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Sample records for quantitative inorganic profile

  1. Determination of the inorganic components in the Brazilian medicinal plants from 'in natura' and capsule forms, using X-ray fluorescence techniques (WD and ED systems). Quantitative inorganic profile definition; Determinacao de componentes inorganicos em plantas medicinais, comercializadas em formas de po (capsulas) e 'in natura', utilizando a tecnica de fluorescencia de raios X por dispersao de comprimento de onda (WDXRF) e por dispersao de energia (EDXRF). Definicao de perfis inorganicos quantitativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Manuel Octavio Marques

    2004-07-01

    The Na, Mg, P, S, CI, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr concentrations in the Stryphnodendron barbatiman (Barbatimao), Malva officinalis (Malva), Salvia officinalis (Salvia), Ginkgo folium (Ginkgo biloba), Echinodorus macrophylius (Chapeu de couro), Paulina cupana (Guarana), Valeriana officinalis (Valeriana), Cordia salicifolia (Porangaba), Calendula officinalis (Calendula), Solidago microglossa (Arnica), Arnica montana (Arnica) and Schinus molle (Aroeira) species were concentrations. The specimens were sampled 'in natura' (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) and capsule (powder) forms from different commercial labels. The elemental determination was outlined by wavelength dispersive (WDXRF) and energy dispersive (EDXRF) X-ray fluorescence techniques using, respectively, linear regression and fundamental parameter methods. The repeatability and accuracy of the methods were evaluated using the certified reference material NIST 1547 - 'Peach Leaves'. Statistical treatments, such as Chauvenet and Cochrane, ANOVA and Z-score tests, were applied. A quantitative inorganic profile was obtained for each specie from 'in natura' and capsule forms. Different inorganic compositions were observed in the different parts (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) of the Schinus molle (Aroeira), Arnica montana (Arnica), Calendula officinalis (Calendula) and Echinodorus macrophylius (Chapeu de couro) species. (author)

  2. Profiling of illicit cocaine seized in China by ICP-MS analysis of inorganic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuimei; Hua, Zhendong; Meng, Xin

    2017-07-01

    For the first time in China, the inorganic element profiling of cocaine specimens was performed at the National Narcotics Laboratory. An inductive coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method was developed and validated for simultaneous analysis of 26 inorganic elements, including sodium (Na), magnesium (Mg), aluminuim (Al), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), silver (Ag), cadmium (Cd), antimony (Sb), barium (Ba), lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), thallium (Tl), lead (Pb), thorium (Th), and uranium (U) in illicit cocaine samples. Ultrasonic assisted dissolution was applied for sample preparation. Minimum sample preparation and analysis time were required, which was suitable for routine analysis. After the analysis of 183 cocaine samples seized from 2011 to 2015, the element concentration ranges of cocaine sample were obtained. Based on the quantitative data set of 26 inorganic elements in 131 linked/un-linked cocaine samples, fifty combinations of pre-treatment methods and distance/correlation measurements were tested for their potential discrimination power for cocaine profiling, and normalization+standardization+logarithm (N+S+L)/Cosine correlation exhibited the best result. After hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) analysis of 183 cocaine samples, 21 groups of linked samples were found within and between provinces, which provide intelligence for case connection and revealing of the distribution networks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Materials Depth Profiling Using Low Energy Cesium Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Céline; Houssiau, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The structures developed in organic electronics, such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) or organic photovoltaics (OPVs) devices always involve hybrid interfaces, joining metal or oxide layers with organic layers. No satisfactory method to probe these hybrid interfaces physical chemistry currently exists. One promising way to analyze such interfaces is to use in situ ion beam etching, but this requires ion beams able to depth profile both inorganic and organic layers. Mono- or diatomic ion beams commonly used to depth profile inorganic materials usually perform badly on organics, while cluster ion beams perform excellently on organics but yield poor results when organics and inorganics are mixed. Conversely, low energy Cs(+) beams (organic and inorganic materials depth profiling with comparable erosion rates. This paper shows a successful depth profiling of a model hybrid system made of metallic (Au, Cr) and organic (tyrosine) layers, sputtered with 500 eV Cs(+) ions. Tyrosine layers capped with metallic overlayers are depth profiled easily, with high intensities for the characteristic molecular ions and other specific fragments. Metallic Au or Cr atoms are recoiled into the organic layer where they cause some damage near the hybrid interface as well as changes in the erosion rate. However, these recoil implanted metallic atoms do not appear to severely degrade the depth profile overall quality. This first successful hybrid depth profiling report opens new possibilities for the study of OLEDs, organic solar cells, or other hybrid devices.

  4. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Materials Depth Profiling Using Low Energy Cesium Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Céline; Houssiau, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The structures developed in organic electronics, such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) or organic photovoltaics (OPVs) devices always involve hybrid interfaces, joining metal or oxide layers with organic layers. No satisfactory method to probe these hybrid interfaces physical chemistry currently exists. One promising way to analyze such interfaces is to use in situ ion beam etching, but this requires ion beams able to depth profile both inorganic and organic layers. Mono- or diatomic ion beams commonly used to depth profile inorganic materials usually perform badly on organics, while cluster ion beams perform excellently on organics but yield poor results when organics and inorganics are mixed. Conversely, low energy Cs+ beams (hybrid system made of metallic (Au, Cr) and organic (tyrosine) layers, sputtered with 500 eV Cs+ ions. Tyrosine layers capped with metallic overlayers are depth profiled easily, with high intensities for the characteristic molecular ions and other specific fragments. Metallic Au or Cr atoms are recoiled into the organic layer where they cause some damage near the hybrid interface as well as changes in the erosion rate. However, these recoil implanted metallic atoms do not appear to severely degrade the depth profile overall quality. This first successful hybrid depth profiling report opens new possibilities for the study of OLEDs, organic solar cells, or other hybrid devices.

  5. Quantitative DNA Methylation Profiling in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerpohl, Ole; Haake, Andrea; Kolarova, Julia; Siebert, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms including DNA methylation are fundamental for the regulation of gene expression. Epigenetic alterations can lead to the development and the evolution of malignant tumors as well as the emergence of phenotypically different cancer cells or metastasis from one single tumor cell. Here we describe bisulfite pyrosequencing, a technology to perform quantitative DNA methylation analyses, to detect aberrant DNA methylation in malignant tumors.

  6. Quantitative 1D saturation profiles on chalk by NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Dan; Topp, Simon; Stensgaard, Anders;

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative one-dimensional saturation profiles showing the distribution of water and oil in chalk core samples are calculated from NMR measurements utilizing a 1D CSI spectroscopy pulse sequence. Saturation profiles may be acquired under conditions of fluid flow through the sample. Results reveal...

  7. Direct-push geochemical profiling for assessment of inorganic chemical heterogeneity in aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulmeister, M.K.; Healey, J.M.; Butler, J.J.; McCall, G.W.

    2004-01-01

    Discrete-depth sampling of inorganic groundwater chemistry is essential for a variety of site characterization activities. Although the mobility and rapid sampling capabilities of direct-push techniques have led to their widespread use for evaluating the distribution of organic contaminants, complementary methods for the characterization of spatial variations in geochemical conditions have not been developed. In this study, a direct-push-based approach for high-resolution inorganic chemical profiling was developed at a site where sharp chemical contrasts and iron-reducing conditions had previously been observed. Existing multilevel samplers (MLSs) that span a fining-upward alluvial sequence were used for comparison with the direct-push profiling. Chemical profiles obtained with a conventional direct-push exposed-screen sampler differed from those obtained with an adjacent MLS because of sampler reactivity and mixing with water from previous sampling levels. The sampler was modified by replacing steel sampling components with stainless-steel and heat-treated parts, and adding an adapter that prevents mixing. Profiles obtained with the modified approach were in excellent agreement with those obtained from an adjacent MLS for all constituents and parameters monitored (Cl, NO3, Fe, Mn, DO, ORP, specific conductance and pH). Interpretations of site redox conditions based on field-measured parameters were supported by laboratory analysis of dissolved Fe. The discrete-depth capability of this approach allows inorganic chemical variations to be described at a level of detail that has rarely been possible. When combined with the mobility afforded by direct-push rigs and on-site methods of chemical analysis, the new approach is well suited for a variety of interactive site-characterization endeavors. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Storage/Turnover rate of inorganic carbon and its dissolvable part in the profile of saline/alkaline soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yugang; Wang, Zhongyuan; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Soil inorganic carbon is the most common form of carbon in arid and semiarid regions, and has a very long turnover time. However, little is known about dissolved inorganic carbon storage and its turnover time in these soils. With 81 soil samples taken from 6 profiles in the southern Gurbantongute Desert, China, we investigated the soil inorganic carbon (SIC) and the soil dissolved inorganic carbon (SDIC) in whole profiles of saline and alkaline soils by analyzing their contents and ages with radiocarbon dating. The results showed that there is considerable SDIC content in SIC, and the variations of SDIC and SIC contents in the saline soil profile were much larger than that in the alkaline profile. SDIC storage accounted for more than 20% of SIC storage, indicating that more than 1/5 of the inorganic carbon in both saline and alkaline soil is not in non-leachable forms. Deep layer soil contains considerable inorganic carbon, with more than 80% of the soil carbon stored below 1 m, whether for SDIC or SIC. More importantly, SDIC ages were much younger than SIC in both saline soil and alkaline soil. The input rate of SDIC and SIC ranged from 7.58 to 29.54 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and 1.34 to 5.33 g C m(-2) yr(-1) respectively for saline soil, and from 1.43 to 4.9 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and 0.79 to 1.27 g C m(-2) yr(-1)respectively for alkaline soil. The comparison of SDIC and SIC residence time showed that using soil inorganic carbon to estimate soil carbon turnover would obscure an important fraction that contributes to the modern carbon cycle: namely the shorter residence and higher input rate of SDIC. This is especially true for SDIC in deep layers of the soil profile.

  9. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T. J., E-mail: t.j.mitchell@dur.ac.uk; Saunter, C. D.; O’Nions, W.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D. [Centre for Advanced Instrumentation and Biophysical Sciences Institute, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences.

  10. Determination of organic compounds in medicinal plants, commercialized in capsulated forms and 'in natura' by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF). Determination of quantitative inorganic profiles; Determinacao de componentes organicos em plantas medicinais, comercializadas em forma de po (capsulas) e 'in natura', utilizando a tecnica de fluorescencia de raios X por dispersao de comprimento de onda (WDXRF). Determinacao de perfis inorganicos quantitativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Manuel Octavio M.; Sato, Ivone Mulako; Salvador, Vera Lucia R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Quimica e Meio Ambiente]. E-mail: lawless@usp.br

    2005-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence technique was used to determine major and trace elements for five Brazilian commercial medicinal plants. The bromobutane (Barbatimao), Ginkgo folium (Ginkgo biloba), Echinodorus macrophyllus (Chapeu de couro), Valeriana officinalis (Valeriana), Cordia salicifolia (Porangaba) samples were collected from three to six different commercial suppliers. The species were collected 'in natura' (leaves, flowers, barks and roots) and capsulated forms. The samples were grinded in liquid N{sub 2} atmosphere and double layer pressed pellet were prepared. The elements Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb e Sr concentrations were determined by individual calibration curves. The precision and accuracy of method were evaluated by certified reference material, NIST 1547 - Peach Leaves and the Chauvenet, Cochrane, ANOVA and Z-score statistical tests were applied. Each specimen presented a distinct inorganic profile and a great variation in its composition was observed. The inorganic profile will contribute for the elaboration of a quality and security guide to assure the phytotherapics commercialization. Moreover, these profiles could be used as complementary data to active farmaco compounds profiles for specimen's ratification. (author)

  11. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, M.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A. [Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Quantitative Structure Property Relations (QSPR) for Predicting Molar Diamagnetic Susceptibilities, χm, of Inorganic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU,Lai-Long; HE,Hong-Mei; FENG,Chang-Jun

    2007-01-01

    For predicting the molar diamagnetic susceptibilities of inorganic compounds, a novel connectivity index mG based on adjacency matrix of molecular graphs and ionic parameter gi was proposed. The gi is defined as gi= (ni0.5-0.91)4·xi0.5/Zi0.5, where Zi, ni, xi are the valence, the outer electronic shell primary quantum number, and the electronegativity of atom I respectively. The good QSPR models for the molar diamagnetic susceptibilities can be constructed from 0G and 1G by using multivariate linear regression (MLR) method and artificial neural network (NN) method. The correlation coefficient r, standard error, and average absolute deviation of the MLR model and NN model are 0.9868, 5.47 cgs, 4.33 cgs, 0.9885, 5.09 cgs and 4.06 cgs, respectively, for the 144 inorganic compounds. The cross-validation by using the leave-one-out method demonstrates that the MLR model is highly reliable from the point of view of statistics. The average absolute deviations of predicted values of the molar diamagnetic susceptibility of other 62 inorganic compounds (test set) are 4.72 cgs and 4.06 cgs for the MLR model and NN model. The results show that the current method is more effective than literature methods for estimating the molar diamagnetic susceptibility of an inorganic compound. Both MLR and NN methods can provide acceptable models for the prediction of the molar diamagnetic susceptibilities. The NN model for the molar diamagnetic susceptibilities appears more reliable than the MLR model.

  13. High-throughput quantitation of inorganic nanoparticle biodistribution at the single-cell level using mass cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Sang Sabrina; Atukorale, Prabhani U.; Moynihan, Kelly D.; Bekdemir, Ahmet; Rakhra, Kavya; Tang, Li; Stellacci, Francesco; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2017-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) are studied as drug carriers, radiosensitizers and imaging agents, and characterizing nanoparticle biodistribution is essential for evaluating their efficacy and safety. Tracking NPs at the single-cell level with current technologies is complicated by the lack of reliable methods to stably label particles over extended durations in vivo. Here we demonstrate that mass cytometry by time-of-flight provides a label-free approach for inorganic nanoparticle quantitation in cells. Furthermore, mass cytometry can enumerate AuNPs with a lower detection limit of ∼10 AuNPs (3 nm core size) in a single cell with tandem multiparameter cellular phenotyping. Using the cellular distribution insights, we selected an amphiphilic surface ligand-coated AuNP that targeted myeloid dendritic cells in lymph nodes as a peptide antigen carrier, substantially increasing the efficacy of a model vaccine in a B16-OVA melanoma mouse model. This technology provides a powerful new level of insight into nanoparticle fate in vivo. PMID:28094297

  14. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror.

  15. Quantitative conversion of phytate to inorganic phosphorus in soybean seeds expressing a bacterial phytase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilyeu, Kristin D; Zeng, Peiyu; Coello, Patricia; Zhang, Zhanyuan J; Krishnan, Hari B; Bailey, April; Beuselinck, Paul R; Polacco, Joe C

    2008-02-01

    Phytic acid (PA) contains the major portion of the phosphorus in the soybean (Glycine max) seed and chelates divalent cations. During germination, both minerals and phosphate are released upon phytase-catalyzed degradation of PA. We generated a soybean line (CAPPA) in which an Escherichia coli periplasmic phytase, the product of the appA gene, was expressed in the cytoplasm of developing cotyledons. CAPPA exhibited high levels of phytase expression, >or=90% reduction in seed PA, and concomitant increases in total free phosphate. These traits were stable, and, although resulted in a trend for reduced emergence and a statistically significant reduction in germination rates, had no effect on the number of seeds per plant or seed weight. Because phytate is not digested by monogastric animals, untreated soymeal does not provide monogastrics with sufficient phosphorus and minerals, and PA in the waste stream leads to phosphorus runoff. The expression of a cytoplasmic phytase in the CAPPA line therefore improves phosphorus availability and surpasses gains achieved by other reported transgenic and mutational strategies by combining in seeds both high phytase expression and significant increases in available phosphorus. Thus, in addition to its value as a high-phosphate meal source, soymeal from CAPPA could be used to convert PA of admixed meals, such as cornmeal, directly to utilizable inorganic phosphorus.

  16. Stand-off Raman spectroscopy: a powerful technique for qualitative and quantitative analysis of inorganic and organic compounds including explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachhuber, Bernhard; Ramer, Georg; Hobro, Alison; Chrysostom, Engelene T H; Lendl, Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    A pulsed stand-off Raman system has been built and optimised for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of inorganic and organic samples including explosives. The system consists of a frequency doubled Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 Hz, 4.4 ns pulse length), aligned coaxially with a 6″ Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope for the collection of Raman scattered light. The telescope was coupled via a fibre optic bundle to an Acton standard series SP-2750 spectrograph with a PI-MAX 1024RB intensified CCD camera equipped with a 500-ps gating option for detection. Gating proved to be essential for achieving high signal-to-noise ratios in the recorded stand-off Raman spectra. In some cases, gating also allowed suppression of disturbing fluorescence signals. For the first time, quantitative analysis of stand-off Raman spectra was performed using both univariate and multivariate methods of data analysis. To correct for possible variation in instrumental parameters, the nitrogen band of ambient air was used as an internal standard. For the univariate method, stand-off Raman spectra obtained at a distance of 9 m on sodium chloride pellets containing varying amounts of ammonium nitrate (0-100%) were used. For the multivariate quantification of ternary xylene mixtures (0-100%), stand-off spectra at a distance of 5 m were used. The univariate calibration of ammonium nitrate yielded R (2) values of 0.992, and the multivariate quantitative analysis yielded root mean square errors of prediction of 2.26%, 1.97% and 1.07% for o-, m- and p-xylene, respectively. Stand-off Raman spectra obtained at a distance of 10 m yielded a detection limit of 174 μg for NaClO(3). Furthermore, to assess the applicability of stand-off Raman spectroscopy for explosives detection in "real-world" scenarios, their detection on different background materials (nylon, polyethylene and part of a car body) and in the presence of interferents (motor oil, fuel oil and soap) at a distance of 20 m was also

  17. Quantitative proteome profiling of normal human circulating microparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer T; Iversen, Line V;

    2012-01-01

    proteome using nano-LC-MS/MS on an LTQ-Orbitrap with optimized sample collection, preparation, and analysis of 12 different normal samples. Analytical and procedural variation were estimated in triply processed samples analyzed in triplicate from two different donors. Label-free quantitation was validated...... by the correlation of cytoskeletal protein intensities with MP numbers obtained by flow cytometry. Finally, the validity of using pooled samples was evaluated using overlap protein identification numbers and multivariate data analysis. Using conservative parameters, 536 different unique proteins were quantitated...

  18. Urinary arsenic profiles reveal exposures to inorganic arsenic from private drinking water supplies in Cornwall, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, D. R. S.; Watts, M. J.; Hamilton, E. M.; Ander, E. L.; Close, R. M.; Exley, K. S.; Crabbe, H.; Leonardi, G. S.; Fletcher, T.; Polya, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    Private water supplies (PWS) in Cornwall, South West England exceeded the current WHO guidance value and UK prescribed concentration or value (PCV) for arsenic of 10 μg/L in 5% of properties surveyed (n = 497). In this follow-up study, the first of its kind in the UK, volunteers (n = 207) from 127 households who used their PWS for drinking, provided urine and drinking water samples for total As determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and urinary As speciation by high performance liquid chromatography ICP-MS (HPLC-ICP-MS). Arsenic concentrations exceeding 10 μg/L were found in the PWS of 10% of the volunteers. Unadjusted total urinary As concentrations were poorly correlated (Spearman’s ρ = 0.36 (P private water supplies as the dominant source of inorganic As exposure in the study population of PWS users.

  19. CBCL Pediatric Bipolar Disorder Profile and ADHD: Comorbidity and Quantitative Trait Loci Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.; McCracken, James T.; Dang, Jeffery; Clark, Shaunna; Nelson, Stanley F.; Smalley, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    The pediatric bipolar disorder profile of the Child Behavior checklist is used to differentiate patterns of comorbidity and to search for quantitative trait loci in multiple affected ADHD sibling pairs. The CBCL-PBD profiling identified 8 percent of individuals with severe psychopathology and increased rates of oppositional defiant, conduct and…

  20. CBCL Pediatric Bipolar Disorder Profile and ADHD: Comorbidity and Quantitative Trait Loci Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.; McCracken, James T.; Dang, Jeffery; Clark, Shaunna; Nelson, Stanley F.; Smalley, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    The pediatric bipolar disorder profile of the Child Behavior checklist is used to differentiate patterns of comorbidity and to search for quantitative trait loci in multiple affected ADHD sibling pairs. The CBCL-PBD profiling identified 8 percent of individuals with severe psychopathology and increased rates of oppositional defiant, conduct and…

  1. Quantitive analysis of gully long profiles on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Susan; Balme, Matthew; Murray, John; Towner, Martin

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the scale, slope and curvature properties of gully long profiles on Earth and Mars to ascertain whether gullies on Mars are formed by alluvial and/or debris flow processes. During this investigation we also compared generic slope profiles on Mars to those with gullies. To perform these analyses we used digital elevation models (DEMs) for Earth, the majority of which were derived from ~ 1 m resolution LiDAR data from the UK's NERC ARSF and the USA's NSF NCALM. For Mars we used a technique developed by Kreslavsky [1] to extract elevation data from pairs of RDR HiRISE images. We successfully validated this technique by comparing its results to those from HiRISE DEMs made using automated stereo photogrammetry techniques [2]. We found that gullies produced by debris flow have properties distinct from those formed by alluvial processes on Earth. In general, debris flow gullies are less concave than alluvial gullies, have a basal concavity and have higher slopes than alluvial gullies. We then compared our results from Earth to the gully profiles on Mars and found that properties of gullies on Mars overlap those of both debris flow and alluvial gullies on Earth, however, gullies on Mars are slightly more similar to terrestrial debris flow gullies. In addition gully long profiles on Mars are distinct from generic slope profiles on Mars with some overlap - this shows that the gully forming process has a marked morphological impact on martian slopes. Our observed latitudinal patterns in gully formation are in agreement with previous investigations [3, 4], with greater numbers of gullies found at ~40° and ~70° latitude north and south. In addition we found that gullies at mid-latitudes are more densely packed and occur across whole slope sections (rather than isolated patches), suggesting this region has preferential conditions for gully formation. Our morphological comparison with gullies on Earth suggests that the formation process shifts from pure water

  2. Assessing the Accuracy of Quantitative Molecular Microbial Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise M. O'Sullivan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The application of high-throughput sequencing in profiling microbial communities is providing an unprecedented ability to investigate microbiomes. Such studies typically apply one of two methods: amplicon sequencing using PCR to target a conserved orthologous sequence (typically the 16S ribosomal RNA gene or whole (metagenome sequencing (WGS. Both methods have been used to catalog the microbial taxa present in a sample and quantify their respective abundances. However, a comparison of the inherent precision or bias of the different sequencing approaches has not been performed. We previously developed a metagenomic control material (MCM to investigate error when performing different sequencing strategies. Amplicon sequencing using four different primer strategies and two 16S rRNA regions was examined (Roche 454 Junior and compared to WGS (Illumina HiSeq. All sequencing methods generally performed comparably and in good agreement with organism specific digital PCR (dPCR; WGS notably demonstrated very high precision. Where discrepancies between relative abundances occurred they tended to differ by less than twofold. Our findings suggest that when alternative sequencing approaches are used for microbial molecular profiling they can perform with good reproducibility, but care should be taken when comparing small differences between distinct methods. This work provides a foundation for future work comparing relative differences between samples and the impact of extraction methods. We also highlight the value of control materials when conducting microbial profiling studies to benchmark methods and set appropriate thresholds.

  3. Quantitative Time Profiling of Children's Activity and Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Claire M; Clark, Cain C T; Holton, Mark D; Stratton, Gareth; Summers, Huw D

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish children's mechanical movement patterns during a standardized assessment of fitness by using an accelerometer. Further to this, our objective was to use the information from the accelerometer to profile individual time courses of exercise, across the cohort. A multistage fitness test study was performed with 103 children (mean ± SD age = 10.3 ± 0.6 yr). Children wore an ankle-mounted accelerometer, and gait data were collected on radial acceleration traces obtained at a frequency of 40 Hz. Time-resolved metrics of foot impact force, maximum leg lift angle, and stride frequency were used to profile children's performance across the test duration. A whole-history metric of stride quality, based on the changing ratio of stride length to stride frequency, was used in bivariate analyses of physical performance and body metrics. Stride angle derived by our protocol was found to have a strong positive correlation with integrated acceleration, synonymous with counts, widely used in the sport science community (r = 0.81, 0.79, and 0.80 across different stages of the multistage fitness test). Accelerometer data show that differing performance in the test is related to the children's ability to accurately control their gait, with high performers displaying a linearly increasing speed, delivered through stride extension and well matched to the demand level of the test. A negative correlation was found between stride quality and body measures of body mass index (r = -0.61) and body mass (r = -0.60). Profiles of the gait parameters provide information on the mechanics of child's motion, allowing detailed assessment of multiple parameter during increasing intensities of exercise.

  4. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Profiling of Anabaena sp. Strain 90 under Inorganic Phosphorus Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teikari, Jonna; Österholm, Julia; Kopf, Matthias; Battchikova, Natalia; Wahlsten, Matti; Aro, Eva-Mari; Hess, Wolfgang R; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2015-08-01

    Inorganic phosphorus (Pi) is one of the main growth-limiting factors of diazotrophic cyanobacteria. Due to human activity, the availability of Pi has increased in water bodies, resulting in eutrophication and the formation of massive cyanobacterial blooms. In this study, we examined the molecular responses of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 90 to phosphorus deprivation, aiming at the identification of candidate genes to monitor the Pi status in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, this study increased the basic understanding of how phosphorus affects diazotrophic and bloom-forming cyanobacteria as a major growth-limiting factor. Based on RNA sequencing data, we identified 246 differentially expressed genes after phosphorus starvation and 823 differentially expressed genes after prolonged Pi limitation, most of them related to central metabolism and cellular growth. The transcripts of the genes related to phosphorus transport and assimilation (pho regulon) were most upregulated during phosphorus depletion. One of the most increased transcripts encodes a giant protein of 1,869 amino acid residues, which contains, among others, a phytase-like domain. Our findings predict its crucial role in phosphorus starvation, but future studies are still needed. Using two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we found 43 proteins that were differentially expressed after prolonged phosphorus stress. However, correlation analysis unraveled an association only to some extent between the transcriptomic and proteomic abundances. Based on the present results, we suggest that the method used for monitoring the Pi status in cyanobacterial bloom should contain wider combinations of pho regulon genes (e.g., PstABCS transport systems) in addition to the commonly used alkaline phosphatase gene alone.

  5. Inorganic geochemical characterisation of the Velenje lignite in the representative P-9k/92 borehole profile (Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Markič

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The study is based on 30 lignite, 6 footwall and 3 hanging-wall interval samples. Lignite seam of the Pliocene age is 101 m thick in the treated profile.Minorelementgeochemistryis evaluated by the contents of 11 standard oxides, among which SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3 and CaO form the bulk composition. Trace-element characterization is based on contents of 46 elements. Stot., Ctot., Corg. and loss on ignition (LOI at 1000 ˚C were analysed in addition. All analyses (by ICP-AES, ICP-MS, Leco were carried out on the “whole lignite”/“whole rock” samples in the Acme Analytical Laboratories (Canada. Recalculation to the “pure inorganic matter” basis was carried out in order to obtain realistic relations between contentsof minor element oxides. Contents of the minor element oxides in the inorganic matter are dependant on the ash content, and, an ash content of 20-25 % was found out as an important “geochemical threshold”. SiO2 + Al2O3, together with positively corelated K2O and TiO2, increase with increasing ash content. On the contrary, CaO, MgO and Fe2O3, they increase with decreasing ash content. Affinity of organic binding of Ca,Mg,and(probablyof Fe is ascertained by negligible contents of Cinorg. Abundances of the great majority of trace elements are mostly lower and/or normal in comparison to the world coals. However, As, U, and Mo are typomorphic for the treated lignite. In spite of that, they are not critical. Widespread areas of different lithologies with higher contents of these elements are known throughout the world as well as in Slovenia.

  6. QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE PROFILE OF ALOIN ISOLATED FROM ALOE VERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Himesh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A.vera is known to contain well over 100 separate ingredients or constituents between those found in the leaf and those found in the mucilaginous gel inside the leaf. It is also known that some of the ingredients found in the leaf such as Aloin, or the Emodins are recognized as having laxative and antimicrobial properties. Aloin is Folk Traditional Medicine used for Healing of minor cutaneous injuries, such a blisters, abrasions, cuts, burns, bites and scares, protection and care of external skin, such as cleansing, moisturizing, tightening and in mixes as sunscreens and anti-chapping compounds. In the present work, we have investigated the qualitative and quantitative determination of Aloin isolated from the A.vera. Qualitative estimation was carried out by treating the sample with bromine water and thin layer chromatographic (TLC method. The simultaneous determination of the Aloin was carried out by HPLC technique. HPLC separation was performed on a Cyber Lab C-18 column (250 x 4.0 mm, 5μ using methanol (A and 0.34% acetic acid (B using a isocratic elution as follow: 0–30 min, 40%A–80% A, 60%B–20% B. The flow rate was 1.0 mL/min, and a column temperature of 25°C. The injection volume was 25µl, and UV detection was effected at 297.5 nm.

  7. Quantitative Analysis and Fingerprint Profiles for Quality Control of Fructus Schisandrae by Gas Chromatography: Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Yong-Gang Xia; Bing-You Yang; Jun Liang; Qi Yang; Di Wang; Hai-Xue Kuang

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, rapid, and effective quality assessment method for Fructus Schisandrae by gas chromatography-mass spectrum (GC-MS). The method was established by using specific lignan fingerprint profiles and quantitation of characteristic compounds in this herbal medicine. The GC-MS fingerprints of 15 batches of Schisandra samples from different regions of China showed similar lignan profiles. Five peaks were selected as characteristic peaks, and all of these were identified b...

  8. Profiling of soil volatile organic compounds after long-term application of inorganic, organic and organic-inorganic mixed fertilizers and their effect on plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Waseem; Mei, Xinlan; Wei, Zhong; Ling, Ning; Yuan, Jun; Wang, Jichen; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2017-12-31

    The complexity of soil processes involved in the production, consumption and accumulation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) makes hard to access the overall dynamics of VOCs in the soil. In this study, the field soil, applied with inorganic (CF), organic (OF) and inorganic-organic mixed (CFOF) fertilizers for ten years was evaluated for the emission of VOCs at different temperature and moisture levels. We identified 30-50 soil emitted VOCs representing the most common soil VOCs groups by using the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The highest total emission of VOCs was found in OF treatment, but it was non-significantly different with CF treatment. The emission of VOCs was significantly increased with the decrease in moisture contents and increase in the temperature of the soil. Among different fertilizer treatments, the emission of VOCs was significantly higher in OF treatment at 5% moisture, and in CF and OF treatments at 35°C. Further, the VOCs emitted from soil treated with CFOF showed the highest increase in plant growth while CF and OF treatments showed similar results. The VOCs were also extracted from the soil using methanol to better understand the dynamics of VOCs. The abundance of VOCs extracted from the soil was 44-61%, while the richness was 65-70% higher than the VOCs emitted from the soil in different treatments. Taken together the results of emitted and extracted VOCs from the soil, we conclude that the fertilizers are able to discriminate among the VOC patterns of soil. In addition, most of the VOCs are retained in the soil and the emission of VOCs from soil depends on the type of VOCs, soil properties and environmental conditions; however, more research is required to find out better soil VOCs analysis methods. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Differential DNA methylation profile of key genes in malignant prostate epithelial cells transformed by inorganic arsenic or cadmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelch, Katherine E.; Tokar, Erik J.; Merrick, B. Alex; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous work shows altered methylation patterns in inorganic arsenic (iAs)-or cadmium (Cd)-transformed epithelial cells. Here, the methylation status near the transcriptional start site was assessed in the normal human prostate epithelial cell line (RWPE-1) that was malignantly transformed by 10 μM Cd for 11 weeks (CTPE) or 5 μM iAs for 29 weeks (CAsE-PE), at which time cells showed multiple markers of acquired cancer phenotype. Next generation sequencing of the transcriptome of CAsE-PE cells identified multiple dysregulated genes. Of the most highly dysregulated genes, five genes that can be relevant to the carcinogenic process (S100P, HYAL1, NTM, NES, ALDH1A1) were chosen for in depth analysis of the DNA methylation profile. DNA was isolated, bisulfite converted, and combined bisulfite restriction analysis was used to identify differentially methylated CpG sites, which was confirmed with bisulfite sequencing. Four of the five genes showed differential methylation in transformants relative to control cells that was inversely related to altered gene expression. Increased expression of HYAL1 (>25-fold) and S100P (>40-fold) in transformants was correlated with hypomethylation near the transcription start site. Decreased expression of NES (>15-fold) and NTM (>1000-fold) in transformants was correlated with hypermethylation near the transcription start site. ALDH1A1 expression was differentially expressed in transformed cells but was not differentially methylated relative to control. In conclusion, altered gene expression observed in Cd and iAs transformed cells may result from altered DNA methylation status. PMID:25922126

  10. Differential DNA methylation profile of key genes in malignant prostate epithelial cells transformed by inorganic arsenic or cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelch, Katherine E.; Tokar, Erik J. [National Toxicology Program Laboratory, Division of the National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Merrick, B. Alex [Molecular Toxicology and Informatics Group, Biomolecular Screening Branch, Division of the National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Morrisville, NC 27560 (United States); Waalkes, Michael P., E-mail: waalkes@niehs.nih.gov [National Toxicology Program Laboratory, Division of the National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Previous work shows altered methylation patterns in inorganic arsenic (iAs)- or cadmium (Cd)-transformed epithelial cells. Here, the methylation status near the transcriptional start site was assessed in the normal human prostate epithelial cell line (RWPE-1) that was malignantly transformed by 10 μM Cd for 11 weeks (CTPE) or 5 μM iAs for 29 weeks (CAsE-PE), at which time cells showed multiple markers of acquired cancer phenotype. Next generation sequencing of the transcriptome of CAsE-PE cells identified multiple dysregulated genes. Of the most highly dysregulated genes, five genes that can be relevant to the carcinogenic process (S100P, HYAL1, NTM, NES, ALDH1A1) were chosen for an in-depth analysis of the DNA methylation profile. DNA was isolated, bisulfite converted, and combined bisulfite restriction analysis was used to identify differentially methylated CpG sites, which was confirmed with bisulfite sequencing. Four of the five genes showed differential methylation in transformants relative to control cells that was inversely related to altered gene expression. Increased expression of HYAL1 (> 25-fold) and S100P (> 40-fold) in transformants was correlated with hypomethylation near the transcriptional start site. Decreased expression of NES (> 15-fold) and NTM (> 1000-fold) in transformants was correlated with hypermethylation near the transcriptional start site. ALDH1A1 expression was differentially expressed in transformed cells but was not differentially methylated relative to control. In conclusion, altered gene expression observed in Cd and iAs transformed cells may result from altered DNA methylation status. - Highlights: • Cd and iAs are known human carcinogens, yet neither appears directly mutagenic. • Prior data suggest epigenetic modification plays a role in Cd or iAs induced cancer. • Altered methylation of four misregulated genes was found in Cd or iAs transformants. • The resulting altered gene expression may be relevant to cellular

  11. Inorganic profile of some Brazilian medicinal plants obtained from ethanolic extract and ''in natura'' samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, M.O.M.; de Sousa, P.T.; Salvador, V.L.R.; Sato, I.M.

    2004-10-03

    The Anadenathera macrocarpa, Schinus molle, Hymenaea courbaril, Cariniana legalis, Solidago microglossa and Stryphnodendron barbatiman, were collected ''in natura'' samples (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) from different commercial suppliers. The pharmaco-active compounds in ethanolic extracts had been made by the Mato Grosso Federal University (UFMT). The energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometry was used for the elemental analysis in different parts of the plants and respective ethanolic extracts. The Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Rb, S, Sr and Zn concentrations were determined by the fundamental parameters method. Some specimens showed a similar inorganic profile for ''in natura'' and ethanolic extract samples and some ones showed a distinct inorganic profile. For example, the Anadenathera macrocarpa showed a similar concentration in Mg, P, Cu, Zn and Rb elements in ''in natura'' and ethanolic extract samples; however very different concentration in Na, S, Cl, K , Ca, Mn, Fe and Sr was observed in distinctive samples. The Solidago microglossa showed the K, Ca, Cl, S, Mg, P and Fe elements as major constituents in both samples, suggesting that the extraction process did not affect in a considerable way the ''in natura'' inorganic composition. The elemental composition of the different parts of the plants (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) has been also determined. For example, the Schinus molle specimen showed P, K, Cl and Ca elements as major constituents in the seeds, Mg, K and Sr in the barks and Mg, S, Cl and Mn in the leaves, demonstrating a differentiated elementary distribution. These inorganic profiles will contribute to evaluate the quality control of the Brazilian herbaceous trade and also will assist to identify which parts of the medicinal plants has greater therapeutic effect.

  12. Quantitative Profiling of Long-Chain Bases by Mass Tagging and Parallel Reaction Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing, Christer S; Bilgin, Mesut; Fabregat, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain bases (LCBs) are both intermediates in sphingolipid metabolism and potent signaling molecules that control cellular processes. To understand how regulation of sphingolipid metabolism and levels of individual LCB species impinge upon physiological and pathophysiological processes requires...... sensitive and specific assays for monitoring these molecules. Here we describe a shotgun lipidomics method for quantitative profiling of LCB molecules. The method employs a "mass-tag" strategy where LCBs are chemically derivatized with deuterated methyliodide (CD3I) to produce trimethylated derivatives...... having a positively charged quaternary amine group. This chemical derivatization minimizes unwanted in-source fragmentation of LCB analytes and prompts a characteristic trimethylaminium fragment ion that enables sensitive and quantitative profiling of LCB molecules by parallel reaction monitoring...

  13. Quantitative Analysis and Fingerprint Profiles for Quality Control of Fructus Schisandrae by Gas Chromatography: Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Gang Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a simple, rapid, and effective quality assessment method for Fructus Schisandrae by gas chromatography-mass spectrum (GC-MS. The method was established by using specific lignan fingerprint profiles and quantitation of characteristic compounds in this herbal medicine. The GC-MS fingerprints of 15 batches of Schisandra samples from different regions of China showed similar lignan profiles. Five peaks were selected as characteristic peaks, and all of these were identified by using GC-MS techniques. The relative retention times of these characteristic peaks in the GC-MS fingerprint were established as an important parameter for identification of Schisandra samples. Meanwhile, relative peak areas may be a feasible approach to discriminate the S. chinensis and S. sphenanthera. Finally, these pharmacologically active constituents in the titled plant, schisandrins A–C and schizandrols A and B, were quantitatively determined using a validated GC-MS method.

  14. Profiling and Quantitation of Bacterial Carotenoids by Liquid Chromatography and Photodiode Array Detection

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    An analytical method for the profiling and quantitative determination of carotenoids in bacteria is described. Exhaustive extraction of the pigments from four selected bacterial strains required treatment of the cells with potassium hydroxide or liquefied phenol or both before the addition of the extracting solvent (methanol or diethyl ether). The carotenoids in the extracts were separated by nonaqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography in conjunction with photodiode array absorption detec...

  15. Building the Connectivity Map of epigenetics: chromatin profiling by quantitative targeted mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Amanda L; Taylor, Jordan E; Maier, Verena K; Wu, Xiaoyun; Feeney, Caitlin M; Udeshi, Namrata D; Peach, Sally E; Boehm, Jesse S; Lee, Jeannie T; Carr, Steven A; Jaffe, Jacob D

    2015-01-15

    Epigenetic control of genome function is an important regulatory mechanism in diverse processes such as lineage commitment and environmental sensing, and in disease etiologies ranging from neuropsychiatric disorders to cancer. Here we report a robust, high-throughput targeted, quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) method to rapidly profile modifications of the core histones of chromatin that compose the epigenetic landscape, enabling comparisons among cells with differing genetic backgrounds, genomic perturbations, and drug treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative dopant profiling in semiconductors. A new approach to Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgart, Christine

    2012-07-01

    Failure analysis and optimization of semiconducting devices request knowledge of their electrical properties. To meet the demands of today's semiconductor industry, an electrical nanometrology technique is required which provides quantitative information about the doping profile and which enables scans with a lateral resolution in the sub-10 nm range. In the presented work it is shown that Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a very promising electrical nanometrology technique to face this challenge. The technical and physical aspects of KPFM measurements on semiconductors required for the correct interpretation of the detected KPFM bias are discussed. A new KPFM model is developed which enables the quantitative correlation between the probed KPFM bias and the dopant concentration in the investigated semiconducting sample. Quantitative dopant profiling by means of the new KPFM model is demonstrated by the example of differently structured, n- and p-type doped silicon. Additionally, the transport of charge carriers during KPFM measurements, in particular in the presence of intrinsic electric fields due to vertical and horizontal pn junctions as well as due to surface space charge regions, is discussed. Detailed investigations show that transport of charge carriers in the semiconducting sample is a crucial aspect and has to be taken into account when aiming for a quantitative evaluation of the probed KPFM bias.

  17. Quantitative damage depth profiles in arsenic implanted HgCdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobre, C., E-mail: clement.lobre@cea.fr [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Jalabert, D. [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble 1 UMR-E, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Vickridge, I.; Briand, E.; Benzeggouta, D. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UMR 7588 du CNRS, Universite de Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Mollard, L. [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Jouneau, P.H. [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble 1 UMR-E, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Ballet, P. [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2013-10-15

    Rutherford backscattering experiments under channeling conditions (RBS-c) have been carried out on Hg{sub 0.77}Cd{sub 0.23}Te (MCT) layers implanted with arsenic. Accurate damage profiles have been extracted through a simple formalism for implanted and annealed layers. Quantitative damage profiles are correlated with structural defects observed by bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM) and chemical composition measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Evolution of damage for increasing ion implantation fluence has been investigated by these three complementary techniques. Evidence is found of irradiation induced annealing during implantation. A fast damage recovery has been observed for post-implantation thermal anneals. In the case of an implanted layer annealed during 1 h, the damage profile, associated with arsenic concentration measurements, indicates the presence of complexes involving arsenic.

