to acquire images with an MR scanner without understanding the principles behind it, but choosing the best parameters and methods, and interpreting images and artifacts, requires understanding. This text serves as an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging techniques. It is aimed at beginners in possession of only a minimal level of technical expertise, yet it introduces aspects of MR that are typically considered technically challenging. The notes were written in conn...

  9. Magnetic resonance in diagnosis of ureterocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Humberto do; Hachul, Mauricio; Macedo Junior, Antonio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Div. de Urologia]. E-mail: humbertojr1@aol.com

    2003-05-15

    Ultrasonography is the main non-invasive technique for screening of ureterocele, but presents some difficulties for its diagnosis. Other supplementary diagnostic methods have the disadvantage of being invasive or using ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) has a high sensitivity for diagnosing urinary tract malformations in adults and children. We report one case of ureterocele in a 1-year old child with the purpose of presenting its diagnosis through MR. (author)

  10. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Choon; Hua; Thng; Tong; San; Koh; David; J; Collins; Dow; Mu; Koh

    2010-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies quantify the microcirculatory status of liver parenchyma and liver lesions, and can be used for the detection of liver metastases, assessing the effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapy, evaluating tumor viability after anticancer therapy or ablation, and diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and its severity. In this review, we discuss the basic concepts of perfusion MRI using tracer kinetic modeling, the common kinetic models applied for analyses, the MR scanning t...

  11. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E

    2008-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are "stiffness weighted" and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery.

  12. Electro-Mechanical Resonant Magnetic Field Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Temnykh, A B; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor which is termed an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore a high Q fundamental mode of frequency $f_1$. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type using for the elastic element a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001G for an applied magnetic field of $ \\sim 1$G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of $\\sim ...

  13. Compact low field magnetic resonance imaging magnet: Design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciandrone, M.; Placidi, G.; Testa, L.; Sotgiu, A.

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed with a very large instrument that allows the patient to be inserted into a region of uniform magnetic field. The field is generated either by an electromagnet (resistive or superconductive) or by a permanent magnet. Electromagnets are designed as air cored solenoids of cylindrical symmetry, with an inner bore of 80-100 cm in diameter. In clinical analysis of peripheral regions of the body (legs, arms, foot, knee, etc.) it would be better to adopt much less expensive magnets leaving the most expensive instruments to applications that require the insertion of the patient in the magnet (head, thorax, abdomen, etc.). These "dedicated" apparati could be smaller and based on resistive magnets that are manufactured and operated at very low cost, particularly if they utilize an iron yoke to reduce power requirements. In order to obtain good field uniformity without the use of a set of shimming coils, we propose both particular construction of a dedicated magnet, using four independently controlled pairs of coils, and an optimization-based strategy for computing, a posteriori, the optimal current values. The optimization phase could be viewed as a low-cost shimming procedure for obtaining the desired magnetic field configuration. Some experimental measurements, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed approach (construction and optimization), have also been reported. In particular, it has been shown that the adoption of the proposed optimization based strategy has allowed the achievement of good uniformity of the magnetic field in about one fourth of the magnet length and about one half of its bore. On the basis of the good experimental results, the dedicated magnet can be used for MRI of peripheral regions of the body and for animal experimentation at very low cost.

  14. Quantitative Activity Measurements of Brown Adipose Tissue at 7 T Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Application of Triglyceride-Rich Lipoprotein 59Fe-Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle: Intravenous Versus Intraperitoneal Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Caroline Sophie Laura; Heine, Markus; Freund, Barbara; Reimer, Rudolph; Koziolek, Eva Jolanthe; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Kording, Fabian; Schumacher, Udo; Weller, Horst; Nielsen, Peter; Adam, Gerhard; Heeren, Jörg; Ittrich, Harald

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine metabolic activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) with in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after intravenous (IV) and intraperitoneal (IP) injection of radioactively labeled superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) embedded into a lipoprotein layer. Fe-labeled SPIOs were either polymer-coated or embedded into the lipid core of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL-Fe-SPIOs). First biodistribution and blood half time analysis in thermoneutral mice after IP injection of either TRL-Fe-SPIOs or polymer-coated Fe-SPIOs (n = 3) were performed. In the next step, cold-exposed (24 hours), BAT-activated mice (n = 10), and control thermoneutral mice (n = 10) were starved for 4 hours before IP (n = 10) or IV (n = 10) injection of TRL-Fe-SPIOs. In vivo MRI was performed before and 24 hours after the application of the particles at a 7 T small animal MRI scanner using a T2*-weighted multiecho gradient echo sequence. R2* and ΔR2* were estimated in the liver, BAT, and muscle. The biodistribution of polymer-coated Fe-SPIOs and TRL-Fe-SPIOs was analyzed ex vivo using a sensitive, large-volume Hamburg whole-body radioactive counter. The amount of Fe-SPIOs in the liver, BAT, and muscle was correlated with the MRI measurements using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Tissue uptake of Fe-SPIOs was confirmed by histological and transmission electron microscopy analyses. Triglyceride-rich lipoprotein Fe-SPIOs exhibited a higher blood concentration after IP injection (10.1% ± 0.91% after 24 hours) and a greater [INCREMENT]R2* in the liver (103 ± 5.0 s), while polymer-coated SPIOs did not increase substantially in the blood stream (0.19% ± 0.01% after 24 hours; P 0.85; P 0.85; P lipoprotein-embedded SPIOs were able to escape the abdominal cavity barrier, whereas polymer-coated SPIOs did not increase substantially in the blood stream. Brown adipose tissue activity can be determined via MRI using TRL-Fe-SPIOs. The quantification of

  15. Minimum joint space width (mJSW) of patellofemoral joint on standing ''skyline'' radiographs: test-retest reproducibility and comparison with quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoni, Paolo; Jamali, Sanaa; Alvarez Miezentseva, Victoria [CHU de Liege, Diagnostic Imaging Departement, Domanine du Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Albert, Adelin [CHU de Liege, Biostatistics Departement, Domanine du Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Totterman, Saara; Schreyer, Edward; Tamez-Pena, Jose G. [Qmetrics Technologies, Rochester, NY (United States); Zobel, Bruno Beomonte [Campus Bio-Medico University, Diagnostic Imaging Departement, Rome (Italy); Gillet, Philippe [CHU de Liege, Orthopaedic surgery Department, Domanine du Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium)

    2013-11-15

    To assess the intraobserver, interobserver, and test-retest reproducibility of minimum joint space width (mJSW) measurement of medial and lateral patellofemoral joints on standing ''skyline'' radiographs and to compare the mJSW of the patellofemoral joint to the mean cartilage thickness calculated by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI). A couple of standing ''skyline'' radiographs of the patellofemoral joints and MRI of 55 knees of 28 volunteers (18 females, ten males, mean age, 48.5 {+-} 16.2 years) were obtained on the same day. The mJSW of the patellofemoral joint was manually measured and Kellgren and Lawrence grade (KLG) was independently assessed by two observers. The mJSW was compared to the mean cartilage thickness of patellofemoral joint calculated by qMRI. mJSW of the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint showed an excellent intraobserver agreement (interclass correlation (ICC) = 0.94 and 0.96), interobserver agreement (ICC = 0.90 and 0.95) and test-retest agreement (ICC = 0.92 and 0.96). The mJSW measured on radiographs was correlated to mean cartilage thickness calculated by qMRI (r = 0.71, p < 0.0001 for the medial PFJ and r = 0.81, p < 0.0001 for the lateral PFJ). However, there was a lack of concordance between radiographs and qMRI for extreme values of joint width and KLG. Radiographs yielded higher joint space measures than qMRI in knees with a normal joint space, while qMRI yielded higher joint space measures than radiographs in knees with joint space narrowing and higher KLG. Standing ''skyline'' radiographs are a reproducible tool for measuring the mJSW of the patellofemoral joint. The mJSW of the patellofemoral joint on radiographs are correlated with, but not concordant with, qMRI measurements. (orig.)

  16. Quantitative T2 combined with texture analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance images identify different degrees of muscle involvement in three mouse models of muscle dystrophy: mdx, Largemyd and mdx/Largemyd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea B Martins-Bach

    Full Text Available Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been considered a promising non-invasive tool for monitoring therapeutic essays in small size mouse models of muscular dystrophies. Here, we combined MRI (anatomical images and transverse relaxation time constant-T2-measurements to texture analyses in the study of four mouse strains covering a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Two still unexplored mouse models of muscular dystrophies were analyzed: The severely affected Largemyd mouse and the recently generated and worst double mutant mdx/Largemyd mouse, as compared to the mildly affected mdx and normal mice. The results were compared to histopathological findings. MRI showed increased intermuscular fat and higher muscle T2 in the three dystrophic mouse models when compared to the wild-type mice (T2: mdx/Largemyd: 37.6±2.8 ms; mdx: 35.2±4.5 ms; Largemyd: 36.6±4.0 ms; wild-type: 29.1±1.8 ms, p<0.05, in addition to higher muscle T2 in the mdx/Largemyd mice when compared to mdx (p<0.05. The areas with increased muscle T2 in the MRI correlated spatially with the identified histopathological alterations such as necrosis, inflammation, degeneration and regeneration foci. Nevertheless, muscle T2 values were not correlated with the severity of the phenotype in the 3 dystrophic mouse strains, since the severely affected Largemyd showed similar values than both the mild mdx and worst mdx/Largemyd lineages. On the other hand, all studied mouse strains could be unambiguously identified with texture analysis, which reflected the observed differences in the distribution of signals in muscle MRI. Thus, combined T2 intensity maps and texture analysis is a powerful approach for the characterization and differentiation of dystrophic muscles with diverse genotypes and phenotypes. These new findings provide important noninvasive tools in the evaluation of the efficacy of new therapies, and most importantly, can be directly applied in human