  18. Quantitative Methylation Profiles for Multiple Tumor Suppressor Gene Promoters in Salivary Gland Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durr, Megan L.; Mydlarz, Wojciech K.; Shao, Chunbo; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Chuang, Alice Y.; Hoque, Mohammad O.; Westra, William H.; Liegeois, Nanette J.; Califano, Joseph A.; Sidransky, David; Ha, Patrick K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Methylation profiling of tumor suppressor gene (TSGs) promoters is quickly becoming a powerful diagnostic tool for the early detection, prognosis, and even prediction of clinical response to treatment. Few studies address this in salivary gland tumors (SGTs); hence the promoter methylation profile of various TSGs was quantitatively assessed in primary SGT tissue to determine if tumor-specific alterations could be detected. Methodology DNA isolated from 78 tumor and 17 normal parotid gland specimens was assayed for promoter methylation status of 19 TSGs by fluorescence-based, quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP). The data were utilized in a binary fashion as well as quantitatively (using a methylation quotient) allowing for better profiling and interpretation of results. Principal Findings The average number of methylation events across the studied genes was highest in salivary duct carcinoma (SDC), with a methylation value of 9.6, compared to the normal 4.5 (p<0.0003). There was a variable frequency and individual methylation quotient detected, depending on the TSG and the tumor type. When comparing normal, benign, and malignant SGTs, there was a statistically significant trend for increasing methylation in APC, Mint 1, PGP9.5, RAR-β, and Timp3. Conclusions/Significance Screening promoter methylation profiles in SGTs showed considerable heterogeneity. The methylation status of certain markers was surprisingly high in even normal salivary tissue, confirming the need for such controls. Several TSGs were found to be associated with malignant SGTs, especially SDC. Further study is needed to evaluate the potential use of these associations in the detection, prognosis, and therapeutic outcome of these rare tumors. PMID:20520817

  19. Technical Note: Precise quantitative measurements of total dissolved inorganic carbon from small amounts of seawater using a gas chromatographic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hansen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT is one of the most frequently measured parameters used to calculate the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in seawater. Its determination has become increasingly important because of the rising interest in the biological effects of ocean acidification. Coulometric and infrared detection methods are currently favored in order to precisely quantify CT. These methods however are not sufficiently validated for CT measurements of biological experiments manipulating seawater carbonate chemistry with an extended CT measurement range (~1250–2400 μmol kg–1 compared to natural open ocean seawater (~1950–2200 μmol kg−1. The requirement of total sample amounts between 0.1–1 L seawater in the coulometric- and infrared detection methods potentially exclude their use for experiments working with much smaller volumes. Additionally, precise CT analytics become difficult with high amounts of biomass (e.g., phytoplankton cultures or even impossible in the presence of planktonic calcifiers without sample pre-filtration. Filtration however, can alter CT concentration through gas exchange induced by high pressure. Addressing these problems, we present precise quantification of CT using a small, basic and inexpensive gas chromatograph as a CT analyzer. Our technique is able to provide a repeatability of ±3.1 μmol kg−1, given by the pooled standard deviation over a CT range typically applied in acidification experiments. 200 μL of sample is required to perform the actual CT measurement. The total sample amount needed is 12 mL. Moreover, we show that sample filtration is applicable with only minor alteration of the CT. The method is simple, reliable and with low cumulative material costs. Hence, it is potentially attractive for all researchers experimentally manipulating the seawater carbonate system.

  20. Quantitative proteomic profiling of breast cancers using a multiplexed microfluidic platform for immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minseok S; Kwon, Seyong; Kim, Taemin; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, Je-Kyun

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes a multiplexed microfluidic immunohistochemistry (IHC)/immunocytochemistry (ICC) platform for quantitative proteomic profiling in breast cancer samples. Proteomic profiling via ICC was examined for four breast cancer cell lines (AU-565, HCC70, MCF-7, and SK-BR-3). The microfluidic device enabled 20 ICC assays on a biological specimen at the same time and a 16-fold decrease in time consumption, and could be used to quantitatively compare the expression level of each biomarker. The immunohistochemical staining from the microfluidic system showed an accurate localization of protein and comparable quality to that of the conventional IHC method. Although AU-565 and SK-BR-3 cell lines were classified by luminal subtype and adenocarcinomas and were derived from the same patient, weak p63 expression was seen only in SK-BR-3. The HCC70 cell line showed a triple-negative (estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptor-negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative) phenotype and showed only cytokeratin 5 expression, a representative basal/myoepithelial cell marker. To demonstrate the applicability of the system to clinical samples for proteomic profiling, we were also able to apply this platform to human breast cancer tissue. This result indicates that the microfluidic IHC/ICC platform is useful for accurate histopathological diagnoses using numerous specific biomarkers simultaneously, facilitating the individualization of cancer therapy.

  1. Profiling and quantitation of bacterial carotenoids by liquid chromatography and photodiode array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelis, H J; De Leenheer, A P

    1989-12-01

    An analytical method for the profiling and quantitative determination of carotenoids in bacteria is described. Exhaustive extraction of the pigments from four selected bacterial strains required treatment of the cells with potassium hydroxide or liquefied phenol or both before the addition of the extracting solvent (methanol or diethyl ether). The carotenoids in the extracts were separated by nonaqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography in conjunction with photodiode array absorption detection. The identity of a peak was considered definitive only when both its retention time and absorption spectrum, before and after chemical reactions, matched those of a reference component. In the absence of the latter, most peaks could be tentatively identified. Two examples illustrate how in the analysis of pigmented bacteria errors may result from using nonchromatographic procedures or liquid chromatographic methods lacking sufficient criteria for peak identification. Carotenoids of interest were determined quantitatively when the authentic reference substance was available or, alternatively, were determined semiquantitatively.

  2. Quantitative assessment of RNA-protein interactions with high-throughput sequencing-RNA affinity profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Abdullah; Tome, Jacob M; Friedman, Robin C; Gheba, Dan; Schroth, Gary P; Lis, John T

    2015-08-01

    Because RNA-protein interactions have a central role in a wide array of biological processes, methods that enable a quantitative assessment of these interactions in a high-throughput manner are in great demand. Recently, we developed the high-throughput sequencing-RNA affinity profiling (HiTS-RAP) assay that couples sequencing on an Illumina GAIIx genome analyzer with the quantitative assessment of protein-RNA interactions. This assay is able to analyze interactions between one or possibly several proteins with millions of different RNAs in a single experiment. We have successfully used HiTS-RAP to analyze interactions of the EGFP and negative elongation factor subunit E (NELF-E) proteins with their corresponding canonical and mutant RNA aptamers. Here we provide a detailed protocol for HiTS-RAP that can be completed in about a month (8 d hands-on time). This includes the preparation and testing of recombinant proteins and DNA templates, clustering DNA templates on a flowcell, HiTS and protein binding with a GAIIx instrument, and finally data analysis. We also highlight aspects of HiTS-RAP that can be further improved and points of comparison between HiTS-RAP and two other recently developed methods, quantitative analysis of RNA on a massively parallel array (RNA-MaP) and RNA Bind-n-Seq (RBNS), for quantitative analysis of RNA-protein interactions.

  3. Conversion of cDNA differential display results (DDRT-PCR into quantitative transcription profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koopmann Birger

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression studies on non-model organisms require open-end strategies for transcription profiling. Gel-based analysis of cDNA fragments allows to detect alterations in gene expression for genes which have neither been sequenced yet nor are available in cDNA libraries. Commonly used protocols for gel-based transcript profiling are cDNA differential display (DDRT-PCR and cDNA-AFLP. Both methods have been used merely as qualitative gene discovery tools so far. Results We developed procedures for the conversion of cDNA Differential Display data into quantitative transcription profiles. Amplified cDNA fragments are separated on a DNA sequencer and detector signals are converted into virtual gel images suitable for semi-automatic analysis. Data processing consists of four steps: (i cDNA bands in lanes corresponding to samples treated with the same primer combination are matched in order to identify fragments originating from the same transcript, (ii intensity of bands is determined by densitometry, (iii densitometric values are normalized, and (iv intensity ratio is calculated for each pair of corresponding bands. Transcription profiles are represented by sets of intensity ratios (control vs. treatment for cDNA fragments defined by primer combination and DNA mobility. We demonstrated the procedure by analyzing DDRT-PCR data on the effect of secondary metabolites of oilseed rape Brassica napus on the transcriptome of the pathogenic fungus Leptosphaeria maculans. Conclusion We developed a data processing procedure for the quantitative analysis of amplified cDNA fragments separated by electrophoresis. The system utilizes common software and provides an open-end alternative to DNA microarray analysis of the transcriptome. It is expected to work equally well with DDRT-PCR and cDNA-AFLP data and be useful particularly in reseach on organisms for which microarray analysis is not available or economical.

  4. Quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia by using UHPLC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Jia-Ning; Wang, Jing-Rong; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2016-02-12

    In the present study, 101 sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its five mycelia were quantitatively profiled by using a fully validated UHPLC-MS method. The results revealed that a general rank order for the abundance of different classes of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia is sphingoid bases/ceramides > phosphosphingolipids > glycosphingolipids. However, remarkable sphingolipid differences between wild Cordyceps and its mycelia were observed. One is that sphingoid base is the dominant sphingolipid in wild Cordyceps, whereas ceramide is the major sphingolipid in mycelia. Another difference is that the abundance of sphingomyelins in wild Cordyceps is almost 10-folds higher than those in most mycelia. The third one is that mycelia contain more inositol phosphorylceramides and glycosphingolipids than wild Cordyceps. Multivariate analysis was further employed to visualize the difference among wild Cordyceps and different mycelia, leading to the identification of respective sphingolipids as potential chemical markers for the differentiation of wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia. This study represents the first report on the quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia, which provided comprehensive chemical evidence for the quality control and rational utilization of wild Cordyceps and its mycelia.

  5. Simulated In Situ Determination of Soil Profile Organic and Inorganic Carbon With LIBS and VisNIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricklemyer, R. S.; Brown, D. J.; Clegg, S. M.; Barefield, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    There is growing need for rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods to measure, and verify soil organic carbon (SOC) change for national greenhouse gas accounting and the development of a soil carbon trading market. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Visible and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (VisNIR) are complementary analytical techniques that have the potential to fill that need. The LIBS method provides precise elemental analysis of soils, but generally cannot distinguish between organic C and inorganic C. VisNIR has been established as a viable technique for measuring soil properties including SOC and inorganic carbon (IC). As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership, 240 intact core samples (3.8 x 50 cm) have been collected from six agricultural fields in north central Montana, USA. Each of these core samples were probed concurrently with LIBS and VisNIR at 2.5, 7.5, 12.5, 17.5, 22.5, 27.5, 35 and 45 cm (+/- 1.5 cm) depths. VisNIR measurements were taken using an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD, Boulder, CO, USA) Agrispec spectrometer to determine the partition of SOC vs. IC in the samples. The LIBS scans were collected with the LANL LIBS Core Scanner Instrument which collected the entire 200 - 900 nm plasma emission including the 247.8 nm carbon emission line. This instrument also collected the emission from the elements typically found in inorganic carbon (Ca and Mg) and organic carbon (H, O, and N). Subsamples of soil (~ 4 g) were taken from interrogation points for laboratory determination of SOC and IC. Using this analytical data, we constructed several full spectrum multivariate VisNIR/LIBS calibration models for SOC and IC. These models were then applied to independent validation cores for model evaluation.

  6. Quantitative biomedical annotation using medical subject heading over-representation profiles (MeSHOPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Warren A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MEDLINE®/PubMed® indexes over 20 million biomedical articles, providing curated annotation of its contents using a controlled vocabulary known as Medical Subject Headings (MeSH. The MeSH vocabulary, developed over 50+ years, provides a broad coverage of topics across biomedical research. Distilling the essential biomedical themes for a topic of interest from the relevant literature is important to both understand the importance of related concepts and discover new relationships. Results We introduce a novel method for determining enriched curator-assigned MeSH annotations in a set of papers associated to a topic, such as a gene, an author or a disease. We generate MeSH Over-representation Profiles (MeSHOPs to quantitatively summarize the annotations in a form convenient for further computational analysis and visualization. Based on a hypergeometric distribution of assigned terms, MeSHOPs statistically account for the prevalence of the associated biomedical annotation while highlighting unusually prevalent terms based on a specified background. MeSHOPs can be visualized using word clouds, providing a succinct quantitative graphical representation of the relative importance of terms. Using the publication dates of articles, MeSHOPs track changing patterns of annotation over time. Since MeSHOPs are quantitative vectors, MeSHOPs can be compared using standard techniques such as hierarchical clustering. The reliability of MeSHOP annotations is assessed based on the capacity to re-derive the subset of the Gene Ontology annotations with equivalent MeSH terms. Conclusions MeSHOPs allows quantitative measurement of the degree of association between any entity and the annotated medical concepts, based directly on relevant primary literature. Comparison of MeSHOPs allows entities to be related based on shared medical themes in their literature. A web interface is provided for generating and visualizing MeSHOPs.

  7. Quantitatively integrating molecular structure and bioactivity profile evidence into drug-target relationship analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Tianlei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public resources of chemical compound are in a rapid growth both in quantity and the types of data-representation. To comprehensively understand the relationship between the intrinsic features of chemical compounds and protein targets is an essential task to evaluate potential protein-binding function for virtual drug screening. In previous studies, correlations were proposed between bioactivity profiles and target networks, especially when chemical structures were similar. With the lack of effective quantitative methods to uncover such correlation, it is demanding and necessary for us to integrate the information from multiple data sources to produce an comprehensive assessment of the similarity between small molecules, as well as quantitatively uncover the relationship between compounds and their targets by such integrated schema. Results In this study a multi-view based clustering algorithm was introduced to quantitatively integrate compound similarity from both bioactivity profiles and structural fingerprints. Firstly, a hierarchy clustering was performed with the fused similarity on 37 compounds curated from PubChem. Compared to clustering in a single view, the overall common target number within fused classes has been improved by using the integrated similarity, which indicated that the present multi-view based clustering is more efficient by successfully identifying clusters with its members sharing more number of common targets. Analysis in certain classes reveals that mutual complement of the two views for compound description helps to discover missing similar compound when only single view was applied. Then, a large-scale drug virtual screen was performed on 1267 compounds curated from Connectivity Map (CMap dataset based on the fused similarity, which obtained a better ranking result compared to that of single-view. These comprehensive tests indicated that by combining different data representations; an improved

  8. A Quantitative Profiling Tool for Diverse Genomic Data Types Reveals Potential Associations between Chromatin and Pre-mRNA Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremsky, Isaac; Bellora, Nicolás; Eyras, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing, and genome-based datasets in general, are often represented as profiles centered at reference points to study the association of protein binding and other signals to particular regulatory mechanisms. Although these profiles often provide compelling evidence of these associations, they do not provide a quantitative assessment of the enrichment, which makes the comparison between signals and conditions difficult. In addition, a number of biases can confound profiles, but are rarely accounted for in the tools currently available. We present a novel computational method, ProfileSeq, for the quantitative assessment of biological profiles to provide an exact, nonparametric test that specific regions of the test profile have higher or lower signal densities than a control set. The method is applicable to high-throughput sequencing data (ChIP-Seq, GRO-Seq, CLIP-Seq, etc.) and to genome-based datasets (motifs, etc.). We validate ProfileSeq by recovering and providing a quantitative assessment of several results reported before in the literature using independent datasets. We show that input signal and mappability have confounding effects on the profile results, but that normalizing the signal by input reads can eliminate these biases while preserving the biological signal. Moreover, we apply ProfileSeq to ChIP-Seq data for transcription factors, as well as for motif and CLIP-Seq data for splicing factors. In all examples considered, the profiles were robust to biases in mappability of sequencing reads. Furthermore, analyses performed with ProfileSeq reveal a number of putative relationships between transcription factor binding to DNA and splicing factor binding to pre-mRNA, adding to the growing body of evidence relating chromatin and pre-mRNA processing. ProfileSeq provides a robust way to quantify genome-wide coordinate-based signal. Software and documentation are freely available for academic use at https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/profileseq/.

  9. A Quantitative Profiling Tool for Diverse Genomic Data Types Reveals Potential Associations between Chromatin and Pre-mRNA Processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Kremsky

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing, and genome-based datasets in general, are often represented as profiles centered at reference points to study the association of protein binding and other signals to particular regulatory mechanisms. Although these profiles often provide compelling evidence of these associations, they do not provide a quantitative assessment of the enrichment, which makes the comparison between signals and conditions difficult. In addition, a number of biases can confound profiles, but are rarely accounted for in the tools currently available. We present a novel computational method, ProfileSeq, for the quantitative assessment of biological profiles to provide an exact, nonparametric test that specific regions of the test profile have higher or lower signal densities than a control set. The method is applicable to high-throughput sequencing data (ChIP-Seq, GRO-Seq, CLIP-Seq, etc. and to genome-based datasets (motifs, etc.. We validate ProfileSeq by recovering and providing a quantitative assessment of several results reported before in the literature using independent datasets. We show that input signal and mappability have confounding effects on the profile results, but that normalizing the signal by input reads can eliminate these biases while preserving the biological signal. Moreover, we apply ProfileSeq to ChIP-Seq data for transcription factors, as well as for motif and CLIP-Seq data for splicing factors. In all examples considered, the profiles were robust to biases in mappability of sequencing reads. Furthermore, analyses performed with ProfileSeq reveal a number of putative relationships between transcription factor binding to DNA and splicing factor binding to pre-mRNA, adding to the growing body of evidence relating chromatin and pre-mRNA processing. ProfileSeq provides a robust way to quantify genome-wide coordinate-based signal. Software and documentation are freely available for academic use at https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/profileseq/.

  10. Benchmark dose profiles for joint-action continuous data in quantitative risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Roland C; Piegorsch, Walter W

    2013-09-01

    Benchmark analysis is a widely used tool in biomedical and environmental risk assessment. Therein, estimation of minimum exposure levels, called benchmark doses (BMDs), that induce a prespecified benchmark response (BMR) is well understood for the case of an adverse response to a single stimulus. For cases where two agents are studied in tandem, however, the benchmark approach is far less developed. This paper demonstrates how the benchmark modeling paradigm can be expanded from the single-agent setting to joint-action, two-agent studies. Focus is on continuous response outcomes. Extending the single-exposure setting, representations of risk are based on a joint-action dose-response model involving both agents. Based on such a model, the concept of a benchmark profile-a two-dimensional analog of the single-dose BMD at which both agents achieve the specified BMR-is defined for use in quantitative risk characterization and assessment.

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Human Pluripotency and Neural Specification by In-Depth (PhosphoProteomic Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyas Singec

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs can be utilized for precise analysis of cell type identities during early development. We established a highly efficient neural induction strategy and an improved analytical platform, and determined proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of hESCs and their specified multipotent neural stem cell derivatives (hNSCs. This quantitative dataset (nearly 13,000 proteins and 60,000 phosphorylation sites provides unique molecular insights into pluripotency and neural lineage entry. Systems-level comparative analysis of proteins (e.g., transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, kinase families, phosphorylation sites, and numerous biological pathways allowed the identification of distinct signatures in pluripotent and multipotent cells. Furthermore, as predicted by the dataset, we functionally validated an autocrine/paracrine mechanism by demonstrating that the secreted protein midkine is a regulator of neural specification. This resource is freely available to the scientific community, including a searchable website, PluriProt.

  12. Highly sensitive and specific derivatization strategy to profile and quantitate eicosanoids by UPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ting; Tie, Cai; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Jin-Lan

    2017-01-15

    Eicosanoids are signaling molecules mainly oxidized from arachidonic acid (ARA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). They have attracted increasing attention from the scientists attributing to their essential physiological functions. However, their quantification have long been challenged by the low abundance, high structure similarity, poor stability and limited ionization efficiency. In this paper, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatograph coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) strategy was developed for the comprehensive profiling of more than 60 eicosanoids based on an efficient derivatization reagent 2,4-bis(diethylamino)-6-hydrazino-1,3,5-triazine (T3) and general multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) parameters. Carboxylic acid of eicosanoid was converted to amide in 30 min at 4 °C with derivatization yield larger than 99%. Limits of quantitation (LOQs) for derivatized eicosanoids varied from 0.05 to 50 pg depending on their structures. The sensitivities of derivatized eicosanoids were enhanced by 10- to 5000-folds compared to free eicosanoids. Stabilities of T3 modified eicosanoids were also highly improved compared to free eicosanoids. This new method can also be used to quantify eicosanoids in bio-samples using isotopic internal standards with high efficiency and reliability within 19 min. 46 and 50 eicosanoids in rat plasma and heart tissue from control and acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) model rats were respectively profiled and quantitated using this new method. And 24 of 46 and 25 of 50 eicosanoids were found to be significantly changed between control and model groups. The changed eicosanoids related to AMI modeling were further statistically analyzed and interpreted based on eicosanoid metabolism pathway.

  13. Large-Scale and Deep Quantitative Proteome Profiling Using Isobaric Labeling Coupled with Two-Dimensional LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Marina A; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive, quantitative information on abundances of proteins and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs) can potentially provide novel biological insights into diseases pathogenesis and therapeutic intervention. Herein, we introduce a quantitative strategy utilizing isobaric stable isotope-labeling techniques combined with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) for large-scale, deep quantitative proteome profiling of biological samples or clinical specimens such as tumor tissues. The workflow includes isobaric labeling of tryptic peptides for multiplexed and accurate quantitative analysis, basic reversed-phase LC fractionation and concatenation for reduced sample complexity, and nano-LC coupled to high resolution and high mass accuracy MS analysis for high confidence identification and quantification of proteins. This proteomic analysis strategy has been successfully applied for in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of tumor samples and can also be used for integrated proteome and PTM characterization, as well as comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis across samples from large clinical cohorts.

  14. Massively parallel digital high resolution melt for rapid and absolutely quantitative sequence profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Daniel Ortiz; Mack, Hannah; Jupe, Julietta; Hawker, Sinead; Kulkarni, Ninad; Hedayatnia, Behnam; Zhang, Yang; Lawrence, Shelley; Fraley, Stephanie I.

    2017-02-01

    In clinical diagnostics and pathogen detection, profiling of complex samples for low-level genotypes represents a significant challenge. Advances in speed, sensitivity, and extent of multiplexing of molecular pathogen detection assays are needed to improve patient care. We report the development of an integrated platform enabling the identification of bacterial pathogen DNA sequences in complex samples in less than four hours. The system incorporates a microfluidic chip and instrumentation to accomplish universal PCR amplification, High Resolution Melting (HRM), and machine learning within 20,000 picoliter scale reactions, simultaneously. Clinically relevant concentrations of bacterial DNA molecules are separated by digitization across 20,000 reactions and amplified with universal primers targeting the bacterial 16S gene. Amplification is followed by HRM sequence fingerprinting in all reactions, simultaneously. The resulting bacteria-specific melt curves are identified by Support Vector Machine learning, and individual pathogen loads are quantified. The platform reduces reaction volumes by 99.995% and achieves a greater than 200-fold increase in dynamic range of detection compared to traditional PCR HRM approaches. Type I and II error rates are reduced by 99% and 100% respectively, compared to intercalating dye-based digital PCR (dPCR) methods. This technology could impact a number of quantitative profiling applications, especially infectious disease diagnostics.

  15. Quantitative lateral flow strip assays as User-Friendly Tools To Detect Biomarker Profiles For Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooij, Anouk; Tjon Kon Fat, Elisa M.; Richardus, Renate; van den Eeden, Susan J. F.; Wilson, Louis; de Dood, Claudia J.; Faber, Roel; Alam, Korshed; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.; Geluk, Annemieke

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a debilitating, infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Despite the availability of multidrug therapy, transmission is unremitting. Thus, early identification of M. leprae infection is essential to reduce transmission. The immune response to M. leprae is determined by host genetics, resulting in paucibacillary (PB) and multibacillary (MB) leprosy associated with dominant cellular or humoral immunity, respectively. This spectral pathology of leprosy compels detection of immunity to M. leprae to be based on multiple, diverse biomarkers. In this study we have applied quantitative user friendly lateral flow assays (LFAs) for four immune markers (anti-PGL-I antibodies, IL-10, CCL4 and IP-10) for whole blood samples from a longitudinal BCG vaccination field-trial in Bangladesh. Different biomarker profiles, in contrast to single markers, distinguished M. leprae infected from non-infected test groups, patients from household contacts (HHC) and endemic controls (EC), or MB from PB patients. The test protocol presented in this study merging detection of innate, adaptive cellular as well as humoral immunity, thus provides a convenient tool to measure specific biomarker profiles for M. leprae infection and leprosy utilizing a field-friendly technology. PMID:27682181

  16. Massively parallel digital high resolution melt for rapid and absolutely quantitative sequence profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Daniel Ortiz; Mack, Hannah; Jupe, Julietta; Hawker, Sinead; Kulkarni, Ninad; Hedayatnia, Behnam; Zhang, Yang; Lawrence, Shelley; Fraley, Stephanie I.

    2017-01-01

    In clinical diagnostics and pathogen detection, profiling of complex samples for low-level genotypes represents a significant challenge. Advances in speed, sensitivity, and extent of multiplexing of molecular pathogen detection assays are needed to improve patient care. We report the development of an integrated platform enabling the identification of bacterial pathogen DNA sequences in complex samples in less than four hours. The system incorporates a microfluidic chip and instrumentation to accomplish universal PCR amplification, High Resolution Melting (HRM), and machine learning within 20,000 picoliter scale reactions, simultaneously. Clinically relevant concentrations of bacterial DNA molecules are separated by digitization across 20,000 reactions and amplified with universal primers targeting the bacterial 16S gene. Amplification is followed by HRM sequence fingerprinting in all reactions, simultaneously. The resulting bacteria-specific melt curves are identified by Support Vector Machine learning, and individual pathogen loads are quantified. The platform reduces reaction volumes by 99.995% and achieves a greater than 200-fold increase in dynamic range of detection compared to traditional PCR HRM approaches. Type I and II error rates are reduced by 99% and 100% respectively, compared to intercalating dye-based digital PCR (dPCR) methods. This technology could impact a number of quantitative profiling applications, especially infectious disease diagnostics. PMID:28176860

  17. Massively parallel digital high resolution melt for rapid and absolutely quantitative sequence profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Daniel Ortiz; Mack, Hannah; Jupe, Julietta; Hawker, Sinead; Kulkarni, Ninad; Hedayatnia, Behnam; Zhang, Yang; Lawrence, Shelley; Fraley, Stephanie I

    2017-02-08

    In clinical diagnostics and pathogen detection, profiling of complex samples for low-level genotypes represents a significant challenge. Advances in speed, sensitivity, and extent of multiplexing of molecular pathogen detection assays are needed to improve patient care. We report the development of an integrated platform enabling the identification of bacterial pathogen DNA sequences in complex samples in less than four hours. The system incorporates a microfluidic chip and instrumentation to accomplish universal PCR amplification, High Resolution Melting (HRM), and machine learning within 20,000 picoliter scale reactions, simultaneously. Clinically relevant concentrations of bacterial DNA molecules are separated by digitization across 20,000 reactions and amplified with universal primers targeting the bacterial 16S gene. Amplification is followed by HRM sequence fingerprinting in all reactions, simultaneously. The resulting bacteria-specific melt curves are identified by Support Vector Machine learning, and individual pathogen loads are quantified. The platform reduces reaction volumes by 99.995% and achieves a greater than 200-fold increase in dynamic range of detection compared to traditional PCR HRM approaches. Type I and II error rates are reduced by 99% and 100% respectively, compared to intercalating dye-based digital PCR (dPCR) methods. This technology could impact a number of quantitative profiling applications, especially infectious disease diagnostics.

  18. Quantitative transcriptome, proteome, and sulfur metabolite profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae response to arsenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Michael; Lagniel, Gilles; Kristiansson, Erik; Junot, Christophe; Nerman, Olle; Labarre, Jean; Tamás, Markus J

    2007-06-19

    Arsenic is ubiquitously present in nature, and various mechanisms have evolved enabling cells to evade toxicity and acquire tolerance. Herein, we explored how Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) respond to trivalent arsenic (arsenite) by quantitative transcriptome, proteome, and sulfur metabolite profiling. Arsenite exposure affected transcription of genes encoding functions related to protein biosynthesis, arsenic detoxification, oxidative stress defense, redox maintenance, and proteolytic activity. Importantly, we observed that nearly all components of the sulfate assimilation and glutathione biosynthesis pathways were induced at both gene and protein levels. Kinetic metabolic profiling evidenced a significant increase in the pools of sulfur metabolites as well as elevated cellular glutathione levels. Moreover, the flux in the sulfur assimilation pathway as well as the glutathione synthesis rate strongly increased with a concomitant reduction of sulfur incorporation into proteins. By combining comparative genomics and molecular analyses, we pinpointed transcription factors that mediate the core of the transcriptional response to arsenite. Taken together, our data reveal that arsenite-exposed cells channel a large part of assimilated sulfur into glutathione biosynthesis, and we provide evidence that the transcriptional regulators Yap1p and Met4p control this response in concert.

  19. ED-XRF spectrometry-based comparative inorganic profile of leaf-derived in vitro calli and in vivo leaf samples of Phyllanthus amarus Schum. & Thonn.--a hepatoprotective herb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, P; Behera, P R; Thirunavoukkarasu, M; Chand, P K

    2011-03-01

    The Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) set-up incorporating a molybdenum secondary exciter was used for quantitative determination of major and minor elements in leaves of in vivo grown medicinal herb Phyllanthus amarus vis-á-vis its leaf-derived in vitro callus culture. The elements such as K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Rb, Sr and Pb were identified, quantified and compared between both the sources. Experimental results revealed that, compared to the naturally grown herb, in vitro leaf-derived callus cultures were more efficient in accumulating inorganic elements, especially trace elements, which are essential for growth and development and more importantly for prevention and cure of diseases. This investigation on a medicinal plant species is the first of its kind to have used the ED-XRF technique to demonstrate a comparative account of the elemental profile of in vitro callus cultures with their in vivo donor in order to explore the possibility of exploiting the former as a viable alternative and a renewable source of phytochemicals.

  20. High resolution profile of inorganic aqueous geochemistry and key redox zones in an arsenic bearing aquifer in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Laura A; Magnone, Daniel; Sovann, Chansopheaktra; Kong, Chivuth; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Kuras, Oliver; van Dongen, Bart E; Ballentine, Christopher J; Polya, David A

    2017-07-15

    Arsenic contamination of groundwaters in South and Southeast Asia is a major threat to public health. In order to better understand the geochemical controls on the mobility of arsenic in a heavily arsenic-affected aquifer in northern Kandal Province, Cambodia, key changes in inorganic aqueous geochemistry have been monitored at high vertical and lateral resolution along dominant groundwater flow paths along two distinct transects. The two transects are characterized by differing geochemical, hydrological and lithological conditions. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater are highly heterogenous, and are broadly positively associated with iron and negatively associated with sulfate and dissolved oxygen. The observed correlations are generally consistent with arsenic mobilization by reductive-dissolution of iron (hydr)oxides. Key redox zones, as identified using groupings of the PHREEQC model equilibrium electron activity of major redox couples (notably ammonium/nitrite; ammonium/nitrate; nitrite/nitrate; dissolved oxygen/water) have been identified and vary with depth, site and season. Mineral saturation is also characterized. Seasonal changes in groundwater chemistry were observed in areas which were (i) sandy and of high permeability; (ii) in close proximity to rivers; and/or (iii) in close proximity to ponds. Such changes are attributed to monsoonal-driven surface-groundwater interactions and are consistent with the separate provenance of recharge sources as identified using stable isotope mixing models. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative micro-CT based coronary artery profiling using interactive local thresholding and cylindrical coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, Daniele; Pelosi, Gualtiero; Viglione, Federica; Kusmic, Claudia; Terreni, Marianna; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Alberto Del; Athanasiou, Lambros; Exarchos, Themistoklis; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Filipovic, Nenad; Trivella, Maria Giovanna; Salvadori, Piero A; Parodi, Oberdan

    2015-01-01

    Micro-CT is an established imaging technique for high-resolution non-destructive assessment of vascular samples, which is gaining growing interest for investigations of atherosclerotic arteries both in humans and in animal models. However, there is still a lack in the definition of micro-CT image metrics suitable for comprehensive evaluation and quantification of features of interest in the field of experimental atherosclerosis (ATS). A novel approach to micro-CT image processing for profiling of coronary ATS is described, providing comprehensive visualization and quantification of contrast agent-free 3D high-resolution reconstruction of full-length artery walls. Accelerated coronary ATS has been induced by high fat cholesterol-enriched diet in swine and left coronary artery (LCA) harvested en bloc for micro-CT scanning and histologic processing. A cylindrical coordinate system has been defined on the image space after curved multiplanar reformation of the coronary vessel for the comprehensive visualization of the main vessel features such as wall thickening and calcium content. A novel semi-automatic segmentation procedure based on 2D histograms has been implemented and the quantitative results validated by histology. The potentiality of attenuation-based micro-CT at low kV to reliably separate arterial wall layers from adjacent tissue as well as identify wall and plaque contours and major tissue components has been validated by histology. Morphometric indexes from histological data corresponding to several micro-CT slices have been derived (double observer evaluation at different coronary ATS stages) and highly significant correlations (R2 > 0.90) evidenced. Semi-automatic morphometry has been validated by double observer manual morphometry of micro-CT slices and highly significant correlations were found (R2 > 0.92). The micro-CT methodology described represents a handy and reliable tool for quantitative high resolution and contrast agent free full length

  2. Communication Profiles of Psychiatric Residents and Attending Physicians in Medication-Management Appointments: A Quantitative Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Enrico G.; Pincus, Harold A.; Wieland, Melissa; Roter, Debra; Larson, Susan; Houck, Patricia; Reynolds, Charles F.; Cruz, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors quantitatively examined differences in psychiatric residents' and attending physicians' communication profiles and voice tones. Methods: Audiotaped recordings of 49 resident-patient and 35 attending-patient medication-management appointments at four ambulatory sites were analyzed with the Roter Interaction Analysis System…

  3. Meloidogyne javanica Chorismate Mutase Transcript Expression Profile Using Real-Time Quantitative RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Janet E; Lambert, Kris N

    2003-03-01

    A developmental expression profile of the Meloidodgyne javanica esophageal gland gene chorismate mutase-1 (Mj-cm-1) could suggest when in the lifecycle of the nematode the Mj-cm-1 product is functional. This study used real-time quantitative RT-PCR to examine the variation in Mj-cm-1 transcript levels over six timepoints in the nematode lifecycle: egg, infective second-stage juveniles (Inf-J2), 2-day post-inoculation (pi), 7-day pi, 14-day pi, and adult. The Mj-cm-1 mRNA levels peaked at 2-day pi, about 100-fold above levels expressed at the egg and Inf-J2 stages. Some expression of Mj-cm-1 remained during the 7-day pi, 14-day pi, and adult stages. High transcript levels of the beta-actin control gene M. javanica Beta-actin-1 (Mj-ba-1) demonstrated the presence of cDNA at all timepoints. The peak in Mj-cm-1 transcript expression at 2-day pi as well as the previously shown esophageal gland localization of Mj-cm-1 mRNA suggest that the product of this gene may be involved early in the establishment of parasitism.

  4. Benchmark dose profiles for joint-action quantal data in quantitative risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Roland C; Piegorsch, Walter W

    2012-12-01

    Benchmark analysis is a widely used tool in public health risk analysis. Therein, estimation of minimum exposure levels, called Benchmark Doses (BMDs), that induce a prespecified Benchmark Response (BMR) is well understood for the case of an adverse response to a single stimulus. For cases where two agents are studied in tandem, however, the benchmark approach is far less developed. This article demonstrates how the benchmark modeling paradigm can be expanded from the single-dose setting to joint-action, two-agent studies. Focus is on response outcomes expressed as proportions. Extending the single-exposure setting, representations of risk are based on a joint-action dose-response model involving both agents. Based on such a model, the concept of a benchmark profile (BMP) - a two-dimensional analog of the single-dose BMD at which both agents achieve the specified BMR - is defined for use in quantitative risk characterization and assessment. The resulting, joint, low-dose guidelines can improve public health planning and risk regulation when dealing with low-level exposures to combinations of hazardous agents.

  5. SILAC-Based Quantitative Strategies for Accurate Histone Posttranslational Modification Profiling Across Multiple Biological Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Alessandro; Soldi, Monica; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2017-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications (hPTMs) play a key role in regulating chromatin dynamics and fine-tuning DNA-based processes. Mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a versatile technology for the analysis of histones, contributing to the dissection of hPTMs, with special strength in the identification of novel marks and in the assessment of modification cross talks. Stable isotope labeling by amino acid in cell culture (SILAC), when adapted to histones, permits the accurate quantification of PTM changes among distinct functional states; however, its application has been mainly confined to actively dividing cell lines. A spike-in strategy based on SILAC can be used to overcome this limitation and profile hPTMs across multiple samples. We describe here the adaptation of SILAC to the analysis of histones, in both standard and spike-in setups. We also illustrate its coupling to an implemented "shotgun" workflow, by which heavy arginine-labeled histone peptides, produced upon Arg-C digestion, are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed in an LC-MS/MS system that combines ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) with new-generation Orbitrap high-resolution instrument.

  6. Phenetic relationships among Lolium s.l. (Poaceae in Iran based on flavonoids spot profiles and quantitative morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Raeisi Chehrazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Relationships between species of Lolium and Festuca have long been an interesting subject in taxonomy of the subtribe Loliineae. This study was concerned with the phenetic relationships of Lolium s.l. (including Festuca subgen. Schedonorus using flavonoids spot profiles and quantitative morphological characters. Measurement of morphological characters and densitometry of flavonoids spots and their profile plots were performed by using calibrated digital images and ImageJ software package. Multivariate analyses (clustering and ordination performed by using NTSYS-pc software package. Each species was described based on its flavonoid spot profile, and Rf values and percentage of each spot in the corresponding profile were reported. Variation in flavonoid spot profiles of Lolium rigidum, L. perenne and Festuca pratensis revealed that flavonoids spot profiles revealed that they may be useful characters for further studying the variations within the species level. Cluster analysis of quantitative morphological characters separated the species in well defined groups and further separated L. persicum population Ardabil from other L. persicum populations. Separation of F. arundinacea populations into two distinct groups was also interesting which suggested that the existence of two forms of this species in Iran is probable.

  7. Quantitative precipitation estimation in complex orography using quasi-vertical profiles of dual polarization radar variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Baldini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Weather radars are nowadays a unique tool to estimate quantitatively the rain precipitation near the surface. This is an important task for a plenty of applications. For example, to feed hydrological models, mitigate the impact of severe storms at the ground using radar information in modern warning tools as well as aid the validation studies of satellite-based rain products. With respect to the latter application, several ground validation studies of the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) products have recently highlighted the importance of accurate QPE from ground-based weather radars. To date, a plenty of works analyzed the performance of various QPE algorithms making use of actual and synthetic experiments, possibly trained by measurement of particle size distributions and electromagnetic models. Most of these studies support the use of dual polarization variables not only to ensure a good level of radar data quality but also as a direct input in the rain estimation equations. Among others, one of the most important limiting factors in radar QPE accuracy is the vertical variability of particle size distribution that affects at different levels, all the radar variables acquired as well as rain rates. This is particularly impactful in mountainous areas where the altitudes of the radar sampling is likely several hundred of meters above the surface. In this work, we analyze the impact of the vertical profile variations of rain precipitation on several dual polarization radar QPE algorithms when they are tested a in complex orography scenario. So far, in weather radar studies, more emphasis has been given to the extrapolation strategies that make use of the signature of the vertical profiles in terms of radar co-polar reflectivity. This may limit the use of the radar vertical profiles when dual polarization QPE algorithms are considered because in that case all the radar variables used in the rain estimation process should be consistently extrapolated at the surface

  8. Unbiased Quantitative Models of Protein Translation Derived from Ribosome Profiling Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A Gritsenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Translation of RNA to protein is a core process for any living organism. While for some steps of this process the effect on protein production is understood, a holistic understanding of translation still remains elusive. In silico modelling is a promising approach for elucidating the process of protein synthesis. Although a number of computational models of the process have been proposed, their application is limited by the assumptions they make. Ribosome profiling (RP, a relatively new sequencing-based technique capable of recording snapshots of the locations of actively translating ribosomes, is a promising source of information for deriving unbiased data-driven translation models. However, quantitative analysis of RP data is challenging due to high measurement variance and the inability to discriminate between the number of ribosomes measured on a gene and their speed of translation. We propose a solution in the form of a novel multi-scale interpretation of RP data that allows for deriving models with translation dynamics extracted from the snapshots. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach by simultaneously determining for the first time per-codon translation elongation and per-gene translation initiation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from RP data for two versions of the Totally Asymmetric Exclusion Process (TASEP model of translation. We do this in an unbiased fashion, by fitting the models using only RP data with a novel optimization scheme based on Monte Carlo simulation to keep the problem tractable. The fitted models match the data significantly better than existing models and their predictions show better agreement with several independent protein abundance datasets than existing models. Results additionally indicate that the tRNA pool adaptation hypothesis is incomplete, with evidence suggesting that tRNA post-transcriptional modifications and codon context may play a role in determining codon elongation rates.

  9. Unbiased Quantitative Models of Protein Translation Derived from Ribosome Profiling Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Alexey A; Hulsman, Marc; Reinders, Marcel J T; de Ridder, Dick

    2015-08-01

    Translation of RNA to protein is a core process for any living organism. While for some steps of this process the effect on protein production is understood, a holistic understanding of translation still remains elusive. In silico modelling is a promising approach for elucidating the process of protein synthesis. Although a number of computational models of the process have been proposed, their application is limited by the assumptions they make. Ribosome profiling (RP), a relatively new sequencing-based technique capable of recording snapshots of the locations of actively translating ribosomes, is a promising source of information for deriving unbiased data-driven translation models. However, quantitative analysis of RP data is challenging due to high measurement variance and the inability to discriminate between the number of ribosomes measured on a gene and their speed of translation. We propose a solution in the form of a novel multi-scale interpretation of RP data that allows for deriving models with translation dynamics extracted from the snapshots. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach by simultaneously determining for the first time per-codon translation elongation and per-gene translation initiation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from RP data for two versions of the Totally Asymmetric Exclusion Process (TASEP) model of translation. We do this in an unbiased fashion, by fitting the models using only RP data with a novel optimization scheme based on Monte Carlo simulation to keep the problem tractable. The fitted models match the data significantly better than existing models and their predictions show better agreement with several independent protein abundance datasets than existing models. Results additionally indicate that the tRNA pool adaptation hypothesis is incomplete, with evidence suggesting that tRNA post-transcriptional modifications and codon context may play a role in determining codon elongation rates.