  17. Quantitative T2 Combined with Texture Analysis of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Images Identify Different Degrees of Muscle Involvement in Three Mouse Models of Muscle Dystrophy: mdx, Largemyd and mdx/Largemyd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Bach, Aurea B.; Malheiros, Jackeline; Matot, Béatrice; Martins, Poliana C. M.; Almeida, Camila F.; Caldeira, Waldir; Ribeiro, Alberto F.; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Azzabou, Noura; Tannús, Alberto; Carlier, Pierre G.; Vainzof, Mariz

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been considered a promising non-invasive tool for monitoring therapeutic essays in small size mouse models of muscular dystrophies. Here, we combined MRI (anatomical images and transverse relaxation time constant—T2—measurements) to texture analyses in the study of four mouse strains covering a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Two still unexplored mouse models of muscular dystrophies were analyzed: The severely affected Largemyd mouse and the recently generated and worst double mutant mdx/Largemyd mouse, as compared to the mildly affected mdx and normal mice. The results were compared to histopathological findings. MRI showed increased intermuscular fat and higher muscle T2 in the three dystrophic mouse models when compared to the wild-type mice (T2: mdx/Largemyd: 37.6±2.8 ms; mdx: 35.2±4.5 ms; Largemyd: 36.6±4.0 ms; wild-type: 29.1±1.8 ms, p<0.05), in addition to higher muscle T2 in the mdx/Largemyd mice when compared to mdx (p<0.05). The areas with increased muscle T2 in the MRI correlated spatially with the identified histopathological alterations such as necrosis, inflammation, degeneration and regeneration foci. Nevertheless, muscle T2 values were not correlated with the severity of the phenotype in the 3 dystrophic mouse strains, since the severely affected Largemyd showed similar values than both the mild mdx and worst mdx/Largemyd lineages. On the other hand, all studied mouse strains could be unambiguously identified with texture analysis, which reflected the observed differences in the distribution of signals in muscle MRI. Thus, combined T2 intensity maps and texture analysis is a powerful approach for the characterization and differentiation of dystrophic muscles with diverse genotypes and phenotypes. These new findings provide important noninvasive tools in the evaluation of the efficacy of new therapies, and most importantly, can be directly applied in human translational research

  18. Portal biliopathy, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography findings: a case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskan, Ozdil; Erol, Cengiz; Sahingoz, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy (PB) is a rare disorder, characterized by biliary ductal and gallbladder wall abnormalities seen in patients with portal hypertension. It most commonly occurs due to idiopathic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO). The abnormalities consist mainly of bile duct compression, stenoses, fibrotic strictures and dilation of both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts, as well as gallbladder varices. PB may mimic cholangiocarcinoma, sclerosing cholangitis, or choledocholithiasis. Misdiagnosis can be avoided using appropriate imaging modalities to prevent complications. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP) features of three patients with PB. PMID:25216728

  19. Anisotropic mechanical properties of magnetically aligned fibrin gels measured by magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namani, Ravi; Wood, Matthew D; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E; Bayly, Philip V

    2009-09-18

    The anisotropic mechanical properties of magnetically aligned fibrin gels were measured by magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) and by a standard mechanical test: unconfined compression. Soft anisotropic biomaterials are notoriously difficult to characterize, especially in vivo. MRE is well-suited for efficient, non-invasive, and non-destructive assessment of shear modulus. Direction-dependent differences in shear modulus were found to be statistically significant for gels polymerized at magnetic fields of 11.7 and 4.7 T compared to control gels. Mechanical anisotropy was greater in the gels polymerized at the higher magnetic field. These observations were consistent with results from unconfined compression tests. Analysis of confocal microscopy images of gels showed measurable alignment of fibrils in gels polymerized at 11.7 T. This study provides direct, quantitative measurements of the anisotropy in mechanical properties that accompanies fibril alignment in fibrin gels.

  20. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop AGENCY... the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and approaches to mitigate risks. The overall goal is...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Magnetic...

  1. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  2. Achilles Impingement Tendinopathy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark J; Mourelatos, Jan; Mar, Alice

    2017-02-28

    Haglund's syndrome is impingement of the retrocalcaneal bursa and Achilles tendon caused by a prominence of the posterosuperior calcaneus. Radiographic measurements are not sensitive or specific for diagnosing Haglund's deformity. Localization of a bone deformity and tendinopathy in the same sagittal section of a magnetic resonance imaging scan can assist with the diagnosis in equivocal cases. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of Haglund's syndrome in patients presenting with Achilles tendinopathy and note any associated findings to determine the criteria for a diagnosis of Haglund's syndrome. We reviewed 40 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles tendinopathy and 19 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles high-grade tears and/or ruptures. Achilles tendinopathy was often in close proximity to the superior aspect of the calcaneal tuberosity, consistent with impingement (67.5%). Patients with Achilles impingement tendinopathy were more often female (p < .04) and were significantly heavier than patients presenting with noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy (p = .014) or Achilles tendon rupture (p = .010). Impingement tendinopathy occurred medially (8 of 20) and centrally (10 of 20) more often than laterally (2 of 20) and was associated with a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with a loss of calcaneal recess more often than a superior projection (22 of 27 versus 8 of 27; p < .001). Haglund's deformity should be reserved for defining a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with loss of calcaneal recess because this corresponds with impingement. Achilles impingement tendinopathy might be more appropriate terminology for Haglund's syndrome, because the bone deformity is often subtle. Of the 27 images with Achilles impingement tendinopathy, 10 (37.0%) extended to a location prone to Achilles tendon rupture. Given these findings, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy are not mutually

  3. SVD compression for magnetic resonance fingerprinting in the time domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGivney, Debra F; Pierre, Eric; Ma, Dan; Jiang, Yun; Saybasili, Haris; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) fingerprinting is a technique for acquiring and processing MR data that simultaneously provides quantitative maps of different tissue parameters through a pattern recognition algorithm. A predefined dictionary models the possible signal evolutions simulated using the Bloch equations with different combinations of various MR parameters and pattern recognition is completed by computing the inner product between the observed signal and each of the predicted signals within the dictionary. Though this matching algorithm has been shown to accurately predict the MR parameters of interest, one desires a more efficient method to obtain the quantitative images. We propose to compress the dictionary using the singular value decomposition, which will provide a low-rank approximation. By compressing the size of the dictionary in the time domain, we are able to speed up the pattern recognition algorithm, by a factor of between 3.4-4.8, without sacrificing the high signal-to-noise ratio of the original scheme presented previously.

  4. Magnetic resonance in hearing loss and vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ángel MARTÍN-PÉREZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Hearing loss and vertiginous syndrome represent an important part of the otorhinolaryngology clinic. The role of the radiologist plays in their workup become fundamental. Studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are essential to guide or give the diagnosis in these cases. Method: After performing a retrospective analysis of 456 MRI studies of patients with these symptoms, we conducted a review of the main pathologies recorded that can cause these symptoms. Results: We classify into vascular disorders and other variants, tumor pathology, malformations and inflammatory pathology; We also describe the most relevant findings on MRI and illustrated with examples of our center.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thyroid and Parathyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gonzalo-Domínguez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment of the thyroid and parathyroid pathology is usually achieved with ultrasounds. There are several systems of classification that are internationally accepted in neoplastic disease, such as TIRADS system, and there are well-defined patterns for ultrasound imaging in inflammatory disease. Material and methods: However, there are specific needs that require magnetic resonance imaging. We review the main indications of MRI in the evaluation of thyroid and parathyroid in 64 patients and determine which protocols are more appropriate and which sequences are better for a proper characterization. Results: Then we review the semiology obtained by this technique, making correlation with disease processes affecting these cervical structures.

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maceira Alicia M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension.

  8. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension. PMID:22559053

  9. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodne, D.; Quinn, S.F.; Murray, W.T.; Cochran, C.; Bolton, T.; Rudd, S.; Lewis, K.; Daines, P.; Bishop, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included 'jumper's knee' and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation. (orig.)

  10. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of musculoaponeurotic fibromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawnaur, J.M.; Jenkins, J.P.R.; Isherwood, I. (Manchester Univ. (UK). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1990-10-01

    Musculoaponeurotic fibromatosis can be mistaken for soft-tissue sarcoma both clinically and on X-ray computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in three patients with this condition enabled the correct diagnosis to be made prospectively in two. The appearance on MRI of a heterogeneous mass with well-defined, predominantly peripheral areas of very low signal intensity due to dense fibrous tissue and areas of medium to high signal intensity corresponding to a more cellular stroma should raise the suspicion of musculoaponeurotic fibromatosis. Cellular areas within the tumour showed moderate enhancement after gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid administration. (orig.).

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of rat fetuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, Yo; Kawanishi, Hiroaki (Imamichi Institute for Animal Reproduction, Ibaraki (Japan)); Hasegawa, Kenichi; Otsu, Shinichi

    1993-06-01

    The internal structures of rat fetuses on day 18.0 of pregnancy were studied by magnetic resonance imaging in 1-mm sagittal slices. Each organ was represented as white to gray images different in tone according to the [sup 1]H proton content and the relaxation time. In solid organs, portions with high cell density were seen as white areas and those with low cell density as gray areas. In the tubular organs, the margins were imaged as white and the lumina as gray. (author).

  13. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and human genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengstschlaeger, Markus [Medical Genetics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: markus.hengstschlaeger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-02-15

    The use of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in addition to prenatal genetic testing and sonography, has the potential to improve prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders. MRI plays an important role in the evaluation of fetal abnormalities and malformations. Fetal MRI often enables a differential diagnosis, a determination of the extent of the disorder, the prognosis, and an improvement in therapeutic management. For counseling of parents, as well as to basically understand how genetic aberrations affect fetal development, it is of great importance to correlate different genotypes with fetal MRI data.

  14. Sciatic neuropathy: findings on magnetic resonance neurography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnollitto, Paulo Moraes; Chu, Marcio Wen King; Simão, Marcelo Novelino; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2017-01-01

    Injuries of the sciatic nerve are common causes of pain and limitation in the lower limbs. Due to its particular anatomy and its long course, the sciatic nerve is often involved in diseases of the pelvis or leg. In recent years, magnetic resonance neurography has become established as an important tool for the study of peripheral nerves and can be widely applied to the study of the sciatic nerve. Therefore, detailed knowledge of its anatomy and of the most prevalent diseases affecting it is essential to maximizing the accuracy of diagnostic imaging. PMID:28670031

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic neuroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashihara, Kengo; Murata, Hideaki; Ito, Haruhide; Onishi, Hiroaki; Kadoya, Masumi; Suzuki, Masayuki.

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen patients with acoustic neuroma were studied on a 1.5T superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imager. Acoustic neuromas appeared as lower signal intensity than the surrounding brain stem on T1 weighted image (W.I.), and as higher signal intensity on T2 W.I.. Axial and coronal sections of T1 W.I. were very useful in observing the tumor in the auditory canal and in investigating the anatomical relations of the tumor and the surrounding structures. MR imaging is very excellent examination to make early diagnosis of the acoustic neuroma and preoperative anatomical evaluation.

  16. Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Mollasadeghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI devices produce noise, which may affect patient’s or operators’ hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus. In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient’s hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.

  17. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti......-angiogenic treatment is presented in the first manuscript. In the second and third manuscript, two separate methods of quantifying perfusion, blood volume and vessel permeability are presented. The methods are used to show that drug delivery to a xenografted tumor is plausible and to show possible vascular maturation...

  18. Hair product artifact in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenji, Sneha; Wilman, Alan H; Mah, Dennell; Seres, Peter; Genge, Angela; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    The presence of metallic compounds in facial cosmetics and permanent tattoos may affect the quality of magnetic resonance imaging. We report a case study describing a signal artifact due to the use of a leave-on powdered hair dye. On reviewing the ingredients of the product, it was found to contain several metallic compounds. In lieu of this observation, we suggest that MRI centers include the use of metal- or mineral-based facial cosmetics or hair products in their screening protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology. An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, M A; Adamis, M K

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized the assessment of pathology involving the musculoskeletal system. The soft tissue contrast, superb resolution, multiplanar acquisition potential, and the ability to monitor physiologic processes combine the best features of other imaging modalities. The sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for a wide range of disease processes matches or supersedes conventional radiology, nuclear medicine, and clinical examination. This article provides a brief overview of the use of MR imaging for some of the more common clinical situations confronting the rheumatologist.

  20. Cardiac magnetic resonance in clinical cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas; Kumar; Rodrigo; Bagur

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, cardiac magnetic resonance(CMR) has transformed from a research tool to a widely used diagnostic method in clinical cardiology. This method can now make useful, unique contributions to the work-up of patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease. Advantages of CMR, compared to other imaging methods, include very high resolution imaging with a spatial resolution up to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm in plane, a large array of different imaging sequences to provide in vivo tissue characterization, and radiationfree imaging. The present manuscript highlights the relevance of CMR in the current clinical practice and new perspectives in cardiology.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjoerstad, K.; Kaass, B.; Svihus, R.

    1987-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical region was carried out on 139 patients in a ten-month period. 64 patients came from Rogaland Central Hospital and 75 from the rest of Norway. A retrospective questionnaire was filled in by the referring physicians. MRI seems to be of great value in the diagnosis of cervical vertebrogenic myelopathy, multiple sclerosis, syringomyelia, and intraspinal tumors. Besides its diagnostic superiority, at least in patients with cervical myelopathy, MRI has definite economic advantages compared to CT and myelography.

  2. [Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros Mendoza, L H; Cañete Celestino, E; Velilla Marco, O

    2008-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small joint with complex anatomy and function. Diverse pathologies with very different symptoms can affect the TMJ. While various imaging techniques such as plain-film radiography and computed tomography can be useful, magnetic resonance imaging's superior contrast resolution reveals additional structures like the articular disk, making this technique essential for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. We analyze the MRI signs of the different pathologies that can affect the TMJ from the structural and functional points of view.

  3. MRCP. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography; MRCP. Magnetresonanzcholangiopankreatografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [Wisconsin-Madison Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lauenstein, Thomas [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duesseldorf (Germany). Radiologie

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a special MR technique to display and analyze the biliary tract and pancreatic ducts. MRCP sequences are equivalent to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for diagnostic purposes due to technical developments of the classical T2 weighted MRCP sequences and the availability of contrast enhanced T1 weighted sequences. Therefore, MRCP plays a fundamental role in the diagnoses of hepatobliary and pancreatic diseases, which are presented in this review article as are technical details of sequence acquisitions and the underlying anatomy.

  4. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Ledbetter, Micah; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with non-trivial spectra.

  5. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, M P; Theis, T; Blanchard, J W; Ring, H; Ganssle, P; Appelt, S; Blümich, B; Pines, A; Budker, D

    2011-09-02

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near zero field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high-field case, where heteronuclear J couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with nontrivial spectra.

  6. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C. [Hospital of Saint Raphael, Cardiac Diagnostic Unit, New Haven, CT (United States)], E-mail: bogmarcu@pol.net

    2006-10-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  7. Nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance with chemical resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Nabeel; Pfender, Matthias; Neumann, Philipp; Reuter, Rolf; Zappe, Andrea; Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Denisenko, Andrej; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a key analytical technique in chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, conventional NMR spectroscopy requires an at least nanoliter-sized sample volume to achieve sufficient signal. We combined the use of a quantum memory and high magnetic fields with a dedicated quantum sensor based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond to achieve chemical shift resolution in 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy of 20-zeptoliter sample volumes. We demonstrate the application of NMR pulse sequences to achieve homonuclear decoupling and spin diffusion measurements. The best measured NMR linewidth of a liquid sample was ~1 part per million, mainly limited by molecular diffusion. To mitigate the influence of diffusion, we performed high-resolution solid-state NMR by applying homonuclear decoupling and achieved a 20-fold narrowing of the NMR linewidth.

  8. Enhancement of magnetic resonance imaging with metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Slobozhanyuk, A P; Raaijmakers, A J E; Berg, C A T van den; Kozachenko, A V; Dubrovina, I A; Melchakova, I V; Kivshar, Yu S; Belov, P A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the cornerstone technique for diagnostic medicine, biology, and neuroscience. This imaging method is highly innovative, noninvasive and its impact continues to grow. It can be used for measuring changes in the brain after enhanced neural activity, detecting early cancerous cells in tissue, as well as for imaging nanoscale biological structures, and controlling fluid dynamics, and it can be beneficial for cardiovascular imaging. The MRI performance is characterized by a signal-to-noise ratio, however the spatial resolution and image contrast depend strongly on the scanner design. Here, we reveal how to exploit effectively the unique properties of metasurfaces for the substantial improvement of MRI efficiency. We employ a metasurface created by an array of wires placed inside the MRI scanner under an object, and demonstrate a giant enhancement of the magnetic field by means of subwavelength near-field manipulation with the metasurface, thus strongly increasing the scanner sen...

  9. High sensitivity piezomagnetic force microscopy for quantitative probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian Nataly; Ma, Feiyue; Xie, Shuhong; Liu, Yuanming; Proksch, Roger; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-07-01

    Accurate scanning probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale is essential for developing and characterizing magnetic nanostructures, yet quantitative analysis is difficult using the state of the art magnetic force microscopy, and has limited spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this communication, we develop a novel piezomagnetic force microscopy (PmFM) technique, with the imaging principle based on the detection of magnetostrictive response excited by an external magnetic field. In combination with the dual AC resonance tracking (DART) technique, the contact stiffness and energy dissipation of the samples can be simultaneously mapped along with the PmFM phase and amplitude, enabling quantitative probing of magnetic materials and structures at the nanoscale with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. PmFM has been applied to probe magnetic soft discs and cobalt ferrite thin films, demonstrating it as a powerful tool for a wide range of magnetic materials.

  10. Plasmon coupling of magnetic resonances in an asymmetric gold semishell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Kong, Yan; Liu, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The generation of magnetic dipole resonances in metallic nanostructures is of great importance for constructing near-zero or even negative refractive index metamaterials. Commonly, planar two-dimensional (2D) split-ring resonators or relevant structures are basic elements of metamaterials. In this work, we introduce a three-dimensional (3D) asymmetric Au semishell composed of two nanocups with a face-to-face geometry and demonstrate two distinct magnetic resonances spontaneously in the visible-near infrared optical wavelength regime. These two magnetic resonances are from constructive and destructive hybridization of magnetic dipoles of individual nanocups in the asymmetric semishell. In contrast, complete cancellation of magnetic dipoles in the symmetric semishell leads to only a pronounced electric mode with near-zero magnetic dipole moment. These 3D asymmetric resonators provide new ways for engineering hybrid resonant modes and ultra-high near-field enhancement for the design of 3D metamaterials.