  10. Distinct quantitative sensory testing profiles in nonspecific chronic back pain subjects with and without psychological trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesarz, Jonas; Gerhardt, Andreas; Leisner, Sabine; Janke, Susanne; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Eich, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Psychological trauma is associated with an increased risk for chronification of nonspecific chronic back pain (nsCLBP) independent of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the mechanisms underlying the role of psychological trauma in nsCLBP are less clear than in PTSD. Therefore, this study considered whether psychological trauma exposure (TE) is accompanied by specific alterations in pain perception. The study included 56 participants with nsCLBP and TE (nsCLBP-TE), 93 participants with nsCLBP without TE (nsCLBP-W-TE), and 31 pain-free controls. All participants underwent a thorough clinical evaluation. The standardized quantitative sensory testing protocol of the "German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain" was used to obtain comprehensive profiles on somatosensory functions in painful (back) and non-painful areas (hand). The protocol consisted of thermal and mechanical detection as well as pain thresholds, vibration thresholds, and pain sensitivity to sharp and blunt mechanical stimuli. Psychological trauma was validated by structured clinical interview. Trauma-associated symptom severity, anxiety, and depressive symptomatology were assessed by self-report questionnaires. Differences in somatosensory function were seen only for pressure pain thresholds. Compared with controls, nsCLBP-TE revealed hyperalgesia generalized in space with lower thresholds in painful and non-painful areas, whereas nsCLBP-W-TE demonstrated localized alterations with decreased thresholds only in the pain-affected area of the back (P ≤ 0.006). Our findings suggest an augmented central pain processing in nsCLBP-TE (alterations in painful and non-painful areas), whereas nsCLBP-W-TE show only local changes (alterations only in the painful area) suggesting regional sensitization processes. This finding might explain why TE without PTSD is associated with an increased prevalence of chronic pain.

  11. Large-Scale and Deep Quantitative Proteome Profiling Using Isobaric Labeling Coupled with Two-Dimensional LC-MS/MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsenko, Marina A.; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-02-12

    Comprehensive, quantitative information on abundances of proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTMs) can potentially provide novel biological insights into diseases pathogenesis and therapeutic intervention. Herein, we introduce a quantitative strategy utilizing isobaric stable isotope-labelling techniques combined with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) for large-scale, deep quantitative proteome profiling of biological samples or clinical specimens such as tumor tissues. The workflow includes isobaric labeling of tryptic peptides for multiplexed and accurate quantitative analysis, basic reversed-phase LC fractionation and concatenation for reduced sample complexity, and nano-LC coupled to high resolution and high mass accuracy MS analysis for high confidence identification and quantification of proteins. This proteomic analysis strategy has been successfully applied for in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of tumor samples, and can also be used for integrated proteome and PTM characterization, as well as comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis across samples from large clinical cohorts.

  12. Linear Quantitative Profiling Method Fast Monitors Alkaloids of Sophora Flavescens That Was Verified by Tri-Marker Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhifei; Sun, Guoxiang; Guo, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrated the use of the Linear Quantitative Profiling Method (LQPM) to evaluate the quality of Alkaloids of Sophora flavescens (ASF) based on chromatographic fingerprints in an accurate, economical and fast way. Both linear qualitative and quantitative similarities were calculated in order to monitor the consistency of the samples. The results indicate that the linear qualitative similarity (LQLS) is not sufficiently discriminating due to the predominant presence of three alkaloid compounds (matrine, sophoridine and oxymatrine) in the test samples; however, the linear quantitative similarity (LQTS) was shown to be able to obviously identify the samples based on the difference in the quantitative content of all the chemical components. In addition, the fingerprint analysis was also supported by the quantitative analysis of three marker compounds. The LQTS was found to be highly correlated to the contents of the marker compounds, indicating that quantitative analysis of the marker compounds may be substituted with the LQPM based on the chromatographic fingerprints for the purpose of quantifying all chemicals of a complex sample system. Furthermore, once reference fingerprint (RFP) developed from a standard preparation in an immediate detection way and the composition similarities calculated out, LQPM could employ the classical mathematical model to effectively quantify the multiple components of ASF samples without any chemical standard. PMID:27529425

  13. Linear Quantitative Profiling Method Fast Monitors Alkaloids of Sophora Flavescens That Was Verified by Tri-Marker Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhifei; Sun, Guoxiang; Guo, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrated the use of the Linear Quantitative Profiling Method (LQPM) to evaluate the quality of Alkaloids of Sophora flavescens (ASF) based on chromatographic fingerprints in an accurate, economical and fast way. Both linear qualitative and quantitative similarities were calculated in order to monitor the consistency of the samples. The results indicate that the linear qualitative similarity (LQLS) is not sufficiently discriminating due to the predominant presence of three alkaloid compounds (matrine, sophoridine and oxymatrine) in the test samples; however, the linear quantitative similarity (LQTS) was shown to be able to obviously identify the samples based on the difference in the quantitative content of all the chemical components. In addition, the fingerprint analysis was also supported by the quantitative analysis of three marker compounds. The LQTS was found to be highly correlated to the contents of the marker compounds, indicating that quantitative analysis of the marker compounds may be substituted with the LQPM based on the chromatographic fingerprints for the purpose of quantifying all chemicals of a complex sample system. Furthermore, once reference fingerprint (RFP) developed from a standard preparation in an immediate detection way and the composition similarities calculated out, LQPM could employ the classical mathematical model to effectively quantify the multiple components of ASF samples without any chemical standard.

  14. Qualitative and quantitative proteomic profiling of cripto(-/-) embryonic stem cells by means of accurate mass LC-MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambery, Angela; Vissers, Johannes P C; Langridge, James I; Lonardo, Enza; Minchiotti, Gabriella; Ruvo, Menotti; Parente, Augusto

    2009-02-01

    Cripto is one of the key regulators of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) differentiation into cardiomyocites vs neuronal fate. Cripto(-/-) murine ESCs have been utilized to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying early events of mammalian lineage differentiation. 2D/LC-MS/MS and a label-free LC-MS approaches were used to qualitatively and quantitatively profile the cripto(-/-) ESC proteome, providing an integral view of the alterations induced in stem cell functions by deleting the cripto gene.

  15. Quantitative Two-Dimensional Dopant Profile Measurement on Semiconductors by Scanning Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunji

    1995-01-01

    A Scanning Capacitance Microscope (SCM) has been built to measure two-dimensional (2D) dopant density profiles on semiconductor materials. A quasi-one-dimensional(1D) analytical model has been constructed for inverting the measured SCM data to dopant profile. Local Capacitance -Voltage (C-V) measurements have been performed on n ^+/n and p^+/n ion implanted silicon wafers and systematic results have been obtained. Dopant profile measurements by SCM have been performed on both top surfaces and cross-sectional surfaces of ion implanted silicon wafers. After inversion, a good agreement has been found between the SCM profile and the profiles obtained by other independent methods such as Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), Spreading Resistance Profiling (SRP), and process simulation (SUPREM IV). The dissertation presented here consists of four chapters. The first chapter introduces the dopant profile measurement and gives a review of existing doping profiling methods. The advantages of SCM for dopant profile measurement are discussed in this chapter. The second chapter concentrates on the instrumentation of SCM, SCM tip preparation, and silicon sample preparation for dopant profile measurement by SCM. The third chapter describes the tip/sample modeling by which the measured capacitance signal is inverted to dopant profile. The calculation of the electrostatic force between a tip and semiconductor sample as a function of dopant density is also presented in this chapter. Finally, in the fourth chapter, the SCM measurement results are presented and the inverted 2D profiles are compared with the results obtained by other independent methods. A discussion about measurement sensitivity, spatial resolution, modeling errors, and future works is presented.

  16. How Linguistic Frames Affect Motivational Profiles and the Roles of Quantitative versus Qualitative Research Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Joseph; Sommer, Linda

    2005-01-01

    The combined tools of psycholinguistics and systems analysis have produced advances in motivational profiling resulting in numerous applications to behavioral engineering. Knowing the way people frame their motive offers leverage in causing behavior change ranging from persuasive marketing campaigns, forensic profiling, individual psychotherapy,…

  17. Inorganic nutrients, sulfide and oxygen profiles from R/V KNORR in the Black Sea from 19880514 to 19880725 (NODC Accession 9400101)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data collection contains inorganic nutrient chemistry, sulfide and oxygen data collected during cruises 2 through 5 of the 1988 Black Sea Oceanographic...

  18. Depth profiles of the inorganic chemical composition of soil water in the unsaturated zone; Tiefenprofile der anorganisch-chemischen Zusammensetzung von Bodenwasser in der ungesaettigten Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoess, J.

    1992-04-01

    Soil water up to a depth of 4 m below ground surface was analysed for its inorganic-chemical composition. It was obtained as `soil solution` by centrifuging original moist soil samples. The analysis provides depth profiles of the concentration of the major inorganic ions in soil water of well evidence. The studies were made on the environmental research test site called `Horkheimer Insel`, 70 km north of Stuttgart, which is a joint research site within the project `Wasser-Abfall-Boden` of the country of Baden-Wuerttemberg. Samples were collected mainly on two parts of the test site, one being operated by `conventional` farming techniques, the other by `sustainable` techniques, i.e. lower quantities of agrochemical and reduced tillage. The nitrat content of soil water in 4 m depth under the field of sustainable argriculture during the three tested years of cultivation was on an average only 30% of the concentration under the field of conventional agriculture. This means, the amount of nitrat, which is carried in groundwater, could be reduced to the same extend by the chosen way of sustainable agriculture. In respect to the overall salt content of soil water the analysis showed, that it is already very high in the upper soil layer (0 - 25 cm) and does not increase with increasing depth. It can be concluded, that it is determined by processes within this zone of the plant roots and of main microbiological activity. Percolation through the layers beneath this zone only provides a change in the proportion of cation or anion concentrations. (orig.). [Deutsch] Bodenwasser bis zu einer Tiefe von 4 m Flurabstand wurde auf seine anorganisch-chemische Zusammensetzung hin untersucht. Es wurde durch Zentrifugieren original feuchter Bodenproben als `Bodenloesung` gewonnen. Die Untersuchung liefert aussagekraeftige Konzentrationsprofile der anorganischen Ionen im Bodenwasser. Die Probenahme erfolgte auf dem Naturmessfeld `Horkheimer Insel`, 70 km noerdlich von Stuttgart, einem

  19. A quantitative measure of the structure of gamma-ray burst time profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestrade, John P.; Fishman, G.; Horack, J.; Meegan, C.; Moore, P.; Paciesas, W.; Wilson, R.

    1992-01-01

    A cursory examination of cosmic gamma-ray burst time profiles indicates an inhomogeneous distribution of structure. In the first approximation, there seem to be two types of profiles; smooth ones with little structure and highly variable ones with lots of structure. To put this observation to the test, we have examined the statistical nature of the profile derivative to choose which parameter might best be called the burst 'spikiness'. We have found that a good estimator is given by a count of the number of 'spikes' (defined by a specific numerical recipe) and not by the rms deviations from either a pre-burst background or any type of moving average background. The application of this parameter to 30 burst time histories shows it to be consistent over a wide range of profile types. The analysis also reveals a preferred average time between spikes of approximately 1.5 seconds.

  20. Quantitative-qualitative structures of the soil fungi communities in three profiles of peat-muck soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Tyszkiewicz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The mycological investigations were performed on three soil profiles, which represent the slightly, moderately and strongly mucked peat-muck soils located in the Biebrza Valley. The aim of the study was the comparison of quantitative-qualitative structures of the fungi communities in the chosen peat-muck soils. The results indicate that soil fungi communities from compared soils reveal only small degree of similarity. The variety in quantitative and in qualitative structure increase with increasing mucking of organic deposits. These results may suggest that decreasing moisture of habitat stimulates the development of soil fungi. The most numerous soil fungi communities were observed in the turf layer and subturf layer of all soils.

  1. Design of a Michelson Interferometer for Quantitative Refraction Index Profile Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, J.L.M.

    1998-01-01

    This book describes the theoretical design of a three camera Michelson interferometer set-up for quantitative refractive index measuerments. Although a two camera system is easier to align and less expensive, a three camera interferometer is preferred because the expected measuring accuracy is much

  2. Quantitative interaction proteomics and genome-wide profiling of epigenetic histone marks and their readers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Michiel; Eberl, H Christian; Matarese, Filomena

    2010-01-01

    Trimethyl-lysine (me3) modifications on histones are the most stable epigenetic marks and they control chromatin-mediated regulation of gene expression. Here, we determine proteins that bind these marks by high-accuracy, quantitative mass spectrometry. These chromatin "readers" are assigned...

  3. Construction of measurement uncertainty profiles for quantitative analysis of genetically modified organisms based on interlaboratory validation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macarthur, Roy; Feinberg, Max; Bertheau, Yves

    2010-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating the size of uncertainty associated with the measurement of products derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The method is based on the uncertainty profile, which is an extension, for the estimation of uncertainty, of a recent graphical statistical tool called an accuracy profile that was developed for the validation of quantitative analytical methods. The application of uncertainty profiles as an aid to decision making and assessment of fitness for purpose is also presented. Results of the measurement of the quantity of GMOs in flour by PCR-based methods collected through a number of interlaboratory studies followed the log-normal distribution. Uncertainty profiles built using the results generally give an expected range for measurement results of 50-200% of reference concentrations for materials that contain at least 1% GMO. This range is consistent with European Network of GM Laboratories and the European Union (EU) Community Reference Laboratory validation criteria and can be used as a fitness for purpose criterion for measurement methods. The effect on the enforcement of EU labeling regulations is that, in general, an individual analytical result needs to be 1.8% to demonstrate noncompliance with a labeling threshold of 0.9%.

  4. Altered somatosensory profile according to quantitative sensory testing in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders scheduled for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbäck, Yvonne; Tropp, Hans; Enthoven, Paul; Gerdle, Björn; Abbott, Allan; Öberg, Birgitta

    2017-06-17

    Somatosensory profiling in affected and non-affected body regions can strengthen our insight regarding the underlying pain mechanisms, which can be valuable in treatment decision making and to improve outcomes, in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders pre-surgery. The aim was to describe somatosensory profiles in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders, to identify the proportion with altered somatosensory profile, and to analyze demographic characteristics, self-reported function, pain, and health pre- and 3 months post-surgery. In this prospective cohort study in a Spine Clinic, 105 patients scheduled for surgery for spinal stenosis, disc herniation, degenerative disc disease, or spondylolisthesis were consecutively recruited. Exclusion criteria were; indication for acute surgery or previous surgery at the same spinal level or severe grade of pathology. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) and self-reported function, pain, and health was measured pre- and 3 months post-surgery. The somatosensory profile included cold detection threshold, warmth detection threshold, cold pain threshold, heat pain threshold and pressure pain threshold in affected and non-affected body regions. On a group level, the patients' somatosensory profiles were within the 95% confidence interval (CI) from normative reference data means. On an individual level, an altered somatosensory profile was defined as having two or more body regions (including a non-affected region) with QST values outside of normal ranges for reference data. The 23 patients (22%) with altered somatosensory profiles, with mostly loss of function, were older (P = 0.031), more often female (P = 0.005), had higher back and leg pain (P = 0.016, 0.020), lower mental health component summary score (SF-36 MCS) (P = 0.004) and larger pain distribution (P = 0.047), compared to others in the cohort. Post-surgery there was a tendency to worse pain, function and health in the group with

  5. Quantitative transcriptional profiling of ATDC5 mouse progenitor cells during chondrogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Fink, Trine; Zhang, Xiao-Yan

    2005-01-01

    . The obtained data provided a robust determination of expression patterns that make possible an accurate assessment of the molecular events along the chondrogenic differentiation pathway. In addition, time-course expression profiles were described for eight highly regulated genes that have not been associated...

  6. Quantitative profiling of housekeeping and Epstein-Barr virus gene transcription in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines using an oligonucleotide microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niggli Felix K

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is associated with lymphoid malignancies, including Burkitt's lymphoma (BL, and can transform human B cells in vitro. EBV-harboring cell lines are widely used to investigate lymphocyte transformation and oncogenesis. Qualitative EBV gene expression has been extensively described, but knowledge of quantitative transcription is lacking. We hypothesized that transcription levels of EBNA1, the gene essential for EBV persistence within an infected cell, are similar in BL cell lines. Results To compare quantitative gene transcription in the BL cell lines Namalwa, Raji, Akata, Jijoye, and P3HR1, we developed an oligonucleotide microarray chip, including 17 housekeeping genes, six latent EBV genes (EBNA1, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3C, LMP1, LMP2, and four lytic EBV genes (BZLF1, BXLF2, BKRF2, BZLF2, and used the cell line B95.8 as a reference for EBV gene transcription. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were used to validate microarray results. We found that transcription levels of housekeeping genes differed considerably among BL cell lines. Using a selection of housekeeping genes with similar quantitative transcription in the tested cell lines to normalize EBV gene transcription data, we showed that transcription levels of EBNA1 were quite similar in very different BL cell lines, in contrast to transcription levels of other EBV genes. As demonstrated with Akata cells, the chip allowed us to accurately measure EBV gene transcription changes triggered by treatment interventions. Conclusion Our results suggest uniform EBNA1 transcription levels in BL and that microarray profiling can reveal novel insights on quantitative EBV gene transcription and its impact on lymphocyte biology.

  7. Using Quantitative Real-Time PCR to Detect MicroRNA Expression Profile During Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoping; Murashov, Alexander K; Stellwag, Edmund J; Zhang, Baohong

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a reliable method to determine and monitor microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles in different cells, tissues, and organisms. Although there are several different strategies in performing qRT-PCR to determine miRNA expression, all of them have two steps in common: reverse transcription for obtaining cDNA from mature miRNA sequencing and standard real-time PCR for amplification of cDNA. This chapter demonstrates the application of quantitative real-time PCR for determining miRNA expression profiles during mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation. In this method, a mature miRNA sequence is first reverse transcribed into a long cDNA with a 40-50 nt miRNA-specific stem-loop primer; then, a standard real-time PCR reaction is performed for determining miRNA expression using a forward miRNA-specific primer and a universal reverse primer.

  8. Systematic evaluation of three microRNA profiling platforms: microarray, beads array, and quantitative real-time PCR array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Howel, Paul; Bruheim, Skjalg; Ju, Jingfang; Owen, Laurie B; Fodstad, Oystein; Xi, Yaguang

    2011-02-11

    A number of gene-profiling methodologies have been applied to microRNA research. The diversity of the platforms and analytical methods makes the comparison and integration of cross-platform microRNA profiling data challenging. In this study, we systematically analyze three representative microRNA profiling platforms: Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) microarray, beads array, and TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR Low Density Array (TLDA). The microRNA profiles of 40 human osteosarcoma xenograft samples were generated by LNA array, beads array, and TLDA. Results show that each of the three platforms perform similarly regarding intra-platform reproducibility or reproducibility of data within one platform while LNA array and TLDA had the best inter-platform reproducibility or reproducibility of data across platforms. The endogenous controls/probes contained in each platform have been observed for their stability under different treatments/environments; those included in TLDA have the best performance with minimal coefficients of variation. Importantly, we identify that the proper selection of normalization methods is critical for improving the inter-platform reproducibility, which is evidenced by the application of two non-linear normalization methods (loess and quantile) that substantially elevated the sensitivity and specificity of the statistical data assessment. Each platform is relatively stable in terms of its own microRNA profiling intra-reproducibility; however, the inter-platform reproducibility among different platforms is low. More microRNA specific normalization methods are in demand for cross-platform microRNA microarray data integration and comparison, which will improve the reproducibility and consistency between platforms.

  9. A targeted quantitative proteomics strategy for global kinome profiling of cancer cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-04-01

    Kinases are among the most intensively pursued enzyme superfamilies as targets for anti-cancer drugs. Large data sets on inhibitor potency and selectivity for more than 400 human kinases became available recently, offering the opportunity to design rationally novel kinase-based anti-cancer therapies. However, the expression levels and activities of kinases are highly heterogeneous among different types of cancer and even among different stages of the same cancer. The lack of effective strategy for profiling the global kinome hampers the development of kinase-targeted cancer chemotherapy. Here, we introduced a novel global kinome profiling method, based on our recently developed isotope-coded ATP-affinity probe and a targeted proteomic method using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM), for assessing simultaneously the expression of more than 300 kinases in human cells and tissues. This MRM-based assay displayed much better sensitivity, reproducibility, and accuracy than the discovery-based shotgun proteomic method. Approximately 250 kinases could be routinely detected in the lysate of a single cell line. Additionally, the incorporation of iRT into MRM kinome library rendered our MRM kinome assay easily transferrable across different instrument platforms and laboratories. We further employed this approach for profiling kinase expression in two melanoma cell lines, which revealed substantial kinome reprogramming during cancer progression and demonstrated an excellent correlation between the anti-proliferative effects of kinase inhibitors and the expression levels of their target kinases. Therefore, this facile and accurate kinome profiling assay, together with the kinome-inhibitor interaction map, could provide invaluable knowledge to predict the effectiveness of kinase inhibitor drugs and offer the opportunity for individualized cancer chemotherapy.

  10. Inorganic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černý, Radovan

    The separation of compounds by inorganic/organic boundary is of less importance for the structure determination by diffraction methods. More important for the diffraction is how the atoms build up larger building units and the crystal itself. A molecular/non-molecular boundary is therefore relevant for the choice of a structure determination method. Non-molecular compounds - also called extended solids - are constructed by bonds that extend "infinitely" in three dimensions through a crystal. These non-molecular crystals usually crystallize with higher symmetries, and atoms often occupy special Wyckoff positions. A review of actual methodology is given first, and then highlights and pitfalls of structure determination from powder diffraction, its problems and their solutions are shown and discussed using selected examples.

  11. Epigenetic DNA Methylation Profiling with MSRE: A Quantitative NGS Approach Using a Parkinson's Disease Test Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam G. Marsh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics is a rapidly developing field focused on deciphering chemical fingerprints that accumulate on human genomes over time. As the nascent idea of precision medicine expands to encompass epigenetic signatures of diagnostic and prognostic relevance, there is a need for methodologies that provide high-throughput DNA methylation profiling measurements. Here we report a novel quantification methodology for computationally reconstructing site-specific CpG methylation status from next generation sequencing (NGS data using methyl-sensitive restriction endonucleases (MSRE. An integrated pipeline efficiently incorporates raw NGS metrics into a statistical discrimination platform to identify functional linkages between shifts in epigenetic DNA methylation and disease phenotypes in samples being analyzed. In this pilot proof-of-concept study we quantify and compare DNA methylation in blood serum of individuals with Parkinson's Disease relative to matched healthy blood profiles. Even with a small study of only six samples, a high degree of statistical discrimination was achieved based on CpG methylation profiles between groups, with 1,008 statistically different CpG sites (p textless 0.0025, after false discovery rate correction. A methylation load calculation was used to assess higher order impacts of methylation shifts on genes and pathways and most notably identified FGF3, FGF8, HTT, KMTA5, MIR8073, and YWHAG as differentially methylated genes with high relevance to Parkinson's Disease and neurodegeneration (based on PubMed literature citations. Of these, KMTA5 is a histone methyl-transferase gene and HTT is Huntington Disease Protein or Huntingtin, for which there are well established neurodegenerative impacts. The future need for precision diagnostics now requires more tools for exploring epigenetic processes that may be linked to cellular dysfunction and subsequent disease progression.

  12. Novel micelle PCR-based method for accurate, sensitive and quantitative microbiota profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, Stefan A.; Hays, John P.; Jansen, Ruud

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, many researchers have embraced 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques, which has led to a wealth of publications and documented differences in the composition of microbial communities derived from many different ecosystems. However, comparison between different microbiota studies is currently very difficult due to the lack of a standardized 16S rRNA gene sequencing protocol. Here we report on a novel approach employing micelle PCR (micPCR) in combination with an internal calibrator that allows for standardization of microbiota profiles via their absolute abundances. The addition of an internal calibrator allows the researcher to express the resulting operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as a measure of 16S rRNA gene copies by correcting the number of sequences of each individual OTU in a sample for efficiency differences in the NGS process. Additionally, accurate quantification of OTUs obtained from negative extraction control samples allows for the subtraction of contaminating bacterial DNA derived from the laboratory environment or chemicals/reagents used. Using equimolar synthetic microbial community samples and low biomass clinical samples, we demonstrate that the calibrated micPCR/NGS methodology possess a much higher precision and a lower limit of detection compared with traditional PCR/NGS, resulting in more accurate microbiota profiles suitable for multi-study comparison. PMID:28378789

  13. Integrated quantitative analysis of nitrogen stress response in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using metabolite and protein profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wase, Nishikant; Black, Paul N; Stanley, Bruce A; DiRusso, Concetta C

    2014-03-01

    Nitrogen starvation induces a global stress response in microalgae that results in the accumulation of lipids as a potential source of biofuel. Using GC-MS-based metabolite and iTRAQ-labeled protein profiling, we examined and correlated the metabolic and proteomic response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under nitrogen stress. Key amino acids and metabolites involved in nitrogen sparing pathways, methyl group transfer reactions, and energy production were decreased in abundance, whereas certain fatty acids, citric acid, methionine, citramalic acid, triethanolamine, nicotianamine, trehalose, and sorbitol were increased in abundance. Proteins involved in nitrogen assimilation, amino acid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, TCA cycle, starch, and lipid metabolism were elevated compared with nonstressed cultures. In contrast, the enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle, one carbon metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway, the Calvin cycle, photosynthetic and light harvesting complex, and ribosomes were reduced. A noteworthy observation was that citrate accumulated during nitrogen stress coordinate with alterations in the enzymes that produce or utilize this metabolite, demonstrating the value of comparing protein and metabolite profiles to understand complex patterns of metabolic flow. Thus, the current study provides unique insight into the global metabolic adjustments leading to lipid storage during N starvation for application toward advanced biofuel production technologies.

  14. IHC Profiler: an open source plugin for the quantitative evaluation and automated scoring of immunohistochemistry images of human tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frency Varghese

    Full Text Available In anatomic pathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC serves as a diagnostic and prognostic method for identification of disease markers in tissue samples that directly influences classification and grading the disease, influencing patient management. However, till today over most of the world, pathological analysis of tissue samples remained a time-consuming and subjective procedure, wherein the intensity of antibody staining is manually judged and thus scoring decision is directly influenced by visual bias. This instigated us to design a simple method of automated digital IHC image analysis algorithm for an unbiased, quantitative assessment of antibody staining intensity in tissue sections. As a first step, we adopted the spectral deconvolution method of DAB/hematoxylin color spectra by using optimized optical density vectors of the color deconvolution plugin for proper separation of the DAB color spectra. Then the DAB stained image is displayed in a new window wherein it undergoes pixel-by-pixel analysis, and displays the full profile along with its scoring decision. Based on the mathematical formula conceptualized, the algorithm is thoroughly tested by analyzing scores assigned to thousands (n = 1703 of DAB stained IHC images including sample images taken from human protein atlas web resource. The IHC Profiler plugin developed is compatible with the open resource digital image analysis software, ImageJ, which creates a pixel-by-pixel analysis profile of a digital IHC image and further assigns a score in a four tier system. A comparison study between manual pathological analysis and IHC Profiler resolved in a match of 88.6% (P<0.0001, CI = 95%. This new tool developed for clinical histopathological sample analysis can be adopted globally for scoring most protein targets where the marker protein expression is of cytoplasmic and/or nuclear type. We foresee that this method will minimize the problem of inter-observer variations across labs and

  15. IHC Profiler: An Open Source Plugin for the Quantitative Evaluation and Automated Scoring of Immunohistochemistry Images of Human Tissue Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Renu; De, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    In anatomic pathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC) serves as a diagnostic and prognostic method for identification of disease markers in tissue samples that directly influences classification and grading the disease, influencing patient management. However, till today over most of the world, pathological analysis of tissue samples remained a time-consuming and subjective procedure, wherein the intensity of antibody staining is manually judged and thus scoring decision is directly influenced by visual bias. This instigated us to design a simple method of automated digital IHC image analysis algorithm for an unbiased, quantitative assessment of antibody staining intensity in tissue sections. As a first step, we adopted the spectral deconvolution method of DAB/hematoxylin color spectra by using optimized optical density vectors of the color deconvolution plugin for proper separation of the DAB color spectra. Then the DAB stained image is displayed in a new window wherein it undergoes pixel-by-pixel analysis, and displays the full profile along with its scoring decision. Based on the mathematical formula conceptualized, the algorithm is thoroughly tested by analyzing scores assigned to thousands (n = 1703) of DAB stained IHC images including sample images taken from human protein atlas web resource. The IHC Profiler plugin developed is compatible with the open resource digital image analysis software, ImageJ, which creates a pixel-by-pixel analysis profile of a digital IHC image and further assigns a score in a four tier system. A comparison study between manual pathological analysis and IHC Profiler resolved in a match of 88.6% (P<0.0001, CI = 95%). This new tool developed for clinical histopathological sample analysis can be adopted globally for scoring most protein targets where the marker protein expression is of cytoplasmic and/or nuclear type. We foresee that this method will minimize the problem of inter-observer variations across labs and further help in

  16. A Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Data Analysis Pipeline for Activity Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruili

    2016-01-01

    The US Tox21 program has developed in vitro assays to test large collections of environmental chemicals in a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) format, using triplicate 15-dose titrations to generate over 50 million data points to date. Counter screens are also employed to minimize interferences from non-target-specific assay artifacts, such as compound auto fluorescence and cytotoxicity. New data analysis approaches are needed to integrate these data and characterize the activities observed from these assays. Here, we describe a complete analysis pipeline that evaluates these qHTS data for technical quality in terms of signal reproducibility. We integrate signals from repeated assay runs, primary readouts, and counter screens to produce a final call on on-target compound activity.

  17. Fast processing of quantitative phase profiles from off-axis interferograms for real-time applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girshovitz, Pinhas; Shaked, Natan T.

    2015-03-01

    We review new and efficient algorithms, lately presented by us, for rapid reconstruction of quantitative phase maps from off-axis digital interferograms. These algorithms improve the conventional Fourier-based algorithm by using the Fourier transforms and the phase unwrapping process more efficiently, and thus decrease the calculation complexity required for extracting the sample phase map from the recorded interferograms. Using the new algorithms, on a standard personal computer without using the graphic processing-unit programming or parallel computing, we were able to speed up the processing and reach frame rates of up to 45 frames per second for one megapixel off-axis interferograms. These capabilities allow real-time visualization, calculation and data extraction for dynamic samples and processes, inspected by off-axis digital holography. Specific applications include biological cell imaging without labeling and real-time nondestructive testing.

  18. SuperSILAC Quantitative Proteome Profiling of Murine Middle Ear Epithelial Cell Remodeling with NTHi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Val

    Full Text Available Chronic Otitis Media with effusion (COME develops after sustained inflammation and is characterized by secretory middle ear epithelial metaplasia and effusion, most frequently mucoid. Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi, the most common acute Otitis Media (OM pathogen, is postulated to promote middle ear epithelial remodeling in the progression of OM from acute to chronic. The goals of this study were to examine histopathological and quantitative proteomic epithelial effects of NTHi challenge in a murine middle ear epithelial cell line.NTHi lysates were generated and used to stimulate murine epithelial cells (mMEEC cultured at air-liquid interface over 48 hours- 1 week. Conditional quantitative Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC of cell lysates was performed to interrogate the global protein production in the cells, using the SuperSILAC technique. Histology of the epithelium over time was done to measure bacterial dependent remodeling.Mass spectrometry analysis identified 2,565 proteins across samples, of which 74 exhibited differential enrichment or depletion in cell lysates (+/-2.0 fold-change; p value<0.05. The key molecular functions regulated by NTHi lysates exposure were related to cell proliferation, death, migration, adhesion and inflammation. Finally, chronic exposure induced significant epithelial thickening of cells grown at air liquid interface.NTHi lysates drive pathways responsible of cell remodeling in murine middle ear epithelium which likely contributes to observed epithelial hyperplasia in vitro. Further elucidation of these mediators will be critical in understanding the progression of OM from acute to chronic at the molecular level.

  19. Proteome Profile and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Follicular Fluid during Follicle Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Huang, Yulin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Fumei; Huang, Delun; Lu, Yangqing; Liang, Xianwei; Zhang, Ming

    2016-04-29

    Follicular fluid (FF) accumulates in the antrum of the ovarian follicle and provides the microenvironment for oocyte development. FF plays an important role in follicle growth and oocyte maturation. The FF provides a unique window to investigate the processes occurring during buffalo follicular development. The observed low quality of buffalo oocytes may arise from the poor follicular microenvironment. Investigating proteins found in buffalo FF (BFF) should provide insight into follicular development processes and provide further understanding of intra-follicular maturation and oocytes quality. Here, a proteomic-based approach was used to analyze the proteome of BFF. SDS-PAGE separation combined with mass spectrometry was used to generate the proteomic dataset. In total, 363 proteins were identified and classified by Gene Ontology terms. The proteins were assigned to 153 pathways, including signaling pathways. To evaluate difference in proteins expressed between BFF with different follicle size (small, 8 mm), a quantitative proteomic analysis based on multi-dimensional liquid chromatography pre-fractionation tandem Orbitrap mass spectrometry identification was performed. Eleven differentially expressed proteins (six downregulated and five upregulated in large BFF) were identified and assigned to a variety of functional processes, including serine protease inhibition, oxidation protection and the complement cascade system. Three differentially expressed proteins, Vimentin, Peroxiredoxin-1 and SERPIND1, were verified by Western blotting, consistent with the quantitative proteomics results. Our datasets offers new information about proteins present in BFF and should facilitate the development of new biomarkers. These differentially expressed proteins illuminate the size-dependent protein changes in follicle microenvironment.

  20. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  1. Pain when walking: individual sensory profiles in the foot soles of torture victims - a controlled study using quantitative sensory testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prip, K.; Persson, A. L.; Sjolund, B. H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: With quantitative sensory testing (QST) we recently found no differences in sensory function of the foot soles between groups of torture victims with or without exposure to falanga (beatings under the feet). Compared to matched controls the torture victims had hyperalgesia to deep...... mechano-nociceptive stimuli and hypoesthesia to non-noxious cutaneous stimuli. The purpose of the present paper was to extend the group analysis into individual sensory profiles of victims' feet to explore possible relations between external violence (torture), reported pain, sensory symptoms and QST data...... to help clarify the underlying mechanisms. Methods: We employed interviews and assessments of the pain and sensory symptoms and QST by investigators blinded to whether the patients, 32 male torture victims from the Middle East, had (n=15), or had not (n=17) been exposed to falanga. Pain intensity, area...

  2. Quantitative sensomics profiling of hop-derived bitter compounds throughout a full-scale beer manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseleu, Gesa; Lagemann, Annika; Stephan, Andreas; Intelmann, Daniel; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2010-07-14

    Although the complex taste profile of beer is well accepted to be reflected by the molecular blueprint of its sensometabolites, the knowledge available on the process-induced transformation of hop-derived phytochemicals into key sensometabolites during beer manufacturing is far from comprehensive. The objective of the present investigation was, therefore, to develop and apply a suitable HPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous and comprehensive quantitative monitoring of a total of 69 hop-derived sensometabolites in selected intermediary products throughout a full-scale beer manufacturing process. After data normalization, the individual sensometabolites were arranged into different clusters by means of agglomerative hierarchical analysis and visualized using a sensomics heatmap to verify the structure-specific reaction routes proposed for their formation during the beer brewing process.

  3. Quantitative gene expression profiling of CD45+ and CD45- skeletal muscle-derived side population cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditte Caroline Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Kristiansen, Gitte Qvist; Jensen, Line;

    2012-01-01

    transcripts associated with endothelial cells, Notch signaling and myogenic precursors. By comparing the mRNA signatures of mSPs with those of adipose tissue-derived SP populations, a common endothelial component seemed to reside in both muscle and fat-derived SPCD45(-) entities. However, each SP subset...... a satellite cell subpopulation) remain in the mSPCD45(-) fraction, and we show that these cells express high levels of many of the known myogenic precursor/stem cell related markers, including Pax7 and Myf5.......The skeletal muscle-derived side population (mSP) which highly excludes Hoechst 33342 is composed of CD45(+) and CD45(-) subpopulations; yet, rareness of mSP cells in general has complicated extensive quantitative analysis of gene expression profiles in primarily isolated mSP cells. Here, we...

  4. Quantitative gene expression profiling of CD45(+) and CD45(-) skeletal muscle-derived side population cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Kristiansen, Gitte Qvistgaard; Jensen, Line;

    2011-01-01

    transcripts associated with endothelial cells, Notch signaling and myogenic precursors. By comparing the mRNA signatures of mSPs with those of adipose tissue-derived SP populations, a common endothelial component seemed to reside in both muscle and fat-derived SPCD45(-) entities. However, each SP subset...... a satellite cell subpopulation) remain in the mSPCD45(-) fraction, and we show that these cells express high levels of many of the known myogenic precursor/stem cell related markers, including Pax7 and Myf5. © 2011 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.......The skeletal muscle-derived side population (mSP) which highly excludes Hoechst 33342 is composed of CD45(+) and CD45(-) subpopulations; yet, rareness of mSP cells in general has complicated extensive quantitative analysis of gene expression profiles in primarily isolated mSP cells. Here, we...

  5. A novel full-angle scanning light scattering profiler to quantitatively evaluate forward and backward light scattering from intraocular lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Bennett N., E-mail: bennett.walker@fda.hhs.gov [Optical Therapeutics and Medical Nanophotonics Laboratory, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); James, Robert H.; Ilev, Ilko K. [Optical Therapeutics and Medical Nanophotonics Laboratory, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Calogero, Don [Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Glare, glistenings, optical defects, dysphotopsia, and poor image quality are a few of the known deficiencies of intraocular lenses (IOLs). All of these optical phenomena are related to light scatter. However, the specific direction that light scatters makes a critical difference between debilitating glare and a slightly noticeable decrease in image quality. Consequently, quantifying the magnitude and direction of scattered light is essential to appropriately evaluate the safety and efficacy of IOLs. In this study, we introduce a full-angle scanning light scattering profiler (SLSP) as a novel approach capable of quantitatively evaluating the light scattering from IOLs with a nearly 360° view. The SLSP method can simulate in situ conditions by controlling the parameters of the light source including angle of incidence. This testing strategy will provide a more effective nonclinical approach for the evaluation of IOL light scatter.

  6. Quantitative Profiling of Major Neutral Lipid Classes in Human Meibum by Direct Infusion Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Green, Kari B.; Nichols, Kelly K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this investigation was to better understand lipid composition in human meibum. Methods. Intact lipids in meibum samples were detected by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis in positive detection mode using sodium iodide (NaI) as an additive. The peak intensities of all major types of lipid species, that is, wax esters (WEs), cholesteryl esters (CEs), and diesters (DEs) were corrected for peak overlapping and isotopic distribution; an additional ionization efficiency correction was performed for WEs and CEs, which was simplified by the observation that the corresponding ionization efficiency was primarily dependent on the specific lipid class and saturation degree of the lipids while independent of the carbon chain length. A set of WE and CE standards was spiked in meibum samples for ionization efficiency determination and absolute quantitation. Results. The absolute amount (μmol/mg) for each of 51 WEs and 31 CEs in meibum samples was determined. The summed masses for 51 WEs and 31 CEs accounted for 48 ± 4% and 40 ± 2%, respectively, of the total meibum lipids. The mass percentages of saturated and unsaturated species were determined to be 75 ± 2% and 25 ± 1% for CEs and 14 ± 1% and 86 ± 1% for WEs. The profiles for two types of DEs were also obtained, which include 42 α,ω Type II DEs, and 21 ω Type I-St DEs. Conclusions. Major neutral lipid classes in meibum samples were quantitatively profiled by ESI-MS analysis with NaI additive. PMID:23847307

  7. Quantitative high-throughput profiling of snake venom gland transcriptomes and proteomes (Ovophis okinavensis and Protobothrops flavoviridis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, Steven D; Watanabe, Yutaka; Villar-Briones, Alejandro; Roy, Michael C; Terada, Kouki; Mikheyev, Alexander S

    2013-11-14

    Advances in DNA sequencing and proteomics have facilitated quantitative comparisons of snake venom composition. Most studies have employed one approach or the other. Here, both Illumina cDNA sequencing and LC/MS were used to compare the transcriptomes and proteomes of two pit vipers, Protobothrops flavoviridis and Ovophis okinavensis, which differ greatly in their biology. Sequencing of venom gland cDNA produced 104,830 transcripts. The Protobothrops transcriptome contained transcripts for 103 venom-related proteins, while the Ovophis transcriptome contained 95. In both, transcript abundances spanned six orders of magnitude. Mass spectrometry identified peptides from 100% of transcripts that occurred at higher than contaminant (e.g. human keratin) levels, including a number of proteins never before sequenced from snakes. These transcriptomes reveal fundamentally different envenomation strategies. Adult Protobothrops venom promotes hemorrhage, hypotension, incoagulable blood, and prey digestion, consistent with mammalian predation. Ovophis venom composition is less readily interpreted, owing to insufficient pharmacological data for venom serine and metalloproteases, which comprise more than 97.3% of Ovophis transcripts, but only 38.0% of Protobothrops transcripts. Ovophis venom apparently represents a hybrid strategy optimized for frogs and small mammals. This study illustrates the power of cDNA sequencing combined with MS profiling. The former quantifies transcript composition, allowing detection of novel proteins, but cannot indicate which proteins are actually secreted, as does MS. We show, for the first time, that transcript and peptide abundances are correlated. This means that MS can be used for quantitative, non-invasive venom profiling, which will be beneficial for studies of endangered species.