  11. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motte, Louise de la, E-mail: louise.de.la.motte@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Pedersen, Mads Møller, E-mail: phd@medit.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.thomsen@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Vogt, Katja, E-mail: Vogt@dadlnet.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Schroeder, Torben V., E-mail: Torben.Veith.schroeder@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Lonn, Lars, E-mail: lonn.lars@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery and Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-10-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics of intraluminal thrombus specimens to the appearance on magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Thirty-four patients undergoing open surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm had a preoperative MRI obtained with a 1.5 T magnet. Qualitative categorization was performed (blinded and in consensus) and correlated to intraluminal thrombus to muscle signal-intensity ratios. Morphology of intraluminal thrombus specimens collected during surgery were compared to the magnetic resonance imaging categories and specimen weight was correlated to thrombus volume measured on preoperative computer tomography angiography. Results: Blinded MRI categorization resulted in agreement in 22 out of 34 intraluminal thrombi (Kappa value 0.3, p = 0.006). Medians (p = 0.004) and distribution (p = 0.002) of signal-intensity ratios varied significantly across the three MRI categories obtained by consensus. Heterogeneous and homogenous specimen appearance corresponded to similar appearances on MRI in 78% and 55% respectively, resulting in an overall Kappa = 0.4 (p = 0.04). Intraluminal thrombus volume and weight correlated well (r{sub s} 0.831, p < 0.001) with a mean difference of 60 g (95% CI 38–80 g), without proportional bias. Conclusion: Qualitative evaluation of intraluminal thrombus morphology based on MRI can be quantified by measuring signal-intensity ratios. Concurrently a fair agreement to blinded qualitative evaluation of thrombus specimens can be obtained. However, the evaluation is impaired by loss of a large proportion of thrombus during sampling.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in laboratory petrophysical core analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.; Holland, D. J.; Gladden, L. F.; Fordham, E. J.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well-known technique in medical diagnosis and materials science. In the more specialized arena of laboratory-scale petrophysical rock core analysis, the role of MRI has undergone a substantial change in focus over the last three decades. Initially, alongside the continual drive to exploit higher magnetic field strengths in MRI applications for medicine and chemistry, the same trend was followed in core analysis. However, the spatial resolution achievable in heterogeneous porous media is inherently limited due to the magnetic susceptibility contrast between solid and fluid. As a result, imaging resolution at the length-scale of typical pore diameters is not practical and so MRI of core-plugs has often been viewed as an inappropriate use of expensive magnetic resonance facilities. Recently, there has been a paradigm shift in the use of MRI in laboratory-scale core analysis. The focus is now on acquiring data in the laboratory that are directly comparable to data obtained from magnetic resonance well-logging tools (i.e., a common physics of measurement). To maintain consistency with well-logging instrumentation, it is desirable to measure distributions of transverse (T2) relaxation time-the industry-standard metric in well-logging-at the laboratory-scale. These T2 distributions can be spatially resolved over the length of a core-plug. The use of low-field magnets in the laboratory environment is optimal for core analysis not only because the magnetic field strength is closer to that of well-logging tools, but also because the magnetic susceptibility contrast is minimized, allowing the acquisition of quantitative image voxel (or pixel) intensities that are directly scalable to liquid volume. Beyond simple determination of macroscopic rock heterogeneity, it is possible to utilize the spatial resolution for monitoring forced displacement of oil by water or chemical agents, determining capillary pressure curves, and estimating

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Ronald Meira Castro; Quadros, Marianne Siquara de [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa], e-mail: rtrindade@einstein.br; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rosemberg, Michelle; Racy, Marcelo de Castro Jorge; Tachibana, Adriano [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Service

    2010-01-15

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods in Soil Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeier, A.; van Dusschoten, D.; Blümler, P.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique to study water content, dynamics and transport in natural porous media. However, MRI systems and protocols have been developed mainly for medical purposes, i.e. for media with comparably high water contents and long relaxation times. In contrast, natural porous media like soils and rocks are characterized by much lower water contents, typically 0 benefit. Three strategies can be applied for the monitoring of water contents and dynamics in natural porous media: i) Dedicated high-field scanners (with vertical bore) allowing stronger gradients and faster switching so that shorter echo times can be realized. ii) Special measurement sequences using ultrashort rf- and gradient-pulses like single point imaging derivates (SPI, SPRITE)(1) and multi-echo methods, which monitor series of echoes and allow for extrapolation to zero time(2). Hence, the loss of signal during the first echo period may be compensated to determine the initial magnetization (= water content) as well as relaxation time maps simultaneously. iii) Finally low field( strategies will be given. References 1) Pohlmeier et al. Vadose Zone J. 7, 1010-1017 (2008) 2) Edzes et al., Magn. Res. Imag. 16, 185-196 (1998) 3) Raich H, and Blümler P, Concepts in Magn. Reson. B 23B, 16-25 (2004) 4) Pohlmeier et al. Magn. Res. Imag. doi:10.1016/j.mri.2008.06.007 (2008)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda, E-mail: ferbraggion@yahoo.com.br [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Teixeira, Sara Reis [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Volpe, Gustavo Jardim [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Divisão de Cardiologia - Universidade Johns Hopkins, Baltimore (United States); Trad, Henrique Simão [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Schmidt, André [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility.

  17. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Alwatban, A Z W

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a ...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannarius, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become one of the most important tools to screen humans in medicine; virtually every modern hospital is equipped with a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) tomograph. The potential of NMR in 3D imaging tasks is by far greater, but there is only "a handful" of MRI studies of particulate matter. The method is expensive, time-consuming, and requires a deep understanding of pulse sequences, signal acquisition, and processing. We give a short introduction into the physical principles of this imaging technique, describe its advantages and limitations for the screening of granular matter, and present a number of examples of different application purposes, from the exploration of granular packing, via the detection of flow and particle diffusion, to real dynamic measurements. Probably, X-ray computed tomography is preferable in most applications, but fast imaging of single slices with modern MRI techniques is unmatched, and the additional opportunity to retrieve spatially resolved flow and diffusion profiles without particle tracking is a unique feature.

  19. General review of magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Gavin; Kruse, Scott A; Lomas, David J

    2016-01-28

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an innovative imaging technique for the non-invasive quantification of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues via the direct visualization of propagating shear waves in vivo using a modified phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence. Fundamentally, MRE employs the same physical property that physicians utilize when performing manual palpation - that healthy and diseased tissues can be differentiated on the basis of widely differing mechanical stiffness. By performing "virtual palpation", MRE is able to provide information that is beyond the capabilities of conventional morphologic imaging modalities. In an era of increasing adoption of multi-parametric imaging approaches for solving complex problems, MRE can be seamlessly incorporated into a standard MRI examination to provide a rapid, reliable and comprehensive imaging evaluation at a single patient appointment. Originally described by the Mayo Clinic in 1995, the technique represents the most accurate non-invasive method for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis and is currently performed in more than 100 centers worldwide. In this general review, the mechanical properties of soft tissues, principles of MRE, clinical applications of MRE in the liver and beyond, and limitations and future directions of this discipline -are discussed. Selected diagrams and images are provided for illustration.

  20. Biological effects of exposure to magnetic resonance imaging: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Formica Domenico; Silvestri Sergio

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The literature on biological effects of magnetic and electromagnetic fields commonly utilized in magnetic resonance imaging systems is surveyed here. After an introduction on the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging and the electric and magnetic properties of biological tissues, the basic phenomena to understand the bio-effects are described in classical terms. Values of field strengths and frequencies commonly utilized in these diagnostic systems are reported in order to a...

  1. Ferromagnetic resonance of particulate magnetic recording tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzelmann, U.

    1990-08-01

    The room-temperature ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra of γ-Fe2O3, CrO2, and barium ferrite particulate magnetic recording tapes have been measured at microwave frequencies of 9.35 and 35 GHz for various orientations of the static and high-frequency magnetic fields with respect to the tape. For CrO2 tapes, the influence of the width of the angular distribution of the particle orientations on the FMR spectra has been studied from the nearly isotropic case up to the highly oriented case. Hysteretic behavior for a CrO2 tape as well as the effect of tape calendering for a γ-Fe2O3 tape has been observed by FMR. Experimental results are found to be in reasonable agreement with results of theoretical calculations based on a model of an ellipsoidal single-domain particle with both shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Magnetostatic interaction inside the magnetic film has been introduced by expressing the total magnetostatic energy as a combination of a part dependent on particle shape and a part dependent on the shape of the tape. As a result of a comparison of experimental data with calculated data from the model, the magnetocrystalline easy axis of the CrO2 particles is found to be parallel with the particle axis.

  2. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keevil, Stephen F [Department of Medical Physics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Guy' s Hospital, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College London, Guy' s Campus, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-21

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  3. Multidataset Refinement Resonant Diffraction, and Magnetic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attfield, J Paul

    2004-01-01

    The scope of Rietveld and other powder diffraction refinements continues to expand, driven by improvements in instrumentation, methodology and software. This will be illustrated by examples from our research in recent years. Multidataset refinement is now commonplace; the datasets may be from different detectors, e.g., in a time-of-flight experiment, or from separate experiments, such as at several x-ray energies giving resonant information. The complementary use of x rays and neutrons is exemplified by a recent combined refinement of the monoclinic superstructure of magnetite, Fe3O4, below the 122 K Verwey transition, which reveals evidence for Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) charge ordering. Powder neutron diffraction data continue to be used for the solution and Rietveld refinement of magnetic structures. Time-of-flight instruments on cold neutron sources can produce data that have a high intensity and good resolution at high d-spacings. Such profiles have been used to study incommensurate magnetic structures such as FeAsO4 and β-CrPO4. A multiphase, multidataset refinement of the phase-separated perovskite (Pr0.35Y0.07Th0.04Ca0.04Sr0.5)MnO3 has been used to fit three components with different crystal and magnetic structures at low temperatures.

  4. Purely electric and magnetic dipole resonances in metamaterial dielectric resonators through perturbation theory inspired geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Campione, Salvatore; Warne, Larry K; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe a methodology for tailoring the design of metamaterial dielectric resonators, which represent a promising path toward low-loss metamaterials at optical frequencies. We first describe a procedure to decompose the far field scattered by subwavelength resonators in terms of multipolar field components, providing explicit expressions for the multipolar far fields. We apply this formulation to confirm that an isolated high-permittivity cube resonator possesses frequency separated electric and magnetic dipole resonances, as well as a magnetic quadrupole resonance in close proximity to the electric dipole resonance. We then introduce multiple dielectric gaps to the resonator geometry in a manner suggested by perturbation theory, and demonstrate the ability to overlap the electric and magnetic dipole resonances, thereby enabling directional scattering by satisfying the first Kerker condition. We further demonstrate the ability to push the quadrupole resonance away from the degenerate dipole ...