  8. Quantitative high-throughput profiling of snake venom gland transcriptomes and proteomes (Ovophis okinavensis and Protobothrops flavoviridis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Advances in DNA sequencing and proteomics have facilitated quantitative comparisons of snake venom composition. Most studies have employed one approach or the other. Here, both Illumina cDNA sequencing and LC/MS were used to compare the transcriptomes and proteomes of two pit vipers, Protobothrops flavoviridis and Ovophis okinavensis, which differ greatly in their biology. Results Sequencing of venom gland cDNA produced 104,830 transcripts. The Protobothrops transcriptome contained transcripts for 103 venom-related proteins, while the Ovophis transcriptome contained 95. In both, transcript abundances spanned six orders of magnitude. Mass spectrometry identified peptides from 100% of transcripts that occurred at higher than contaminant (e.g. human keratin) levels, including a number of proteins never before sequenced from snakes. These transcriptomes reveal fundamentally different envenomation strategies. Adult Protobothrops venom promotes hemorrhage, hypotension, incoagulable blood, and prey digestion, consistent with mammalian predation. Ovophis venom composition is less readily interpreted, owing to insufficient pharmacological data for venom serine and metalloproteases, which comprise more than 97.3% of Ovophis transcripts, but only 38.0% of Protobothrops transcripts. Ovophis venom apparently represents a hybrid strategy optimized for frogs and small mammals. Conclusions This study illustrates the power of cDNA sequencing combined with MS profiling. The former quantifies transcript composition, allowing detection of novel proteins, but cannot indicate which proteins are actually secreted, as does MS. We show, for the first time, that transcript and peptide abundances are correlated. This means that MS can be used for quantitative, non-invasive venom profiling, which will be beneficial for studies of endangered species. PMID:24224955

  9. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling the Molecular Signatures of Annexin A5 in Lung Squamous Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gong, Linlin; Qi, Xiaoyu; Li, Huizhen; Wang, Faming; Chi, Xinming; Jiang, Yulin; Shao, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cancer killer around the world. It’s crucial to identify newer mechanism-based targets to effectively manage lung cancer. Annexin A5 (ANXA5) is a protein kinase C inhibitory protein and calcium dependent phospholipid-binding protein, which may act as an endogenous regulator of various pathophysiological processes. However, its molecular mechanism in lung cancer remains poorly understood. This study was designed to determine the mechanism of ANXA5 in lung cancer with a hope to obtain useful information to provide a new therapeutic target. We used a stable isotope dimethyl labeling based quantitative proteomic method to identify differentially expressed proteins in NSCLC cell lines after ANXA5 transfection. Out of 314 proteins, we identified 26 and 44 proteins that were down- and up-regulated upon ANXA5 modulation, respectively. The IPA analysis revealed that glycolysis and gluconeogenesis were the predominant pathways modulated by ANXA5. Multiple central nodes, namely HSPA5, FN1, PDIA6, ENO1, ALDOA, JUP and KRT6A appeared to occupy regulatory nodes in the protein-protein networks upon ANXA5 modulation. Taken together, ANXA5 appears to have pleotropic effects, as it modulates multiple key signaling pathways, supporting the potential usefulness of ANXA5 as a potential target in lung cancer. This study might provide a new insight into the mechanism of ANXA5 in lung cancer. PMID:27684953

  10. Quantitative profiling of oxylipins in plasma and atherosclerotic plaques of hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojic, Lazar A; McLaren, David G; Harms, Amy C; Hankemeier, Thomas; Dane, Adrie; Wang, Sheng-Ping; Rosa, Ray; Previs, Stephen F; Johns, Douglas G; Castro-Perez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Oxylipins are oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that affect a broad range of physiological processes, including cell proliferation, inflammation, inflammation resolution, and vascular function. Moreover, oxylipins are readily detectable in plasma, and certain subsets of oxylipins have been detected in human atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, we set out to produce a detailed quantitative assessment of plasma and plaque oxylipins in a widely used model of atherosclerosis, to identify potential biomarkers of disease progression. We administered regular chow or regular chow supplemented with 0.5% cholesterol (HC) to male New Zealand white rabbits for 12 weeks to induce hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Our targeted lipidomic analyses of oxylipins on plaques isolated from rabbits fed the HC diet detected 34 oxylipins, 28 of which were in compliance with our previously established quality control acceptance criteria. The arachidonic acid (AA) metabolite derived from the COX pathway, 6-keto-PGF1α was the most abundant plaque oxylipin, followed by the linoleic acid (LA) metabolites 9-HODE, 13-HODE and 9,12,13-TriHOME and the arachidonic acid (AA)-derivatives 11-HETE and 12-HETE. We additionally found that the most abundant oxylipins in plasma were three of the five most abundant oxylipins in plaque, namely 11-HETE, 13-HODE, and 9-HODE. The studies reported here make the first step towards a comprehensive characterization of oxylipins as potentially translatable biomarkers of atherosclerosis.

  11. Quantitative cardiac phosphoproteomics profiling during ischemia-reperfusion in an immature swine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kang, Min A.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Purvine, Samuel O.; Brewer, Heather M.; Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana; Portman, Michael A.

    2017-07-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) results in altered metabolic and molecular responses, and phosphorylation is one of the most noted regulatory mechanisms mediating signaling mechanisms during physiological stresses. To expand our knowledge of the potential phosphoproteomic changes in the myocardium during I/R, we used Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation-based analyses in left ventricular samples obtained from porcine hearts under control or I/R conditions. The data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006066. We identified 1,896 phosphopeptides within left ventricular control and I/R porcine samples. Significant differential phosphorylation between control and I/R groups was discovered in 111 phosphopeptides from 86 proteins. Analysis of the phosphopeptides using Motif-x identified five motifs: (..R..S..), (..SP..), (..S.S..), (..S…S..), and (..S.T..). Semiquantitative immunoblots confirmed site location and directional changes in phosphorylation for phospholamban and pyruvate dehydrogenase E1, two proteins known to be altered by I/R and identified by this study. Novel phosphorylation sites associated with I/R were also identified. Functional characterization of the phosphopeptides identified by our methodology could expand our understanding of the signaling mechanisms involved during I/R damage in the heart as well as identify new areas to target therapeutic strategies.

  12. Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Metabolomics Revealed a Distinct Lipid Profile in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Yen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer accounts for the largest number of newly diagnosed cases in female cancer patients. Although mammography is a powerful screening tool, about 20% of breast cancer cases cannot be detected by this method. New diagnostic biomarkers for breast cancer are necessary. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based quantitative metabolomics method to analyze plasma samples from 55 breast cancer patients and 25 healthy controls. A number of 30 patients and 20 age-matched healthy controls were used as a training dataset to establish a diagnostic model and to identify potential biomarkers. The remaining samples were used as a validation dataset to evaluate the predictive accuracy for the established model. Distinct separation was obtained from an orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA model with good prediction accuracy. Based on this analysis, 39 differentiating metabolites were identified, including significantly lower levels of lysophosphatidylcholines and higher levels of sphingomyelins in the plasma samples obtained from breast cancer patients compared with healthy controls. Using logical regression, a diagnostic equation based on three metabolites (lysoPC a C16:0, PC ae C42:5 and PC aa C34:2 successfully differentiated breast cancer patients from healthy controls, with a sensitivity of 98.1% and a specificity of 96.0%.

  13. Quantitative proteomic profiling reveals photosynthesis responsible for inoculum size dependent variation in Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Wang, Jiangxin; Lu, Shuhuan; Lv, Yajin; Yuan, Yingjin

    2013-03-01

    High density cultivation is essential to industrial production of biodiesel from microalgae, which involves in variations of micro-environment around individual cells, including light intensity, nutrition distribution, other abiotic stress and so on. To figure out the main limit factor in high inoculum cultivation, a quantitative proteomic analysis (iTRAQ-on-line 2-D nano-LC/MS) in a non-model green microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana, under different inoculum sizes was conducted. The resulting high-quality proteomic dataset consisted of 695 proteins. Using a cutoff of P photosynthesis (light reaction) and Calvin cycle (carbon reaction pathway) had highest expression levels under inoculum size of 1 × 10(6) cells mL(-1), and lowest levels under 1 × 10(7) cells mL(-1). Canonical correlation analysis of the photosynthesis related proteins and metabolites biomarkers showed that a good correlation existed between them (canonical coefficient was 0.987), suggesting photosynthesis process greatly affected microalgae biodiesel productivity and quality. Proteomic study of C. sorokiniana under different illuminations was also conducted to confirm light intensity as a potential limit factor of high inoculum size. Nearly two thirds of proteins showed up-regulation under the illumination of 70-110 µmol m(-2) s(-1), compared to those of 40 µmol m(-2) s(-1). This result suggested that by elegantly adjusting light conditions, high cell density cultivation and high biodiesel production might be achieved. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Context influences on TALE-DNA binding revealed by quantitative profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Julia M; Barrera, Luis A; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D; Kellis, Manolis; Joung, J Keith; Bulyk, Martha L

    2015-06-11

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins recognize DNA using a seemingly simple DNA-binding code, which makes them attractive for use in genome engineering technologies that require precise targeting. Although this code is used successfully to design TALEs to target specific sequences, off-target binding has been observed and is difficult to predict. Here we explore TALE-DNA interactions comprehensively by quantitatively assaying the DNA-binding specificities of 21 representative TALEs to ∼5,000-20,000 unique DNA sequences per protein using custom-designed protein-binding microarrays (PBMs). We find that protein context features exert significant influences on binding. Thus, the canonical recognition code does not fully capture the complexity of TALE-DNA binding. We used the PBM data to develop a computational model, Specificity Inference For TAL-Effector Design (SIFTED), to predict the DNA-binding specificity of any TALE. We provide SIFTED as a publicly available web tool that predicts potential genomic off-target sites for improved TALE design.

  15. [Digital droplet PCR - a prospective technological approach to quantitative profiling of microRNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseleva, Y Y; Ptitsyn, K G; Radko, S P; Zgoda, V G; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNA is a special type of regulatory molecules governing gene expression. Circulating microRNAs found in blood and other biological fluids are considered today as potential biomarkers of human pathology. Presently, quantitative alterations of particular microRNAs are revealed for a large number of oncological diseases and other disorders. The recently emerged method of digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) possesses a number of advantages making this method the most suitable for verification and validation of perspective microRNA markers of human pathologies. Among these advantages are the high accuracy and reproducibility of microRNA quantification as well as the capability to directly measure the absolute number of microRNA copies with the large dynamic range and a high throughput. The paper reviews microRNA biogenesis, the origin of circulating microRNAs, and methods used for their quantification. The special technical features of ddPCR, which make it an attractive method both for studying microRNAs as biomarkers of human pathologies and for basic research devoted to aspects of gene regulation by microRNA molecules, are also discussed.

  16. An Integrated Strategy for Global Qualitative and Quantitative Profiling of Traditional Chinese Medicine Formulas: Baoyuan Decoction as a Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Yuelin; Qiao, Lirui; Wang, Wenguang; Zhao, Mingbo; Tu, Pengfei; Jiang, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Clarification of the chemical composition of traditional Chinese medicine formulas (TCMFs) is a challenge due to the variety of structures and the complexity of plant matrices. Herein, an integrated strategy was developed by hyphenating ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF), hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (Qtrap-MS), and the novel post-acquisition data processing software UNIFI to achieve automatic, rapid, accurate, and comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analysis of the chemical components in TCMFs. As a proof-of-concept, the chemical profiling of Baoyuan decoction (BYD), which is an ancient TCMF that is clinically used for the treatment of coronary heart disease that consists of Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma, Astragali Radix, Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma Praeparata Cum Melle, and Cinnamomi Cortex, was performed. As many as 236 compounds were plausibly or unambiguously identified, and 175 compounds were quantified or relatively quantified by the scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (sMRM) method. The findings demonstrate that the strategy integrating the rapidity of UNIFI software, the efficiency of UPLC, the accuracy of Q-TOF-MS, and the sensitivity and quantitation ability of Qtrap-MS provides a method for the efficient and comprehensive chemome characterization and quality control of complex TCMFs.

  17. An Integrated Strategy for Global Qualitative and Quantitative Profiling of Traditional Chinese Medicine Formulas: Baoyuan Decoction as a Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Yuelin; Qiao, Lirui; Wang, Wenguang; Zhao, Mingbo; Tu, Pengfei; Jiang, Yong

    2016-12-07

    Clarification of the chemical composition of traditional Chinese medicine formulas (TCMFs) is a challenge due to the variety of structures and the complexity of plant matrices. Herein, an integrated strategy was developed by hyphenating ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF), hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (Qtrap-MS), and the novel post-acquisition data processing software UNIFI to achieve automatic, rapid, accurate, and comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analysis of the chemical components in TCMFs. As a proof-of-concept, the chemical profiling of Baoyuan decoction (BYD), which is an ancient TCMF that is clinically used for the treatment of coronary heart disease that consists of Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma, Astragali Radix, Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma Praeparata Cum Melle, and Cinnamomi Cortex, was performed. As many as 236 compounds were plausibly or unambiguously identified, and 175 compounds were quantified or relatively quantified by the scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (sMRM) method. The findings demonstrate that the strategy integrating the rapidity of UNIFI software, the efficiency of UPLC, the accuracy of Q-TOF-MS, and the sensitivity and quantitation ability of Qtrap-MS provides a method for the efficient and comprehensive chemome characterization and quality control of complex TCMFs.

  18. Quantitative proteome profiling of respiratory virus-infected lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Angela; Brand, H Kim; Sama, Iziah; Lambooy, Lambert H J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; van der Well, Leontine; Huynen, Martijn; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Andeweg, Arno C; Hermans, Peter W M

    2010-08-05

    Respiratory virus infections are among the primary causes of morbidity and mortality in humans. Influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (PIV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are major causes of respiratory illness in humans. Especially young children and the elderly are susceptible to infections with these viruses. In this study we aim to gain detailed insight into the molecular pathogenesis of respiratory virus infections by studying the protein expression profiles of infected lung epithelial cells. A549 cells were exposed to a set of respiratory viruses [RSV, hMPV, PIV and Measles virus (MV)] using both live and UV-inactivated virus preparations. Cells were harvested at different time points after infection and processed for proteomics analysis by 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Samples derived from infected cells were compared to mock-infected cells to identify proteins that are differentially expressed due to infection. We show that RSV, hMPV, PIV3, and MV induced similar core host responses and that mainly proteins involved in defense against ER stress and apoptosis were affected which points towards an induction of apoptosis upon infection. By 2-D DIGE analyses we have gathered information on the induction of apoptosis by respiratory viruses in A549 cells.

  19. Sequential use of transcriptional profiling, expression quantitative trait mapping, and gene association implicates MMP20 in human kidney aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather E Wheeler

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Kidneys age at different rates, such that some people show little or no effects of aging whereas others show rapid functional decline. We sequentially used transcriptional profiling and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL mapping to narrow down which genes to test for association with kidney aging. We first performed whole-genome transcriptional profiling to find 630 genes that change expression with age in the kidney. Using two methods to detect eQTLs, we found 101 of these age-regulated genes contain expression-associated SNPs. We tested the eQTLs for association with kidney aging, measured by glomerular filtration rate (GFR using combined data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA and the InCHIANTI study. We found a SNP association (rs1711437 in MMP20 with kidney aging (uncorrected p = 3.6 x 10(-5, empirical p = 0.01 that explains 1%-2% of the variance in GFR among individuals. The results of this sequential analysis may provide the first evidence for a gene association with kidney aging in humans.

  20. Sequential use of transcriptional profiling, expression quantitative trait mapping, and gene association implicates MMP20 in human kidney aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Heather E; Metter, E Jeffrey; Tanaka, Toshiko; Absher, Devin; Higgins, John; Zahn, Jacob M; Wilhelmy, Julie; Davis, Ronald W; Singleton, Andrew; Myers, Richard M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kim, Stuart K

    2009-10-01

    Kidneys age at different rates, such that some people show little or no effects of aging whereas others show rapid functional decline. We sequentially used transcriptional profiling and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping to narrow down which genes to test for association with kidney aging. We first performed whole-genome transcriptional profiling to find 630 genes that change expression with age in the kidney. Using two methods to detect eQTLs, we found 101 of these age-regulated genes contain expression-associated SNPs. We tested the eQTLs for association with kidney aging, measured by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using combined data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) and the InCHIANTI study. We found a SNP association (rs1711437 in MMP20) with kidney aging (uncorrected p = 3.6 x 10(-5), empirical p = 0.01) that explains 1%-2% of the variance in GFR among individuals. The results of this sequential analysis may provide the first evidence for a gene association with kidney aging in humans.

  1. Quantitative impedimetric NPY-receptor activation monitoring and signal pathway profiling in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Kamp, Verena; Lindner, Ricco; Jahnke, Heinz-Georg; Krinke, Dana; Kostelnik, Katja B; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Robitzki, Andrea A

    2015-05-15

    Label-free and non-invasive monitoring of receptor activation and identification of the involved signal pathways in living cells is an ongoing analytic challenge and a great opportunity for biosensoric systems. In this context, we developed an impedance spectroscopy-based system for the activation monitoring of NPY-receptors in living cells. Using an optimized interdigital electrode array for sensitive detection of cellular alterations, we were able for the first time to quantitatively detect the NPY-receptor activation directly without a secondary or enhancer reaction like cAMP-stimulation by forskolin. More strikingly, we could show that the impedimetric based NPY-receptor activation monitoring is not restricted to the Y1-receptor but also possible for the Y2- and Y5-receptor. Furthermore, we could monitor the NPY-receptor activation in different cell lines that natively express NPY-receptors and proof the specificity of the observed impedimetric effect by agonist/antagonist studies in recombinant NPY-receptor expressing cell lines. To clarify the nature of the observed impedimetric effect we performed an equivalent circuit analysis as well as analyzed the role of cell morphology and receptor internalization. Finally, an antagonist based extensive molecular signal pathway analysis revealed small alterations of the actin cytoskeleton as well as the inhibition of at least L-type calcium channels as major reasons for the observed NPY-induced impedance increase. Taken together, our novel impedance spectroscopy based NPY-receptor activation monitoring system offers the opportunity to identify signal pathways as well as for novel versatile agonist/antagonist screening systems for identification of novel therapeutics in the field of obesity and cancer.

  2. QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE PROFILE OF CURCUMIN FROM ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF CURCUMA LONGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Himesh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Turmeric, derived from the plant Curcuma longa, is a gold-colored spice commonly used in the Indian subcontinent, not only for health care but also for the preservation of food and as a yellow dye for textiles. Curcumin, which gives the yellow color to turmeric, was first isolated almost two centuries ago, and its structure as diferuloylmethane was determined in 1910. Since the time of Ayurveda (1900 B.C numerous therapeutic activities have been assigned to turmeric for a wide variety of diseases and conditions, including those of the skin, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal systems, aches, pains, wounds, sprains, and liver disorders. Extensive research within the last half century has proven that most of these activities, once associated with turmeric, are due to curcumin. Curcumin has been shown to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer activities and thus has a potential against various malignant diseases, diabetes, allergies, arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, and other chronic illnesses. Curcumin can be considered an ideal “Spice for Life”. Curcumin is the most important fraction of turmeric which is responsible for its biological activity. In the present work we have investigated the qualitative and quantitative determination of curcumin in the ethanolic extract of C.longa. Qualitative estimation was carried out by thin layer chromatographic (TLC method. The total phenolic content of the ethanolic extract of C.longa was found to be 11.24 as mg GAE/g. The simultaneous determination of the pharmacologically important active curcuminoids viz. curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bis-demethoxycurcumin in Curcuma longa was carried out by spectrophotometric and HPLC techniques. HPLC separation was performed on a Cyber Lab C-18 column (250 x 4.0 mm, 5μ using acetonitrile and 0.1 % orthophosphoric acid solution in water in the ratio 60 : 40 (v/v at flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Detection of curcuminoids

  3. Tumour xenograft detection through quantitative analysis of the metabolic profile of urine in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroz, Jennifer [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11322-89 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Turner, Joan [Department of Experimental Oncology, University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Slupsky, Carolyn [Department of Nutrition, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-8598 (United States); Fallone, Gino; Syme, Alasdair, E-mail: alasdair.syme@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2011-02-07

    The metabolic content of urine from NIH III nude mice (n = 22) was analysed before and after inoculation with human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer cells. An age- and gender-matched control population (n = 14) was also studied to identify non-tumour-related changes. Urine samples were collected daily for 6 weeks, beginning 1 week before cell injection. Metabolite concentrations were obtained via targeted profiling with Chenomx Suite 5.1, based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra acquired on an Oxford 800 MHz cold probe NMR spectrometer. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to evaluate the significance of the change in metabolite concentration between the two time points. Both the metabolite concentrations and the ratios of pairs of metabolites were studied. The complicated inter-relationships between metabolites were assessed through partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for all variables and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated. The data indicate that the number of statistically significant changes in metabolite concentrations was more pronounced in the tumour-bearing population than in the control animals. This was also true of the ratios of pairs of metabolites. ROC analysis suggests that the ratios were better able to differentiate between the pre- and post-injection samples compared to the metabolite concentrations. PLS-DA models produced good separation between the populations and had the best AUC results (all models exceeded 0.937). These results demonstrate that metabolomics may be used as a screening tool for GBM cells grown in xenograft models in mice.

  4. Targeted profiling of oral bacteria in human saliva and in vitro biofilms with quantitative real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, R R; Viscount, H B; Stanley, M C; Leung, K-P

    2007-01-01

    An in vitro plaque model based on the use of human salivary bacteria and tooth-like surfaces was previously developed for studying the formation of oral biofilm and its use for pre-clinical testing of candidate antimicrobial or antiplaque agents. In this study, a quantitative Taqman PCR assay (QPCR) was developed to compare the bacterial compositions of in vitro biofilms to parent saliva samples, and to determine the relative contributions of different species in the formation of the oral biofilm. In addition, the growth inhibition of saliva-derived plaque was evaluated by chlorhexidine. With this assay, which consisted of primer/probe sets targeting either 16S rDNA sequences present in public databases or cloned ribosomal intergenic spacer region (ISR) sequences, 15 oral bacteria derived from saliva as well as those that were responsible for biofilm formation in an in vitro plaque model were rapidly identified and quantified. Among the target organisms were Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Micromonas micros, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Tannerella forsythensis, and Veillonella parvula. Primer and probe sets developed were both sensitive and specific. The relative profiles of a number of bacteria in 45-h-old biofilms were determined and, when compared to saliva samples, it was found that most of the bacteria identified in saliva also populated the in vitro plaque, including some anaerobes. Brief exposure of biofilms to chlorhexidine resulted in significant losses in viability. This new broad spectrum QPCR assay in combination with the in vitro plaque model will be of significant value in the quantitative study of the microbial composition of human saliva, saliva-derived plaque, and pre-clinical evaluation of potential antimicrobial and antiplaque molecules.

  5. Quantitative profiling of bile acids in biofluids and tissues based on accurate mass high resolution LC-FT-MS: Compound class targeting in a metabolomics workflow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobeldijk, I.; Hekman, M.; Vries de- Weij, J.van der; Coulier, L.; Ramaker, R.; Kleemann, R.; Kooistra, T.; Rubingh, C.; Freidig, A.; Verheij, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report a sensitive, generic method for quantitative profiling of bile acids and other endogenous metabolites in small quantities of various biological fluids and tissues. The method is based on a straightforward sample preparation, separation by reversed-phase high performance liquid-chromatograp

  6. Inorganic particle analysis of dental impression elastomers

    OpenAIRE

    Carlo,Hugo Lemes; FONSECA, Rodrigo Borges; Soares, Carlos José; Correr,Américo Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti,Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine quantitatively and qualitatively the inorganic particle fraction of commercially available dental elastomers. The inorganic volumetric fraction of two addition silicones (Reprosil Putty/Fluid and Flexitime Easy Putty/Fluid), three condensation silicones (Clonage Putty/Fluid, Optosil Confort/Xantopren VL and Silon APS Putty/Fluid), one polyether (Impregum Soft Light Body) and one polysulfide (Permlastic Light Body) was accessed by weighing a previously de...

  7. Quantitative Prevalence and Toxin Gene Profile of Bacillus cereus from Ready-to-Eat Vegetables in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Yim, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Hong-Seok; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyunsook; Oh, Deog-Hwan; Kim, Soo-Ki; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    Ready-to-eat (RTE) foods such as prepared vegetables are becoming an increasingly popular food choice. Since RTE vegetables are not commonly sterilized by heat treatment, contamination with foodborne pathogens such as Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) is a major concern. The objective of this study was to assess the quantitative prevalence and toxin gene profiles of B. cereus strains isolated from RTE vegetables. We found that 70 of the 145 (48%) tested retail vegetable salad and sprout samples were positive for B. cereus. The B. cereus isolates harbored at least one enterotoxin gene. The detection rates of nheABC, hblCDA, cytK, and entFM enterotoxin genes among all isolates were 97.1%, 100%, 81.4%, and 98.6%, respectively. No strain carried the emetic toxin genes. Only 4 strains (5.7%) from the 70 isolates were psychrotrophic and were able to grow at 7°C. All of the psychrotrophic isolates possessed at least 1 enterotoxin gene.

  8. Fatty Acid Profiles of Supraspinatus, Longissimus lumborum and Semitendinosus Muscles and Serum in Kacang Goats Supplemented with Inorganic Selenium and Iodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghwan, Z A; Alimon, A R; Goh, Y M; Nakyinsige, K; Sazili, A Q

    2014-04-01

    Fat and fatty acids in muscle and adipose tissues are among the major factors influencing meat quality particularly nutritional value and palatability. The present study was carried out to examine the effects of supplementing inorganic selenium (Se), iodine (I) and a combination of both on fatty acid compositions in serum, and supraspinatus (SS), longissimus lumborum (LL), and semitendinosus (ST) muscles in goats. Twenty-four, 7 to 8 months old, Kacang male goats with a mean live weight of 22.00±1.17 kg were individually and randomly assigned into four groups of six animals each for 100 d of feeding prior to slaughter. The animals were offered the same concentrate (basal) diet as 1% of body weight with ad libitum amount of fresh guinea grass. The four groups were as follows: T1 (control) - basal diet without supplementation; T2 - basal diet with 0.6 mg Se/kg DM; T3 - basal diet with 0.6 mg I/kg DM; T4 - basal diet with combination of 0.6 mg Se/kg DM and 0.6 mg I/kg DM. The major fatty acids (FAs) detected in the serum were palmitic (C16:0), stearic (C18:0), oleic (C18:1n9) and linoleic (C18:2n-6), while the major FAs in the selected muscles were C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1n9 acids. The main polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) detected in muscles and serum were (CI8:2n-6), linolenic acid (C18:3n-3), and arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6). No significant differences (p>0.05) were observed in the concentration of total saturated fatty acids (SFA) among the four groups. PUFA concentrations in the goats supplemented with Se (T2) were significantly higher (pgoats of the control group (T1). The PUFA: SFA ratio was significantly higher in the animals supplemented with dietary Se (T2) than those of control ones (T1). It is concluded that dietary supplementation of inorganic Se increased the unsaturated fatty acids in muscle. The supplementation of iodine with or without Se had negligible effects on muscle fatty acid content of Kacang crossbred male goats.

  9. Fatty Acid Profiles of Supraspinatus, Longissimus lumborum and Semitendinosus Muscles and Serum in Kacang Goats Supplemented with Inorganic Selenium and Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghwan, Z. A.; Alimon, A. R.; Goh, Y. M.; Nakyinsige, K.; Sazili, A. Q.

    2014-01-01

    Fat and fatty acids in muscle and adipose tissues are among the major factors influencing meat quality particularly nutritional value and palatability. The present study was carried out to examine the effects of supplementing inorganic selenium (Se), iodine (I) and a combination of both on fatty acid compositions in serum, and supraspinatus (SS), longissimus lumborum (LL), and semitendinosus (ST) muscles in goats. Twenty-four, 7 to 8 months old, Kacang male goats with a mean live weight of 22.00±1.17 kg were individually and randomly assigned into four groups of six animals each for 100 d of feeding prior to slaughter. The animals were offered the same concentrate (basal) diet as 1% of body weight with ad libitum amount of fresh guinea grass. The four groups were as follows: T1 (control) - basal diet without supplementation; T2 - basal diet with 0.6 mg Se/kg DM; T3 - basal diet with 0.6 mg I/kg DM; T4 - basal diet with combination of 0.6 mg Se/kg DM and 0.6 mg I/kg DM. The major fatty acids (FAs) detected in the serum were palmitic (C16:0), stearic (C18:0), oleic (C18:1n9) and linoleic (C18:2n-6), while the major FAs in the selected muscles were C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1n9 acids. The main polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) detected in muscles and serum were (CI8:2n-6), linolenic acid (C18:3n-3), and arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6). No significant differences (p>0.05) were observed in the concentration of total saturated fatty acids (SFA) among the four groups. PUFA concentrations in the goats supplemented with Se (T2) were significantly higher (pgoats of the control group (T1). The PUFA: SFA ratio was significantly higher in the animals supplemented with dietary Se (T2) than those of control ones (T1). It is concluded that dietary supplementation of inorganic Se increased the unsaturated fatty acids in muscle. The supplementation of iodine with or without Se had negligible effects on muscle fatty acid content of Kacang crossbred male goats. PMID:25049986

  10. Increased Survivorship and Altered Cytokine Profile from Treatment of Influenza A H1N1-Infected Mice with Ekybion: A Drug Complex of Natural Extracts and Inorganic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Lupfer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ekybion is a drug complex of 16 natural extracts and inorganic compounds designed to treat a variety of respiratory pathogens of bacterial and viral origin. It is licensed throughout Europe for the treatment of respiratory tract infections from equine parainfluenza type 3 and equine herpes virus type 1 in equine stables. The purpose of this paper was to test the efficacy of Ekybion on a well-developed animal model of influenza A infection and determine a mode of action. Experiments were performed with Balb/c mice infected with a lethal dose of influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 virus and treated with nebulized Ekybion every 8 h in a time-dependant or dose-dependant fashion. These experiments showed that mice treated prior to infection with Ekybion had a higher survival rates (~46% compared with untreated animals (~0%. Paradoxically, these mice showed no significant difference in lung virus titer or weight loss. There was, however, a decrease in the level of GM-CSF, IL-6, and G-CSF cytokines in the lungs of Ekybion-treated, infected mice. It is possible that decreases in proinflammatory cytokines may have contributed to increased survivorship in Ekybion-treated influenza-infected mice.

  11. Accumulation of organic and inorganic contaminants in shellfish collected in estuarine waters near Pensacola, Florida: Contamination profiles and risks to human consumers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karouna-Renier, Natalie K. [Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation, University of West Florida, 11000 University Parkway, Pensacola, FL 32514 (United States)]. E-mail: nkarouna@usgs.gov; Snyder, Richard A. [Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation, University of West Florida, 11000 University Parkway, Pensacola, FL 32514 (United States); Allison, Jeffrey G. [Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation, University of West Florida, 11000 University Parkway, Pensacola, FL 32514 (United States); Wagner, Matthew G. [Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation, University of West Florida, 11000 University Parkway, Pensacola, FL 32514 (United States); Ranga Rao, K. [Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation, University of West Florida, 11000 University Parkway, Pensacola, FL 32514 (United States)

    2007-01-15

    We conducted a screening level assessment of contaminants in blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from bays and bayous in the Pensacola, FL area. Tissue samples were analyzed for 17 dioxins/furans, 12 dioxin-like PCB (DL-PCBs) congeners, mercury, and various metals. Contaminant levels were compared to screening values (SV) calculated using U.S. EPA recommendations for establishing consumption advisories. All sampling locations exceeded the SV (0.098 pg g{sup -1}) for dioxins/furans/DL-PCBs, based on a Florida-specific consumption rate (46 g day{sup -1}). Arsenic (inorganic), mercury, cadmium, and zinc levels exceeded SVs in samples from select locations, and with the exception of mercury, these locations were generally downstream of known contaminated areas. We also assessed potential human health risks from consumption of these species. Risks to human health were greatest from consumption of crab hepatopancreas, suggesting that consumption of hepatopancreas, whether directly or indirectly, from crabs collected anywhere in the Pensacola Bay region should be avoided. - Elevated levels of dioxins/furans and dioxin-like PCBs were detected in blue crabs and oysters from select locations in the Pensacola Bay region.

  12. Comparison of lung cancer cell lines representing four histopathological subtypes with gene expression profiling using quantitative real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawaguchi Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancers are the most common type of human malignancy and are intractable. Lung cancers are generally classified into four histopathological subtypes: adenocarcinoma (AD, squamous cell carcinoma (SQ, large cell carcinoma (LC, and small cell carcinoma (SC. Molecular biological characterization of these subtypes has been performed mainly using DNA microarrays. In this study, we compared the gene expression profiles of these four subtypes using twelve human lung cancer cell lines and the more reliable quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR. Results We selected 100 genes from public DNA microarray data and examined them by DNA microarray analysis in eight test cell lines (A549, ABC-1, EBC-1, LK-2, LU65, LU99, STC 1, RERF-LC-MA and a normal control lung cell line (MRC-9. From this, we extracted 19 candidate genes. We quantified the expression of the 19 genes and a housekeeping gene, GAPDH, with qPCR, using the same eight cell lines plus four additional validation lung cancer cell lines (RERF-LC-MS, LC-1/sq, 86-2, and MS-1-L. Finally, we characterized the four subtypes of lung cancer cell lines using principal component analysis (PCA of gene expression profiling for 12 of the 19 genes (AMY2A, CDH1, FOXG1, IGSF3, ISL1, MALL, PLAU, RAB25, S100P, SLCO4A1, STMN1, and TGM2. The combined PCA and gene pathway analyses suggested that these genes were related to cell adhesion, growth, and invasion. S100P in AD cells and CDH1 in AD and SQ cells were identified as candidate markers of these lung cancer subtypes based on their upregulation and the results of PCA analysis. Immunohistochemistry for S100P and RAB25 was closely correlated to gene expression. Conclusions These results show that the four subtypes, represented by 12 lung cancer cell lines, were well characterized using qPCR and PCA for the 12 genes examined. Certain genes, in particular S100P and CDH1, may be especially important for distinguishing the different subtypes. Our results

  13. Quantitative profiling of polar metabolites in herbal medicine injections for multivariate statistical evaluation based on independence principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Miaomiao; Jiao, Yujiao; Wang, Yuefei; Xu, Lei; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Buchang; Jia, Lifu; Pan, Hao; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Xiumei

    2014-01-01

    Botanical primary metabolites extensively exist in herbal medicine injections (HMIs), but often were ignored to control. With the limitation of bias towards hydrophilic substances, the primary metabolites with strong polarity, such as saccharides, amino acids and organic acids, are usually difficult to detect by the routinely applied reversed-phase chromatographic fingerprint technology. In this study, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) profiling method was developed for efficient identification and quantification of small polar molecules, mostly primary metabolites in HMIs. A commonly used medicine, Danhong injection (DHI), was employed as a model. With the developed method, 23 primary metabolites together with 7 polyphenolic acids were simultaneously identified, of which 13 metabolites with fully separated proton signals were quantified and employed for further multivariate quality control assay. The quantitative 1H NMR method was validated with good linearity, precision, repeatability, stability and accuracy. Based on independence principal component analysis (IPCA), the contents of 13 metabolites were characterized and dimensionally reduced into the first two independence principal components (IPCs). IPC1 and IPC2 were then used to calculate the upper control limits (with 99% confidence ellipsoids) of χ2 and Hotelling T2 control charts. Through the constructed upper control limits, the proposed method was successfully applied to 36 batches of DHI to examine the out-of control sample with the perturbed levels of succinate, malonate, glucose, fructose, salvianic acid and protocatechuic aldehyde. The integrated strategy has provided a reliable approach to identify and quantify multiple polar metabolites of DHI in one fingerprinting spectrum, and it has also assisted in the establishment of IPCA models for the multivariate statistical evaluation of HMIs.

  14. Quantitative profiling of polar metabolites in herbal medicine injections for multivariate statistical evaluation based on independence principal component analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miaomiao Jiang

    Full Text Available Botanical primary metabolites extensively exist in herbal medicine injections (HMIs, but often were ignored to control. With the limitation of bias towards hydrophilic substances, the primary metabolites with strong polarity, such as saccharides, amino acids and organic acids, are usually difficult to detect by the routinely applied reversed-phase chromatographic fingerprint technology. In this study, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR profiling method was developed for efficient identification and quantification of small polar molecules, mostly primary metabolites in HMIs. A commonly used medicine, Danhong injection (DHI, was employed as a model. With the developed method, 23 primary metabolites together with 7 polyphenolic acids were simultaneously identified, of which 13 metabolites with fully separated proton signals were quantified and employed for further multivariate quality control assay. The quantitative 1H NMR method was validated with good linearity, precision, repeatability, stability and accuracy. Based on independence principal component analysis (IPCA, the contents of 13 metabolites were characterized and dimensionally reduced into the first two independence principal components (IPCs. IPC1 and IPC2 were then used to calculate the upper control limits (with 99% confidence ellipsoids of χ2 and Hotelling T2 control charts. Through the constructed upper control limits, the proposed method was successfully applied to 36 batches of DHI to examine the out-of control sample with the perturbed levels of succinate, malonate, glucose, fructose, salvianic acid and protocatechuic aldehyde. The integrated strategy has provided a reliable approach to identify and quantify multiple polar metabolites of DHI in one fingerprinting spectrum, and it has also assisted in the establishment of IPCA models for the multivariate statistical evaluation of HMIs.

  15. Quantitative expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infection or DNA vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Herwig, Russell P.; Winton, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a well-studied virus of salmonid fishes. A highly efficacious DNA vaccine has been developed against this virus and studies have demonstrated that this vaccine induces both an early and transient non-specific anti-viral phase as well as long-term specific protection. The mechanisms of the early anti-viral phase are not known, but previous studies noted changes in Mx gene expression, suggesting a role for type I interferon. This study used quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR methodology to compare expression changes over time of a number of cytokine or cytokine-related genes in the spleen of rainbow trout following injection with poly I:C, live IHNV, the IHNV DNA vaccine or a control plasmid encoding the non-antigenic luciferase gene. The target genes included Mx-1, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus induced gene 8 (Vig-8), TNF-α1, TNF-α2, IL-1β1, IL-8, TGF-β1 and Hsp70. Poly I:C stimulation induced several genes but the strongest and significant response was observed in the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes. The live IHN virus induced a significant response in all genes examined except TGF-β1. The control plasmid construct and the IHNV DNA vaccine marginally induced a number of genes, but the main difference between these two groups was a statistically significant induction of the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes by the IHNV vaccine only. The gene expression profiles elicited by the live virus and the IHNV DNA vaccine differed in a number of aspects but this study confirms the clear role for a type I interferon-like response in early anti-viral defence.

  16. Quantitative amino acid profiling and stable isotopically labeled amino acid tracer enrichment used for in vivo human systemic and tissue kinetics measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornø, Andreas; van Hall, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    /ion exchange, derivatized using a phenylisothiocyanate reagent and each amino acid was quantitated with its own stable isotopically labeled internal standard (uniformly labeled-(13)C/(15)N). The method was validated according to general recommendations for chromatographic analytical methods. The calibration...... and plasma were 4.4 and 0.8%, and the interday variability was 3.4% and the recovery was 90.5%, respectively. In conclusion, we have developed and validated a method for quantitative amino acid profiling that meets the requirements for systemic and tissue human in vivo amino acid and protein turnover...

  17. Pain when walking: individual sensory profiles in the foot soles of torture victims - a controlled study using quantitative sensory testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prip Karen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With quantitative sensory testing (QST we recently found no differences in sensory function of the foot soles between groups of torture victims with or without exposure to falanga (beatings under the feet. Compared to matched controls the torture victims had hyperalgesia to deep mechano-nociceptive stimuli and hypoesthesia to non-noxious cutaneous stimuli. The purpose of the present paper was to extend the group analysis into individual sensory profiles of victims’ feet to explore possible relations between external violence (torture, reported pain, sensory symptoms and QST data to help clarify the underlying mechanisms. Methods We employed interviews and assessments of the pain and sensory symptoms and QST by investigators blinded to whether the patients, 32 male torture victims from the Middle East, had (n=15, or had not (n=17 been exposed to falanga. Pain intensity, area and stimulus dependence were used to characterize the pain. QST included thresholds for touch, cold, warmth, cold-pain, heat-pain, deep pressure pain and wind-up to cutaneous noxious stimuli. An ethnically matched control group was available.The normality criterion, from our control group data, was set as the mean +/− 1.28SD, thus including 80% of all values.QST data were transformed into three categories in relation to our normality range; hypoesthesia, normoesthesia or hyperesthesia/hyperalgesia. Results Most patients, irrespective of having been exposed to falanga or not, reported severe pain when walking. This was often associated with hyperalgesia to deep mechanical pressure. Hypoesthesia to mechanical stimuli co-occurred with numbness, burning and with deep mechanical hyperalgesia more often than not, but otherwise, a hypoesthesia to cutaneous sensory modalities did not co-occur systematically to falanga, pain or sensory symptoms. Conclusion In torture victims, there seem to be overriding mechanisms, manifested by hyperalgesia to pressure pain

  18. Quantitative evaluation of sputtering induced surface roughness and its influence on AES depth profiles of polycrystalline Ni/Cu multilayer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. L.; Coetsee, E.; Wang, J. Y.; Swart, H. C.; Terblans, J. J.

    2017-07-01

    The polycrystalline Ni/Cu multilayer thin films consisting of 8 alternating layers of Ni and Cu were deposited on a SiO2 substrate by means of electron beam evaporation in a high vacuum. Concentration-depth profiles of the as-deposited multilayered Ni/Cu thin films were determined with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) in combination with Ar+ ion sputtering, under various bombardment conditions with the samples been stationary as well as rotating in some cases. The Mixing-Roughness-Information depth (MRI) model used for the fittings of the concentration-depth profiles accounts for the interface broadening of the experimental depth profiling. The interface broadening incorporates the effects of atomic mixing, surface roughness and information depth of the Auger electrons. The roughness values extracted from the MRI model fitting of the depth profiling data agrees well with those measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ion sputtering induced surface roughness during the depth profiling was accordingly quantitatively evaluated from the fitted MRI parameters with sample rotation and stationary conditions. The depth resolutions of the AES depth profiles were derived directly from the values determined by the fitting parameters in the MRI model.

  19. Comprehensive and quantitative profiling of lipid species in human milk, cow milk and a phospholipid-enriched milk formula by GC and MS/MSALL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokol, Olena; Ulven, Trond; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a workflow for in-depth analysis of milk lipids that combines gas chromatography (GC) for fatty acid (FA) profiling and a shotgun lipidomics routine termed MS/MSALL for structural characterization of molecular lipid species. To evaluate the performance of the workflow we performed...... a comparative lipid analysis of human milk, cow milk, and Lacprodan® PL-20, a phospholipid-enriched milk protein concentrate for infant formula. The GC analysis showed that human milk and Lacprodan have a similar FA profile with higher levels of unsaturated FAs as compared to cow milk. In-depth lipidomic....... This method reports the total fatty acid composition of all milk lipids, but provides no structural or quantitative information about individual lipid molecules in milk or milk products. Here we present a workflow that integrates gas chromatography for fatty acid profiling and a shotgun lipidomics routine...