  5. 共济失调患者手运动时脑激活区域的定量分析%Quantitative analysis of the hand motor cortex in ataxia patients using blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    元小冬; 王小洁; 王德; 赵丽君; 王守红

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the characteristics of the hand motor cortex in ataxia patients during active and passive finger-to-thumb opposition movements using bold oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI). Methods Ten right-handed healthy volunteers and 16 ataxia patients with motor cortex lesions were selected, and whole-brain BOLD-fMRI examinations were made while the subjects were performing the active and passive movements. Activated volume and intensity were recorded from the corresponding motor cortex and analyzed quantitatively. Meanwhile, the patients' coordination was evaluated using the international cooperative ataxia rating scale (ICARS). Results During passive movement of the ataxia patient's affected hands, the ipsilateral supplementary motor area (SMA) activated volume was larger than that during normal ipsilateral hand movement, and the activation intensity was also higher than that in the healthy controls. The ipsilateral cerebellum activated volume and intensity were significantly lower than those in the control group, and the frequency of appearance of the cerebellum was also less. The patients' activated volume and intensity in the ipsilateral cerebellum showed no correlation with ICARS scores. Conclusions When the ataxia patients' affected side cerebellum was dysfunctional, the ipsilateral SMA could compensate for the weak cerebellum function. The ICARS does not reflect cerebellum function.%目的 利用血氧水平依赖性功能性磁共振成像(BOLD-fMRI)技术,探讨共济失调患者在主动与被动复杂对指运动模式下关键脑功能区激活体积和强度的变化.方法 选取共济失调患者16例作为病例组,另选10名健康志愿者作为正常组.入选者均进行主动与被动复杂对指运动,在这两种运动模式下进行BOLD-fMRl检查,记录相应脑运动功能区的激活体积和强度并进行定量分析.采用共济失调量表(ICARS)对共济失调患者的

  6. Magnetic resonance tracking of fluorescent nanodiamond fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; Boudou, J. P.; Panich, A. M.; von Bardeleben, H. J.; Treussart, F.; Vul', A. Ya

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques (electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) are used for tracking the multi-stage process of the fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) produced by high-energy electron irradiation, annealing, and subsequent nano-milling. Pristine commercial high pressure and high temperature microdiamonds (MDs) with mean size 150 μm contain ~5  ×  1018 spins/g of singlet (S = 1/2) substitutional nitrogen defects P1, as well as sp3 C-C dangling bonds in the crystalline lattice. The half-field X-band EPR clearly shows (by the appearance of the intense ‘forbidden’ g = 4.26 line) that high-energy electron irradiation and annealing of MDs induce a large amount (~5  ×  1017 spins/g) of triplet (S = 1) magnetic centers, which are identified as negatively charged nitrogen vacancy defects (NV-). This is supported by EPR observations of the ‘allowed’ transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the triplet state. After progressive milling of the fluorescent MDs down to an ultrasubmicron scale (≤100 nm), the relative abundance of EPR active NV- defects in the resulting fluorescent NDs (FND) substantially decreases and, vice versa, the content of C-inherited singlet defects correlatively increases. In the fraction of the finest FNDs (mean particle size dried supernatant of ultracentrifuged aqueous dispersion of FNDs, the NV- content is found to be reduced by one order of magnitude whereas the singlet defects content increases up to ~2  ×  1019 spins/g. In addition, another triplet-type defect, which is characterized by the g = 4.00 ‘forbidden’ line, appears. On reduction of the particle size below the 20 nm limit, the ‘allowed’ EPR lines become practically unobservable, whereas the ‘forbidden’ lines remain as a reliable fingerprint of the presence of NV- centers in small ND systems. The same size reduction causes the disappearance of the characteristic hyperfine satellites in the

  7. Surface Coil for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Taimy Ricardo Ferro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, has become a vital tool for the clinical diagnosis of various diseases, especially in the Nervisos Central System and the Musculos keletal System. Coils(RF are an essential component in the generation of these images, are responsible for exciting thespins of nuclei in a sample and/or detect the resultant signal coming from them. The use of surface RF coils has increased considerably, because they have a high signal to noise ratio, a parameter that defines the quality of the image. In the present work, there was realized the theoretical design and practical implementation of a circular surface RF coil. The experimental prototype was optimized to be used in the tomograph Giroimag03  built in Medical Biophysics Center

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with panhypopituitarism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi Mucelli, R.S. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Frezza, F. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Magnaldi, S. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Proto, G. [Servizio di Endocrinologia, Ospedale Civile di Udine (Italy)

    1992-02-01

    Primary panhypopituitarism consists of functional deficiency of the anterior pituitary lobe, which appears during infancy or adolescence. The magnetic resonance findings in 10 patients with a history of primary hypopituitarism are presented. The findings include: reduced pituitary size in all cases; partially (8 cases) or totally (2 cases) empty sella; thin (4 cases), partially visible (3 cases) or absent (2 cases) pituitary stalk; absence of the posterior lobe in 9 cases; bright spot corresponding to an ectopic posterior lobe in 8 cases. These findings are similar to those already reported in pituitary dwarfism and may help understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, which seems to be related to a pituitary stalk lesion. (orig.)

  9. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.

  10. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  11. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: patient safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroletti, Elio; Corbucci, Giorgio

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is widely used in medicine. In cardiology, it is used to assess congenital or acquired diseases of the heat: and large vessels. Unless proper precautions are taken, it is generally advisable to avoid using this technique in patients with implanted electronic stimulators, such as pacemakers and defibrillators, on account of the potential risk of inducing electrical currents on the endocardial catheters, since these currents might stimulate the heart at a high frequency, thereby triggering dangerous arrhythmias. In addition to providing some basic information on pacemakers, defibrillators and MRI, and on the possible physical phenomena that may produce harmful effects, the present review examines the indications given in the literature, with particular reference to coronary stents, artificial heart valves and implantable cardiac stimulators.

  12. [Gastric magnetic resonance study (methods, semiotics)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stashuk, G A

    2003-01-01

    The paper shows the potentialities of gastric study by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The methodic aspects of gastric study have been worked out. The MRI-semiotics of the unchanged and tumor-affected wall of the stomach and techniques in examining patients with gastric cancer of various sites are described. Using the developed procedure, MRI was performed in 199 patients, including 154 patients with gastric pathology and 45 control individuals who had no altered gastric wall. Great emphasis is placed on the role of MRI in the diagnosis of endophytic (diffuse) gastric cancer that is of priority value in its morphological structure. MRI was found to play a role in the diagnosis of the spread of a tumorous process both along the walls of the stomach and to its adjacent anatomic structures.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeab, Dhafer A., E-mail: dhafer_ahmed@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, St Mary' s Campus, Imperial College NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Dick, Elizabeth; Sergot, Antoni A.; Sundblon, Lauren; Gedroyc, Wady [Department of Radiology, St Mary' s Campus, Imperial College NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel (MR Enterography, or MRE) is becoming increasingly popular as the first imaging modality for the diagnosis and follow-up of small bowel diseases. The inherent advantages of MRI, including excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability and lack of ionising radiation are well known. In addition, the use of luminal contrast agents in MRE has the added advantage of demonstrating the lumen and the wall directly, something not possible to achieve with conventional small bowel barium follow-through imaging. This review will highlight recent technical advances to this low cost, simple technique which is easily achievable in all hospitals. It will also review normal and abnormal radiological findings and highlight the value of this technique to both the clinician and patient alike in the investigation of small bowel disease.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the adrenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinig, J.W.; Doppmann, J.L.

    1986-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the adrenals was performed on 50 subjects: 5 normal volunteers, 6 Cushing patients with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, 14 patients with adrenal adenomas, 3 with adrenal carcinomas, 15 with pheochromocytomas and 7 with metastatic disease to the adrenal. The normal and hyperplastic adrenal glands were imaged in all cases. Using the signal intensity of the adrenals on a T2 weighted image, various forms of adrenal pathology could be differentiated. A ratio of signal intensity of the adrenal mass to the liver was utilized and allowed the differentitaion of adrenal adenomas from adrenal carcinomas, pheochromocytomas and metastases. Using the same ratio, metastases could be distinguished from pheochromocytomas as well. MRI appears to be particularly valuable in distinguishing clinically silent adrenal metastases from nonfunctioning adrenal adenomas.

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Steven L; Burton, Martha W

    2002-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging of language builds on almost 150 years of study in neurology, psychology, linguistics, anatomy, and physiology. In recent years, there has been an explosion of research using functional imaging technology, especially positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to understand the relationship between brain mechanisms and language processing. These methods combine high-resolution anatomic images with measures of language-specific brain activity to reveal neural correlates of language processing. This article reviews some of what has been learned about the neuroanatomy of language from these imaging techniques. We first discuss the normal case, organizing the presentation according to the levels of language, encompassing words (lexicon), sound structure (phonemes), and sentences (syntax and semantics). Next, we delve into some unusual language processing circumstances, including second languages and sign languages. Finally, we discuss abnormal language processing, including developmental and acquired dyslexia and aphasia.

  16. Fetal Cerebral Magnetic Resonance Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, András; Pogledic, Ivana; Schwartz, Ernst; Gruber, Gerlinde; Mitter, Christian; Brugger, Peter C; Langs, Georg; Schöpf, Veronika; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The recent technological advancement of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences allowed the inclusion of diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, and proton MR spectroscopy in prenatal imaging protocols. These methods provide information beyond morphology and hold the key to improving several fields of human neuroscience and clinical diagnostics. Our review introduces the fundamental works that enabled these imaging techniques, and also highlights the most recent contributions to this emerging field of prenatal diagnostics, such as the structural and functional connectomic approach. We introduce the advanced image processing approaches that are extensively used to tackle fetal or maternal movement-related image artifacts, and which are necessary for the optimal interpretation of such imaging data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Breast conserving therapy and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Tsuneaki; Masuda, Yu; Hachiya, Junichi; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Fukushima, Hisayoshi; Uchigasaki, Shinya [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-12-01

    Recently, breast conserving therapy has been widely accepted in our country. The extensive intraductal component (EIC) is a serious problem in breast conserving therapy, because it is well-known that EIC frequently causes locoregional recurrence in preserved breast parenchyma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful method for detecting breast masses due to its excellent contrast resolution. We studied the application of MRI to detection of intraductal spread in twenty-two patients. All cases were revealed invasive cancer with intraductal spread by histopathological examination. MRI findings of intraductal spread can be divided into two major groups. One is daugter nodules or strand-like enhancement and the other is bridging enhancement. We also reffered to the preliminary study of MR-guiding transcutaneous aspiration biopsy of mammographically and clinically occult breast masses. (author)