  20. Assessment of capillary anion exchange ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the quantitative profiling of the phosphometabolome and organic acids in biological extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitvang, Hans F N; Kristiansen, Kåre A; Bruheim, Per

    2014-11-28

    Metabolic profiling has become an important tool in biological research, and the chromatographic separation of metabolites coupled with mass spectrometric detection is the most frequently used approach for such studies. The establishment of robust chromatographic methods for comprehensive coverage of the anionic metabolite pool is especially challenging. In this study, the development of a capillary ion exchange chromatography (capIC) - negative ESI tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) workflow for the quantitative profiling of the phosphometabolome (e.g., sugar phosphates and nucleotides) is presented. The chromatographic separation and MS/MS conditions were optimized, and the precision of repetitive injections and accuracy in terms of error percentage to true concentration were assessed. The precision is excellent for a capillary flow system with an average CV% of 8.5% for a 50-fmol standard injection and in the lower 2.4-4.4% range for higher concentrations (500-7,500 fmol). The limit of detection (LOD) ranges from 1 to 100 nM (5-500 fmol injected on column), and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) ranges from 1 to 500 nM (5-2,500 fmol injected on column). A fast gradient method with the injection of 50% methanol in water between analytical samples is needed to eliminate carry-over and ensure optimal re-equilibration of the column. Finally, the quantitative applicability of the system was tested on real biological matrices using the constant-volume standard addition method (SAM). Extracts of the human kidney Hek293 cell line were spiked with increasing concentrations of standards to determine the concentration of each metabolite in the sample. Forty-four metabolites were detected with an average uncertainty of 4.1%. Thus, the capIC-MS/MS method exhibits excellent selectivity, sensitivity and precision for the quantitative profiling of the phosphometabolome.

  1. Size exclusion chromatography for the quantitative profiling of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of xylo-oligosaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Louise Enggaard; Meyer, Anne S.

    2010-01-01

    of the progress of enzymatic hydrolysis of different xylan substrates was developed. The method relies on dividing the HPSEC elution profiles into fixed time intervals and utilizing the linear refractive index response (area under the curve) of defined standard compounds. To obtain optimal HPSEC profiles...... of birchwood xylan and wheat bran by a Bacillus subtilis XynA xylanase (GH 11) was used as an example to demonstrate the workability of the HPSEC method for obtaining progress curves describing the evolution in the product profile during enzyme catalysis....

  2. Metabolite profiling of soy sauce using gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry and analysis of correlation with quantitative descriptive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Bamba, Takeshi; Sano, Atsushi; Kodama, Yukako; Imamura, Miho; Obata, Akio; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2012-08-01

    Soy sauces, produced from different ingredients and brewing processes, have variations in components and quality. Therefore, it is extremely important to comprehend the relationship between components and the sensory attributes of soy sauces. The current study sought to perform metabolite profiling in order to devise a method of assessing the attributes of soy sauces. Quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA) data for 24 soy sauce samples were obtained from well selected sensory panelists. Metabolite profiles primarily concerning low-molecular-weight hydrophilic components were based on gas chromatography with time-of-flightmass spectrometry (GC/TOFMS). QDA data for soy sauces were accurately predicted by projection to latent structure (PLS), with metabolite profiles serving as explanatory variables and QDA data set serving as a response variable. Moreover, analysis of correlation between matrices of metabolite profiles and QDA data indicated contributing compounds that were highly correlated with QDA data. Especially, it was indicated that sugars are important components of the tastes of soy sauces. This new approach which combines metabolite profiling with QDA is applicable to analysis of sensory attributes of food as a result of the complex interaction between its components. This approach is effective to search important compounds that contribute to the attributes.

  3. Biosynthetic inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi

    2006-08-25

    Inorganic chemistry and biology can benefit greatly from each other. Although synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry have been greatly successful in clarifying the role of metal ions in biological systems, the time may now be right to utilize biological systems to advance coordination chemistry. One such example is the use of small, stable, easy-to-make, and well-characterized proteins as ligands to synthesize novel inorganic compounds. This biosynthetic inorganic chemistry is possible thanks to a number of developments in biology. This review summarizes the progress in the synthesis of close models of complex metalloproteins, followed by a description of recent advances in using the approach for making novel compounds that are unprecedented in either inorganic chemistry or biology. The focus is mainly on synthetic "tricks" learned from biology, as well as novel structures and insights obtained. The advantages and disadvantages of this biosynthetic approach are discussed.

  4. In-depth Qualitative and Quantitative Profiling of Tyrosine Phosphorylation Using a Combination of Phosphopeptide Immunoaffinity Purification and Stable Isotope Dimethyl Labeling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersema, Paul J.; Foong, Leong Yan; Ding, Vanessa M. Y.; Lemeer, Simone; van Breukelen, Bas; Philp, Robin; Boekhorst, Jos; Snel, Berend; den Hertog, Jeroen; Choo, Andre B. H.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Several mass spectrometry-based assays have emerged for the quantitative profiling of cellular tyrosine phosphorylation. Ideally, these methods should reveal the exact sites of tyrosine phosphorylation, be quantitative, and not be cost-prohibitive. The latter is often an issue as typically several milligrams of (stable isotope-labeled) starting protein material are required to enable the detection of low abundance phosphotyrosine peptides. Here, we adopted and refined a peptidecentric immunoaffinity purification approach for the quantitative analysis of tyrosine phosphorylation by combining it with a cost-effective stable isotope dimethyl labeling method. We were able to identify by mass spectrometry, using just two LC-MS/MS runs, more than 1100 unique non-redundant phosphopeptides in HeLa cells from about 4 mg of starting material without requiring any further affinity enrichment as close to 80% of the identified peptides were tyrosine phosphorylated peptides. Stable isotope dimethyl labeling could be incorporated prior to the immunoaffinity purification, even for the large quantities (mg) of peptide material used, enabling the quantification of differences in tyrosine phosphorylation upon pervanadate treatment or epidermal growth factor stimulation. Analysis of the epidermal growth factor-stimulated HeLa cells, a frequently used model system for tyrosine phosphorylation, resulted in the quantification of 73 regulated unique phosphotyrosine peptides. The quantitative data were found to be exceptionally consistent with the literature, evidencing that such a targeted quantitative phosphoproteomics approach can provide reproducible results. In general, the combination of immunoaffinity purification of tyrosine phosphorylated peptides with large scale stable isotope dimethyl labeling provides a cost-effective approach that can alleviate variation in sample preparation and analysis as samples can be combined early on. Using this approach, a rather complete qualitative

  5. Quantitative Metabolite Profiling of an Amino Group Containing Pharmaceutical in Human Plasma via Precolumn Derivatization and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sanwang; Klencsár, Balázs; Balcaen, Lieve; Cuyckens, Filip; Lynen, Frederic; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2017-02-07

    Quantitative determination of the candidate drug molecule and its metabolites in biofluids and tissues is an inevitable step in the development of new pharmaceuticals. Because of the time-consuming and expensive nature of the current standard technique for quantitative metabolite profiling, i.e., radiolabeling followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with radiodetection, the development of alternative methodologies is of great interest. In this work, a simple, fast, sensitive, and accurate method for the quantitative metabolite profiling of an amino group containing drug (levothyroxine) and its metabolites in human plasma, based on precolumn derivatization followed by HPLC-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), was developed and validated. To introduce a suitable "heteroelement" (defined here as an element that is detectable with ICPMS), an inexpensive and commercially available reagent, tetrabromophthalic anhydride (TBPA) was used for the derivatization of free NH2-groups. The presence of a known number of I atoms in both the drug molecule and its metabolites enabled a cross-validation of the newly developed derivatization procedure and quantification based on monitoring of the introduced Br. The formation of the derivatives was quantitative, providing a 4:1 stoichiometric Br/NH2 ratio. The derivatives were separated via reversed-phase HPLC with gradient elution. Bromine was determined via ICPMS at a mass-to-charge ratio of 79 using H2 as a reaction gas to ensure interference-free detection, and iodine was determined at a mass-to-charge ratio of 127 for cross-validation purposes. The method developed shows a fit-for-purpose accuracy (recovery between 85% and 115%) and precision (repeatability <15% RSD). The limit of quantification (LoQ) for Br was approximately 100 μg/L.

  6. Prediction Model of Antibacterial Activities for Inorganic Antibacterial Agents Based on Artificial Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雪峰; 张利; 涂铭旌

    2004-01-01

    Quantitatively evaluation of antibacterial activities of inorganic antibacterial agents is an urgent problem to be solved. Using experimental data by an orthogonal design, a prediction model of the relation between conditions of preparing inorganic antibacterial agents and their antibacterial activities has been developed. This is accomplished by introducing BP artificial neural networks in the study of inorganic antibacterial agents..It provides a theoretical support for the development and research on inorganic antibacterial agents.

  7. Quantitative analysis of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) viremia profiles from experimental infection: a statistical modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is the most economically significant viral disease facing the global swine industry. Viremia profiles of PRRS virus challenged pigs reflect the severity and progression of the infection within the host and provide crucial information for subsequen...

  8. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  9. Inorganic Coatings Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The inorganic Coatings Lab provides expertise to Navy and Joint Service platforms acquisition IPTs to aid in materials and processing choices which balance up-front...

  10. Quantitative expression profiling guided by common retroviral insertion sites reveals novel and cell type–specific cancer genes in leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvageau, Martin; Miller, Michelle; Lemieux, Sébastien; Lessard, Julie; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Proviral insertional mutagenesis is a powerful tool for the discovery of cancer-associated genes. The ability of integrated proviruses to affect gene expression over long distances combined with the lack of methods to determine the expression levels of large numbers of genes in a systematic and truly quantitative manner have limited the identification of cancer genes by proviral insertional mutagenesis. Here, we have characterized a new model of proviral insertional mutagenesis-induced lymphoid tumors derived from Eed Polycomb group gene mutant mice and quantitatively determined the expression levels of all genes within 100 kb of 20 different retroviral common insertion sites (CISs) identified in these tumors. Using high-throughput quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR), we document an average of 13 CIS-associated genes deregulated per tumor, half of which are leukemia subtype–specific, while the others are coordinately deregulated in the majority of tumors analyzed. Interestingly, we find that genes located distantly from common proviral integration sites are as frequently deregulated as proximal genes, with multiple genes affected per integration. Our studies reveal an unsuspected conservation in the group of genes deregulated among phenotypically similar subtypes of lymphoid leukemias, and suggest that identification of common molecular determinants of this disease is within reach. PMID:17906077

  11. Development, validation and quantitative assessment of an enzymatic assay suitable for small molecule screening and profiling: A case-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Sancenon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The successful discovery and subsequent development of small molecule inhibitors of drug targets relies on the establishment of robust, cost-effective, quantitative, and physiologically relevant in vitro assays that can support prolonged screening and optimization campaigns. The current study illustrates the process of developing and validating an enzymatic assay for the discovery of small molecule inhibitors using alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestine as model target. The assay development workflow includes an initial phase of optimization of assay materials, reagents, and conditions, continues with a process of miniaturization and automation, and concludes with validation by quantitative measurement of assay performance and signal variability. The assay is further evaluated for dose–response and mechanism-of-action studies required to support structure–activity-relationship studies. Emphasis is placed on the most critical aspects of assay optimization and other relevant considerations, including the technology, assay materials, buffer constituents, reaction conditions, liquid handling equipment, analytical instrumentation, and quantitative assessments. Examples of bottlenecks encountered during assay development and strategies to address them are provided.

  12. Quantitative T1 and proton density mapping with direct calculation of radiofrequency coil transmit and receive profiles from two-point variable flip angle data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudrexel, Simon; Reitz, Sarah C; Hof, Stephanie; Gracien, René-Maxime; Fleischer, Vinzenz; Zimmermann, Hilga; Droby, Amgad; Klein, Johannes C; Deichmann, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative T1 mapping of brain tissue is frequently based on the variable flip angle (VFA) method, acquiring spoiled gradient echo (GE) datasets at different excitation angles. However, accurate T1 calculation requires a knowledge of the sensitivity profile B1 of the radiofrequency (RF) transmit coil. For an additional derivation of proton density (PD) maps, the receive coil sensitivity profile (RP) must also be known. Mapping of B1 and RP increases the experiment duration, which may be critical when investigating patients. In this work, a method is presented for the direct calculation of B1 and RP from VFA data. Thus, quantitative maps of T1 , PD, B1 and RP can be obtained from only two spoiled GE datasets. The method is based on: (1) the exploitation of the linear relationship between 1/PD and 1/T1 in brain tissue and (2) the assumption of smoothly varying B1 and RP, so that a large number of data points can be fitted across small volume elements where B1 and RP are approximately constant. The method is tested and optimized on healthy subjects. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Quantitative proteome profiling of dystrophic dog skeletal muscle reveals a stabilized muscular architecture and protection against oxidative stress after systemic delivery of MuStem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardenois, Aurélie; Jagot, Sabrina; Lagarrigue, Mélanie; Guével, Blandine; Ledevin, Mireille; Larcher, Thibaut; Dubreil, Laurence; Pineau, Charles; Rouger, Karl; Guével, Laëtitia

    2016-07-01

    Proteomic profiling plays a decisive role in the elucidation of molecular signatures representative of a specific clinical context. MuStem cell based therapy represents a promising approach for clinical applications to cure Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). To expand our previous studies collected in the clinically relevant DMD animal model, we decided to investigate the skeletal muscle proteome 4 months after systemic delivery of allogenic MuStem cells. Quantitative proteomics with isotope-coded protein labeling was used to compile quantitative changes in the protein expression profiles of muscle in transplanted Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs as compared to Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. A total of 492 proteins were quantified, including 25 that were overrepresented and 46 that were underrepresented after MuStem cell transplantation. Interestingly, this study demonstrates that somatic stem cell therapy impacts on the structural integrity of the muscle fascicle by acting on fibers and its connections with the extracellular matrix. We also show that cell infusion promotes protective mechanisms against oxidative stress and favors the initial phase of muscle repair. This study allows us to identify putative candidates for tissue markers that might be of great value in objectively exploring the clinical benefits resulting from our cell-based therapy for DMD. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001768 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001768).

  14. RIVERINE INORGANIC CARBON DYNAMICS: OVERVIEW AND PERSPECTIVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Guan-rong; GAO Quan-zhou

    2006-01-01

    Inorganic carbon, the great part of the riverine carbon exported to the ocean, plays an important role in the global carbon cycle and ultimately impacts the coupled carbon-climate system. An overview was made on both methods and results of the riverine inorganic carbon researches. In addition to routine in situ survey, measurement and calculation,the direct precipitation method and the gas evolution technique were commonly used to analyze dissolved inorganic carbon in natural water samples. Soil CO2, carbonate minerals and atmospheric CO2 incorporated into riverine inorganic carbon pool via different means, with bicarbonate ion being the dominant component. The concentration of inorganic carbon, the composition of carbon isotopes (δ13C and △14C), and their temporal or spatial variations in the streams were controlled by carbon input, output and changes of carbon biogeochemistry within the riverine system. More accurate flux estimation, better understanding of different influential processes, and quantitative determination of various inputs or outputs need to be well researched in future.

  15. Quantitative site-specific reactivity profiling of S-nitrosylation in mouse skeletal muscle using cysteinyl peptide enrichment coupled with mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Dian; Shukla, Anil K.; Chen, Baowei; Kim, Jong-Seo; Nakayasu, Ernesto; Qu, Yi; Aryal, Uma; Weitz, Karl; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp II, David G.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2013-04-01

    S-nitrosylation (SNO) is an important reversible thiol oxidation event that has been increasingly recognized for its role in cell signaling. While many proteins susceptible to S-nitrosylation have been reported, site-specific identification of physiologically relevant SNO modifications remains an analytical challenge due to the low-abundance and labile nature of the modification. Herein we present further improvement and optimization of the recently reported, resin-assisted cysteinyl peptide enrichment protocol for SNO identification and the extension of this application to mouse skeletal muscle to identify specific sites sensitive to S-nitrosylation by quantitative reactivity profiling. The results of our data indicate that the protein- and peptide-level enrichment protocols provide comparable specificity and coverage of SNO-peptide identifications. S-nitrosylation reactivity profiling was performed by quantitatively comparing the site-specific SNO modification levels in samples treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), an NO donor, at two different physiologically relevant concentrations (i.e., 10 μM and 100 μM). The reactivity profiling experiments overall identified 489 SNO-modified cysteine sites from 197 proteins with the specificity of 95.2% at the unique-peptide-level based on the percentage of Cys-peptides. Among these sites, 260 sites from 135 proteins were observed with relatively high reactivity to S-nitrosylation; such SNO-sensitive sites are more likely to be physiologically relevant. Many of the SNO-sensitive proteins are preferentially localized in mitochondria, contractile fiber and actin cytoskeleton, suggesting the susceptibility of these subcellular compartments to redox regulation. Moreover, the SNO-sensitive proteins seem to be primarily involved in metabolic pathways, including TCA cycle, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glutathione metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism, suggesting the importance of redox regulation in muscle metabolism and

  16. Symptom profiles in the painDETECT Questionnaire in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain stratified according to sensory loss in quantitative sensory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollert, Jan; Kramer, Martin; Barroso, Alejandro; Freynhagen, Rainer; Haanpää, Maija; Hansson, Per; Jensen, Troels S; Kuehler, Bianca M; Maier, Christoph; Mainka, Tina; Reimer, Maren; Segerdahl, Märta; Serra, Jordi; Solà, Romà; Tölle, Thomas R; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Baron, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    The painDETECT Questionnaire (PDQ) is commonly used as a screening tool to discriminate between neuropathic pain (NP) and nociceptive pain, based on the self-report of symptoms, including pain qualities, numbness, and pain to touch, cold, or heat. However, there are minimal data about whether the PDQ is differentially sensitive to different sensory phenotypes in NP. The aim of the study was to analyze whether the overall PDQ score or its items reflect phenotypes of sensory loss in NP as determined by quantitative sensory testing. An exploratory analysis in the Innovative Medicines Initiative Europain and Neuropain database was performed. Data records of 336 patients identified with NP were grouped into sensory profiles characterized by (1) no loss of sensation, (2) loss of thermal sensation, (3) loss of mechanical sensation, and (4) loss of thermal and mechanical sensation. painDETECT Questionnaire profiles were analyzed in a 2-factor analysis of variance. Patients with loss of thermal sensation (2 and 4) significantly more often reported pain evoked by light touch, and patients with loss of mechanical sensation (3 and 4) significantly more often reported numbness and significantly less often burning sensations and pain evoked by light touch. Although the PDQ was not designed to assess sensory loss, single items reflect thermal and/or mechanical sensory loss at group level, but because of substantial variability, the PDQ does not allow for individual allocation of patients into sensory profiles. It will be useful to develop screening tools according to the current definition of NP.

  17. Extending the Limits of Quantitative Proteome Profiling with Data-Independent Acquisition and Application to Acetaminophen-Treated Three-Dimensional Liver Microtissues*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruderer, Roland; Bernhardt, Oliver M.; Gandhi, Tejas; Miladinović, Saša M.; Cheng, Lin-Yang; Messner, Simon; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Zanotelli, Vito; Butscheid, Yulia; Escher, Claudia; Vitek, Olga; Rinner, Oliver; Reiter, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    The data-independent acquisition (DIA) approach has recently been introduced as a novel mass spectrometric method that promises to combine the high content aspect of shotgun proteomics with the reproducibility and precision of selected reaction monitoring. Here, we evaluate, whether SWATH-MS type DIA effectively translates into a better protein profiling as compared with the established shotgun proteomics. We implemented a novel DIA method on the widely used Orbitrap platform and used retention-time-normalized (iRT) spectral libraries for targeted data extraction using Spectronaut. We call this combination hyper reaction monitoring (HRM). Using a controlled sample set, we show that HRM outperformed shotgun proteomics both in the number of consistently identified peptides across multiple measurements and quantification of differentially abundant proteins. The reproducibility of HRM in peptide detection was above 98%, resulting in quasi complete data sets compared with 49% of shotgun proteomics. Utilizing HRM, we profiled acetaminophen (APAP)1-treated three-dimensional human liver microtissues. An early onset of relevant proteome changes was revealed at subtoxic doses of APAP. Further, we detected and quantified for the first time human NAPQI-protein adducts that might be relevant for the toxicity of APAP. The adducts were identified on four mitochondrial oxidative stress related proteins (GATM, PARK7, PRDX6, and VDAC2) and two other proteins (ANXA2 and FTCD). Our findings imply that DIA should be the preferred method for quantitative protein profiling. PMID:25724911

  18. Quantitative sensory testing somatosensory profiles in patients with cervical radiculopathy are distinct from those in patients with nonspecific neck-arm pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampin, Brigitte; Slater, Helen; Hall, Toby; Lee, Gabriel; Briffa, Noelle Kathryn

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the somatosensory profiles of patients with cervical radiculopathy and patients with nonspecific neck-arm pain associated with heightened nerve mechanosensitivity (NSNAP). Sensory profiles were compared to healthy control (HC) subjects and a positive control group comprising patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Quantitative sensory testing (QST) of thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds, pain sensitivity and responsiveness to repetitive noxious mechanical stimulation was performed in the maximal pain area, the corresponding dermatome and foot of 23 patients with painful C6 or C7 cervical radiculopathy, 8 patients with NSNAP in a C6/7 dermatomal pain distribution, 31 HC and 22 patients with FM. For both neck-arm pain groups, all QST parameters were within the 95% confidence interval of HC data. Patients with cervical radiculopathy were characterised by localised loss of function (thermal, mechanical, vibration detection Ppain area and dermatome (thermal detection, vibration detection, pressure pain sensitivity Pneck-arm pain groups demonstrated increased cold sensitivity in their maximal pain area (Pneck-arm pain groups differed from patients with FM, the latter characterised by a widespread gain of function in most nociceptive parameters (thermal, pressure, mechanical pain sensitivity Ppain characteristics between the 2 neck-arm pain groups, distinct sensory profiles were demonstrated for each group.

  19. Quantitative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-based depth profiling of bioleached arsenopyrite surface by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tingting; Lu, Xiancai; Liu, Huan; Li, Juan; Zhu, Xiangyu; Lu, Jianjun; Wang, Rucheng

    2014-02-01

    In supergene environments, microbial activities significantly enhance sulfide oxidation and result in the release of heavy metals, causing serious contamination of soils and waters. As the most commonly encountered arsenic mineral in nature, arsenopyrite (FeAsS) accounts for arsenic contaminants in various environments. In order to investigate the geochemical behavior of arsenic during microbial oxidation of arsenopyrite, (2 3 0) surfaces of arsenopyrite slices were characterized after acidic (pH 2.00) and oxidative decomposition with or without an acidophilic microorganism Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The morphology as well as chemical and elemental depth profiles of the oxidized arsenopyrite surface were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. With the mediation of bacteria, cell-shaped and acicular pits were observed on the reacted arsenopyrite surface, and the concentration of released arsenic species in solution was 50 times as high as that of the abiotic reaction after 10 days reaction. Fine-scale XPS depth profiles of the reacted arsenopyrite surfaces after both microbial and abiotic oxidation provided insights into the changes in chemical states of the elements in arsenopyrite surface layers. Within the 450 nm surface layer of abiotically oxidized arsenopyrite, Fe(III)-oxides appeared and gradually increased towards the surface, and detectable sulfite and monovalent arsenic appeared above 50 nm. In comparison, higher contents of ferric sulfate, sulfite, and arsenite were found in the surface layer of approximately 3 μm of the microbially oxidized arsenopyrite. Intermediates, such as Fe(III)-AsS and S0, were detectable in the presence of bacteria. Changes of oxidative species derived from XPS depth profiles show the oxidation sequence is Fe > As = S in abiotic oxidation, and Fe > S > As in microbial oxidation. Based on these results, a possible reaction path of microbial oxidation was proposed in a concept model.

  20. Inorganic UV filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloísa Berbel Manaia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, concern over skin cancer has been growing more and more, especially in tropical countries where the incidence of UVA/B radiation is higher. The correct use of sunscreen is the most efficient way to prevent the development of this disease. The ingredients of sunscreen can be organic and/or inorganic sun filters. Inorganic filters present some advantages over organic filters, such as photostability, non-irritability and broad spectrum protection. Nevertheless, inorganic filters have a whitening effect in sunscreen formulations owing to the high refractive index, decreasing their esthetic appeal. Many techniques have been developed to overcome this problem and among them, the use of nanotechnology stands out. The estimated amount of nanomaterial in use must increase from 2000 tons in 2004 to a projected 58000 tons in 2020. In this context, this article aims to analyze critically both the different features of the production of inorganic filters (synthesis routes proposed in recent years and the permeability, the safety and other characteristics of the new generation of inorganic filters.

  1. Novel approach for quantitatively estimating element retention and material balances in soil profiles of recharge basins used for wastewater reclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshel, Gil, E-mail: eshelgil@gmail.com [Soil Erosion Research Station, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, HaMaccabim Road, Rishon-Lezion. P.O.B. 30, Beit-Dagan, 50250 (Israel); Lin, Chunye [School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, 19 Xinjiekouwaidajie St., Beijing, 100875 (China); Banin, Amos [Department of Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot (Israel)

    2015-01-01

    We investigated changes in element content and distribution in soil profiles in a study designed to monitor the geochemical changes accruing in soil due to long-term secondary effluent recharge, and its impact on the sustainability of the Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) system. Since the initial elemental contents of the soils at the studied site were not available, we reconstructed them using scandium (Sc) as a conservative tracer. By using this approach, we were able to produce a mass-balance for 18 elements and evaluate the geochemical changes resulting from 19 years of effluent recharge. This approach also provides a better understanding of the role of soils as an adsorption filter for the heavy metals contained in the effluent. The soil mass balance suggests 19 years of effluent recharge cause for a significant enrichment in Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, Mg, K, Na, S and P contents in the upper 4 m of the soil profile. Combining the elements lode record during the 19 years suggest that Cr, Ni, and P inputs may not reach the groundwater (20 m deep), whereas the other elements may. Conversely, we found that 58, 60, and 30% of the initial content of Mn, Ca and Co respectively leached from the upper 2-m of the soil profile. These high percentages of Mn and Ca depletion from the basin soils may reduce the soil's ability to buffer decreases in redox potential pe and pH, respectively, which could initiate a reduction in the soil's holding capacity for heavy metals. - Highlights: • Sc proved as a reliable tracer for reconstructing the initial soil elemental contents. • Mass-balance for 18 elements resulting from 19 years of SAT operation is presented. • After 19 years of operation Cr, Ni, and P inputs may not reach the groundwater. • The inputs of other 15 elements may reach the groundwater. • 58, 60, 30% of initial soil content of Mn, Ca, Co res. leached from the upper 2-m.

  2. In-depth cDNA Library Sequencing Provides Quantitative Gene Expression Profiling in Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanling Yang; Dingge Ying; Yu-Lung Lau

    2009-01-01

    procedures may allow detection of many expres-sion features for less abundant gene variants. With the reduction of sequencing cost and the emerging of new generation sequencing technology, in-depth sequencing of cDNA pools or libraries may represent a better and powerful tool in gene expression profiling and cancer biomarker detection. We also propose using sequence-specific subtraction to remove hundreds of the most abundant housekeeping genes to in-crease sequencing depth without affecting relative expression ratio of other genes, as transcripts from as few as 300 most abundantly expressed genes constitute about 20% of the total transcriptome. In-depth sequencing also represents a unique ad-vantage of detecting unknown forms of transcripts, such as alternative splicing variants, fusion genes, and regulatory RNAs, as well as detecting mutations and polymorphisms that may play important roles in disease pathogenesis.

  3. Microfluidics in inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Hassan, Ali; Sandre, Olivier; Cabuil, Valérie

    2010-08-23

    The application of microfluidics in chemistry has gained significant importance in the recent years. Miniaturized chemistry platforms provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. The advantages of microfluidics have been clearly established in the field of analytical and bioanalytical sciences and in the field of organic synthesis. It is less true in the field of inorganic chemistry and materials science; however in inorganic chemistry it has mostly been used for the separation and selective extraction of metal ions. Microfluidics has been used in materials science mainly for the improvement of nanoparticle synthesis, namely metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor nanoparticles. Microfluidic devices can also be used for the formulation of more advanced and sophisticated inorganic materials or hybrids.

  4. Study of the Pd-Rh interdiffusion by ToF-SIMS, RBS and PIXE: Semi-quantitative depth profiles with MCs + clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brison, J.; Hubert, R.; Lucas, S.; Houssiau, L.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, ToF-SIMS was used to study the Pd-Rh interdiffusion which has a great interest in brachytherapy, a cancer treatment. The secondary ion mass spectrometry was used in the semi-quantitative MCs + mode, by detecting the RhCs + and the PdCs + molecular ions under cesium bombardment. At first, different Rh xPd y (from pure Rh to pure Pd) layers were deposited by PVD and were subsequently characterized by ToF-SIMS, RBS and PIXE. A linear relationship between the relative CsPd + yields and the Pd concentration into the Rh matrices was found. Moreover, the total sputtering yield increases linearly with the Pd concentration. Those relationships permitted to calibrate the ToF-SIMS depth profiles of annealed Pd/Rh layers and were successfully used to quantify the Pd-Rh interdiffusion.

  5. Quantitative profiling of glucosinolates by LC-MS analysis reveals several cultivars of cabbage and kale as promising sources of sulforaphane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Katsunori; Neyazaki, Makiko; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Ogawa, Toshiya; Momose, Masaki

    2012-08-15

    Sulforaphane is an isothiocyanate well known for its potential health benefits. With the aim of finding sulforaphane supply sources, its precursor, glucoraphanin, was widely searched for among Brassica oleracea varieties. Quantitative profiling of seven glucosinolates by LC-MS analysis was performed on 6 cultivars of broccoli, 32 of cabbage and 24 cultivars of kale. The glucoraphanin levels found in three cultivars of cabbage and six cultivars of kale were comparable with, or even higher than, the highest of broccoli (119.4 mg/100g FW). The most promising group belonged to the black kale, Cavolo nero. Use of a C30 column and an ammonium formate buffer in LC-MS and a micro plate solid phase extraction technique was highly effective.

  6. Qualitative and quantitative sugar profiling in olive fruits, leaves, and stems by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) after ultrasound-assisted leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-González, Soledad; Ruiz-Jiménez, José; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Luque de Castro, María Dolores

    2010-12-08

    Qualitative and quantitative profiling of sugars in vegetal materials from Olea europaea cultivars is here reported. Vegetal tissues from olive fruits, leaves, and stems have been characterized by determination of 22 compounds belonging to monosaccharides, disaccharides, trisaccharides, sugar carboxylic acids and alcohols, cyclic polyols, and derived compounds. Sugar isolation was carried out by leaching into a 2:1 dichloromethane/methanol extraction solution under ultrasonic assistance. Multivariate optimization made possible complete isolation of the target fraction in 10 min with an efficiency similar to that provided by a conventional protocol based on 24 h maceration of the vegetal samples. An aliquot of the extract was dried and reconstituted for silylation prior to GC-MS/MS analysis for selective and sensitive identification/quantitation of sugars. Monitoring the target product ions generated after isolation of the precursor ions for each analyte increases the selectivity of the method. The proposed approach is of particular interest for characterization of the sugar fraction in O. europaea, which is of great relevance because of the role of sugars in the metabolism of lipids, proteins, and antioxidants.

  7. Comparison of gene expression profiling by reverse transcription quantitative PCR between fresh frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Navarro, Iker; Gámez-Pozo, Angelo; González-Barón, Manuel; Pinto-Marín, Alvaro; Hardisson, David; López, Rocío; Madero, Rosario; Cejas, Paloma; Mendiola, Marta; Espinosa, Enrique; Vara, Juan Angel Fresno

    2010-05-01

    Recent reports demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying gene expression by using RNA isolated from blocks of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue. The development of molecular tests for clinical use based on archival materials would be of great utility in the search for and validation of important genes or gene expression profiles. In this study, we compared the performance of different normalization strategies in the correlation of quantitative data between fresh frozen (FF) and FFPE samples and analyzed the parameters that characterize such correlation for each gene. Total RNA extracted from FFPE samples presented a shift in raw cycle threshold (Cq) values that can be explained by its extensive degradation. Proper normalization can compensate for the effects of RNA degradation in gene expression measurements. We show that correlation between normalized expression values is better for moderately to highly expressed genes whose expression varies significantly between samples. Nevertheless, some genes had no correlation. These genes should not be included in molecular tests for clinical use based on FFPE samples. Our results could serve as a guide when developing clinical diagnostic tests based on RT-qPCR analyses of FFPE tissues in the coming era of treatment decision-making based on gene expression profiling.

  8. Mass spectrometric profiling of Bacillus cereus strains and quantitation of the emetic toxin cereulide by means of stable isotope dilution analysis and HEp-2 bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Timo; Marxen, Sandra; Rütschle, Andrea; Lücking, Genia; Scherer, Siegfried; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Hofmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A fast and robust high-throughput ultra-performance liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOF MS) profiling method was developed and successfully applied to discriminate a total of 78 Bacillus cereus strains into no/low, medium and high producers of the emetic toxin cereulide. The data obtained by UPLC-TOF MS profiling were confirmed by absolute quantitation of cereulide in selected samples by means of high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA). Interestingly, the B. cereus strains isolated from four vomit samples and five faeces samples from patients showing symptoms of intoxication were among the group of medium or high producers. Comparison of HEp-2 bioassay data with those determined by means of mass spectrometry showed differences, most likely because the HEp-2 bioassay is based on the toxic action of cereulide towards mitochondria of eukaryotic cells rather than on a direct measurement of the toxin. In conclusion, the UPLC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-TOF MS and the HPLC-ESI-MS/MS-SIDA analyses seem to be promising tools for the robust high-throughput analysis of cereulide in B. cereus cultures, foods and other biological samples.

  9. Quantitative profiling of PrP(Sc) peptides by high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to investigate the diversity of prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielbert, Adriana; Davis, Linda A; Sayers, A Robin; Tang, Yue; Hope, James; Sauer, Maurice J

    2013-05-01

    Prions are proteins that can exist in two (or more) folding states, a normal or cellular form and a series of infectious or prion forms, which are prone to aggregate. The prion form can induce conversion of the cellular form and so transmit phenotypic effects of this structural rearrangement within and between cells and organisms. The conversion of PrP(C), the mammalian prion glycoprotein, to its prion form, PrP(Sc), in the brain is a precursor to progressive neurological degeneration, and the various folded forms of PrP(Sc) (defined by the size and glycosylation of protease-resistant core peptides of the PrP aggregates, PrP(res)) are characteristic of a particular neurodegenerative phenotype or prion disease. Here, quantitative multiplex mass spectrometry was used for N-terminal amino acid profiling (N-TAAP) of PrP(res) from sheep affected by scrapie, the prion disease of small ruminants, to rapidly assess the diversity of prions within particular flocks. In 29 cases, PrP(res) concentrations varied from below the limit of detection (350 fmol/g) to 15 pmol/g wet brain. Although most had a single N-TAAP profile, two novel variants were identified: one common to the ARH/ARQ animals in this study and one in an animal of the wild-type sheep PrP genotype (ARQ/ARQ).

  10. Geological and Inorganic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, L. L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review focusing on techniques and their application to the analysis of geological and inorganic materials that offer significant changes to research and routine work. Covers geostandards, spectroscopy, plasmas, microbeam techniques, synchrotron X-ray methods, nuclear activation methods, chromatography, and electroanalytical methods.…

  11. Funky inorganic fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Inorganic porous hollow fibers (IPHF) are interesting for various applications that can benefit from a high surface-area-to-volume ratio. Examples include membranes, catalysts, electrodes, and combinations of these. The thesis starts with providing an overview of conceivable materials of which IPHF

  12. Quantitative targeted bile acid profiling as new markers for DILI in a model of methapyrilene-induced liver injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slopianka, Markus; Herrmann, Anne; Pavkovic, Mira; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Ernst, Rainer; Mally, Angela; Keck, Matthias; Riefke, Bjoern

    2017-07-01

    Recently, bile acids (BAs) were reported as promising markers for drug-induced liver injury (DILI). BAs have been suggested to correlate with hepatocellular and hepatobiliary damage; however a clear connection of BA patterns with different types of DILI remains to be established. To investigate if BAs can improve the assessment of liver injury, 20 specific BAs were quantitatively profiled via LC-MS/MS in plasma and liver tissue in a model of methapyrilene-induced liver injury in rats. Methapyrilene, a known hepatotoxin was dosed daily over 14-days at doses of 30 and 80mg/kg, followed by a recovery phase of 10days. Conventional preclinical safety endpoints were related to BA perturbations and to hepatic gene expression profiling for a mechanistic interpretation of effects. Histopathological signs of hepatocellular and hepatobiliary damage with significant changes of clinical chemistry markers were accompanied by significantly increased levels of indivdual BAs in plasma and liver tissue. BA perturbations were already evident at the earliest time point after 30mg/kg treatment, and thereby indicating better sensitivity than clinical chemistry parameters. Furthermore, the latter markers suggested recovery of liver injury, whereas BA levels in plasma and liver remained significantly elevated during the recovery phase, in line with persistent histopathological findings of bile duct hyperplasia (BDH) and bile pigment deposition. Gene expression profiling revealed downregulation of genes involved in BA synthesis (AMACR, BAAT, ACOX2) and hepatocellular uptake (NTCP, OATs), and upregulation for efflux transporters (MRP2, MRP4), suggesting an adaptive hepatocellular protection mechanism against cytotoxic bile acid accumulation. In summary, our data suggests that specific BAs with high reliability such as cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) followed by glycocholic acid (GCA), taurocholic acid (TCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) can serve as additional biomarkers for

  13. Microdialysis Sampling from Wound Fluids Enables Quantitative Assessment of Cytokines, Proteins, and Metabolites Reveals Bone Defect-Specific Molecular Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Förster

    Full Text Available Bone healing involves a variety of different cell types and biological processes. Although certain key molecules have been identified, the molecular interactions of the healing progress are not completely understood. Moreover, a clinical routine for predicting the quality of bone healing after a fracture in an early phase is missing. This is mainly due to a lack of techniques to comprehensively screen for cytokines, growth factors and metabolites at their local site of action. Since all soluble molecules of interest are present in the fracture hematoma, its in-depth assessment could reveal potential markers for the monitoring of bone healing. Here, we describe an approach for sampling and quantification of cytokines and metabolites by using microdialysis, combined with solid phase extractions of proteins from wound fluids. By using a control group with an isolated soft tissue wound, we could reveal several bone defect-specific molecular features. In bone defect dialysates the neutrophil chemoattractants CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL3 were quantified with either a higher or earlier response compared to dialysate from soft tissue wound. Moreover, by analyzing downstream adaptions of the cells on protein level and focusing on early immune response, several proteins involved in the immune cell migration and activity could be identified to be specific for the bone defect group, e.g. immune modulators, proteases and their corresponding inhibitors. Additionally, the metabolite screening revealed different profiles between the bone defect group and the control group. In summary, we identified potential biomarkers to indicate imbalanced healing progress on all levels of analysis.

  14. A quantitative multiplex nuclease protection assay reveals immunotoxicity gene expression profiles in the rabbit model for vaginal drug safety evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichorova, Raina N., E-mail: rfichorova@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Laboratory of Genital Tract Biology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mendonca, Kevin; Yamamoto, Hidemi S.; Murray, Ryan [Laboratory of Genital Tract Biology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Chandra, Neelima; Doncel, Gustavo F. [CONRAD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Any vaginal product that alters the mucosal environment and impairs the immune barrier increases the risk of sexually transmitted infections, especially HIV infection, which thrives on mucosal damage and inflammation. The FDA-recommended rabbit vaginal irritation (RVI) model serves as a first line selection tool for vaginal products; however, for decades it has been limited to histopathology scoring, insufficient to select safe anti-HIV microbicides. In this study we incorporate to the RVI model a novel quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA) to quantify mRNA levels of 25 genes representing leukocyte differentiation markers, toll-like receptors (TLR), cytokines, chemokines, epithelial repair, microbicidal and vascular markers, by designing two multiplex arrays. Tissue sections were obtained from 36 rabbits (6 per treatment arm) after 14 daily applications of a placebo gel, saline, 4% nonoxynol-9 (N-9), and three combinations of the anti-HIV microbicides tenofovir (TFV) and UC781 in escalating concentrations (highest: 10% TFV + 2.5%UC781). Results showed that increased expression levels of toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, interleukin (IL)-1β, CXCL8, epithelial membrane protein (EMP)-1 (P < 0.05), and decreased levels of TLR2 (P < 0.05), TLR3 and bactericidal permeability increasing protein (BPI) (P < 0.001) were associated with cervicovaginal mucosal alteration (histopathology). Seven markers showed a significant linear trend predicting epithelial damage (up with CD4, IL-1β, CXCL8, CCL2, CCL21, EMP1 and down with BPI). Despite the low tissue damage RVI scores, the high-dose microbicide combination gel caused activation of HIV host cells (SLC and CD4) while N-9 caused proinflammatory gene upregulation (IL-8 and TLR4) suggesting a potential for increasing risk of HIV via different mechanisms depending on the chemical nature of the test product. - Highlights: • A transcriptome nuclease protection assay assessed microbicides for vaginal safety. • Biomarkers were

  15. Receptor binding profiles and quantitative structure-affinity relationships of some 5-substituted-N,N-diallyltryptamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Nicholas V; Daley, Paul F

    2016-02-01

    N,N-Diallyltryptamine (DALT) and 5-methoxy-N,N-diallyltryptamine (5-MeO-DALT) are two tryptamines synthesized and tested by Alexander Shulgin. In self-experiments, 5-MeO-DALT was reported to be psychoactive in the 12-20mg range, while the unsubstituted compound DALT had few discernible effects in the 42-80 mg range. Recently, 5-MeO-DALT has been used in nonmedical settings for its psychoactive effects, but these effects have been poorly characterized and little is known of its pharmacological properties. We extended the work of Shulgin by synthesizing additional 5-substituted-DALTs. We then compared them to DALT and 5-MeO-DALT for their binding affinities at 45 cloned receptors and transporter proteins. Based on in vitro binding affinity, we identified 27 potential receptor targets for the 5-substituted-DALT compounds. Five of the DALT compounds had affinity in the 10-80 nM range for serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2B receptors, while the affinity of DALT itself at 5-HT1A receptors was slightly lower at 100 nM. Among the 5-HT2 subtypes, the weakest affinity was at 5-HT2A receptors, spanning 250-730 nM. Five of the DALT compounds had affinity in the 50-400 nM range for serotonin 5-HT1D, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors; again, it was the unsubstituted DALT that had the weakest affinity at all three subtypes. The test drugs had even weaker affinity for 5-HT1B, 5-HT1E, and 5-HT5A subtypes and little or no affinity for the 5-HT3 subtype. These compounds also had generally nanomolar affinities for adrenergic α2A, α2B, and α2C receptors, sigma receptors σ1 and σ2, histamine H1 receptors, and norepinephrine and serotonin uptake transporters. They also bound to other targets in the nanomolar-to-low micromolar range. Based on these binding results, it is likely that multiple serotonin receptors, as well as several nonserotonergic sites are important for the psychoactive effects of DALT drugs. To learn whether any quantitative structure-affinity relationships existed, we evaluated

  16. Comprehensive and quantitative profiling of lipid species in human milk, cow milk and a phospholipid-enriched milk formula by GC and MS/MSALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Elena; Ulven, Trond; Færgeman, Nils J; Ejsing, Christer S

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a workflow for in-depth analysis of milk lipids that combines gas chromatography (GC) for fatty acid (FA) profiling and a shotgun lipidomics routine termed MS/MSALL for structural characterization of molecular lipid species. To evaluate the performance of the workflow we performed a comparative lipid analysis of human milk, cow milk, and Lacprodan® PL-20, a phospholipid-enriched milk protein concentrate for infant formula. The GC analysis showed that human milk and Lacprodan have a similar FA profile with higher levels of unsaturated FAs as compared to cow milk. In-depth lipidomic analysis by MS/MSALL revealed that each type of milk sample comprised distinct composition of molecular lipid species. Lipid class composition showed that the human and cow milk contain a higher proportion of triacylglycerols (TAGs) as compared to Lacprodan. Notably, the MS/MSALL analysis demonstrated that the similar FA profile of human milk and Lacprodan determined by GC analysis is attributed to the composition of individual TAG species in human milk and glycerophospholipid species in Lacprodan. Moreover, the analysis of TAG molecules in Lacprodan and cow milk showed a high proportion of short-chain FAs that could not be monitored by GC analysis. The results presented here show that complementary GC and MS/MSALL analysis is a powerful approach for characterization of molecular lipid species in milk and milk products. Practical applications : Milk lipid analysis is routinely performed using gas chromatography. This method reports the total fatty acid composition of all milk lipids, but provides no structural or quantitative information about individual lipid molecules in milk or milk products. Here we present a workflow that integrates gas chromatography for fatty acid profiling and a shotgun lipidomics routine termed MS/MSALL for structural analysis and quantification of molecular lipid species. We demonstrate the efficacy of this complementary workflow by a

  17. Inorganic Analytical Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    The book is a treatise on inorganic analytical reactions in aqueous solution. It covers about half of the elements in the periodic table, i.e. the most important ones : H, Li, B, C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, I, Ba, W,...

  18. An integrated platform for directly widely-targeted quantitative analysis of feces part II: An application for steroids, eicosanoids, and porphyrins profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuelin; Song, Qingqing; Li, Jun; Zheng, Jiao; Li, Chun; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Lingling; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-08-19

    Steroids, especially bile acids, along with eicosanoids and porphyrins in feces play pivotal roles for the clinical diagnosis of various diseases. However, their reliable measurement is extensively obstructed by poor stability, structural diversity, broad content ranges, and tedious sample preparation protocols that account for a majority of the measurement errors. In current study, in-depth component screening was initially carried out by flexibly integrating diverse modes, such as predefined multiple reaction monitoring, stepped multiple ion monitoring, neutral loss scan, and precursor ion scan on a hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer, which also provided MS(2) spectra via enhanced product ion experiments. Meanwhile, a hybrid ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometer served as a complementary tool by providing accurate mass spectral information. Afterwards, because authentic compounds were unavailable for most analytes, an online optimization strategy was then proposed to optimize parameters, including precursor-to-product ion transitions and spectrometric parameters, notably collision energy. Finally, direct analysis of all detected components in feces was carried out by employing a platform integrating online pressurized liquid extraction, turbulent flow chromatography, and LC-MS/MS, and applying those optimized parameters. Seventy-one compounds, including 52 steroids and 13 eicosanoids, together with 6 porphyrins, were found and annotated in a fecal pool, and then relatively quantified in various fecal matrices. The quantitative dataset was subjected for multivariate statistical analysis and significant differences were observed among the quantitative chemome profiles of the fecal matrices from different groups. The findings obtained in the two parts demonstrated that the analytical platform in combination with the work-flow is qualified for not only directly simultaneous measurement of diverse endogenous substances, but widely targeted

  19. Quantitative gas chromatography-olfactometry carried out at different dilutions of an extract. Key differences in the odor profiles of four high-quality Spanish aged red wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, V; Aznar, M; López, R; Cacho, J

    2001-10-01

    Four Spanish aged red wines made in different wine-making areas have been extracted, and the extracts and their 1:5, 1:50, and 1:500 dilutions have been analyzed by a gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) approach in which three judges evaluated odor intensity on a four-point scale. Sixty-nine different odor regions were detected in the GC-O profiles of wines, 63 of which could be identified. GC-O data have been processed to calculate averaged flavor dilution factors (FD). Different ANOVA strategies have been further applied on FD and on intensity data to check for significant differences among wines and to assess the effects of dilution and the judge. Data show that FD and the average intensity of the odorants are strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.892). However, the measurement of intensity represents a quantitative advantage in terms of detecting differences. For some odorants, dilution exerts a critical role in the detection of differences. Significant differences among wines have been found in 30 of the 69 odorants detected in the experiment. Most of these differences are introduced by grape compounds such as methyl benzoate and terpenols, by compounds released by the wood, such as furfural, (Z)-whiskey lactone, Furaneol, 4-propylguaiacol, eugenol, 4-ethylphenol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, isoeugenol, and ethyl vanillate, by compounds formed by lactic acid bacteria, such as 2,3-butanedione and acetoine, or by compounds formed during the oxidative storage of wines, such as methional, sotolon, o-aminoacetophenone, and phenylacetic acid. The most important differences from a quantitative point of view are due to 2-methyl-3-mercaptofuran, 4-propylguaiacol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, and isoeugenol.

  20. Quantitative multiplex quantum dot in-situ hybridisation based gene expression profiling in tissue microarrays identifies prognostic genes in acute myeloid leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tholouli, Eleni [Department of Haematology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9WL (United Kingdom); MacDermott, Sarah [The Medical School, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PT Manchester (United Kingdom); Hoyland, Judith [School of Biomedicine, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PT Manchester (United Kingdom); Yin, John Liu [Department of Haematology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9WL (United Kingdom); Byers, Richard, E-mail: richard.byers@cmft.nhs.uk [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, The University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Oxford Road, M13 9PT Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of a quantitative high throughput in situ expression profiling method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application to a tissue microarray of 242 AML bone marrow samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1 and DNMT3A as prognostic markers in AML. -- Abstract: Measurement and validation of microarray gene signatures in routine clinical samples is problematic and a rate limiting step in translational research. In order to facilitate measurement of microarray identified gene signatures in routine clinical tissue a novel method combining quantum dot based oligonucleotide in situ hybridisation (QD-ISH) and post-hybridisation spectral image analysis was used for multiplex in-situ transcript detection in archival bone marrow trephine samples from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Tissue-microarrays were prepared into which white cell pellets were spiked as a standard. Tissue microarrays were made using routinely processed bone marrow trephines from 242 patients with AML. QD-ISH was performed for six candidate prognostic genes using triplex QD-ISH for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and for HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1. Scrambled oligonucleotides were used to correct for background staining followed by normalisation of expression against the expression values for the white cell pellet standard. Survival analysis demonstrated that low expression of HOXA4 was associated with poorer overall survival (p = 0.009), whilst high expression of HOXA9 (p < 0.0001), Meis1 (p = 0.005) and DNMT3A (p = 0.04) were associated with early treatment failure. These results demonstrate application of a standardised, quantitative multiplex QD-ISH method for identification of prognostic markers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical samples, facilitating measurement of gene expression signatures in routine clinical samples.

  1. Quantitative amino acid profiling and stable isotopically labeled amino acid tracer enrichment used for in vivo human systemic and tissue kinetics measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornø, Andreas; van Hall, Gerrit

    2014-03-01

    An important area within clinical functional metabolomics is in vivo amino acid metabolism and protein turnover measurements for which accurate amino acid concentrations and stable isotopically labeled amino acid enrichments are mandatory not the least when tissue metabolomics is determined. The present study describes a new sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry method quantifying 20 amino acids and their tracer(s) ([ring-(13)C6]/D5Phenylalanine) in human plasma and skeletal muscle specimens. Before analysis amino acids were extracted and purified via deprotonization/ion exchange, derivatized using a phenylisothiocyanate reagent and each amino acid was quantitated with its own stable isotopically labeled internal standard (uniformly labeled-(13)C/(15)N). The method was validated according to general recommendations for chromatographic analytical methods. The calibration curve correlations for amino acids were on average; r(2)=0.998. Interday accuracy for amino acids determined in spiked plasma was on average 97.3% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 2.6%. The ([ring-(13)C6]/D5Phenylalanine) enrichment CV's for machine reproducibility in muscle tissue fluid and plasma were 4.4 and 0.8%, and the interday variability was 3.4% and the recovery was 90.5%, respectively. In conclusion, we have developed and validated a method for quantitative amino acid profiling that meets the requirements for systemic and tissue human in vivo amino acid and protein turnover kinetics measurements. Moreover, citrulline, ornithine, π-methyl-histidine, τ-methyl-l-histidine, hydroxy-proline and carnitine were analysed but when similar precision and accuray are required an additional stable istopically labeled internal standard for these meatablites should be be added.

  2. QM/MM methods in inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Carles; Maseras, Feliu

    2008-06-14

    Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods are a useful tool for the computational study of inorganic systems. They allow a quantitative description of systems larger than those treatable with pure QM methods, in principle with a comparable quality. QM/MM calculations are being currently applied to the research in a variety of topics, including structural effects of ligand bulk, selectivity in homogeneous catalysis and mechanical embedding in heterogeneous catalysis. The QM/MM approach is also useful for the separation of steric and electronic contributions, and as an auxiliary tool for geometry optimization when full QM methods are mandatory. The power of QM/MM methods in inorganic chemistry is illustrated in this Perspective with a summary of recent representative applications.

  3. Similar Spectral Power Densities Within the Schumann Resonance and a Large Population of Quantitative Electroencephalographic Profiles: Supportive Evidence for Koenig and Pobachenko.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin S Saroka

    Full Text Available In 1954 and 1960 Koenig and his colleagues described the remarkable similarities of spectral power density profiles and patterns between the earth-ionosphere resonance and human brain activity which also share magnitudes for both electric field (mV/m and magnetic field (pT components. In 2006 Pobachenko and colleagues reported real time coherence between variations in the Schumann and brain activity spectra within the 6-16 Hz band for a small sample. We examined the ratios of the average potential differences (~3 μV obtained by whole brain quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG between rostral-caudal and left-right (hemispheric comparisons of 238 measurements from 184 individuals over a 3.5 year period. Spectral densities for the rostral-caudal axis revealed a powerful peak at 10.25 Hz while the left-right peak was 1.95 Hz with beat-differences of ~7.5 to 8 Hz. When global cerebral measures were employed, the first (7-8 Hz, second (13-14 Hz and third (19-20 Hz harmonics of the Schumann resonances were discernable in averaged QEEG profiles in some but not all participants. The intensity of the endogenous Schumann resonance was related to the 'best-of-fitness' of the traditional 4-class microstate model. Additional measurements demonstrated real-time coherence for durations approximating microstates in spectral power density variations between Schumann frequencies measured in Sudbury, Canada and Cumiana, Italy with the QEEGs of local subjects. Our results confirm the measurements reported by earlier researchers that demonstrated unexpected similarities in the spectral patterns and strengths of electromagnetic fields generated by the human brain and the earth-ionospheric cavity.

  4. Direct injection ion chromatography for the control of chlorinated drinking water: simultaneous estimation of nine haloacetic acids and quantitation of bromate, chlorite and chlorate along with the major inorganic anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Villanova, Rafael J; Raposo Funcia, César; Oliveira Dantas Leite, M Vilani; Toruño Fonseca, Ivania M; Espinosa Nieto, Miguel; Espuelas India, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Most methods for the analysis of haloacetic acids published in recent years are based on ion chromatography with direct injection, employing a gradient elution with potassium hydroxide (KOH). This work reports the exploration of an alternative eluent, a buffer of sodium carbonate/sodium hydrogen carbonate, aimed at the simultaneous analysis of nine haloacetic acids along with bromate, chlorite and chlorate. The alternative of both a less alkaline eluent and a lower temperature of operation may prevent the partial decomposition of some of the haloacetic acids during the analytical process, especially the more vulnerable brominated ones. Gradient elution at temperature of 7 °C yielded the best results, with an acceptable separation of 17 analytes (which includes the major natural inorganic anions) and a good linearity. Precision ranges from 0.3 to 23.4 (% V.C.), and detection limits are within units of μg L⁻¹, except for tribromoacetic acid - somewhat high in comparison with those of the official methods. Nonetheless, with the basic instrumentation setup herein described, this method may be suitable for monitoring when the drinking water treatments are to be optimized. This is especially interesting for small communities or for developing/developed countries in which regulations on disinfection by-products others than trihalomethanes are being addressed.

  5. A potential determinant role of adiponectin and receptors for the early embryo development in PCOS patients with obesity hinted by quantitative profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Hao, Cuifang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Shouxin; Zhang, Fengrong; Zhuang, Lili; Zhao, Dongmei

    2017-02-01

    To identify the quantitative profiling of adiponectin and its receptors (AdipoR1, AdipoR2, and T-cadherin) in cumulus cells (CCs) and to evaluate their roles in the early embryo development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients, in part, with obesity. Fifty-five subjects were divided into two groups according to the body mass index. Oocytes were further inseminated and only mature and normal fertilized oocytes (2PN) were included in this research. Real-time PCR and western blot were performed to identify adiponectin and its receptors in CCs. Adiponectin and receptors were ubiquitously expressed in CCs of PCOS and non-PCOS patients. The level of AdipoR2 in CCs from the oocytes yielding blastocyst after 5/6 days in vitro culture was markedly higher than in those from oocytes could not develop to blastocyst stage after Day 6, for non-obese or obese PCOS patients (0.1647 ± 0.0161 versus 0.0783 ± 0.0385, 0.1948 ± 0.0307 versus 0.1057 ± 0.0236, respectively, p adiponectin could positively modulate embryo development in humans. Further investigations should be carried out to unlock the crucial role that adiponectin plays in embryo development.

  6. Application of quantitative targeted absolute proteomics to profile protein expression changes of hepatic transporters and metabolizing enzymes during cholic acid-promoted liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takayuki; Tachikawa, Masanori; Ohtsuka, Hideo; Fukase, Koji; Nakayama, Shun; Sakata, Naoaki; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Naitoh, Takeshi; Katayose, Yu; Uchida, Yasuo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Unno, Michiaki

    2017-02-26

    Preoperative administration of cholic acid (CA) may be an option to increase the liver volume before elective liver resection surgery, so it is important to understand its effects on liver functionality for drug transport and metabolism. The purpose of this study was to clarify the absolute protein expression dynamics of transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the liver of mice fed CA-containing diet for 5 days (CA1) and mice fed CA-containing diet for 5 days followed by diet without CA for 7 days (CA2), in comparison with non CA-fed control mice. The CA1 group showed the increased liver weight, cell proliferation index, and oxidative stress, but no increase of apoptosis. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics revealed (i) decreases in basolateral bile acid transporters ntcp, oatp1a1, oatp1b2, bile acid synthesis-related enzymes cyp7a1 and cyp8b1, and drug transporters bcrp, mrp6, ent1, oatp2b1, and (ii) increases in glutathione biosynthetic enzymes and drug-metabolizing enzyme cyp3a11. Liver concentrations of reduced and oxidized glutathione were both increased. In the CA2 group, the increased liver weight was maintained, while the biochemical features and protein profiles were restored to the non-CA-fed control levels. These findings suggest that CA administration alters liver functionality per body during liver regeneration and restoration.

  7. Development of a fast and selective UHPLC-DAD-QTOF-MS/MS method for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of destruxin profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibon, Judith; Sturm, Sonja; Seger, Christoph; Parth, Martin; Strasser, Hermann; Stuppner, Hermann

    2014-11-01

    A fast and selective ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography diode array detector (UHPLC-DAD) method combined with an off-line solid phase extraction (SPE) protocol was established to monitor destruxins (dtxs), a secondary metabolite class of highly bioactive cyclic depsipeptides. Sample purification via SPE was tailored to remove both more polar and apolar matrix constituents by applying analyte class-selective washing and elution conditions. To separate and detect destruxin congeners an UHPLC-DAD system hyphenated to a quadrupole-time-of-flight (Q-TOF) hybrid mass spectrometer was utilized. Analyses were performed on a sub-2-μm-particle-size RP-18 column with an acidified (0.02% acetic acid) 12 min water/acetonitrile solvent gradient. In the dtx congener elution zone 22 chromatographic peaks were separated. Four of these were identified by comparison with reference materials as dtx A, dtx B, dtx E, and dtx E-diol; 16 were tentatively assigned as known or novel dtx congeners by the analysis of high resolution UHPLC-DAD-QTOF-MS/MS data recorded in the positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode. The applicability of the UHPLC-DAD assay to investigate biological materials in a qualitative and quantitative manner was proven by the application of the platform to monitor the dtx production profile of three Metarhizium brunneum strain fungal culture broths.

  8. Inorganic Analytical Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    The book is a treatise on inorganic analytical reactions in aqueous solution. It covers about half of the elements in the periodic table, i.e. the most important ones : H, Li, B, C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, I, Ba, W......, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi. The subjects of compound identification and bringing insoluble compounds in solution by alcaline melt digestion are also treated. A high number of small experiments are described....

  9. Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 84 FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) (PC database for purchase)   The Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) is produced cooperatively by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe(FIZ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The ICSD is a comprehensive collection of crystal structure data of inorganic compounds containing more than 140,000 entries and covering the literature from 1915 to the present.

  10. Inorganic particle analysis of dental impression elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Soares, Carlos José; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine quantitatively and qualitatively the inorganic particle fraction of commercially available dental elastomers. The inorganic volumetric fraction of two addition silicones (Reprosil Putty/Fluid and Flexitime Easy Putty/Fluid), three condensation silicones (Clonage Putty/Fluid, Optosil Confort/Xantopren VL and Silon APS Putty/Fluid), one polyether (Impregum Soft Light Body) and one polysulfide (Permlastic Light Body) was accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 600 ºC, during 3 h. Unsettled material samples were soaked in acetone and chloroform for removal of the organic portion. The remaining filler particles were sputter-coated with gold evaluation of their morphology and size, under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexitime Easy Putty was the material with the highest results for volumetric particle fraction, while Impregum Soft had the lowest values. Silon 2 APS Fluid presented the lowest mean filler size values, while Clonage Putty had the highest values. SEM micrographs of the inorganic particles showed several morphologies - lathe-cut, spherical, spherical-like, sticks, and sticks mixed to lathe-cut powder. The results of this study revealed differences in particle characteristics among the elastometic materials that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties.

  11. Quantitative profiling of bacteriocins present in dairy-free probiotic preparations of Lactobacillus acidophilus by nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, Renu; Talapatra, Kesh

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriocins are a heterogeneous group of ribosomally synthesized peptides or proteins with antimicrobial activity, produced predominantly by lactic acid bacteria, with potential applications as biopreservatives and probiotics. We describe here a novel strategy based on a bottom-up, shotgun proteomic approach using nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) with multiple fragmentation techniques for the quantitative profiling of bacteriocins present in the probiotic preparations of Lactobacillus acidophilus. A direct LC-MS/MS analysis with alternate collision-induced dissociation, high-energy collision dissociation, and electron-transfer dissociation fragmentation following a filter-assisted size-exclusion sample prefractionation has resulted in the identification of peptides belonging to 37 bacteriocins or related proteins. Peptides from lactacin F, helveticin J, lysin, avicin A, acidocin M, curvaticin FS47, and carocin D were predominant. The process of freeze drying under vacuum was observed to affect both the diversity and abundance of bacteriocins. Data acquisition using alternating complementary peptide fragmentation modes, especially electron-transfer dissociation, has significantly enhanced the peptide sequence coverage and number of bacteriocin peptides identified. Multi-enzyme proteolytic digestion was observed to increase the sample complexity and dynamic range, lowering the chances of detection of low-abundant bacteriocin peptides by LC-MS/MS. An analytical platform integrating size exclusion prefractionation, nanoLC-MS/MS analysis with multiple fragmentation techniques, and data-dependent decision tree-driven bioinformatic data analysis is novel in bacteriocin research and suitable for the comprehensive bioanalysis of diverse, low-abundant bacteriocins in complex samples.

  12. Quantitative profiling of the shedding rate of the three Marek's disease virus (MDV) serotypes reveals that challenge with virulent MDV markedly increases shedding of vaccinal viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Aminul; Walkden-Brown, Stephen W

    2007-08-01

    The shedding profile of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1, virulent), serotype 2 (MDV2, vaccinal) and herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT, vaccinal) in commercial broiler chickens was determined by measuring the daily rate of production of feather dander from chickens housed in isolators and by quantifying the viral load of each of these serotypes in the dander using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). MDV1 and HVT viruses were detectable in dander filtered from isolator exhaust air from day 7 and MDV2 from day 12 after infection and thereafter until the end of the experiment at 61 days of age of the chickens. There was no difference in shedding rate among the three MDV1 isolates. Daily shedding of MDV1 increased sharply between days 7 and 28 and stabilized thereafter at about 10(9) virus copies per chicken per day, irrespective of vaccination status. Challenge with the three different MDV1 isolates markedly increased shedding of the vaccinal viruses HVT and MDV2 in dander by 38- and 75-fold, respectively. These results demonstrate the utility of qPCR for the differentiation and quantification of different MDV serotypes in feather dander and have significant implications for the routine monitoring of Marek's disease using qPCR assays of dust, for epidemiological modelling of the behaviour and spread of MDVs in chicken populations and for studies into the evolution of virulence in MDV1 in the face of blanket vaccination with imperfect vaccines that ameliorate disease but do not prevent infection and replication of virulent virus.

  13. Selective inorganic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Weisenbach, L.A.; Anderson, M.T. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    This project is developing inorganic thin films as membranes for gas separation applications, and as discriminating coatings for liquid-phase chemical sensors. Our goal is to synthesize these coatings with tailored porosity and surface chemistry on porous substrates and on acoustic and optical sensors. Molecular sieve films offer the possibility of performing separations involving hydrogen, air, and natural gas constituents at elevated temperatures with very high separation factors. We are focusing on improving permeability and molecular sieve properties of crystalline zeolitic membranes made by hydrothermally reacting layered multicomponent sol-gel films deposited on mesoporous substrates. We also used acoustic plate mode (APM) oscillator and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor elements as substrates for sol-gel films, and have both used these modified sensors to determine physical properties of the films and have determined the sensitivity and selectivity of these sensors to aqueous chemical species.

  14. Structural crystallography of inorganic oxysalts

    CERN Document Server

    Krivovichev, Sergey V

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic oxysalts are chemical compounds that contain oxygen - the most abundant element in the Earth's core. This book is the first systematic survey of structures of inorganic oxysalts considered from the viewpoint of modern scientific methods of description and visualisation of complex atomic arrangements.

  15. Selective inorganic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Pohl, P.I.; Brinker, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Separating light gases using membranes is a technology area for which there exists opportunities for significant energy savings. Examples of industrial needs for gas separation include hydrogen recovery, natural gas purification, and dehydration. A membrane capable of separating H{sub 2} from other gases at high temperatures could recover hydrogen from refinery waste streams, and facilitate catalytic dehydrogenation and the water gas shift (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) reaction. Natural gas purification requires separating CH{sub 4} from mixtures with CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}O, and higher alkanes. A dehydrating membrane would remove water vapor from gas streams in which water is a byproduct or a contaminant, such as refrigeration systems. Molecular sieve films offer the possibility of performing separations involving hydrogen, natural gas constituents, and water vapor at elevated temperatures with very high separation factors. It is in applications such as these that the authors expect inorganic molecular sieve membranes to compete most effectively with current gas separation technologies. Cryogenic separations are very energy intensive. Polymer membranes do not have the thermal stability appropriate for high temperature hydrogen recovery, and tend to swell in the presence of hydrocarbon natural gas constituents. The authors goal is to develop a family of microporous oxide films that offer permeability and selectivity exceeding those of polymer membranes, allowing gas membranes to compete with cryogenic and adsorption technologies for large-scale gas separation applications.

  16. Essentials of inorganic materials synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, C N R

    2015-01-01

    This compact handbook describes all the important methods of synthesis employed today for synthesizing inorganic materials. Some features: Focuses on modern inorganic materials with applications in nanotechnology, energy materials, and sustainability Synthesis is a crucial component of materials science and technology; this book provides a simple introduction as well as an updated description of methods Written in a very simple style, providing references to the literature to get details of the methods of preparation when required

  17. Inorganic materials in industrial processes

    OpenAIRE

    Demadis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Although inorganic materials represent a small number to the extreme number of the organic ones, they play a number of crucial roles in several processes of industrial interest. Two significant technologically processes have been selected as “case studies” for this presentation: metallic corrosion and its control, and mitigation of inorganic deposits, both related to industrial water systems. Universidad de Málaga. Campus de Excelencia Internacional Andalucía Tech.

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and time series profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HERMANO GINES in the Caribbean Sea from 1995-11-08 to 2015-07-29 (NODC Accession 0112926)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112926 includes discrete sample, profile and time series profile data collected from HERMANO GINES in the Caribbean Sea from 1995-11-08 to...

  19. Applications of Raman Spectroscopy to Inorganic Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RobinJHClarkFRS

    1995-01-01

    The renaissance in Raman spectroscopy some 25-30 years ago had particular and immediate impact on Inorganic Chemistry,viz in areas such as the study of deeply coloued compounds,structural changes on change of state,equilibria,vapour phase band contour analysis,Raman band intensities and the nature of the chemical bond,metal-metal bonding,species in melts,identification of species in solution and of radicals by time-resolved techniques,in bioinorganic chemistry,and of linear-chain semiconductors.More recently,much attention has been directed at the quantitative level at the evaluation of geometric changes in molecules on excitation by resonance Raman spectroscopy.At the qualitative level Raman microscopy is now recognised to be the most effective technique for the identification of pigments-particularly the inorganic ones-on medieval manuscripts and especially of the components(down to grain sizes of -1 um)of pigment mixtures,It is thus a very important technique at the Arts/Science borderling in conservation science.

  20. Quantitative Microplate Assay for Real-Time Nuclease Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Jonas; Langel, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the phenomenon of nucleases exposing oligonucleotide phosphate backbones to phosphatases we present a novel quantitative method for kinetics of nuclease catalysis. Inorganic phosphate released from nuclease products by phosphatases could be quantified in real-time by a fluorescent sensor of inorganic phosphate. Two different nucleases were employed, showing the versatility of this assay for multiple turnover label-free nuclease studies.

  1. Effect of preservative addition on sensory and dynamic profile of Lucanian dry-sausages as assessed by quantitative descriptive analysis and temporal dominance of sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braghieri, Ada; Piazzolla, Nicoletta; Galgano, Fernanda; Condelli, Nicola; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Napolitano, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    The quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA) was combined with temporal dominance of sensations (TDS) to assess the sensory properties of Lucanian dry-sausages either added with nitrate, nitrite and l-ascorbic acid (NS), or not (NNS). Both QDA and TDS differentiated the two groups of sausages. NNS products were perceived with higher intensity of hardness (Pdescription and differentiation of Lucanian sausages.

  2. Quantitative Real Time PCR approach to study gene expression profile during prenatal growth of skeletal muscle in pig of Duroc and Pietrain breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cagnazzo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative real time-PCR (QRT-PCR is a very sensitive method used to quantify mRNA level in gene expression analysis. Combining amplification, detection and quantification in a single step, allows a more accurate measurement compared to the traditional PCR end point analysis (Pfaffl, 2001; Bustin, 2002.

  3. Recent developments in Inorganic polymers: A Review with focus on Si-Al based inorganic polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrray Srivastava

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic polymers are a unique classification of polymers. They contain inorganic atoms in the main chain. Hybrids with organic polymers as well as those chains that contain metals as pendant groups are considered in a special sub-classification as organo-metallic polymers. The networks containing only inorganic elements in main chain are called inorganic polymers. The silicone rubber is the most commercial inorganic polymer. The organo-metallic and inorganic polymers have a different set of applications. The current paper is a review of current applications of polymers with inorganic back-bone networks, especially focusing on Si and Al based inorganic polymeric materials.

  4. Quantitative profiling of PE, MMPE, DMPE, and PC lipid species by multiple precursor ion scanning: A tool for monitoring PE metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilgin, Mesut; Markgraf, Daniel F; Duchoslav, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We report a method for the simultaneous identification and quantification of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), monomethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (MMPE), dimethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), and phosphatidylcholine (PC) species in lipid extracts. The method employs a specific "mass-tag" strategy...... metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Finally, we benchmarked the mass-tag strategy by specific and sensitive profiling of intermediate MMPE and DMPE species in liver....

  5. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  6. Inorganic nanomedicine--part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhon, Bhupinder S; Kamboj, Seema R

    2010-08-01

    Inorganic nanomedicine refers to the use of inorganic or hybrid nanomaterials and nanosized objects to achieve innovative medical breakthroughs for drug and gene discovery and delivery, discovery of biomarkers, and molecular diagnostics. Potential uses for fluorescent quantum dots include cell labeling, biosensing, in vivo imaging, bimodal magnetic-luminescent imaging, and diagnostics. Biocompatible quantum dot conjugates have been used successfully for sentinel lymph node mapping, tumor targeting, tumor angiogenesis imaging, and metastatic cell tracking. Magnetic nanowires applications include biosensing and construction of nucleic acids sensors. Magnetic cell therapy is used for the repair of blood vessels. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are important for magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery, cell labeling, and tracking. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used for hyperthermic treatment of tumors. Multifunctional MNPs applications include drug and gene delivery, medical imaging, and targeted drug delivery. MNPs could have a vital role in developing techniques to simultaneously diagnose, monitor, and treat a wide range of common diseases and injuries. From the clinical editor: This review serves as an update about the current state of inorganic nanomedicine. The use of inorganic/hybrid nanomaterials and nanosized objects has already resulted in innovative medical breakthroughs for drug/gene discovery and delivery, discovery of biomarkers and molecular diagnostics, and is likely to remain one of the most prolific fields of nanomedicine.

  7. Comprehensive and quantitative profiling of lipid species in human milk, cow milk and a phospholipid-enriched milk formula by GC and MS/MSALL

    OpenAIRE

    Sokol, Olena; Ulven, Trond; Færgeman, Nils J.; Ejsing, Christer S.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a workflow for in-depth analysis of milk lipids that combines gas chromatography (GC) for fatty acid (FA) profiling and a shotgun lipidomics routine termed MS/MSALL for structural characterization of molecular lipid species. To evaluate the performance of the workflow we performed a comparative lipid analysis of human milk, cow milk, and Lacprodan® PL-20, a phospholipid-enriched milk protein concentrate for infant formula. The GC analysis showed that human milk and Lacprodan h...

  8. Organic - Inorganic Hybrids made from Polymerizable Precursors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uricanu, V.I.; Donescu, D.; Banu, A.G.; Serban, S.; Olteanu, M.; Dudau, M.

    2004-01-01

    Organic–inorganic hybrid films were prepared based on a recipe using organoalkoxysilanes’ ability to create an inorganic network combined with polymer network formation via radical polymerization of the organic groups. The starting mixtures included different triethoxysilanes (RTES), where the

  9. Quantitative depth profiling of Si{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x} structures by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and secondary neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdov, M.N.; Drozdov, Y.N. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPM RAS), 603950 Nizhniy Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevski Nizhniy Novgorod State University, 603950 Nizhniy Novgorod (Russian Federation); Csik, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), Hungarian Academy of Science, Bem tér 18/C, 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Novikov, A.V. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPM RAS), 603950 Nizhniy Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevski Nizhniy Novgorod State University, 603950 Nizhniy Novgorod (Russian Federation); Vad, K. [Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), Hungarian Academy of Science, Bem tér 18/C, 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Yunin, P.A.; Yurasov, D.V. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPM RAS), 603950 Nizhniy Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevski Nizhniy Novgorod State University, 603950 Nizhniy Novgorod (Russian Federation); Belykh, S.F. [MATI Russian State Technological University, Orshanskaya Str. 3, 121552 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gololobov, G.P.; Suvorov, D.V. [Ryazan State Radio Engineering University, Gagarin Str. 59/1, 390005 Ryazan (Russian Federation); Tolstogouzov, A., E-mail: a.tolstoguzov@fct.unl.pt [Ryazan State Radio Engineering University, Gagarin Str. 59/1, 390005 Ryazan (Russian Federation); Centre for Physics and Technological Research (CeFITec), Dept. de Física da Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia (FCT), Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2016-05-31

    Quantification of Ge in Si{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x} structures (0.092 ≤ x ≤ 0.78) was carried out by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and electron-gas secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS). A good linear correlation (R{sup 2} > 0.9997) of the intensity ratios of secondary ions GeCs{sub 2}{sup +}/SiCs{sub 2}{sup +} and {sup 74}Ge{sup −}/{sup 30}Si{sup −} and post-ionized sputtered neutrals {sup 70}Ge{sup +}/{sup 28}Si{sup +} with Ge concentration was obtained. The calibration data were used for quantitative depth profiling of [10 × (12.3 nm Si{sub 0.63}Ge{sub 0.37}/34 nm Si)] structures on Si. Satisfactory compliance of the quantified Ge concentration in SiGe layers with the values obtained by high-resolution X-ray diffraction was revealed for both techniques. SIMS and SNMS experimental profiles were fitted using Hofmann's mixing-roughness-information depth (MRI) model. In the case of TOF-SIMS, the quality of the reconstruction was better than for SNMS since not only the progressing roughening, but also the crater effect and other processes unaccounted in the MRI simulation could have a significant impact on plasma sputter depth profiling.

  10. Organic/inorganic nanocomposite polymer electrolyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qi; Shao Jun Dong

    2007-01-01

    The organic/inorganic nanocomposites polymer electrolytes were designed and synthesized. The organic/inorganic nanocom posites membrane materials and their lithium salt complexes have been found thermally stable below 200 ℃. The conductivity of the organic/inorganic nanocomposites polymer electrolytes prepared at room temperature was at magnitude range of 10-6 S/cm.

  11. Evaluation of process parameters governing the aroma generation in three hazelnut cultivars (Corylus avellana L.) by correlating quantitative key odorant profiling with sensory evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefl, Johannes; Schieberle, Peter

    2013-06-05

    The majority of the world hazelnut crop is roasted, thus developing a unique aroma that depends on the cultivar used and on the roasting conditions applied. Although several studies have investigated the volatile fraction of different cultivars and have correlated the data with overall sensory profiles, studies establishing a correlation between key odorants among the bulk of odorless volatiles and the respective aroma profiles are not yet available. On the basis of recently published stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOF-MS), differences in concentrations of key odorants in different hazelnut cultivars roasted under defined conditions were monitored and compared with sensory data obtained by projective mapping, aroma profile analysis, and triangle tests. The results showed that the aroma-active compounds 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 2-propionyl-1-pyrroline, 5-methyl-(E)-2-hepten-4-one, 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine, 3,5-dimethyl-2-ethylpyrazine, and 2-furfurylthiol are appropriate marker odorants to differentiate the various nut aromas. In particular, the appreciated roasty, nutty aroma of optimally roasted hazelnuts was developed if both 5-methyl-(E)-2-hepten-4-one and 3-methyl-4-heptanone were >450 μg/kg, whereas the sum of the two 2-acyl-1-pyrrolines and two pyrazines should not exceed 400 μg/kg to avoid an over-roasted smell. Such a desired aroma can be obtained for each cultivar, but obviously specific roasting times, temperatures, and roasting techniques had to be applied.

  12. Application of SSH and quantitative real time PCR to construction of gene expression profiles from scallop Chlamys farreri in response to exposure to tetrabromobisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoli; Pan, Luqing; Miao, Jingjing; Liu, Na

    2012-11-01

    TBBPA-induced genes were identified using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) from Chlamys farreri. A total of 203 and 44 clones from SSH forward and reverse library were respectively obtained including cellular process, immune system process, response to stimulus, metabolic process and signaling etc. Differential gene expressions were compared between scallops from control and TBBPA treatment groups (400 μg/L, 15 days) using quantitative real time RT-PCR. For further research, eight significant genes expression from scallops exposed to TBBPA (0; 100; 200; 400 μg/L) sampling at 0, 1, 3, 6 and 15 days, were utilized for Q-RT-PCR. The results revealed that the expression level of most selected cDNAs was dominantly up-regulated or down-regulated in the TBBPA-induced scallops. These findings provide basic genomic information of the bivalve and the selected genes may be the potential molecular biomarkers for TBBPA pollution in aquatic environment.

  13. Quantitative proteomic profiling of membrane proteins from the mouse brain cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum using the HysTag reagent: mapping of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper V; Nielsen, Peter Aa; Andersen, Jens R

    2007-01-01

    of recently developed methods for isolation of membrane proteins from 10-20 mg brain tissue [Nielsen, P.Aa., Olsen, J.V., Podtelejnokov, A.V., Andersen, J.R., Mann, M., Wisniewski, J.R., 2005. Proteomic mapping of brain plasma membrane proteins. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 4, 402--408] and the Hys......Analysis of the brain proteome and studying brain diseases through clinical biopsies and animal disease models require methods of quantitative proteomics that are sensitive and allow identification and quantification of low abundant membrane proteins from minute amount of tissue. Taking advantage......Tag-quantification method [Olsen, J.V., Andersen, J.R., Nielsen, P.Aa., Nielsen, M.L., Figeys, D., Mann, M., Wisniewski, J.R., 2004. HysTag---A novel proteomic qualification tool applied to differential analysis of membrane proteins from distinct areas of mouse brain. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 3, 82--92] we performed...

  14. 基于人工神经网络的无机抗菌剂抗菌性能预测模型%Predictiong Model of Antibacterial Activities for Inorganic Antibacterial Agents Based on Artificial Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雪峰; 张利; 涂铭旌

    2004-01-01

    Quantitatively evaluation of antibacterial activities of inorganic antibacterial agents is an urgent problem to be solved.Using experimental data by an orthogonal design, a prediction model of the relation between conditions of preparing inorganic antibacterial agents and their antibacterial activities has been developed.This is accomplished by introducing BP artificial neural networks in the study of inorganic antibacterial agents.It provides a theoretical support for the development and research on inorganic antibacterial agents.

  15. Problems in structural inorganic chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wai-Kee; Mak, Thomas Chung Wai; Mak, Kendrew Kin Wah

    2013-01-01

    This book consists of over 300 problems (and their solutions) in structural inorganic chemistry at the senior undergraduate and beginning graduate level. The topics covered comprise Atomic and Molecular Electronic States, Atomic Orbitals, Hybrid Orbitals, Molecular Symmetry, Molecular Geometry and Bonding, Crystal Field Theory, Molecular Orbital Theory, Vibrational Spectroscopy, and Crystal Structure. The central theme running through these topics is symmetry, molecular or crystalline. The problems collected in this volume originate in examination papers and take-home assignments that have been part of the teaching of the book's two senior authors' at The Chinese University of Hong Kong over the past four decades. The authors' courses include Chemical Bonding, Elementary Quantum Chemistry, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, X-Ray Crystallography, etc. The problems have been tested by generations of students taking these courses.

  16. Inorganic semiconductors for flexible electronics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y.; Rogers, J. A.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Univ. of Illinois

    2007-08-03

    This article reviews several classes of inorganic semiconductor materials that can be used to form high-performance thin-film transistors (TFTs) for large area, flexible electronics. Examples ranging from thin films of various forms of silicon to nanoparticles and nanowires of compound semiconductors are presented, with an emphasis on methods of depositing and integrating thin films of these materials into devices. Performance characteristics, including both electrical and mechanical behavior, for isolated transistors as well as circuits with various levels of complexity are reviewed. Collectively, the results suggest that flexible or printable inorganic materials may be attractive for a range of applications not only in flexible but also in large-area electronics, from existing devices such as flat-panel displays to more challenging (in terms of both cost and performance requirements) systems such as large area radiofrequency communication devices, structural health monitors, and conformal X-ray imagers.

  17. A comparison of social cognitive profiles in children with autism spectrum disorders and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a matter of quantitative but not qualitative difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, Carly; Hopkins, Joyce; Davis, Amy

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare social cognitive profiles of children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and ADHD. Participants diagnosed with an ASD (n = 137) were compared to participants with ADHD (n = 436) on tests of facial and vocal affect recognition, social judgment and problem-solving, and parent- and teacher-report of social functioning. Both groups performed significantly worse than the normative sample on all measures. Although the ASD group had more severe deficits, the pattern of deficits was surprisingly similar between groups, suggesting that social cognitive deficit patterns may be more similar in ASD and ADHD than previously thought. Thus, like those with ASDs, individuals with ADHD may also need to be routinely considered for treatments targeting social skills.

  18. Quantitative profiling of retinyl esters in milk from different ruminant species by using high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchi, Silvia; Caretti, Fulvia; Gentili, Alessandra; Curini, Roberta; Perret, Daniela; Pérez-Fernández, Virginia

    2016-11-15

    An effective high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS/MS) analytical approach was developed for retinoid profiling in raw milk samples (cow, buffalo, ewe, and goat). The analytes were isolated by means of liquid-liquid extraction, including a "lipid freezing" step, with yields exceeding 66%. Since the positive atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) detection is not completely selective, a reliable identification has been accomplished by fully separating the analytes on a tandem C18/C30 column system under non-aqueous reversed phase (NARP) chromatography conditions. After validation, different milk varieties obtained from pasture-fed animals were analysed, providing, for the first time, the retinoid composition of both buffalo's and ewe's milk. According to the literature, retinyl palmitate has been found to be the most abundant vitamin A vitamer, but retinyl oleate is the prevalent form in the caprine milk.