  18. Quantum information processing through nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulnes, J.D.; Sarthour, R.S.; Oliveira, I.S. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bonk, F.A.; Azevedo, E.R. de; Bonagamba, T.J. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Freitas, J.C.C. [Espirito Santo Univ., Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2005-09-15

    We discuss the applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to quantum information processing, focusing on the use of quadrupole nuclei for quantum computing. Various examples of experimental implementation of logic gates are given and compared to calculated NMR spectra and their respective density matrices. The technique of Quantum State Tomography for quadrupole nuclei is briefly described, and examples of measured density matrices in a two-qubit I = 3/2 spin system are shown. Experimental results of density matrices representing pseudo-Bell states are given, and an analysis of the entropy of theses states is made. Considering an NMR experiment as a depolarization quantum channel we calculate the entanglement fidelity and discuss the criteria for entanglement in liquid state NMR quantum information. A brief discussion on the perspectives for NMR quantum computing is presented at the end. (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance urography by virtual reality modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Navid; Sangild, Thomas; Terkildsen, Søren Vorre; Deding, Dorthe; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Pedersen, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a 3D visualization of the urinary tract by a novel virtual reality approach, and to evaluate the usefulness of this method for papillary classification as compared with 2D urogram obtained by maximum intensity projection (MIP). In one healthy pig, magnetic resonance urography was performed using a T1-weighted 3D gradient echo pulse sequence. Post-processing was performed by means of an MIP algorithm and by using 3D virtual reality modelling, followed by manual classification of papillae as being either simple or compound. The 2D MIP urogram demonstrated 6 simple and 6 compound papillae, whereas the 3D urogram demonstrated 5 simple and 7 compound papillae. In both urograms, some papillae were unsuccessfully classified. The possibility of using virtual reality devices allowed 3D rotation and offered additional diagnostic information. However, further studies should reveal its feasibility in diseased kidneys.

  20. Stafne bone cavity--magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Yoram; Puterman, Max; Bodner, Lipa

    2006-07-01

    A case of Stafne bone cavity (SBC) affecting the body of the mandible of a 51-year-old female is reported. The imaging modalities included panoramic radiograph, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Panoramic radiograph and CT were able to determine the outline of the cavity and its three dimensional shape, but failed to precisely diagnose the soft tissue content of the cavity. MR imaging demonstrated that the bony cavity is filled with soft tissue that is continuous and identical in signal with that of the submandibular salivary gland. Based on the MR imaging a diagnosis of SBC was made and no further studies or surgical treatment were initiated. MR imaging should be considered the diagnostic technique in cases where SBC is suspected. Recognition of the lesion should preclude any further treatment or surgical exploration.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foram Gala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao (Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.).

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.H.; Nathanson, J.A.; Fox, A.J.; Pelz, D.M.; Lownie, S.P.

    1995-06-01

    In order to demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the brain in patients with clinical brain death, high-field MRI was performed on 5 patients using conventional T1-weighted and T2-weighted imaging. The study showed MRI exhibited similar features for all of the patients, features which were not found in MRI of comatose patients who were not clinically brain dead. It was stated that up to now the most important limitation in MRI of patients with suspected brain death has been the extreme difficulty of moving them out of the intensive care setting. If this problem can be overcome, and it appears possible with with the advent of MRI-compatible ventilators and noninvasive monitoring, MRI could become an excellent alternative for confirming clinical diagnosis of brain death for such patients. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscholakoff, D; Higgins, C B

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a completely noninvasive technique for the evaluation of the cardiovascular system. With a multi-section technique and the spin echo pulse sequence the entire heart can be examined within six to ten minutes. All our cardiac MR studies were performed with electrocardiographic (ECG) gating, to obtain adequate resolution of the cardiac structures. With this technique, patients and animals with a variety of cardiac abnormalities were studied. The examined pathologic conditions included acute and chronic myocardial infarctions and their complications, hypertrophic and congestive cardiomyopathies, congenital heart diseases and pericardial diseases. MRI offers an enormous potential for cardiovascular diagnosis, even beyond the demonstration of pathoanatomy, because of the capability for direct tissue characterization and blood flow measurements.

  5. Quantum information processing and nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Cummins, H K

    2001-01-01

    as spectrometer pulse sequence programs. Quantum computers are information processing devices which operate by and exploit the laws of quantum mechanics, potentially allowing them to solve problems which are intractable using classical computers. This dissertation considers the practical issues involved in one of the more successful implementations to date, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Techniques for dealing with systematic errors are presented, and a quantum protocol is implemented. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to quantum computation. The physical basis of its efficiency and issues involved in its implementation are discussed. NMR quantum information processing is reviewed in more detail in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 considers some of the errors that may be introduced in the process of implementing an algorithm, and high-level ways of reducing the impact of these errors by using composite rotations. Novel general expressions for stabilising composite rotations are presented in Chapter 4 and a new class o...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic cervical injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhng, S. K.; Lee, K. S.; Sohn, K. J.; Choi, S. S.; Won, J. J. [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iri (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cevical injuries. MRI studies of 34 patients with cervical spinal injuries were analyzed retrospectively. All MRI scans were obtained with an 1.0T superconductive MRI scanner (Siemens Magnetom 42SPE) and their findings were analyzed regarding the spinal cord, bony spine, ligaments, and intervertebral disks. A variety of abnormal findings were detected: 25 cord abnormalities including cord compression (15 cases), cord edema (4 cases), syringomyelia (4 cases), myelomalacia (1 case), and hemorrhagic contusion (1 case), 18 ligamentous injuries, 22 disk herniations (9 post-traumatic, 13 chronic degenerative), 11 spine fractures, and 4 subluxations. MRI is useful in evaluating the spinal cord itself, in depicting ligamentous injuries, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in assessing the alignment of cervical spine.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Starnes, D.L.; Duchesneau, P.M.; Boumphrey, F.; Hardy, R.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Forty subjects were examined to determine the accuracy and clinical usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination of the spine. The NMR images were compared with plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomograms, and myelograms. The study included 15 patients with normal spinal cord anatomy and 25 patients whose pathological conditions included canal stenosis, herniated discs, metastatic tumors, primary cord tumor, trauma, Chiari malformations, syringomyelia, and developmental disorders. Saturation recovery images were best in differentiating between soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. NMR was excellent for the evaluation of the foramen magnum region and is presently the modality of choice for the diagnosis of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation. NMR was accurate in diagnosing spinal cord trauma and spinal canal block.

  8. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Parga, Jose Rodrigues; Arteaga, Edmundo; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao. Setor de Tomografia Computarizada e Ressonancia Magnetica Cardiovascular]. E-mail: rochitte@incor.usp.br; Kim, Raymond J. [Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, Durham, NC (United States); Tassi, Eduardo Marinho [Diagnosticos da America S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Sector of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography

    2007-03-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequent genetic cardiac disease that causes sudden death in young people, with an incidence of 1:500 adults. The routinely used criteria for worst prognosis have limited sensitivity and specificity. Thus, the estimated risk of evolving to dilated cardiomyopathy or sudden death is somewhat inaccurate, leading to management uncertainty of HCM patients. Therefore, an accurate noninvasive method for the diagnosis of HCM with prognostic value is of great importance. In the last years, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) emerged not only as a diagnostic tool, but also as a study with prognostic values, by characterizing myocardial fibrosis with great accuracy in HCM patients. Additionally, CMR identifies the types of hypertrophy, analyses the ventricular function, estimates the intraventricular gradient and allows the determination of differential diagnosis. Moreover, CMR can uniquely access myocardial fibrosis in HCM. (author)

  9. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging: challenges of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Ronald; Fowler, Kathryn; Schmidt, Ryan; Ippolito, Joseph; Siegel, Cary; Narra, Vamsi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is among the most common causes of cancer and cancer deaths in men. Screening methods and optimal treatments have become controversial in recent years. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is gaining popularity as a tool to assist diagnosis, risk assessment, and staging. However, implementation into clinical practice can be difficult, with many challenges associated with image acquisition, postprocessing, interpretation, reporting, and radiologic-pathologic correlation. Although state-of-the-art technology is available at select sites for targeting tissue biopsy and interpreting multiparametric prostate MRI, many institutions struggle with adapting this new technology into an efficient multidisciplinary model of patient care. This article reviews several of the challenges that radiologists should be aware of when integrating prostate MRI into their clinical practice.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of septic sacroiliitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrasegaran, K. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Saifuddin, A. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Coral, A. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Butt, W.P. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom))

    1994-05-01

    Five cases of septic sacroiliitis diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are presented. Imaging was performed between 2 and 14 days after onset of symptoms and consisted of varying combinations of coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), axial T2-weighted spin echo (SE), and coronal and axial pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted SE scans. Abnormalities included demonstration of sacroiliac joint effusions, bone oedema and adjacent inflammation as high signal on STIR and T2-weighted SE scans, and identification of abscesses in two cases as rim-enhancing lesions anterior to the joint on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted SE scans. The role of MRI and other forms of imaging in septic sacroiliitis is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    -angiogenic treatment is presented in the first manuscript. In the second and third manuscript, two separate methods of quantifying perfusion, blood volume and vessel permeability are presented. The methods are used to show that drug delivery to a xenografted tumor is plausible and to show possible vascular maturation...... and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti...... in a transgenic mouse model. The last manuscript presents a new method for in vivo cell labeling. This method could find use in studying the metastatic spread of cancer cells throughout the body....

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huijun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the carotid vessel wall is one promising modality in the evaluation of patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. Advances in carotid vessel wall CMR allow comprehensive assessment of morphology inside the wall, contributing substantial disease-specific information beyond luminal stenosis. Although carotid vessel wall CMR has not been widely used to screen for carotid atherosclerotic disease, many trials support its potential for this indication. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding carotid vessel wall CMR and its potential clinical application for management of carotid atherosclerotic disease.

  13. Optimal sequence for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Akata, Soichi; Ozuki, Taizo; Abe, Kimihiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) has attracted attention as a useful examination for abnormalities of the pancreaticobiliary system, because it is a simple procedure. Since there are few detailed reports on optimal sequences for MRCP, we attempted to clarify the topic. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment we used was a 1.0 Tesla super-conductive type. A fast spin echo (16 echo train) was used, and the echo space was set at 17 msec. TE was changed from 17 msec to 272 msec in 17 msec increments. TR was changed from 1,000 msec to 9,000 msec by 1,000 msec increments. Bile juice which had been collected from the PTCD tube of a patient with common bile duct cancer, was put in a test tube of 10 mm internal diameter. Saline was used as a substitute for pancreatic juice, because collection of pancreatic juice was difficult. Fat was used for contrast. Each signal intensity inside the test tube was measured and evaluated. We attempted to evaluate the signal of gastric juice by adding blueberry juice, making use of its manganese ion (Mn{sup ++}). With longer TR, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice increased. As TE became longer, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice decreased slightly, while that of fat decreased much more. In MRCP, it is necessary to set up a long TE to increase the relative signal intensity difference of fat in bile and pancreas juice. The signal intensity of gastric juice was made to disappear by the addition of blueberry juice diluted to a ratio of 1:3. (author)

  14. Observation of spin diffusion in zero-field magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, D.; Jarvie, T.P.; Sun, B.; Pines, A.

    1987-07-06

    We report the measurement of spin diffusion at zero field, observed by two-dimensional deuterium magnetic resonance of a polycrystalline sample. This demonstrates for the first time an appealing feature of pulsed zero-field magnetic resonance, namely the potential for structure determination in solids without the need for single crystals or oriented samples.

  15. Resonances and dipole moments in dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A.; Arslanagic, Samel; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2011-01-01

    An eigenfunction solution to the problem of plane wave scattering by dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders is used for a systematic investigation of their resonances. An overview of the resonances with electric and magnetic dipole moments, needed in, e.g., the synthesis...... of metamaterials, is given with an emphasis on their strength, bandwidth, and isolation....

  16. Monitoring Locally Induced Hyperthermia with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Vogel (M.)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Magnetic resonance thermometry is a relatively new and unique technology for non-invasive monitoring of (local) therapeutic temperature changes that is not yet in common use. Temperature measurements using magnetic resonance heat thermometry can be performed in several

  17. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings in lipoid pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Bréchot, J M; Buy, J.N.; Laaban, J P; Rochemaure, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia was documented by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Although strongly suggesting the presence of fat on T1 weighted images, magnetic resonance does not produce images specific for this condition. Computed tomography is the best imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, P.N.L.; Hemminga, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measure

  19. Plasma-induced magnetic responses during nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands due to resonant magnetic perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produce magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas. Self-healing (annihilation) of RMP-induced magnetic islands has been observed in helical systems, where a possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by plasma flows, which is well known in tokamaks. Thus, fundamental physics of RMP shielding is commonly investigated in both tokamaks and helical systems. In order to check this mechanism, detailed informations of magnetic island phases are necessary. In experiments, measurement of radial magnetic responses is relatively easy. In this study, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands, behavior of radial magnetic fields during the self-healing is investigated. It is confirmed that flips of radial magnetic fields are typically observed during the self-healing. Such behavior of radial magnetic responses is also observed in LHD experiments.

  20. Poor quality of early evaluations of magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, L.S.; Chalmers, T.C.; McCally, M.; Berrier, J.; Sacks, H.S.

    1988-06-10

    To study the quality of early research on the clinical efficacy of diagnostic imaging with magnetic resonance, they assessed 54 evaluations published in the first four years after introduction of this modality using ten commonly accepted criteria of research methodology. The terms sensitivity, specificity, false-positive or false-negative, accuracy, and predictive values were used infrequently. 19% of the evaluations used three terms appropriately, 48% used one or two terms, and 33% used none. Data were presented appropriately for one or more of the five terms in 59% of evaluations. A gold standard comparison with the results of an independent procedure, such as surgical or autopsy findings, was presented in 22% of evaluations. Results of another imaging procedure were described in 63% of evaluations. Only one evaluation clearly described a prospective study design, although 11 evaluations apparently were planned in advance. Not one evaluation contained an appropriate statistical analysis of the distributions of quantitative readings, blinded image readers to diagnosis or other test results, measured observer error, or randomized the order of magnetic resonance imaging and other imaging procedures. The authors concludes that health care professionals paying for expensive innovative diagnostic technology should demand better research on diagnostic efficacy.

  1. Evaluating the Systemic Right Ventricle by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance : Short Axis or Axial Slices?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bom, Teun; Romeih, Soha; Groenink, Maarten; Pieper, Petronella G.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Helbing, Willem A.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Bouma, Berto J.

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo evaluate differences in functional parameters and reproducibility between short axis and axial slice orientation in the quantitative evaluation of the systemic right ventricle by cardiovascular magnetic resonance. DesignCross-sectional evaluation comparing two methods (Bland-Altman).

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Nikhil [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)], E-mail: nikhil_ms26@yahoo.co.in; Kakar, Arun K. [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Chowdhury, Veena [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Gulati, Praveen [MR Centre, A-23 Green Park, New Delhi (India); Shankar, L. Ravi [Department of Radioiodine Uptake and Imaging, Institute of Nucler Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), Timarpur, New Delhi (India); Vindal, Anubhav [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)

    2007-12-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solitary thyroid nodules and its correlation with histopathology. Materials and methods: In this study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was carried out on 26 patients having solitary thyroid nodules. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on a 1.5 T super conductive system with gradient strength of 33 mTs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done after MRS. All 26 patients underwent surgery either because of cytopathologically proven malignancy or because of cosmetic reasons. Findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared with histopathology of thyroid specimens. Results and conclusion: It was seen that presence or absence of choline peak correlates very well with presence or absence of malignant foci with in the nodule (sensitivity = 100%; specificity = 88.88%). These results indicate that magnetic resonance spectroscopy may prove to be an useful diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid.

  3. Torque-mixing magnetic resonance spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losby, Joseph; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Grandmont, Dylan T.; Diao, Zhu; Belov, Miro; Burgess, Jacob A.; Compton, Shawn R.; Hiebert, Wayne K.; Vick, Doug; Mohammad, Kaveh; Salimi, Elham; Bridges, Gregory E.; Thomson, Douglas J.; Freeman, Mark R.

    2016-10-01

    An optomechanical platform for magnetic resonance spectroscopy will be presented. The method relies on frequency mixing of orthogonal RF fields to yield a torque amplitude (arising from the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment, in analogy to magnetic resonance detection by electromagnetic induction) on a miniaturized resonant mechanical torsion sensor. In contrast to induction, the method is fully broadband and allows for simultaneous observation of the equilibrium net magnetic moment alongside the associated magnetization dynamics. To illustrate the method, comprehensive electron spin resonance spectra of a mesoscopic, single-crystal YIG disk at room temperature will be presented, along with situations where torque spectroscopy can offer complimentary information to existing magnetic resonance detection techniques. The authors are very grateful for support from NSERC, CRC, AITF, and NINT. Reference: Science 350, 798 (2015).

  4. Italian registry of cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francone, Marco [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Di Cesare, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche Applicate e Biotecnologie, Università di L’Aquila (Italy); Cademartiri, Filippo [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pontone, Gianluca [IRCCS Centro Cardiologico Monzino (Italy); Lovato, Luigi [Policlinico S. Orsola Bologna (Italy); Matta, Gildo [Azienda ospedaliera G Brotzu Cagliari (Italy); Secchi, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Maffei, Erica [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pradella, Silvia [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi (Italy); Carbone, Iacopo [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Marano, Riccardo [Policlinico Gemelli, Università Cattolica Roma (Italy); Bacigalupo, Lorenzo [Ospedale Galliera, Genova (Italy); Chiodi, Elisabetta [Ospedale S. Anna Ferrara (Italy); Donato, Rocco [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria G. Martino, Me (Italy); Sbarbati, Stefano [Ospedale Madre Giuseppina Vannini, Roma (Italy); De Cobelli, Francesco [IRCCS S. Raffaele, Università Vita Salute, Milano (Italy); Di Renzi, Paolo [Fate Bene Fratelli Isola tiberina, Roma (Italy); Ligabue, Guido; Mancini, Andrea [Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Policlinico di Modena (Italy); Palmieri, Francesco [Diparimento di Diagnostica per immagini e radiologia interventistica, Ospedale S. Maria delle Grazie, Pozzuoli, Napoli (Italy); and others

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: Forty sites were involved in this multicenter and multivendor registry, which sought to evaluate indications, spectrum of protocols, impact on clinical decision making and safety profile of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Materials and methods: Data were prospectively collected on a 6-month period and included 3376 patients (47.2 ± 19 years; range 1–92 years). Recruited centers were asked to complete a preliminary general report followed by a single form/patient. Referral physicians were not required to exhibit any specific certificate of competency in CMR imaging. Results: Exams were performed with 1.5 T scanners in 96% of cases followed by 3 T (3%) and 1 T (1%) magnets and contrast was administered in 84% of cases. The majority of cases were performed for the workup of inflammatory heart disease/cardiomyopathies representing overall 55.7% of exams followed by the assessment of myocardial viability and acute infarction (respectively 6.9% and 5.9% of patients). In 49% of cases the final diagnosis provided was considered relevant and with impact on patient's clinical/therapeutic management. Safety evaluation revealed 30 (0.88%) clinical events, most of which due to patient's preexisting conditions. Radiological reporting was recorded in 73% of exams. Conclusions: CMR is performed in a large number of centers in Italy with relevant impact on clinical decision making and high safety profile.

  5. Experiments in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong; Lu, Wei; Choi, J.-H.; Chia, H. J.; Mirsaidov, U. M.; Guchhait, S.; Cambou, A. D.; Cardenas, R.; Park, K.; Markert, J. T.

    2006-03-01

    We report our group's effort in the construction of an 8-T, ^3 He cryostat based nuclear magnetic resonance force microscope (NMRFM). The probe has two independent 3-D of piezoelectric x-y-z positioners for precise positioning of a fiber optic interferometer and a sample/gradient-producing magnet with respect to a micro-cantilever. The piezoelectric positioners have a very uniform controllable step size with virtually no backlash. A novel RF tuning circuit board design is implemented which allows us to simply swap out one RF component board with another for experiments involving different nuclear species. We successfully fabricated and are characterizing 50μm x50μm x0.2μm double torsional oscillators. We have also been characterizing ultrasoft cantilevers whose spring constant is on the order of 10-4 N/m. We also report NMRFM data for ammonium dihydrogen phosphate(ADP) at room temperature using our 1.2-T system. Observed features include the correct shift of the NMR peak with carrier frequency, increases in signal amplitude with both RF field strength and frequency modulation amplitude, and signal oscillation (spin nutation) as a function of tipping RF pulse length. Experiments in progress on NH4MgF3 (at 1.2 T) and MgB2 (at 8.1 T) will also be briefly reviewed. Robert A. Welch Foundation grant No.F-1191 and the National Science Foundation grant No. DMR-0210383.

  6. Parametric resonance induced chaos in magnetic damped driven pendulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomeriki, Giorgi, E-mail: giokhomeriki123@gmail.com

    2016-07-15

    A damped driven pendulum with a magnetic driving force, appearing from a solenoid, where ac current flows is considered. The solenoid acts on the magnet, which is located at a free end of the pendulum. In this system the existence and interrelation of chaos and parametric resonance is theoretically examined. Derived analytical results are supported by numerical simulations and conducted experiments. - Highlights: • A damped magnetic pendulum is considered driven by off resonant magnetic field. • Our system is chaotic only when the conditions for parametric resonance are fulfilled. • Conducted experiments give a good agreement with theory and numerical simulations. • Calculated Lyapunov exponents are compared with parametric instability growth rates.

  7. Electric and magnetic dipole couplings in split ring resonator metamaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Jing; Sun Guang-Yong; and Zhu Wei-Ren

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,the electric and the magnetic dipole couplings between the outer and the inner rings of a single split ring resonator (SRR) are investigated.We numerically demonstrate that the magnetic resonance frequency can be substantially modified by changing the couplings of the electric and magnetic dipoles,and give a theoretical expression of the magnetic resonance frequency.The results in this work are expected to be conducive to a deeper understanding of the SRR and other similar metamaterials,and provide new guidance for complex metamaterials design with a tailored electromagnetic response.

  8. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z.W

    2002-07-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  9. Possibilities and limitations of sup 1 H and sup 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the identification and the quantitative determination of some naturally occurring carcinogenic risk factors. [Senecio vulgaris; Senecio vernalis; Senecio jacobaea; Euphorbia ingens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieters, L.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a phytochemical screening method for some selected carcinogenic or tumor-promoting principles in higher plants. The pyrrolizidine alkaloids from some Senecio species (Compositae or Asteraceae), and the diterpene ester from Croton tiglium L. and Euphorbia ingens E. Mey (Euphorbiaceae) were chosen as representatives of both groups. The possibilities and limitations of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR) for the analysis of mixtures of carcinogenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids were compared with high performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography with high performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography was well as gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. Senecio vulgaris L., Senecio vernalis Waldst. and Kit. and Senecio jacobaea L. were investigated.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in neurologic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Man Chung; Wan, Chu Wan; Myung, Ho Jin; Choi, Kil Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chang Beom; Oh, Chang Hyun; Cho, Zang Hee [Koear Advanced Institute of Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-02-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 0.15 Tesla resistive magnet developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science were performed in 27 patients with various neurologic diseases and compared with x-ray computed tomography (CT). The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the image quality, the diagnostic value and limitation, and the optimal pulse sequence of MR imagings with a resistive magnet. The MR images were obtained by using a variety of pulse sequence with spin echo technique including saturation recovery. T2-weighted spin echo, and/or inversion recovery with various pulse repetition (TR) and echo delay (TE) times. The MR imaging demonstrated the capability of detecting the lesions shown on CT in al cases and also detected an additional finding in one case (multiple sclerosis) which was not seen on CT. The MR imaging appeared to be more useful than CT in the evaluation of syringomyelia of spinal cord and white matter disease, while it failed to demonstrated small calcific lesion or inflammatory nodule (less than 1 cm) shown on CT and has shown somewhat poor contrast resolution in the case of meingloma. The spatial resolution of saturation recovery images was similar or superior to CT, whereas the contrast resolution of saturation recovery was inferior to CT. While the saturation recovery images have shown false negative findings in 5 patients (19%), the inversion recovery and T2-weighted spin echo have shown consistently positive findings. The inversive recovery and T2-weighted spin echo images demonstrated better contrast discrimination between normal and pathologic conditions than the saturation recovery images, but somewhat poorer spatial resolution. Authors suggest that the MR images of both the saturation recovery with 300/30 and T2-weighted spin echo with 1000/90 be used as a routine procedure and additional inversion recovery of 1300/300/30 sequence as a option if white matter disease is suspected.

  11. Waveguide volume probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a probe for use within the field of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). One embodiment relates to an RF probe for magnetic resonance imaging and/or spectroscopy comprising a conductive...... non-magnetic hollow waveguide having an internal volume and at least one open end, one or more capacitors and at least a first conductive non-magnetic wire, wherein said first conductive wire connects at least one of said one or more capacitors to opposite walls of one open end of the waveguide...... and wherein said first conductive wire and said one or more capacitors are located outside of said internal volume, wherein the internal volume of the hollow waveguide defines an imaging volume or sample volume....

  12. Controlling interactions between highly magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic (7)S3 chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on dysprosium and erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P-states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  13. Controlling interactions between highly-magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic $^7$S$_3$ chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on Dysprosium and Erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  14. Brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for hepatic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Chin-Sing; McConnell, James R.; Chu, Wei-Kom

    1993-08-01

    Liver failure can induce gradations of encephalopathy from mild to stupor to deep coma. The objective of this study is to investigate and quantify the variation of biochemical compounds in the brain in patients with liver failure and encephalopathy, through the use of water- suppressed, localized in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (HMRS). The spectral parameters of the compounds quantitated are: N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA) to Creatine (Cr) ratio, Choline (Cho) to Creatine ratio, Inositol (Ins) to Creatine ratio and Glutamine-Glutamate Amino Acid (AA) to Creatine ratio. The study group consisted of twelve patients with proven advanced chronic liver failure and symptoms of encephalopathy. Comparison has been done with results obtained from five normal subjects without any evidence of encephalopathy or liver diseases.

  15. Bias correction for magnetic resonance images via joint entropy regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Xia, Yong; Dong, Pei; Luo, Jianhua; Huang, Qiu; Feng, Dagan; Li, Yuanxiang

    2014-01-01

    Due to the imperfections of the radio frequency (RF) coil or object-dependent electrodynamic interactions, magnetic resonance (MR) images often suffer from a smooth and biologically meaningless bias field, which causes severe troubles for subsequent processing and quantitative analysis. To effectively restore the original signal, this paper simultaneously exploits the spatial and gradient features of the corrupted MR images for bias correction via the joint entropy regularization. With both isotropic and anisotropic total variation (TV) considered, two nonparametric bias correction algorithms have been proposed, namely IsoTVBiasC and AniTVBiasC. These two methods have been applied to simulated images under various noise levels and bias field corruption and also tested on real MR data. The test results show that the proposed two methods can effectively remove the bias field and also present comparable performance compared to the state-of-the-art methods.

  16. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in process engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Lynn F.; Alexander, Paul

    1996-03-01

    During the past decade, the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging techniques to problems of relevance to the process industries has been identified. The particular strengths of NMR techniques are their ability to distinguish between different chemical species and to yield information simultaneously on the structure, concentration distribution and flow processes occurring within a given process unit. In this paper, examples of specific applications in the areas of materials and food processing, transport in reactors and two-phase flow are discussed. One specific study, that of the internal structure of a packed column, is considered in detail. This example is reported to illustrate the extent of new, quantitative information of generic importance to many processing operations that can be obtained using NMR imaging in combination with image analysis.

  17. Accelerated Magnetic Resonance Thermometry in Presence of Uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Madankan, Reza; Fahrenholtz, Samuel; MacLellan, Christopher; Hazle, John; Stafford, Jason; Weinberg, Jeffrey S; Rao, Ganesh; Fuentes, David

    2015-01-01

    An accelerated model-based information theoretic approach is presented to perform the task of Magnetic Resonance (MR) thermal image reconstruction from a limited number of observed samples on k-space. The key idea of the proposed approach is to utilize information theoretic techniques to optimally detect samples of k-space that are information rich with respect to a model of the thermal data acquisition. These highly informative k-space samples are then used to refine the mathematical model and reconstruct the image. The information theoretic reconstruction is demonstrated retrospectively in data acquired during MR guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy (MRgLITT) procedures. The approach demonstrates that locations of high-information content with respect to a model based reconstruction of MR thermometry may be quantitatively identified. The predicted locations of high-information content are sorted and retrospectively extracted from the fully sampled k-space measurements data set. The effect of interactively i...

  18. Magnetic force microscopy: Quantitative issues in biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passeri, D.; Dong, C.; Reggente, M.; Angeloni, L.; Barteri, M.; Scaramuzzo, F.A.; De Angelis, F.; Marinelli, F.; Antonelli, F.; Rinaldi, F.; Marianecci, C.; Carafa, M.; Sorbo, A.; Sordi, D.; Arends, I.W.C.E.; Rossi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples

  19. Control of Transport-barrier relaxations by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Leconte, M; Garbet, X; Benkadda, S

    2009-01-01

    Transport-barrier relaxation oscillations in the presence of resonant magnetic perturbations are investigated using three-dimensional global fluid turbulence simulations from first principles at the edge of a tokamak. It is shown that resonant magnetic perturbations have a stabilizing effect on these relaxation oscillations and that this effect is due mainly to a modification of the pressure profile linked to the presence of both residual residual magnetic island chains and a stochastic layer.

  20. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-25

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for