  19. Quantitative determination of urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine, and their non-oxidized forms: daily concentration profile in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Roberta; Manini, Paola; De Palma, Giuseppe; Alinovi, Rossella; Goldoni, Matteo; Niessen, Wilfried M A; Mutti, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    We developed a new method for the simultaneous quantitative determination of 8-oxo-7,8-hydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo), and the corresponding non-oxidized forms, 2'-deoxyguanosine (dGuo), guanine (Gua) and guanosine (Guo), in human urine samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Differences in the ionization of analytes in different urine batches with variable matrix effects were effectively compensated for by internal standardization with stable isotope-labelled analytes. The method was sensitive enough to allow the determination of background levels of these biomarkers and was applied to characterize the inter- and intraindividual variability of biomarkers in the diurnal profile of concentrations in 24 healthy volunteers. When normalized for creatinine, none of the biomarkers was affected by sampling time, thus ruling out any circadian rhythm for nucleic acid oxidation in urine.

  20. Pharmacological profile of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) splice variant translation using a novel drug screening assay: a "quantitative code".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghi, Valentina; Polacchini, Alessio; Baj, Gabriele; Pinheiro, Vera L M; Vicario, Annalisa; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2014-10-03

    The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key regulator of neuronal development and plasticity. BDNF is a major pharmaceutical target in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. However, pharmacological modulation of this neurotrophin is challenging because BDNF is generated by multiple, alternatively spliced transcripts with different 5'- and 3'UTRs. Each BDNF mRNA variant is transcribed independently, but translation regulation is unknown. To evaluate the translatability of BDNF transcripts, we developed an in vitro luciferase assay in human neuroblastoma cells. In unstimulated cells, each BDNF 5'- and 3'UTR determined a different basal translation level of the luciferase reporter gene. However, constructs with either a 5'UTR or a 3'UTR alone showed poor translation modulation by BDNF, KCl, dihydroxyphenylglycine, AMPA, NMDA, dopamine, acetylcholine, norepinephrine, or serotonin. Constructs consisting of the luciferase reporter gene flanked by the 5'UTR of one of the most abundant BDNF transcripts in the brain (exons 1, 2c, 4, and 6) and the long 3'UTR responded selectively to stimulation with the different receptor agonists, and only transcripts 2c and 6 were increased by the antidepressants desipramine and mirtazapine. We propose that BDNF mRNA variants represent "a quantitative code" for regulated expression of the protein. Thus, to discriminate the efficacy of drugs in stimulating BDNF synthesis, it is appropriate to use variant-specific in vitro screening tests.

  1. An acetate-hydroxide gradient for the quantitation of the neutral sugar and uronic acid profile of pectins by HPAEC-PAD without postcolumn pH adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Andreas; Sirisakulwat, Suparat; Carle, Reinhold; Neidhart, Sybille

    2014-03-05

    An HPAEC-PAD method was developed and validated to quantitate seven neutral sugars and two uronic acids of hydrolyzed pectic polysaccharides without postcolumn pH adjustment. Due to a short gradient phase minimizing the ion concentrations after equilibrating the CarboPac PA20 column with sodium acetate and hydroxide, subsequent isocratic separation of the neutral sugars was characterized by almost baseline resolution of rhamnose and arabinose (1.45 ± 0.15) and xylose and mannose (1.21 ± 0.02) at their maximal concentrations. Linearity was shown (R² = 0.9975-0.9998) for the relevant ranges (0.28-30.3 μmol L⁻¹); galacturonic acid, 1.7-128 μmol L⁻¹) above the limits of detection (30-81 nmol L⁻¹; galacturonic acid, 179 nmol L⁻¹) and ∼3.8 times higher limits of quantification. Conformity of the findings for four pectins after methanolysis plus hydrolysis in trifluoroacetic acid with those of reference procedures (total uronic acids, 95-102%; total neutral sugars, 97-105%) proved the accuracy.

  2. Quantitative, high-resolution epigenetic profiling of CpG loci identifies associations with cord blood plasma homocysteine and birth weight in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Anthony A; Emes, Richard D; Ismail, Khaled M K; Haworth, Kim E; Mein, Charles; Carroll, William D; Farrell, William E

    2011-01-01

    Supplementation with folic acid during pregnancy is known to reduce the risk of neural tube defects and low birth weight. It is thought that folate and other one-carbon intermediates might secure these clinical effects via DNA methylation. We examined the effects of folate on the human methylome using quantitative interrogation of 27,578 CpG loci associated with 14,496 genes at single-nucleotide resolution across 12 fetal cord blood samples. Consistent with previous studies, the majority of CpG dinucleotides located within CpG islands exhibited hypo-methylation while those outside CpG islands showed mid-high methylation. However, for the first time in human samples, unbiased analysis of methylation across samples revealed a significant correlation of methylation patterns with plasma homocysteine, LINE-1 methylation and birth weight centile. Additionally, CpG methylation significantly correlated with either birth weight or LINE-1 methylation were predominantly located in CpG islands. These data indicate that levels of folate-associated intermediates in cord blood reflect their influence and consequences for the fetal epigenome and potentially on pregnancy outcome. In these cases, their influence might be exerted during late gestation or reflect those present during the peri-conceptual period.

  3. Inorganic acid emission factors of semiconductor manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chein, HungMin; Chen, Tzu Ming; Aggarwal, Shankar Gopala; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Huang, Chun-Chao

    2004-02-01

    A huge amount of inorganic acids can be produced and emitted with waste gases from integrated circuit manufacturing processes such as cleaning and etching. Emission of inorganic acids from selected semiconductor factories was measured in this study. The sampling of the inorganic acids was based on the porous metal denuders, and samples were then analyzed by ion chromatography. The amount of chemical usage was adopted from the data that were reported to the Environmental Protection Bureau in Hsin-chu County according to the Taiwan Environmental Protection Agency regulation. The emission factor is defined as the emission rate (kg/month) divided by the amount of chemical usage (L/month). Emission factors of three inorganic acids (i.e., hydrofluoric acid [HF], hydrochloric acid [HCl], and sulfuric acid [H2SO4]) were estimated by the same method. The emission factors of HF and HCl were determined to be 0.0075 kg/L (coefficient of variation [CV] = 60.7%, n = 80) and 0.0096 kg/L (CV = 68.2%, n = 91), respectively. Linear regression equations are proposed to fit the data with correlation coefficient square (R2) = 0.82 and 0.9, respectively. The emission factor of H2SO4, which is in the droplet form, was determined to be 0.0016 kg/L (CV = 99.2%, n = 107), and its R2 was 0.84. The emission profiles of gaseous inorganic acids show that HF is the dominant chemical in most of the fabricators.

  4. Detection of quantitative trait loci affecting the milk fatty acid profile on sheep chromosome 22: role of the stearoyl-CoA desaturase gene in Spanish Churra sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, M; Gutiérrez-Gil, B; García-Gámez, E; Sánchez, J P; Arranz, J J

    2010-01-01

    Sheep milk fat contains several components that may provide human health benefits, such as monounsaturated fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Most of the CLA in ruminant milk is synthesized in the mammary gland by the action of the enzyme stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) on circulating vaccenic acid (trans-11 C18:2; VA). Previous studies have found significant associations between polymorphisms in the SCD gene and the fatty acid composition of ruminant products, including sheep milk. Based on this, we performed a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of an ovine chromosome (22) that harbors the SCD gene for effects on milk fatty acid composition traits and classical milk production traits. We identified a suggestive QTL influencing the CLA/VA ratio with the maximum statistic at position 26 cM of the studied chromosome, whereas the SCD gene has been mapped to position 41.6 cM. The individual introduction of 4 SCD single nucleotide polymorphisms in the QTL model did not cause a reduction of the variance explained by the QTL, which suggests that the SCD gene is not directly responsible for the detected effect in the Churra population studied herein. This conclusion was supported by the lack of any significant association identified between the 4 SCD single nucleotide polymorphisms and the CLA/VA ratio. This association analysis suggested a possible effect of the SCD gene on milk fat percentage in Churra sheep. An independent confirmation of these primary results will be required before attempting its practical implementation in selection programs.

  5. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from profile and discrete sample observations using CTD, Niskin bottle, and other instruments from NOAA Ship HI'IALAKAI and NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE in the U.S. Pacific Reefs from 2012-03-02 to 2014-05-05 (NCEI Accession 0131502)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains data from samples collected and analyzed for total alkalinity (TA) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). From these constituents,...

  6. The inorganic constituents of echinoderms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, F.W.; Wheeler, W.C.

    1915-01-01

    In a recent paper on the composition of crinoid skeletons we showed that crinoids contain large quantities of magnesia, and that its proportion varies with the temperature of the water in which the creatures live. This result was so novel and surprising that it seemed desirable to examine other echinoderms and to ascertain whether they showed the same characteristics and regularity. A number of sea urchins and starfishes were therefore studied, their inorganic constituents being analyzed in the same manner as those of the crinoids

  7. Plasma chemistry for inorganic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, O.

    1980-01-01

    Practical application of plasma chemistry to the development of inorganic materials using both low temperature and warm plasmas are summarized. Topics cover: the surface nitrification and oxidation of metals; chemical vapor deposition; formation of minute oxide particles; the composition of oxides from chloride vapor; the composition of carbides and nitrides; freezing high temperature phases by plasma arc welding and plasma jet; use of plasma in the development of a substitute for petroleum; the production of silicon for use in solar cell batteries; and insulating the inner surface of nuclear fusion reactor walls.

  8. Quantitative profiling of colorectal cancer-associated bacteria reveals associations between fusobacterium spp., enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie S Viljoen

    Full Text Available Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF, Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a the presence and b the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5. We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05, age (FDR = 0.03 or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01. Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  9. Heat-resistant inorganic binders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUDRYAVTSEV Pavel Gennadievich,

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider some aspects of production of inorganic heat-resistant composite materials in which new classes of inorganic binders - the basic salts of various metals – are applied. The possibility to use hydroxochlorides and hydroxonitrates of aluminum, zirconium, chromium and a number of other metals as the binder has been shown. The main products of the thermal decomposition of all types of binders discussed in this paper are nano-dispersed highly refractory oxides. Increased pressure in the manufacture of these materials shifts the position of the minimum of the dependence «production strength – production temperature» in the direction of low temperatures. This effect is caused by decreased film thickness of the binder located between filler particles and hence by increased rate of transfer of the matter to the interface and by facilitated sintering process. Materials based on the systems containing chromium and some other elements in transitional oxidation states are colour. For this reason, they have the worst thermal conductivity under the same heat resistance compared to colorless materials.

  10. Infrared Spectra of Simple Inorganic Ion Pairs in Solid Solution: A Physical Inorganic Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Philip J.; Tong, William G.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a physical inorganic experiment in which large single crystals of the alkali halides doped with divalent ion impurities are prepared easily. Demonstrates the ion pairing of inorganic ions in solid solution. (CS)

  11. Contrasting modes of inorganic carbon acquisition amongst Symbiodinium (Dinophyceae) phylotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brading, Patrick; Warner, Mark E; Smith, David J; Suggett, David J

    2013-10-01

    Growing concerns over ocean acidification have highlighted the need to critically understand inorganic carbon acquisition and utilization in marine microalgae. Here, we contrast these characteristics for the first time between two genetically distinct dinoflagellate species of the genus Symbiodinium (phylotypes A13 and A20) that live in symbiosis with reef-forming corals. Both phylotypes were grown in continuous cultures under identical environmental conditions. Rubisco was measured using quantitative Western blots, and radioisotopic (14) C uptake was used to characterize light- and total carbon dioxide (TCO2 )-dependent carbon fixation, as well as inorganic carbon species preference and external carbonic anhydrase activity. A13 and A20 exhibited similar rates of carbon fixation despite cellular concentrations of Rubisco being approximately four-fold greater in A13. The uptake of CO2 over HCO3 - was found to support the majority of carbon fixation in both phylotypes. However, A20 was also able to indirectly utilize HCO3 - by first converting it to CO2 via external carbonic anhydrase. These results show that adaptive differences in inorganic carbon acquisition have evolved within the Symbiodinium genus, which thus carries fundamental implications as to how this functionally key genus will respond to ocean acidification, but could also represent a key trait factor that influences their productivity when in hospite of their coral hosts.

  12. Inorganic and hybrid inorganic-organic systems for conservative treatments of stone and wood materials

    OpenAIRE

    Bergamonti, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic and hybrid inorganic-organic systems for conservative treatments of stone and wood materials The research has focused on the synthesis, characterization and application of inorganic and hybrid inorganic-organic systems for conservative treatments of stone and wood. The wood preservatives synthesized and tested for biocidal activity are polyamidoamines functionalized with hydroxyl and siloxane groups, while the coatings applied on the stones are water based TiO2 nanosols with ...

  13. The biological inorganic chemistry of zinc ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krężel, Artur; Maret, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    The solution and complexation chemistry of zinc ions is the basis for zinc biology. In living organisms, zinc is redox-inert and has only one valence state: Zn(II). Its coordination environment in proteins is limited by oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur donors from the side chains of a few amino acids. In an estimated 10% of all human proteins, zinc has a catalytic or structural function and remains bound during the lifetime of the protein. However, in other proteins zinc ions bind reversibly with dissociation and association rates commensurate with the requirements in regulation, transport, transfer, sensing, signalling, and storage. In contrast to the extensive knowledge about zinc proteins, the coordination chemistry of the "mobile" zinc ions in these processes, i.e. when not bound to proteins, is virtually unexplored and the mechanisms of ligand exchange are poorly understood. Knowledge of the biological inorganic chemistry of zinc ions is essential for understanding its cellular biology and for designing complexes that deliver zinc to proteins and chelating agents that remove zinc from proteins, for detecting zinc ion species by qualitative and quantitative analysis, and for proper planning and execution of experiments involving zinc ions and nanoparticles such as zinc oxide (ZnO). In most investigations, reference is made to zinc or Zn(2+) without full appreciation of how biological zinc ions are buffered and how the d-block cation Zn(2+) differs from s-block cations such as Ca(2+) with regard to significantly higher affinity for ligands, preference for the donor atoms of ligands, and coordination dynamics. Zinc needs to be tightly controlled. The interaction with low molecular weight ligands such as water and inorganic and organic anions is highly relevant to its biology but in contrast to its coordination in proteins has not been discussed in the biochemical literature. From the discussion in this article, it is becoming evident that zinc ion speciation is

  14. Global expression profiling of rice microRNAs by one-tube stem-loop reverse transcription quantitative PCR revealed important roles of microRNAs in abiotic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jianqiang; Xie, Kabin; Xiong, Lizhong

    2010-12-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of endogenous small RNA molecules (20-24 nucleotides) that have pivotal roles in regulating gene expression mostly at posttranscriptional levels in plants. Plant microRNAs have been implicated in the regulation of diverse biological processes including growth and stress responses. However, the information about microRNAs in regulating abiotic stress responses in rice is limited. We optimized a one-tube stem-loop reverse transcription quantitative PCR (ST-RT qPCR) for high-throughput expression profiling analysis of microRNAs in rice under normal and stress conditions. The optimized ST-RT qPCR method was as accurate as small RNA gel blotting and was more convenient and time-saving than other methods in quantifying microRNAs. With this method, 41 rice microRNAs were quantified for their relative expression levels after drought, salt, cold, and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. Thirty-two microRNAs showed induced or suppressed expression after stress or ABA treatment. Further analysis suggested that stress-responsive cis-elements were enriched in the promoters of stress-responsive microRNA genes. The expressions of five and seven microRNAs were significantly affected in the rice plant with defects in stress tolerance regulatory genes OsSKIPa and OsbZIP23, respectively. Some of the predicted target genes of these microRNAs were also related to abiotic stresses. We conclude that ST-RT qPCR is an efficient and reliable method for expression profiling of microRNAs and a significant portion of rice microRNAs participate in abiotic stress response and regulation.

  15. Attachment of inorganic moieties onto aliphatic polyurethanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Ayres

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethanes have been used in a series of applications due basically to their versatility in terms of controlling the behavior by altering basically the type of reagents used. However, for more specific and advanced applications, such as in membranes, biomaterials and sensors, well-organized and defined chemical functionalities are necessary. In this work, inorganic functionalities were incorporated into aliphatic polyurethanes (PU having different macromolecular architectures. Polyurethanes were synthesized using a polyether diol and dicyclohexylmethane 4,4' diisocyanate (H12-MDI. Polyurethanes having carboxylic acid groups were also produced by introducing 2,2- bis (hydroxymethyl propionic acid in the polymerization process. Inorganic functionalities were inserted into polyurethanes by reacting isocyanate end capped chains with aminopropyltriethoxysilane followed by tetraethoxysilane. PU having carboxylic acid groups yielded transparent samples after the incorporation of inorganic entities, as an evidence of smaller and better dispersed inorganic entities in the polymer network. FTIR and swelling measurements showed that polyurethanes having carboxylic acid groups had inorganic domains less packed, condensed and cross-linked when compared to polyurethanes with no carboxylic acid groups. Results also suggested that the progressive incorporation of inorganic moieties in both types of polyurethanes occurred in regions previously activated with inorganic functionalities, instead of by the creation of new domains. The temperatures of thermal decomposition and glass transition were also shifted to higher temperatures when inorganic functionalities were incorporated into polyurethanes.

  16. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  18. Inorganic materials synthesis in ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Janiak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of "inorganic materials from ionic liquids" (ILs is a young and dynamically growing research area for less than 10 years. The ionothermal synthesis in ILs is often connected with the preparation of nanomaterials, the use of microwave heating and in part also ultrasound. Inorganic material synthesis in ILs allows obtaining phases which are not accessible in conventional organic or aqueous solvents or with standard methods of solid-state chemistry or under such mild conditions. Cases at hand include "ligand-free" metal nanoparticles without added stabilizing capping ligands, inorganic or inorganic-organic hybrid solid-state compounds, large polyhedral clusters and exfoliated graphene from low-temperature synthesis. There are great expectations that ILs open routes towards new, possibly unknown, inorganic materials with advantageous properties that cannot (or only with great difficulty be made via conventional processes.

  19. On some problems of inorganic supramolecular chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervov, Vladislav S; Zotova, Anna E

    2013-12-02

    In this study, some features that distinguish inorganic supramolecular host-guest objects from traditional architectures are considered. Crystalline inorganic supramolecular structures are the basis for the development of new functional materials. Here, the possible changes in the mechanism of crystalline inorganic supramolecular structure self-organization at high interaction potentials are discussed. The cases of changes in the host structures and corresponding changes in the charge states under guest intercalation, as well as their impact on phase stability and stoichiometry are considered. It was demonstrated that the deviation from the geometrical and topological complementarity conditions may be due to the additional energy gain from forming inorganic supramolecular structures. It has been assumed that molecular recognition principles can be employed for the development of physicochemical analysis and interpretation of metastable states in inorganic crystalline alloys.

  20. PETROGRAPHY AND APPLICATION OF THE RIETVELD METHOD TO THE QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF PHASES OF NATURAL CLINKER GENERATED BY COAL SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinilla A. Jesús Andelfo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Fine-grained and mainly reddish color, compact and slightly breccious and vesicular pyrometamorphic rocks (natural clinker are associated to the spontaneous combustion of coal seams of the Cerrejón Formation exploited by Carbones del Cerrejón Limited in La Guajira Peninsula (Caribbean Region of Colombia. These rocks constitute remaining inorganic materials derived from claystones, mudstones and sandstones originally associated with the coal and are essentially a complex mixture of various amorphous and crystalline inorganic constituents. In this paper, a petrographic characterization of natural clinker, aswell as the application of the X-ray diffraction (Rietveld method by mean of quantitative analysis of its mineral phases were carried out. The RIQAS program was used for the refinement of X ray powder diffraction profiles, analyzing the importance of using the correct isostructural models for each of the existing phases, which were obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD. The results obtained in this investigation show that the Rietveld method can be used as a powerful tool in the quantitative analysis of phases in polycrystalline samples, which has been a traditional problem in geology.

  1. Welcome to Inorganics: A New Open Access, Inclusive Forum for Inorganic Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan H. Gregory

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the beauties of inorganic chemistry is its sheer diversity. Just as chemistry sits at the centre of the sciences, inorganic chemistry sits at the centre of chemistry itself. Inorganic chemists are fortunate in having the entire periodic table at their disposal, providing a palette for the creation of a multitude of rich and diverse compounds and materials from the simplest salts to the most complex of molecular species. It follows that the language of inorganic chemistry can thus be a demanding one, accommodating sub-disciplines with very different perspectives and frames of reference. One could argue that it is the unequivocal breadth of inorganic chemistry that empowers inorganic chemists to work at the interfaces, not just between the traditional Inorganic-Organic-Physical boundaries of the discipline, but in the regions where chemistry borders the other physical and life sciences, engineering and socio-economics. [...

  2. Inorganic biomaterials structure, properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiang C

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a practical guide to the use and applications of inorganic biomaterials. It begins by introducing the concept of inorganic biomaterials, which includes bioceramics and bioglass. This concept is further extended to hybrid biomaterials consisting of inorganic and organic materials to mimic natural biomaterials. The book goes on to provide the reader with information on biocompatibility, bioactivity and bioresorbability. The concept of the latter is important because of the increasing role resorbable biomaterials are playing in implant applications. The book also introduces a n

  3. Nanocomposites Derived from Polymers and Inorganic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Yup Jeon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Polymers are considered to be good hosting matrices for composite materials because they can easily be tailored to yield a variety of bulk physical properties. Moreover, organic polymers generally have long-term stability and good processability. Inorganic nanoparticles possess outstanding optical, catalytic, electronic and magnetic properties, which are significantly different their bulk states. By combining the attractive functionalities of both components, nanocomposites derived from organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles are expected to display synergistically improved properties. The potential applications of the resultant nanocomposites are various, e.g. automotive, aerospace, opto-electronics, etc. Here, we review recent progress in polymer-based inorganic nanoparticle composites.

  4. Inorganic Nanoparticles Conjugated with Biofunctional Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.H.Choy

    2007-01-01

    1 Results We have attempted to conjugate inorganic nanoparticles with biofunctional molecules.Recently we were quite successful in demonstrating that a two-dimensional inorganic compound like layered double hydroxide (LDH),and natural and synthetic clays can be used as gene or drug delivery carriers1-4.To the best of our knowledge,such inorganic vectors are completely new and different from conventionally developed ones such as viruses and cationic liposomes,those which are limited in certain cases of ap...

  5. Quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roger

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the basic tenets of quantitative research. The concepts of dependent and independent variables are addressed and the concept of measurement and its associated issues, such as error, reliability and validity, are explored. Experiments and surveys – the principal research designs in quantitative research – are described and key features explained. The importance of the double-blind randomised controlled trial is emphasised, alongside the importance of longitudinal surveys, as opposed to cross-sectional surveys. Essential features of data storage are covered, with an emphasis on safe, anonymous storage. Finally, the article explores the analysis of quantitative data, considering what may be analysed and the main uses of statistics in analysis.

  6. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ally, M.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  7. The quest for inorganic fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietsch, Susanne; Dollinger, Andreas; Strobel, Christoph H.; Ganteför, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.gantefoer@uni-konstanz.de, E-mail: ydkim91@skku.edu [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Park, Eun Ji; Kim, Young Dok, E-mail: gerd.gantefoer@uni-konstanz.de, E-mail: ydkim91@skku.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, 440-746 Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Hyun Ook [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science/DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Idrobo, Juan-Carlos [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Pennycook, Stephen J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117575 (Singapore)

    2015-10-07

    Experimental results of the search for inorganic fullerenes are presented. Mo{sub n}S{sub m}{sup −} and W{sub n}S{sub m}{sup −} clusters are generated with a pulsed arc cluster ion source equipped with an annealing stage. This is known to enhance fullerene formation in the case of carbon. Analogous to carbon, the mass spectra of the metal chalcogenide clusters produced in this way exhibit a bimodal structure. The species in the first maximum at low mass are known to be platelets. Here, the structure of the species in the second maximum is studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microcopy. All experimental results indicate a two-dimensional structure of these species and disagree with a three-dimensional fullerene-like geometry. A possible explanation for this preference of two-dimensional structures is the ability of a two-element material to saturate the dangling bonds at the edges of a platelet by excess atoms of one element. A platelet consisting of a single element only cannot do this. Accordingly, graphite and boron might be the only materials forming nano-spheres because they are the only single element materials assuming two-dimensional structures.

  8. Organic/inorganic hybrid materials: challenges for ab initio methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxl, Claudia; Nabok, Dmitrii; Hannewald, Karsten

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: Organic/inorganic hybrid structures are most exciting since one can expect new properties that are absent in either of their building blocks. They open new perspectives toward the design and tailoring of materials with desired features and functions. Prerequisite for real progress is, however, the in-depth understanding of what happens on the atomic and electronic scale. In this respect, hybrid materials pose a challenge for electronic-structure theory. Methods that proved useful for describing one side may not be applicable for the other one, and they are likely to fail for the interfaces. In this Account, we address the question to what extent we can quantitatively describe hybrid materials and where we even miss a qualitative description. We note that we are dealing with extended systems and thus adopt a solid-state approach. Therefore, density-functional theory (DFT) and many-body perturbation theory (MBPT), the GW approach for charged and the Bethe-Salpeter equation for neutral excitations, are our methods of choice. We give a brief summary of the used methodology, focusing on those aspects where problems can be expected when materials of different character meet at an interface. These issues are then taken up when discussing hybrid materials. We argue when and why, for example, standard DFT may fall short when it comes to the electronic structure of organic/metal interfaces or where the framework of MBPT can or must take over. Selected examples of organic/inorganic interfaces, structural properties, electronic bands, optical excitation spectra, and charge-transport properties as obtained from DFT and MBPT highlight which properties can be reliably computed for such materials. The crucial role of van der Waals forces is shown for sexiphenyl films, where the subtle interplay between intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions is decisive for growth and morphologies. With a PTCDA monolayer on metal surfaces we discuss the performance of DFT in

  9. Development of neutron imaging quantitative data treatment to assess conservation products in cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realini, Marco; Colombo, Chiara; Conti, Claudia; Grazzi, Francesco; Perelli Cippo, Enrico; Hovind, Jan

    2017-08-14

    Distribution, penetration depth and amount of new mineralogical phases formed after the interaction between an inorganic treatment and a matrix are key factors for the evaluation of the conservation treatment behaviour. Nowadays, the conventional analytical methodologies, such as vibrational spectroscopies, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, provide only qualitative and spot information. Here, we report, for the first time, the proof of concept of a methodology based on neutron imaging able to achieve quantitative data useful to assess the formation of calcium oxalate in a porous carbonatic stone treated with ammonium oxalate. Starting from the neutron attenuation coefficient of Noto stone-treated specimens, the concentrations of newly formed calcium oxalate and the diffusion coefficient have been calculated for both sound and decayed substrates. These outcomes have been also used for a comparative study between different treatment modalities. Graphical abstract Horizontal slice at 300 mm depth and CaOx molar density profile by NEUTRA output.

  10. Perfil sensorial de vinhos brancos varietais brasileiros através de análise descritiva quantitativa Sensory profile of brazilian varietal white wines by quantitative descriptive analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Herman BEHRENS

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Terminologia descritiva e perfil sensorial de três variedades de vinhos brancos varietais brasileiros (Chardonnay, Gewürztraminer e Riesling foram desenvolvidos através de metodologia fundamentada na Análise Descritiva Quantitativa (ADQ. Em consenso, a equipe sensorial definiu os descritores, materiais de referência e a ficha de avaliação das amostras. Após treinamento, dez indivíduos foram selecionados para compor a equipe final de provadores, utilizando-se como critérios o poder discriminativo, reprodutibilidade dos julgamentos e consenso do indivíduo com a equipe. Doze termos descritores definindo as similaridades e diferenças entre as amostras foram gerados. A intensidade de cada descritor foi avaliada em cada amostra através de uma escala não estruturada de nove centímetros, com termos de intensidade ancorados em seus extremos. Os dados foram analisados por ANOVA, Teste de Tukey e Análise de Componentes Principais (ACP. Os resultados indicaram moderada variação entre os perfis sensoriais das amostras dos varietais Gewürztraminer e Riesling e pouca variação entre os perfis sensoriais dos vinhos Chardonnay. A ACP separou as amostras em dois grupos: um primeiro grupo caracterizado por vinhos com maior intensidade de doçura, sabor e aroma frutado e corpo, e um segundo grupo de amostras de maior acidez, adstringência, amargor, sabor alcoólico e sabor fermentado.Descriptive terminology and sensory profile of three varieties of brazilian varietal white wines (cultivars Riesling, Gewürztraminer and Chardonnay were developed by a methodology based on the Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA. The sensory panel consensually defined the sensory descriptors, their respective reference materials and the descriptive evaluation ballot. Ten individuals were selected as judges based on their discrimination, reproducibility and individual consensus with the sensory panel. Twelve descriptors were generated showing similarities and

  11. Probing the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyu; Qian, Yong; Deng, Yonghong; Liu, Di; Li, Hao; Qiu, Xueqing

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides has both fundamental and practical importance in industrial and energy fields. In this work, the specific interactions between alkali lignin (AL) and three inorganic oxide substrates in aqueous environment are quantitatively measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the average adhesion force between AL and metal oxide such as Al2O3 or MgO is nearly two times bigger than that between AL and nonmetal oxide such as SiO2 due to the electrostatic difference and cation-π interaction. When 83% hydroxyl groups of AL is blocked by acetylation, the adhesion forces between AL and Al2O3, MgO and SiO2 decrease 43, 35 and 75% respectively, which indicate hydrogen bonds play an important role between AL and inorganic oxides, especially in AL-silica system.

  12. Biomedical inorganic polymers bioactivity and applications of natural and synthetic polymeric inorganic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Schroder, Heinz C

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, inorganic polymers have attracted much attention in nano-biomedicine, in particular in the area of regenerative medicine and drug delivery. This growing interest in inorganic polymers has been further accelerated by the development of new synthetic and analytical methods in the field of nanotechnology and nanochemistry. Examples for biomedical inorganic polymers that had been proven to exhibit biomedical effects and/or have been applied in preclinical or clinical trials are polysilicate / silica glass (such as naturally formed "biosilica" and synthetic "bioglass") and inorganic polyphosphate. Some members of the mentioned biomedical inorganic polymers have already been applied e.g. as "bioglass" for bone repair and bone tissue engineering, or they are used in food processing and in dental care (inorganic polyphosphates). However, there are a number of further biological and medicinal properties of these polymers, which have been elucidated in the last few years but not yet been applied for tr...

  13. Quantitative interpretation of Great Lakes remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, D. F.; Salzman, J.; Svehla, R. A.; Gedney, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses the quantitative interpretation of Great Lakes remote sensing water quality data. Remote sensing using color information must take into account (1) the existence of many different organic and inorganic species throughout the Great Lakes, (2) the occurrence of a mixture of species in most locations, and (3) spatial variations in types and concentration of species. The radiative transfer model provides a potential method for an orderly analysis of remote sensing data and a physical basis for developing quantitative algorithms. Predictions and field measurements of volume reflectances are presented which show the advantage of using a radiative transfer model. Spectral absorptance and backscattering coefficients for two inorganic sediments are reported.

  14. Inorganic nanoparticles for cancer imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huang-Chiao; Barua, Sutapa; Sharma, Gaurav; Dey, Sandwip K; Rege, Kaushal

    2011-11-07

    Inorganic nanoparticles have received increased attention in the recent past as potential diagnostic and therapeutic systems in the field of oncology. Inorganic nanoparticles have demonstrated successes in imaging and treatment of tumors both ex vivo and in vivo, with some promise towards clinical trials. This review primarily discusses progress in applications of inorganic nanoparticles for cancer imaging and treatment, with an emphasis on in vivo studies. Advances in the use of semiconductor fluorescent quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles (spheres, shells, rods, cages), iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles and ceramic nanoparticles in tumor targeting, imaging, photothermal therapy and drug delivery applications are discussed. Limitations and toxicity issues associated with inorganic nanoparticles in living organisms are also discussed.

  15. Structure and properties of layered inorganic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Duan

    2010-01-01

    @@ Inorganic layered materials are a class of advanced functional materials that have attracted considerable attention by virtue of their practical applications in a wide variety of fields. Sys-tematic studies of structure, design, synthesis, and fabrication processing may extend the range of practical utility of inor-ganic layered functional materials, in areas such as food industry,chemical industry, energy engineering, environmental engineer-ing, drug and gene delivery, electronics technology, and materials protection.

  16. Inorganic nanolayers: structure, preparation, and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifullah, Bullo; Hussein, Mohd Zobir B

    2015-01-01

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds are two-dimensional inorganic nanolayers also known as clay minerals or anionic clays or layered double hydroxides/layered hydroxy salts, and have emerged as a single type of material with numerous biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, gene delivery, cosmetics, and biosensing. Inorganic nanolayers are promising materials due to their fascinating properties, such as ease of preparation, ability to intercalate different type of anions (inorganic, organic, biomolecules, and even genes), high thermal stability, delivery of intercalated anions in a sustained manner, high biocompatibility, and easy biodegradation. Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science. These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery. They have also been applied in biosensing technology, and most recently in bioimaging science. The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes. In this paper, we review the structure, methods of preparation, and latest advances made by inorganic nanolayers in such biomedical applications as drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging. PMID:26366081

  17. Organic-Inorganic Composites Toward Biomaterial Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Sugawara-Narutaki, Ayae; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive ceramics are known to exhibit specific biological affinities and are able to show direct integration with surrounding bone when implanted in bony defects. However, their inadequate mechanical properties, such as low fracture toughness and high Young's modulus in comparison to natural bone, limit their clinical application. Bone is a kind of organic-inorganic composite where apatite nanocrystals are precipitated onto collagen fibre networks. Thus, one way to address these problems is to mimic the natural composition of bone by using bioactive ceramics via material designs based on organic-inorganic composites. In this chapter, the current research on the development of the various organic-inorganic composites designed for biomaterial applications has been reviewed. Various compounds such as calcium phosphate, calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate can be used for the inorganic phases to design composites with the desired mechanical and biological properties of bone. Not only classical mechanical mixing but also coating of the inorganic phase in aqueous conditions is available for the fabrication of such composites. Organic modifications using various polymers enable the control of the crystalline structure of the calcium carbonate in the composites. These approaches on the fabrication of organic-inorganic composites provide important options for biomedical materials with novel functions. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Inorganic nanolayers: structure, preparation, and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifullah, Bullo; Hussein, Mohd Zobir B

    2015-01-01

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds are two-dimensional inorganic nanolayers also known as clay minerals or anionic clays or layered double hydroxides/layered hydroxy salts, and have emerged as a single type of material with numerous biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, gene delivery, cosmetics, and biosensing. Inorganic nanolayers are promising materials due to their fascinating properties, such as ease of preparation, ability to intercalate different type of anions (inorganic, organic, biomolecules, and even genes), high thermal stability, delivery of intercalated anions in a sustained manner, high biocompatibility, and easy biodegradation. Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science. These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery. They have also been applied in biosensing technology, and most recently in bioimaging science. The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes. In this paper, we review the structure, methods of preparation, and latest advances made by inorganic nanolayers in such biomedical applications as drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging.

  19. Characterization of Nanoreinforcement Dispersion in Inorganic Nanocomposites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouari Saheb

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal and ceramic matrix composites have been developed to enhance the stiffness and strength of metals and alloys, and improve the toughness of monolithic ceramics, respectively. It is possible to further improve their properties by using nanoreinforcement, which led to the development of metal and ceramic matrix nanocomposites, in which case, the dimension of the reinforcement is on the order of nanometer, typically less than 100 nm. However, in many cases, the properties measured experimentally remain far from those estimated theoretically. This is mainly due to the fact that the properties of nanocomposites depend not only on the properties of the individual constituents, i.e., the matrix and reinforcement as well as the interface between them, but also on the extent of nanoreinforcement dispersion. Therefore, obtaining a uniform dispersion of the nanoreinforcement in the matrix remains a key issue in the development of nanocomposites with the desired properties. The issue of nanoreinforcement dispersion was not fully addressed in review papers dedicated to processing, characterization, and properties of inorganic nanocomposites. In addition, characterization of nanoparticles dispersion, reported in literature, remains largely qualitative. The objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive description of characterization techniques used to evaluate the extent of nanoreinforcement dispersion in inorganic nanocomposites and critically review published work. Moreover, methodologies and techniques used to characterize reinforcement dispersion in conventional composites, which may be used for quantitative characterization of nanoreinforcement dispersion in nanocomposites, is also presented.

  20. Release to the Gas Phase of Inorganic Elements during Wood Combustion. Part 2: Influence of Fuel Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    Combustion of wood for heat and power production may cause problems such as ash deposition, corrosion, and harmful emissions of gases and particulate matter. These problems are all directly related to the release of inorganic elements (in particular Cl, S, K, Na, Zn, and Pb) from the fuel...... to the gas phase. The aims of this study are to obtain quantitative data on the release of inorganic elements during wood combustion and to investigate the influence of fuel composition. Quantitative release data were obtained by pyrolyzing and subsequently combusting small samples of wood (~30 g) at various...... temperatures in the range of 500–1150 °C in a laboratory-scale tube reactor and by performing mass balance calculations based on the weight measurements and chemical analyses of the wood fuels and the residual ash samples. Four wood fuels with different ash contents and inorganic compositions were investigated...

  1. Foundation Coursework in Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry: Results from a National Survey of Inorganic Chemistry Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Reisner, Barbara A.; Smith, Sheila R.; Stewart, Joanne L.; Crane, Johanna L.; Pesterfield, Les; Sobel, Sabrina G.

    2015-01-01

    A national survey of inorganic chemists explored the self-reported topics covered in foundation-level courses in inorganic chemistry at the postsecondary level; the American Chemical Society's Committee on Professional Training defines a foundation course as one at the conclusion of which, "a student should have mastered the vocabulary,…

  2. Foundation Coursework in Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry: Results from a National Survey of Inorganic Chemistry Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Reisner, Barbara A.; Smith, Sheila R.; Stewart, Joanne L.; Crane, Johanna L.; Pesterfield, Les; Sobel, Sabrina G.

    2015-01-01

    A national survey of inorganic chemists explored the self-reported topics covered in foundation-level courses in inorganic chemistry at the postsecondary level; the American Chemical Society's Committee on Professional Training defines a foundation course as one at the conclusion of which, "a student should have mastered the vocabulary,…

  3. Quantification of the release of inorganic elements from biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Flemming; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Korbee, Rob

    2007-01-01

    and fuel characterization, global equilibrium analysis, simulating the experimental combustion conditions, was performed. The objective of this work was to compare the lab-scale release data with the results from the fuel characterization techniques and from the equilibrium calculations. Furthermore......, the results from the lab-scale fixed-bed release tests were compared to pilot-scale mass balance tests. While large differences were seen between the lab-scale release data and the release information obtained by the fuel characterization techniques, a good correlation was found between the lab......-scale and pilot-scale fixed-bed release data. In conclusion, it is recommended to perform the described lab-scale tests in order to obtain reliable quantitative data on the release of inorganic elements under grate-firing or suspension-firing conditions. Advanced fuel characterization by use of chemical...

  4. Intercalation compounds involving inorganic layered structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CONSTANTINO VERA R. L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional inorganic networks can shown intracrystalline reactivity, i.e., simple ions, large species as Keggin ions, organic species, coordination compounds or organometallics can be incorporated in the interlayer region. The host-guest interaction usually causes changes in their chemical, catalytic, electronic and optical properties. The isolation of materials with interesting properties and making use of soft chemistry routes have given rise the possibility of industrial and technological applications of these compounds. We have been using several synthetic approaches to intercalate porphyrins and phthalocyanines into inorganic materials: smectite clays, layered double hydroxides and layered niobates. The isolated materials have been characterized by elemental and thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, surface area measurements, scanning electronic microscopy, electronic and resonance Raman spectroscopies and EPR. The degree of layer stacking and the charge density of the matrices as well their acid-base nature were considered in our studies on the interaction between the macrocycles and inorganic hosts.

  5. Inorganic nanocarriers for platinum drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping’an Ma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays platinum drugs take up almost 50% of all the clinically used anticancer drugs. Besides cisplatin, novel platinum agents including sterically hindered platinum (II drugs, chemically reductive platinum (IV drugs, photosensitive platinum (IV drugs, and multinuclear platinum drugs have been developed recently, with a few entering clinic trials. Rapid development of nanobiotechnology makes targeted delivery of anticancer platinum agents to the tumor site possible, while simultaneously minimizing toxicity and maximizing the drug efficacy. Being versatile drug carriers to deliver platinum drugs, inorganic nanovehicles such as gold nanoparticles, iron oxide nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes, mesoporous nanosilica, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, have been extensively studied over the past decades. In contrast to conventional polymeric and lipid nanoparticles, inorganic nanoparticles based drug carriers are peculiar as they have shown excellent theranostic effects, revealing themselves an indispensable part of future nanomedicine. Here, we will elaborate recent research advances on fabrication of inorganic nanoparticles for platinum drug delivery.

  6. Microporous Inorganic Membranes as Proton Exchange Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vichi, F.M. Tejedor-Tejedor, M.I. Anderson, Marc A

    2002-08-28

    Porous oxide electrolyte membranes provide an alternative approach to fabricating proton exchange membrane fuel cells based on inorganic materials. This study focused on elucidating the properties of these inorganic membranes that make them good electrolyte materials in membrane electrode assemblies; in particular, we investigated several properties that affect the nature of proton conductivity in these membranes. This report discusses our findings on the effect of variables such as site density, amount of surface protonation and surface modification on the proton conductivity of membranes with a fixed pore structure under selected conditions. Proton conductivities of these inorganic membranes are similar to conductivities of nafion, the polymeric membrane most commonly used in low temperature fuel cells.

  7. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Swierczewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal molecular imaging can offer a synergistic improvement of diagnostic ability over a single imaging modality. Recent development of hybrid imaging systems has profoundly impacted the pool of available multimodal imaging probes. In particular, much interest has been focused on biocompatible, inorganic nanoparticle-based multimodal probes. Inorganic nanoparticles offer exceptional advantages to the field of multimodal imaging owing to their unique characteristics, such as nanometer dimensions, tunable imaging properties, and multifunctionality. Nanoparticles mainly based on iron oxide, quantum dots, gold, and silica have been applied to various imaging modalities to characterize and image specific biologic processes on a molecular level. A combination of nanoparticles and other materials such as biomolecules, polymers, and radiometals continue to increase functionality for in vivo multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents. In this review, we discuss the unique concepts, characteristics, and applications of the various multimodal imaging probes based on inorganic nanoparticles.

  8. Relation of dietary inorganic arsenic exposure and urinary inorganic arsenic metabolites excretion in Japanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Tomoko; Yoshinaga, Jun; Suzuki, Yayoi; Tao, Hiroaki; Nakazato, Tetsuya

    2017-03-08

    Inorganic arsenic (InAs) is a ubiquitous metalloid that has been shown to exert multiple adverse health outcomes. Urinary InAs and its metabolite concentration has been used as a biomarker of arsenic (As) exposure in some epidemiological studies, however, quantitative relationship between daily InAs exposure and urinary InAs metabolites concentration has not been well characterized. We collected a set of 24-h duplicated diet and spot urine sample of the next morning of diet sampling from 20 male and 19 female subjects in Japan from August 2011 to October 2012. Concentrations of As species in duplicated diet and urine samples were determined by using liquid chromatography-ICP mass spectrometry with a hydride generation system. Sum of the concentrations of urinary InAs and methylarsonic acid (MMA) was used as a measure of InAs exposure. Daily dietary InAs exposure was estimated to be 0.087 µg kg(-1) day(-1) (Geometric mean, GM), and GM of urinary InAs+MMA concentrations was 3.5 ng mL(-1). Analysis of covariance did not find gender-difference in regression coefficients as significant (P > 0.05). Regression equation Log 10 [urinary InAs+MMA concentration] = 0.570× Log 10 [dietary InAs exposure level per body weight] + 1.15 was obtained for whole data set. This equation would be valuable in converting urinary InAs concentration to daily InAs exposure, which will be important information in risk assessment.

  9. Engineered inorganic core/shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mélinon, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.melinon@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière matière Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 et CNRS et OMNT, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Léon Brillouin, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Begin-Colin, Sylvie [IPCMS et OMNT, 23 rue du Loess BP 43, 67034 STRASBOURG Cedex 2 (France); Duvail, Jean Luc [IMN UMR 6502 et OMNT Campus Sciences : 2 rue de la Houssinire, BP32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex3 (France); Gauffre, Fabienne [SPM et OMNT : Institut des sciences chimiques de Rennes - UMR 6226, 263 Avenue du General Leclerc, CS 74205, 35042 RENNES Cedex (France); Boime, Nathalie Herlin [IRAMIS-NIMBE, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CEA CNRS URA 2453) et OMNT, Bat 522, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Ledoux, Gilles [Institut Lumière Matière Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 et CNRS et OMNT, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Alfred Kastler 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918 F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Plain, Jérôme [Universit de technologie de Troyes LNIO-ICD, CNRS et OMNT 12 rue Marie Curie - CS 42060 - 10004 Troyes cedex (France); Reiss, Peter [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM, UMR 5819 CEA-CNRS-UJF et OMNT, Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Silly, Fabien [CEA, IRAMIS, SPEC, TITANS, CNRS 2464 et OMNT, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Warot-Fonrose, Bénédicte [CEMES-CNRS, Université de Toulouse et OMNT, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig F 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2014-10-20

    It has been for a long time recognized that nanoparticles are of great scientific interest as they are effectively a bridge between bulk materials and atomic structures. At first, size effects occurring in single elements have been studied. More recently, progress in chemical and physical synthesis routes permitted the preparation of more complex structures. Such structures take advantages of new adjustable parameters including stoichiometry, chemical ordering, shape and segregation opening new fields with tailored materials for biology, mechanics, optics magnetism, chemistry catalysis, solar cells and microelectronics. Among them, core/shell structures are a particular class of nanoparticles made with an inorganic core and one or several inorganic shell layer(s). In earlier work, the shell was merely used as a protective coating for the core. More recently, it has been shown that it is possible to tune the physical properties in a larger range than that of each material taken separately. The goal of the present review is to discuss the basic properties of the different types of core/shell nanoparticles including a large variety of heterostructures. We restrict ourselves on all inorganic (on inorganic/inorganic) core/shell structures. In the light of recent developments, the applications of inorganic core/shell particles are found in many fields including biology, chemistry, physics and engineering. In addition to a representative overview of the properties, general concepts based on solid state physics are considered for material selection and for identifying criteria linking the core/shell structure and its resulting properties. Chemical and physical routes for the synthesis and specific methods for the study of core/shell nanoparticle are briefly discussed.

  10. Inorganic-organic hybrid white light phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Sheng; Guo, Guo-Cong

    2016-11-03

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have brought about a revolution in lighting and display. A very hot field in recent years has been to develop white-light phosphors, aiming to achieve better colour stability, better reproducibility, and a simpler fabrication process for LEDs and OLEDs. This feature article reviews the development of inorganic-organic hybrid white-light phosphors, including coordination compounds of small organic molecules, organically templated inorganic compounds (phosphates, borates, sulfides, halides), metal-functionalized organic polymers, and organically coated nanoparticles.

  11. Activity-based proteasome profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Nan

    2013-01-01

    The work described in this thesis is mainly focusing on setting up and application of a quantitative activity‐based proteasome profiling method. Chapter 1 provides a general introduction on the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and activity‐based proteasome profiling. Chapter 2 is a literature

  12. 29 CFR 1910.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Engineering plans and studies used to determine methods selected for controlling exposure to inorganic arsenic... such exposures. The following three sections quoted from “Occupational Diseases: A Guide to Their.... Arsenic; chronic human intoxication. J. Occup. Med. 2:137. Elkins, H. B. 1959. The Chemistry of...

  13. Modelling inorganic material in activated sludge systems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driniev

    2004-04-02

    Apr 2, 2004 ... organic models above, predictive models for the reactor inorganic ... included TSS as a non-conservative compound (Gujer and Lawson,. 1995) .... The OHO and PAO fractions of the VSS (favOHO, favPAO) are defined by, and ...

  14. Thermoplastic Polymer Nanocomposites Based on Inorganic Fullerene-like Nanoparticles and Inorganic Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Naffakh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using inorganic fullerene-like (IF nanoparticles and inorganic nanotubes (INT in organic-inorganic hybrid composite, materials provide the potential for improving thermal, mechanical, and tribological properties of conventional composites. The processing of such high-performance hybrid thermoplastic polymer nanocomposites is achieved via melt-blending without the aid of any modifier or compatibilizing agent. The incorporation of small quantities (0.1–4 wt.% of IF/INTs (tungsten disulfide, IF-WS2 or molybdenum disulfide, MoS2 generates notable performance enhancements through reinforcement effects and excellent lubricating ability in comparison with promising carbon nanotubes or other inorganic nanoscale fillers. It was shown that these IF/INT nanocomposites can provide an effective balance between performance, cost effectiveness, and processability, which is of significant importance for extending the practical applications of diverse hierarchical thermoplastic-based composites.

  15. Striking a Balance: Experiment and Concept in Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an inorganic chemistry course based on the premise that a balanced understanding of inorganic chemistry requires knowledge of the experimental, theoretical, and technological aspects of the subject. A detailed description of lectures and laboratories is included. (KR)

  16. Inorganic Nitrogen Wet Deposition for the Conterminous United States, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Annual inorganic nitrogen wet deposition were estimated for the conterminous United States for 1962. The estimates were derived from inorganic nitrogen...

  17. Striking a Balance: Experiment and Concept in Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an inorganic chemistry course based on the premise that a balanced understanding of inorganic chemistry requires knowledge of the experimental, theoretical, and technological aspects of the subject. A detailed description of lectures and laboratories is included. (KR)

  18. Preparation, Properties and Application of Polymeric Organic-Inorganic Nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任杰; 刘艳; 唐小真

    2003-01-01

    Six preparation methods for polymeric organic-inorganic nanocomposites and their respective mechanisms and features are reviewed. The extraordinary properties of polymeric organic-inorganic nanocomposites are discussed,and their potential applications are evaluated.

  19. Inorganic Nitrogen Wet Deposition for the Conterminous United States, 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Annual inorganic nitrogen wet deposition were estimated for the conterminous United States for 1984. The estimates were derived from inorganic nitrogen...

  20. Influence of Organic and Inorganic Sources of Fertilizer on Growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of Organic and Inorganic Sources of Fertilizer on Growth and Leaf Yield of ... the effect of Tithonia diversifolia, farmyard manure and inorganic sources of ... Leaf yield was assessed by both cumulative leaf weight per given plant and ...

  1. Inorganic Nitrogen Wet Deposition for the Conterminous United States, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Annual inorganic nitrogen wet deposition were estimated for the conterminous United States for 1963. The estimates were derived from inorganic nitrogen...

  2. Inorganic Nitrogen Wet Deposition for the Conterminous United States, 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Annual inorganic nitrogen wet deposition were estimated for the conterminous United States for 1983. The estimates were derived from inorganic nitrogen...

  3. Inorganic Nitrogen Wet Deposition for the Conterminous United States, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Annual inorganic nitrogen wet deposition were estimated for the conterminous United States for 1961. The estimates were derived from inorganic nitrogen...

  4. Inorganic Nitrogen Wet Deposition for the Conterminous United States, 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Annual inorganic nitrogen wet deposition were estimated for the conterminous United States for 1964. The estimates were derived from inorganic nitrogen...

  5. The quantitative Morse theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Loi, Ta Le; Phien, Phan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we give a proof of the quantitative Morse theorem stated by {Y. Yomdin} in \\cite{Y1}. The proof is based on the quantitative Sard theorem, the quantitative inverse function theorem and the quantitative Morse lemma.

  6. Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile data collected by Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences at OceanSITES site BATS from 1988-10-20 to 2012-08-13 (NCEI Accession 0130027)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Biological, chemical, in situ, navigational, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected, including BACTERIA, DEPTH - OBSERVATION, DISSOLVED INORGANIC...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from ARNI FRIDRIKSSON and BJARNI SAEMUNDSSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1983-03-05 to 2013-11-13 (NCEI Accession 0149098)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0149098 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from ARNI FRIDRIKSSON and BJARNI SAEMUNDSSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1983-03-05...

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the FRANKLIN in the Indian Ocean from 2000-09-26 to 2000-11-12 (NODC Accession 0108074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108074 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from FRANKLIN in the Indian Ocean from 2000-09-26 to 2000-11-12 and...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the FRANKLIN in the South Pacific Ocean from 2001-05-24 to 2001-07-07 (NODC Accession 0108083)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108083 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from FRANKLIN in the South Pacific Ocean from 2001-05-24 to 2001-07-07...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the TYRO in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1989-07-31 to 1989-09-11 (NODC Accession 0113604)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113604 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from TYRO in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1989-07-31 to 1989-09-11...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, and other variables collected from profile and discrete sample observations using CTD, Niskin bottle, and other instruments from NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter off the northeastern coast of the United States from 2013-11-14 to 2013-11-24 (NCEI Accession 0137722)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains discrete bottle (CTD profile) data that was collected in the northeastern coast of the United States in 2013. Increasing amounts of...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, and other variables collected from time series and profile observations using CTD, Niskin bottle,and other instruments near CenGOOS buoy off the coast of Mississippi in the Gulf of Mexico from 2012-10-15 to 2014-04-22 (NCEI Accession 0131199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains time series profile (discrete bottle) data that were collected at the GenGOOS buoy off the coast of Mississippi. The CenGOOS 3-m...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Pacific Ocean from 1997-04-04 to 1997-05-12 (NODC Accession 0116065)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116065 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Pacific Ocean from 1997-04-04 to...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Pacific Ocean from 1997-01-13 to 1997-02-11 (NODC Accession 0116069)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116069 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Pacific Ocean from 1997-01-13 to...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, and other variables collected from profile and discrete sample observations using CTD, Niskin bottle, and other instruments from R/V Delware II in the Northeast coast of the United States from 2012-02-06 to 2012-02-19 (NCEI Accession 0131423)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains carbon and nutrient related data that were collected from CTD profile measurements in the Northeast coast of the United States...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, and other variables collected from profile and discrete observations using CTD, Niskin bottle, and other instruments from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, off the east coast of Florida, United States from 2014-05-10 to 2014-05-17 (NCEI Accession 0131424)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains carbon and nutrient related data that were collected from CTD profile measurements off the east coast of Florida, United States...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 1999-01-04 to 1999-02-23 (NODC Accession 0113760)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113760 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 1999-01-04 to 1999-02-23...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the BELGICA, CHARLES DARWIN and others in the Bay of Biscay, English Channel and others from 1993-04-01 to 1995-11-01 (NODC Accession 0115608)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115608 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from BELGICA, CHARLES DARWIN, DISCOVERY, HEINCKE, MADORNINA, METEOR,...

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, and other variables collected from profile and discrete sample observations using CTD, Niskin bottle, and other instruments from NOAA Ship Henry B. Bigelow off the northeastern coast of the United States from 2012-06-02 to 2012-06-13 (NCEI Accession 0138982)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains discrete bottle (CTD profile) data that was collected in the northeastern coast of the United States in 2012. Increasing amounts of...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, and other variables collected from profile and discrete sample observations using CTD, Niskin bottle, and other instruments from NOAA Ship Pisces off the northeastern coast of the United States from 2012-10-27 to 2012-11-13 (NCEI Accession 0137874)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains discrete bottle (CTD profile) data that was collected in the northeastern coast of the United States in 2012. Increasing amounts of...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1991-02-10 to 1991-03-23 (NODC Accession 0115022)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115022 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1991-02-10 to 1991-03-23...

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea and South Pacific Ocean from 2004-06-16 to 2004-08-13 (NODC Accession 0112212)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112212 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea...

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1992-08-07 to 1992-10-05 (NODC Accession 0112227)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112227 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and South...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the PRIDE OF BILBAO in the Bay of Biscay, English Channel and North Atlantic Ocean from 2005-09-26 to 2010-09-16 (NODC Accession 0108092)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108092 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from PRIDE OF BILBAO in the Bay of Biscay, English Channel and North...

  5. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the WAKATAKA MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 1996-05-16 to 1996-05-25 (NODC Accession 0112374)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112374 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from WAKATAKA MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from...

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Soyo Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997-08-20 to 1997-08-27 (NODC Accession 0112300)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112300 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Soyo Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997-08-20 to...

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2004-03-27 to 2004-04-17 (NODC Accession 0112261)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112261 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2004-03-27 to 2004-04-17...

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1998-08-19 to 1998-08-27 (NODC Accession 0112304)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112304 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1998-08-19 to...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2007-05-10 to 2007-05-27 (NODC Accession 0108223)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108223 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 1999-08-04 to 1999-10-13 (NODC Accession 0112344)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112344 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2005-05-26 to 2005-06-17 (NODC Accession 0108221)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108221 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 1996-08-07 to 1996-10-03 (NODC Accession 0112232)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112232 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1998-10-07 to 1998-10-15 (NODC Accession 0112305)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112305 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1998-10-07 to...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1999-09-17 to 1999-11-09 (NODC Accession 0115279)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115279 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and South...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the GAUSS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2000-05-06 to 2000-06-06 (NODC Accession 0113946)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113946 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from GAUSS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2000-05-06 to 2000-06-06...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 2000-08-17 to 2000-08-25 (NODC Accession 0112314)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112314 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 2000-08-17 to...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the Celtic Explorer in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2009-02-06 to 2012/01/10 (NODC Accession 0112886)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112886 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Celtic Explorer in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2009-02-06 to...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from METEOR in the Aegean Sea, Mediterranean Sea and others from 2001-10-18 to 2001-11-11 (NODC Accession 0084620)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0084620 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from METEOR in the Aegean Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Mediterranean Sea - Eastern Basin,...

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the POLARSTERN in the Arctic Ocean from 1996-07-12 to 1996-09-06 (NODC Accession 0113594)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113594 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the Arctic Ocean from 1996-07-12 to 1996-09-06 and...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the POLARSTERN in the Arctic Ocean and North Greenland Sea from 1987-07-04 to 1987-09-02 (NODC Accession 0113916)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113916 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the Arctic Ocean and North Greenland Sea from...

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from time series profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the POLARFRONT in the Norwegian Sea from 2001-10-31 to 2007-11-29 (NODC Accession 0112884)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112884 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and time series profile data collected from POLARFRONT in the Norwegian Sea from 2001-10-31 to...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, Barometric pressure sensor and other instruments from ROGER REVELLE in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2008-02-04 to 2008-03-17 (NODC Accession 0108118)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108118 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from ROGER REVELLE in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South) from...

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from ATLANTIS in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-03-24 to 2012-04-17 (NODC Accession 0109915)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109915 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from ATLANTIS in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-03-24 to 2012-04-17...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1992-05-21 to 1992-08-05 (NODC Accession 0116641)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116641 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1992-05-21 to...

  5. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MELVILLE in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2013-03-21 to 2013-05-01 (NODC Accession 0117338)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117338 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MELVILLE in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from...

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from ROGER REVELLE in the Bay of Bengal and Indian Ocean from 2007-03-22 to 2007-05-01 (NODC Accession 0110791)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0110791 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from ROGER REVELLE in the Bay of Bengal and Indian Ocean from 2007-03-22 to 2007-05-01....

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2011-02-19 to 2011-04-23 (NODC Accession 0109933)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109933 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern...

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2008-12-26 to 2009-01-30 (NODC Accession 0110254)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0110254 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans (>...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from ROGER REVELLE in the Indian Ocean from 2009-03-20 to 2009-05-15 (NODC Accession 0108075)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108075 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from ROGER REVELLE in the Indian Ocean from 2009-03-20 to 2009-05-15. These data include...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from ROGER REVELLE in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2007-02-04 to 2007-03-17 (NODC Accession 0108119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108119 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from ROGER REVELLE in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South) from...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from RRS JAMES COOK in the South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2010-03-19 to 2010-04-24 (NODC Accession 0108069)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108069 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from RRS JAMES COOK in the South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the North Pacific Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2007-12-15 to 2008-02-23 (NODC Accession 0109903)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109903 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the North Pacific Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the PELAGIA in the English Channel, North Atlantic Ocean and others from 2001-08-18 to 2002-05-25 (NODC Accession 0112843)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112843 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from PELAGIA in the English Channel, North Atlantic Ocean, North Sea,...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the HOKKO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-07-01 to 2003-07-11 (NODC Accession 0112222)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112222 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HOKKO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-07-01 to...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the HOKKO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-06-09 to 2003-06-17 (NODC Accession 0112221)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112221 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HOKKO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-06-09 to...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from POLARSTERN in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 1996-03-17 to 1996-05-20 (NODC Accession 0116640)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0116640 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and underway - surface observations using CTD, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1994-04-03 to 1994-05-21 (NODC Accession 0115002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115002 includes chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical, profile and underway - surface data collected from KNORR in the North Atlantic...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the Davis Strait, Gulf of Guinea and others from 1994-11-15 to 1994-12-19 (NODC Accession 0113919)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113919 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the Davis Strait, Gulf of Guinea, Labrador Sea, North...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE in the Indian Ocean and Laccadive Sea from 1995-09-22 to 1995-10-25 (NODC Accession 0114478)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0114478 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE in the Indian Ocean and Laccadive Sea...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HESPERIDES in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1992-06-14 to 1992-08-15 (NODC Accession 0115227)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115227 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HESPERIDES in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1992-06-14 to...

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR, MAURICE EWING and others in the Andaman Sea or Burma Sea, Arabian Sea and others from 1983-10-10 to 1998-10-20 (NODC Accession 0115689)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115689 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR, MAURICE EWING, METEOR, NATHANIEL B. PALMER and THOMAS G....

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans from 1996-02-20 to 1996-03-31 (NODC Accession 0115012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115012 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South) from...

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the L'ATALANTE in the Gulf of Guinea, North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1995-01-13 to 1995-04-02 (NODC Accession 0115764)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115764 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from L'ATALANTE in the Gulf of Guinea, North Atlantic Ocean and South...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 1998-03-28 to 1998-05-23 (NODC Accession 0113595)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0113595 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South)...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JOHAN HJORT in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from 1992-07-12 to 1992-07-28 (NODC Accession 0113558)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113558 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JOHAN HJORT in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea and...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1983-10-07 to 1984-02-19 (NODC Accession 0117503)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117503 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JAMES CLARK ROSS in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1995-03-20 to 1995-05-06 (NODC Accession 0114999)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0114999 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1995-03-20 to...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the Andaman Sea or Burma Sea, Arabian Sea and others from 1994-12-01 to 1996-01-23 (NODC Accession 0115009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115009 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the Andaman Sea or Burma Sea, Arabian Sea, Bay of...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the DISCOVERY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1997-08-07 to 1997-09-17 (NODC Accession 0113535)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113535 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1997-08-07...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the THOMAS WASHINGTON in the South Pacific Ocean from 1991-07-16 to 1991-08-25 (NODC Accession 0115171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115171 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS WASHINGTON in the South Pacific Ocean from 1991-07-16 to...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence and others from 1995-06-07 to 1995-07-05 (NODC Accession 0115006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115006 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and underway - surface observations using CTD, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1991-09-02 to 1991-09-26 (NODC Accession 0115001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115001 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical, profile and underway - surface data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997-11-01 to 1997-11-11 (NODC Accession 0115176)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115176 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997-11-01 to...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from WECOMA and GYRE in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1979-02-07 to 1980-06-14 (NCEI Accession 0143951)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143951 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from WECOMA and GYRE in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1979-02-07 to...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the PELAGIA in the English Channel, North Atlantic Ocean and others from 2001-08-18 to 2002-05-25 (NODC Accession 0112844)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112844 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from PELAGIA in the English Channel, North Atlantic Ocean, North Sea,...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the OCEANUS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1995-05-29 to 1995-06-03 (NODC Accession 0113588)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113588 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from OCEANUS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1995-05-29 to 1995-06-03...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the ROGER REVELLE in the South Pacific Ocean from 1997-10-20 to 1997-11-24 (NODC Accession 0116068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116068 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from ROGER REVELLE in the South Pacific Ocean from 1997-10-20 to...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JAMES CLARK ROSS in the South Atlantic Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1992-11-01 to 1992-12-08 (NODC Accession 0115024)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115024 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the South Atlantic Ocean and South Pacific...

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the ROGER REVELLE in the South Pacific Ocean from 1997-12-02 to 1998-01-03 (NODC Accession 0116136)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116136 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from ROGER REVELLE in the South Pacific Ocean from 1997-12-02 to...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 2001-10-29 to 2001-12-13 (NODC Accession 0108158)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108158 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 2001-10-29 to...

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2001-06-27 to 2001-08-15 (NODC Accession 0113568)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113568 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2001-06-27 to 2001-08-15...

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight and Indian Ocean from 1998-02-28 to 1998-04-01 (NODC Accession 0115154)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115154 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight and Indian Ocean...

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2004-12-23 to 2005-02-17 (NODC Accession 0108076)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108076 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South) from...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean from 2012-01-07 to 2012-03-11 (NCEI Accession 0144341)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144341 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean from 2012-01-07 to 2012-03-11. These data...

  5. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1993-04-13 to 1993-06-11 (NODC Accession 0112228)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112228 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and South...

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HAKON MOSBY in the North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from 1995-02-17 to 1995-03-18 (NODC Accession 0113543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113543 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HAKON MOSBY in the North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from...

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1992-09-06 to 1992-12-08 (NODC Accession 0000193)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0000193 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the TYRO in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1990-07-01 to 1990-07-12 (NODC Accession 0113602)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113602 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from TYRO in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1990-07-01 to 1990-07-12...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the PELAGIA in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2000-09-26 to 2000-10-16 (NODC Accession 0108066)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108066 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from PELAGIA in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2000-09-26 to 2000-10-16...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the TYRO in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1990-07-14 to 1990-07-29 (NODC Accession 0113603)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113603 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from TYRO in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1990-07-14 to 1990-07-29...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the POLARSTERN in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and Laptev (or Nordenskjold) Sea from 2007-07-28 to 2007-10-10 (NODC Accession 0109899)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109899 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and Laptev (or...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the HOKKO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2001-05-08 to 2001-05-14 (NODC Accession 0112217)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112217 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HOKKO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2001-05-08 to...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 2006-01-02 to 2006-03-12 (NODC Accession 0109922)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109922 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea and others from 1972-07-18 to 1973-04-01 (NCEI Accession 0143398)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143398 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea, Norwegian Sea, South Atlantic...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from RRS JAMES COOK in the South Atlantic Ocean from 2009-03-07 to 2009-04-21 (NODC Accession 0108214)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108214 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from RRS JAMES COOK in the South Atlantic Ocean from 2009-03-07 to 2009-04-21 and...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the HOKKO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2006-07-15 to 2006-07-25 (NODC Accession 0112224)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112224 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HOKKO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2006-07-15 to...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the South Atlantic Ocean from 2011-09-26 to 2011-10-31 (NODC Accession 0109914)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109914 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the South Atlantic Ocean from 2011-09-26 to 2011-10-31....

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the MELVILLE in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1989-01-23 to 1989-04-12 (NODC Accession 0115014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115014 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MELVILLE in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the USCGC POLAR SEA in the North Greenland Sea from 1993-07-18 to 1993-08-20 (NODC Accession 0114447)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0114447 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from USCGC POLAR SEA in the North Greenland Sea from...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the USCGC POLAR SEA in the North Greenland Sea from 1992-07-15 to 1992-08-14 (NODC Accession 0115687)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115687 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from USCGC POLAR SEA in the North Greenland Sea from...

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2000-11-05 to 2000-11-20 (NODC Accession 0115289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115289 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine...

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea and South Pacific Ocean from 2001-10-10 to 2001-12-06 (NODC Accession 0115281)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115281 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea...

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2007-07-24 to 2007-09-03 (NODC Accession 0108121)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108121 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2007-07-24 to 2007-09-03 and retrieved during...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2000-12-27 to 2001-02-08 (NODC Accession 0112353)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112353 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and underway - surface observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the MIRAI in the Coral Sea, North Pacific Ocean and others from 2009-04-10 to 2009-07-03 (NODC Accession 0108084)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108084 includes chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical, profile and underway - surface data collected from MIRAI in the Coral Sea, North...

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the Arctic Ocean and Beaufort Sea from 1999-09-11 to 1999-10-05 (NODC Accession 0112350)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112350 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the Arctic Ocean and Beaufort Sea from 1999-09-11 to...

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1999-11-21 to 1999-12-27 (NODC Accession 0112351)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112351 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean, Sea of Japan and Sea of Okhotsk from 2006-08-01 to 2006-08-20 (NODC Accession 0112267)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112267 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean, Sea of Japan and...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2002-01-07 to 2002-02-16 (NODC Accession 0112354)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112354 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KAIYO-MARU and MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 1999-05-21 to 1999-09-10 (NODC Accession 0115168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115168 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KAIYO-MARU and MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the MIRAI in the East China Sea (Tung Hai), North Pacific Ocean and others from 2005-10-31 to 2006-01-30 (NODC Accession 0109919)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109919 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the East China Sea (Tung Hai), North Pacific Ocean,...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2002-11-13 to 2002-12-16 (NODC Accession 0112356)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112356 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the OSHORO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-05-10 to 2003-05-23 (NODC Accession 0112274)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112274 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from OSHORO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-05-10 to...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JAN MAYEN in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and North Greenland Sea from 2005-05-20 to 2005-06-02 (NODC Accession 0113564)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113564 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JAN MAYEN in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and North Greenland...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the ATLANTIS II in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1989-04-20 to 1989-06-06 (NODC Accession 0113522)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113522 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from ATLANTIS II in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1989-04-20 to...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway, discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from MIRAI in the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2007-10-08 to 2007-12-26 (NODC Accession 0108123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108123 includes Surface underway, discrete sample and profile data collected from MIRAI in the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the ANTEA in the Gulf of Guinea, North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2005-09-04 to 2005-09-26 (NODC Accession 0108087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108087 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from ANTEA in the Gulf of Guinea, North Atlantic Ocean and South...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from KNORR in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and others from 1981-04-01 to 1981-10-19 (NCEI Accession 0000733)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0000733 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from KNORR in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea, North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea...

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1982-12-01 to 1983-02-18 (NODC Accession 0116706)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116706 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and South...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 1996-11-02 to 1997-09-03 (NODC Accession 0115005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115005 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the L'ATALANTE in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1993-02-13 to 1993-03-19 (NODC Accession 0115158)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115158 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from L'ATALANTE in the North Atlantic Ocean and South...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the South Pacific Ocean and Tasman Sea from 1992-05-02 to 1992-07-30 (NODC Accession 0115018)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115018 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the South Pacific Ocean and Tasman Sea from 1992-05-02...

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea and South Pacific Ocean from 2004-01-20 to 2004-02-06 (NODC Accession 0112210)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112210 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2006-04-18 to 2006-05-22 (NODC Accession 0112329)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112329 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine...

  5. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2000-09-12 to 2000-11-21 (NODC Accession 0112345)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112345 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from...

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JOHAN HJORT in the North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from 1995-11-08 to 1995-11-26 (NODC Accession 0113562)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113562 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JOHAN HJORT in the North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from...

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JOHAN HJORT in the North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from 1997-04-14 to 1997-05-22 (NODC Accession 0113563)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113563 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JOHAN HJORT in the North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from...

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JOHAN HJORT in the North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from 1995-04-27 to 1995-05-23 (NODC Accession 0113561)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113561 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JOHAN HJORT in the North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JOHAN HJORT in the North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from 1994-05-25 to 1994-06-06 (NODC Accession 0113954)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113954 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JOHAN HJORT in the North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2009-09-16 to 2009-10-09 (NODC Accession 0112845)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112845 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Kaiyo in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1994-01-06 to 1994-02-05 (NODC Accession 0112362)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112362 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Kaiyo in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-07-26 to 2012-09-13 (NODC Accession 0116564)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116564 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2001-07-23 to 2001-08-28 (NODC Accession 0108152)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108152 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2001-07-23 to 2001-08-28...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2011-05-15 to 2011-08-26 (NODC Accession 0115178)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115178 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and South...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JOHN P. TULLY in the North Pacific Ocean, Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument and South Pacific Ocean from 1994-09-06 to 1994-11-10 (NODC Accession 0115011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115011 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JOHN P. TULLY in the North Pacific Ocean, Papahanaumokuakea...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the DARVIN in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2005-05-01 to 2005-06-15 (NODC Accession 0113527)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113527 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DARVIN in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2005-05-01 to 2005-06-15...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the DARVIN in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1990-05-28 to 1990-06-15 (NODC Accession 0113523)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113523 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DARVIN in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1990-05-28 to 1990-06-15...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the DARVIN in the Inner Sea - West Coast Scotland and North Atlantic Ocean from 1991-06-14 to 1991-07-02 (NODC Accession 0113525)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113525 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DARVIN in the Inner Sea - West Coast Scotland and North Atlantic...

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2003-04-22 to 2003-05-12 (NODC Accession 0112207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112207 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997-11-11 to 1997-12-04 (NODC Accession 0112250)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112250 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997-11-11 to 1997-12-04...

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the SAGAR SAMPADA in the Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean and Laccadive Sea from 1994-03-01 to 1995-05-03 (NODC Accession 0117387)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117387 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SAGAR SAMPADA in the Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean and Laccadive Sea...

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997-07-11 to 1997-08-11 (NODC Accession 0112236)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112236 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997-07-11 to...

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the OSHORO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-08-11 to 2003-08-25 (NODC Accession 0112276)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112276 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from OSHORO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-08-11 to...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2000-09-20 to 2000-11-04 (NODC Accession 0115288)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115288 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and South...

  5. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from 2002-10-11 to 2002-11-06 (NODC Accession 0112258)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112258 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from 2002-10-11...

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the Ryofu Maru II in the Bismarck Sea, North Pacific Ocean and others from 1994-07-07 to 1994-08-25 (NODC Accession 0115017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115017 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Ryofu Maru II in the Bismarck Sea, North Pacific Ocean,...

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the MARION DUFRESNE in the South Atlantic Ocean from 2008-02-07 to 2008-03-24 (NODC Accession 0112841)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112841 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the South Atlantic Ocean from 2008-02-07 to...

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KAIYO-MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 1996-06-17 to 1996-07-02 (NODC Accession 0115016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115016 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KAIYO-MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the G.O. SARS in the Barents Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and others from 2009-05-28 to 2009-08-11 (NODC Accession 0114433)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0114433 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from G.O. SARS in the Barents Sea, North Atlantic Ocean,...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from ATLANTIS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-04-19 to 2012-05-15 (NODC Accession 0108160)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108160 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from ATLANTIS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-04-19 to 2012-05-15. These data...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1997-01-07 to 1997-01-20 (NODC Accession 0113583)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113583 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1997-01-07 to...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the HAKUREI MARU in the South Pacific Ocean from 1996-04-12 to 1996-06-10 (NODC Accession 0112341)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112341 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HAKUREI MARU in the South Pacific Ocean from...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 1998-08-12 to 1998-10-21 (NODC Accession 0112343)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112343 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1994-10-12 to 1994-11-12 (NODC Accession 0113580)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113580 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1994-10-12 to 1994-11-12...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the HAKUREI MARU in the Coral Sea, North Pacific Ocean and others from 1995-04-14 to 1995-06-12 (NODC Accession 0112340)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112340 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HAKUREI MARU in the Coral Sea, North Pacific Ocean,...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1999-10-13 to 1999-11-20 (NODC Accession 0112253)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112253 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2001-05-07 to 2001-05-31 (NODC Accession 0113586)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113586 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the WAKATAKA MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2002-11-07 to 2002-11-22 (NODC Accession 0112359)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112359 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from WAKATAKA MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2002-11-07 to...

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2001-06-04 to 2001-07-18 (NODC Accession 0112256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112256 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2001-06-04 to 2001-07-18...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the WAKATAKA MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2004-09-24 to 2004-10-08 (NODC Accession 0112360)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112360 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from WAKATAKA MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2004-09-24 to...

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1999-06-10 to 1999-07-09 (NODC Accession 0113584)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113584 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1999-06-10 to 1999-07-09...

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2001-08-13 to 2001-10-22 (NODC Accession 0112346)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112346 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HAKUREI MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from...

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 1999-07-11 to 1999-08-10 (NODC Accession 0113585)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113585 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 1997-05-09 to 1997-06-11 (NODC Accession 0113557)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113557 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JOHAN HJORT in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from 1994-07-23 to 1994-08-16 (NODC Accession 0113560)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113560 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JOHAN HJORT in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea and...

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 1994-05-24 to 1994-06-12 (NODC Accession 0113554)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113554 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1997-10-05 to 1997-11-19 (NODC Accession 0113567)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113567 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1997-10-05 to 1997-11-19...

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2003-07-23 to 2003-08-29 (NODC Accession 0113891)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113891 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the Barents Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and others from 2002-05-30 to 2002-07-01 (NODC Accession 0113569)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113569 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the Barents Sea, North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JAN MAYEN in the Arctic Ocean and Barents Sea from 2004-07-24 to 2004-07-31 (NODC Accession 0113566)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113566 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JAN MAYEN in the Arctic Ocean and Barents Sea from 2004-07-24 to...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-04-05 to 1993-05-14 (NODC Accession 0113551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113551 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-04-05 to 1993-05-14...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the G.O. SARS in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from 2003-09-22 to 2003-10-13 (NODC Accession 0113752)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113752 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from G.O. SARS in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea and...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the Davis Strait and Labrador Sea from 1993-06-17 to 1993-06-29 (NODC Accession 0113552)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113552 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait and Labrador Sea from 1993-06-17 to...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HAKON MOSBY in the North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from 1997-02-25 to 1997-03-24 (NODC Accession 0113545)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113545 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HAKON MOSBY in the North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JAN MAYEN in the Barents Sea from 2003-07-10 to 2003-07-18 (NODC Accession 0113565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113565 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JAN MAYEN in the Barents Sea from 2003-07-10 to 2003-07-18 and...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HAKON MOSBY in the Barents Sea from 2000-09-23 to 2000-10-03 (NODC Accession 0113886)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113886 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HAKON MOSBY in the Barents Sea from 2000-09-23 to 2000-10-03 and...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-11-05 to 1993-12-16 (NODC Accession 0113553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113553 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-11-05 to 1993-12-16...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1997-05-15 to 1997-06-06 (NODC Accession 0113912)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113912 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1997-05-15 to 1997-06-06...

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2000-01-05 to 2000-02-06 (NODC Accession 0112254)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112254 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2000-01-05 to 2000-02-06...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2005-04-19 to 2005-05-09 (NODC Accession 0112214)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112214 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine...

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Ryofu Maru II in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2007-06-06 to 2007-07-24 (NODC Accession 0112295)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112295 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Ryofu Maru II in the North Pacific Ocean and South...

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the Hakuho Maru in the Indian Ocean, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2001-12-08 to 2002-01-19 (NODC Accession 0113547)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113547 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hakuho Maru in the Indian Ocean, North Pacific Ocean...

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea and South Pacific Ocean from 2002-01-17 to 2002-03-06 (NODC Accession 0115278)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115278 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1998-12-29 to 1999-02-01 (NODC Accession 0112349)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112349 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and...

  5. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and Bering Sea from 2004-07-18 to 2004-08-26 (NODC Accession 0115707)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115707 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and Bering...

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from 2004-08-07 to 2004-08-30 (NODC Accession 0113609)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113609 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from 2004-08-07...

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Ryofu Maru II in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2007-07-24 to 2007-10-08 (NODC Accession 0112296)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112296 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Ryofu Maru II in the North Pacific Ocean and...

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 1999-05-08 to 1999-05-30 (NODC Accession 0112252)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112252 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 1999-05-08 to 1999-05-30...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1999-07-09 to 1999-07-17 (NODC Accession 0112308)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112308 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1999-07-09 to...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the OSHORO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2002-06-06 to 2002-06-19 (NODC Accession 0112272)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112272 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from OSHORO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2002-06-06 to...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2002-04-24 to 2002-05-29 (NODC Accession 0115595)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115595 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2002-04-24...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2007-09-04 to 2007-10-02 (NODC Accession 0112270)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112270 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2007-09-04 to 2007-10-02...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-02-20 to 2003-03-30 (NODC Accession 0112259)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112259 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-02-20 to 2003-03-30...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2000-05-09 to 2000-06-10 (NODC Accession 0112255)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112255 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean from 2000-05-09 to 2000-06-10...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the BOSEI MARU NO. 2 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2000-10-06 to 2000-10-21 (NODC Accession 0112200)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112200 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from BOSEI MARU NO. 2 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2000-10-06 to...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the OSHORO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-03-11 to 2003-03-20 (NODC Accession 0112273)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112273 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from OSHORO MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-03-11 to...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2002-10-01 to 2002-11-27 (NODC Accession 0115283)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115283 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and South...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1992-09-29 to 1992-11-30 (NODC Accession 0117714)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117714 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean from...

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the L'ATALANTE in the Coral Sea, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1994-09-23 to 1994-10-29 (NODC Accession 0111870)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0111870 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from L'ATALANTE in the Coral Sea, North Pacific Ocean and South...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from 2001-08-28 to 2001-09-14 (NODC Accession 0112257)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112257 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from 2001-08-28...

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1998-06-22 to 1998-07-06 (NODC Accession 0112238)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112238 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1998-06-22 to...

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1992-06-20 to 1992-07-05 (NODC Accession 0112235)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112235 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1992-06-20 to...

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Hakuho Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-09-30 to 2003-10-17 (NODC Accession 0112348)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112348 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hakuho Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 2003-09-30 to...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2000-06-20 to 2000-07-31 (NODC Accession 0112278)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112278 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2000-06-20 to...

  5. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea and South Pacific Ocean from 2005-01-18 to 2005-02-24 (NODC Accession 0112213)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112213 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea...

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea and South Pacific Ocean from 1998-07-03 to 1998-07-31 (NODC Accession 0115285)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115285 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea...

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 2000-06-21 to 2000-07-05 (NODC Accession 0112244)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112244 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 2000-06-21 to...

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HEALY in the Baffin Bay and Lincoln Sea from 2003-07-21 to 2003-08-16 (NODC Accession 0113909)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113909 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HEALY in the Baffin Bay and Lincoln Sea from 2003-07-21 to...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1998-07-09 to 1998-07-17 (NODC Accession 0112303)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112303 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1998-07-09 to...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1998-07-18 to 1998-08-18 (NODC Accession 0112239)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112239 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1998-07-18 to...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1992-06-20 to 1992-07-05 (NODC Accession 0112233)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112233 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1992-06-20 to...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the TANGAROA in the Indian Ocean from 2002-02-06 to 2002-03-07 (NODC Accession 0113598)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113598 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from TANGAROA in the Indian Ocean from 2002-02-06 to...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2001-04-24 to 2001-05-28 (NODC Accession 0115266)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115266 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2001-04-24...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 2001-07-10 to 2001-07-21 (NODC Accession 0112247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112247 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hokusei Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 2001-07-10 to...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the Hakuho Maru in the Indian Ocean, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2001-12-08 to 2002-01-19 (NODC Accession 0112347)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112347 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hakuho Maru in the Indian Ocean, North Pacific Ocean...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1999-04-28 to 1999-05-06 (NODC Accession 0112307)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112307 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1999-04-28 to...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the BOSEI MARU NO. 2 in the North Pacific Ocean from 1999-10-07 to 1999-10-26 (NODC Accession 0112199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112199 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from BOSEI MARU NO. 2 in the North Pacific Ocean from 1999-10-07 to...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the BOSEI MARU NO. 2 in the North Pacific Ocean from 1998-10-03 to 1998-10-20 (NODC Accession 0112190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112190 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from BOSEI MARU NO. 2 in the North Pacific Ocean from 1998-10-03 to...

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the SHIRASE in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Tasman Sea from 1992-12-03 to 1993-03-19 (NODC Accession 0113597)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113597 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHIRASE in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2004-04-21 to 2004-05-11 (NODC Accession 0112211)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112211 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KEIFU MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine...