WorldWideScience

Sample records for quantitative distance distributions

  1. Transforming distance education curricula through distributive leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Keppell

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a core leadership strategy for transforming learning and teaching in distance education through flexible and blended learning. It focuses on a project centred on distributive leadership that involves collaboration, shared purpose, responsibility and recognition of leadership irrespective of role or position within an organisation. Distributive leadership was a core principle in facilitating the transformation of learning and teaching through a Teaching Fellowship Scheme that empowered leaders across a regional distance education university. In parallel, a design-based research project analysed the perceptions of the Teaching Fellows in relation to blended learning, time/space, peer learning, innovation and equity issues in relation to distance education.

  2. Computer Systems for Distributed and Distance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M.; Jackson, David

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of network-based learning focuses on a survey of computer systems for distributed and distance learning. Both Web-based systems and non-Web-based systems are reviewed in order to highlight some of the major trends of past projects and to suggest ways in which progress may be made in the future. (Contains 92 references.) (Author/LRW)

  3. Hybrid Long-Distance Entanglement Distribution Protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, J.B.; Rigas, I.; Polzik, E.S.;

    2010-01-01

    We propose a hybrid (continuous-discrete variable) quantum repeater protocol for long-distance entanglement distribution. Starting from states created by single-photon detection, we show how entangled coherent state superpositions can be generated by means of homodyne detection. We show that near...

  4. Distance distribution in configuration-model networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Mor; Katzav, Eytan; Kühn, Reimer; Biham, Ofer

    2016-06-01

    We present analytical results for the distribution of shortest path lengths between random pairs of nodes in configuration model networks. The results, which are based on recursion equations, are shown to be in good agreement with numerical simulations for networks with degenerate, binomial, and power-law degree distributions. The mean, mode, and variance of the distribution of shortest path lengths are also evaluated. These results provide expressions for central measures and dispersion measures of the distribution of shortest path lengths in terms of moments of the degree distribution, illuminating the connection between the two distributions.

  5. Distribution of transverse distances in directed animals

    CERN Document Server

    Sumedha

    2003-01-01

    We relate phi(x, s), the average number of sites at a transverse distance x in the directed animals with s sites in d transverse dimensions, to the two-point correlation function of a lattice gas with nearest neighbour exclusion in d dimensions. For large s, phi(x, s) has the scaling form s/R sup d sub s f(|x|/R sub s), where R sub s is the root-mean square radius of gyration of animals of s sites. We determine the exact scaling function for d = 1 to be f(r) = sq root pi/2 sq root 3 erfc(r/sq root 3). We also show that phi(x = 0, s) can be determined in terms of the animal number generating function of the directed animals.

  6. Distributions of cognates in Europe as based on Levenshtein distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepens, J.J.; Dijkstra, A.F.J.; Grootjen, F.A.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers on bilingual processing can benefit from computational tools developed in artificial intelligence. We show that a normalized Levenshtein distance function can efficiently and reliably simulate bilingual orthographic similarity ratings. Orthographic similarity distributions of cognates

  7. Distributions of cognates in Europe as based on Levenshtein distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepens, J.J.; Dijkstra, A.F.J.; Grootjen, F.A.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers on bilingual processing can benefit from computational tools developed in artificial intelligence. We show that a normalized Levenshtein distance function can efficiently and reliably simulate bilingual orthographic similarity ratings. Orthographic similarity distributions of cognates an

  8. Fast Distributed Computation of Distances in Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, Paulo Sérgio; Cunha, Alcino

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a distributed algorithm to simultaneously compute the diameter, radius and node eccentricity in all nodes of a synchronous network. Such topological information may be useful as input to configure other algorithms. Previous approaches have been modular, progressing in sequential phases using building blocks such as BFS tree construction, thus incurring longer executions than strictly required. We present an algorithm that, by timely propagation of available estimations, achieves a faster convergence to the correct values. We show local criteria for detecting convergence in each node. The algorithm avoids the creation of BFS trees and simply manipulates sets of node ids and hop counts. For the worst scenario of variable start times, each node i with eccentricity ecc(i) can compute: the node eccentricity in diam(G)+ecc(i)+2 rounds; the diameter in 2*diam(G)+ecc(i)+2 rounds; and the radius in diam(G)+ecc(i)+2*radius(G) rounds.

  9. Random matrix approach to the distribution of genomic distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Nikita; Zograf, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The cycle graph introduced by Bafna and Pevzner is an important tool for evaluating the distance between two genomes, that is, the minimal number of rearrangements needed to transform one genome into another. We interpret this distance in topological terms and relate it to the random matrix theory. Namely, the number of genomes at a given 2-break distance from a fixed one (the Hultman number) is represented by a coefficient in the genus expansion of a matrix integral over the space of complex matrices with the Gaussian measure. We study generating functions for the Hultman numbers and prove that the two-break distance distribution is asymptotically normal.

  10. Long distance quantum key distribution with continuous variables

    CERN Document Server

    Leverrier, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    We present a continuous-variable quantum key distribution protocol combining a continuous but slightly non-Gaussian modulation together with a efficient reverse reconciliation scheme. At the price of requiring an heterodyne detection, this protocol outperforms all known practical protocols. In particular, longer distances can be achieved, even taking into account finite size effects.

  11. Distance distributions of photogenerated charge pairs in organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Alex J; Chen, Kai; Hodgkiss, Justin M

    2014-08-27

    Strong Coulomb interactions in organic photovoltaic cells dictate that charges must separate over relatively long distances in order to circumvent geminate recombination and produce photocurrent. In this article, we measure the distance distributions of thermalized charge pairs by accessing a regime at low temperature where charge pairs are frozen out following the primary charge separation step and recombine monomolecularly via tunneling. The exponential attenuation of tunneling rate with distance provides a sensitive probe of the distance distribution of primary charge pairs, reminiscent of electron transfer studies in proteins. By fitting recombination dynamics to distributions of recombination rates, we identified populations of charge-transfer states and well-separated charge pairs. For the wide range of materials we studied, the yield of separated charges in the tunneling regime is strongly correlated with the yield of free charges measured via their intensity-dependent bimolecular recombination dynamics at room temperature. We therefore conclude that populations of free charges are established via long-range charge separation within the thermalization time scale, thus invoking early branching between free and bound charges across an energetic barrier. Subject to assumed values of the electron tunneling attenuation constant, we estimate critical charge separation distances of ∼3-4 nm in all materials. In some blends, large fullerene crystals can enhance charge separation yields; however, the important role of the polymers is also highlighted in blends that achieved significant charge separation with minimal fullerene concentration. We expect that our approach of isolating the intrinsic properties of primary charge pairs will be of considerable value in guiding new material development and testing the validity of proposed mechanisms for long-range charge separation.

  12. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Fulton, John L.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Pin, Sonia; Mei, Donghai; Schenter, Gregory K.; Govind, Niranjan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Hu, Jian Z.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-06-11

    The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the oxygen-terminated tetrahedra (Al T-sites) of zeolites determines the concentration of ion-exchange and Brønsted acid sites. As the location of the tetrahedra and the associated subtle variations in bond angles influence the acid strength, quantitative information about Al T-sites in the framework is critical to rationalize catalytic properties and to design new catalysts. A quantitative analysis is reported that uses a combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy supported by DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. To discriminate individual Al atoms, sets of ab initio EXAFS spectra for various T-sites are generated from DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations allowing quantitative treatment of the EXAFS single- and multiple-photoelectron scattering processes out to 3-4 atom shells surrounding the Al absorption center. It is observed that identical zeolite types show dramatically different Al-distributions. A preference of Al for T-sites that are part of one or more 4-member rings in the framework over those T-sites that are part of only 5- and 6-member rings in the HBEA150 sample has been determined from a combination of these methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

  13. Long-distance practical quantum key distribution by entanglement swapping

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Artur; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We develop a model for practical, entanglement-based long-distance quantum key distribution employing entanglement swapping as a key building block. Relying only on existing off-the-shelf technology, we show how to optimize resources so as to maximize secret key distribution rates. The tools comprise lossy transmission links, such as telecom optical fibers or free space, parametric down-conversion sources of entangled photon pairs, and threshold detectors that are inefficient and have dark counts. Our analysis provides the optimal trade-off between detector efficiency and dark counts, which are usually competing, as well as the optimal source brightness that maximizes the secret key rate for specified distances (i.e. loss) between sender and receiver.

  14. Long distance transmission through distributed erbium-doped fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    1993-01-01

    High bit rate, all-optical long-distance transmission could be created through the combined use of loss-compensating gain in erbium-doped fibers and solitons. A detailed analysis of the distributed erbium-doped fiber, including the spectral-gain dependency, is combined with an optimum design...... of the transmission fiber and general bit-error-rate calculations. Changes in wavenumber, group velocity, and fiber dispersion due to erbium doping in a single-mode fiber are evaluated, and a reduction in bit-error rates due to the erbium spectral-gain profile is shown. Transmission through distributed erbium...

  15. Generation of distributed W-states over long distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi

    2017-08-01

    Ultra-secure quantum communication between distant locations requires distributed entangled states between nodes. Various methodologies have been proposed to tackle this technological challenge, of which the so-called DLCZ protocol is the most promising and widely adopted scheme. This paper aims to extend this well-known protocol to a multi-node setting where the entangled W-state is generated between nodes over long distances. The generation of multipartite W-states is the foundation of quantum networks, paving the way for quantum communication and distributed quantum computation.

  16. Long-distance quantum key distribution in optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Hiskett, P A; Lita, A E; Miller, A J; Nam, S; Nordholt, J E; Peterson, C G; Rosenberg, D

    2006-01-01

    Use of low-noise detectors can both increase the secret bit rate of long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) and dramatically extend the length of a fibre optic link over which secure key can be distributed. Previous work has demonstrated use of ultra-low-noise transition-edge sensors (TESs) in a QKD system with transmission over 50 km. In this work, we demonstrate the potential of the TESs by successfully generating error-corrected, privacy-amplified key over 148.7 km of dark optical fibre at a mean photon number mu = 0.1, or 184.6 km of dark optical fibre at a mean photon number of 0.5. We have also exchanged secret key over 67.5 km that is secure against powerful photon-number-splitting attacks.

  17. Probabilistic distance-based quantizer design for distributed estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Hak

    2016-12-01

    We consider an iterative design of independently operating local quantizers at nodes that should cooperate without interaction to achieve application objectives for distributed estimation systems. We suggest as a new cost function a probabilistic distance between the posterior distribution and its quantized one expressed as the Kullback Leibler (KL) divergence. We first present the analysis that minimizing the KL divergence in the cyclic generalized Lloyd design framework is equivalent to maximizing the logarithmic quantized posterior distribution on the average which can be further computationally reduced in our iterative design. We propose an iterative design algorithm that seeks to maximize the simplified version of the posterior quantized distribution and discuss that our algorithm converges to a global optimum due to the convexity of the cost function and generates the most informative quantized measurements. We also provide an independent encoding technique that enables minimization of the cost function and can be efficiently simplified for a practical use of power-constrained nodes. We finally demonstrate through extensive experiments an obvious advantage of improved estimation performance as compared with the typical designs and the novel design techniques previously published.

  18. Long-distance quantum key distribution with imperfect devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Piparo, Nicoló; Razavi, Mohsen [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-04

    Quantum key distribution over probabilistic quantum repeaters is addressed. We compare, under practical assumptions, two such schemes in terms of their secure key generation rate per memory, R{sub QKD}. The two schemes under investigation are the one proposed by Duan et al. in [Nat. 414, 413 (2001)] and that of Sangouard et al. proposed in [Phys. Rev. A 76, 050301 (2007)]. We consider various sources of imperfections in the latter protocol, such as a nonzero double-photon probability for the source, dark count per pulse, channel loss and inefficiencies in photodetectors and memories, to find the rate for different nesting levels. We determine the maximum value of the double-photon probability beyond which it is not possible to share a secret key anymore. We find the crossover distance for up to three nesting levels. We finally compare the two protocols.

  19. Long-distance quantum key distribution with imperfect devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Piparo, Nicoló; Razavi, Mohsen

    2014-12-01

    Quantum key distribution over probabilistic quantum repeaters is addressed. We compare, under practical assumptions, two such schemes in terms of their secure key generation rate per memory, RQKD. The two schemes under investigation are the one proposed by Duan et al. in [Nat. 414, 413 (2001)] and that of Sangouard et al. proposed in [Phys. Rev. A 76, 050301 (2007)]. We consider various sources of imperfections in the latter protocol, such as a nonzero double-photon probability for the source, dark count per pulse, channel loss and inefficiencies in photodetectors and memories, to find the rate for different nesting levels. We determine the maximum value of the double-photon probability beyond which it is not possible to share a secret key anymore. We find the crossover distance for up to three nesting levels. We finally compare the two protocols.

  20. Quantitative bounds for Markov chain convergence: Wasserstein and total variation distances

    CERN Document Server

    Madras, Neal; 10.3150/09-BEJ238

    2011-01-01

    We present a framework for obtaining explicit bounds on the rate of convergence to equilibrium of a Markov chain on a general state space, with respect to both total variation and Wasserstein distances. For Wasserstein bounds, our main tool is Steinsaltz's convergence theorem for locally contractive random dynamical systems. We describe practical methods for finding Steinsaltz's "drift functions" that prove local contractivity. We then use the idea of "one-shot coupling" to derive criteria that give bounds for total variation distances in terms of Wasserstein distances. Our methods are applied to two examples: a two-component Gibbs sampler for the Normal distribution and a random logistic dynamical system.

  1. Long distance free-space quantum key distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Manderbach, T.

    2007-10-16

    The aim of the presented experiment was to investigate the feasibility of satellite-based global quantum key distribution. In this context, a free-space quantum key distribution experiment over a real distance of 144 km was performed. The transmitter and the receiver were situated in 2500 m altitude on the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife, respectively. The small and compact transmitter unit generated attenuated laser pulses, that were sent to the receiver via a 15-cm optical telescope. The receiver unit for polarisation analysis and detection of the sent pulses was integrated into an existing mirror telescope designed for classical optical satellite communications. To ensure the required stability and efficiency of the optical link in the presence of atmospheric turbulence, the two telescopes were equipped with a bi-directional automatic tracking system. Still, due to stray light and high optical attenuation, secure key exchange would not be possible using attenuated pulses in connection with the standard BB84 protocol. The photon number statistics of attenuated pulses follows a Poissonian distribution. Hence, by removing a photon from all pulses containing two or more photons, an eavesdropper could measure its polarisation without disturbing the polarisation state of the remaining pulse. In this way, he can gain information about the key without introducing detectable errors. To protect against such attacks, the presented experiment employed the recently developed method of using additional 'decoy' states, i.e., the the intensity of the pulses created by the transmitter were varied in a random manner. By analysing the detection probabilities of the different pulses individually, a photon-number-splitting attack can be detected. Thanks to the decoy-state analysis, the secrecy of the resulting quantum key could be ensured despite the Poissonian nature of the emitted pulses. For a channel attenuation as high as 35 dB, a secret key rate of up to 250

  2. Efficient Computation of Distance Sketches in Distributed Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sarma, Atish Das; Pandurangan, Gopal

    2011-01-01

    Distance computation is one of the most fundamental primitives used in communication networks. The cost of effectively and accurately computing pairwise network distances can become prohibitive in large-scale networks such as the Internet and Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks. To negotiate the rising need for very efficient distance computation, approximation techniques for numerous variants of this question have recently received significant attention in the literature. The goal is to preprocess the graph and store a small amount of information such that whenever a query for any pairwise distance is issued, the distance can be well approximated (i.e., with small stretch) very quickly in an online fashion. Specifically, the pre-processing (usually) involves storing a small sketch with each node, such that at query time only the sketches of the concerned nodes need to be looked up to compute the approximate distance. In this paper, we present the first theoretical study of distance sketches derived from distance ora...

  3. Distance Determination Method for Normally Distributed Obstacle Avoidance of Mobile Robots in Stochastic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Jinhong Noh; Ukyoul Huh

    2016-01-01

    Obstacle avoidance methods require knowledge of the distance between a mobile robot and obstacles in the environment. However, in stochastic environments, distance determination is difficult because objects have position uncertainty. The purpose of this paper is to determine the distance between a robot and obstacles represented by probability distributions. Distance determination for obstacle avoidance should consider position uncertainty, computational cost and collision probability. The pr...

  4. Quantitative assessments of distributed systems methodologies and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bruneo, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Distributed systems employed in critical infrastructures must fulfill dependability, timeliness, and performance specifications. Since these systems most often operate in an unpredictable environment, their design and maintenance require quantitative evaluation of deterministic and probabilistic timed models. This need gave birth to an abundant literature devoted to formal modeling languages combined with analytical and simulative solution techniques The aim of the book is to provide an overview of techniques and methodologies dealing with such specific issues in the context of distributed

  5. Distance measures and optimization spaces in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.; Rode, Karyn D.; Budge, Suzanne M.; Thiemann, Gregory W.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis has become an important method of diet estimation in ecology, especially marine ecology. Controlled feeding trials to validate the method and estimate the calibration coefficients necessary to account for differential metabolism of individual fatty acids have been conducted with several species from diverse taxa. However, research into potential refinements of the estimation method has been limited. We compared the performance of the original method of estimating diet composition with that of five variants based on different combinations of distance measures and calibration-coefficient transformations between prey and predator fatty acid signature spaces. Fatty acid signatures of pseudopredators were constructed using known diet mixtures of two prey data sets previously used to estimate the diets of polar bears Ursus maritimus and gray seals Halichoerus grypus, and their diets were then estimated using all six variants. In addition, previously published diets of Chukchi Sea polar bears were re-estimated using all six methods. Our findings reveal that the selection of an estimation method can meaningfully influence estimates of diet composition. Among the pseudopredator results, which allowed evaluation of bias and precision, differences in estimator performance were rarely large, and no one estimator was universally preferred, although estimators based on the Aitchison distance measure tended to have modestly superior properties compared to estimators based on the Kullback-Leibler distance measure. However, greater differences were observed among estimated polar bear diets, most likely due to differential estimator sensitivity to assumption violations. Our results, particularly the polar bear example, suggest that additional research into estimator performance and model diagnostics is warranted.

  6. A New Algorithm for Distributed Control Problem with Shortest-Distance Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the distributed shortest-distance problem of multiagent systems where agents satisfy the same continuous-time dynamics. The objective of multiagent systems is to find a common point for all agents to minimize the sum of the distances from each agent to its corresponding convex region. A distributed consensus algorithm is proposed based on local information. A sufficient condition also is given to guarantee the consensus. The simulation example shows that the distributed shortest-distance consensus algorithm is effective for our theoretical results.

  7. Distance Determination Method for Normally Distributed Obstacle Avoidance of Mobile Robots in Stochastic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhong Noh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obstacle avoidance methods require knowledge of the distance between a mobile robot and obstacles in the environment. However, in stochastic environments, distance determination is difficult because objects have position uncertainty. The purpose of this paper is to determine the distance between a robot and obstacles represented by probability distributions. Distance determination for obstacle avoidance should consider position uncertainty, computational cost and collision probability. The proposed method considers all of these conditions, unlike conventional methods. It determines the obstacle region using the collision probability density threshold. Furthermore, it defines a minimum distance function to the boundary of the obstacle region with a Lagrange multiplier method. Finally, it computes the distance numerically. Simulations were executed in order to compare the performance of the distance determination methods. Our method demonstrated a faster and more accurate performance than conventional methods. It may help overcome position uncertainty issues pertaining to obstacle avoidance, such as low accuracy sensors, environments with poor visibility or unpredictable obstacle motion.

  8. Distance Determination Method for Normally Distributed Obstacle Avoidance of Mobile Robots in Stochastic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhong Noh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obstacle avoidance methods require knowledge of the distance between a mobile robot and obstacles in the environment. However, in stochastic environments, distance determination is difficult because objects have position uncertainty. The purpose of this paper is to determine the distance between a robot and obstacles represented by probability distributions. Distance determination for obstacle avoidance should consider position uncertainty, computational cost and collision probability. The proposed method considers all of these conditions, unlike conventional methods. It determines the obstacle region using the collision probability density threshold. Furthermore, it defines a minimum distance function to the boundary of the obstacle region with a Lagrange multiplier method. Finally, it computes the distance numerically. Simulations were executed in order to compare the performance of the distance determination methods. Our method demonstrated a faster and more accurate performance than conventional methods. It may help overcome position uncertainty issues pertaining to obstacle avoidance, such as low accuracy sensors, environments with poor visibility or unpredictable obstacle motion.

  9. Scheme for Robust Long-Distance Continuous Variable Quantum Key Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong-Sheng; QUO Guang-Can

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the configuration of phase coding for quantum key distribution with single photon can also be used for continuous variable quantum key distribution. Therefore the robust long-distance high-speed quantum key distribution can be achieved with current technology.

  10. A non-Gaussian distribution quantifies distances measured with fluorescence localization techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Churchman, L.S.; Flyvbjerg, H.; Spudich, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    When single-molecule fluorescence localization techniques are pushed to their lower limits in attempts to measure ever-shorter distances, measurement errors become important to understand. Here we describe the non-Gaussian distribution of measured distances that is the key to proper interpretation...

  11. THEORETICAL JUSTIFICATION OF EXPONENTIAL DISTRIBUTION LAW OF DISTANCES BETWEEN STOPS OF CITY PUBLIC TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbachov, P.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of investigation of relation bitween the trip distance on stops location on the route between places of attraction. Theoretical justification of the use fulness of exponential distribution with the shift parameter for describing the trip distance between stops is given.

  12. Long distance decoy state quantum key distribution in optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, D; Hiskett, P A; Hughes, R J; Lita, A E; Nam, S W; Nordholt, J E; Peterson, C G; Rice, P R; Harrington, Jim W.; Hiskett, Philip A.; Hughes, Richard J.; Lita, Adriana E.; Nam, Sae Woo; Nordholt, Jane E.; Peterson, Charles G.; Rice, Patrick R.; Rosenberg, Danna

    2006-01-01

    The theoretical existence of photon-number-splitting attacks creates a security loophole for most quantum key distribution (QKD) demonstrations that use a highly attenuated laser source. Using ultra-low-noise, high-efficiency transition-edge sensor photo-detectors, we have implemented the first finite statistics version of a decoy state protocol in a one-way QKD system, enabling the creation of secure keys immune to both photon-number-splitting attacks and Trojan horse attacks over 107 km of optical fiber.

  13. The Fluence and Distance Distributions of Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Ravi, V.; Hallinan, G.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-10-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRB) are millisecond-duration radio pulses with apparent extragalactic origins. All but two of the FRBs have been discovered using the Parkes dish, which employs multiple beams formed by an array of feed horns on its focal plane. In this paper, we show that (i) the preponderance of multiple-beam detections and (ii) the detection rates for varying dish diameters can be used to infer the index α of the cumulative fluence distribution function (the logN–logF function: α = 1.5 for a non-evolving population in a Euclidean universe). If all detected FRBs arise from a single progenitor population, multiple-beam FRB detection rates from the Parkes telescope yield the constraint 0.52 the universe.

  14. Distribution of minimum distance among N random points in d dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Fischler

    2002-05-03

    The Minimum Distance test in the DIEHARD suite for validating random number generators often indicates ''false positives,'' rejecting the quality of what is actually a good generator. A reason for this is presented. The test has enough sensitivity to detect the discrepancy between the approximate theoretical distribution of minimum distance used, and the actual distribution. We present next-order corrections to the theoretical expected distribution, for the 2-dimensional case used in DIEHARD and for higher dimensions. The corrected expectation will eliminate false positives arising from theoretical distribution discrepancies, at any practical test sensitivity level.

  15. The Fluence and Distance Distributions of Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Vedantham, H K; Hallinan, G; Shannon, R

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRB) are millisecond-duration radio pulses with apparent extragalactic origins. All but two of the FRBs have been discovered using the Parkes dish which employs multiple beams formed by an array of feed horns on its focal plane. In this paper, we show that (i) the preponderance of multiple-beam detections, and (ii) the detection rates for varying dish diameters, can be used to infer the index $\\alpha$ of the cumulative fluence distribution function (the log$N$-log$F$ function: $\\alpha=1.5$ for a non-evolving population in a Euclidean universe). If all detected FRBs arise from a single progenitor population, multiple-beam FRB detection rates from the Parkes telescope yield the constraint $0.52<\\alpha<1.0$ with $90$% confidence. Searches at other facilities with different dish sizes refine the constraint to $0.66<\\alpha<0.96$. Our results favor FRB searches with smaller dishes, because for $\\alpha<1$, the gain in field-of-view for a smaller dish is more important than the reduc...

  16. Quantitative Structure-retention Relationship Study of Polychlorinated Dibenzothiophenes by Molecular Electronegativity Distance Vector(MEDV)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Mei-Ping; ZHANG Sheng-Wan; CHEN Ting

    2012-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzothiophenes(PCDTs) are classified as persistent organic pollutants in the environment,so the analysis of PCDTs by their gas chromatographic behaviors is of great significance.Quantitative structure-retention relationship(QSRR) analysis is a useful technique capable of relating chromatographic retention time to the molecular structure.In this paper,a QSRR study of 37 PCDTs was carried out by using molecular electronegativity distance vector(MEDV) descriptors and multiple linear regression(MLR) and partial least-squares regression(PLS) methods.The correlation coefficient R of established MLR,PLS models,leave-one-out(LOO) cross-validation(CV),Q2ext were 0.9951,0.9942,0.9839(MLR) and 0.9925,0.9915,0.9833(PLS),respectively.Results showed that the model exhibited excellent estimate capability for internal sample set and good predictive capability for external sample set.By using MEDV descriptors,the QSRR model can provide a simple and rapid way to predict the gas-chromatographic retention indices of polychlorinated dibenzothiophenes in conditions of lacking standard samples or poor experimental conditions.

  17. Unconditional security proof of long-distance continuous-variable quantum key distribution with discrete modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leverrier, Anthony; Grangier, Philippe

    2009-05-08

    We present a continuous-variable quantum key distribution protocol combining a discrete modulation and reverse reconciliation. This protocol is proven unconditionally secure and allows the distribution of secret keys over long distances, thanks to a reverse reconciliation scheme efficient at very low signal-to-noise ratio.

  18. An altitude and distance correction to the source fluence distribution of TGFs

    CERN Document Server

    Nisi, R S; Gjesteland, T; Collier, A B

    2016-01-01

    The source fluence distribution of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) has been extensively discussed in recent years, but few have considered how the TGF fluence distribution at the source, as estimated from satellite measurements, depends on the distance from satellite foot point and assumed production altitude. As the absorption of the TGF photons increases significantly with lower source altitude and larger distance between the source and the observing satellite, these might be important factors. We have addressed the issue by using the tropopause pressure distribution as an approximation of the TGF production altitude distribution and World Wide Lightning Location Network spheric measurements to determine the distance. The study is made possible by the increased number of Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) TGFs found in the second catalog of the RHESSI data. One find is that the TGF/lightning ratio for the tropics probably has an annual variability due to an annual variability in the...

  19. Using Diffusion Tractography to Predict Cortical Connection Strength and Distance: A Quantitative Comparison with Tracers in the Monkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donahue, Chad J.; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N.; Jbabdi, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Tractography based on diffusion MRI offers the promise of characterizing many aspects of long-distance connectivity in the brain, but requires quantitative validation to assess its strengths and limitations. Here, we evaluate tractography's ability to estimate the presence and strength of connect......Tractography based on diffusion MRI offers the promise of characterizing many aspects of long-distance connectivity in the brain, but requires quantitative validation to assess its strengths and limitations. Here, we evaluate tractography's ability to estimate the presence and strength...... of comprehensive maps of neural connections in the brain ("connectomes"). Here, we describe methods to assess quantitatively tractography's performance in detecting interareal cortical connections and estimating connection strength by comparing it against published results using neuroanatomical tracers. We found...

  20. Geographic distance affects dispersal of the patchy distributed greater long-tailed hamster (Tscherskia triton).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Huiliang; Zhong, Min; Xu, Jinhui; Xu, Laixiang

    2014-01-01

    Dispersal is a fundamental process in ecology influencing the genetic structure and the viability of populations. Understanding how variable factors influence the dispersal of the population is becoming an important question in animal ecology. To date, geographic distance and geographic barriers are often considered as main factors impacting dispersal, but their effects are variable depending on different conditions. In general, geographic barriers affect more significantly than geographic distance on dispersal. In rapidly expanding populations, however, geographic barriers have less effect on dispersal than geographic distance. The effects of both geographic distance and geographic barriers in low-density populations with patchy distributions are poorly understood. By using a panel of 10 microsatellite loci we investigated the genetic structure of three patchy-distributed populations of the Greater long-tailed hamster (Tscherskia triton) from Raoyang, Guan and Shunyi counties of the North China Plain. The results showed that (i) high genetic diversity and differentiation exist in three geographic populations with patchy distributions; (ii) gene flow occurs among these three populations with physical barriers of Beijing city and Hutuo River, which potentially restricted the dispersal of the animal; (iii) the gene flow is negatively correlated with the geographic distance, while the genetic distance shows the positive correlation. Our results suggest that the effect of the physical barriers is conditional-dependent, including barrier capacity or individual potentially dispersal ability. Geographic distance also acts as an important factor affecting dispersal for the patchy distributed geographic populations. So, gene flow is effective, even at relatively long distances, in balancing the effect of geographic barrier in this study.

  1. Protection Distance of Surge Protective Devices in Low Voltage Distribution Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dong; FU Zheng-cai; ZHAO Gang; SUN Wei

    2008-01-01

    Protection distance of surge protective devices (SPDs) is an important problem in designing a good location scheme of SPDs in low voltage distribution systems for protecting electrical equipments against overvoltage caused by lightning stroke. The simplified lumped-parameter circuit model and the circuit method were used to study the protection distance problem of SPDs. The analytical solutions of the load voltage and generale quations of the protection distance of SPDs under different load conditions were given. Simulation results of examples proved the validity of the proposed analytical method.

  2. Quantitative Measurements of the Decentration Distance of Four Kinds of Intraocular Lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Feng; Zhende Lin; Jianjing Li; Yonghua Li

    2004-01-01

    Purpose:To investigate a quantitative method to measure decentration distance(DD) and analyze the DD of four kinds of intraocular lenses (IOLs).Methods :The pseudophakic eye photos were taken under the slit lamp after the IOLs were implanted a year or longer. Then the images were inputted into a computer and the Photoshop software was applied to analyze the DD. Four kinds of IOLs were analyzed,including AcrySof MA60BM (11 eyes), Allergan SA40N (11 eyes), AcrySof SA60AT/SA30AL (5 eyes), Corneal Quattro (4 eyes).Results:The mean value of DD was (0.264 3±0.157 4)mm in the AcrySof MA60BM group,(0.353 6±0.171 9)mm in the Array SA40N group,(0.309 9±0.152 9)mm in the SA60AT/SA30AL group, and (0.326 1±0.187 7)mm in the Quattro group, The difference of the DD values among these 4 kinds of IOLs had no statistic significance (F=0.506,P=0.681) and the values were not equal to zero (t=10.508, P < 0.001). Conclusion:The Photoshop method is a simple and efficient way for DD analysis. The modern foldable posterior-chamber-IOLs have good centration performances when implanted into the capsular bags. Eye Science 2004;20:48-51.

  3. Generalized chemical distance distribution in all-sided critical percolation clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katunin, Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    The algorithm of evaluation of chemical distance distribution in 2D and 3D critical percolation clusters is presented in the following study. The algorithm is enriched by numerous examples of 2D and 3D critical percolation clusters related to the currently investigated problem of electrical percolation in a mixture of conducting/dielectric polymers. The introduced measure of the chemical distance distribution can be a useful tool for characterization of percolation clusters, and in problems of percolation theory and graphs theory in general.

  4. Modelling Framework and the Quantitative Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources in Future Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Xue; Sandels, Claes; Zhu, Kun;

    2013-01-01

    , comprising distributed generation, active demand and electric vehicles. Subsequently, quantitative analysis was made on the basis of the current and envisioned DER deployment scenarios proposed for Sweden. Simulations are performed in two typical distribution network models for four seasons. The simulation...... results show that in general the DER deployment brings in the possibilities to reduce the power losses and voltage drops by compensating power from the local generation and optimizing the local load profiles....

  5. Phonological Attainment and Foreign Language Anxiety in Distance Language Learning: A Quantitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Daniel; Hurd, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Learning a language through distance means is becoming increasingly widespread. The investigation reported in this paper was part of a large study (n = 590) carried out in 2011, which examined the experience of English-speaking students learning French pronunciation in a distance setting. This paper explores the hypothesis that there is a link…

  6. Phonological Attainment and Foreign Language Anxiety in Distance Language Learning: A Quantitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Daniel; Hurd, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Learning a language through distance means is becoming increasingly widespread. The investigation reported in this paper was part of a large study (n = 590) carried out in 2011, which examined the experience of English-speaking students learning French pronunciation in a distance setting. This paper explores the hypothesis that there is a link…

  7. Distance Education, Disciplinary Environments and Deep Learning: A Quantitative Exploration of Faculty Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, David Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Many institutions have increasingly turned to distance education as a way to meet student and institutional needs while living within a constantly shrinking budget. While distance education has the potential to meet many resource-based challenges, its presence provides additional challenges to the faculty who direct the learning environment and…

  8. Distance Education, Disciplinary Environments and Deep Learning: A Quantitative Exploration of Faculty Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, David Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Many institutions have increasingly turned to distance education as a way to meet student and institutional needs while living within a constantly shrinking budget. While distance education has the potential to meet many resource-based challenges, its presence provides additional challenges to the faculty who direct the learning environment and…

  9. Misinterpretation of statistical distance in security of quantum key distribution shown by simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakoshi, Takehisa; Hirota, Osamu

    2014-10-01

    This study will test an interpretation in quantum key distribution (QKD) that trace distance between the distributed quantum state and the ideal mixed state is a maximum failure probability of the protocol. Around 2004, this interpretation was proposed and standardized to satisfy both of the key uniformity in the context of universal composability and operational meaning of the failure probability of the key extraction. However, this proposal has not been verified concretely yet for many years while H. P. Yuen and O. Hirota have thrown doubt on this interpretation since 2009. To ascertain this interpretation, a physical random number generator was employed to evaluate key uniformity in QKD. In this way, we calculated statistical distance which correspond to trace distance in quantum theory after a quantum measurement is done, then we compared it with the failure probability whether universal composability was obtained. As a result, the degree of statistical distance of the probability distribution of the physical random numbers and the ideal uniformity was very large. It is also explained why trace distance is not suitable to guarantee the security in QKD from the view point of quantum binary decision theory.

  10. On a Class of Statistical Distance Measures for Sales Distribution: Theory, Simulation and Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhao Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available While firm-level and micro issue analysis become an important part in research of international trade, only a few work is concerned about the goodness-of-fit for size distribution of firms. In this paper, we revisit the statistical aspects of firm productivity and sales revenue, in order to compare different definitions of statistical distances. We first deduce the exact form of size distribution of firms by only implementing the assumptions of productivity and demand function, and then introduce the famous g-divergence as well as its statistical implications. We also do the simulation and calibration so as to compare those different divergences, moreover, tests the combined assumptions. We conclude that minimizing Pearson χ2 and Neyman χ2 produces similar results and minimizing Kullback-Leibler divergence is likely to take the expense of other distance measures. Additionally, selection among different statistical distances is much more significant than demand functions

  11. ON THE ESTIMATION OF DISTANCE DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS FOR POINT PROCESSES AND RANDOM SETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Stoyan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses various estimators for the nearest neighbour distance distribution function D of a stationary point process and for the quadratic contact distribution function Hq of a stationary random closed set. It recommends the use of Hanisch's estimator of D, which is of Horvitz-Thompson type, and the minussampling estimator of Hq. This recommendation is based on simulations for Poisson processes and Boolean models.

  12. CFD modeling of methane distribution at a continuous miner face with various curtain setback distances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Lihong; Pritchard Christopher; Zheng Yi

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the airflow patterns and methane distributions at a continuous miner face under different ventilation conditions can minimize the risks of explosion and injury to miners by accurately forecasting potentially hazardous face methane levels. This study focused on validating a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models using full-scale ventilation gallery data that assessed how curtain setback distance impacted airflow patterns and methane distributions at an empty mining face (no continuous miner present). Three CFD models of face ventilation with 4.6, 7.6 and 10.7 m (15, 25, and 35 ft) blowing curtain setback distances were constructed and validated with experimental data collected in a full-scale ventilation test facility. Good agreement was obtained between the CFD simulation results and this data. Detailed airflow and methane distribution information are provided. Elevated methane zones at the working faces were identified with the three curtain setback distances. Visualization of the setback dis-tance impact on the face methane distribution was performed by utilizing the post-processing capability of the CFD software.

  13. Fundamental design of a distributed erbium-doped fiber amplifier for long-distance transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard;

    1992-01-01

    Comprehensive theoretical analysis on the design of a distributed erbium-doped fiber amplifier for long-distance transmission has been carried out, using a highly accurate model. The dispersion of the optical fiber as a function of the numerical aperture and the cutoff wavelength is included...

  14. Diffraction pattern simulation of cellulose fibrils using distributed and quantized pair distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Inouye, Hideyo [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Crowley, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yu, Leiming [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Kaeli, David [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Makowski, Lee [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-10-14

    Intensity simulation of X-ray scattering from large twisted cellulose molecular fibrils is important in understanding the impact of chemical or physical treatments on structural properties such as twisting or coiling. This paper describes a highly efficient method for the simulation of X-ray diffraction patterns from complex fibrils using atom-type-specific pair-distance quantization. Pair distances are sorted into arrays which are labelled by atom type. Histograms of pair distances in each array are computed and binned and the resulting population distributions are used to represent the whole pair-distance data set. These quantized pair-distance arrays are used with a modified and vectorized Debye formula to simulate diffraction patterns. This approach utilizes fewer pair distances in each iteration, and atomic scattering factors are moved outside the iteration since the arrays are labelled by atom type. This algorithm significantly reduces the computation time while maintaining the accuracy of diffraction pattern simulation, making possible the simulation of diffraction patterns from large twisted fibrils in a relatively short period of time, as is required for model testing and refinement.

  15. Visualization of Distance Distribution from Pulsed Double Electron-Electron Resonance Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Michael K.; Maryasov, Alexander G.; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; DeRose, Victoria J.

    2004-01-01

    Double electron-electron resonance (DEER), also known as pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR), is a time-domain electron paramagnetic resonance method that can measure the weak dipole-dipole interactions between unpaired electrons. DEER has been applied to discrete pairs of free radicals in biological macromolecules and to clusters containing small numbers of free radicals in polymers and irradiated materials. The goal of such work is to determine the distance or distribution of distances between radicals, which is an underdetermined problem. That is, the spectrum of dipolar interactions can be readily calculated for any distribution of free radicals, but there are many, quite different distributions of radicals that could produce the same experimental dipolar spectrum. This paper describes two methods that are useful for approximating the distance distributions for the large subset of cases in which the mutual orientations of the free radicals are uncorrelated and the width of the distribution is more than a few percent of its mean. The first method relies on a coordinate transformation and is parameter free, while the second is based on iterative least-squares with Tikhonov regularization. Both methods are useful in DEER studies of spin labeled biomolecules containing more than two labels.

  16. Quantitative Vulnerability Assessment of Cyber Security for Distribution Automation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaming Ye

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The distribution automation system (DAS is vulnerable to cyber-attacks due to the widespread use of terminal devices and standard communication protocols. On account of the cost of defense, it is impossible to ensure the security of every device in the DAS. Given this background, a novel quantitative vulnerability assessment model of cyber security for DAS is developed in this paper. In the assessment model, the potential physical consequences of cyber-attacks are analyzed from two levels: terminal device level and control center server level. Then, the attack process is modeled based on game theory and the relationships among different vulnerabilities are analyzed by introducing a vulnerability adjacency matrix. Finally, the application process of the proposed methodology is illustrated through a case study based on bus 2 of the Roy Billinton Test System (RBTS. The results demonstrate the reasonability and effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  17. Improving the maximum transmission distance of continuous-variable quantum key distribution using a noiseless amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blandino, Rémi; Etesse, Jean; Grangier, Philippe [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 2 avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Leverrier, Anthony [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland and INRIA Paris-Rocquencourt, 78153 Le Chesnay Cedex (France); Barbieri, Marco [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 2 avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex, France and Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Tualle-Brouri, Rosa [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 2 avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex, France and Institut Universitaire de France, 103 boulevard St. Michel, 75005, Paris (France)

    2014-12-04

    We show that the maximum transmission distance of continuous-variable quantum key distribution in presence of a Gaussian noisy lossy channel can be arbitrarily increased using a heralded noiseless linear amplifier. We explicitly consider a protocol using amplitude and phase modulated coherent states with reverse reconciliation. Assuming that the secret key rate drops to zero for a line transmittance T{sub lim}, we find that a noiseless amplifier with amplitude gain g can improve this value to T{sub lim}/g{sup 2}, corresponding to an increase in distance proportional to log g. We also show that the tolerance against noise is increased.

  18. Four-state continuous-variable quantum key distribution with long secure distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Xu, Bingjie; Peng, Xiang; Guo, Hong

    2012-05-01

    The four-state continuous-variable quantum key distribution protocol has a long practical secure distance [A. Leverrier and P. Grangier, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.180504 102, 180504 (2009)], while it poses the difficulty of parameter estimation. We propose an improved four-state protocol where the covariance matrix can be estimated from experimental data without using the linear channel assumption, thus ensuring its unconditional security in the asymptotical limit. Our scheme maintains the advantage of high reconciliation efficiency of the four-state protocol, which ensures long practical secure distance its. Our scheme can be implemented with the current technology.

  19. Estimating infectious disease transmission distances using the overall distribution of cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salje, Henrik; Cummings, Derek A T; Lessler, Justin

    2016-12-01

    The average spatial distance between transmission-linked cases is a fundamental property of infectious disease dispersal. However, the distance between a case and their infector is rarely measurable. Contact-tracing investigations are resource intensive or even impossible, particularly when only a subset of cases are detected. Here, we developed an approach that uses onset dates, the generation time distribution and location information to estimate the mean transmission distance. We tested our method using outbreak simulations. We then applied it to the 2001 foot-and-mouth outbreak in Cumbria, UK, and compared our results to contact-tracing activities. In simulations with a true mean distance of 106m, the average mean distance estimated was 109m when cases were fully observed (95% range of 71-142). Estimates remained consistent with the true mean distance when only five percent of cases were observed, (average estimate of 128m, 95% range 87-165). Estimates were robust to spatial heterogeneity in the underlying population. We estimated that both the mean and the standard deviation of the transmission distance during the 2001 foot-and-mouth outbreak was 8.9km (95% CI: 8.4km-9.7km). Contact-tracing activities found similar values of 6.3km (5.2km-7.4km) and 11.2km (9.5km-12.8km), respectively. We were also able to capture the drop in mean transmission distance over the course of the outbreak. Our approach is applicable across diseases, robust to under-reporting and can inform interventions and surveillance.

  20. Experimental Long-Distance Decoy-State Quantum Key Distribution Based On Polarization Encoding

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, C Z; Ma, H X; Pan, J W; Wang, X B; Yang, D; Yang, T; Yin, H; Zeng, H P; Zhang, J; Gao, Wei-Bo; Ma, Huai-Xin; Pan, Jian-Wei; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Yang, Dong; Yang, Tao; Yin, Hao; Zeng, He-Ping; Zhang, Jun

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the decoy-state quantum key distribution (QKD) with one-way quantum communication in polarization space over 75 km. So far, our experimental implementation is the only one that really offers the unconditionally secure final keys among all the implementations of long-distance QKD with weak coherent states. We use 3 different intensities of 0, 0.2 and 0.6 for the pulses of source in our experiment. In order to eliminate the influences of polarization mode dispersion in the long-distance single-mode optical fiber, an automatic polarization compensation system is utilized to implement the active compensation. Only one detector is used in our experiment. The secure distance can be raised to 120 km given 4 detectors.

  1. Ensemble models of proteins and protein domains based on distance distribution restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-04-01

    Conformational ensembles of intrinsically disordered peptide chains are not fully determined by experimental observations. Uncertainty due to lack of experimental restraints and due to intrinsic disorder can be distinguished if distance distributions restraints are available. Such restraints can be obtained from pulsed dipolar electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy applied to pairs of spin labels. Here, we introduce a Monte Carlo approach for generating conformational ensembles that are consistent with a set of distance distribution restraints, backbone dihedral angle statistics in known protein structures, and optionally, secondary structure propensities or membrane immersion depths. The approach is tested with simulated restraints for a terminal and an internal loop and for a protein with 69 residues by using sets of sparse restraints for underlying well-defined conformations and for published ensembles of a premolten globule-like and a coil-like intrinsically disordered protein.

  2. Improving the maximum transmission distance of continuous-variable quantum key distribution using a noiseless amplifier

    CERN Document Server

    Blandino, Rémi; Barbieri, Marco; Etesse, Jean; Grangier, Philippe; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    We show that the maximum transmission distance of continuous-variable quantum key distribution in presence of a Gaussian noisy lossy channel can be arbitrarily increased using a linear noiseless amplifier. We explicitly consider a protocol using amplitude and phase modulated coherent states with reverse reconciliation. We find that a noiseless amplifier with amplitude gain g can increase the maximum admissible losses by a factor 1/g^2.

  3. Geographic distance and ecosystem size determine the distribution of smallest protists in lacustrine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepère, Cécile; Domaizon, Isabelle; Taïb, Najwa; Mangot, Jean-François; Bronner, Gisèle; Boucher, Delphine; Debroas, Didier

    2013-07-01

    Understanding the spatial distribution of aquatic microbial diversity and the underlying mechanisms causing differences in community composition is a challenging and central goal for ecologists. Recent insights into protistan diversity and ecology are increasing the debate over their spatial distribution. In this study, we investigate the importance of spatial and environmental factors in shaping the small protists community structure in lakes. We analyzed small protists community composition (beta-diversity) and richness (alpha-diversity) at regional scale by different molecular methods targeting the gene coding for 18S rRNA gene (T-RFLP and 454 pyrosequencing). Our results show a distance-decay pattern for rare and dominant taxa and the spatial distribution of the latter followed the prediction of the island biogeography theory. Furthermore, geographic distances between lakes seem to be the main force shaping the protists community composition in the lakes studied here. Finally, the spatial distribution of protists was discussed at the global scale (11 worldwide distributed lakes) by comparing these results with those present in the public database. UniFrac analysis showed 18S rRNA gene OTUs compositions significantly different among most of lakes, and this difference does not seem to be related to the trophic status. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The distribution of pairwise genetic distances: a tool for investigating disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worby, Colin J; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Hanage, William P; Lipsitch, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of pathogens has recently been used to investigate disease outbreaks and is likely to play a growing role in real-time epidemiological studies. Methods to analyze high-resolution genomic data in this context are still lacking, and inferring transmission dynamics from such data typically requires many assumptions. While recent studies have proposed methods to infer who infected whom based on genetic distance between isolates from different individuals, the link between epidemiological relationship and genetic distance is still not well understood. In this study, we investigated the distribution of pairwise genetic distances between samples taken from infected hosts during an outbreak. We proposed an analytically tractable approximation to this distribution, which provides a framework to evaluate the likelihood of particular transmission routes. Our method accounts for the transmission of a genetically diverse inoculum, a possibility overlooked in most analyses. We demonstrated that our approximation can provide a robust estimation of the posterior probability of transmission routes in an outbreak and may be used to rule out transmission events at a particular probability threshold. We applied our method to data collected during an outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, ruling out several potential transmission links. Our study sheds light on the accumulation of mutations in a pathogen during an epidemic and provides tools to investigate transmission dynamics, avoiding the intensive computation necessary in many existing methods.

  5. Dependency distance distribution - from the perspective of genre variation. Comment on "Dependency distance: a new perspective on syntactic patterns in natural languages" by Haitao Liu et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaqin

    2017-07-01

    Language can be regarded as a system where different components fit together, according to Saussure [1]. Likewise, the central axiom of synergetic linguistic is that language is a self-organized and self-adapting system. One of its main concerns is to view language as ;a psycho-social phenomenon and a biological-cognitive one at the same time; [2, 760]. Based on this assumption, Liu, Xu and Liang propose a novel approach, i.e., dependency distance, to study the general tendency hidden beneath diverse human languages [3]. As the authors describe in sections 1-3, variations within and between human languages all show the similar tendency towards dependency distance minimization (DDM). In sections 4-5, they introduce certain syntactic patterns related to both short and long dependency distances. However, the effect of genre seems to be given less sufficient attention by the authors. A study suggests that different distributions of closeness and degree centralities across genres can broaden the understanding of dependency distance distribution [4]. Another one shows that different genres have different parameters in terms of modeling dependency distance distribution [5]. Further research on the genre variation, therefore, can provide additional support for this issue.

  6. The determination of pair-distance distribution by double electron-electron resonance: regularization by the length of distance discretization with Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzuba, Sergei A.

    2016-08-01

    Pulsed double electron-electron resonance technique (DEER, or PELDOR) is applied to study conformations and aggregation of peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and other macromolecules. For a pair of spin labels, experimental data allows for the determination of their distance distribution function, P(r). P(r) is derived as a solution of a first-kind Fredholm integral equation, which is an ill-posed problem. Here, we suggest regularization by increasing the distance discretization length to its upper limit where numerical integration still provides agreement with experiment. This upper limit is found to be well above the lower limit for which the solution instability appears because of the ill-posed nature of the problem. For solving the integral equation, Monte Carlo trials of P(r) functions are employed; this method has an obvious advantage of the fulfillment of the non-negativity constraint for P(r). The regularization by the increasing of distance discretization length for the case of overlapping broad and narrow distributions may be employed selectively, with this length being different for different distance ranges. The approach is checked for model distance distributions and for experimental data taken from literature for doubly spin-labeled DNA and peptide antibiotics.

  7. Examination of “Pre-competition” anxiety levels, of mid-distance runners: A quantitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bebetsos Evangelos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mid-distance runners are subject to intense cognitive and somatic anxiety, not only during competition but also during practice. An important variable which may influence athletes’ performance is perceived behavioral control on anxiety. The aim of the present study was to examine whether aspects such as sex, sport/competition experience and weekly practices, differentiated the participants respectively. The participants consisted of 110 athletes, 61 male and 49 female athletes, between the ages of 15 and 28 (Μ=20.05, SD=2.82.They all completed the Greek version of the “Pre- Race Questionnaire”. Results indicated differences between the less experienced and more experienced athletes in almost all factors of the questionnaire, for both sport/competition experience, and weekly practices. No gender differences were shown. Overall, results could help sport professionals such as coaches and the athletes themselves, become more familiar with the sport-specific psychological aspects involved in their unique sport.

  8. Using Diffusion Tractography to Predict Cortical Connection Strength and Distance: A Quantitative Comparison with Tracers in the Monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Chad J.; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N.; Jbabdi, Saad; Hernandez-Fernandez, Moises; Behrens, Timothy E.; Dyrby, Tim B.; Coalson, Timothy; Kennedy, Henry; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Glasser, Matthew F.

    2016-01-01

    Tractography based on diffusion MRI offers the promise of characterizing many aspects of long-distance connectivity in the brain, but requires quantitative validation to assess its strengths and limitations. Here, we evaluate tractography's ability to estimate the presence and strength of connections between areas of macaque neocortex by comparing its results with published data from retrograde tracer injections. Probabilistic tractography was performed on high-quality postmortem diffusion imaging scans from two Old World monkey brains. Tractography connection weights were estimated using a fractional scaling method based on normalized streamline density. We found a correlation between log-transformed tractography and tracer connection weights of r = 0.59, twice that reported in a recent study on the macaque. Using a novel method to estimate interareal connection lengths from tractography streamlines, we regressed out the distance dependence of connection strength and found that the correlation between tractography and tracers remains positive, albeit substantially reduced. Altogether, these observations provide a valuable, data-driven perspective on both the strengths and limitations of tractography for analyzing interareal corticocortical connectivity in nonhuman primates and a framework for assessing future tractography methodological refinements objectively. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tractography based on diffusion MRI has great potential for a variety of applications, including estimation of comprehensive maps of neural connections in the brain (“connectomes”). Here, we describe methods to assess quantitatively tractography's performance in detecting interareal cortical connections and estimating connection strength by comparing it against published results using neuroanatomical tracers. We found the correlation of tractography's estimated connection strengths versus tracer to be twice that of a previous study. Using a novel method for calculating interareal

  9. Long-distance quantum teleportation assisted with free-space entanglement distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Ji-Gang; Yang Bin; Yi Zhen-Huan; Zhou Fei; Chen Kai; Peng Cheng-Zhi; Pan Jian-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Faithful long-distance quantum teleportation necessitates prior entanglement distribution between two communicated locations.The particle carrying on the unknown quantum information is then combined with one particle of the entangled states for Bell-state measurements,which leads to a transfer of the original quantum information onto the other particle of the entangled states.However in most of the implemented teleportation experiments nowadays,the Bell-state measurements are performed even before successful distribution of entanglement.This leads to an instant collapse of the quantum state for the transmitted particle,which is actually a single-particle transmission thereafter.Thus the true distance for quantum teleportation is,in fact,only in a level of meters.In the present experiment we design a novel scheme which has overcome this limit by utilizing fiber as quantum memory.A complete quantum teleportation is achieved upon successful entanglement distribution over 967 meters in public free space.Active feed-forward control techniques are developed for real-time transfer of quantum information.The overall experimental fidelities for teleported states are better than 89.6%,which signify high-quality teleportation.

  10. The Spectral Energy Distributions of White Dwarfs in 47 Tucanae: The Distance to the Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Woodley, Kristin A; Kalirai, Jason; Richer, Harvey; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Anderson, Jay; Bergeron, Pier; Dotter, Aaron; Esteves, Lisa; Fahlman, Greg; Hansen, Brad; Heyl, Jeremy; Hurley, Jarrod; Rich, R Michael; Shara, Michael; Stetson, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We present a new distance determination to the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae by fitting the spectral energy distributions of its white dwarfs to pure hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf models. Our photometric dataset is obtained from a 121 orbit Hubble Space Telescope program using the Wide Field Camera 3 UVIS/IR channels, capturing F390W, F606W, F110W, and F160W images. These images cover more than 60 square arcmins and extend over a radial range of 5-13.7 arcmin (6.5-17.9 pc) within the globular cluster. Using a likelihood analysis, we obtain a best fitting unreddened distance modulus of (m - M)o=13.36+/-0.02+/-0.06 corresponding to a distance of 4.70+/-0.04+/-0.13 kpc, where the first error is random and the second is systematic. We also search the white dwarf photometry for infrared excess in the F160W filter, indicative of debris disks or low mass companions, and find no convincing cases within our sample.

  11. Predicting the offshore distribution and abundance of marine birds with a hierarchical community distance sampling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyert, Holly F; Gardner, Beth; Sollmann, Rahel; Veit, Richard R; Gilbert, Andrew T; Connelly, Emily E; Williams, Kathryn A

    2016-09-01

    Proposed offshore wind energy development on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf has brought attention to the need for baseline studies of the distribution and abundance of marine birds. We compiled line transect data from 15 shipboard surveys (June 2012-April 2014), along with associated remotely sensed habitat data, in the lower Mid-Atlantic Bight off the coast of Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, USA. We implemented a recently developed hierarchical community distance sampling model to estimate the seasonal abundance of 40 observed marine bird species. Treating each season separately, we included six oceanographic parameters to estimate seabird abundance: three static (distance to shore, slope, sediment grain size) and three dynamic covariates (sea surface temperature [SST], salinity, primary productivity). We expected that avian bottom-feeders would respond primarily to static covariates that characterize seafloor variability, and that surface-feeders would respond more to dynamic covariates that quantify surface productivity. We compared the variation in species-specific and community-level responses to these habitat features, including for rare species, and we predicted species abundance across the study area. While several protected species used the study area in summer during their breeding season, estimated abundance and observed diversity were highest for nonbreeding species in winter. Distance to shore was the most common significant predictor of abundance, and thus useful in estimating the potential exposure of marine birds to offshore development. In many cases, our expectations based on feeding ecology were confirmed, such as in the first winter season, when bottom-feeders associated significantly with the three static covariates (distance to shore, slope, and sediment grain size), and surface-feeders associated significantly with two dynamic covariates (SST, primary productivity). However, other cases revealed significant relationships between

  12. Mixture models of geometric distributions in genomic analysis of inter-nucleotide distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelaide Valente Freitas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The mapping defined by inter-nucleotide distances (InD provides a reversible numerical representation of the primary structure of DNA. If nucleotides were independently placed along the genome, a finite mixture model of four geometric distributions could be fitted to the InD where the four marginal distributions would be the expected distributions of the four nucleotide types. We analyze a finite mixture model of geometric distributions (f_2, with marginals not explicitly addressed to the nucleotide types, as an approximation to the InD. We use BIC in the composite likelihood framework for choosing the number of components of the mixture and the EM algorithm for estimating the model parameters. Based on divergence profiles, an experimental study was carried out on the complete genomes of 45 species to evaluate f_2. Although the proposed model is not suited to the InD, our analysis shows that divergence profiles involving the empirical distribution of the InD are also exhibited by profiles involving f_2. It suggests that statistical regularities of the InD can be described by the model f_2. Some characteristics of the DNA sequences captured by the model f_2 are illustrated. In particular, clusterings of subgroups of eukaryotes (primates, mammalians, animals and plants are detected.

  13. The z Distribution of Hydrogen Clouds and Masers with Kinematic Distances

    CERN Document Server

    Bobylev, V V

    2016-01-01

    Data on HII regions, molecular clouds, and methanol masers have been used to estimate the Sun's distance from the symmetry plane zo and the vertical disk scale height h. Kinematic distance estimates are available for all objects in these samples. The Local-arm (Orion-arm) objects are shown to affect noticeably the pattern of the z distribution. The deviations from the distribution symmetry are particularly pronounced for the sample of masers with measured trigonometric parallaxes, where the fraction of Local-arm masers is large. The situation with the sample of HII regions in the solar neighborhood is similar. We have concluded that it is better to exclude the Local arm from consideration. Based on the model of a self-gravitating isothermal disk, we have obtained the following estimates from objects located in the inner region of the Galaxy (R<= Ro): zo= -5.7+/-0.5 pc and h2=24.1+/-0.9 pc from the sample of 639 methanol masers, zo=-7.6+/-0.4 pc and h2=28.6+/-0.5 pc from 878 HII regions, zo=-10.1+/-0.5 pc a...

  14. Predicting quantitative structure-activity relationship of substituted 17α-acetoxyprogesterones by molecular hybridization electronegativity-distance vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-li; LAN Yu-kun; ZHOU Li-ping; YU Yu; LI Zhi-liang

    2007-01-01

    A set of novel structural descriptors (molecular hybridization electronegativity-distance vector, VMEDh) was put forward, and the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) of a series of 17α-Acetoxyprogesterones (Aps) was investigated. Taking into account the effect of various hybridized orbits on atomic electronegativities, we developed the structure descriptors with amended electronegativities to build a QSAR model. The 10-parameter model based on VMEDh yields a correlation coefficient R=0.972 and standard deviation SD=0.262, which are more desirable than those of the previous molecular electonegativity-distance vector (MEDV-4) (R=0.969, SD=0.275). By stepwise multiple linear regression, several parameters are selected to construct optimal models. The 7-parameter model based on VMEDh has R=0.960 and SD=0.276; its correlation coefficient (RCV) and standard deviation (SDCV) for leave-one-out procedure crossvalidation are respectively RCV=0.890 and SDCV=0.445. The 6-parameter MEDV-4 model has R=0.946, SD=0.304, RCV=0.903 and SDCV=0.406. It is demonstrated that VMEDh has desirable estimation performance and good predictive capability for this series of chemical compounds.

  15. Quantitative analysis of distributed control paradigms of robot swarms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Trung Dung

    2010-01-01

    describe the physical and simulated robots, experiment scenario, and experiment setup. Third, we present our robot controllers based on behaviour based and neural network based paradigms. Fourth, we graphically show their experiment results and quantitatively analyse the results in comparison of the two...

  16. Quantitative Analysis on the Relationship between Population Distribution and Environment Factors in Mountain Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to analyze the relationship between population distribution and environment factors in mountain area quantitatively.[Method] Taking the contiguous area of Sichuan,Yunnan and Guizhou Province as study object,population density and residential point density were chosen as the indices of population distribution,and the quantitative relationship between population distribution and environment factors (including altitude,topography relief amplitude,land use,road network and river network)...

  17. Luminosity distance in Swiss cheese cosmology with randomized voids. II. Magnification probability distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Flanagan, Éanna É; Wasserman, Ira; Vanderveld, R Ali

    2011-01-01

    We study the fluctuations in luminosity distances due to gravitational lensing by large scale (> 35 Mpc) structures, specifically voids and sheets. We use a simplified "Swiss cheese" model consisting of a \\Lambda -CDM Friedman-Robertson-Walker background in which a number of randomly distributed non-overlapping spherical regions are replaced by mass compensating comoving voids, each with a uniform density interior and a thin shell of matter on the surface. We compute the distribution of magnitude shifts using a variant of the method of Holz & Wald (1998), which includes the effect of lensing shear. The standard deviation of this distribution is ~ 0.027 magnitudes and the mean is ~ 0.003 magnitudes for voids of radius 35 Mpc, sources at redshift z_s=1.0, with the voids chosen so that 90% of the mass is on the shell today. The standard deviation varies from 0.005 to 0.06 magnitudes as we vary the void size, source redshift, and fraction of mass on the shells today. If the shell walls are given a finite thic...

  18. Long-distance continuous-variable quantum key distribution with advanced reconciliation of a Gaussian modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyongyosi, L.; Imre, S.

    2014-02-01

    The two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CVQKD) systems allow higher key rates and improved transmission distances over standard telecommunication networks in comparison to the one-way CVQKD protocols. To exploit the real potential of two-way CVQKD systems a robust reconciliation technique is needed. It is currently unavailable, which makes it impossible to reach the real performance of a two-way CVQKD system. The reconciliation process of correlated Gaussian variables is a complex problem that requires either tomography in the physical layer that is intractable in a practical scenario, or high-cost calculations in the multidimensional spherical space with strict dimensional limitations. To avoid these issues, we propose an efficient logical layer-based reconciliation method for two-way CVQKD to extract binary information from correlated Gaussian variables. We demonstrate that by operating on the raw-data level, the noise of the quantum channel can be corrected in the scalar space and the reconciliation can be extended to arbitrary high dimensions. We prove that the error probability of scalar reconciliation is zero in any practical CVQKD scenario, and provides unconditional security. The results allow to significantly improve the currently available key rates and transmission distances of two-way CVQKD. The proposed scalar reconciliation can also be applied in oneway systems as well, to replace the existing reconciliation schemes.

  19. Experimental long-distance decoy-state quantum key distribution based on polarization encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Dong; Gao, Wei-Bo; Ma, Huai-Xin; Yin, Hao; Zeng, He-Ping; Yang, Tao; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2007-01-05

    We demonstrate the decoy-state quantum key distribution (QKD) with one-way quantum communication in polarization space over 102 km. Further, we simplify the experimental setup and use only one detector to implement the one-way decoy-state QKD over 75 km, with the advantage to overcome the security loopholes due to the efficiency mismatch of detectors. Our experimental implementation can really offer the unconditionally secure final keys. We use 3 different intensities of 0, 0.2, and 0.6 for the light sources in our experiment. In order to eliminate the influences of polarization mode dispersion in the long-distance single-mode optical fiber, an automatic polarization compensation system is utilized to implement the active compensation.

  20. Binomial moments of the distance distribution and the probability of undetected error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barg, A. [Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, NJ (United States). Bell Labs.; Ashikhmin, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-09-01

    In [1] K.A.S. Abdel-Ghaffar derives a lower bound on the probability of undetected error for unrestricted codes. The proof relies implicitly on the binomial moments of the distance distribution of the code. The authors use the fact that these moments count the size of subcodes of the code to give a very simple proof of the bound in [1] by showing that it is essentially equivalent to the Singleton bound. They discuss some combinatorial connections revealed by this proof. They also discuss some improvements of this bound. Finally, they analyze asymptotics. They show that an upper bound on the undetected error exponent that corresponds to the bound of [1] improves known bounds on this function.

  1. Probability distributions of bed load particle velocities, accelerations, hop distances, and travel times informed by Jaynes's principle of maximum entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbish, David J.; Schmeeckle, Mark; Schumer, Rina; Fathel, Siobhan L.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the most likely forms of the probability distributions of bed load particle velocities, accelerations, hop distances, and travel times, in a manner that formally appeals to inferential statistics while honoring mechanical and kinematic constraints imposed by equilibrium transport conditions. The analysis is based on E. Jaynes's elaboration of the implications of the similarity between the Gibbs entropy in statistical mechanics and the Shannon entropy in information theory. By maximizing the information entropy of a distribution subject to known constraints on its moments, our choice of the form of the distribution is unbiased. The analysis suggests that particle velocities and travel times are exponentially distributed and that particle accelerations follow a Laplace distribution with zero mean. Particle hop distances, viewed alone, ought to be distributed exponentially. However, the covariance between hop distances and travel times precludes this result. Instead, the covariance structure suggests that hop distances follow a Weibull distribution. These distributions are consistent with high-resolution measurements obtained from high-speed imaging of bed load particle motions. The analysis brings us closer to choosing distributions based on our mechanical insight.

  2. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  3. Quantitative morphology and water distribution of bronchial biopsy samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, D. R.; Wise, R.; Andrews, J. M.; HONEYBOURNE, D

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An approach to the study of the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the lung is to measure their concentrations in bronchial biopsy specimens. The main criticism of this technique is that bronchial biopsy specimens consist of more than one tissue type and that drugs are often not distributed evenly. The morphology of bronchial biopsy specimens and the distribution of water between the extracellular and the intracellular compartments is therefore important. METHODS: Fifteen subjects under...

  4. Changes in the end-to-end distance distribution in an oligonucleotide following hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Parkhurst, Kay M.

    1994-08-01

    A 16-mer deoxy oligonucleotide was labeled at the 5' end with x- rhodamine and at the 3' end with fluorescein. The fluorescence lifetime of the donor, fluorescein, under conditions for resonance energy transfer, was studied using the SLM 4850 multiharmonic frequency phase fluorometer in order to obtain information on the end-to-end distance distribution P(R) in the oligomer. When this doubly labeled oligonucleotide was hybridized to its 16-mer complement, the fluorescein fluorescence decay could be very well described by a P(R) that was a symmetric shifted Gaussian with center at 68.4 angstrom and (sigma) equals6.4 angstrom. Simulations suggested that part of the width might be attributable to a distribution in (kappa) 2. In the single- stranded labeled oligomer, there was enhanced energy transfer from the fluorescein to the rhodamine and the best fitting symmetrical shifted Gaussian representation of P(R) was centered at 53.8 angstrom with (kappa) equals6.9 angstrom. There was significant lack of fit with this model, however. A model independent procedure was developed for extracting P(R) as a sum of weighted Hermite polynomials. This procedure gave a P(R) with a large negative region at R<20 angstrom, suggesting that rotational averaging for (kappa) 2 was not quite complete prior to significant decay of the donor excited state.

  5. Solution structure investigation of Ru(II) complex ion pairs: quantitative NOE measurements and determination of average interionic distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaccia, C; Bellachioma, G; Cardaci, G; Macchioni, A

    2001-11-07

    The structure of the Ru(II) ion pairs trans-[Ru(COMe)[(pz(2))CH(2)](CO)(PMe(3))(2)]X (X(-) = BPh(4)(-), 1a; BPh(3)Me(-), 1b; BPh(3)(n-Bu)(-), 1c; BPh(3)(n-Hex)(-), 1d; B(3, 5-(CF(3))(2)(C(6)H(3)))(4)(-), 1e; PF(6)(-), 1f; and BF(4)(-), 1g; pz = pyrazol-1-yl-ring) was investigated in solution from both a qualitative (chloroform-d, methylene chloride-d(2), nithromethane-d(3)) and quantitative (methylene chloride-d(2)) point of view by performing 1D- and 2D-NOE NMR experiments. In particular, the relative anion-cation localization (interionic structure) was qualitatively determined by (1)H-NOESY and (19)F, (1)H-HOESY (heteronuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) NMR experiments. The counteranion locates close to the peripheral protons of the bispyrazolyl ligand independent of its nature and that of the solvent. In complexes 1c and 1d bearing unsymmetrical counteranions, the aliphatic chain points away from the metal center as indicated by the absence of NOE between the terminal Me group and any cationic protons. An estimation of the average interionic distances in solution was obtained by the quantification of the NOE build-up versus the mixing time under the assumption that the interionic and intramolecular correlation times (tau(c)) are the same. Such an assumption was checked by the experimental measurements of tau(c) from both the dipolar contribution to the carbon-13 longitudinal relaxation time T(DD-1)and the comparison of the intramolecular and interionic cross relaxation rate constant (sigma) dependence on the temperature. Both the methodologies indicate that anion and cation have comparable tau(c) values. The determined correlation time values were compared with those obtained for the neutral trans-[Ru(COMe)[(pz(2))BH(2)](CO)(PMe(3))(2)] complex (2), isosteric with the cation of 1. They were significantly shorter (approximately 3.8 times), indicating that the main contribution to dipolar relaxation processes comes from the overall ion pair rotation. As a

  6. Quantitative Estimation of Variability in the Underwater Radiance Distribution (RADCAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    deployments of RADCAM with the CIMEL sky radiance distribution system. RESULTS Hardware Each of the cameras include a bandpass filter centered at 555...of angles for each of the cameras, and then validated by cross comparison with the CIMEL sky radiance camera. The entire image processing

  7. The quantitative determination of the spectral distribution of phototactic sensitivity in the purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milatz, J.M.W.; Manten, A.

    1953-01-01

    By using a compensation method, the action spectrum (spectral distribution of stimulating efficiency in a quantitative measure) of phototaxis in the purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum (Esmarch) Molisch Strain 4 was determined. Two differently coloured adjacent small light fields were projected

  8. Phenotyping of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by a quantitative antibiogram [MIC] typing scheme using Euclidean distances [QATED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldsmith Colin E

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteropathogenic Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli are presently the most common cause of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in the developed world. An understanding of sources and means of transmission of Campylobacter is an essential factor in order to reduce the incidence of Campylobacter-related gastroenteritis in man. Consequently a reproducible, sensitive and well-standardised typing scheme is critical in the successful discrimination of strains and in the subsequent investigations of outbreaks. For this purpose, a phenotypic typing scheme based on quantitative antibiogram determination based on Euclidean distance (QATED, was developed. Results and Conclusion The results obtained with this typing scheme demonstrated that individual livers of colonized pigs could be infected with multiple strains of Campylobacter spp. and subspecies types. In conclusion, phenotyping of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli by QATED is a simple, inexpensive and discriminatory sub-species characterisation scheme, which may be useful in primary diagnostic clinical laboratories, where no specialist Campylobacter phenotyping or molecular genotyping schemes exist. It is especially suitable for food-bome outbreak investigations in the community, where a rapid and local response is required to aid with public health epidemiological investigations.

  9. DISTRIBUTED OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR FOR LONG-DISTANCE OIL PIPELINE HEALTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A fully distributed optical fiber sensor (DOFS) for monitoring long-distance oil pipeline health is proposed based on optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR). A smart and sensitive optical fiber cable is installed along the pipeline acting as a sensor. The experiments show that the cable swells when exposed to oil and induced additional bending losses inside the fiber, and the optical attenuation of the fiber coated by a thin skin with periodical hardness is sensitive to deformation and vibration caused by oil leakage, tampering,or mechanical impact. The region where the additional attenuation occurred is detected and located by DOFS based on OTDR, the types of pipeline accidents are identified according to the characteristics of transmitted optical power received by an optical power meter. Another prototype of DOFS based on a forward traveling frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) is also proposed to monitor pipeline. The advantages and disadvantages of DOFSs based on OTDR and FMCW are discussed. The experiments show that DOFSs are capable of detecting and locating distant oil pipeline leakages and damages in real time with an estimated precision of ten meters over tens of kilometers.

  10. Using hybrid angle/distance information for distributed topology control in vehicular sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Chi; Chiu, Yang-Hung; Wen, Chih-Yu

    2014-10-27

    In a vehicular sensor network (VSN), the key design issue is how to organize vehicles effectively, such that the local network topology can be stabilized quickly. In this work, each vehicle with on-board sensors can be considered as a local controller associated with a group of communication members. In order to balance the load among the nodes and govern the local topology change, a group formation scheme using localized criteria is implemented. The proposed distributed topology control method focuses on reducing the rate of group member change and avoiding the unnecessary information exchange. Two major phases are sequentially applied to choose the group members of each vehicle using hybrid angle/distance information. The operation of Phase I is based on the concept of the cone-based method, which can select the desired vehicles quickly. Afterwards, the proposed time-slot method is further applied to stabilize the network topology. Given the network structure in Phase I, a routing scheme is presented in Phase II. The network behaviors are explored through simulation and analysis in a variety of scenarios. The results show that the proposed mechanism is a scalable and effective control framework for VSNs.

  11. Long-distance copropagation of quantum key distribution and terabit classical optical data channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liu-Jun; Zou, Kai-Heng; Sun, Wei; Mao, Yingqiu; Zhu, Yi-Xiao; Yin, Hua-Lei; Chen, Qing; Zhao, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Teng-Yun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) generates symmetric keys between two remote parties and guarantees the keys are not accessible to any third party. Wavelength-division multiplexing between QKD and classical optical communications by sharing the existing fiber-optics infrastructure is highly desired in order to reduce the cost of QKD applications. However, comparing to the light for classical transmission, quantum signals are very weak and easily affected by impairments from classical light, such as the spontaneous Raman-scattering effect. Here, by selecting an optimal wavelength of quantum signals, we significantly reduce the influence of the Raman-scattering effect. In addition, through coherent optical communication technology, we achieve high-speed classical data transmission with relatively low launch powers, thereby further reducing the impairments from classical light. As a result, we realize the multiplexing and long-distance copropagation of QKD and terabit classical data transmission up to 80 km. The data capacity is two orders of magnitude larger than the existing results. Our demonstration verifies the feasibility of QKD and classical communication to share the resources of backbone fiber links and thus taking the utility of QKD a great step forward.

  12. Excipient quantitation and drug distribution during formulation optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Robert; Spagnoli, Suzanne

    2006-06-07

    An oral granules formulation experienced high drug content and increased variability when the process was scaled up from lab scale to clinical manufacturing scale. It was suspected that mannitol, due to its smaller particle size and lower density, was preferentially lost during the top spray granulation process, thereby causing active enrichment in the remaining granules. In order to troubleshoot the problem, rapidly evaluate solutions, and further optimize the formulation, a simple and rapid analytical technique was required. Since mannitol does not have a UV chromophore, conventional HPLC/UV analysis could not be used. Three alternative analytical techniques were evaluated in terms of ease of use, reproducibility, linear dynamic range and rapidity. The HPLC/RID (refractive index detector) and HPLC/ELSD (evaporative light scattering detector) provided rapid, reproducible alternate techniques to HPLC/UV, whereas LC/MS showed poor reproducibility. Analysis of the sieve samples of the granulations by HPLC/RID and HPLC/ELSD confirmed that poor active drug distribution was due to mannitol losses in the filter bag, as well as increased low size granules low in active drug content. The resultant formulation process was modified and a reduction in the initial air flow at start-up reduced losses of mannitol in the granulator filters.

  13. Distribution of distances between dislocations in different types of dislocation substructures in deformed Cu-Al alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trishkina, L., E-mail: trishkina.53@mail.ru; Zboykova, N.; Koneva, N., E-mail: koneva@tsuab.ru; Kozlov, E. [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya St., Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Cherkasova, T. [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya St., Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 50 Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of the investigation was the determination of the statistic description of dislocation distribution in each dislocation substructures component forming after different deformation degrees in the Cu-Al alloys. The dislocation structures were investigated by the transmission diffraction electron microscopy method. In the work the statistic description of distance distribution between the dislocations, dislocation barriers and dislocation tangles in the deformed Cu-Al alloys with different concentration of Al and test temperature at the grain size of 100 µm was carried out. It was established that the above parameters influence the dislocation distribution in different types of the dislocation substructures (DSS): dislocation chaos, dislocation networks without disorientation, nondisoriented and disoriented cells, in the walls and inside the cells. The distributions of the distances between dislocations in the investigated alloys for each DSS type formed at certain deformation degrees and various test temperatures were plotted.

  14. The Mean Distance to the nth Neighbour in a Uniform Distribution of Random Points: An Application of Probability Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Pratip; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2008-01-01

    We study different ways of determining the mean distance (r[subscript n]) between a reference point and its nth neighbour among random points distributed with uniform density in a D-dimensional Euclidean space. First, we present a heuristic method; though this method provides only a crude mathematical result, it shows a simple way of estimating…

  15. Magnitude and distance distribution of strong aftershocks in Sichuan-Yunnan region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Xiao-jian; GAO Meng-tan; GAO Zhan-wu; MI Su-ting

    2008-01-01

    Using the earthquake sequences data with Ms≥6.5 since 1966 in Sichuan-Yunnan region, we research the charac- teristic of the magnitude difference distribution between main shocks and their strong aftershocks; and then study the spatial distribution characteristic of the strong aftershocks away from their main shocks. The result shows that the magnitude difference distribution obeys intercepted exponential distribution, while the spatial distribution of strong aftershocks obeys normal distribution and the dominated distribution area of strong shocks is 10~39 krn away from main shock. Finally the probability density function of the magnitude difference distribution and the spatial distribution of strong aftershocks is deduced.

  16. Adaptive settings of distance relay for MOV-protected series compensated line with distributed capacitance considering wind power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivov, Oleg Viktorovich

    Series compensated lines are protected from overvoltage by metal-oxide-varistors (MOVs) connected in parallel with the capacitor bank. The nonlinear characteristics of MOV devices add complexity to fault analysis and distance protection operation. During faults, the impedance of the line is modified by an equivalent impedance of the parallel MOV/capacitor circuit, which affects the distance protection. The intermittent wind generation introduces additional complexity to the system performance and distance protection. Wind variation affects the fault current level and equivalent MOV/capacitor impedance during a fault, and hence the distance relay operation. This thesis studies the impact of the intermittent wind power generation on the operation of MOV during faults. For the purpose of simulation, an equivalent wind farm model is proposed to generate a wind generation profile using wind farm generation from California independent system operator (ISO) as a guide for wind power variation to perform the study. The IEEE 12-bus test system is modified to include MOV-protected series capacitor and the equivalent wind farm model. The modified test system is simulated in the MATLAB/Simulink environment. The study has been achieved considering three phase and single line to ground (SLG) faults on the series compensated line to show the effect of wind variation on the MOV operation. This thesis proposes an adaptive setting method for the mho relay distance protection of series compensated line considering effects of wind power variation and MOV operation. The distributed parameters of a transmission line are taken into account to avoid overreaching and underreaching of distance relays. The study shows that variable wind power affects system power flow and fault current in the compensated line during a fault which affects the operation of MOVs for different fault conditions. The equivalent per-phase impedance of the MOV/capacitor circuit has an effect on the system operation

  17. Plantar Pressure Distribution among Older Persons with Different Types of Foot and Its Correlation with Functional Reach Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisyah Mohd Said

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Changes in biomechanical structures of human foot are common in the older person, which may lead to alteration of foot type and plantar pressure distribution. We aimed to examine how foot type affects the plantar pressure distribution and to determine the relationship between plantar pressure distribution and functional reach distance in older persons. Methods. Fifty community-dwelling older persons (age: 69.98±5.84 were categorized into three groups based on the Foot Posture Index. The plantar pressure (max⁡P and contact area were analyzed using Footscan® RSScan platform. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the plantar pressure between foot types and Spearman’s correlation coefficient was used to correlate plantar pressure with the functional reach distance. Results. There were significant differences of max⁡P in the forefoot area across all foot types. The post hoc analysis found significantly lower max⁡P in the pronated foot compared to the supinated foot. A high linear rank correlation was found between functional reach distance and max⁡P of the rearfoot region of the supinated foot. Conclusions. These findings suggested that types of the foot affect the plantar maximal pressure in older persons with functional reach distance showing some associations.

  18. Statistical distribution of elapsed times and distances of seismic events: the case of the Southern Spain seismic catalogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Martínez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Several empiric cumulative distributions of elapsed times and distances between seismic events occurred in the Southern Iberian Peninsula from 1985 to 2000 (data extracted from the seismic catalogue of the Andalusian Institute of Geophysics are investigated. Elapsed times and distances between consecutive seismic events of the whole catalogue, taking into account threshold magnitudes of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0, and of five seismic crises, without distinguishing magnitudes, are investigated. Additionally, the series of distances and elapsed times from the main event to every aftershock are also analysed for the five seismic crises. Even though a power law is sometimes a satisfactory model for the cumulative distribution of elapsed times and distances between seismic events, in some cases a fit with a Weibull distribution for elapsed times performs better. It is worth of mention that, in the case of the seismic crises, the fit achieved by the power law is sometimes improved when it is combined with a logarithmic law. The results derived might be a contribution to a better representation of the seismic activity by means of models that could be based on random-walk processes.

  19. Dense Molecular Gas in the First Galactic Quadrant: A New Distance Estimation Technique and the Molecular Cloud Clump Mass Function, Physical Properties, and Galactic Distribution from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jason; Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy; Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    2015-01-01

    Large submillimeter and millimeter Galactic dust continuum surveys of the Milky Way, such as the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS), Hi-GAL, ATLAS-GAL, and JCMT-JPS cumulatively have discovered 105 cores, clumps, and other structures in Galactic molecular clouds. Robust distance measurements to these structures are needed to enable the large range of quantitative astrophysics that these surveys promise, such as physical properties of clumps, the clump mass function, and the three-dimensional distribution of dense gas and star formation in the Milky Way. We have developed a technique for deriving distances to continuum-identified molecular cloud clumps employing kinematic distances and a suite of distance estimators for breaking kinematic distance ambiguities. Application to the BGPS has yielded 3,700 distance probability density functions (DPDFs) and 1,800 well-constrained distances (typical σdist ≈ 0.5 kpc). These have been used to determine sizes and masses of molecular cloud clumps, derive the clump mass function, and map the three-dimensional distribution of dense gas in the first Galactic quadrant. Among the interesting results are a mass function intermediate between molecular clouds and the stellar initial mass function and inter-arm star formation. Next, we plan to apply the technique to Hi-GAL, which covers the entire Galactic plane and whose submilllimeter maps provide for temperature and bolometric luminosity measurements of cloud structures.

  20. The spectrum and spatial distribution of cyanogen in comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) at large heliocentric distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R M; Schleicher, D G

    1997-03-28

    Optical spectra of comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) at a heliocentric distance of 6.45 astronomical units showed emission from cyanogen gas. The spatial distribution of cyanogen was considerably more diffuse and extended compared to the spatial profile of the dust or grains which were sharply peaked near the center. This behavior is consistent with comets at smaller heliocentric distances suggesting the same or a similar formation mechanism. A cyanogen gas production rate of (1.2 +/- 0.3) x10(26) molecules per second was derived. A model band profile derived from fluorescence equilibrium calculations for the comet's heliocentric velocity and distance agrees with the observed band profile.

  1. The importance of long-distance seed dispersal for the demography and distribution of a canopy tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughlin, T Trevor; Ferguson, Jake M; Lichstein, Jeremy W; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Levey, Douglas J

    2014-04-01

    Long-distance seed dispersal (LDD) is considered a crucial determinant of tree distributions, but its effects depend on demographic processes that enable seeds to establish into adults and that remain poorly understood at large spatial scales. We estimated rates of seed arrival, germination, and survival and growth for a canopy tree species (Miliusa horsfieldii), in a landscape ranging from evergreen forest, where the species' abundance is high, to deciduous forest, where it is extremely low. We then used an individual-based model (IBM) to predict sapling establishment and to compare the relative importance of seed arrival and establishment in explaining the observed distribution of seedlings. Individuals in deciduous forest, far from the source population, experienced multiple benefits (e.g., increased germination rate and seedling survival and growth) from being in a habitat where conspecifics were almost absent. The net effect of these spatial differences in demographic processes was significantly higher estimated sapling establishment probabilities for seeds dispersed long distances into deciduous forest. Despite the high rate of establishment in this habitat, Miliusa is rare in the deciduous forest because the arrival of seeds at long distances from the source population is extremely low. Across the entire landscape, the spatial pattern of seed arrival is much more important than the spatial pattern of establishment for explaining observed seedling distributions. By using dynamic models to link demographic data to spatial patterns, we show that LDD plays a pivotal role in the distribution of this tree in its native habitat.

  2. Temporal and spatial PM10 concentration distribution using an inverse distance weighted method in Klang Valley, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarmizi, S. N. M.; Asmat, A.; Sumari, S. M.

    2014-02-01

    PM10 is one of the air contaminants that can be harmful to human health. Meteorological factors and changes of monsoon season may affect the distribution of these particles. The objective of this study is to determine the temporal and spatial particulate matter (PM10) concentration distribution in Klang Valley, Malaysia by using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) method at different monsoon season and meteorological conditions. PM10 and meteorological data were obtained from the Malaysian Department of Environment (DOE). Particles distribution data were added to the geographic database on a seasonal basis. Temporal and spatial patterns of PM10 concentration distribution were determined by using ArcGIS 9.3. The higher PM10 concentrations are observed during Southwest monsoon season. The values are lower during the Northeast monsoon season. Different monsoon seasons show different meteorological conditions that effect PM10 distribution.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of island separation and island size distributions in chemisorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihua, Zhao; Enzhou, Luo; Naijuan, Wu; Kean, Feng

    1987-11-01

    The two-dimensional autocorrelation function of island separations for commensurately adsorbed overlayers is evaluated and used to calculate the angular profiles of the diffracted beams from arbitrary distribution of overlayer islands. Model calculations are made for a realistic surface. The results are compared to the low energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurement of O/W (112) system and quantitative structural information on the distribution of islands for overlayers is then extracted.

  4. Distributed Localization Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Network Based on Multidimensional Scaling and the Shortest Path Distance Correction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yingqiang; DU Liufeng; YANG Ting; SUN Yugeng

    2009-01-01

    Sensor localization is crucial for the configuration and applications of wireless sensor network (WSN). A novel distributed localization algorithm, MDS-DC was proposed for wireless sensor network based on multidi-mensional scaling (MDS) and the shortest path distance correction. In MDS-DC, several local positioning regions with reasonable distribution were firstly constructed by an adaptive search algorithm, which ensures the mergence between the local relative maps of the adjacent local position regions and can reduce the number of common nodes in the network. Then, based on the relationships between the estimated distances and actual distances of anchors, the distance estimation vectors of sensors around anchors were corrected in each local positioning region. During the computations of the local relative coordinates, an iterative process, which is the combination of classical MDS algorithm and SMACOF algorithm, was applied. Finally, the global relative positions or absolute positions of sen-sors were obtained through merging the relative maps of all local positioning regions. Simulation results show that MDS-DC has better performances in positioning precision, energy efficiency and robustness to range error, which can meet the requirements of applications for sensor localization in WSN.

  5. Method for Quantitative Determination of Spatial Polymer Distribution in Alginate Beads Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, Matthias; Meinberg, Holger; Büchs, Jochen; Koß, Hans-Jürgen; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion B.

    2005-01-01

    A new method based on Raman spectroscopy is presented for non-invasive, quantitative determination of the spatial polymer distribution in alginate beads of approximately 4 mm diameter. With the experimental setup, a two-dimensional image is created along a thin measuring line through the bead compri

  6. Method for Quantitative Determination of Spatial Polymer Distribution in Alginate Beads Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, Matthias; Meinberg, Holger; Büchs, Jochen; Koß, Hans-Jürgen; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion B.

    2005-01-01

    A new method based on Raman spectroscopy is presented for non-invasive, quantitative determination of the spatial polymer distribution in alginate beads of approximately 4 mm diameter. With the experimental setup, a two-dimensional image is created along a thin measuring line through the bead

  7. Model for teaching distributed computing in a distance-based educational environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    le Roux, P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available for teaching distributed computing in a DEE. This research examines how distributed computing should be taught in a DEE in order to ensure effective and quality learning for students, specifically by investigating both the specific characteristics...

  8. Three-Dimensional Point Cloud Recognition via Distributions of Geometric Distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    A geometric framework for the recognition of three-dimensional objects represented by point clouds is introduced in this paper. The proposed approach...representing the point clouds . The first signature we introduce is the histogram of pairwise diffusion distances between all points on the shape

  9. Quantitative analysis of the DNA distribution on cigarette butt filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Lisa; Engen, Sarah; Frank, Greg

    2013-03-01

    The distribution of DNA on the filter paper of smoked cigarette butts was quantitatively mapped using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The filter papers from smoked cigarette butts collected from indoor and outdoor sources were sliced into equal pieces and the amount of DNA on each slice was determined. This study found that the cigarette butt filter papers sliced parallel to the seam of the cigarette had more uniformly distributed DNA on the slices and in most cases, there was enough DNA on each slice to obtain a complete DNA profile. The perpendicular slices had a less uniform pattern of distribution and some slices did not have enough DNA to obtain an interpretable DNA profile. Cigarette butts found indoors also had more DNA per cigarette on average than cigarette butts found outdoors.

  10. Continuous-variable quantum enigma machines for long-distance key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Lloyd, Seth

    2015-12-01

    Quantum physics allows for unconditionally secure communication through insecure communication channels. The achievable rates of quantum-secured communication are fundamentally limited by the laws of quantum physics and in particular by the properties of entanglement. For a lossy communication line, this implies that the secret-key generation rate vanishes at least exponentially with the communication distance. We show that this fundamental limitation can be violated in a realistic scenario where the eavesdropper can store quantum information for only a finite, yet arbitrarily long, time. We consider communication through a lossy bononic channel (modeling linear loss in optical fibers) and we show that it is in principle possible to achieve a constant rate of key generation of one bit per optical mode over arbitrarily long communication distances.

  11. Five-Qubit Contextuality, Noise-Like Distribution of Distances Between Maximal Bases and Finite Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Planat, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Employing five commuting sets of five-qubit observables, we propose specific 160-661 and 160-21 state proofs of the Bell-Kochen-Specker theorem that are also proofs of Bell's theorem. A histogram of the 'Hilbert-Schmidt' distances between the corresponding maximal bases shows in both cases a noise-like behaviour. The five commuting sets are also ascribed a finite-geometrical meaning in terms of the structure of symplectic polar space W(9,2).

  12. Dispersion Distance and the Matter Distribution of the Universe in Dispersion Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, Kiyoshi Wesley; Sigurdson, Kris

    2015-09-18

    We propose that "standard pings," brief broadband radio impulses, can be used to study the three-dimensional clustering of matter in the Universe even in the absence of redshift information. The dispersion of radio waves as they travel through the intervening plasma can, like redshift, be used as a cosmological distance measure. Because of inhomogeneities in the electron density along the line of sight, dispersion is an imperfect proxy for radial distance and we show that this leads to calculable dispersion-space distortions in the apparent clustering of sources. Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are a new class of radio transients that are the prototypical standard ping and, due to their high observed dispersion, have been interpreted as originating at cosmological distances. The rate of fast radio bursts has been estimated to be several thousand over the whole sky per day and, if cosmological, the sources of these events should trace the large-scale structure of the Universe. We calculate the dispersion-space power spectra for a simple model where electrons and FRBs are biased tracers of the large-scale structure of the Universe, and we show that the clustering signal could be measured using as few as 10 000 events. Such a survey is in line with what may be achieved with upcoming wide-field radio telescopes.

  13. ATLASGAL - Kinematic distances and the dense gas mass distribution of the inner Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Wienen, M; Menten, K M; Urquhart, J S; Csengeri, T; Walmsley, C M; Bontemps, S; Russeil, D; Bronfman, L; Koribalski, B S; Schuller, F

    2015-01-01

    The formation of high mass stars and clusters occurs in giant molecular clouds. Objects in evolved stages of massive star formation such as protostars, hot molecular cores, and ultracompact HII regions have been studied in more detail than earlier, colder objects. With this in mind, the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the whole inner Galactic plane at 870 micron (ATLASGAL) has been carried out to provide a global view of cold dust and star formation at submillimetre wavelengths. To derive kinematic distances to a large sample of ATLASGAL clumps we divided them into groups of sources, which are located close together, mostly within a radius of 2 pc, and have velocities in a similar range with a median velocity dispersion of ~ 1 km/s. Using NH3, N2H+ and CS velocities we calculate near and far kinematic distances to 296 groups of ATLASGAL sources in the first quadrant and 393 groups in the fourth quadrant. We analyse HI self-absorption and HI absorption to resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity. We obtain...

  14. Species at risk setback distances : the effects of shallow gas activity on the distribution of grassland birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnen, C. [Northern EnviroSearch, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The effects of shallow gas activity on the distribution of grassland birds was discussed in this presentation. The overall purpose of the study was to examine the effects of minimal disturbance gas wells and associated activity on species richness; effects on species abundance; and effects on the occurrence of species. The presentation provided several hypotheses, including that species richness would increase with increasing distance from gas wells and trails; that abundance and occurrence of sensitive species would increase with distance from gas wells and trails; and that abundance and occurrence of brood parasites and predators would decrease with increasing distance from gas wells and trails. The presentation illustrated the study area and study design. Several graphs representing the study results were also presented. Bird species that were examined included the abundance and occurrence of western meadowlark; horned lark; chestnut-collared longspur; clay-coloured sparrow; vesper sparrow; sprague pipit; savannah sparrow; grasshopper sparrow; baird sparrow; and brown-headed cowbird. A summary slide was also presented that concluded that species richness did not vary with distance from gas development and that brown-headed cowbirds tended to favour areas with gas development and interior habitats. tabs., figs.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of a single-distance phase-retrieval method applied on in-line phase-contrast images of a mouse lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Sara, E-mail: sara.mohammadi@elettra.trieste.it [The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Synchrotron Light Source ‘Elettra’ Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, Basovizza 34149 (Italy); Larsson, Emanuel [Synchrotron Light Source ‘Elettra’ Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, Basovizza 34149 (Italy); Linköping University, SE-581 83 (Sweden); University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Alves, Frauke [University Hospital Goettingen, Robert Koch Strasse 40, Goettingen, Lower Saxony 37075 (Germany); Dal Monego, Simeone [Cluster in Biomedicine s.c.r.l., AREA Science Park, Strada Statale 14, km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Biffi, Stefania; Garrovo, Chiara [IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, via dell’Istria 65/1, 34137 Trieste (Italy); Lorenzon, Andrea [Cluster in Biomedicine s.c.r.l., AREA Science Park, Strada Statale 14, km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Tromba, Giuliana [Synchrotron Light Source ‘Elettra’ Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, Basovizza 34149 (Italy); Dullin, Christian, E-mail: sara.mohammadi@elettra.trieste.it [University Hospital Goettingen, Robert Koch Strasse 40, Goettingen, Lower Saxony 37075 (Germany)

    2014-05-16

    Quantitative analysis concerning the application of a single-distance phase-retrieval algorithm on in-line phase-contrast images of a mouse lung at different sample-to-detector distances is presented. Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PBI) has already proven its potential in a great variety of soft-tissue-related applications including lung imaging. However, the strong edge enhancement, caused by the phase effects, often hampers image segmentation and therefore the quantitative analysis of data sets. Here, the benefits of applying single-distance phase retrieval prior to the three-dimensional reconstruction (PhR) are discussed and quantified compared with three-dimensional reconstructions of conventional PBI data sets in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and preservation of image features. The PhR data sets show more than a tenfold higher CNR and only minor blurring of the edges when compared with PBI in a predominately absorption-based set-up. Accordingly, phase retrieval increases the sensitivity and provides more functionality in computed tomography imaging.

  16. Three-dimensional modeling and quantitative analysis of gap junction distributions in cardiac tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Daniel P; Carruth, Eric D; Lasher, Richard A; Boenisch, Jan; Sachse, Frank B; Hitchcock, Robert W

    2011-11-01

    Gap junctions play a fundamental role in intercellular communication in cardiac tissue. Various types of heart disease including hypertrophy and ischemia are associated with alterations of the spatial arrangement of gap junctions. Previous studies applied two-dimensional optical and electron-microscopy to visualize gap junction arrangements. In normal cardiomyocytes, gap junctions were primarily found at cell ends, but can be found also in more central regions. In this study, we extended these approaches toward three-dimensional reconstruction of gap junction distributions based on high-resolution scanning confocal microscopy and image processing. We developed methods for quantitative characterization of gap junction distributions based on analysis of intensity profiles along the principal axes of myocytes. The analyses characterized gap junction polarization at cell ends and higher-order statistical image moments of intensity profiles. The methodology was tested in rat ventricular myocardium. Our analysis yielded novel quantitative data on gap junction distributions. In particular, the analysis demonstrated that the distributions exhibit significant variability with respect to polarization, skewness, and kurtosis. We suggest that this methodology provides a quantitative alternative to current approaches based on visual inspection, with applications in particular in characterization of engineered and diseased myocardium. Furthermore, we propose that these data provide improved input for computational modeling of cardiac conduction.

  17. Five-qubit contextuality, noise-like distribution of distances between maximal bases and finite geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planat, Michel, E-mail: michel.planat@femto-st.fr [Institut FEMTO-ST, CNRS, 32 Avenue de l' Observatoire, F-25044 Besançon (France); Saniga, Metod, E-mail: msaniga@astro.sk [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranská Lomnica (Slovakia)

    2012-10-15

    Employing five commuting sets of five-qubit observables, we propose specific 160–661 and 160–21 state proofs of the Bell–Kochen–Specker theorem that are also proofs of Bell's theorem. A histogram of the ‘Hilbert–Schmidt’ distances between the corresponding maximal bases shows in both cases a noise-like behavior. The five commuting sets are also ascribed a finite-geometrical meaning in terms of the structure of symplectic polar space W(9,2).

  18. Recognition of Facial Expression Using Eigenvector Based Distributed Features and Euclidean Distance Based Decision Making Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeemoni Kalita

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an Eigenvector based system has been presented to recognize facial expressions from digital facial images. In the approach, firstly the images were acquired and cropping of five significant portions from the image was performed to extract and store the Eigenvectors specific to the expressions. The Eigenvectors for the test images were also computed, and finally the input facial image was recognized when similarity was obtained by calculating the minimum Euclidean distance between the test image and the different expressions.

  19. Quantifying Similarity and Distance Measures for Vector-Based Datasets: Histograms, Signals, and Probability Distribution Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    documents. Citation of manufacturer’s or trade names does not constitute an official endorse- ment or approval of the use thereof. Destroy this report when it...NUMBER (Include area code)   Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98)    Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 February 2017 Technical Note Quantifying Similarity and...datasets. There are a large number of different possible similarity and distance measures that can be applied to different datasets. In this technical

  20. MtsslWizard: In Silico Spin-Labeling and Generation of Distance Distributions in PyMOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelueken, Gregor; Ward, Richard; Naismith, James H; Schiemann, Olav

    2012-04-01

    MtsslWizard is a computer program, which operates as a plugin for the PyMOL molecular graphics system. MtsslWizard estimates distances between spin labels on proteins quickly with user-configurable options through a simple graphical interface. In default mode, the program searches for ensembles of possible MTSSL conformations that do not clash with a static model of the protein. Once conformations are assigned, distance distributions between two or more ensembles are calculated, displayed, and can be exported to other software. The program's use is evaluated in a number of challenging test cases and its strengths and weaknesses evaluated. The benefits of the program are its accuracy and simplicity. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00723-012-0314-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  1. Quantitative analysis of short- and long-distance racing performance in young and adult horses and association analysis with functional candidate genes in Spanish Trotter horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro Rama, S; Valera, M; Membrillo, A; Gómez, M D; Solé, M; Menendez-Buxadera, A; Anaya, G; Molina, A

    2016-10-01

    The association of five candidate genes with sporting performance in young and adult Spanish Trotter horses (STHs) was performed according to a previous selection based on quantitative analysis of the trait time per kilometre (TPK). A total of 334 516 records of TPK from 5958 STHs were used to estimate the estimated breeding values (EBVs) at different age groups (young and adults horses) throughout the range of distances (1600-2700 m) using a bicharacter random regression model. The heritability estimated by distance ranged from 0.16 to 0.40, with a different range for the two age groups. Considering the animals with the best and the worst deregressed EBV, 321 STHs were selected for SNP genotyping in MSTN, COX4I2, PDK4, DMRT3 and CKM genes. An association analysis based on ridge and logistic regression revealed that the young trotters with genotype GG in PDK4 (p < 0.05) and AA of DMRT3 (p < 0.001) SNPs show the best potential in short-distance races, while those carrying the genotype AA in DMRT3 (p < 0.001) and CC in CKM (p < 0.05) genes seem to be the best in long-distance races. Adult trotters with genotype AA in DMRT3 also display greater speed (p < 0.05) and endurance (p < 0.001).

  2. The ASCI Network for SC '98: Dense Wave Division Multiplexing for Distributed and Distance Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.L.; Butman, W.; Martinez, L.G.; Pratt, T.J.; Vahle, M.O.

    1999-06-01

    This document highlights the DISCOM's Distance computing and communication team activities at the 1998 Supercomputing conference in Orlando, Florida. This conference is sponsored by the IEEE and ACM. Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory have participated in this conference for ten years. For the last three years, the three laboratories have a joint booth at the conference under the DOE's ASCI, Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiatives. The DISCOM communication team uses the forum to demonstrate and focus communications and networking developments. At SC '98, DISCOM demonstrated the capabilities of Dense Wave Division Multiplexing. We exhibited an OC48 ATM encryptor. We also coordinated the other networking activities within the booth. This paper documents those accomplishments, discusses the details of their implementation, and describes how these demonstrations support overall strategies in ATM networking.

  3. Ultra-stable long distance optical frequency distribution using the Internet fiber network

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Olivier; Chanteau, Bruno; Chardonnet, Christian; Amy-Klein, Anne; Santarelli, Georgio

    2012-01-01

    We report an optical link of 540 km for ultrastable frequency distribution over the Internet fiber network. The stable frequency optical signal is processed enabling uninterrupted propagation on both directions. The robustness and the performance of the link are enhanced by a cost effective fully automated optoelectronic station. This device is able to coherently regenerate the return optical signal with a heterodyne optical phase locking of a low noise laser diode. Moreover the incoming signal polarization variation are tracked and processed in order to maintain beat note amplitudes within the operation range. Stable fibered optical interferometer enables optical detection of the link round trip phase signal. The phase-noise compensated link shows a fractional frequency instability in 10 Hz bandwidth of 5\\times10-15 at one second measurement time and 2\\times10-19 at 30 000 s. This work is a significant step towards a sustainable wide area ultrastable optical frequency distribution and comparison network.

  4. Symplasmic networks in secondary vascular tissues: parenchyma distribution and activity supporting long-distance transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Rachel

    2014-04-01

    Stems that develop secondary vascular tissue (i.e. xylem and phloem derived from the vascular cambium) have unique demands on transport owing to their mass and longevity. Transport of water and assimilates must occur over long distances, while the increasing physical separation of xylem and phloem requires radial transport. Developing secondary tissue is itself a strong sink positioned between xylem and phloem along the entire length of the stem, and the integrity of these transport tissues must be maintained and protected for years if not decades. Parenchyma cells form an interconnected three-dimensional lattice throughout secondary xylem and phloem and perform critical roles in all of these tasks, yet our understanding of their physiology, the nature of their symplasmic connections, and their activity at the symplast-apoplast interface is very limited. This review highlights key historical work as well as current research on the structure and function of parenchyma in secondary vascular tissue in the hopes of spurring renewed interest in this area, which has important implications for whole-plant transport processes and resource partitioning.

  5. Transport-distance specific SOC distribution: Does it skew erosion induced C fluxes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yaxian; Berbe, Asmerat Asefaw; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The net effect of soil erosion by water, as a sink or source of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), is determined by the spatial (re-)distribution and stability of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC), and the dynamic replacement of eroded C by the production of new photosynthate. The depositi......Abstract The net effect of soil erosion by water, as a sink or source of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), is determined by the spatial (re-)distribution and stability of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC), and the dynamic replacement of eroded C by the production of new photosynthate....... (Land Degrad Dev 11:83–91, 2000) to predict SOC redistribution patterns along hillslopes. The d13C values of soil fractions were more positive at the footslope than on the slope shoulder or at the slope tail, suggesting enhanced decomposition rate of fresh SOC input at the footslope during or after...... emissions during or immediately after transport, must be appropriately accounted for in attempts to quantify the role of soil erosion in terrestrial C sequestration. A SOC erodibility parameter based on actual settling velocity distribution of eroded fractions is needed to better calibrate soil erosion...

  6. A non-adiabatic approach to entanglement distribution over long distances

    CERN Document Server

    Razavi, M; Razavi, Mohsen; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2006-01-01

    Entanglement distribution between trapped-atom quantum memories, viz. single atoms in optical cavities, is addressed. In most scenarios, the rate of entanglement distribution depends on the efficiency with which the state of traveling single photons can be transferred to trapped atoms. This loading efficiency is analytically studied for two-level, $V$-level, $\\Lambda$-level, and double-$\\Lambda$-level atomic configurations by means of a system-reservoir approach. An off-resonant non-adiabatic approach to loading $\\Lambda$-level trapped-atom memories is proposed, and the ensuing trade-offs between the atom-light coupling rate and input photon bandwidth for achieving a high loading probability are identified. The non-adiabatic approach allows a broad class of optical sources to be used, and in some cases it provides a higher system throughput than what can be achieved by adiabatic loading mechanisms. The analysis is extended to the case of two double-$\\Lambda$ trapped-atom memories illuminated by a polarization...

  7. Assessing the Distribution of Urban Green Spaces and its Anisotropic Cooling Distance on Urban Heat Island Pattern in Baotou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongliga Bao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An essential part of urban natural systems, urban green spaces play a crucial role in mitigating the urban heat island effect (UHI. The UHI effect refers to the phenomenon where the temperature within a city is higher than that of the surrounding rural areas. The effects of the spatial composition and configuration of urban green spaces on urban land surface temperature (LST have recently been documented. However, few studies have examined the effects of the directionality and distribution of green spaces on LST. In this study, we used a landscape index to describe the change in pattern of heat island intensity for the city of Baotou, China. We then used a semi-variable function and nearest neighbor algorithm to analyze the cooling effects of green spaces. We found that: (1 the cooling distance of an urban green space was not only influenced by its size, vegetation cover, and shape, but also showed anisotropy. In general, the larger the area of the urban green space and the higher the value of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI; a measure of plant photosynthetic activity, the larger the cooling distance within a certain threshold. Green spaces with more regular shapes displayed higher LST mitigation; however, the cooling distance was directional, and cooling effects depended on the semi-major axis and semi-minor axis of the green space. (2 The distribution of the urban green space within the landscape played a key role in mitigating the UHI effect. Within a certain area, the cooling effect of green spaces that are evenly distributed was greater than that which was associated with either green spaces that were large in area or where greens spaces were aggregated in the landscape. Therefore, within urban areas, where space is limited, urban planning should account for green spaces that are relatively scattered and evenly distributed to maximize cooling effects. The results of this study have key implications for sustainable urban

  8. sup 123 I-iomazenil: A quantitative study of the central benzodoazepine receptor distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haldemann, R.C.; Bicik, I.; Pfeiffer, A.; Schulthess, G.K. von (Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Medical Radiology, Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)); Wieser, H.G. (Clinic and Policlinic of Neurology, Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)); Hasler, P.H.; Schubiger, P. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland))

    1992-06-01

    Fourteen patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 9 patients after amygdalohippocampectomy and 3 healthy volunteers were examined with the new benzodiazepine receptor marker {sup 123}I-Iomazenil and SPECT. For comparison perfusion SPECT studies with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO were done and a quantitative ROI analysis of the date performed. This quantitative analysis consisted of calculation of right-to-left ratios for {sup 123}I{sup I}omazenil SPECTs, whereby values of 1 were obtained with narrow standard deviations. ROI measurements of the medial occipital, frontal and parietal cortex, the cerebellum and white matter showed a pattern of benzodiazepine receptor concentration in concordance with that previously found in PET and autoradiographic studies, if {sup 123}I-Iomazenil ROIs were normalized to the corresponding {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO ROIs. The abnormal distribution in the temporal lobes will not be discussed in this paper. (orig.).

  9. A custom-built PET phantom design for quantitative imaging of printed distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, P J; Angelis, G I; Kotasidis, F; Green, M; Matthews, J C [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Lionheart, W R [School of Mathematics, Alan Turing Building, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Reader, A J, E-mail: p.markiewicz@manchester.ac.uk [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

    2011-11-07

    This note presents a practical approach to a custom-made design of PET phantoms enabling the use of digital radioactive distributions with high quantitative accuracy and spatial resolution. The phantom design allows planar sources of any radioactivity distribution to be imaged in transaxial and axial (sagittal or coronal) planes. Although the design presented here is specially adapted to the high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT), the presented methods can be adapted to almost any PET scanner. Although the presented phantom design has many advantages, a number of practical issues had to be overcome such as positioning of the printed source, calibration, uniformity and reproducibility of printing. A well counter (WC) was used in the calibration procedure to find the nonlinear relationship between digital voxel intensities and the actual measured radioactive concentrations. Repeated printing together with WC measurements and computed radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plates (IP) were used to evaluate the reproducibility and uniformity of such printing. Results show satisfactory printing uniformity and reproducibility; however, calibration is dependent on the printing mode and the physical state of the cartridge. As a demonstration of the utility of using printed phantoms, the image resolution and quantitative accuracy of reconstructed HRRT images are assessed. There is very good quantitative agreement in the calibration procedure between HRRT, CR and WC measurements. However, the high resolution of CR and its quantitative accuracy supported by WC measurements made it possible to show the degraded resolution of HRRT brain images caused by the partial-volume effect and the limits of iterative image reconstruction. (note)

  10. Improvement of Radar Quantitative Precipitation Estimation Based on Real-Time Adjustments to Z-R Relationships and Inverse Distance Weighting Correction Schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gaili; LIU Liping; DING Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The errors in radar quantitative precipitation estimations consist not only of systematic biases caused by random noises but also spatially nonuniform biases in radar rainfall at individual rain-gauge stations.In this study,a real-time adjustment to the radar reflectivity-rainfall rates (Z R) relationship scheme and the gauge-corrected,radar-based,estimation scheme with inverse distance weighting interpolation was developed.Based on the characteristics of the two schemes,the two-step correction technique of radar quantitative precipitation estimation is proposed.To minimize the errors between radar quantitative precipitation estimations and rain gauge observations,a real-time adjustnent to the Z-R relationship scheme is used to remove systematic bias on the time-domain.The gauge-corrected,radar-based,estination scheme is then used to eliminate non-uniform errors in space.Based on radar data and rain gauge observations near the Huaihe River,the two-step correction technique was evaluated using two heavy-precipitation events.The results show that the proposed scheme improved not only in the underestination of rainfall but also reduced the root-mean-square error and the mean relative error of radar-rain gauge pairs.

  11. Quantitative assessment of distance to collection point and improved sorting information on source separation of household waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousta, Kamran; Bolton, Kim; Lundin, Magnus; Dahlén, Lisa

    2015-06-01

    The present study measures the participation of households in a source separation scheme and, in particular, if the household's application of the scheme improved after two interventions: (a) shorter distance to the drop-off point and (b) easy access to correct sorting information. The effect of these interventions was quantified and, as far as possible, isolated from other factors that can influence the recycling behaviour. The study was based on households located in an urban residential area in Sweden, where waste composition studies were performed before and after the interventions by manual sorting (pick analysis). Statistical analyses of the results indicated a significant decrease (28%) of packaging and newsprint in the residual waste after establishing a property close collection system (intervention (a)), as well as significant decrease (70%) of the miss-sorted fraction in bags intended for food waste after new information stickers were introduced (intervention (b)). Providing a property close collection system to collect more waste fractions as well as finding new communication channels for information about sorting can be used as tools to increase the source separation ratio. This contribution also highlights the need to evaluate the effects of different types of information and communication concerning sorting instructions in a property close collection system.

  12. A quantitative analysis of the causes of the global climate change research distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasgaard, Maya; Strange, Niels

    2013-01-01

    investigates whether the need for knowledge on climate changes in the most vulnerable regions of the world is met by the supply of knowledge measured by scientific research publications from the last decade. A quantitative analysis of more than 15,000 scientific publications from 197 countries investigates...... the distribution of climate change research and the potential causes of this distribution. More than 13 explanatory variables representing vulnerability, geographical, demographical, economical and institutional indicators are included in the analysis. The results show that the supply of climate change knowledge...... is biased toward richer countries, which are more stable and less corrupt, have higher school enrolment and expenditures on research and development, emit more carbon and are less vulnerable to climate change. Similarly, the production of knowledge, analyzed by author affiliations, is skewed away from...

  13. SUePDF: a program to obtain quantitative pair distribution functions from electron diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dung Trung; Svensson, Gunnar; Tai, Cheuk-Wai

    2017-01-01

    SUePDF is a graphical user interface program written in MATLAB to achieve quantitative pair distribution functions (PDFs) from electron diffraction data. The program facilitates structural studies of amorphous materials and small nanoparticles using electron diffraction data from transmission electron microscopes. It is based on the physics of electron scattering as well as the total scattering methodology. A method of background modeling is introduced to treat the intensity tail of the direct beam, inelastic scattering and incoherent multiple scattering. Kinematical electron scattering intensity is scaled using the electron scattering factors. The PDFs obtained after Fourier transforms are normalized with respect to number density, nanoparticle form factor and the non-negativity of probability density. SUePDF is distributed as free software for academic users. PMID:28190994

  14. Coping with coping strategies: how distributed teams and their members deal with the stress of distance, time zones and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Niina

    2011-04-01

    The changing world of work is increasing demands on workers through greater need for flexibility in global collaboration. This multiple-case study uses a qualitative research approach to study context-specific job stressors and coping in ten geographically distributed work teams. Results demonstrate the complex and dynamic nature of the stress-coping process and how coping strategies, adapted to manage stress-evoking uncertainty and ambiguity in distributed work, created secondary sources of psychological strain to individuals. The main strategies for managing the uncertainty and ambiguity in the studied teams were extensive emailing, travelling to face-to-face meetings and extending workdays to collaborate simultaneously across time zones. Continuously used, these coping strategies created work overload and strain. Experienced workers, who had good self-management skills, succeeded in coping with these secondary sources of strain by prioritizing and setting clear limits for workload. Less-experienced workers were overloaded and needed more social support from their leaders and teammates. The study proposes that distributed team members rely heavily on individual coping resources, because spatial and temporal distance hinders or even precludes the mobilization of social resources related to emotional, instrumental and informational social support.

  15. High-speed free-space quantum key distribution with automatic tracking for short-distance urban links

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Denisenko, Natalia; Fernandez, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    High-speed free-space quantum key distribution located in urban environment offers an interesting alternative to public key encryption - whose security strength is yet to be mathematically proven. To achieve this, three main objectives need to be accomplished: both the emitter and receiver have to be capable of transmitting and receiving at high speed - with the selection of the source's wavelength and detectors being of especial importance - the error rate needs to be kept at a minimum, especially that due to solar background radiation; and finally, a fast automatic tracking system, capable of compensating for atmospheric turbulence effects, is needed. Regarding to sky background and atmospheric turbulence, two different tracking techniques involving the beam wander compensation in the emitter or the receiver are presented and one of them is selected for our system, based on the link propagation distance and the atmospheric turbulence regime.

  16. A Framework for Process Reengineering in Higher Education: A case study of distance learning exam scheduling and distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M'hammed Abdous

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a conceptual and operational framework for process reengineering (PR in higher education (HE institutions. Using a case study aimed at streamlining exam scheduling and distribution in a distance learning (DL unit, we outline a sequential and non-linear four-step framework designed to reengineer processes. The first two steps of this framework – initiating and analyzing – are used to initiate, document, and flowchart the process targeted for reengineering, and the last two steps – reengineering/ implementing and evaluating – are intended to prototype, implement, and evaluate the reengineered process. Our early involvement of all stakeholders, and our in-depth analysis and documentation of the existing process, allowed us to avoid the traditional pitfalls associated with business process reengineering (BPR. Consequently, the outcome of our case study indicates a streamlined and efficient process with a higher faculty satisfaction at substantial cost reduction.

  17. Vertical quantitative and dominant population distribution of the bacteria isolated from the Muztagata ice core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG; Shurong; YAO; Tandong; AN; Lizhe; WU; Guangjian; XU

    2005-01-01

    Vertical distribution of the main bacteria isolated from the Muztagata ice core (about 22.4 m) was investigated by means of cultivation and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The results showed that the amount of culturable bacteria fluctuated with ice core depth, and was more in dirty layer than in clean ice, which suggested the close corresponding relationship between high input of the bacteria deposited by wind and snowflow and dirty layer. Most of the bacteria were psychrophiles and psychrotolerants, including α- and γ-proteobacteria, Cryobacterium psychrophilum, CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides) group, high-G+C gram-positive bacteria (HGC). Acinetobacter sp. And HGC repeatly occurred in different ice depths, and their quantitative distribution was consistent with the change of the total amount of culturable bacteria with depth, which suggested the main bio-indicator; while Flavobacterium, Cryobacterium psychrophilum, and α-proteobacteria, also functioned as a secondary indicator of climatic and environmental changes. This study is the first report concerning continuous quantitative variation and pattern of the main culturable bacteria in ice core section.

  18. Representing distance, consuming distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunvor Riber

    to mobility and its social context. Such an understanding can be approached through representations, as distance is being represented in various ways, most noticeably in maps and through the notions of space and Otherness. The question this talk subsequently asks is whether these representations of distance...... are being consumed in the contemporary society, in the same way as places, media, cultures and status are being consumed (Urry 1995, Featherstone 2007). An exploration of distance and its representations through contemporary consumption theory could expose what role distance plays in forming...... are present in theoretical and empirical elaborations on mobility, but these remain largely implicit and unchallenged (Bauman 1998). This talk will endeavour to unmask distance as a theoretical entity by exploring ways in which distance can be understood and by discussing distance through its representations...

  19. Laboratory investigation of the distribution of travel distance and rest period of sediment particles from PTV data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rui M. L.; Antico, Federica

    2016-04-01

    We analyze paths of sediment particles on cohesionless granular bet subjected to a turbulent open-channel flow. The key objective is to provide further insights on particle dispersion including resting times. Hence, we focus on the spatial and temporal scale identified by Nikora et al. (2002) as the global range, defined as the particle path composed of many intermediate range paths, i.e with several "starts" and "stops". This requires the calculation of the probability distribution functions of particle travel distances and of rest periods. The experimental work was performed at the Hydraulics Laboratory of IST-UL in a 12.5 m long, 0.405 m wide glass-walled flume recirculating water and sediment through independent circuits. The granular bed was a 4.0 m long and 2.5 cm deep reach filled with 5 mm diameter glass beads packed (with some vibration) to a void fraction of 0.356, typical of random packing. Upstream the mobile bed reach the bed was composed of glued particles to ensure the development of a boundary layer with the same roughness. Laboratory tests were run under conditions of weak beadload transport with Shields parameter (θ) in the range 0.007 to 0.030, Froude numbers (Fr) between 0.630 and 0.950 and boundary Reynolds number (Re_ast) in the range 130 to 300. White-coated particles with 5.0 mm diameter were introduced in the flow 3 m upstream the mobile bed reach. Particle motion was registered from above using a high-speed camera AVT Bonito CL-400 with resolution set to 2320 × 1000 px2 and frame rate of 170 fps. The field of view recorded was 77.0 cm long and 38.0 cm wide, covering almost all the width of the flume. The maximum duration of the runs was 20 min, during which more than 500 particle paths, including resting times, were registered. The video footage was subjected to a PTV (Particle Tracking Velocimetry) developed for the problem at hand. The algorithm includes the application of Gaussian filters and thresholding operations to identify the

  20. Structural parameterization and functional prediction of antigenic polypeptome sequences with biological activity through quantitative sequence-activity models (QSAM) by molecular electronegativity edge-distance vector (VMED)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; ZhiLiang; WU; ShiRong; CHEN; ZeCong; YE; Nancy; YANG; ShengXi; LIAO; ChunYang; ZHANG; MengJun; YANG; Li; MEI; Hu; YANG; Yan; ZHAO; Na; ZHOU; Yuan; ZHOU; Ping; XIONG; Qing; XU; Hong; LIU; ShuShen; LING; ZiHua; CHEN; Gang; LI; GenRong

    2007-01-01

    Only from the primary structures of peptides, a new set of descriptors called the molecular electronegativity edge-distance vector (VMED) was proposed and applied to describing and characterizing the molecular structures of oligopeptides and polypeptides, based on the electronegativity of each atom or electronic charge index (ECI) of atomic clusters and the bonding distance between atom-pairs. Here, the molecular structures of antigenic polypeptides were well expressed in order to propose the automated technique for the computerized identification of helper T lymphocyte (Th) epitopes. Furthermore, a modified MED vector was proposed from the primary structures of polypeptides, based on the ECI and the relative bonding distance of the fundamental skeleton groups. The side-chains of each amino acid were here treated as a pseudo-atom. The developed VMED was easy to calculate and able to work. Some quantitative model was established for 28 immunogenic or antigenic polypeptides (AGPP) with 14 (1―14) Ad and 14 other restricted activities assigned as "1"(+) and "0"(-), respectively. The latter comprised 6 Ab(15-20), 3 Ak(21-23), 2 Ek(24-26), 2 H-2k(27 and 28) restricted sequences. Good results were obtained with 90% correct classification (only 2 wrong ones for 20 training samples) and 100% correct prediction (none wrong for 8 testing samples); while contrastively 100% correct classification (none wrong for 20 training samples) and 88% correct classification (1 wrong for 8 testing samples). Both stochastic samplings and cross validations were performed to demonstrate good performance. The described method may also be suitable for estimation and prediction of classes I and II for major histocompatibility antigen (MHC) epitope of human. It will be useful in immune identification and recognition of proteins and genes and in the design and development of subunit vaccines. Several quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed for various

  1. Quantitative analysis of CT attenuation distribution patterns of nodule components for pathologic categorization of lung nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chughtai, Aamer; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the feasibility of classifying pathologic invasive nodules and pre-invasive or benign nodules by quantitative analysis of the CT attenuation distribution patterns and other radiomic features of lung nodule components. We developed a new 3D adaptive multi-component Expectation-Maximization (EM) analysis method to segment the solid and non-solid nodule components and the surrounding lung parenchymal region. Features were extracted to characterize the size, shape, and the CT attenuation distribution of the entire nodule as well as the individual regions. With permission of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) project, a data set containing the baseline low dose CT scans of 53 cases with known pathologic tumor type categorization was obtained. The 53 cases contain 45 invasive nodules (group 1) and 42 pre-invasive nodules (group 2). A logistic regression model (LRM) was built using leave-one-case-out resampling and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for classification of group 1 and group 2, using the pathologic categorization as ground truth. With 4 selected features, the LRM achieved a test area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.877+/-0.036. The results demonstrated that the pathologic invasiveness of lung adenocarcinomas could be categorized according to the CT attenuation distribution patterns of the nodule components manifested on LDCT images.

  2. Mapping of quantitative trait loci using the skew-normal distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In standard interval mapping (IM) of quantitative trait loci (QTL), the QTL effect is described by a normal mixture model. When this assumption of normality is violated, the most commonly adopted strategy is to use the previous model after data transformation. However, an appropriate transformation may not exist or may be difficult to find. Also this approach can raise interpretation issues. An interesting alternative is to consider a skew-normal mixture model in standard IM, and the resulting method is here denoted as skew-normal IM. This flexible model that includes the usual symmetric normal distribution as a special case is important, allowing continuous variation from normality to non-normality. In this paper we briefly introduce the main peculiarities of the skew-normal distribution. The maximum likelihood estimates of parameters of the skew-normal distribution are obtained by the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. The proposed model is illustrated with real data from an intercross experiment that shows a significant departure from the normality assumption. The performance of the skew-normal IM is assessed via stochastic simulation. The results indicate that the skew-normal IM has higher power for QTL detection and better precision of QTL location as compared to standard IM and nonparametric IM.

  3. Quantitative distribution of aquatic plant and animal communities in the Forsmark-area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautsky, H.; Plantman, P.; Borgiel, M. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Systems Ecology

    1999-12-15

    This report is a part of the SKB project 'SAFE'. The aim of SAFE is to update the previous safety analysis of SFR-1. SFR is for the repository of low and intermediate level radioactive waste. The aim of this report is to provide background information of the quantitative distribution of macroscopic (>1 mm) plants and animals on the sea floor (the phytobenthic communities) above the SFR. The phytobenthic plant and animal communities in the Bothnian Sea may constitute over half of the total production of the ecosystem in the coastal zone. Data will be used in a simulation model of the area. The attached plant and animal communities of the sea floor can be the major component to find radioactive isotopes when a leakage should occur from the SFR below the investigated area. Their ability to bioaccumulate the isotopes and the abundance of the plants and animals might to a large extent determine the amount of radionuclides that could be retained in the biological system. This might then affect the form of further dispersal of the radionuclides over larger areas, whether they are kept within and accumulated in the food chain or retained in the sediments or diluted in the water column. In the investigated area divers described the sea floor substrate and the dominating plant and animal communities along transect lines. In addition, the divers collected quantitative samples. Three transects were placed just above SFR, and two transects were placed from the shore of islands adjacent to SFR. In total, divers collected 54 quantitative samples. Also, divers collected 6 sediment cores for analysis of the organic contents and chlorophylla. The results from the divers estimates of plant and animal species distribution and cover degree, as well as the quantitative samples, indicated the area being fairly rich. An eroded moraine (boulders, stones, gravel and sand) dominated the substrate with occasional rock outcrops. At several sites, on the hard, more stable substrates

  4. Quantitative Study of the Geographical Distribution of the Authorship of High-Energy Physics Journals

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Jan; Mele, S

    2007-01-01

    The recent debate on Open Access publishing in High-Energy Physics has exposed the problem of assessing the scienti c production of every country where scholars are active in this discipline. This assessment is complicated by the highly-collaborative cross-border tradition of High-Energy Physics research. We present the results of a quantitative study of the geographical distribution of authors of High-Energy Physics articles, which takes into account cross-border co-authorship by attributing articles to countries on a pro-rata basis. Aggregated data on the share of scienti c results published by each country are presented together with a breakdown for the most popular journals in the eld, and a separation for articles by small groups or large collaborations. Collaborative patterns across large geographic areas are also investigated. Finally, the High-Energy Physics production of each country is compared with some economic indicators.

  5. Prediction of maximum P- and S-wave amplitude distributions incorporating frequency- and distance-dependent characteristics of the observed apparent radiation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Manabu; Yoshimoto, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    Frequency-dependent model of the apparent radiation pattern has been extensively incorporated into engineering and scientific applications for high-frequency seismic waves, but distance-dependent properties have not yet been fully taken into account. We investigated the unified characteristics of frequency and distance dependences in both apparent P- and S-wave radiation patterns during local crustal earthquakes. Observed distortions of the apparent P- and S-wave radiation patterns could be simply modeled by using a function of the normalized hypocentral distance, which is a product of the wave number and hypocentral distance. This behavior suggests that major cause of distortion of the apparent radiation pattern is seismic wave scattering and diffraction within the heterogeneous crust. On the basis of observed normalized hypocentral distance dependency, we proposed a method for prediction of spatial distributions of maximum P- and S-wave amplitudes. Our method incorporating normalized hypocentral distance dependence of the apparent radiation pattern reproduced the observed spatial distributions of maximum P- and S-wave amplitudes over a wide frequency and distance ranges successfully.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Statistical distributions of test statistics used for quantitative trait association mapping in structured populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teyssèdre Simon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spurious associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and phenotypes are a major issue in genome-wide association studies and have led to underestimation of type 1 error rate and overestimation of the number of quantitative trait loci found. Many authors have investigated the influence of population structure on the robustness of methods by simulation. This paper is aimed at developing further the algebraic formalization of power and type 1 error rate for some of the classical statistical methods used: simple regression, two approximate methods of mixed models involving the effect of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and a random polygenic effect (GRAMMAR and FASTA and the transmission/disequilibrium test for quantitative traits and nuclear families. Analytical formulae were derived using matrix algebra for the first and second moments of the statistical tests, assuming a true mixed model with a polygenic effect and SNP effects. Results The expectation and variance of the test statistics and their marginal expectations and variances according to the distribution of genotypes and estimators of variance components are given as a function of the relationship matrix and of the heritability of the polygenic effect. These formulae were used to compute type 1 error rate and power for any kind of relationship matrix between phenotyped and genotyped individuals for any level of heritability. For the regression method, type 1 error rate increased with the variability of relationships and with heritability, but decreased with the GRAMMAR method and was not affected with the FASTA and quantitative transmission/disequilibrium test methods. Conclusions The formulae can be easily used to provide the correct threshold of type 1 error rate and to calculate the power when designing experiments or data collection protocols. The results concerning the efficacy of each method agree with simulation results in the literature but were

  7. Use of Relative vs Fixed Offset Distance to Define Region of Interest at the Distal Radius and Tibia in High-Resolution Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V; Hansen, Stinus; Halekoh, Ulrich; Brixen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Although the region of interest in high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography, defined based on the manufacturer's protocol for in vivo scanning, provides consistency and is practically convenient, it does not take into account possible variation in morphology in the regions adjacent to the measurement site. This study aimed at compare the morphologic variation in measurements using the standard fixed offset distance to define the distal starting slice against those obtained by using a relative measurement position scaled to the individual bone length at the distal radius and tibia in normal healthy adult subjects. A total of 40 healthy adult subjects (median height, 175.3 cm; range: 150.0-196.0 cm) were included in the study. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography at the distal radius and tibia was performed in all subjects, the region of interest defined by, first, the standard measurement protocol, where the most distal CT slice was 9.5 mm and 22.5 mm from the end plate of the radius and tibia, respectively, and second, the relative measurement method, where the most distal CT slice was at 4% and 7% of the radial and tibial lengths, respectively. Volumetric densities and microarchitectural parameters were compared between the 2 methods. Measurements of the total and cortical volumetric density and cortical thickness at the radius and tibia and cortical porosity, trabecular volumetric density, and trabecular number at the tibia were significantly different between the 2 methods (all p radius (up to 34%) and the tibia (up to 36%). A lack of consideration to height (and in turn the bone lengths) in the standard patient protocol could lead to the introduction of systematic errors in radial and tibial measurements. Although this may not be of particular significance in longitudinal studies in the same individual, it potentially assumes critical importance in cross-sectional studies.

  8. Design and synthesis of target-responsive hydrogel for portable visual quantitative detection of uranium with a microfluidic distance-based readout device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yishun; Fang, Luting; Zhu, Zhi; Ma, Yanli; Zhou, Leiji; Chen, Xi; Xu, Dunming; Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-11-15

    Due to uranium's increasing exploitation in nuclear energy and its toxicity to human health, it is of great significance to detect uranium contamination. In particular, development of a rapid, sensitive and portable method is important for personal health care for those who frequently come into contact with uranium ore mining or who investigate leaks at nuclear power plants. The most stable form of uranium in water is uranyl ion (UO2(2+)). In this work, a UO2(2+) responsive smart hydrogel was designed and synthesized for rapid, portable, sensitive detection of UO2(2+). A UO2(2+) dependent DNAzyme complex composed of substrate strand and enzyme strand was utilized to crosslink DNA-grafted polyacrylamide chains to form a DNA hydrogel. Colorimetric analysis was achieved by encapsulating gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the DNAzyme-crosslinked hydrogel to indicate the concentration of UO2(2+). Without UO2(2+), the enzyme strand is not active. The presence of UO2(2+) in the sample activates the enzyme strand and triggers the cleavage of the substrate strand from the enzyme strand, thereby decreasing the density of crosslinkers and destabilizing the hydrogel, which then releases the encapsulated AuNPs. As low as 100nM UO2(2+) was visually detected by the naked eye. The target-responsive hydrogel was also demonstrated to be applicable in natural water spiked with UO2(2+). Furthermore, to avoid the visual errors caused by naked eye observation, a previously developed volumetric bar-chart chip (V-Chip) was used to quantitatively detect UO2(2+) concentrations in water by encapsulating Au-Pt nanoparticles in the hydrogel. The UO2(2+) concentrations were visually quantified from the travelling distance of ink-bar on the V-Chip. The method can be used for portable and quantitative detection of uranium in field applications without skilled operators and sophisticated instruments.

  9. [Quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) studies of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) on diverse gas chromatographic stationary phases on a set of novel molecular distance edge vector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z H; Liu, S S; Li, Z L

    2001-03-01

    By taking phenyl as a pseudo atom, there are three types of atom in the polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDF) molecule, being chlorine atom, oxygen atom and pseudo atom. The chemical structure of PCDF congeners is depicted by a novel molecular distance-edge vector(VMDE, mu in short), developed in our laboratory, which consists of the modified VMDE parameters based on the identical group as a pseudo atom instead of a traditional atom. Furthermore quantitative structure-retention relationships (QSRR) between the new mu vector and gas chromatographic (GC) retention behavior of PCDFs are generated by multiple linear regression method for various stationary phases. Four models, each of which is constructed by using all sample sets, with high correlation coefficient, r > 0.98, are developed for three columns (DB-5, SE-54, OV-101). In order to test the equation stability and prediction ability of each model, it is essential to perform a cross validation (CV) procedure. Satisfactory CV results have been obtained by using one external predicted sample every time with high correlation coefficients, r > 0.97. These results show that the new mu vector has high structural selectivity and good property relativity, and it is easy to calculate the mu vector. And the QSRR models have high relative coefficients, good stability and good predictability.

  10. Quantitative Verification of Dynamic Wedge Dose Distribution Using a 2D Ionization Chamber Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahnoun, Tarek; Farhat, Leila; Mtibaa, Anis; Besbes, Mounir; Daoud, Jamel

    2015-10-01

    The accuracy of two calculation algorithms of the Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system (TPS)--the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and pencil-beam convolution (PBC)--in modeling the enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) was investigated. Measurements were carried out for 6 and 18 MV photon beams using a 2D ionization chamber array. Accuracy of the TPS was evaluated using a gamma index analysis with the following acceptance criteria for dose differences (DD) and distance to agreement (DTA): 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm. The TPS models the dose distribution accurately except for 20×20 cm(2) field size, 60 (°) and 45 (°) wedge angles using PBC at 6 MV photon energy. For these latter fields, the pass rate and the mean value of gamma were less than 90% and more than 0.5, respectively at the (3%/3 mm) acceptance criteria. In addition, an accuracy level of (2%/2 mm) was achieved using AAA with better agreement for 18 MV photon energy.

  11. Estimating distributions out of qualitative and (semi)quantitative microbiological contamination data for use in risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busschaert, P; Geeraerd, A H; Uyttendaele, M; Van Impe, J F

    2010-04-15

    A framework using maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) is used to fit a probability distribution to a set of qualitative (e.g., absence in 25 g), semi-quantitative (e.g., presence in 25 g and absence in 1g) and/or quantitative test results (e.g., 10 CFU/g). Uncertainty about the parameters of the variability distribution is characterized through a non-parametric bootstrapping method. The resulting distribution function can be used as an input for a second order Monte Carlo simulation in quantitative risk assessment. As an illustration, the method is applied to two sets of in silico generated data. It is demonstrated that correct interpretation of data results in an accurate representation of the contamination level distribution. Subsequently, two case studies are analyzed, namely (i) quantitative analyses of Campylobacter spp. in food samples with nondetects, and (ii) combined quantitative, qualitative, semiquantitative analyses and nondetects of Listeria monocytogenes in smoked fish samples. The first of these case studies is also used to illustrate what the influence is of the limit of quantification, measurement error, and the number of samples included in the data set. Application of these techniques offers a way for meta-analysis of the many relevant yet diverse data sets that are available in literature and (inter)national reports of surveillance or baseline surveys, therefore increases the information input of a risk assessment and, by consequence, the correctness of the outcome of the risk assessment.

  12. A robust multiple-locus method for quantitative trait locus analysis of non-normally distributed multiple traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Möttönen, J; Sillanpää, M J

    2015-12-01

    Linear regression-based quantitative trait loci/association mapping methods such as least squares commonly assume normality of residuals. In genetics studies of plants or animals, some quantitative traits may not follow normal distribution because the data include outlying observations or data that are collected from multiple sources, and in such cases the normal regression methods may lose some statistical power to detect quantitative trait loci. In this work, we propose a robust multiple-locus regression approach for analyzing multiple quantitative traits without normality assumption. In our method, the objective function is least absolute deviation (LAD), which corresponds to the assumption of multivariate Laplace distributed residual errors. This distribution has heavier tails than the normal distribution. In addition, we adopt a group LASSO penalty to produce shrinkage estimation of the marker effects and to describe the genetic correlation among phenotypes. Our LAD-LASSO approach is less sensitive to the outliers and is more appropriate for the analysis of data with skewedly distributed phenotypes. Another application of our robust approach is on missing phenotype problem in multiple-trait analysis, where the missing phenotype items can simply be filled with some extreme values, and be treated as outliers. The efficiency of the LAD-LASSO approach is illustrated on both simulated and real data sets.

  13. Sensitivity of quantitative groundwater recharge estimates to volumetric and distribution uncertainty in rainfall forcing products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Micha; Westerhoff, Rogier; Moore, Catherine

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative estimates of recharge due to precipitation excess are an important input to determining sustainable abstraction of groundwater resources, as well providing one of the boundary conditions required for numerical groundwater modelling. Simple water balance models are widely applied for calculating recharge. In these models, precipitation is partitioned between different processes and stores; including surface runoff and infiltration, storage in the unsaturated zone, evaporation, capillary processes, and recharge to groundwater. Clearly the estimation of recharge amounts will depend on the estimation of precipitation volumes, which may vary, depending on the source of precipitation data used. However, the partitioning between the different processes is in many cases governed by (variable) intensity thresholds. This means that the estimates of recharge will not only be sensitive to input parameters such as soil type, texture, land use, potential evaporation; but mainly to the precipitation volume and intensity distribution. In this paper we explore the sensitivity of recharge estimates due to difference in precipitation volumes and intensity distribution in the rainfall forcing over the Canterbury region in New Zealand. We compare recharge rates and volumes using a simple water balance model that is forced using rainfall and evaporation data from; the NIWA Virtual Climate Station Network (VCSN) data (which is considered as the reference dataset); the ERA-Interim/WATCH dataset at 0.25 degrees and 0.5 degrees resolution; the TRMM-3B42 dataset; the CHIRPS dataset; and the recently releases MSWEP dataset. Recharge rates are calculated at a daily time step over the 14 year period from the 2000 to 2013 for the full Canterbury region, as well as at eight selected points distributed over the region. Lysimeter data with observed estimates of recharge are available at four of these points, as well as recharge estimates from the NGRM model, an independent model

  14. A QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF THE WATER DISTRIBUTION IN A SOIL SAMPLE USING NEUTRON IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Šácha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical method by Kang et al. recently proposed for correcting two-dimensional neutron radiography for water quantification in soil. The method was tested on data from neutron imaging of the water infiltration in a soil sample. The raw data were affected by neutron scattering and by beam hardening artefacts. Two strategies for identifying the correction parameters are proposed in this paper. The method has been further developed for the case of three-dimensional neutron tomography. In a related experiment, neutron imaging is used to record ponded-infiltration experiments in two artificial soil samples. Radiograms, i.e., two-dimensional projections of the sample, were acquired during infiltration. A calculation was made of the amount of water and its distribution within the radiograms, in the form of two-dimensional water thickness maps. Tomograms were reconstructed from the corrected and uncorrected water thickness maps to obtain the 3D spatial distribution of the water content within the sample. Without the correction, the beam hardening and the scattering effects overestimated the water content values close to the perimeter of the sample, and at the same time underestimated the values close to the centre of the sample. The total water content of the entire sample was the same in both cases. The empirical correction method presented in this study is a relatively accurate, rapid and simple way to obtain the quantitatively determined water content from two-dimensional and three-dimensional neutron images. However, an independent method for measuring the total water volume in the sample is needed in order to identify the correction parameters.

  15. An Ensemble Generator for Quantitative Precipitation Estimation Based on Censored Shifted Gamma Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D.; Kirschbaum, D.; Yatheendradas, S.

    2016-12-01

    The considerable uncertainties associated with quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE), whether from satellite platforms, ground-based weather radar, or numerical weather models, suggest that such QPE should be expressed as distributions or ensembles of possible values, rather than as single values. In this research, we borrow a framework from the weather forecast verification community, to "correct" satellite precipitation and generate ensemble QPE. This approach is based on the censored shifted gamma distribution (CSGD). The probability of precipitation, central tendency (i.e. mean), and the uncertainty can be captured by the three parameters of the CSGD. The CSGD can then be applied for simulation of rainfall ensembles using a flexible nonlinear regression framework, whereby the CSGD parameters can be conditioned on one or more reference rainfall datasets and on other time-varying covariates such as modeled or measured estimates of precipitable water and relative humidity. We present the framework and initial results by generating precipitation ensembles based on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) dataset, using both NLDAS and PERSIANN-CDR precipitation datasets as references. We also incorporate a number of covariates from MERRA2 reanalysis including model-estimated precipitation, precipitable water, relative humidity, and lifting condensation level. We explore the prospects for applying the framework and other ensemble error models globally, including in regions where high-quality "ground truth" rainfall estimates are lacking. We compare the ensemble outputs against those of an independent rain gage-based ensemble rainfall dataset. "Pooling" of regional rainfall observations is explored as one option for improving ensemble estimates of rainfall extremes. The approach has potential applications in near-realtime, retrospective, and scenario modeling of rainfall-driven hazards such as floods and landslides

  16. Quantitative distribution of monoamine oxidase A in brainstem monoamine nuclei is normal in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, G A; Farley, J T; Dilley, G E; Overholser, J C; Meltzer, H Y; Balraj, E K; Stockmeier, C A; Klimek, V

    1999-11-13

    An abnormal expression of noradrenergic proteins (e.g., tyrosine hydroxylase, norepinephrine transporters) in the locus coeruleus has recently been demonstrated in subjects with major depression and/or victims of suicide. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) is a key enzyme in the catabolism of biogenic amines and is expressed in brain noradrenergic neurons. In this study, the binding of [3H]Ro41-1049 to MAO-A was measured by quantitative autoradiography at multiple levels along the rostral-caudal axis of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus from subjects with major depression and age- and postmortem interval-matched control subjects who were psychiatrically normal. [3H]Ro41-1049 binding to MAO-A was unevenly distributed along the axis of the locus coeruleus, paralleling an uneven number of neuromelanin-containing (noradrenergic) neurons throughout the nucleus. Accordingly, there was a significant correlation between the number of neuromelanin-containing neurons per section and the specific binding of [3H]Ro41-1049 at any particular level of the locus coeruleus in control subjects (r(2)=0.25; pdepression (r(2)=0.14; pdepression to psychiatrically normal control subjects. These findings demonstrate that the pathophysiology of major depression is not likely to involve abnormalities in MAO-A.

  17. Adaptive differentiation of quantitative traits in the globally distributed weed, wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahli, Heather F; Conner, Jeffrey K; Shaw, Frank H; Howe, Stephen; Lale, Allison

    2008-10-01

    Weedy species with wide geographical distributions may face strong selection to adapt to new environments, which can lead to adaptive genetic differentiation among populations. However, genetic drift, particularly due to founder effects, will also commonly result in differentiation in colonizing species. To test whether selection has contributed to trait divergence, we compared differentiation at eight microsatellite loci (measured as F(ST)) to differentiation of quantitative floral and phenological traits (measured as Q(ST)) of wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) across populations from three continents. We sampled eight populations: seven naturalized populations and one from its native range. By comparing estimates of Q(ST) and F(ST), we found that petal size was the only floral trait that may have diverged more than expected due to drift alone, but inflorescence height, flowering time, and rosette formation have greatly diverged between the native and nonnative populations. Our results suggest the loss of a rosette and the evolution of early flowering time may have been the key adaptations enabling wild radish to become a major agricultural weed. Floral adaptation to different pollinators does not seem to have been as necessary for the success of wild radish in new environments.

  18. Genomic Distribution of Quantitative Trait Loci for Yield and Yield-related Traits in Common Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Yi Zhang; Dong-Cheng Liu; Xiao-Li Guo; Wen-Long Yang; Jia-Zhu Sun; Dao-Wen Wang; Aimin Zhang

    2010-01-01

    A major objective of quantitative trait locus(QTL)studies is to find genes/markers that can be used in breeding programs via marker assisted selection(MAS).We surveyed the QTLs for yield and yield related traits and their genomic distributions in common wheat(Triticum aestivum L.)in the available published reports.We then carried out a meta-QTL(MQTL)analysis to identify the major and consistent QTLs for these traits.In total,55 MQTLs were identified,of which 12 significant MQTLs were located on wheat chromosomes 1A,1B,2A,2D,3B,4A,4B,4D and 5A.Our study showed that the genetic control of yield and its components in common wheat involved the important genes such as Rht and Vrn.Furthermore,several significant MQTLs were found in the chromosomal regions corresponding to several rice genomic locations containing important QTLs for yield related traits.Our results demonstrate that meta-QTL analysis is a powerful tool for confirming the major and stable QTLs and refining their chromosomal positions in common wheat,which may be useful for improving the MAS efficiency of yield related traits.

  19. Quantitative analysis of organelle distribution and dynamics in Physcomitrella patens protonemal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furt Fabienne

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last decade, the moss Physcomitrella patens has emerged as a powerful plant model system, amenable for genetic manipulations not possible in any other plant. This moss is particularly well suited for plant polarized cell growth studies, as in its protonemal phase, expansion is restricted to the tip of its cells. Based on pollen tube and root hair studies, it is well known that tip growth requires active secretion and high polarization of the cellular components. However, such information is still missing in Physcomitrella patens. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the participation of organelle organization in tip growth, it is essential to determine the distribution and the dynamics of the organelles in moss cells. Results We used fluorescent protein fusions to visualize and track Golgi dictyosomes, mitochondria, and peroxisomes in live protonemal cells. We also visualized and tracked chloroplasts based on chlorophyll auto-fluorescence. We showed that in protonemata all four organelles are distributed in a gradient from the tip of the apical cell to the base of the sub-apical cell. For example, the density of Golgi dictyosomes is 4.7 and 3.4 times higher at the tip than at the base in caulonemata and chloronemata respectively. While Golgi stacks are concentrated at the extreme tip of the caulonemata, chloroplasts and peroxisomes are totally excluded. Interestingly, caulonemata, which grow faster than chloronemata, also contain significantly more Golgi dictyosomes and fewer chloroplasts than chloronemata. Moreover, the motility analysis revealed that organelles in protonemata move with low persistency and average instantaneous speeds ranging from 29 to 75 nm/s, which are at least three orders of magnitude slower than those of pollen tube or root hair organelles. Conclusions To our knowledge, this study reports the first quantitative analysis of organelles in Physcomitrella patens and will make possible

  20. Quantitative distribution of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in citrus plants with citrus huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbin; Levy, Laurene; Hartung, John S

    2009-02-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB), or greening disease, is strongly associated with any of three nonculturable gram-negative bacteria belonging to 'Candidatus Liberibacter spp.' 'Ca. Liberibacter spp.' are transmitted by citrus psyllids to all commercial cultivars of citrus. The diseases can be lethal to citrus and have recently become widespread in both São Paulo, Brazil, and Florida, United States, the locations of the largest citrus industries in the world. Asiatic HLB, the form of the disease found in Florida, is associated with 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' and is the subject of this report. The nonculturable nature of the pathogen has hampered research and little is known about the distribution of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in infected trees. In this study, we have used a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay to systematically quantify the distribution of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genomes in tissues of six species of citrus either identified in the field during survey efforts in Florida or propagated in a greenhouse in Beltsville, MD. The populations of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' inferred from the distribution of 16S rDNA sequences specific for 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in leaf midribs, leaf blades, and bark samples varied by a factor of 1,000 among samples prepared from the six citrus species tested and by a factor of 100 between two sweet orange trees tested. In naturally infected trees, above-ground portions of the tree averaged 10(10) 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genomes per gram of tissue. Similar levels of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genomes were observed in some but not all root samples from the same plants. In samples taken from greenhouse-inoculated trees, levels of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genomes varied systematically from 10(4) genomes/g at the graft inoculation site to 10(10) genomes/g in some leaf petioles. Root samples from these trees also contained 'Ca. L. asiaticus' at 10(7) genomes/g. In symptomatic fruit tissues, 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genomes were also readily detected and quantified. The highest

  1. Pareto分布的Pearson-χ2距离%The Study of Pearson-χ2 Distance for Gamma Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季海波

    2016-01-01

    The Pareto distribution Pa(θ,a) is studied, and the expression of Pearson-χ2 distance between two Pareto distributions was given.For two different parameters, it sets the Pearson-χ2 maximum distance between two Pareto distributions.Moreover, with the same parameter a , it was also discussed..%对Pareto分布Pa(θ,a)进行研究,给出两个Pareto分布之间的Pearson-χ2距离的表达式。在两个参数都不同的情况下,得到了两个Pareto分布之间Pearson-χ2的最大距离。此外,在尺度参数a相同情况下,讨论了两个Pareto分布间的最大距离。

  2. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börries, S.; Metz, O.; Pranzas, P. K.; Bücherl, T.; Söllradl, S.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A.

    2015-10-01

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail.

  3. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Börries, S., E-mail: stefan.boerries@hzg.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Metz, O.; Pranzas, P.K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Bücherl, T. [ZTWB Radiochemie München (RCM), Technische Universität München (TUM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Söllradl, S. [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRMII), Technische Universität München (TUM), Lichtenbergstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2015-10-11

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail.

  4. Quantitative multi-scale analysis of mineral distributions and fractal pore structures for a heterogeneous Junger Basin shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. D.; Liu, K. Y.; Yang, Y. S.; Ren, Y. Q.; Hu, T.; Deng, B.; Xiao, T. Q.

    2016-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) characterization of shales has recently attracted wide attentions in relation to the growing importance of shale oil and gas. Obtaining a complete 3D compositional distribution of shale has proven to be challenging due to its multi-scale characteristics. A combined multi-energy X-ray micro-CT technique and data-constrained modelling (DCM) approach has been used to quantitatively investigate the multi-scale mineral and porosity distributions of a heterogeneous shale from the Junger Basin, northwestern China by sub-sampling. The 3D sub-resolution structures of minerals and pores in the samples are quantitatively obtained as the partial volume fraction distributions, with colours representing compositions. The shale sub-samples from two areas have different physical structures for minerals and pores, with the dominant minerals being feldspar and dolomite, respectively. Significant heterogeneities have been observed in the analysis. The sub-voxel sized pores form large interconnected clusters with fractal structures. The fractal dimensions of the largest clusters for both sub-samples were quantitatively calculated and found to be 2.34 and 2.86, respectively. The results are relevant in quantitative modelling of gas transport in shale reservoirs.

  5. Isolation by language and distance in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrai, I; Rodriguez-Larralde, A; Manni, F; Ruggiero, V; Tartari, D; Scapoli, C

    2004-01-01

    The isonymy structure of trilingual Belgium was studied using the surname distributions for 1,118,004 private telephone users. The users were distributed in 77 Flemish, 76 French, and 3 German speaking towns, selected on a geographic basis to form an approximately regular grid over Belgium. Lasker's distance was found to be considerably higher between languages than within languages. For the whole of Belgium, irrespective of language, it was highly correlated with linear geographic distance, with r = 0.721+/-0.014, which is the highest correlation observed in European countries to date. Within Belgium and within languages, the correlation was highest among the Flemish (r = 0.878 +/- 0.007), and lowest among the French (r = 0.631+/-0.020). Isolation by distance in Belgium is the highest we have found in Europe, and as high as in Switzerland where the different languages are separated by geographical barriers. This is not the case in Belgium, so that the considerable isolating power of languages emerges clearly from the present analysis. From the comparison of Lasker's distance between (9.48) and within (8.16) languages, and from its regression over geographic distance (b = 0.01206), it was possible to establish a quantitative relationship between the isolating power of languages and that of geographic distance as (9.48-8.16)/0.01206 = 109 kilometres. This transformation of language distance into an equivalent geographic distance, given here for Belgium, can be applied to any similar geo-linguistic situation.

  6. DISTANCE ESTIMATION TO THE INTERPHASE-FAULT LOCATION IN THE DISTRIBUTIVE AIR-LINE GRIDS BASED ON ANALYSIS OF THE HARMONIC COMPONENT PARAMETERS OF THE OPERATING EMERGENCY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Kalentionok

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most techniques of the fault location based on the one-side measurement of the emergency mode characteristics use the short-circuit steady-regime parameters in the fundamental mode frequency. This approach compels to seek additional devices for tuning out the loadings of transformer-substations. Besides, it is susceptible to the nonlinearity effect of closed-circuit arc in the fault location which significantly reduces the accuracy of the remote location of the failure.For estimating the distance to the location of interphase failure on the aerial distributive transmission lines the article proposes a new technique employing the harmonic components of the operating emergency parameters. The algorithm of the present method realization includes: taking down oscillograms of the emergency-mode parameter values (e. g. in doublephase failure – the short-circuit current, the linear voltage between the faulty phases with necessary discretization interval; expansion of the operating emergency parameters in a Fourier series (realized with a quick Fourier expansion algorithm; estimating the distance to the fault location by the analytical expression; performing the statistical analysis of a row of distance values and finding the most probable distance to the fault location.For effectiveness investigation of the proposed method of trapping harmonic components the paper considers a 10 kV distributive electrical grid feeding nine transformer substations. The authors performed calculation of normal and emergency modes utilizing computer program MatLab in dynamic simulating environment Simulink. The arc is represented by a block describing the linearized dynamic volt-ampere characteristic of the arc. The built characteristic curves demonstrate dependence of the fault-location distance value from the frequency at which this value is obtained and the number if its reiterations. Based on the calculations, the authors establish that the accuracy of the distance

  7. Distance learning for similarity estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, J.; Amores, J.; Sebe, N.; Radeva, P.; Tian, Q.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a general guideline to find a better distance measure for similarity estimation based on statistical analysis of distribution models and distance functions. A new set of distance measures are derived from the harmonic distance, the geometric distance, and their generalized

  8. 一种新的恒星光谱间距离度量方法:残差分布距离%A New Distance Metric between Different Stellar Spectra:the Residual Distribution Distance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘杰; 潘景昌; 罗阿理; 韦鹏; 刘猛

    2015-01-01

    of large-scale stellar spectral sky surveys ,how to define more efficient distance metric on stellar spectra has become a very important issue in the spectral data processing .Based on this problem and fully considering of the characteristics and data features of the stellar spec-tra ,a new distance measurement method of stellar spectra named Residual Distribution Distance is proposed .While using this method to measure the distance ,the two spectra are firstly scaled and then the standard deviation of the residual is used the dis-tance .Different from the traditional distance metric calculation methods of stellar spectra ,when used to calculate the distance between stellar spectra ,this method normalize the two spectra to the same scale ,and then calculate the residual corresponding to the same wavelength ,and the standard error of the residual spectrum is used as the distance measure .The distance measurement method can be used for stellar classification ,clustering and stellar atmospheric physical parameters measurement and so on .This paper takes stellar subcategory classification as an example to test the distance measure method .The results show that the dis-tance defined by the proposed method is more effective to describe the gap between different types of spectra in the classification than other methods ,which can be well applied in other related applications .At the same time ,this paper also studies the effect of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) on the performance of the proposed method .The result show that the distance is affected by the SNR .The smaller the signal-to-noise ratio is ,the greater impact is on the distance ;While SNR is larger than 10 ,the signal-to-noise ratio has little effect on the performance for the classification .

  9. Interface Simulation Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Černý

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical (boolean notion of refinement for behavioral interfaces of system components is the alternating refinement preorder. In this paper, we define a distance for interfaces, called interface simulation distance. It makes the alternating refinement preorder quantitative by, intuitively, tolerating errors (while counting them in the alternating simulation game. We show that the interface simulation distance satisfies the triangle inequality, that the distance between two interfaces does not increase under parallel composition with a third interface, and that the distance between two interfaces can be bounded from above and below by distances between abstractions of the two interfaces. We illustrate the framework, and the properties of the distances under composition of interfaces, with two case studies.

  10. Recognizing the fingerprints of the Galactic bar: a quantitative approach to comparing model (l,v) distributions to observation

    CERN Document Server

    Sormani, Mattia C

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method for fitting simple hydrodynamical models to the (l,v) distribution of atomic and molecular gas observed in the Milky Way. The method works by matching features found in models and observations. It is based on the assumption that the large-scale features seen in (l,v) plots, such as ridgelines and the terminal velocity curve, are influenced primarily by the underlying large-scale Galactic potential and are only weakly dependent on local ISM heating and cooling processes. In our scheme one first identifies by hand the features in the observations: this only has to be done once. We describe a procedure for automatically extracting similar features from simple hydrodynamical models and quantifying the "distance" between each model's features and the observations. Application to models of the Galactic Bar region (|l|<30deg) shows that our feature-fitting method performs better than \\chi^2 or envelope distances at identifying the correct underlying galaxy model.

  11. Overcoming artificial broadening in Gd(3+)-Gd(3+) distance distributions arising from dipolar pseudo-secular terms in DEER experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marie Ramirez; Frydman, Veronica; Milko, Petr; Iron, Mark A; Abdelkader, Elwy H; Lee, Michael D; Swarbrick, James D; Raitsimring, Arnold; Otting, Gottfried; Graham, Bim; Feintuch, Akiva; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2016-05-14

    By providing accurate distance measurements between spin labels site-specifically attached to bio-macromolecules, double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy provides a unique tool to probe the structural and conformational changes in these molecules. Gd(3+)-tags present an important family of spin-labels for such purposes, as they feature high chemical stability and high sensitivity in high-field DEER measurements. The high sensitivity of the Gd(3+) ion is associated with its high spin (S = 7/2) and small zero field splitting (ZFS), resulting in a narrow spectral width of its central transition at high fields. However, under the conditions of short distances and exceptionally small ZFS, the weak coupling approximation, which is essential for straightforward DEER data analysis, becomes invalid and the pseudo-secular terms of the dipolar Hamiltonian can no longer be ignored. This work further explores the effects of pseudo-secular terms on Gd(3+)-Gd(3+) DEER measurements using a specifically designed ruler molecule; a rigid bis-Gd(3+)-DOTA model compound with an expected Gd(3+)-Gd(3+) distance of 2.35 nm and a very narrow central transition at the W-band (95 GHz). We show that the DEER dipolar modulations are damped under the standard W-band DEER measurement conditions with a frequency separation, Δν, of 100 MHz between the pump and observe pulses. Consequently, the DEER spectrum deviates considerably from the expected Pake pattern. We show that the Pake pattern and the associated dipolar modulations can be restored with the aid of a dual mode cavity by increasing Δν from 100 MHz to 1.09 GHz, allowing for a straightforward measurement of a Gd(3+)-Gd(3+) distance of 2.35 nm. The increase in Δν increases the contribution of the |-5/2〉→|-3/2〉 and |-7/2〉→|-5/2〉 transitions to the signal at the expense of the |-3/2 〉→|-1/2〉 transition, thus minimizing the effect of dipolar pseudo-secular terms and restoring the validity of the weak

  12. The Q-CHAT (Quantitative CHecklist for Autism in Toddlers): a normally distributed quantitative measure of autistic traits at 18-24 months of age: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Carrie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Wheelwright, Sally; Charman, Tony; Richler, Jennifer; Pasco, Greg; Brayne, Carol

    2008-09-01

    We report a major revision of the CHecklist for Autism in Toddlers (CHAT). This quantitative CHAT (Q-CHAT) contains 25 items, scored on a 5 point scale (0-4). The Q-CHAT was completed by parents of n = 779 unselected toddlers (mean age 21 months) and n = 160 toddlers and preschoolers (mean age 44 months) with an Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC). The ASC group (mean (SD) = 51.8 (14.3)) scored higher on the Q-CHAT than controls (26.7 (7.8)). Boys in the control group (27.5 (7.8)) scored higher than girls (25.8 (7.7)). The intraclass correlation for test-retest reliability was 0.82 (n = 330). The distribution in the control group was close to normal. Full examination of the clinical validity of the Q-CHAT and test properties is underway.

  13. Hierarchical structure of genetic distances: Effects of matrix size, spatial distribution and correlation structure among gene frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Melo Rodrigues

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Geographic structure of genetic distances among local populations within species, based on allozyme data, has usually been evaluated by estimating genetic distances clustered with hierarchical algorithms, such as the unweighted pair-group method by arithmetic averages (UPGMA. The distortion produced in the clustering process is estimated by the cophenetic correlation coefficient. This hierarchical approach, however, can fail to produce an accurate representation of genetic distances among populations in a low dimensional space, especially when continuous (clinal or reticulate patterns of variation exist. In the present study, we analyzed 50 genetic distance matrices from the literature, for animal taxa ranging from Platyhelminthes to Mammalia, in order to determine in which situations the UPGMA is useful to understand patterns of genetic variation among populations. The cophenetic correlation coefficients, derived from UPGMA based on three types of genetic distance coefficients, were correlated with other parameters of each matrix, including number of populations, loci, alleles, maximum geographic distance among populations, relative magnitude of the first eigenvalue of covariance matrix among alleles and logarithm of body size. Most cophenetic correlations were higher than 0.80, and the highest values appeared for Nei's and Rogers' genetic distances. The relationship between cophenetic correlation coefficients and the other parameters analyzed was defined by an "envelope space", forming triangles in which higher values of cophenetic correlations are found for higher values in the parameters, though low values do not necessarily correspond to high cophenetic correlations. We concluded that UPGMA is useful to describe genetic distances based on large distance matrices (both in terms of elevated number of populations or alleles, when dimensionality of the system is low (matrices with large first eigenvalues or when local populations are separated

  14. A finite element analysis of the effect of electrode area and inter-electrode distance on the spatial distribution of the current density in tDCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Paula; Hallett, Mark; Miranda, Pedro Cavaleiro

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the effect of electrode area and inter-electrode distance on the spatial distribution of the current density in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). For this purpose, we used the finite element method to compute the distribution of the current density in a four-layered spherical head model using various electrode montages, corresponding to a range of electrode sizes and inter-electrode distances. We found that smaller electrodes required slightly less current to achieve a constant value of the current density at a reference point on the brain surface located directly under the electrode center. Under these conditions, smaller electrodes also produced a more focal current density distribution in the brain, i.e. the magnitude of the current density fell more rapidly with distance from the reference point. The combination of two electrodes with different areas produced an asymmetric current distribution that could lead to more effective and localized neural modulation under the smaller electrode than under the larger one. Focality improved rapidly with decreasing electrode size when the larger electrode sizes were considered but the improvement was less marked for the smaller electrode sizes. Also, focality was not affected significantly by inter-electrode distance unless two large electrodes were placed close together. Increasing the inter-electrode distance resulted in decreased shunting of the current through the scalp and the cerebrospinal fluid, and decreasing electrode area resulted in increased current density on the scalp under the edges of the electrode. Our calculations suggest that when working with conventional electrodes (25-35 cm(2)), one of the electrodes should be placed just 'behind' the target relative to the other electrode, for maximum current density on the target. Also electrodes with areas in the range 3.5-12 cm(2) may provide a better compromise between focality and current density in the scalp than the traditional

  15. Numerical distance protection

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Distance protection provides the basis for network protection in transmission systems and meshed distribution systems. This book covers the fundamentals of distance protection and the special features of numerical technology. The emphasis is placed on the application of numerical distance relays in distribution and transmission systems.This book is aimed at students and engineers who wish to familiarise themselves with the subject of power system protection, as well as the experienced user, entering the area of numerical distance protection. Furthermore it serves as a reference guide for s

  16. Whole body autoradiographic and quantitative tissue distribution studies with /sup 14/C-cefotaxime in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, L.A.; Ings, R.M.J.; Fromson, J.M.; Coombes, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The absorption, distribution and elimination of radioactivity following intravenous (i.v.) or intramuscular (i.m.) administration of /sup 14/C-cefotaxime (/sup 14/C-HR 756) to the rat has been examined by qualitative and quantitative techniques. After i.v. and i.m. doses to male albino animals radioactivity was extensively distributed throughout the body and rapidly eliminated with a predominant half-life of approximately 30 to 40 min. Maximum plasma levels for the i.m. dose were reached within 20 min and approximately 85% of the dose was recovered from the urine (74%) and faeces (11%) within 8 h after dosing. In all quantitative studies 100+-5% of the dose was recovered within 24 h. Whole body autoradiography studies showed good distribution of radioactivity from the blood into the tissues including lung, liver, kidney, heart, bone marrow and the gastrointestinal tract. Lowest levels were seen in the eye and brain. There was limited placental transfer of radioactivity in 14-days pregnant animals although by day 18 of the gestation period radioactivity was detected in the foetus but distribution into individual organs and tissues could not be seen. There was no evidence to show that retention of radioactivity in pigmented tissues had occurred nor was there any suggestion of accumulation of radioactivity in any organ or tissues as a consequence of multiple dosing /sup 14/C-cefotaxime.

  17. The spatial distribution of otosclerosis: a quantitative study using design-based stereology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sune Land; Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten

    2010-01-01

    This study documents that otosclerotic bone remodeling is distributed centripetally around the inner ear space whereas normal bone remodeling is distributed centrifugally. We suggest that this inverse relation reflects the unique osteo-dynamic setting of the otic capsule: since perilabyrinthine b...

  18. Association Between Geographic Access to Cancer Care, Insurance, and Receipt of Chemotherapy: Geographic Distribution of Oncologists and Travel Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun Chieh; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Kirkwood, M Kelsey; Olsen, Christine; Jemal, Ahmedin; Bajorin, Dean; Giordano, Sharon H; Goldstein, Michael; Guadagnolo, B Ashleigh; Kosty, Michael; Hopkins, Shane; Yu, James B; Arnone, Anna; Hanley, Amy; Stevens, Stephanie; Hershman, Dawn L

    2015-10-01

    Geographic access to care may be associated with receipt of chemotherapy but has not been fully examined. This study sought to evaluate the association between density of oncologists and travel distance and receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer within 90 days of colectomy. Patients in the National Cancer Data Base with stage III colon cancer, diagnosed between 2007 and 2010, and age 18 to 80 years were selected. Generalized estimating equation clustering by hospital service area was conducted to examine the association between geographic access and receipt of oncology services, controlling for patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Of 34,694 patients in the study cohort, 75.7% received adjuvant chemotherapy within 90 days of colectomy. Compared with travel distance less than 12.5 miles, patients who traveled 50 to 249 miles (odds ratio [OR], 0.87; P=.009) or ≥250 miles (OR, 0.36; P<.001) had decreased likelihood of receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. Density level of oncologists was not statistically associated with receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy (low v high density: OR, 0.98; P=.77). When stratifying analyses by insurance status, non-privately insured patients who resided in areas with low density of oncologists were less likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy (OR, 0.85; P=.03). Increased travel burden was associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving adjuvant chemotherapy, regardless of insurance status. Patients with nonprivate insurance who resided in low-density oncologist areas were less likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. If these findings are validated prospectively, interventions to decrease geographic barriers may improve the timeliness and quality of colon cancer treatment. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Quantitative bioluminescence imaging--a method for the detection of metabolite distributions in frozen tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Walenta, Stefan; Schwickert, Georg

    1994-02-01

    A novel technique allows for measurement of metabolite distributions in tissue cryosections at a microscopic level using bioluminescence, single photon imaging, and computerized image analysis. Metabolites, such as ATP, glucose and lactate are registered in absolute concentration units, and the respective images can be correlated with each other and with histological structures by specific algorithms. One striking difference between malignant tumors and normal tissue is the pronounced heterogeneity of metabolite distributions in malignancies contrasted by rather homogeneous patterns obtained in many normal organs. The heterogeneous distribution of metabolites in solid tumors reflects the chaotic organization of the histological architecture and of the microvascular supply in cancerous tissue. Pixel-to-pixel comparison of metabolite distributions measured in cervix cancers of patients revealed a negative linear correlation between glucose and ATP concentrations at identical locations. In contrast, local lactate concentration was positively correlated with ATP.

  20. A quantitative analysis of fine scale distribution of intertidal meiofauna in response to food resources

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A.; Gauns, M.

    Fine scale vertical and spatial distribution of meiofauna in relation to food abundance was studied in the intertidal sediment at Dias Beach. The major abiotic factors showed significant changes and progressive fine scale decrease in vertical...

  1. Quantitative comparison of PET and Bremsstrahlung SPECT for imaging the in vivo yttrium-90 microsphere distribution after liver radioembolization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattijs Elschot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: After yttrium-90 ((90Y microsphere radioembolization (RE, evaluation of extrahepatic activity and liver dosimetry is typically performed on (90Y Bremsstrahlung SPECT images. Since these images demonstrate a low quantitative accuracy, (90Y PET has been suggested as an alternative. The aim of this study is to quantitatively compare SPECT and state-of-the-art PET on the ability to detect small accumulations of (90Y and on the accuracy of liver dosimetry. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SPECT/CT and PET/CT phantom data were acquired using several acquisition and reconstruction protocols, including resolution recovery and Time-Of-Flight (TOF PET. Image contrast and noise were compared using a torso-shaped phantom containing six hot spheres of various sizes. The ability to detect extra- and intrahepatic accumulations of activity was tested by quantitative evaluation of the visibility and unique detectability of the phantom hot spheres. Image-based dose estimates of the phantom were compared to the true dose. For clinical illustration, the SPECT and PET-based estimated liver dose distributions of five RE patients were compared. At equal noise level, PET showed higher contrast recovery coefficients than SPECT. The highest contrast recovery coefficients were obtained with TOF PET reconstruction including resolution recovery. All six spheres were consistently visible on SPECT and PET images, but PET was able to uniquely detect smaller spheres than SPECT. TOF PET-based estimates of the dose in the phantom spheres were more accurate than SPECT-based dose estimates, with underestimations ranging from 45% (10-mm sphere to 11% (37-mm sphere for PET, and 75% to 58% for SPECT, respectively. The differences between TOF PET and SPECT dose-estimates were supported by the patient data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study we quantitatively demonstrated that the image quality of state-of-the-art PET is superior over Bremsstrahlung SPECT for the

  2. [Quantitative calculation of drugs distribution parameter in the brain extracellular space by using MRI tracer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing-yuan; He, Dong-qi; Han, Hong-bin; Yuan, Lan; Yang, Xiao-hong; Peng, Yun; Ka, Wei-bo; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Hai-long; Li, Ke-jia; Xu, Feng; Tian, Jin; Liu, Xiao-hua; Xue, Xiao-qi

    2013-06-18

    To build a mathematical model to simulate the drug distribution accompanying with diffusion, distribution and clearance in the brain extracellular space (ECS). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology was used to monitor changes in the signal-intensity-related tracer gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acidm(Gd-DTPA), as an external drug which was injected into the rat brain, and then the mathematical model was built by using the data to establish the diffusion, distribution and clearance process of Gd-DTPA in the brain ECS. The model equation was resolved by Laplace transform. In the sphere coordinates, the linear regressive model was adopted to obtain the estimation method of diffusion coefficient, clearance rate of drugs distribution in the brain ECS. The diffusion coefficient D and the clearance rate k were obtained as (2.73±0.364)×10(-4) mm(2)/s and (1.40±0.206)×10(-5) /s, respectively. The proposed method can accurately reflect the isotropic drug distribution in the brain ECS, and can serve as the foundation to further solve problems about the orthotropic distribution in the brain ECS.

  3. Olfaction-based Detection Distance: A Quantitative Analysis of How Far Away Dogs Recognize Tortoise Odor and Follow It to Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindee Valentin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of detector dogs has been demonstrated to be effective and safe for finding Mojave desert tortoises and provides certain advantages over humans in field surveys. Unlike humans who rely on visual cues for target identification, dogs use primarily olfactory cues and can therefore locate targets that are not visually obvious. One of the key benefits of surveying with dogs is their efficiency at covering ground and their ability to detect targets from long distances. Dogs may investigate potential targets using visual cues but confirm the presence of a target based on scent. Everything that emits odor does so via vapor-phase molecules and the components comprising a particular scent are carried primarily though bulk movement of the atmosphere. It is the ability to search for target odor and then go to its source that makes dogs ideal for rapid target recognition in the field setting. Using tortoises as targets, we quantified distances that dogs detected tortoise scent, followed it to source, and correctly identified tortoises as targets. Detection distance data were collected during experimental trials with advanced global positioning system (GPS technology and then analyzed using geographic information system (GIS modeling techniques. Detection distances ranged from 0.5 m to 62.8 m for tortoises on the surface. We did not observe bias with tortoise size, age class, sex or the degree to which tortoises were handled prior to being found by the dogs. The methodology we developed to quantify olfaction-based detection distance using dogs can be applied to other targets that dogs are trained to find.

  4. Distribution of neurons in functional areas of the mouse cerebral cortex reveals quantitatively different cortical zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2013-01-01

    How are neurons distributed along the cortical surface and across functional areas? Here we use the isotropic fractionator (Herculano-Houzel and Lent, 2005) to analyze the distribution of neurons across the entire isocortex of the mouse, divided into 18 functional areas defined anatomically. We find that the number of neurons underneath a surface area (the N/A ratio) varies 4.5-fold across functional areas and neuronal density varies 3.2-fold. The face area of S1 contains the most neurons, followed by motor cortex and the primary visual cortex. Remarkably, while the distribution of neurons across functional areas does not accompany the distribution of surface area, it mirrors closely the distribution of cortical volumes-with the exception of the visual areas, which hold more neurons than expected for their volume. Across the non-visual cortex, the volume of individual functional areas is a shared linear function of their number of neurons, while in the visual areas, neuronal densities are much higher than in all other areas. In contrast, the 18 functional areas cluster into three different zones according to the relationship between the N/A ratio and cortical thickness and neuronal density: these three clusters can be called visual, sensory, and, possibly, associative. These findings are remarkably similar to those in the human cerebral cortex (Ribeiro et al., 2013) and suggest that, like the human cerebral cortex, the mouse cerebral cortex comprises two zones that differ in how neurons form the cortical volume, and three zones that differ in how neurons are distributed underneath the cortical surface, possibly in relation to local differences in connectivity through the white matter. Our results suggest that beyond the developmental divide into visual and non-visual cortex, functional areas initially share a common distribution of neurons along the parenchyma that become delimited into functional areas according to the pattern of connectivity established later.

  5. Survey of quantitative data on the solar energy and its spectra distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of available quantitative data on the total and spectral solar irradiance at ground level and outside the atmosphere. Measurements from research aircraft have resulted in the currently accepted NASA/ASTM standards of the solar constant and zero air mass solar spectral irradiance. The intrinsic variability of solar energy output and programs currently under way for more precise measurements from spacecraft are discussed. Instrumentation for solar measurements and their reference radiation scales are examined. Insolation data available from the records of weather stations are reviewed for their applicability to solar energy conversion. Two alternate methods of solarimetry are briefly discussed.

  6. Helicity Parton Distributions at a Future Electron-Ion Collider: A Quantitative Appraisal

    CERN Document Server

    Aschenauer, Elke C; Stratmann, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We present a quantitative assessment of the impact a future electron-ion collider will have on determinations of helicity quark and gluon densities and their contributions to the proton spin. Our results are obtained by performing a series of global QCD analyses at next-to-leading order accuracy based on realistic sets of pseudo-data for the inclusive and semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons and protons at different, conceivable center-of-mass system energies.

  7. A Markov Chain-based quantitative study of angular distribution of photons through turbid slabs via isotropic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuesong; Northrop, William F.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a quantitative approach to approximate multiple scattering through an isotropic turbid slab based on Markov Chain theorem. There is an increasing need to utilize multiple scattering for optical diagnostic purposes; however, existing methods are either inaccurate or computationally expensive. Here, we develop a novel Markov Chain approximation approach to solve multiple scattering angular distribution (AD) that can accurately calculate AD while significantly reducing computational cost compared to Monte Carlo simulation. We expect this work to stimulate ongoing multiple scattering research and deterministic reconstruction algorithm development with AD measurements.

  8. Binomial distribution-based quantitative measurement of multiple-acceptors fluorescence resonance energy transfer by partially photobleaching acceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Huaina; Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Tongsheng

    2014-06-01

    We report that binomial distribution depending on acceptor photobleaching degree can be used to characterize the proportions of various kinds of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) constructs resulted from partial acceptor photobleaching of multiple-acceptors FRET system. On this basis, we set up a rigorous quantitation theory for multiple-acceptors FRET construct named as Mb-PbFRET which is not affected by the imaging conditions and fluorophore properties. We experimentally validate Mb-PbFRET with FRET constructs consisted of one donor and two or three acceptors inside living cells on confocal and wide-field microscopes.

  9. Distance Learning Environment Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The Distance Learning Environment Demonstration (DLED) was a comparative study of distributed multimedia computer-based training using low cost high...measurement. The DLED project provides baseline research in the effective use of distance learning and multimedia communications over a wide area ATM/SONET

  10. Quantitative non-monotonic modeling of economic uncertainty by probability and possibility distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans

    2012-01-01

    to the understanding of similarities and differences of the two approaches as well as practical applications. The probability approach offers a good framework for representation of randomness and variability. Once the probability distributions of uncertain parameters and their correlations are known the resulting...... uncertainty can be calculated. The possibility approach is particular well suited for representation of uncertainty of a non-statistical nature due to lack of knowledge and requires less information than the probability approach. Based on the kind of uncertainty and knowledge present, these aspects...... by probability distributions is readily done by means of Monte Carlo simulation. Calculation of non-monotonic functions of possibility distributions is done within the theoretical framework of fuzzy intervals, but straight forward application of fuzzy arithmetic in general results in overestimation of interval...

  11. Quantitative autoradiographic assessment of sup 55 Fe-RBC distribution in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.Z.; Nakata, H.; Tajima, A.; Gruber, K.; Acuff, V.; Patlak, C.; Fenstermacher, J. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (USA))

    1990-11-01

    A simple in vivo technique of labeling erythrocytes (RBCs) with {sup 55}Fe was developed for quantitative autoradiography (QAR). This procedure involved injecting 5-6 ml of ({sup 55}Fe)ferrous citrate solution (1 mCi/ml) intraperitoneally into donor rats. The number of labeled RBCs reached a maximum at around 7 days and declined very slowly thereafter. Labeled RBCs were harvested from donor rats and used for RBC volume measurement in awake rats. Brain radioactivity was assayed by QAR, which yielded spatial resolution of greater than 50 microns. Tight nearly irreversible binding of {sup 55}Fe to RBCs was found in vivo and in vitro. More than 99.5% of the {sup 55}Fe in the blood of donor rats was bound to RBCs. Because of this, labeled blood can be taken from donors and injected into recipients without further preparation. The tissue absorption of {sup 55}Fe emissions was the same in gray and white matter. Microvascular RBC volumes measured with {sup 55}Fe-labeled RBCs agreed with those assayed with {sup 51}Cr-labeled RBCs for many, but not all, brain areas. In conclusion, {sup 55}Fe-RBCs can be readily prepared by this technique and accurately quantitated in brain tissue by QAR.

  12. REGULARITIES OF QUANTITATIVE DISTRIBUTION FOR FE(III-REDUCING BACTERIA IN NATURAL ECOSYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govorukha V. M.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was quantitative determination of Fe(III-reducing bacteria in natural ecosystems of the Antarctic, the Arctic, the Dead and the Black Sea, middle latitude (Ukraine, Abkhazia and the equatorial zone (Ecuador. It was used the method of quantitative determination of microorganisms by McCready and the colorimetric method for determination of Fe(II compounds . Results. The systemic study of the number of Fe(III-reducing bacteria of both hemispheres in the ecosystems of six geographic regions was carried out for the first time. High number of Fe(III-reducing bacteria in natural ecosystems was experimentally shown. The number of Fe(III-reducing bacteria ranged from 1.1•102 to 2.8•107 cells/g of absolutely dry sample. Conclusions. The presented data showed that Fe(III-reducing bacteria are an integral part of natural ecosystems and can significantly affect the biogeochemical cycles of iron and carbon compounds transformation.

  13. Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    A study reviewing the existing Army Distance Learning Plan (ADLP) and current Distance Learning practices, with a focus on the Army’s training and...educational challenges and the benefits of applying Distance Learning techniques. The ASB study panel makes six specific recommendations, the most

  14. Rotation Curve and Mass Distribution in the Galaxy from the Velocities of Objects at Distances up to 200 kpc

    CERN Document Server

    Bajkova, A T

    2016-01-01

    Three three-component (bulge, disk, halo) model Galactic gravitational potentials differing by the expression for the dark matter halo are considered. The central (bulge) and disk components are described by the Miyamoto-Nagai expressions. The Allen-Santill'an (I), Wilkinson-Evans (II), and Navarro-Frenk-White (III) models are used to describe the halo. A set of present-day observational data in the range of Galactocentric distances R from 0 to 200 kpc is used to refine the parameters of these models. The model rotation curves have been fitted to the observed velocities by taking into account the constraints on the local matter density \\rho_\\odotand the force K_{z=1.1} acting perpendicularly to the Galactic plane. The Galactic mass within a sphere of radius 50 kpc, M_G (R<=50 kpc)=(0.41+/-0.12)x10^12 M_\\odot, is shown to satisfy all three models. The differences between the models become increasingly significant with increasing radius R. In model I, the Galactic mass within a sphere of radius 200 kpc turns...

  15. Exploring the Role of Distributed Learning in Distance Education at Allama Iqbal Open University: Academic Challenges at Postgraduate Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qadir BUKHSH

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed learning is derived from the concept of distributed resources. Different institutions around the globe connected through network and the learners are diverse, located in the different cultures and communities. Distributed learning provides global standards of quality to all learners through synchronous and asynchronous communications and provides the opportunity of flexible and independent learning with equity, low cost educational services and has become the first choice of the dispersed learners around the globe. The present study was undertaken to investigate the challenges faced by the Faculty Members of Department of Business Administration and Computer Science at Allama Iqbal Open University Islamabad Pakistan. 25 Faculty Members were taken as sample of the study from both Departments (100% Sampling. The study was qualitative in nature and interview was the data collection tool. Data was analyzed by thematic analysis technique. The major challenges faced by the Faculty Members were as: bandwidth, synchronous learning activities, irregularity of the learners, feedback on individual work, designing and managing the learning activities, quality issues and training to use the network for teaching learning activities

  16. Generalized multidimensional earthquake frequency distributions consistent with Non-Extensive Statistical Physics: An appraisal of the universality in the interdependence of magnitude, interevent time and interevent distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanis, Andreas; Vallianatos, Philippos; Efstathiou, Angeliki

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that earthquake frequency is related to earthquake magnitude via a simple linear relationship of the form logN = a - bM, where N is the number of earthquakes in a specified time interval; this is the famous Gutenberg - Richter (G-R) law. The generally accepted interpretation of the G-R law is that it expresses the statistical behaviour of a fractal active tectonic grain (active faulting). The relationship between the constant b and the fractal dimension of the tectonic grain has been demonstrated in various ways. The story told by the G-R law is, nevertheless, incomplete. It is now accepted that the active tectonic grain comprises a critical complex system, although it hasn't yet been established whether it is stationary (Self-Organized Critical), evolutionary (Self-Organizing Critical), or a time-varying blend of both. At any rate, critical systems are characterized by complexity and strong interactions between near and distant neighbours. This, in turn, implies that the self-organization of earthquake occurrence should be manifested by certain statistical behaviour of its temporal and spatial dependence. A strong line of evidence suggests that G-R law is a limiting case of a more general frequency-magnitude distribution, which is properly expressed in terms of Non-Extensive Statistical Physics (NESP) on the basis of the Tsallis entropy; this is a context natural and particularly suitable for the description of complex systems. A measure of temporal dependence in earthquake occurrence is the time lapsed between consecutive events above a magnitude threshold over a given area (interevent time). A corresponding measure of spatial dependence is the hypocentral distance between consecutive events above a magnitude threshold over a given area (interevent distance). The statistics of earthquake frequency vs. interevent time have been studied by several researchers and have been shown to comply with the predictions of the NESP formalism. There's also

  17. Analysis of the spatio-temporal distribution of Eurygaster integriceps (Hemiptera: Scutelleridae) by using spatial analysis by distance indices and geostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, R; Hejazi, M J; Helali, H; Iranipour, S; Mohammadi, S A

    2011-10-01

    Eurygaster integriceps Puton (Hemiptera: Scutelleridae) is the most serious insect pest of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in Iran. In this study, spatio-temporal distribution of this pest was determined in wheat by using spatial analysis by distance indices (SADIE) and geostatistics. Global positioning and geographic information systems were used for spatial sampling and mapping the distribution of this insect. The study was conducted for three growing seasons in Gharamalek, an agricultural region to the west of Tabriz, Iran. Weekly sampling began when E. integriceps adults migrated to wheat fields from overwintering sites and ended when the new generation adults appeared at the end of season. The adults were sampled using 1- by 1-m quadrat and distance-walk methods. A sweep net was used for sampling the nymphs, and five 180° sweeps were considered as the sampling unit. The results of spatial analyses by using geostatistics and SADIE indicated that E. integriceps adults were clumped after migration to fields and had significant spatial dependency. The second- and third-instar nymphs showed aggregated spatial structure in the middle of growing season. At the end of the season, population distribution changed toward random or regular patterns; and fourth and fifth instars had weaker spatial structure compared with younger nymphs. In Iran, management measures for E. integriceps in wheat fields are mainly applied against overwintering adults, as well as second and third instars. Because of the aggregated distribution of these life stages, site-specific spraying of chemicals is feasible in managing E. integriceps.

  18. Identification of cytochrome P-450, and its distribution in the membrana granulosa of the preovulatory follicle, using quantitative cytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoller, L C; Weisz, J

    1978-07-01

    The distribution of cytochrome P-450 (C-P450), an essential component of the oxidative enzyme system involved in the hydroxylation of steroids, was measured by quantitative cytochemistry in cryostat sections of preovulatory follicles obtained from rats in proestrous. The sections were reacted with medium saturated with carbon monoxide with or without the addition of sodium dithionite. The absorbance spectrum was measured from 400 to 500 nm and a difference spectrum calculated by subtracting the extinction obtained from incubations without sodium dithionite from that obtained in the presence of sodium dithionite. A distinct peak at 450nm was recorded in cells of the peripheral portion of the membrana granulosa (MG) but not in those of the cumulus, providing evidence for the presence and differential distribution of C-P450 in the MG of the preovulatory follicle.

  19. [Quantitative analysis of chondrocyte distribution patterns in hyaline cartilage tissue--a comparison of different models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranke, T P; Ranke, I; Schwandtke, A; Rother, P

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of our investigations were aging changes in hyaline cartilage of the trachea and of the larynx. 42 samples of carina tracheae and 29 samples of arytenoid cartilage were used in both organs from the newborn age up to the age of 91 a. We have examined patterns of cell distribution with the help of the computer programme "Dichte" ("density") using the following methods of stochastic geometry: product density, L function, and others. Product density allows for a reliable destination between a regular pattern of cells (hard-core distribution), a random pattern (soft-core distribution), and a typical clustering of chondrocytes. 2 examples of arytenoid cartilage have been selected to demonstrate the possibilities of interpretation of product density supported by the L function. Soft-core and in few cases hard-core distribution have been found both with the carina tracheae and the cartilago arytaenoidea in the 1st decade of life. Beginning with the 2nd decade of life, the typical clustering of chondrocytes have been confirmed with both organs.

  20. Inter-Dye Distance Distributions Studied by a Combination of Single-Molecule FRET-Filtered Lifetime Measurements and a Weighted Accessible Volume (wAV Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Höfig

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET is an important tool for studying the structural and dynamical properties of biomolecules. The fact that both the internal dynamics of the biomolecule and the movements of the biomolecule-attached dyes can occur on similar timescales of nanoseconds is an inherent problem in FRET studies. By performing single-molecule FRET-filtered lifetime measurements, we are able to characterize the amplitude of the motions of fluorescent probes attached to double-stranded DNA standards by means of flexible linkers. With respect to previously proposed experimental approaches, we improved the precision and the accuracy of the inter-dye distance distribution parameters by filtering out the donor-only population with pulsed interleaved excitation. A coarse-grained model is employed to reproduce the experimentally determined inter-dye distance distributions. This approach can easily be extended to intrinsically flexible proteins allowing, under certain conditions, to decouple the macromolecule amplitude of motions from the contribution of the dye linkers.

  1. Dynamic contrast optical coherence tomography: quantitative measurement of microvascular transit-time distributions in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Conrad W.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2016-03-01

    Transit time is a fundamental microcirculatory parameter that is critical in determining oxygen delivery from capillaries to surrounding tissue. Recently, it was demonstrated theoretically that capillary transit-time heterogeneity potentially leads to non-uniform oxygen extraction in micro-domains. However, in spite of its importance, capillary transit-time distribution has been challenging to quantify comprehensively and efficiently at the microscopic level. Here, we introduce a method, called Dynamic Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography (DyC-OCT), based on dynamic cross-sectional OCT imaging of the kinetics of an intravascular tracer during its passage through the field-of-view. DyC-OCT is used to quantitatively measure the transit-time distribution in microvascular networks in cross-section at the single-capillary level. Transit-time metrics are derived from analysis of the temporal characteristics of the dynamic scattering signal, related to tracer concentration, using indicator-dilution theory. Since DyC-OCT does not require calibration of the optical focus, quantitative accuracy is achieved even deep in highly scattering brain tissue where the focal spot degrades. After direct validation of DyC-OCT against the dilution curves measured using a fluorescent plasma label in the surface pial vessels of a mouse brain, imaged through a thinned-skull, glass coverslip-reinforced cranial window, the laminar transit-time distribution was investigated in microvasculature across the entire depth of the mouse somatosensory cortex. Laminar trends were identified, with the earliest transit times in the middle cortical layers, and the lowest heterogeneity in cortical layer 4. The new DyC-OCT technique affords a novel perspective of microvascular networks, with the unique capability of performing simultaneous measurements of transit-time distributions across cortical laminae.

  2. A suggestion of reference data for flow distribution at ankle and foot level using quantitative 99Tc-HDP three-phase bone scintigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøndevold, Niklas; Reving, Sofie; Møller, Nette

    2012-01-01

    To determine reference intervals for quantitative 99mTc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (99mTc-HDP) three-phase bone scintigraphy regarding flow distribution at ankle and mid-foot level.......To determine reference intervals for quantitative 99mTc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (99mTc-HDP) three-phase bone scintigraphy regarding flow distribution at ankle and mid-foot level....

  3. Reconciling cyanobacterial fixed-nitrogen distributions and transport experiments with quantitative modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Aidan I

    2011-01-01

    Filamentous cyanobacteria growing in media with insufficient fixed nitrogen differentiate some cells into heterocysts, which fix nitrogen for the remaining vegetative cells. Transport studies have shown both periplasmic and cytoplasmic connections between cells that could transport fixed-nitrogen along the filament. Two experiments have imaged fixed-nitrogen distributions along filaments. In 1974,Wolk et al found a peaked concentration of fixed-nitrogen at heterocysts using autoradiographic techniques. In contrast, in 2007, Popa et al used nanoSIMS to show large dips at the location of heterocysts, with a variable but approximately level distribution between them. With an integrated model of fixed-nitrogen transport and cell growth, we recover the results of both Wolk et al and of Popa et al using the same model parameters. To do this, we account for immobile incorporated fixed-nitrogen and for the differing durations of labeled nitrogen fixation that occurred in the two experiments. The variations seen by Po...

  4. McSAS: A package for extracting quantitative form-free distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Breßler, Ingo; Thünemann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    A reliable and user-friendly characterisation of nano-objects in a target material is presented here in the form of a software data analysis package for interpreting small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns. When provided with data on absolute scale with reasonable uncertainty estimates, the software outputs (size) distributions in absolute volume fractions complete with uncertainty estimates and minimum evidence limits, and outputs all distribution modes of a user definable range of one or more model parameters. A multitude of models are included, including prolate and oblate nanoparticles, core-shell objects, polymer models (Gaussian chain and Kholodenko worm) and a model for densely packed spheres (using the LMA-PY approximations). The McSAS software can furthermore be integrated as part of an automated reduction and analysis procedure in laboratory instruments or at synchrotron beamlines.

  5. Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: A Quantitative Analysis of Policy Impacts and Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doris, E.; Krasko, V.A.

    2012-10-01

    State and local policymakers show increasing interest in spurring the development of customer-sited distributed generation (DG), in particular solar photovoltaic (PV) markets. Prompted by that interest, this analysis examines the use of state policy as a tool to support the development of a robust private investment market. This analysis builds on previous studies that focus on government subsidies to reduce installation costs of individual projects and provides an evaluation of the impacts of policies on stimulating private market development.

  6. A Quantitative Analysis of the Distribution of CRH Neurons in Whole Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Peng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH, with widespread expression in the brain, plays a key role in modulating a series of behaviors, including anxiety, arousal, motor function, learning and memory. Previous studies have focused on some brain regions with densely distributed CRH neurons such as paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH and bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BST and revealed some basic structural and functional knowledge of CRH neurons. However, there is no systematic analysis of brain-wide distribution of CRH neurons. Here, we performed a comprehensive study of CRH neurons in CRH-IRES-Cre;Ai3 mice via automatic imaging and stereoscopic cell counting in a whole mouse brain. We acquired four datasets of the CRH distributions with co-localized cytoarchitecture at a voxel resolution of 0.32 μm × 0.32 μm × 2 μm using brain-wide positioning system (BPS. Next, we precisely located and counted the EYFP-labeled neurons in different regions according to propidium iodide counterstained anatomical reference using Neuronal Global Position System. In particular, dense EYFP expression was found in piriform area, BST, central amygdalar nucleus, PVH, Barrington’s nucleus, and inferior olivary complex. Considerable CRH neurons were also found in main olfactory bulb, medial preoptic nucleus, pontine gray, tegmental reticular nucleus, external cuneate nucleus, and midline thalamus. We reconstructed and compared the soma morphology of CRH neurons in 11 brain regions. The results demonstrated that CRH neurons had regional diversities of both cell distribution and soma morphology. This anatomical knowledge enhances the current understanding of the functions of CRH neurons. These results also demonstrated the ability of our platform to accurately orient, reconstruct and count neuronal somas in three-dimension for type-specific neurons in the whole brain, making it feasible to answer the fundamental neuroscience question of exact numbers of

  7. A Quantitative Analysis of the Distribution of CRH Neurons in Whole Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jie; Long, Ben; Yuan, Jing; Peng, Xue; Ni, Hong; Li, Xiangning; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Li, Anan

    2017-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), with widespread expression in the brain, plays a key role in modulating a series of behaviors, including anxiety, arousal, motor function, learning and memory. Previous studies have focused on some brain regions with densely distributed CRH neurons such as paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) and bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BST) and revealed some basic structural and functional knowledge of CRH neurons. However, there is no systematic analysis of brain-wide distribution of CRH neurons. Here, we performed a comprehensive study of CRH neurons in CRH-IRES-Cre;Ai3 mice via automatic imaging and stereoscopic cell counting in a whole mouse brain. We acquired four datasets of the CRH distributions with co-localized cytoarchitecture at a voxel resolution of 0.32 μm × 0.32 μm × 2 μm using brain-wide positioning system (BPS). Next, we precisely located and counted the EYFP-labeled neurons in different regions according to propidium iodide counterstained anatomical reference using Neuronal Global Position System. In particular, dense EYFP expression was found in piriform area, BST, central amygdalar nucleus, PVH, Barrington's nucleus, and inferior olivary complex. Considerable CRH neurons were also found in main olfactory bulb, medial preoptic nucleus, pontine gray, tegmental reticular nucleus, external cuneate nucleus, and midline thalamus. We reconstructed and compared the soma morphology of CRH neurons in 11 brain regions. The results demonstrated that CRH neurons had regional diversities of both cell distribution and soma morphology. This anatomical knowledge enhances the current understanding of the functions of CRH neurons. These results also demonstrated the ability of our platform to accurately orient, reconstruct and count neuronal somas in three-dimension for type-specific neurons in the whole brain, making it feasible to answer the fundamental neuroscience question of exact numbers of various neurons in the

  8. Rotation curve and mass distribution in the Galaxy from the velocities of objects at distances up to 200 kpc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    Three three-component (bulge, disk, halo) model Galactic gravitational potentials differing by the expression for the dark matter halo are considered. The central (bulge) and disk components are described by the Miyamoto-Nagai expressions. The Allen-Santillán (I), Wilkinson-Evans (II), and Navarro-Frenk-White (III) models are used to describe the halo. A set of present-day observational data in the range of Galactocentric distances R from 0 to 200 kpc is used to refine the parameters of thesemodels. For the Allen-Santillán model, a dimensionless coefficient γ has been included as a sought-for parameter for the first time. In the traditional and modified versions, γ = 2.0 and 6.3, respectively. Both versions are considered in this paper. The model rotation curves have been fitted to the observed velocities by taking into account the constraints on the local matter density ρ ⊙ = 0.1 M ⊙ pc-3 and the force K z =1.1/2 πG = 77 M ⊙ pc-2 acting perpendicularly to the Galactic plane. The Galactic mass within a sphere of radius 50 kpc, M G ( R ≤ 50 kpc) ≈ (0.41 ± 0.12) × 1012 M ⊙, is shown to satisfy all three models. The differences between the models become increasingly significant with increasing radius R. In model I, the Galactic mass within a sphere of radius 200 kpc at γ = 2.0 turns out to be greatest among the models considered, M G ( R ≤ 200 kpc) = (1.45 ±0.30)× 1012 M ⊙, M G ( R ≤ 200 kpc) = (1.29± 0.14)× 1012 M ⊙ at γ = 6.3, and the smallest value has been found in model II, M G ( R ≤ 200 kpc) = (0.61 ± 0.12) × 1012 M ⊙. In our view, model III is the best one among those considered, because it ensures the smallest residual between the data and the constructed model rotation curve provided that the constraints on the local parameters hold with a high accuracy. Here, the Galactic mass is M G ( R ≤ 200 kpc) = (0.75 ± 0.19) × 1012 M ⊙. A comparative analysis with the models by Irrgang et al. (2013), including those using

  9. Monge Distance between Quantum States

    CERN Document Server

    Zyczkowski, K; Zyczkowski, Karol; Slomczynski, Wojciech

    1998-01-01

    We define a metric in the space of quantum states taking the Monge distance between corresponding Husimi distributions (Q--functions). This quantity fulfills the axioms of a metric and satisfies the following semiclassical property: the distance between two coherent states is equal to the Euclidean distance between corresponding points in the classical phase space. We compute analytically distances between certain states (coherent, squeezed, Fock and thermal) and discuss a scheme for numerical computation of Monge distance for two arbitrary quantum states.

  10. Characterisation and distribution of deposited trace elements transported over long and intermediate distances in north-eastern France using Sphagnum peatlands as a sentinel ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Caroline; Diaz-de-Quijano, Maria; Monna, Fabrice; Franchi, Marielle; Toussaint, Marie-Laure; Gilbert, Daniel; Bernard, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Trace elements in the form of particulate matter can be transported downwind from their emission sources and may have negative effects on human health and ecosystems. The transport of trace elements is often studied by monitoring their accumulation in mosses. The aim of this study was to characterise and describe the distribution of deposited trace elements transported over long and intermediate distances in north-eastern France, a location far from the main emission sources. We analysed the trace element accumulation in Sphagnum capillifolium in 54 ombrotrophic peatlands distributed in six regions of France (Alps, Jura, Massif Central, Morvan, Rhône corridor and Vosges). The concentrations of Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Ti, V, and Zn in the surface were determined in three replicate samples of Sphagnum within each peatland. The enrichment factors calculated using Ti as the element of reference clearly exhibited a predominant anthropogenic origin for Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn, although the concentrations were relatively low compared to those found in other studies. The isolation of the peatlands from any fixed and traffic emission source suggests an intermediate and/or long-distance transport of the pollutants from their emission sources. The structure of the compositional dataset was explored using a covariance biplot. The first score was used as a synthetic indicator of the origin of the deposits and the degree of contamination of each peatland. This new index showed that the Vosges and the Alps were the regions most affected by high enrichment of trace elements, particularly Pb and Cd. The erosion of soils highly contaminated by former mining and smelting activities in the Vosges and the polluted cities and busy highways in the Alps may account for these distributions. The Jura was the least affected region sampled, and the other regions presented intermediate anthropogenic deposits. This study provides valuable information concerning the management and protection of

  11. The large-scale distribution of ammonia oxidizers in paddy soils is driven by soil pH, geographic distance and climatic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangwei eHu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paddy soils distribute widely from temperate to tropical regions, and are characterized by intensive nitrogen fertilization practices in China. Mounting evidence has confirmed the functional importance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB in soil nitrification, but little is known about their biogeographic distribution patterns in paddy ecosystems. Here, we used barcoded pyrosequencing to characterize the effects of climatic, geochemical and spatial factors on the distribution of ammonia oxidizers from 11 representative rice-growing regions (75-1945 km apart of China. Potential nitrification rates varied greatly by more than three orders of magnitude, and were significantly correlated with the abundances of AOA and AOB. The community composition of ammonia oxidizer was affected by multiple factors, but changes in relative abundances of the major lineages could be best predicted by soil pH. The alpha diversity of AOA and AOB displayed contrasting trends over the gradients of latitude and atmospheric temperature, indicating a possible niche separation between AOA and AOB along the latitude. The Bray-Curtis dissimilarities in ammonia-oxidizing community structure significantly increased with increasing geographical distance, indicating that more geographically distant paddy fields tend to harbor more dissimilar ammonia oxidizers. Variation partitioning analysis revealed that spatial, geochemical and climatic factors could jointly explain majority of the data variation, and were important drivers defining the ecological niches of AOA and AOB. Our findings suggest that both AOA and AOB are of functional importance in paddy soil nitrification, and ammonia oxidizers in paddy ecosystems exhibit large-scale biogeographic patterns shaped by soil pH, geographic distance, and climatic factors.

  12. Abundance and distribution of ultramafic microbreccia in Moses Rock Dike: Quantitative application of AIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1987-01-01

    Moses Rock dike is a Tertiary diatreme containing serpentinized ultramafic microbreccia (SUM). Field evidence indicates the SUM was emplaced first followed by breccias derived from the Permian strata exposed in the walls of the diatreme and finally by complex breccias containing basement and mantle derived rocks. SUM is found primarily dispersed throughout the matrix of the diatreme. Moses Rock dike was examined with Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) to map the distribution and excess of SUM in the matrix and to better understand the nature of the eruption which formed this explosive volcanic feature. AIS data was calibrated by dividing the suite of AIS data by data from an internal standard area and then multiplying this relative reflectance data by the absolute bidirectional reflectance of a selected sample from the standard area which was measured in the lab. From the calibrated AIS data the minerals serpentine, gypsum, and illite as well as desert varnish and the lithologies SUM and other sandstones were identified. SUM distribution and abundance in the matrix of the diatreme were examined in detail and two distinct styles of SUM dispersion were observed. The two styles are discussed in detail.

  13. Misconceptions of Astronomical Distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brian W.; Brewer, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Previous empirical studies using multiple-choice procedures have suggested that there are misconceptions about the scale of astronomical distances. The present study provides a quantitative estimate of the nature of this misconception among US university students by asking them, in an open-ended response format, to make estimates of the distances…

  14. In situ hybridization of oxytocin messenger RNA: macroscopic distribution and quantitation in rat hypothalamic cell groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbach, J.P.; Voorhuis, T.A.; van Tol, H.H.; Ivell, R.

    1987-05-29

    Oxytocin mRNA was detected in the rat hypothalamus by in situ hybridization to a single stranded /sup 35/S-labelled DNA probe and the distribution of oxytocin mRNA-containing cell groups was studied at the macroscopic level. Specificity of hybridization was confirmed by comparison to vasopressin mRNA hybridization in parallel tissue sections. Cell groups containing oxytocin mRNA were confined to a set of hypothalamic cell groups, i.c. the supraoptic, paraventricular, anterior commissural nuclei, nucleus circularis and scattered hypothalamic islets. These cell groups displayed similar densities of autoradiographic signals indicating that the oxytocin gene is expressed at approximately the same average level at these various sites.

  15. Measurement of effective source distribution and its importance for quantitative interpretation of STEM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: christian.dwyer@mcem.monash.edu.au [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, and Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Erni, R. [Electron Microscopy Center, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Etheridge, J. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, and Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2010-07-15

    We review the manner in which lens aberrations, partial spatial coherence, and partial temporal coherence affect the formation of a sub-A electron probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. Simulations are used to examine the effect of each of these factors on a STEM image. It is found that the effects of partial spatial coherence (resulting from finite effective source size) are dominant, while the effects of residual lens aberrations and partial temporal coherence produce only subtle changes from an ideal image. We also review the way in which partial spatial and temporal coherence effects are manifest in a Ronchigram. Finally, we provide a demonstration of the Ronchigram method for measuring the effective source distribution in a probe aberration-corrected 300 kV field-emission gun transmission electron microscope.

  16. Quantitative imaging of inositol distribution in yeast using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiardi, A; Guillermier, C; Loss, O; Poczatek, J C; Lechene, C

    2014-11-01

    Despite the widely recognized importance of the several species of inositol polyphosphates in cell biology, inositol has not been successfully imaged and quantified inside cells using traditional spectrophotometry. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) technology, however, has facilitated direct imaging and measurement of cellular inositol. After pulsing cells with inositol labeled with the stable isotope Carbon-13 ((13)C), the label was detected in subcellular volumes by MIMS. The tridimensional localization of (13)C within the cell illustrated cellular distribution and local accumulation of inositol. In parallel, we performed control experiments with (13)C-Glucose to compare a different (13)C distribution pattern. Because many functions recently attributed to inositol polyphosphates are localized in the nucleus, we analyzed its relative nuclear concentration. We engineered yeast with human thymidine permease and viral thymidine kinase, then fed them with (15)N-thymidine. This permitted direct analysis of the nuclear DNA through the detection of the (15)N isotopic signal. We found practically no co-localization between inositol signal ((13)C-isotope) and nuclear signal ((15)N-isotope). The (13)C-tag (inositol) accumulation was highest at the plasma membrane and in cytoplasmic domains. In time-course labeling experiments performed with wild type yeast (WT) or modified yeast unable to synthesize inositol from glucose (ino1Δ), the half-time of labeled inositol accumulation was ~1 hour in WT and longer in ino1Δ. These studies should serve as a template to study metabolism and physiological role of inositol using genetically modified yeasts.

  17. Quantitation and localization of regional body fat distribution--a comparison between magnetic resonance imaging and somatometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R C; Kramsch, D M; Lee, P L; Colletti, P; Jiao, Q

    1996-03-01

    The emerging concept that various fat compartments are metabolically active and play separate and decisive roles in the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis, hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes and stroke, has given obesity research a new direction. Of particular interest is the relative amount of intra-abdominal fat thought to be responsible for the metabolic complications. We studied the precise fat distribution and its correlations with the metabolic parameters in 44 non-human primates (Macaca fascicularis). Intra-abdominal, subcutaneous, and total abdominal fat (IAF, SAF, TAF) were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and somatometry. Quantitative computer analyses of abdominal MRI scans revealed predominant IAF distribution. Box plot analysis of IAF and SAF revealed wide diversity in the amounts of fat, especially in monkeys with body mass index (BMI) < 30 kg/m2. Primates with similar BMI in each quartile revealed an extensive heterogeneity in IAF as well as SAF. Numerous significant correlations within site-specific somatometric measurements as well as within the MRI determinants of abdominal fat were seen. However, only body weight correlated with IAF and skinfolds could predict SAF. After adjusting for body weight, partial correlation analysis showed a significant correlation (P < 0.05) between total cholesterol and IAF. MRI revealed considerable heterogeneity of IAF, SAF and TAF in cohort of primates believed to be homogeneous by somatometric definition. Male cynomolgus monkeys appear to be a valuable model for a systematic evaluation of fat. Individuals with identical body weight and height may show a diverse pattern of fat distribution.

  18. Chance long-distance or human-mediated dispersal? How Acacia s.l. farnesiana attained its pan-tropical distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, Haripriya; Fernandes, Manuel M.; Kull, Christian A.; Murphy, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Acacia s.l. farnesiana, which originates from Mesoamerica, is the most widely distributed Acacia s.l. species across the tropics. It is assumed that the plant was transferred across the Atlantic to southern Europe by Spanish explorers, and then spread across the Old World tropics through a combination of chance long-distance and human-mediated dispersal. Our study uses genetic analysis and information from historical sources to test the relative roles of chance and human-mediated dispersal in its distribution. The results confirm the Mesoamerican origins of the plant and show three patterns of human-mediated dispersal. Samples from Spain showed greater genetic diversity than those from other Old World tropics, suggesting more instances of transatlantic introductions from the Americas to that country than to other parts of Africa and Asia. Individuals from the Philippines matched a population from South Central Mexico and were likely to have been direct, trans-Pacific introductions. Australian samples were genetically unique, indicating that the arrival of the species in the continent was independent of these European colonial activities. This suggests the possibility of pre-European human-mediated dispersal across the Pacific Ocean. These significant findings raise new questions for biogeographic studies that assume chance or transoceanic dispersal for disjunct plant distributions. PMID:28484637

  19. Use of Relative vs Fixed Offset Distance to Define Region of Interest at the Distal Radius and Tibia in High-Resolution Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V; Hansen, Stinus; Halekoh, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    adjacent to the measurement site. This study aimed at compare the morphologic variation in measurements using the standard fixed offset distance to define the distal starting slice against those obtained by using a relative measurement position scaled to the individual bone length at the distal radius...... defined by, first, the standard measurement protocol, where the most distal CT slice was 9.5 mm and 22.5 mm from the end plate of the radius and tibia, respectively, and second, the relative measurement method, where the most distal CT slice was at 4% and 7% of the radial and tibial lengths, respectively...... to the introduction of systematic errors in radial and tibial measurements. Although this may not be of particular significance in longitudinal studies in the same individual, it potentially assumes critical importance in cross-sectional studies....

  20. Station distribution and quality control for real-time moment tensor inversion at regional distances for the southwestern Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convers, Jaime; Custodio, Susana

    2016-04-01

    Rapid assessment of seismological parameters pertinent to the nucleation and rupture of earthquakes are now routinely calculated by local and regional seismic networks. With the increasing number of stations, fast data transmission, and advanced computer power, we can now go beyond accurate magnitude and epicentral locations, to rapid estimations of other higher-order earthquake parameters such as seismic moment tensor. Although an increased number of stations can minimize azimuthal gaps, it also increases computation time, and potentially introduces poor quality data that often leads to a lower the stability of automated inversions. In this presentation, we focus on moment tensor calculations for earthquakes occurring offshore the southwestern Iberian peninsula. The available regional seismic data in this region has a significant azimuthal gap that results from the geographical setting. In this case, increasing the number of data from stations spanning a small area (and at a small azimuthal angle) increases the calculation time without necessarily improving the accuracy of the inversion. Additionally, limited regional data coverage makes it imperative to exclude poor-quality data, as their negative effect on moment tensor inversions is often significant. In our work, we analyze methods to minimize the effects of large azimuthal gaps in a regional station coverage, of potential bias by uneven station distribution, and of poor data quality in moment tensor inversions obtained for earthquakes offshore the southwestern Iberian peninsula. We calculate moment tensors using the KIWI tools, and we implement different configurations of station-weighing, and cross-correlation of neighboring stations, with the aim of automatically estimating and selecting high-quality data, improving the accuracy of results, and reducing the computation time of moment tensor inversions. As the available recent intermediate-size events offshore the Iberian peninsula is limited due to the long

  1. Phylogeny and biogeography of exacum (gentianaceae): a disjunctive distribution in the Indian ocean basin resulted from long distance dispersal and extensive radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yong-Ming; Wohlhauser, Sébastien; Möller, Michael; Klackenberg, Jens; Callmander, Martin; Küpfer, Philippe

    2005-02-01

    Disjunctive distributions across paleotropical regions in the Indian Ocean Basin (IOB) often invoke dispersal/vicariance debates. Exacum (Gentianaceae, tribe Exaceae) species are spread around the IOB, in Africa, Madagascar, Socotra, the Arabian peninsula, Sri Lanka, India, the Himalayas, mainland Southeast Asia including southern China and Malaysia, and northern Australia. The distribution of this genus was suggested to be a typical example of vicariance resulting from the breakup of the Gondwanan supercontinent. The molecular phylogeny of Exacum is in principle congruent with morphological conclusions and shows a pattern that resembles a vicariance scenario with rapid divergence among lineages, but our molecular dating analysis demonstrates that the radiation is too recent to be associated with the Gondwanan continental breakup. We used our dating analysis to test the results of DIVA and found that the program predicted impossible vicariance events. Ancestral area reconstruction suggests that Exacum originated in Madagascar, and divergence dating suggests its origin was not before the Eocene. The Madagascan progenitor, the most recent common ancestor of Exacum, colonized Sri Lanka and southern India via long-distance dispersals. This colonizer underwent an extensive range expansion and spread to Socotra-Arabia, northern India, and mainland Southeast Asia in the northern IOB when it was warm and humid in these regions. This widespread common ancestor retreated subsequently from most parts of these regions and survived in isolation in Socotra-Arabia, southern India-Sri Lanka, and perhaps mainland Southeast Asia, possibly as a consequence of drastic climatic changes, particularly the spreading drought during the Neogene. Secondary diversification from these surviving centers and Madagascar resulted in the extant main lineages of the genus. The vicariance-like pattern shown by the phylogeny appears to have resulted from long-distance dispersals followed by extensive

  2. Immunochemical quantitation, size distribution, and cross-reactivity of lepidoptera (moth) aeroallergens in southeastern Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynn, S.R.; Swanson, M.C.; Reed, C.E.; Penny, N.D.; Showers, W.B.; Smith, J.M.

    1988-07-01

    With an immunochemical method, we analyzed outdoor air samples during a 3-year period for concentrations of the predominant local species of moth, Pseudaletia unipuncta (Haworth). Airborne particulates were collected on fiberglass filter sheets with an Accu-Vol sampler located 1.5 m above ground on the southeastern Minnesota prairie. Filter eluates analyzed by RIA inhibition contained concentrations of moth protein peaking in June and August to September of each year, with levels comparable to reported immunochemically measured levels of pollen and mold allergens. These peaks also corresponded with total numbers of moths captured in light traps. Moth-allergen activity was distributed in particle sizes ranging from 0.8 to greater than 4.1 micron when sized samples were obtained by use of an Andersen cascade impaction head. By RIA inhibition, there was cross-reactivity between P. unipuncta and insects of different genera, families, and orders, but not with pollens or molds. Forty-five percent of 257 patients with immediate positive skin tests to common aeroallergens had positive skin tests to one or more commercially available whole body insect extracts. Of 120 patients with allergic rhinitis believed to be primarily caused by ragweed sensitivity, 5% also had elevated specific IgE to moths. We conclude that airborne concentrations of Lepidoptera can be measured immunochemically and that moths may be a seasonal allergen in the United States.

  3. The paradox of soft singularity crossing and its resolution by distributional cosmological quantitities

    CERN Document Server

    Keresztes, Zoltán; Kamenshchik, Alexander Yu

    2012-01-01

    A cosmological model of a flat Friedmann universe filled with a mixture of anti-Chaplygin gas and dust-like matter exhibits a future soft singularity, where the pressure of the anti-Chaplygin gas diverges (while its energy density vanishes). Despite infinite tidal forces the geodesics pass through the singularity. Due to the dust component, the Hubble parameter has a non-zero value at the encounter with the singularity, therefore the dust implies further expansion. With continued expansion however, the energy density and the pressure of the anti-Chaplygin gas would become ill-defined, hence from the point of view of the anti-Chaplygin gas only a contraction is allowed. Paradoxically, the universe in this cosmological model would have to expand and contract simultaneously. This obviosly could not happen. We solve the paradox by redefining the anti-Chaplygin gas in a distributional sense. Then a contraction could follow the expansion phase at the singularity at the price of a jump in the Hubble parameter. Altho...

  4. Quantitative Changes in Microtubule Distribution Correlate with Guard Cell Function in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William R. Eisinger; Viktor Kirik; Charlotte Lewis; David W. Ehrhardt; Winslow R. Briggs

    2012-01-01

    Radially arranged cortical microtubules are a prominent feature of guard cells.We observed guard cells expressing GFP-tubulin (GFP-TUA6) with confocal microscopy and found recognizable changes in the appearance of microtubules when stomata open or close (Eisinger et al.,2012).In the present study,analysis of fluorescence distribution showed a dramatic increase in peak intensities of microtubule bundles within guard cells as stomata open.This increase was correlated with an increase in the total fluorescence that could be attributed to polymerized tubulin.Adjacent pavement cells did not show similar changes in peak intensities or integrated fluorescence when stomatal apertures changed.Imaging of RFP-tagged end binding protein 1 (EB1) and YFP-tagged α-tubulin expressed in the same cell revealed that the number of microtubules with growing ends remained constant,although the total amount of polymerized tubulin was higher in open than in closed guard cells.Taken together,these results indicate that the changes in microtubule array organization that are correlated with and required for normal guard cell function are characterized by changes in microtubule clustering or bundling.

  5. Information Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Charles H; Li, Ming; Vitanyi, Paul M B; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2010-01-01

    While Kolmogorov complexity is the accepted absolute measure of information content in an individual finite object, a similarly absolute notion is needed for the information distance between two individual objects, for example, two pictures. We give several natural definitions of a universal information metric, based on length of shortest programs for either ordinary computations or reversible (dissipationless) computations. It turns out that these definitions are equivalent up to an additive logarithmic term. We show that the information distance is a universal cognitive similarity distance. We investigate the maximal correlation of the shortest programs involved, the maximal uncorrelation of programs (a generalization of the Slepian-Wolf theorem of classical information theory), and the density properties of the discrete metric spaces induced by the information distances. A related distance measures the amount of nonreversibility of a computation. Using the physical theory of reversible computation, we give...

  6. Some features of the quantitative distribution of sipunculan worms (Sipuncula in the central and southern Barents Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny A. Garbul

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reports on the current state of the sipunculan fauna of the central and southern parts of the Barents Sea. The main quantitative parameters (biomass and abundance of the sipunculan populations are obtained, and the contribution of sipunculids to the total benthos biomass is assessed. The major factors causing long-term variations in Sipunculidae distribution and abundance are evaluated for the area in question.      The investigations show that the most commonly encountered sipunculan species are Nephasoma diaphanes diaphanes,N. abyssorum abyssorum and Phascolion strombus strombus. The main contribution to the total benthos biomass comes from the two species most typical of the Barents Sea benthic fauna: Golfingia margaritacea margaritacea and G. vulgaris vulgaris. It is possible that the reductionin Golfingia biomass between the 1970s and 1990s, described in the article, is due to changes in the sampling methodology.

  7. Mapping quantitative trait loci from a single-tail sample of the phenotype distribution including survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, Mikko J; Hoti, Fabian

    2007-12-01

    A new effective Bayesian quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping approach for the analysis of single-tail selected samples of the phenotype distribution is presented. The approach extends the affected-only tests to single-tail sampling with quantitative traits such as the log-normal survival time or censored/selected traits. A great benefit of the approach is that it enables the utilization of multiple-QTL models, is easy to incorporate into different data designs (experimental and outbred populations), and can potentially be extended to epistatic models. In inbred lines, the method exploits the fact that the parental mating type and the linkage phases (haplotypes) are known by definition. In outbred populations, two-generation data are needed, for example, selected offspring and one of the parents (the sires) in breeding material. The idea is to statistically (computationally) generate a fully complementary, maximally dissimilar, observation for each offspring in the sample. Bayesian data augmentation is then used to sample the space of possible trait values for the pseudoobservations. The benefits of the approach are illustrated using simulated data sets and a real data set on the survival of F(2) mice following infection with Listeria monocytogenes.

  8. [Quantitative topographic characterization of the myoelectric activity distribution of the masseter muscle: mapping of spectral EMG parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholle, H C; Schumann, N P; Anders, C; Mey, E

    1992-09-01

    A new method for quantitative characterization of myoelectrical masseter activity distribution by mapping of spectral EMG-parameters is described. The surface electromyograms of M. masseter were monopolarly recorded (16 channels). On the basis of registered EMG intervals (512 ms) the spectral EMG power of several frequency bands was calculated (Fast Fourier Transformation). The spectral EMG parameters between the 16 electrode positions were estimated by linear interpolation (4-nearest neighbours algorithm). Afterwards the spectral EMG parameters were fitted in a grey-tone or colour scale with 10 intervals. The so obtained EMG activity maps ("EMG-Maps") permit a quantitative-topographic characterization of myoelectrical masseter activity during different functional load procedures. The frequency range which is to consider in masseter surface-EMG investigations encloses frequencies between 15 and 500 Hz. The topography of EMG activation pattern of M. masseter is only described in a comprehensive manner when the electrode array consists of 16 electrodes and more. During defined motor tasks like clenching with controlled forces the reproducibility of EMG-Maps which respect to the topography of EMG activity pattern is very high. The absolute values of spectral EMG power as well as power changes of selected band ranges during clenching correlate to the extent of chewing forces.

  9. The Comparison of Distributed P2P Trust Models Based on Quantitative Parameters in the File Downloading Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingpei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Varied P2P trust models have been proposed recently; it is necessary to develop an effective method to evaluate these trust models to resolve the commonalities (guiding the newly generated trust models in theory and individuality (assisting a decision maker in choosing an optimal trust model to implement in specific context issues. A new method for analyzing and comparing P2P trust models based on hierarchical parameters quantization in the file downloading scenarios is proposed in this paper. Several parameters are extracted from the functional attributes and quality feature of trust relationship, as well as requirements from the specific network context and the evaluators. Several distributed P2P trust models are analyzed quantitatively with extracted parameters modeled into a hierarchical model. The fuzzy inferring method is applied to the hierarchical modeling of parameters to fuse the evaluated values of the candidate trust models, and then the relative optimal one is selected based on the sorted overall quantitative values. Finally, analyses and simulation are performed. The results show that the proposed method is reasonable and effective compared with the previous algorithms.

  10. Some quantitative relationships between leaf area index and canopy nitrogen content and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xinyou; Lantinga, Egvert A; Schapendonk, Ad H C M; Zhong, Xuhua

    2003-06-01

    In a previous study (Yin et al. 2000. Annals of Botany 85: 579-585), a generic logarithmic equation for leaf area index (L) in relation to canopy nitrogen content (N) was developed: L=(1/ktn)1n(1+ktnN/nb). The equation has two parameters: the minimum leaf nitrogen required to support photosynthesis (nb), and the leaf nitrogen extinction coefficient (ktn). Relative to nb, there is less information in the literature regarding the variation of ktn. We therefore derived an equation to theoretically estimate the value of ktn. The predicted profile of leaf nitrogen in a canopy using this theoretically estimated value of ktn is slightly more uniform than the profile predicted by the optimum nitrogen distribution that maximizes canopy photosynthesis. Relative to the optimum profile, the predicted profile is somewhat closer to the observed one. Based on the L-N logarithmic equation and the theoretical ktn value, we further quantified early leaf area development of a canopy in relation to nitrogen using simulation analysis. In general, there are two types of relations between L and N, which hold for canopies at different developmental phases. For a fully developed canopy where the lowest leaves are senescing due to nitrogen shortage, the relationship between L and N is described well by the logarithmic model above. For a young, unclosed canopy (i.e. L < 1.0), the relation between L and N is nearly linear. This linearity is virtually the special case of the logarithmic model when applied to a young canopy where its total nitrogen content approaches zero and the amount of nitrogen in its lowest leaves is well above nb. The expected patterns of the L-N relationship are discussed for the phase of transition from young to fully developed canopies.

  11. Quantitative assessment of industrial VOC emissions in China: Historical trend, spatial distribution, uncertainties, and projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chenghang; Shen, Jiali; Zhang, Yongxin; Huang, Weiwei; Zhu, Xinbo; Wu, Xuecheng; Chen, Linghong; Gao, Xiang; Cen, Kefa

    2017-02-01

    The temporal trends of industrial volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions was comprehensively summarized for the 2011 to 2013 period, and the projections for 2020 to 2050 for China were set. The results demonstrate that industrial VOC emissions in China increased from 15.3 Tg in 2011 to 29.4 Tg in 2013 at an annual average growth rate of 38.3%. Guangdong (3.45 Tg), Shandong (2.85 Tg), and Jiangsu (2.62 Tg) were the three largest contributors collectively accounting for 30.4% of the national total emissions in 2013. The top three average industrial VOC emissions per square kilometer were Shanghai (247.2 ton/km2), Tianjin (62.8 ton/km2), and Beijing (38.4 ton/km2), which were 12-80 times of the average level in China. The data from the inventory indicate that the use of VOC-containing products, as well as the production and use of VOCs as raw materials, as well as for storage and transportation contributed 75.4%, 10.3%, 9.1%, and 5.2% of the total emissions, respectively. ArcGIS was used to display the remarkable spatial distribution variation by allocating the emission into 1 km × 1 km grid cells with a population as surrogate indexes. Combined with future economic development and population change, as well as implementation of policy and upgrade of control technologies, three scenarios (scenarios A, B, and C) were set to project industrial VOC emissions for the years 2020, 2030, and 2050, which present the industrial VOC emissions in different scenarios and the potential of reducing emissions. Finally, the result shows that the collaborative control policies considerably influenced industrial VOC emissions.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Depth, Distribution, and Density of Cysts in Acanthamoeba Keratitis Using Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping; Tepelus, Tudor; Vickers, Laura A; Baghdasaryan, Elmira; Huang, Jianyan; Irvine, John A; Hsu, Hugo Y; Sadda, Srinivas; Lee, Olivia L

    2017-08-01

    To quantify the density, distribution, and depth of invasion of cysts in the corneas of eyes with acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) by in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) with a novel scanning pattern. The medical records of patients with AK evaluated at the Doheny Eye Center UCLA between September 2014 and July 2016 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients with clinically diagnosed AK underwent IVCM at various time points during their clinical course. Five corneal locations were scanned at each time point: the central area and 4 standard points on the peripheral cornea corresponding to temporal, nasal, inferior, and superior locations. The IVCM scans were manually graded to quantify the maximum depth of invasion and density of cysts. Twenty-one eyes of 18 patients with visible cysts on IVCM were included. Mean cyst density at presentation was 214.1 ± 120.2/mm (range: 64-484 cells/mm), and the average cyst depth was 164.3 ± 81.2 μm (range: 17-290 μm). In 17 eyes, the average cyst depth was 139.4 ± 68.6 μm (range: 17-245 μm), mean cyst density was 177.9 ± 99.6/mm, and an average of 1.4 ± 1.3 quadrants was infiltrated at presentation, and reached clinical resolution with medical treatment without surgical intervention. Four eyes that ultimately underwent therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty had cysts in all 4 quadrants and deeper cyst infiltration; the average cyst depth in these corneas was 270.5 ± 17.5 μm (range: 252-290). Eyes with AK requiring therapeutic keratoplasty were more likely to have a deeper and more diffuse penetration of cysts in the cornea compared with those resolving with medical treatment.

  13. A quantitative assessment of the distribution and extent of urban clusters in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qian; HU Yunfeng; LIU Jiyuan; LIU Yue; REN Wangbing; LI Jun

    2012-01-01

    Urban clusters are the expected products of high levels of industry and urbanization in a country,as well as being the basic units of participation in global competition.With respect to China,urban clusters are regarded as the dominant formation for boosting the Chinese urbanization process.However,to date,there is no coincident,efficient,and credible methodological system and set of techniques to identify Chinese urban clusters.This research investigates the potential of a computerized identification method supported by geographic information techniques to provide a better understanding of the distribution of Chinese urban clusters.The identification method is executed based on a geographic information database,a digital elevation model,and socio-economic data with the aid of Arclnfo Macro Language programming.In the method,preliminary boundaries are identified according to transportation accessibility,and final identifications are achieved from limiting city numbers,population,and GDP in a region with the aid of the rasterized socio-economic dataset.The results show that the method identifies nine Chinese urban clusters,i.e.,Pearl River Delta,Lower Yangtze River Valley,Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region,Northeast China Plain,Middle Yangtze River Valley,Central China Plains,Western Taiwan Strait,Guanzhong and Chengdu-Chongqing urban clusters.This research represents the first study involving the computerized identification of Chinese urban clusters.Moreover,compared to other related studies,the study's approach,which combines transportation accessibility and socio-economic characteristics,is shown to be a distinct,effective and reliable way of identifying urban cIusters.

  14. The Carina spiral feature: Strömgren-β photometry approach. II. Distances and space distribution of the O and B stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltcheva, N.; Scorcio, M.

    2010-05-01

    Aims: In recent years a significant development has become evident in the study of the stellar structure of the Galactic disk. This is especially true for the 3rd Galactic quadrant, where the stellar population was extensively investigated beyond 10 kpc, revealing details about the warped geometry of the thin and thick disks and outer arm. The 4th Galactic quadrant offers even better opportunity to follow the distribution of the young stellar populace to a large distance, since the line of sight is parallel to the largest single segment of a spiral arm seen from our position in the Galaxy: the Carina spiral feature. This paper further contributes to the study of the structure of the Galactic disk in the direction of Carina field utilizing homogeneous photometric distances of a sample of about 600 bright early-type stars seen in this direction up to 6 kpc. Methods: The derived stellar distances are based on uvbyβ photometry. All O and B type stars with uvbyβ data presently available are included in the study. Results: The photometry-derived parameters allow us to study the structure and characteristics of this segment of the Carina arm. We find that the stellar distribution is consistent with a location of the apparent edge of the arm at l = 287°. Toward the edge of the arm the warp of the Galactic plane can be traced up to 6 kpc where it reaches negative 200 pc. The field toward the edge seems to be much more complex than harboring just one OB association, and it is likely that some of the apparent concentrations in this field represent parts of long segments of the edge. In the 284° longitude range an interarm space about 1 kpc wide is found beyond 850 pc from the Sun. The giant molecular clouds and open clusters do not follow the edge of the arm as defined by the OB stars and indicate a possible presence of an age gradient in a direction perpendicular to the formal Galactic plane. Table 4 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to

  15. Distribution of parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the hippocampus of the gerbil--a qualitative and quantitative statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsch, C; Scotti, A L; Nitsch, F M

    1995-08-01

    In the gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) hippocampal formation, the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) shows a unique species-specific distribution: it is present in the perforant path from the entorhinal cortex to the stratum molecular of the dentate are and cornu ammonis. A possible relation of this to the seizure-sensitivity of gerbils has been suggested. In addition, as in other species, PV is contained in a subpopulation of GABAergic nerve cells of the gerbil hippocampus. The characteristics of these PV-containing neurons are here described. Distribution and shape of the PV-positive neurons in general agreed with the features described for rat hippocampus with two notable exceptions: in CA2 PV-containing perikarya were densely crowded and gave rise to an intense immunoreactive plexus around the pyramidal cells and, in CA1, the number of stained neurons was variable, often much lower than in rats and occasionally not a single PV-positive neuron was present. In parasagittal brain sections of the lateralities 1.0, 1.6 and 2.2 mm from the midline, obtained from 27 male gerbils, the number of PV-containing neurons was determined. The data set obtained in CA3 and dentate area resembled unimodal distributions, while in CA1 a bimodal frequency distribution was present. Since parametric and non-parametric correlation tests rely on a unimodal distribution of the data set, they gave falsely significant values in CA1. The bimodal distribution suggests that, with respect to the PV-containing interneurons in CA1, two different populations of gerbils were included in our sample, those with many positive neurons and those with only a few. Since the nerve terminal staining is preserved also in those gerbils with only a few positive perikarya in CA1, it seems possible that an unknown factor influenced PV expression and storage in the soma. Sex, age, seasonal or circadian rhythm or quality of immunocytochemical staining did not influence the outcome of the quantitative

  16. Quantitative assessment on the orientation and distribution of carbon fibers in a conductive polymer composite using high-frequency ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Hsun; Huang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Shyh-Hau

    2012-05-01

    Conductive polymer composites, typically fabricated from a mix of conductive fillers and a polymer substrate, are commonly applied as bipolar plates in a fuel cell stack. Electrical conductivity is a crucial property that greatly depends on the distribution and orientation of the fillers. In this study, a 50-MHz ultrasound imaging system and analysis techniques capable of nondestructively assessing the properties of carbon fibers (CFs) in conductive polymer composites were developed. Composite materials containing a mix of polycarbonate substrates and 0 to 0.3 wt% of CFs were prepared using an injection molding technique. Ultrasonic A-line signals and C-scan images were acquired from each composite sample in regions at a depth of 0.15 mm beneath the sample surface (region A) and those at a depth of 0.3 mm (region B). The integrated backscatter (IB) and the Nakagami statistical parameter were calculated to quantitatively assess the samples. The area ratio, defined as the percentage of areas composed of CF images normalized by that of the whole C-scan image, was applied to further quantify the orientation of CFs perpendicular to the sample surface. Corresponding to the increase in CF concentrations from 0.1 to 0.3 wt%, the average IB and Nakagami parameter (m) of the composite samples increased from -78.10 ± 2.20 (mean ± standard deviation) to -72.66 ± 1.40 dB and from 0.024 ± 0.012 to 0.048 ± 0.011, respectively. The corresponding area ratios were respectively estimated to be 0.78 ± 0.35%, 2.33 ± 0.66%, and 2.20 ± 0.60% in region A of the samples; those of CFs with a perpendicular orientation were 0.04 ± 0.03%, 0.08 ± 0.02%, and 0.12 ± 0.05%. The area ratios in region B of the samples were calculated to be 1.19 ± 0.54%, 2.81 ± 0.42%, and 2.64 ± 0.76%, and those of CFs with a perpendicular orientation were 0.07 ± 0.04%, 0.12 ± 0.04%, and 0.14 ± 0.03%. According to the results of the orientations and ultrasonic images, CFs tended to distribute more

  17. Quantitative Analysis of the Distribution of cis-Eicosenoic Acid Positional Isomers in Marine Fishes from the Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senarath, Samanthika; Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Nagai, Toshiharu; Yoshida, Akihiko; Beppu, Fumiaki; Jayasinghe, Chamila; Devadawson, Chandravathany; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the occurrence and distribution of cis-eicosenoic acid (c-20:1) positional isomers in fishes from the Indian Ocean and compared to those from the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean. Lipids were extracted from the edible part of the fish and then methylated. The eicosenoic acid methyl ester fraction was separated from total fatty acid methyl esters by reversed-phase HPLC and quantitatively analyzed using a GC-FID fitted with the SLB-IL111 highly polar GC column. c14-20:1 was used as an internal standard. The results indicated that the highest levels of c-20:1 positional isomers were found in fishes from the Pacific Ocean (saury, 166.95±12.4 mg/g of oil), followed by the Atlantic Ocean (capelin, 162.7±3.5 mg/g of oil), and lastly in fishes from the Indian Ocean (goatfish, 34.39 mg/g of oil). With only a few exceptions, the most abundant 20:1 positional isomer found in fishes of the Indian and Atlantic Ocean was the c11-20:1 isomer (>50%) followed by the c13-20:1 isomer (<25%). Unusually, the c7-20:1 isomer was predominantly found in a few fishes such as the tooth ponyfish, longface emperor, and commerson's sole. The c9, c5, and c15-20:1 isomers were the least occurring in fishes from the Indian and Atlantic Ocean. In contrast, the c9-20:1 isomer was the principal isomer identified in fishes from the Pacific Ocean. The results revealed that the content and distribution of c-20:1 positional isomers varied among fishes in different oceans. The data presented in the current study are the first to report on the distribution of c-20:1 positional isomers in fishes from the Indian Ocean.

  18. Quantitative analysis of cone photoreceptor distribution and its relationship with axial length, age, and early age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Obata

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: It has not been clarified whether early age-related macular degeneration (AMD is associated with cone photoreceptor distribution. We used adaptive optics fundus camera to examine cone photoreceptors in the macular area of aged patients and quantitatively analyzed its relationship between the presence of early AMD and cone distribution. METHODS: Sixty cases aged 50 or older were studied. The eyes were examined with funduscopy and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to exclude the eyes with any abnormalities at two sites of measurement, 2° superior and 5° temporal to the fovea. High-resolution retinal images with cone photoreceptor mosaic were obtained with adaptive optics fundus camera (rtx1, Imagine Eyes, France. After adjusting for axial length, cone packing density was calculated and the relationship with age, axial length, or severity of early AMD based on the age-related eye disease study (AREDS classification was analyzed. RESULTS: Patient's age ranged from 50 to 77, and axial length from 21.7 to 27.5 mm. Mean density in metric units and that in angular units were 24,900 cells/mm2, 2,170 cells/deg2 at 2° superior, and 18,500 cells/mm2, 1,570 cels/deg2 at 5° temporal, respectively. Axial length was significantly correlated with the density calculated in metric units, but not with that in angular units. Age was significantly correlated with the density both in metric and angular units at 2° superior. There was no significant difference in the density in metric and angular units between the eyes with AREDS category one and those with categories two or three. CONCLUSION: Axial length and age were significantly correlated with parafoveal cone photoreceptor distribution. The results do not support that early AMD might influence cone photoreceptor density in the area without drusen or pigment abnormalities.

  19. Quantifying full phenological event distributions reveals simultaneous advances, temporal stability and delays in spring and autumn migration timing in long-distance migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Will T S; Bolton, Mark; Davis, Peter; Dennis, Roy; Broad, Roger; Robertson, Iain; Riddiford, Nick J; Harvey, Paul V; Riddington, Roger; Shaw, Deryk N; Parnaby, David; Reid, Jane M

    2017-04-01

    Phenological changes in key seasonally expressed life-history traits occurring across periods of climatic and environmental change can cause temporal mismatches between interacting species, and thereby impact population and community dynamics. However, studies quantifying long-term phenological changes have commonly only measured variation occurring in spring, measured as the first or mean dates on which focal traits or events were observed. Few studies have considered seasonally paired events spanning spring and autumn or tested the key assumption that single convenient metrics accurately capture entire event distributions. We used 60 years (1955-2014) of daily bird migration census data from Fair Isle, Scotland, to comprehensively quantify the degree to which the full distributions of spring and autumn migration timing of 13 species of long-distance migratory bird changed across a period of substantial climatic and environmental change. In most species, mean spring and autumn migration dates changed little. However, the early migration phase (≤10th percentile date) commonly got earlier, while the late migration phase (≥90th percentile date) commonly got later. Consequently, species' total migration durations typically lengthened across years. Spring and autumn migration phenologies were not consistently correlated within or between years within species and hence were not tightly coupled. Furthermore, different metrics quantifying different aspects of migration phenology within seasons were not strongly cross-correlated, meaning that no single metric adequately described the full pattern of phenological change. These analyses therefore reveal complex patterns of simultaneous advancement, temporal stability and delay in spring and autumn migration phenologies, altering species' life-history structures. Additionally, they demonstrate that this complexity is only revealed if multiple metrics encompassing entire seasonal event distributions, rather than single

  20. Long-distance dispersal by sea-drifted seeds has maintained the global distribution of Ipomoea pes-caprae subsp. brasiliensis (Convolvulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miryeganeh, Matin; Takayama, Koji; Tateishi, Yoichi; Kajita, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Ipomoea pes-caprae (Convolvulaceae), a pantropical plant with sea-drifted seeds, is found globally in the littoral areas of tropical and subtropical regions. Unusual long-distance seed dispersal has been believed to be responsible for its extraordinarily wide distribution; however, the actual level of inter-population migration has never been studied. To clarify the level of migration among populations of I. pes-caprae across its range, we investigated nucleotide sequence variations by using seven low-copy nuclear markers and 272 samples collected from 34 populations that cover the range of the species. We applied coalescent-based approaches using Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods to assess migration rates, direction of migration, and genetic diversity among five regional populations. Our results showed a high number of migrants among the regional populations of I. pes-caprae subsp. brasiliensis, which suggests that migration among distant populations was maintained by long-distance seed dispersal across its global range. These results also provide strong evidence for recent trans-oceanic seed dispersal by ocean currents in all three oceanic regions. We also found migration crossing the American continents. Although this is an apparent land barrier for sea-dispersal, migration between populations of the East Pacific and West Atlantic regions was high, perhaps because of trans-isthmus migration via pollen dispersal. Therefore, the migration and gene flow among populations across the vast range of I. pes-caprae is maintained not only by seed dispersal by sea-drifted seeds, but also by pollen flow over the American continents. On the other hand, populations of subsp. pes-caprae that are restricted to only the northern part of the Indian Ocean region were highly differentiated from subsp. brasiliensis. Cryptic barriers that prevented migration by sea dispersal between the ranges of the two subspecies and/or historical differentiation that caused local adaptation

  1. Long-distance dispersal by sea-drifted seeds has maintained the global distribution of Ipomoea pes-caprae subsp. brasiliensis (Convolvulaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matin Miryeganeh

    Full Text Available Ipomoea pes-caprae (Convolvulaceae, a pantropical plant with sea-drifted seeds, is found globally in the littoral areas of tropical and subtropical regions. Unusual long-distance seed dispersal has been believed to be responsible for its extraordinarily wide distribution; however, the actual level of inter-population migration has never been studied. To clarify the level of migration among populations of I. pes-caprae across its range, we investigated nucleotide sequence variations by using seven low-copy nuclear markers and 272 samples collected from 34 populations that cover the range of the species. We applied coalescent-based approaches using Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods to assess migration rates, direction of migration, and genetic diversity among five regional populations. Our results showed a high number of migrants among the regional populations of I. pes-caprae subsp. brasiliensis, which suggests that migration among distant populations was maintained by long-distance seed dispersal across its global range. These results also provide strong evidence for recent trans-oceanic seed dispersal by ocean currents in all three oceanic regions. We also found migration crossing the American continents. Although this is an apparent land barrier for sea-dispersal, migration between populations of the East Pacific and West Atlantic regions was high, perhaps because of trans-isthmus migration via pollen dispersal. Therefore, the migration and gene flow among populations across the vast range of I. pes-caprae is maintained not only by seed dispersal by sea-drifted seeds, but also by pollen flow over the American continents. On the other hand, populations of subsp. pes-caprae that are restricted to only the northern part of the Indian Ocean region were highly differentiated from subsp. brasiliensis. Cryptic barriers that prevented migration by sea dispersal between the ranges of the two subspecies and/or historical differentiation that

  2. The Q-CHAT (Quantitative CHecklist for Autism in Toddlers): A Normally Distributed Quantitative Measure of Autistic Traits at 18-24 Months of Age--Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Carrie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Wheelwright, Sally; Charman, Tony; Richler, Jennifer; Pasco, Greg; Brayne, Carol

    2008-01-01

    We report a major revision of the CHecklist for Autism in Toddlers (CHAT). This "quantitative" CHAT (Q-CHAT) contains 25 items, scored on a 5 point scale (0-4). The Q-CHAT was completed by parents of n = 779 unselected toddlers (mean age 21 months) and n = 160 toddlers and preschoolers (mean age 44 months) with an Autism Spectrum…

  3. Quantile regression applied to spectral distance decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchini, D.; Cade, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    Remotely sensed imagery has long been recognized as a powerful support for characterizing and estimating biodiversity. Spectral distance among sites has proven to be a powerful approach for detecting species composition variability. Regression analysis of species similarity versus spectral distance allows us to quantitatively estimate the amount of turnover in species composition with respect to spectral and ecological variability. In classical regression analysis, the residual sum of squares is minimized for the mean of the dependent variable distribution. However, many ecological data sets are characterized by a high number of zeroes that add noise to the regression model. Quantile regressions can be used to evaluate trend in the upper quantiles rather than a mean trend across the whole distribution of the dependent variable. In this letter, we used ordinary least squares (OLS) and quantile regressions to estimate the decay of species similarity versus spectral distance. The achieved decay rates were statistically nonzero (p species similarity when habitats are more similar. In this letter, we demonstrated the power of using quantile regressions applied to spectral distance decay to reveal species diversity patterns otherwise lost or underestimated by OLS regression. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  4. A NEW METHOD FOR MEASURING EXTRAGALACTIC DISTANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshii, Yuzuru; Minezaki, Takeo [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Kobayashi, Yukiyasu [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Koshida, Shintaro [Center of Astro Engineering and Department of Electrical Engineering, Pontificia Univercsidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4868 (Chile); Peterson, Bruce A., E-mail: yoshii@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Mount Stromlo Observatory, Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek P.O., ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2014-03-20

    We have pioneered a new method for the measurement of extragalactic distances. This method uses the time lag between variations in the short wavelength and long wavelength light from an active galactic nucleus (AGN), based on a quantitative physical model of dust reverberation that relates the time lag to the absolute luminosity of the AGN. We use the large homogeneous data set from intensive monitoring observations in optical and near-infrared wavelength bands with the dedicated 2 m MAGNUM telescope to obtain the distances to 17 AGNs in the redshift range z = 0.0024 to z = 0.0353. These distance measurements are compared with distances measured using Cepheid variable stars, and are used to infer that H {sub 0} = 73 ± 3 (random) km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}. The systematic error in H {sub 0} is examined, and the uncertainty in the size distribution of dust grains is the largest source of the systematic error, which is much reduced for a sample of AGNs for which their parameter values in the model of dust reverberation are individually measured. This AGN time lag method can be used beyond 30 Mpc, the farthest distance reached by extragalactic Cepheids, and can be extended to high-redshift quasi-stellar objects.

  5. Development of acute toxicity quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and their use in linear alkylbenzene sulfonate species sensitivity distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Scott E; Brill, Jessica L; Rawlings, Jane M; Price, Brad B

    2016-07-01

    Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) is high tonnage and widely dispersed anionic surfactant used by the consumer products sector. A range of homologous structures are used in laundry applications that differ primarily on the length of the hydrophobic alkyl chain. This research summarizes the development of a set of acute toxicity QSARs (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships) for fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and daphnids (Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia) using accepted test guideline approaches. A series of studies on pure chain length LAS from C10 to C14 were used to develop the QSARs and the robustness of the QSARs was tested by evaluation of two technical mixtures of differing compositions. All QSARs were high quality (R(2) were 0.965-0.997, p < 0.0001). Toxicity normalization employing QSARs is used to interpret a broader array of tests on LAS chain length materials to a diverse group of test organisms with the objective of developing Species Sensitivity Distributions (SSDs) for various chain lengths of interest. Mixtures include environmental distributions measured from exposure monitoring surveys of wastewater effluents, various commercial mixtures, or specific chain lengths. SSD 5th percentile hazardous concentrations (HC5s) ranged from 0.129 to 0.254 mg/L for wastewater effluents containing an average of 11.26-12 alkyl carbons. The SSDs are considered highly robust given the breadth of species (n = 19), use of most sensitive endpoints from true chronic studies and the quality of the underlying statistical properties of the SSD itself. The data continue to indicate a low hazard to the environment relative to expected environmental concentrations.

  6. Rules of RNA specificity of hnRNP A1 revealed by global and quantitative analysis of its affinity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Niyati; Lin, Hsuan-Chun; Morgan, Christopher E.; Harris, Michael E.; Tolbert, Blanton S.

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a multipurpose RNA-binding protein (RBP) involved in normal and pathological RNA metabolism. Transcriptome-wide mapping and in vitro evolution identify consensus hnRNP A1 binding motifs; however, such data do not reveal how surrounding RNA sequence and structural context modulate affinity. We determined the affinity of hnRNP A1 for all possible sequence variants (n = 16,384) of the HIV exon splicing silencer 3 (ESS3) 7-nt apical loop. Analysis of the affinity distribution identifies the optimal motif 5′-YAG-3′ and shows how its copy number, position in the loop, and loop structure modulate affinity. For a subset of ESS3 variants, we show that specificity is determined by association rate constants and that variants lacking the minimal sequence motif bind competitively with consensus RNA. Thus, the results reveal general rules of specificity of hnRNP A1 and provide a quantitative framework for understanding how it discriminates between alternative competing RNA ligands in vivo. PMID:28193894

  7. The Distance to M51

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Dolphin, Andrew E; Berg, Danielle; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Great investments of observing time have been dedicated to the study of nearby spiral galaxies with diverse goals ranging from understanding the star formation process to characterizing their dark matter distributions. Accurate distances are fundamental to interpreting observations of these galaxies, yet many of the best studied nearby galaxies have distances based on methods with relatively large uncertainties. We have started a program to derive accurate distances to these galaxies. Here we measure the distance to M51 - the Whirlpool galaxy - from newly obtained Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging using the tip of the red giant branch method. We measure the distance modulus to be 8.58+/-0.10 Mpc (statistical), corresponding to a distance modulus of 29.67+/-0.02 mag. Our distance is an improvement over previous results as we use a well-calibrated, stable distance indicator, precision photometry in a optimally selected field of view, and a Bayesian Maximum Likelihood technique that reduces measurement unce...

  8. Quantitative determination of the mineral distribution in different collagen zones of calcifying tendon using high voltage electron microscopic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, B. F.; Song, M. J.; Landis, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    High voltage electron microscopic tomography was used to make the first quantitative determination of the distribution of mineral between different regions of collagen fibrils undergoing early calcification in normal leg tendons of the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. The tomographic 3-D reconstruction was computed from a tilt series of 61 different views spanning an angular range of +/- 60 degrees in 2 degrees intervals. Successive applications of an interactive computer operation were used to mask the collagen banding pattern of either hole or overlap zones into separate versions of the reconstruction. In such 3-D volumes, regions specified by the mask retained their original image density while the remaining volume was set to background levels. This approach was also applied to the mineral crystals present in the same volumes to yield versions of the 3-D reconstructions that were masked for both the crystal mass and the respective collagen zones. Density profiles from these volumes contained a distinct peak corresponding only to the crystal mass. A comparison of the integrated density of this peak from each profile established that 64% of the crystals observed were located in the collagen hole zones and 36% were found in the overlap zones. If no changes in crystal stability occur once crystals are formed, this result suggests the possibilities that nucleation of mineral is preferentially and initially associated with the hole zones, nucleation occurs more frequently in the hole zones, the rate of crystal growth is more rapid in the hole zones, or a combination of these alternatives. All lead to the conclusion that the overall accumulation of mineral mass is predominant in the collagen hole zones compared to overlap zones during early collagen fibril calcification.

  9. Gastrointestinal tract distribution of Salmonella enteritidis in orally infected mice with a species-specific fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To identify and understand the regular distribution pattern and primary penetration site for Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis) in the gastrointestinal tract.METHODS: Based on the species-specific DNA sequence of S. enteritidis from GenBank, a species-specific real-time, fluorescence-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) was developed for the detection of S.enteritidis. We used this assay to detect genomic DNA of S. enteritidis in the gastrointestinal tract, including duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon, rectum,esophagus and stomach, from mice after oral infection.RESULTS: S. enteritidis was consistently detected in all segments of the gastrointestinal tract. The jejunum and ileum were positive at 8 h post inoculation, and the final organ to show a positive result was the stomach at 18 h post inoculation. The copy number of S. enteritidis DNA in each tissue reached a peak at 24-36 h post inoculation,with the jejunum, ileum and cecum containing high concentrations of S. enteritidis, whereas the duodenum,colon, rectum, stomach and esophagus had low concentrations. S. enteritidis began to decrease and vanished at 2 d post inoculation, but it was still present up to 5 d post inoculation in the jejunum, ileum and cecum, without causing apparent symptoms. By 5 d post inoculation, the cecum had significantly higher numbers of S. enteritidis than any of the other areas (P < 0.01),and this appeared to reflect its function as a repository for S. enteritidis.CONCLUSION: The results provided significant data for clarifying the pathogenic mechanism of S. enteritidis in the gastrointestinal tract, and showed that the jejunum,ileum and cecum are the primary sites of invasion in normal mice after oral infection. This study will help to further understanding of the mechanisms of action of S.enteritidis.

  10. Distance learning for similarity estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie; Amores, Jaume; Sebe, Nicu; Radeva, Petia; Tian, Qi

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we present a general guideline to find a better distance measure for similarity estimation based on statistical analysis of distribution models and distance functions. A new set of distance measures are derived from the harmonic distance, the geometric distance, and their generalized variants according to the Maximum Likelihood theory. These measures can provide a more accurate feature model than the classical Euclidean and Manhattan distances. We also find that the feature elements are often from heterogeneous sources that may have different influence on similarity estimation. Therefore, the assumption of single isotropic distribution model is often inappropriate. To alleviate this problem, we use a boosted distance measure framework that finds multiple distance measures which fit the distribution of selected feature elements best for accurate similarity estimation. The new distance measures for similarity estimation are tested on two applications: stereo matching and motion tracking in video sequences. The performance of boosted distance measure is further evaluated on several benchmark data sets from the UCI repository and two image retrieval applications. In all the experiments, robust results are obtained based on the proposed methods.

  11. The Use of Ex Vivo Whole-organ Imaging and Quantitative Tissue Histology to Determine the Bio-distribution of Fluorescently Labeled Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Jeremy W D; Bidwell, Gene L

    2016-12-24

    Fluorescent labeling is a well-established process for examining the fate of labeled molecules under a variety of experimental conditions both in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescent probes are particularly useful in determining the bio-distribution of administered large molecules, where the addition of a small-molecule fluorescent label is unlikely to affect the kinetics or bio-distribution of the compound. A variety of methods exist to examine bio-distribution that vary significantly in the amount of effort required and whether the resulting measurements are fully quantitative, but using multiple methods in conjunction can provide a rapid and effective system for analyzing bio-distributions. Ex vivo whole-organ imaging is a method that can be used to quickly compare the relative concentrations of fluorescent molecules within tissues and between multiple types of tissues or treatment groups. Using an imaging platform designed for live-animal or whole-organ imaging, fluorescence within intact tissues can be determined without further processing, saving time and labor while providing an accurate picture of the overall bio-distribution. This process is ideal in experiments attempting to determine the tissue specificity of a compound or for the comparison of multiple different compounds. Quantitative tissue histology on the other hand requires extensive further processing of tissues in order to create a quantitative measure of the labeled compounds. To accurately assess bio-distribution, all tissues of interest must be sliced, scanned, and analyzed relative to standard curves in order to make comparisons between tissues or groups. Quantitative tissue histology is the gold standard for determining absolute compound concentrations within tissues. Here, we describe how both methods can be used together effectively to assess the ability of different administration methods and compound modifications to target and deliver fluorescently labeled molecules to the central nervous

  12. Report of study group 5.4 remote operation of distribution networks; Rapport du comite de travail 5.4 distribution du gaz: exploitation a distance des reseaux de distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spohn, D.; Osiadacz, A.

    2000-07-01

    This study by the IGU WOC 5.4 reviews, at a management level, the application of remote monitoring and control systems for distribution networks. Gas distribution companies have to carefully balance the safety, quality, economic and financial aspects of managing geographically distributed assets to meet customer needs. Remote systems are a key tool in meeting these objectives. A questionnaire was developed to identify the key drives for the selection of remote monitoring and control systems, high level company parameters and current technologies in use. The field in questionnaires received by the WOC 5.4 show that monitoring equipment and remote control systems for gas distribution in various configurations are commonly utilized by the firms operating in this field. The reason why the firms themselves did adopt a remote control system mainly depends on safety as well as on a reduction of operating costs due to reduction in the personnel and related overheads associated with the management of the system. (authors)

  13. A New Method for Measuring Extragalactic Distances

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshii, Y; Minezaki, T; Koshida, S; Peterson, B A

    2014-01-01

    We have pioneered a new method for the measurement of extragalactic distances. This method uses the time-lag between variations in the short wavelength and long wavelength light from an active galactic nucleus (AGN), based on a quantitative physical model of dust reverberation that relates the time-lag to the absolute luminosity of the AGN. We use the large homogeneous data set from intensive monitoring observations in optical and near-infrared wavelength bands with the dedicated 2-m MAGNUM telescope to obtain the distances to 17 AGNs in the redshift range z=0.0024 to z=0.0353. These distance measurements are compared with distances measured using Cepheid variable stars, and are used to infer that H_0= 73 +- 3 (random) km/s/Mpc. The systematic error in H_0 is examined, and the uncertainty in the size distribution of dust grains is the largest source of the systematic error, which is much reduced for a sample of AGNs for which their parameter values in the model of dust reverberation are individually measured....

  14. A novel molecular distance edge vector as applied to chemical modeling of quantitative structure-retention relationships: Various gas chromatographic retention behaviors of polychlorinated dibenzo-furans on different polarity-varying stationary phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Hong; HUANG Ping; HU Yinyu; YE Nancy; LI Zhiliang

    2005-01-01

    Based on the identical group as a pseudo atom instead of a typical atom, a novel modified molecular distance-edge (MDE) vector μ was developed in our laboratory to characterize chemical structure of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) congeners and/or isomers. Quantitative structure-retention relationships (QSRRs) between the new VMDE parameters and gas chromatographic (GC) retention behavior of PCDFs were then generated by multiple linear regression (MLR) method for non-polar, moderately polar, and polar stationary phases. Four excellent models with high correlation coefficients, R=0.984-0.995, were proposed for non-polar columns (DB-5, SE-54, OV-101). For the moderately polar columns (OV-1701), the correlation coefficient of the developed good model is only 0.958. For the polar columns (SP-2300), the QSRR model is poor with R=0.884. Then cross validation with leave-one out of procedure (CV) is performed in high correlation with the non-polar (Rcv=992-0.974) and weakly polar (Rcv=921) columns and in little correlation (Rcv=0.834) with the polar columns. These results show that the new μ vector is suitable for describing the retention behaviors of PCDFs on non-polar and moderately polar stationary phases and not for the various gas chromatographic retention behaviors of PCDFs on the different polarity-varying stationary phases.

  15. A Quantitative Analysis of Distributed Leadership in Practice: Teachers' Perception of Their Engagement in Four Dimensions of Distributed Leadership in Bhutanese Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashi, Kelzang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the teacher engagement in distributed leadership practices within the four dimensions of the distributed leadership in Bhutan. It seeks to investigate the differences in teachers' perception of distributed leadership based on teacher and school background including gender, experience and qualification,…

  16. Dominant Microbial Composition and Its Vertical Distribution in Saline Meromictic Lake Kaiike (Japan) as Revealed by Quantitative Oligonucleotide Probe Membrane Hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2004-01-01

    Vertical distributions of dominant bacterial populations in saline meromictic Lake Kaiike were investigated throughout the water column and sediment by quantitative oligonucleotide probe membrane hybridization. Three oligonucleotide probes specific for the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA of three groups of Chlorobiaceae were newly designed. In addition, three general domain (Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya)-specific probes, two δ-Proteobacteria-specific probes, a Chlorobiaceae-specific probe, and a C...

  17. [Vertical distribution and quantitative dynamics of dominant functional groups of arthropod community in rice fields and estimation of natural enemy effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, S; Zhang, X; Cheng, X

    2000-02-01

    The study showed that Lycosid (wolf spider) mainly distributed in the basal part of rice plants, not as wide as we know in past. Tetragnathid did not limited in the upper part of plants, but might translate to middle or lower part when affected by insecticide. The relationship between the vertical distributions of top and basal species was not significant. Besides the amount of natural enemies, the spatial distribution characteristics of natural enemies and brownplanthopper, and the proportion of brownplanthopper to total preys of natural enemies were the factors affecting the role of natural enemies on the population dynamics of brownplanthopper in rice fields. A model to evaluate the effect of natural enemies to brownplanthopper was put forward, which included the message of quantitative dynamics, spatial distribution and feeding characteristics of natural enemies, brownplanthopper and neutral insects.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Influence Factors on Distribution Efficiency of Agricultural Products: A Case Study using Data Envelopment Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeping Chu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the influence factors on the distribution efficiency of agricultural products. Distribution efficiency of agricultural product directly reflects the efficiency of agricultural distribution system. The output and cost in the process of agricultural distribution can be accessed by distribution efficiency. Much work has been done to measured distribution efficiency by single indicator but little work has been done to investigate the multiply indicators and their impacts on the distribution efficiency of agricultural products. Hence, for the first time, the Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA has been used to assess the influence of multiply indicators on the distribution efficiency of agricultural products. A case study using the historical data has been carried out. The empirical analysis results show that the level of informatization and logistics infrastructure greatly influence the distribution efficiency of agricultural products while the Logistics transportation and the professional level of labors do not promote the efficiency of agricultural distribution system. Hence, useful suggestions could be proposed to provide theoretical reference for the construction of robust and efficient agricultural distribution system.

  19. The Monge distance between quantum states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zyczkowski, Karol [Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Slomczynski, Wojciech [Instytut Matematyki, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland)

    1998-11-13

    We define a metric in the space of quantum states taking the Monge distance between corresponding Husimi distributions (Q-functions). This quantity fulfils the axioms of a metric and satisfies the following semiclassical property: the distance between two coherent states is equal to the Euclidean distance between corresponding points in the classical phase space. We compute analytically distances between certain states (coherent, squeezed, Fock and thermal) and discuss a scheme for numerical computation of Monge distance for two arbitrary quantum states. (author)

  20. Molecular imaging of melanin distribution in vivo and quantitative differential diagnosis of human pigmented lesions using label-free harmonic generation biopsy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chi-Kuang; Wei, Ming-Liang; Su, Yu-Hsiang; Weng, Wei-Hung; Liao, Yi-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Harmonic generation microscopy is a noninvasive repetitive imaging technique that provides real-time 3D microscopic images of human skin with a sub-femtoliter resolution and high penetration down to the reticular dermis. In this talk, we show that with a strong resonance effect, the third-harmonic-generation (THG) modality provides enhanced contrast on melanin and allows not only differential diagnosis of various pigmented skin lesions but also quantitative imaging for longterm tracking. This unique capability makes THG microscopy the only label-free technique capable of identifying the active melanocytes in human skin and to image their different dendriticity patterns. In this talk, we will review our recent efforts to in vivo image melanin distribution and quantitatively diagnose pigmented skin lesions using label-free harmonic generation biopsy. This talk will first cover the spectroscopic study on the melanin enhanced THG effect in human cells and the calibration strategy inside human skin for quantitative imaging. We will then review our recent clinical trials including: differential diagnosis capability study on pigmented skin tumors; as well as quantitative virtual biopsy study on pre- and post- treatment evaluation on melasma and solar lentigo. Our study indicates the unmatched capability of harmonic generation microscopy to perform virtual biopsy for noninvasive histopathological diagnosis of various pigmented skin tumors, as well as its unsurpassed capability to noninvasively reveal the pathological origin of different hyperpigmentary diseases on human face as well as to monitor the efficacy of laser depigmentation treatments. This work is sponsored by National Health Research Institutes.

  1. Adaptive Distance Protection for Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Hengwei; Guerrero, Josep M.; Quintero, Juan Carlos Vasquez

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing penetration of distributed generation resources, more and more microgrids can be found in distribution systems. This paper proposes a phasor measurement unit based distance protection strategy for microgrids in distribution system. At the same time, transfer tripping scheme...... is adopted to accelerate the tripping speed of the relays on the weak lines. The protection methodology is tested on a mid-voltage microgrid network in Aalborg, Denmark. The results show that the adaptive distance protection methodology has good selectivity and sensitivity. What is more, this system also has...

  2. End to end Distance and its Probability Distribution of Polymer Chains near a Flat Barrier%平面壁限制的高分子链末端距及其概率分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄建花; 蒋文华; 韩世钧

    2001-01-01

    The problem of polymer chains near an impenetrable plane is investigated by means of the probability method. It is shown that the 2kth moment of the reduced normal component of the end-to-end distance A2k only depends on the reduced distance to the plane of the first segment AZ0, here, A=l- 1· , n is the chain length, l is the bond length and fixed to be unity, which can be expressed as A2k=f(AZ0). When AZ0≈ 0, A2k is the maximum(A2k=k!), then it decreases rapidly and soon reaches the minimum with the increase of AZ0, afterwards A2k goes up gradually and reaches the limit value [(2k- 1)× (2k- 3)× … × 1]/2k when AZ0 is large enough. Suggesting that the polymer chain can be significantly elongated for small Z0 and contracted for an intermediate range of Z0 due to the barrier. The distribution of the end-to-end distance also depends on the distance Z0 to the plane of the first segment.

  3. Probability distribution of intersymbol distances in random symbolic sequences: Applications to improving detection of keywords in texts and of amino acid clustering in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpena, Pedro; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro A.; Carretero-Campos, Concepción; Coronado, Ana V.

    2016-11-01

    Symbolic sequences have been extensively investigated in the past few years within the framework of statistical physics. Paradigmatic examples of such sequences are written texts, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and protein sequences. In these examples, the spatial distribution of a given symbol (a word, a DNA motif, an amino acid) is a key property usually related to the symbol importance in the sequence: The more uneven and far from random the symbol distribution, the higher the relevance of the symbol to the sequence. Thus, many techniques of analysis measure in some way the deviation of the symbol spatial distribution with respect to the random expectation. The problem is then to know the spatial distribution corresponding to randomness, which is typically considered to be either the geometric or the exponential distribution. However, these distributions are only valid for very large symbolic sequences and for many occurrences of the analyzed symbol. Here, we obtain analytically the exact, randomly expected spatial distribution valid for any sequence length and any symbol frequency, and we study its main properties. The knowledge of the distribution allows us to define a measure able to properly quantify the deviation from randomness of the symbol distribution, especially for short sequences and low symbol frequency. We apply the measure to the problem of keyword detection in written texts and to study amino acid clustering in protein sequences. In texts, we show how the results improve with respect to previous methods when short texts are analyzed. In proteins, which are typically short, we show how the measure quantifies unambiguously the amino acid clustering and characterize its spatial distribution.

  4. Probability distribution of intersymbol distances in random symbolic sequences: Applications to improving detection of keywords in texts and of amino acid clustering in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpena, Pedro; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro A; Carretero-Campos, Concepción; Coronado, Ana V

    2016-11-01

    Symbolic sequences have been extensively investigated in the past few years within the framework of statistical physics. Paradigmatic examples of such sequences are written texts, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and protein sequences. In these examples, the spatial distribution of a given symbol (a word, a DNA motif, an amino acid) is a key property usually related to the symbol importance in the sequence: The more uneven and far from random the symbol distribution, the higher the relevance of the symbol to the sequence. Thus, many techniques of analysis measure in some way the deviation of the symbol spatial distribution with respect to the random expectation. The problem is then to know the spatial distribution corresponding to randomness, which is typically considered to be either the geometric or the exponential distribution. However, these distributions are only valid for very large symbolic sequences and for many occurrences of the analyzed symbol. Here, we obtain analytically the exact, randomly expected spatial distribution valid for any sequence length and any symbol frequency, and we study its main properties. The knowledge of the distribution allows us to define a measure able to properly quantify the deviation from randomness of the symbol distribution, especially for short sequences and low symbol frequency. We apply the measure to the problem of keyword detection in written texts and to study amino acid clustering in protein sequences. In texts, we show how the results improve with respect to previous methods when short texts are analyzed. In proteins, which are typically short, we show how the measure quantifies unambiguously the amino acid clustering and characterize its spatial distribution.

  5. Quantitative distribution of Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli on beef carcasses and raw beef at retail establishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Chávez, L; Cabrera-Diaz, E; Pérez-Montaño, J A; Garay-Martínez, L E; Varela-Hernández, J J; Castillo, A; Lucia, L; Ávila-Novoa, M G; Cardona-López, M A; Gutiérrez-González, P; Martínez-Gonzáles, N E

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella is a foodborne pathogen that commonly inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of a healthy feedlot cattle and can be transferred to the carcass surface during hide removal and evisceration procedures. Numerous investigations on Salmonella prevalence throughout different stages of the beef chain have been conducted. In contrast, limited studies are available on quantitative determinations of Salmonella at different steps in raw meat production. Quantitative data, particularly for pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella are important for quantitative risk assessment. Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli populations were enumerated on beef carcass samples collected at abattoirs and also in beef chunks and ground beef samples collected from butcher's shops at retail in Jalisco State, Mexico. Sponge samples from beef carcass sides (n=142) were collected immediately after final water wash and before chilling at three non-federally inspected abattoirs following USDA-FSIS sampling protocols. Beef chunks (n=84) and ground beef (n=65) samples were obtained from 86 butcher's shops. Salmonella enumeration was conducted by the Most Probable Number method and E. coli counts were determined using Petrifilm plates. Salmonella was isolated from 18% of beef carcasses, 39% of beef chunks and 71% of ground beef samples. Salmonella mean counts were 1.3±0.9 Log MPN/300 cm(2) on beef carcasses, 1.9±0.9 and 2.3±1.1 Log MPN/25 g in beef chunks and ground beef samples, respectively. Twenty-six Salmonella serotypes and 11 serogroups were identified among 432 isolates recovered. Salmonella typhimurium (14%), Salmonella sinstorf (12%) and S. Group E1 monophasic (10%) were the most frequent. Escherichia coli was present on 97, 84 and 100% of beef carcasses, beef chunks and ground beef samples, respectively. Escherichia coli mean counts were 3.2±0.7 Log CFU/300 cm(2), 3.9±1.1 and 4.5±1.2 Log CFU/25 g on beef carcasses, beef chunks and ground beef, respectively. Salmonella prevalence

  6. From language identification to language distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamallo, Pablo; Pichel, José Ramom; Alegria, Iñaki

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we define two quantitative distances to measure how far apart two languages are. The distance measure that we have identified as more accurate is based on the perplexity of n-gram models extracted from text corpora. An experiment to compare forty-four European languages has been performed. For this purpose, we computed the distances for all the possible language pairs and built a network whose nodes are languages and edges are distances. The network we have built on the basis of linguistic distances represents the current map of similarities and divergences among the main languages of Europe.

  7. Quantitative whole-body MRI in familial partial lipodystrophy type 2: changes in adipose tissue distribution coincide with biochemical improvement.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLaughlin, Patrick D

    2012-11-01

    OBJECTIVE: Familial partial lipodystrophy type 2 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man no. 151660) is a systemic disorder characterized by regional lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy, severe insulin resistance, and early cardiovascular death. At initial presentation, whole-body MRI allows the radiologist to accurately characterize patients with familial partial lipodystrophy and helps differentiate familial partial lipodystrophy from many other subtypes of lipodystophy. We present the findings of serial quantitative MRI analysis in two patients with familial partial lipodystrophy type 2 and outline the objective imaging changes that occur during medical therapy with oral rosiglitazone. CONCLUSION: Cervical adipose volume and visceral adipose area increased by 105% and 60% in the two patients and hepatic fat fraction decreased by 55% during a 21-month period of medical therapy. These changes coincided with a decrease in biochemical indexes of insulin resistance. Whole body quantitative MRI may therefore help to demonstrate the subclinical changes in fat deposition that occur as a result of novel treatment of familial partial lipodystrophy and with continued research may play a role in guiding the choice, duration, and intensity of novel medical therapy.

  8. Contrasting geographical distributions as a result of thermal tolerance and long-distance dispersal in two allegedly widespread tropical brown algae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tronholm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many tropical marine macroalgae are reported from all three ocean basins, though these very wide distributions may simply be an artifact resulting from inadequate taxonomy that fails to take into account cryptic diversity. Alternatively, pantropical distributions challenge the belief of limited intrinsic dispersal capacity of marine seaweeds and the effectiveness of the north-south oriented continents as dispersal barriers. We aimed to re-assess the distribution of two allegedly circumtropical brown algae, Dictyota ciliolata and D. crenulata, and interpret the realized geographical range of the respective species in relation to their thermal tolerance and major tectonic and climatic events during the Cenozoic. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Species delimitation was based on 184 chloroplast encoded psbA sequences, using a Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent method. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred by analyzing a six-gene dataset. Divergence times were estimated using relaxed molecular clock methods and published calibration data. Distribution ranges of the species were inferred from DNA-confirmed records, complemented with credible literature data and herbarium vouchers. Temperature tolerances of the species were determined by correlating distribution records with local SST values. We found considerable conflict between traditional and DNA-based species definitions. Dictyota crenulata consists of several pseudocryptic species, which have restricted distributions in the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Central America. In contrast, the pantropical distribution of D. ciliolata is confirmed and linked to its significantly wider temperature tolerance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Tectonically driven rearrangements of physical barriers left an unequivocal imprint on the current diversity patterns of marine macroalgae, as witnessed by the D. crenulata-complex. The nearly circumglobal tropical distribution of D. ciliolata, however

  9. A Finding Method of Business Risk Factors Using Characteristics of Probability Distributions of Effect Ratios on Qualitative and Quantitative Hybrid Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samejima, Masaki; Negoro, Keisuke; Mitsukuni, Koshichiro; Akiyoshi, Masanori

    We propose a finding method of business risk factors on qualitative and quantitative hybrid simulation in time series. Effect ratios of qualitative arcs in the hybrid simulation vary output values of the simulation, so we define effect ratios causing risk as business risk factors. Finding business risk factors in entire ranges of effect ratios is time-consuming. It is considered that probability distributions of effect ratios in present time step and ones in previous time step are similar, the probability distributions in present time step can be estimated. Our method finds business risk factors in only estimated ranges effectively. Experimental results show that a precision rate and a recall rate are 86%, and search time is decreased 20% at least.

  10. An Analysis of the Distribution of Student Financial Aid and Social Justice in China: A Quantitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiehua

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese government's stated objective of student financial aid (SFA) policy is to help students from low-income families to access higher levels of education. This article first explores the possible associations between the distribution of SFA and students' various demographic and academic backgrounds. Then it presents the findings regarding…

  11. Visualization of Time-Dependent Distribution of Rifampicin in Rat Brain Using MALDI MSI and Quantitative LCMS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobo, Adeola; Bratkowska, Dominika; Baijnath, Sooraj; Naiker, Suhashni; Bester, Linda A; Singh, Sanil D; Maguire, Glenn Eamond Mitchell; Kruger, Hendrik Gert; Govender, Thavendran

    2015-06-01

    Rifampicin (RIF) is a major component for short-course chemotherapy against tuberculosis, since it is active against rapidly metabolizing as well as dormant bacteria. According to the Lipinski rules, RIF should not enter the blood-brain barrier. Visualization of tissue drug distribution is of major importance in pharmacological studies; thus, far imaging of RIF in the brain has been limited to positron emission tomography. We propose using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging techniques as a suitable alternative for the visualization and localization of drug tissue distribution. Using the liquid chromatography mass spectrometric (LCMS) technique, we were able to quantify the concentrations of RIF in the uninfected rat brain; we paired this with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) to show the time-dependent manner in which RIF is able to enter the brain. Our results show that even at the minute concentrations measured with LCMS/MS we were able visualize the drug and show its exact distribution in the rat brain. Other available methods require nuclear labeling and the detection of gamma rays produced by labeled compounds to visualize the compound and its localization; MALDI MSI is a more recently developed technique, which can provide detailed information on drug distribution in tissues when compared to other imaging techniques. This study shows that without any requirement for complex preprocessing we are able to produce images with a relatively improved resolution and localization than those acquired using more complex imaging methods, showing MALDI MSI to be an invaluable tool in drug distribution studies.

  12. Performance Evaluation of Automobile Distribution Logistics Based on Quantitative Results%基于结果量化的汽车销售物流绩效评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李蓉; 杨林玲; 王向银; 刘坚

    2011-01-01

    以汽车销售物流绩效服务水平为研究对象,将平衡计分卡法和层次分析法引入汽车销售物流的绩效评价中,构建了系统科学全面的汽车销售物流绩效评价体系并确定了指标的客观权重,设计了目标实现指数,实现了评价结果与企业战略规划对比,为汽车销售物流业务的量化绩效评估和持续改进提供了有效技术手段.实例验证了该方法的可操作性和实用性.%Aiming at increasing the performance level of automobile distribution logistics, a systematic and comprehensive quantitative performance evaluation system for automotive distribution logistics is developed in this paper. To evaluate the performance in the system, the index weights are determined by combining the balanced seorecard method (BSC) and analytic hierarchy process (AHP). In the system, it presents goal realization indices such that the quantitative performance evaluation results can be compared with the planned one. In this way, it can promote the continuous improvement of the performance. The feasibility, operability, and practicability of the proposed method are verified through examples.

  13. A quantitative correlation of the effect of density distributions in roller-compacted ribbons on the mechanical properties of tablets using ultrasonics and X-ray tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akseli, Ilgaz; Iyer, Srinivas; Lee, Hwahsiung P; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2011-09-01

    Enabling the paradigm of quality by design requires the ability to quantitatively correlate material properties and process variables to measureable product performance attributes. In this study, we show how heterogeneities in compacted ribbon densities quantitatively correlate to tablet mechanical properties. These density variations, which have been purposely modulated by internal and external lubrications, are characterized longitudinally and transversally by nondestructive ultrasonic and X-ray micro-computed tomography measurements. Subsequently, different transversal regions of the compacted ribbon are milled under the same conditions, and granules with nominally the same particle size distribution are utilized to manufacture cylindrical tablets, whose mechanical properties are further analyzed by ultrasonic measurements. We consider three different ribbon conditions: no lubrication (case 1); lubricated powder (case 2); and lubricated tooling (hopper, side sealing plates, feed screws, and rolls) (case 3). This study quantitatively reveals that variation in local densities in ribbons (for case 1) and process conditions (i.e., internal case 2 and external lubrication case 3) during roller compaction significantly affect the mechanical properties of tablets even for granules with the same particle size distribution. For case 1, the mechanical properties of tablets depend on the spatial location where granules are produced. For cases 2 and 3, the ribbon density homogeneity was improved by the use of a lubricant. It is demonstrated that the mechanical performances of tablets are decreased due to applied lubricant and work-hardening phenomenon. Moreover, we extended our study to correlate the speed of sound to the tensile strength of the tablet. It is found that the speed of sound increases with the tensile strength for the tested tablets.

  14. Understanding the heterogeneity in volume overload and fluid distribution in decompensated heart failure is key to optimal volume management: role for blood volume quantitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Wayne L; Mullan, Brian P

    2014-06-01

    This study sought to quantitate total blood volume (TBV) in patients hospitalized for decompensated chronic heart failure (DCHF) and to determine the extent of volume overload, and the magnitude and distribution of blood volume and body water changes following diuretic therapy. The accurate assessment and management of volume overload in patients with DCHF remains problematic. TBV was measured by a radiolabeled-albumin dilution technique with intravascular volume, pre-to-post-diuretic therapy, evaluated at hospital admission and at discharge. Change in body weight in relation to quantitated TBV was used to determine interstitial volume contribution to total fluid loss. Twenty-six patients were prospectively evaluated. Two patients had normal TBV at admission. Twenty-four patients were hypervolemic with TBV (7.4 ± 1.6 liters) increased by +39 ± 22% (range, +9.5% to +107%) above the expected normal volume. With diuresis, TBV decreased marginally (+30 ± 16%). Body weight declined by 6.9 ± 5.2 kg, and fluid intake/fluid output was a net negative 8.4 ± 5.2 liters. Interstitial compartment fluid loss was calculated at 6.2 ± 4.0 liters, accounting for 85 ± 15% of the total fluid reduction. TBV analysis demonstrated a wide range in the extent of intravascular overload. Dismissal measurements revealed marginally reduced intravascular volume post-diuretic therapy despite large reductions in body weight. Mobilization of interstitial fluid to the intravascular compartment with diuresis accounted for this disparity. Intravascular volume, however, remained increased at dismissal. The extent, composition, and distribution of volume overload are highly variable in DCHF, and this variability needs to be taken into account in the approach to individualized therapy. TBV quantitation, particularly serial measurements, can facilitate informed volume management with respect to a goal of treating to euvolemia. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published

  15. Quantitative method to determine the regional drinking water odorant regulation goals based on odor sensitivity distribution: illustrated using 2-MIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianwei; An, Wei; Cao, Nan; Yang, Min; Gu, Junong; Zhang, Dong; Lu, Ning

    2014-07-01

    Taste and odor (T/O) in drinking water often cause consumer complaints and are thus regulated in many countries. However, people in different regions may exhibit different sensitivities toward T/O. This study proposed a method to determine the regional drinking water odorant regulation goals (ORGs) based on the odor sensitivity distribution of the local population. The distribution of odor sensitivity to 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) by the local population in Beijing, China was revealed by using a normal distribution function/model to describe the odor complaint response to a 2-MIB episode in 2005, and a 2-MIB concentration of 12.9 ng/L and FPA (flavor profile analysis) intensity of 2.5 was found to be the critical point to cause odor complaints. Thus the Beijing ORG for 2-MIB was determined to be 12.9 ng/L. Based on the assumption that the local FPA panel can represent the local population in terms of sensitivity to odor, and that the critical FPA intensity causing odor complaints was 2.5, this study tried to determine the ORGs for seven other cities of China by performing FPA tests using an FPA panel from the corresponding city. ORG values between 12.9 and 31.6 ng/L were determined, showing that a unified ORG may not be suitable for drinking water odor regulations. This study presents a novel approach for setting drinking water odor regulations.

  16. Quantitative evaluation of berberine subcellular distribution and cellular accumulation in non-small cell lung cancer cells by UPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhong-Wen; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Fan, Xing-Xing; Zhou, Hua; Ma, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Liang; Xie, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, has been demonstrated to be a safe anti-cancer agent with multiple effects on mitochondria. Intracellular concentration and distribution around the targeting sites are determinants of efficacy, but subcellular distribution of berberine has not been fully elucidated yet, which relies on the sensitive and robustness assay. In this study, a sensitive and robust UPLC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated with optimized extraction solvents and detection conditions. Key factors such as the purity and integrity of isolated organelle fractions, and the effects of isolation procedures on the subcellular concentration of berberine were systemically evaluated. With the developed assay, we found that the intracellular accumulations of berberine in two gefitinib resistant NSCLC cell lines H1650 and H1975 were 2-3 folds higher than that of normal epithelial cells BEAS-2B. Moreover, significantly different subcellular distribution profiles in NSCLC cancer cells from that of BEAS-2B cells with a striking increase in content in most organelles may contribute to its selective cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Furthermore, a predominant accumulation of berberine was observed for the first time in microsomal fraction for all three cell lines. Therefore, this method could be used for quantitative evaluation of subcellular distribution and cellular accumulation of berberine and for further evaluation of the concentration-effects relationship.

  17. The Distance to M51

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuinn, Kristen. B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Berg, Danielle; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Great investments of observing time have been dedicated to the study of nearby spiral galaxies with diverse goals ranging from understanding the star formation process to characterizing their dark matter distributions. Accurate distances are fundamental to interpreting observations of these galaxies, yet many of the best studied nearby galaxies have distances based on methods with relatively large uncertainties. We have started a program to derive accurate distances to these galaxies. Here we measure the distance to M51—the Whirlpool galaxy—from newly obtained Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging using the tip of the red giant branch method. We measure the distance modulus to be 8.58 ± 0.10 Mpc (statistical), corresponding to a distance modulus of 29.67 ± 0.02 mag. Our distance is an improvement over previous results as we use a well-calibrated, stable distance indicator, precision photometry in a optimally selected field of view, and a Bayesian Maximum Likelihood technique that reduces measurement uncertainties. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  18. Quantitative chemical imaging of the intracellular spatial distribution of fundamental elements and light metals in single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malucelli, Emil; Iotti, Stefano; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Fratini, Michela; Merolle, Lucia; Notargiacomo, Andrea; Marraccini, Chiara; Sargenti, Azzurra; Cappadone, Concettina; Farruggia, Giovanna; Bukreeva, Inna; Lombardo, Marco; Trombini, Claudio; Maier, Jeanette A; Lagomarsino, Stefano

    2014-05-20

    We report a method that allows a complete quantitative characterization of whole single cells, assessing the total amount of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sodium, and magnesium and providing submicrometer maps of element molar concentration, cell density, mass, and volume. This approach allows quantifying elements down to 10(6) atoms/μm(3). This result was obtained by applying a multimodal fusion approach that combines synchrotron radiation microscopy techniques with off-line atomic force microscopy. The method proposed permits us to find the element concentration in addition to the mass fraction and provides a deeper and more complete knowledge of cell composition. We performed measurements on LoVo human colon cancer cells sensitive (LoVo-S) and resistant (LoVo-R) to doxorubicin. The comparison of LoVo-S and LoVo-R revealed different patterns in the maps of Mg concentration with higher values within the nucleus in LoVo-R and in the perinuclear region in LoVo-S cells. This feature was not so evident for the other elements, suggesting that Mg compartmentalization could be a significant trait of the drug-resistant cells.

  19. High-resolution three-dimensional quantitative map of the macromolecular proton fraction distribution in the normal rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Naumova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The presented dataset provides a normative high-resolution three-dimensional (3D macromolecular proton fraction (MPF map of the healthy rat brain in vivo and source images used for its reconstruction. The images were acquired using the protocol described elsewhere (Naumova, et al. High-resolution three-dimensional macromolecular proton fraction mapping for quantitative neuroanatomical imaging of the rodent brain in ultra-high magnetic fields. Neuroimage (2016 doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.09.036. The map was reconstructed from three source images with different contrast weightings (proton density, T1, and magnetization transfer using the single-point algorithm with a synthetic reference image. Source images were acquired from a living animal on an 11.7 T small animal MRI scanner with isotropic spatial resolution of 170 µm3 and total acquisition time about 1.5 h. The 3D dataset can be used for multiple purposes including interactive viewing of rat brain anatomy, measurements of reference MPF values in various brain structures, and development of image processing techniques for the rodent brain segmentation. It also can serve as a gold standard image for implementation and optimization of rodent brain MRI protocols.

  20. Quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy of subcellular GLUT4 distribution in human skeletal muscle: effects of endurance and sprint interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Helen; Shaw, Christopher S; Worthington, Philip L; Shepherd, Sam O; Cocks, Matthew; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    2014-07-01

    Increases in insulin-mediated glucose uptake following endurance training (ET) and sprint interval training (SIT) have in part been attributed to concomitant increases in glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) protein content in skeletal muscle. This study used an immunofluorescence microscopy method to investigate changes in subcellular GLUT4 distribution and content following ET and SIT. Percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were taken from the m. vastus lateralis of 16 sedentary males in the overnight fasted state before and after 6 weeks of ET and SIT. An antibody was fully validated and used to show large (> 1 μm) and smaller (GLUT4-containing clusters. The large clusters likely represent trans-Golgi network stores and the smaller clusters endosomal stores and GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs). Density of GLUT4 clusters was higher at the fibre periphery especially in perinuclear regions. A less dense punctate distribution was seen in the rest of the muscle fibre. Total GLUT4 fluorescence intensity increased in type I and type II fibres following both ET and SIT. Large GLUT4 clusters increased in number and size in both type I and type II fibres, while the smaller clusters increased in size. The greatest increases in GLUT4 fluorescence intensity occurred within the 1 μm layer immediately adjacent to the PM. The increase in peripheral localisation and protein content of GLUT4 following ET and SIT is likely to contribute to the improvements in glucose homeostasis observed after both training modes.

  1. Population=stratified analysis of bone mineral density distribution in cervical and lumbar vertebrae of chinese from quantitative computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Xiaoguang; Cai, Wei; Wang, Ling; Duanmu, Yangyang; Zhang, Chen Xin [Dept. of Radiology, The Fourth Clinical Medical College of Peking University, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhou, Zhuang [Dept. of Orthopedic Oncology, The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang (China); Wu, Cheng' ai; Zhao, Danhui; Wang, Chao [Beijing Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics, Beijing (China); Tian, Wei [Dept. of Spine Surgery, The Fourth Clinical Medical College of Peking University, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-09-15

    To investigate the bone mineral density (BMD) of cervical vertebrae in a population-stratified manner and correlate with that of the lumbar vertebrae. Five hundred and ninety-eight healthy volunteers (254 males, 344 females), ranging from 20 to 64 years of age, were recruited for volumetric BMD (vBMD) measurements by quantitative computed tomography. Basic information (age, height, weight, waistline, and hipline), and vBMD of the cervical and lumbar vertebrae (C2–7 and L2–4) were recorded. Comparisons among sex, age groups and different levels of vertebrae were analyzed using analysis of variance. Linear regression was performed for relevance of different vertebral levels. The vBMD of cervical and lumbar vertebrae was higher in females than males in each age group. The vBMD of the cervical and lumbar vertebrae in males and the vBMD of lumbar vertebrae in females decreased with aging. In each age group, the vBMD of the cervical vertebrae was higher than that of the lumbar vertebrae with gradual decreases from C2 to C7 except for C3; moreover, the vBMD of C6 and C7 was significantly different from that of C2–5. Correlations of vBMD among different cervical vertebrae (females: r = 0.62–0.94; males: r = 0.63–0.94) and lumbar vertebrae (males: r = 0.93–0.98; females: r = 0.82–0.97) were statistically significant at each age group. The present study provided normative data of cervical vertebrae in an age- and sex-stratified manner. Sex differences in vBMD prominently vary with age, which can be helpful to design a more comprehensive pre-operative surgical plan.

  2. Population-Stratified Analysis of Bone Mineral Density Distribution in Cervical and Lumbar Vertebrae of Chinese from Quantitative Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong [Department of Radiology, The Fourth Clinical Medical College of Peking University, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing 100035 (China); Zhou, Zhuang [Department of Orthopedic Oncology, The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050051 (China); Wu, Cheng' ai; Zhao, Danhui; Wang, Chao [Beijing Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics, Beijing 100035 (China); Cheng, Xiaoguang; Cai, Wei; Wang, Ling; Duanmu, Yangyang; Zhang, Chenxin [Department of Radiology, The Fourth Clinical Medical College of Peking University, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing 100035 (China); Tian, Wei [Department of Spine Surgery, The Fourth Clinical Medical College of Peking University, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing 100035 (China)

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the bone mineral density (BMD) of cervical vertebrae in a population-stratified manner and correlate with that of the lumbar vertebrae. Five hundred and ninety-eight healthy volunteers (254 males, 344 females), ranging from 20 to 64 years of age, were recruited for volumetric BMD (vBMD) measurements by quantitative computed tomography. Basic information (age, height, weight, waistline, and hipline), and vBMD of the cervical and lumbar vertebrae (C2–7 and L2–4) were recorded. Comparisons among sex, age groups and different levels of vertebrae were analyzed using analysis of variance. Linear regression was performed for relevance of different vertebral levels. The vBMD of cervical and lumbar vertebrae was higher in females than males in each age group. The vBMD of the cervical and lumbar vertebrae in males and the vBMD of lumbar vertebrae in females decreased with aging. In each age group, the vBMD of the cervical vertebrae was higher than that of the lumbar vertebrae with gradual decreases from C2 to C7 except for C3; moreover, the vBMD of C6 and C7 was significantly different from that of C2–5. Correlations of vBMD among different cervical vertebrae (females: r = 0.62–0.94; males: r = 0.63–0.94) and lumbar vertebrae (males: r = 0.93–0.98; females: r = 0.82–0.97) were statistically significant at each age group. The present study provided normative data of cervical vertebrae in an age- and sex-stratified manner. Sex differences in vBMD prominently vary with age, which can be helpful to design a more comprehensive pre-operative surgical plan.

  3. Quantitative binomial distribution analyses of nanoscale like-solute atom clustering and segregation in atom probe tomography data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Michael P; Stephenson, Leigh T; Ceguerra, Anna V; Ringer, Simon P

    2008-07-01

    The applicability of the binomial frequency distribution is outlined for the analysis of the evolution nanoscale atomic clustering of dilute solute in an alloy subject to thermal ageing in 3D atom probe data. The conventional chi(2) statistics and significance testing are demonstrated to be inappropriate for comparison of quantity of solute segregation present in two or more different sized system. Pearson coefficient, mu, is shown to normalize chi(2) with respect to sample size over an order of magnitude. A simple computer simulation is implemented to investigate the binomial analysis and infer meaning in the measured value of mu over a series of systems at different solute concentrations and degree of clustering. The simulations replicate the form of experimental data and demonstrate the effect of detector efficiency to significantly underestimate the measured segregation. The binomial analysis is applied to experimental atom probe data sets and complementary simulations are used to interpret the results.

  4. Quantitative estimation of farmland soil loss by wind-erosion using improved particle-size distribution comparison method (IPSDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rende, Wang; Zhongling, Guo; Chunping, Chang; Dengpan, Xiao; Hongjun, Jiang

    2015-12-01

    The rapid and accurate estimation of soil loss by wind erosion still remains challenge. This study presents an improved scheme for estimating the soil loss by wind erosion of farmland. The method estimates the soil loss by wind erosion based on a comparison of the relative contents of erodible and non-erodible particles between the surface and sub-surface layers of the farmland ploughed layer after wind erosion. It is based on the features that the soil particle-size distribution of the sampling soil layer (approximately 2 cm) is relatively uniform, and that on the surface layer, wind erosion causes the relative numbers of erodible and non-erodible particles to decrease and increase, respectively. Estimations were performed using this method for the wind erosion periods (WEP) from Oct. of 2012 to May of 2013 and from Oct. of 2013 to April of 2014 and a large wind-erosion event (WEE) on May 3, 2014 in the Bashang area of Hebei Province. The results showed that the average soil loss of farmland by wind erosion from Oct. of 2012 to May of 2013 was 2852.14 g/m2 with an average depth of 0.21 cm, while soil loss by wind from Oct. of 2013 to April of 2014 was 1199.17 g/m2 with a mean depth of 0.08 cm. During the severe WEE on May 3, 2014, the average soil loss of farmland by wind erosion was 1299.19 g/m2 with an average depth of 0.10 cm. The soil loss by wind erosion of ploughed and raked fields (PRF) was approximately twice as large as that of oat-stubble fields (OSF). The improved method of particle-size distribution comparison (IPSDC) has several advantages. It can not only calculate the wind erosion amount, but also the wind deposition amount. Slight changes in the sampling thickness and in the particle diameter range of the non-erodible particles will not obviously influence the results. Furthermore, the method is convenient, rapid, simple to implement. It is suitable for estimating the soil loss or deposition by wind erosion of farmland with flat surfaces and high

  5. Beyond the Horizon Distance: LIGO-Virgo can Boost Gravitational Wave Detection Rates by Exploiting the Mass Distribution of Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bartos, Imre

    2015-01-01

    The masses of neutron stars in neutron star binaries are observed to fall in a narrow mass range around $\\sim 1.33$ M$_{\\odot}$. We explore the advantage of focusing on this region of the parameter space in gravitational wave searches. We find that an all-sky (externally triggered) search with optimally reduced template bank is expected to detect $14\\%$ ($61\\%$) more binary mergers than without the reduction. A reduced template bank can also represent significant improvement in technical cost. We also develop a more detailed search method using binary mass distribution, and find similar sensitivity increase to that due to the reduced template bank.

  6. Fluorescence microscopy techniques for quantitative evaluation of organic biocide distribution in antifouling paint coatings: application to model antifouling coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodes, L R; Dennington, S P; Schuppe, H; Wharton, J A; Bakker, M; Klijnstra, J W; Stokes, K R

    2012-01-01

    A test matrix of antifouling (AF) coatings including pMMA, an erodible binder and a novel trityl copolymer incorporating Cu₂O and a furan derivative (FD) natural product, were subjected to pontoon immersion and accelerated rotor tests. Fluorescence and optical microscopy techniques were applied to these coatings for quantification of organic biocide and pigment distribution. Total leaching of the biocide from the novel copolymer binder was observed within 6 months of rotor immersion, compared to 35% from the pMMA coating. In pontoon immersions, 61% of the additive was lost from the pMMA coating, and 53% from the erodible binder. Profiles of FD content in the binders revealed an accelerated loss of additive from the surface of the CDP resulting from rosin degradation, compared to even depletion from pMMA. In all samples, release of the biocide was inhibited beyond the Cu₂O front, corresponding to the leached layer in samples where Cu₂O release occurred.

  7. Determination of regional distribution of crop transpiration and soil water use efficiency using quantitative remote sensing data through inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Renhua(张仁华); SUN; Xiaomin(孙晓敏); LIU; Jiyuan(刘纪远); SU; Hongbo(苏红波); TANG; Xinzhai(唐新斋); ZHU; Zhilin(朱治林)

    2003-01-01

    A two-layer model used to get the estimated values of crop transpiration by inversion using remote sensing data, which has been proved effective at some agricultural-ecological stations, is first discussed. An important part of it is the temperature separation model (in which the surface temperature in a mixed pixel is separated into soil surface temperature and crop canopy surface temperature) on the basis of bi-temporal radiometric temperature in a mixed pixel and its thermal inertia. To improve the inversion, the authors put forward some new algorithms, including an algorithm for the estimation of regional emissivities, a static feedback algorithm using surface temperature for the extension of air temperature at ecological stations to the region surrounding them and a spatial extension algorithm for calculating the wind speed 2 m above the ground with surface roughness and radiometric temperature. Finally, regional distributions of crop transpiration (CT) and soil water use efficiency (SWUE) in North China were calculated pixel by pixel using NOAA-AVHRR data and surface measurements and calibrations. The results provide a way to assess the effects of various agricultural practices on SWUE by using remote sensing data in North China in spring.

  8. Particle-size distribution (PSD) of pulverized hair: A quantitative approach of milling efficiency and its correlation with drug extraction efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, Aline Garcia da Rosa; Spinelli, Eliani; Fiaux, Sorele Batista; Barreto, Adriana da Silva; Rodrigues, Silvana Vianna

    2017-08-01

    Different types of hair were submitted to different milling procedures and their resulting powders were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser diffraction (LD). SEM results were qualitative whereas LD results were quantitative and accurately characterized the hair powders through their particle size distribution (PSD). Different types of hair were submitted to an optimized milling conditions and their PSD was quite similar. A good correlation was obtained between PSD results and ketamine concentration in a hair sample analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Hair samples were frozen in liquid nitrogen for 5min and pulverized at 25Hz for 10min, resulting in 61% of particles 90% of particles were PSD is a key feature on analysis of pulverized hair as it can affect the method recovery and reproducibility. In addition, PSD is an important issue on sample retesting and quality control procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative X-ray pair distribution function analysis of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates: a contribution to the understanding of cement chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangeon, Sylvain; Baronnet, Alain; Marty, Nicolas; Poulain, Agnieszka; Elkaïm, Erik; Roosz, Cédric; Gaboreau, Stéphane; Henocq, Pierre; Claret, Francis

    2017-01-01

    The structural evolution of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) as a function of its calcium to silicon (Ca/Si) ratio has been probed using qualitative and quantitative X-ray atomic pair distribution function analysis of synchrotron X-ray scattering data. Whatever the Ca/Si ratio, the C–S–H structure is similar to that of tobermorite. When the Ca/Si ratio increases from ∼0.6 to ∼1.2, Si wollastonite-like chains progressively depolymerize through preferential omission of Si bridging tetrahedra. When the Ca/Si ratio approaches ∼1.5, nanosheets of portlandite are detected in samples aged for 1 d, while microcrystalline portlandite is detected in samples aged for 1 year. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging shows that the tobermorite-like structure is maintained to Ca/Si > 3.

  10. Exposure of health care workers and occupants to coughed air in a hospital room with displacement air distribution: impact of ventilation rate and distance from coughing patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Kostadinov, Kamen

    The exposure of a doctor and a second patient to coughed air by an infected patient was studied in a simulated two-bed hospital patient room. The air temperature in the room, ventilated at two air change rates (3 h-1 and 6 h-1) was kept 22 oC. Thermal manikin with realistic body shape and surface...... temperature distribution was used as the doctor standing 0.55, 1.1 or 2.8 m downstream the cough. A coughing thermal dummy, lying in one bed and a second thermal manikin in the other bed (1.3 m away), were used as the “sick” and the “exposed” patients. The cough consisted of 100% CO2. The doctor...... hospital standards as minimum ventilation rate in hospital patient rooms, resulted in elevated exposure to coughed air for the doctor, suggesting increased risk from airborne cross-infection. Displacement air distribution does not reduce the risk from cross-infection....

  11. Encyclopedia of distances

    CERN Document Server

    Deza, Michel Marie

    2016-01-01

    This 4th edition of the leading reference volume on distance metrics is characterized by updated and rewritten sections on some items suggested by experts and readers, as well a general streamlining of content and the addition of essential new topics. Though the structure remains unchanged, the new edition also explores recent advances in the use of distances and metrics for e.g. generalized distances, probability theory, graph theory, coding theory, data analysis. New topics in the purely mathematical sections include e.g. the Vitanyi multiset-metric, algebraic point-conic distance, triangular ratio metric, Rossi-Hamming metric, Taneja distance, spectral semimetric between graphs, channel metrization, and Maryland bridge distance. The multidisciplinary sections have also been supplemented with new topics, including: dynamic time wrapping distance, memory distance, allometry, atmospheric depth, elliptic orbit distance, VLBI distance measurements, the astronomical system of units, and walkability distance. Lea...

  12. Quantitative LC-MS of polymers: determining accurate molecular weight distributions by combined size exclusion chromatography and electrospray mass spectrometry with maximum entropy data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruendling, Till; Guilhaus, Michael; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2008-09-15

    We report on the successful application of size exclusion chromatography (SEC) combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and refractive index (RI) detection for the determination of accurate molecular weight distributions of synthetic polymers, corrected for chromatographic band broadening. The presented method makes use of the ability of ESI-MS to accurately depict the peak profiles and retention volumes of individual oligomers eluting from the SEC column, whereas quantitative information on the absolute concentration of oligomers is obtained from the RI-detector only. A sophisticated computational algorithm based on the maximum entropy principle is used to process the data gained by both detectors, yielding an accurate molecular weight distribution, corrected for chromatographic band broadening. Poly(methyl methacrylate) standards with molecular weights up to 10 kDa serve as model compounds. Molecular weight distributions (MWDs) obtained by the maximum entropy procedure are compared to MWDs, which were calculated by a conventional calibration of the SEC-retention time axis with peak retention data obtained from the mass spectrometer. Comparison showed that for the employed chromatographic system, distributions below 7 kDa were only weakly influenced by chromatographic band broadening. However, the maximum entropy algorithm could successfully correct the MWD of a 10 kDa standard for band broadening effects. Molecular weight averages were between 5 and 14% lower than the manufacturer stated data obtained by classical means of calibration. The presented method demonstrates a consistent approach for analyzing data obtained by coupling mass spectrometric detectors and concentration sensitive detectors to polymer liquid chromatography.

  13. Advanced hierarchical distance sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, Andy

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we cover a number of important extensions of the basic hierarchical distance-sampling (HDS) framework from Chapter 8. First, we discuss the inclusion of “individual covariates,” such as group size, in the HDS model. This is important in many surveys where animals form natural groups that are the primary observation unit, with the size of the group expected to have some influence on detectability. We also discuss HDS integrated with time-removal and double-observer or capture-recapture sampling. These “combined protocols” can be formulated as HDS models with individual covariates, and thus they have a commonality with HDS models involving group structure (group size being just another individual covariate). We cover several varieties of open-population HDS models that accommodate population dynamics. On one end of the spectrum, we cover models that allow replicate distance sampling surveys within a year, which estimate abundance relative to availability and temporary emigration through time. We consider a robust design version of that model. We then consider models with explicit dynamics based on the Dail and Madsen (2011) model and the work of Sollmann et al. (2015). The final major theme of this chapter is relatively newly developed spatial distance sampling models that accommodate explicit models describing the spatial distribution of individuals known as Point Process models. We provide novel formulations of spatial DS and HDS models in this chapter, including implementations of those models in the unmarked package using a hack of the pcount function for N-mixture models.

  14. Distance Education Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indira Gandhi National Open University, New Delhi (India). Distance Education Council.

    Since its inception in India in 1962, distance education has grown in popularity. The Distance Education Council (DEC) directs distance learning within India's higher education system. The DEC's promotion, coordination, and maintenance of standards for distance education are its three major roles. Its initiatives include grants, support for…

  15. A Practical Experiment to Obtain Either Which-Way or Interference Photon Distributions at a Distance Using Delayed Choice and Without Correlating Measurement Results on Entangled Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Douglas

    For a pair of entangled signal-idler photons, one may ``lose'' the idler photon (that provides which-way information to the entangled signal photon) in many other photons with similar characteristics to the idler photon before the signal photon is detected, thereby losing the which-way information supplied to the signal photon and eliminating the entanglement. The experiment allows for a delayed choice on the idler photons (whether or not to lose the idler photon before the signal photon is detected) to determine the distribution of distant signal photons (either overall which-way or overall interference) without making correlations between signal and idler photon detections. When the idler photon is lost, it is lost in an optical microcavity filled with photons in the same mode as the idler photon. The experiment could provide the basis for a useful quantum communications device. It might be possible to use a micropost coated with a material such as Vantablack in place of the optical microcavity.

  16. Visualization and Quantitative Assessment of the Brain Distribution of Insulin through Nose-to-Brain Delivery Based on the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Noncovalent Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Shingaki, Tomotaka; Kanayama, Yousuke; Tanaka, Misa; Zochi, Riyo; Hasegawa, Koki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2016-03-07

    Our recent work suggested that intranasal coadministration with the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin increased the brain distribution of the peptide drug insulin. The present study aimed to distinctly certify the ability of penetratin to facilitate the nose-to-brain delivery of insulin by quantitatively evaluating the distribution characteristics in brain using radioactive (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin. Autoradiography and analysis using a gamma counter of brain areas demonstrated that the accumulation of radioactivity was greatest in the olfactory bulb, the anterior part of the brain closest to the administration site, at 15 min after intranasal administration of (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin with l- or d-penetratin. The brain accumulation of (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin with penetratin was confirmed by ELISA using unlabeled insulin in which intact insulin was delivered to the brain after intranasal coadministration with l- or d-penetratin. By contrast, quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples showed increased insulin concentration in only the anterior portion of the CSF at 15 min after intranasal coadministration with l-penetratin. This study gives the first concrete proof that penetratin can accelerate the direct transport of insulin from the nasal cavity to the brain parenchyma. Further optimization of intranasal administration with CPP may increase the efficacy of delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the brain while reducing the risk of systemic drug exposure.

  17. Training for Distance Teaching through Distance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadorath, Jill; Harris, Simon; Encinas, Fatima

    2002-01-01

    Describes a mixed-mode bachelor degree course in English language teaching at the Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico) that was designed to help practicing teachers write appropriate distance education materials by giving them the experience of being distance students. Includes a course outline and results of a course evaluation. (Author/LRW)

  18. Analysis of power distribution grids and transmission distances. Baseline data for definition of transmission paths segments for power transmission pricing under open access; Analyse von Versorgungsflaechen. Ausgangsdaten fuer Durchleitungs-Grenzentfernungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubrich, H.J.; Fritz, W.; Stobrawe, M. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Elektrische Anlagen und Energiewirtschaft

    1998-09-01

    The expert opinion for `Determination of practicable transmission paths segments for billing of power transfer operations under TPA`, commissioned by the Vereinigung Deutscher Elektrizitaetswerke (VDEW), was presented in February 1998. The study was to define on the basis of a map of existing distribution systems and system ownerships, practicable transmission distances or path segments for the billing of transfer operations. Information acquisition for the study encompassed selective documentation of geographic data and electrical characteristics of high voltage as well as medium and low voltage grids owned by companies members of VDEW. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Im Februar 1998 wurde das im Auftrag der Vereinigung Deutscher Elektrizitaetswerke (VDEW) erstellte Gutachten `Bestimmung von praxisorientierten Grenzentfernungen fuer Durchleitungen` in Frankfurt/Main vorgestellt. Dessen Aufgabe war es, Grenzentfernungen fuer Durchleitungen im Rahmen der Verbaendevereinbarung aus der tatsaechlichen Ausdehnung realer Netze abzuleiten. Dazu wurden bei einer repraesentativen Auswahl von VDEW-Mitgliedsunternehmen charakteristische geografische und elektrische Kenngroessen von Hoch-, Mittel- und Niederspannungsnetzen erfasst. (orig.)

  19. Encyclopedia of distances

    CERN Document Server

    Deza, Michel Marie

    2014-01-01

    This updated and revised third edition of the leading reference volume on distance metrics includes new items from very active research areas in the use of distances and metrics such as geometry, graph theory, probability theory and analysis. Among the new topics included are, for example, polyhedral metric space, nearness matrix problems, distances between belief assignments, distance-related animal settings, diamond-cutting distances, natural units of length, Heidegger’s de-severance distance, and brain distances. The publication of this volume coincides with intensifying research efforts into metric spaces and especially distance design for applications. Accurate metrics have become a crucial goal in computational biology, image analysis, speech recognition and information retrieval. Leaving aside the practical questions that arise during the selection of a ‘good’ distance function, this work focuses on providing the research community with an invaluable comprehensive listing of the main available di...

  20. PROJECT CONCEPT “DISTANCE LEARNING OF PUPILS"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy M. Bogachkov

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the project "Distance Learning School” is considered. The aim of the project is the practical testing of technologies for distance learning in a real educational process in mainstream education. As a result of the project is expected to obtain experimental data needed to determine the quantitative characteristics of backbone elements of distance learning students.

  1. Evaluating the spatial distribution of quantitative risk and hazard level of arsenic exposure in groundwater, case study of Qorveh County, Kurdistan Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrabadi, Touraj; Bidabadi, Niloufar Shirani

    2013-01-01

    Regional distribution of quantitative risk and hazard levels due to arsenic poisoning in some parts of Iran's Kurdistan province is considered. To investigate the potential risk and hazard level regarding arsenic-contaminated drinking water and further carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects on villagers, thirteen wells in rural areas of Qorveh County were considered for evaluation of arsenic concentration in water. Sampling campaign was performed in August 2010 and arsenic concentration was measured via the Silver Diethyldithiocarbamate method. The highest and lowest arsenic concentration are reported in Guilaklu and Qezeljakand villages with 420 and 67 μg/L, respectively. None of thirteen water samples met the maximum contaminant level issued by USEPA and Institute of Standards and Industrial Research of Iran (10 ppb). The highest arsenic concentration and consequently risk and hazard levels belong to villages situated alongside the eastern frontiers of the county. Existence of volcanic activities within the upper Miocene and Pleistocene in this part of the study area may be addressed as the main geopogenic source of arsenic pollution. Quantitative risk values are varying from 1.49E-03 in Qezeljakand to 8.92E-03 in Guilaklu and may be interpreted as very high when compared by similar studies in Iran. Regarding non-carcinogenic effects, all thirteen water samples are considered hazardous while all calculated chronic daily intakes are greater than arsenic reference dose. Such drinking water source has the potential to impose adverse carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects on villagers. Accordingly, an urgent decision must be made to substitute the current drinking water source with a safer one.

  2. Evaluating the Spatial Distribution of Quantitative Risk and Hazard Level of Arsenic Exposure in Groundwater, case Study of Qorveh County, Kurdistan Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touraj Nasrabadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Regional distribution of quantitative risk and hazard levels due to arsenic poisoning in some parts of Iran’s Kurdistan province is considered. To investigate the potential risk and hazard level regarding arsenic-contaminated drinking water and further carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects on villagers, thirteen wells in rural areas of Qorveh County were considered for evaluation of arsenic concentration in water. Sampling campaign was performed in August 2010 and arsenic concentration was measured via the Silver Diethyldithiocarbamate method. The highest and lowest arsenic concentration are reported in Guilaklu and Qezeljakand villages with 420 and 67 μg/L, respectively. None of thirteen water samples met the maximum contaminant level issued by USEPA and Institute of Standards and Industrial Research of Iran (10 ppb. The highest arsenic concentration and consequently risk and hazard levels belong to villages situated alongside the eastern frontiers of the county. Existence of volcanic activities within the upper Miocene and Pleistocene in this part of the study area may be addressed as the main geopogenic source of arsenic pollution. Quantitative risk values are varying from 1.49E-03 in Qezeljakand to 8.92E-03 in Guilaklu and may be interpreted as very high when compared by similar studies in Iran. Regarding non-carcinogenic effects, all thirteen water samples are considered hazardous while all calculated chronic daily intakes are greater than arsenic reference dose. Such drinking water source has the potential to impose adverse carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects on villagers. Accordingly, an urgent decision must be made to substitute the current drinking water source with a safer one.

  3. Center—Distance Continuous Probability Models and the Distance Measure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑方; 吴文虎; 等

    1998-01-01

    In this paper,a new statistic model named Center-Distance Continuous Probability Model(CDCPM)for speech recognition is described,which is based on Center-Distance Normal(CDN)distribution.In a CDCPM,the probability transition matrix is omitted,and the observation probability density function(PDF)in each state is in the form of embedded multiple-model(EMM)based on the Nearest Neighbour rule.The experimental results on two giant real-world Chinese speech databases and a real-world continuous-manner 2000 phrase system show that this model is a powerful one.Also,a distance measure for CDPMs is proposed which is based on the Bayesian minimum classification error(MCE) discrimination.

  4. Distribution Principle of Bone Tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Xu, Zongxiang; Li, Zhiyu

    2009-01-01

    Using the analytic and experimental techniques we present an exploratory study of the mass distribution features of the high coincidence of centre of mass of heterogeneous bone tissue in vivo and its centroid of geometry position. A geometric concept of the average distribution radius of bone issue is proposed and functional relation of this geometric distribution feature between the partition density and its relative tissue average distribution radius is observed. Based upon the mass distribution feature, our results suggest a relative distance assessment index between the center of mass of cortical bone and the bone center of mass and establish a bone strength equation. Analysing the data of human foot in vivo, we notice that the mass and geometric distribution laws have expanded the connotation of Wolff's law, which implies a leap towards the quantitative description of bone strength. We finally conclude that this will not only make a positive contribution to help assess osteoporosis, but will also provide...

  5. The Distance Geometry of Music

    CERN Document Server

    Demaine, Erik D; Meijer, Henk; Rappaport, David; Taslakian, Perouz; Toussaint, Godfried T; Winograd, Terry; Wood, David R

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate relationships between the classic Euclidean algorithm and many other fields of study, particularly in the context of music and distance geometry. Specifically, we show how the structure of the Euclidean algorithm defines a family of rhythms which encompass over forty timelines (\\emph{ostinatos}) from traditional world music. We prove that these \\emph{Euclidean rhythms} have the mathematical property that their onset patterns are distributed as evenly as possible: they maximize the sum of the Euclidean distances between all pairs of onsets, viewing onsets as points on a circle. Indeed, Euclidean rhythms are the unique rhythms that maximize this notion of \\emph{evenness}. We also show that essentially all Euclidean rhythms are \\emph{deep}: each distinct distance between onsets occurs with a unique multiplicity, and these multiplicies form an interval $1,2,...,k-1$. Finally, we characterize all deep rhythms, showing that they form a subclass of generated rhythms, which in turn proves a useful prop...

  6. Distances from Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Ciardullo, R

    2003-01-01

    The [O III] 5007 planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF) occupies an important place on the extragalactic distance ladder. Since it is the only method that is applicable to all the large galaxies of the Local Supercluster, it is uniquely useful for cross-checking results and linking the Population I and Population II distance scales. We review the physics underlying the method, demonstrate its precision, and illustrate its value by comparing its distances to distances obtained from Cepheids and the Surface Brightness Fluctuation (SBF) method. We use the Cepheid and PNLF distances to 13 galaxies to show that the metallicity dependence of the PNLF cutoff is in excellent agreement with that predicted from theory, and that no additional systematic corrections are needed for either method. However, when we compare the Cepheid-calibrated PNLF distance scale with the Cepheid-calibrated SBF distance scale, we find a significant offset: although the relative distances of both methods are in excellent agreement, th...

  7. A generalized evidence distance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongming Mo; Xi Lu; Yong Deng

    2016-01-01

    How to efficiently measure the distance between two basic probability assignments (BPAs) is an open issue. In this paper, a new method to measure the distance between two BPAs is proposed, based on two existing measures of evidence distance. The new proposed method is comprehen-sive and generalized. Numerical examples are used to ilus-trate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Form of the galactic globular cluster system and the distance to the Galactic Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenk, C.S. (Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Astronomy); White, S.D.M. (California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Dept. of Astronomy)

    1982-01-01

    New quantitative methods are developed for analysing the structure of the galactic globular cluster system. Samples limited in galactic latitude which can be assumed complete are chosen, and the distance independent information contained in the positions of clusters on the sky, and the information contained in the apparent three-dimensional distribution, are considered separately. The cluster system is slightly flattened and there is no significant evidence for any variation in flattening as a function of metallicity. Its density is well described over the range 0.2 < r/Rsub(Sun) < 5 by a Hubble law, rho varies as r/sup -3/, or by a de Vaucouleurs law with rsub(e)/Rsub(Sun) = 0.50. Distance modulus errors of order one magnitude are required to explain the deviation of the apparent distribution of metal-rich clusters from axial symmetry. In addition a systematic difference in distance scale of about 0.5 magnitudes is necessary to reconcile the centroid of this distribution with that of the metal-poor clusters. This shift is in the same sense and of about the size predicted by theoretical pulsation models of RR Lyrae stars. If the standard distance scale is adopted for metal-poor clusters, the estimated distance from the Sun to the Galactic Centre is Rsub(Sun) = 6.8 +- 0.8 kpc.

  9. Plakilactones G and H from a marine sponge. Stereochemical determination of highly flexible systems by quantitative NMR-derived interproton distances combined with quantum mechanical calculations of 13C chemical shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Di Micco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the stereostructural investigation of two new oxygenated polyketides, plakilactones G and H, isolated from the marine sponge Plakinastrella mamillaris collected at Fiji Islands, is reported. The stereostructural studies began on plakilactone H by applying an integrated approach of the NOE-based protocol and quantum mechanical calculations of 13C chemical shifts. In particular, plakilactone H was used as a template to extend the application of NMR-derived interproton distances to a highly flexible molecular system with simultaneous assignment of four non-contiguous stereocenters. Chemical derivatization and quantum mechanical calculations of 13C on plakilactone G along with a plausible biogenetic interconversion between plakilactone G and plakilactone H allowed us to determine the absolute configuration in this two new oxygenated polyketides.

  10. Learner characteristics involved in distance learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernicek, A.T.; Hahn, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    Distance learning represents a strategy for leveraging resources to solve educational and training needs. Although many distance learning programs have been developed, lessons learned regarding differences between distance learning and traditional education with respect to learner characteristics have not been well documented. Therefore, we conducted a survey of 20 distance learning professionals. The questionnaire was distributed to experts attending the second Distance Learning Conference sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This survey not only acquired demographic information from each of the respondents but also identified important distance learning student characteristics. Significant distance learner characteristics, which were revealed statistically and which influence the effectiveness of distance learning, include the following: reading level, student autonomy, and self-motivation. Distance learning cannot become a more useful and effective method of instruction without identifying and recognizing learner characteristics. It will be important to consider these characteristics when designing all distance learning courses. This paper will report specific survey findings and their implications for developing distance learning courses. 9 refs., 6 tabs.

  11. Tourists consuming distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunvor Riber

    The environmental impact of tourism mobility is linked to the distances travelled in order to reach a holiday destination, and with tourists travelling more and further than previously, an understanding of how the tourists view the distance they travel across becomes relevant. Based on interviews...... contribute to an understanding of how it is possible to change tourism travel behaviour towards becoming more sustainable. How tourists 'consume distance' is discussed, from the practical level of actually driving the car or sitting in the air plane, to the symbolic consumption of distance that occurs when...... travelling on holiday becomes part of a lifestyle and a social positioning game. Further, different types of tourist distance consumers are identified, ranging from the reluctant to the deliberate and nonchalant distance consumers, who display very differing attitudes towards the distance they all travel...

  12. Learning string edit distance

    CERN Document Server

    Ristad, E S; Ristad, Eric Sven; Yianilos, Peter N.

    1996-01-01

    In many applications, it is necessary to determine the similarity of two strings. A widely-used notion of string similarity is the edit distance: the minimum number of insertions, deletions, and substitutions required to transform one string into the other. In this report, we provide a stochastic model for string edit distance. Our stochastic model allows us to learn a string edit distance function from a corpus of examples. We illustrate the utility of our approach by applying it to the difficult problem of learning the pronunciation of words in conversational speech. In this application, we learn a string edit distance with one fourth the error rate of the untrained Levenshtein distance. Our approach is applicable to any string classification problem that may be solved using a similarity function against a database of labeled prototypes. Keywords: string edit distance, Levenshtein distance, stochastic transduction, syntactic pattern recognition, prototype dictionary, spelling correction, string correction, ...

  13. Distribution and quantitative changes in amounts of aquaporin 1, 5 and 9 in the pig uterus during the estrous cycle and early pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skowronski Mariusz T

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aquaporins (AQPs are a family of membrane channel proteins that facilitate bulk water transport. To date, 11 isoforms of AQPs have been reported to be expressed in the female and male reproductive systems. The purpose of our study was to determine the localization and quantitative changes in the expression of AQP1, 5 and 9 within the pig uterus during different stages of the estrous cycle and early pregnancy. Methods Immunoperoxidase and semi-quantitative immunoblotting techniques were used to examine the distribution and changes in amounts of AQP1, AQP5 and AQP9 in uteral cells of pigs at the early (Days 2-4, middle (10-12, late (14-16 stage of the luteal phase and late (18-20 stage of the follicular phase of the estrous cycle as well as on Days 14-16 and 30-32 of gestation (the onset and the end of implantation process. Results The results demonstrated that AQP1, 5, and 9 were clearly detected in all studied stages of the estrous cycle and pregnancy. AQP1 was localized within uterine blood vessels. In cyclic gilts, endometrial and myometrial expression of AQP1 protein did not change significantly but increased during gestation. AQP5 was localized in smooth muscle cells and uterine epithelial cells. Endometrial expression of AQP5 protein did not change significantly between Days 2-4 and 10-12 of the estrous cycle but increased on Days 14-16 and 18-20 as well as during early pregnancy. Myometrial expression of AQP5 did not differ significantly during the estrous cycle but increased in the pregnancy. The anti-AQP9 antibody labeled uterine epithelial cells of uterus. Endometrial expression of AQP9 did not change significantly between Days 2-4 and 10-12 of the estrous cycle but increased on Days 14-16 and 18-20 as well as during early pregnancy. Conclusions The results suggest that a functional and distinctive collaboration exists among diverse AQPs in water handling during the different uterine phases in the estrous cycle and

  14. Study on Short Distance Spread and Space Distribution of Windflower Rust%白头翁锈病近程传播及空间分布型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏丹; 傅俊范

    2013-01-01

    白头翁锈病是近年来我国新报道发生的一种病害,在辽宁省保护地白头翁生产中,病害尤为严重.根据植物病害流行学原理和研究方法,对沈阳地区白头翁锈病菌近程传播及空间分布进行了研究.对调查数据进行回归分析,结果表明:指数模型是沈阳地区白头翁锈病近程传播中的最佳模型,顺风传播梯度可用y=570.63e-0.0055x描述,侧风向传播梯度可用y=1 004.9e-0.0116x描述(y为锈病的发病程度,x为距菌源中心的距离).在全田普遍发病的条件下,白头翁锈病在1个月内顺风向传播距离约为100 m;侧风向传播距离约为55 m.白头翁锈病病株空间分布型在病害发生前期和中期为聚集分布,后期为均匀分布.%Windflower rust is a newly discovered disease in China,which is very serious in the protected field of windflower.Spores flying,disease gradient and space distribution of windflower rust were studied.Regression analysis was used to analyze the surveyed data.The results show that exponential model was the optimum one for the short distance spread of windflower rust in Shenyang region.The regressive equation of downwind to spread was y =570.63e-0.005 5x and the regressive equation of crosswind was y =1 004.9e-0.0116x When the disease came on in the entire field,the distance of disease spread downwind was about 100 metres,but 50 metres crosswind in a month.Spatial distribution pattern of the disease was gathered at the beginning and middle stages,evenness at the later stage.

  15. Final technical report for project titled Quantitative Characterization of Cell Aggregation/Adhesion as Predictor for Distribution and Transport of Microorganisms in Subsurface Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, April Z. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Wan, Kai-tak [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-09-02

    This project aims to explore and develop enabling methodology and techniques for nano-scale characterization of microbe cell surface contact mechanics, interactions and adhesion quantities that allow for identification and quantification of indicative properties related to microorganism migration and transport behavior in porous media and in subsurface environments. Microbe transport has wide impact and therefore is of great interest in various environmental applications such as in situ or enhanced subsurface bioremediation,filtration processes for water and wastewater treatments and protection of drinking water supplies. Although great progress has been made towards understanding the identities and activities of these microorganisms in the subsurface, to date, little is known of the mechanisms that govern the mobility and transport of microorganisms in DOE’s contaminated sites, making the outcomes of in situ natural attenuation or contaminant stability enhancement unpredictable. Conventionally, movement of microorganisms was believed to follows the rules governing solute (particle) transport. However, recent studies revealed that cell surface properties, especially those pertaining to cell attachment/adhesion and aggregation behavior, can cause the microbe behavior to deviate from non-viable particles and hence greatly influence the mobility and distribution of microorganisms in porous media.This complexity highlights the need to obtain detailed information of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions in order to improve and refine the conceptual and quantitative model development for fate and transport of microorganisms and contaminant in subsurface. Traditional cell surface characterization methods are not sufficient to fully predict the deposition rates and transport behaviors of microorganism observed. A breakthrough of methodology that would allow for quantitative and molecular-level description of intrinsic cell surface properties indicative for cell

  16. Qualification of a distributed optical fiber sensor bonded to the surface of a concrete structure: a methodology to obtain quantitative strain measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billon, Astrid; Hénault, Jean-Marie; Quiertant, Marc; Taillade, Frédéric; Khadour, Aghiad; Martin, Renaud-Pierre; Benzarti, Karim

    2015-11-01

    Distributed optical fiber systems (DOFSs) are an emerging and innovative technology that allows long-range and continuous strain/temperature monitoring with a high resolution. Sensing cables are either surface-mounted or embedded into civil engineering structures to ensure long-term structural monitoring and early crack detection. However, strain profiles measured in the optical fiber (OF) may differ from the actual strain in the structure due to the shear transfer through the intermediate material layers between the OF and the host material (i.e., in the protective coating of the sensing cable and in the adhesive). Therefore, OF sensors need to be qualified to provide accurate quantitative strain measurements. This study presents a methodology for the qualification of a DOFS. This qualification is achieved through the calculation of the so-called mechanical transfer function (MTF), which relates the strain profile in the OF to the actual strain profile in the structure. It is proposed to establish a numerical modeling of the system, in which the mechanical parameters are calibrated from experiments. A specific surface-mounted sensing cable connected to an optical frequency domain reflectometry interrogator is considered as a case study. It was found that (i) tensile and pull-out tests can provide detailed information about materials and interfaces of the numerical model; (ii) the calibrated model made it possible to compute strain profiles along the OF and therefore to calculate the MTF of the system; (iii) the results proved to be consistent with experimental data collected on a cracked concrete beam during a four-point bending test. This paper is organized as follows: first, the technical background related to DOFSs and interrogators is briefly recalled, the MTF is defined and the above-mentioned methodology is presented. In the second part, the methodology is applied to a specific cable. Finally, a comparison with experimental evidence validates the proposed

  17. Quantitative differentiation of breast lesions at 3T diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) using the ratio of distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertas, Gokhan; Onaygil, Can; Akin, Yasin; Kaya, Handan; Aribal, Erkin

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the accuracy of diffusion coefficients and diffusion coefficient ratios of breast lesions and of glandular breast tissue from mono- and stretched-exponential models for quantitative diagnosis in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We analyzed pathologically confirmed 170 lesions (85 benign and 85 malignant) imaged using a 3.0T MR scanner. Small regions of interest (ROIs) focusing on the highest signal intensity for lesions and also for glandular tissue of contralateral breast were obtained. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC) were estimated by performing nonlinear fittings using mono- and stretched-exponential models, respectively. Coefficient ratios were calculated by dividing the lesion coefficient by the glandular tissue coefficient. A stretched exponential model provides significantly better fits then the monoexponential model (P correlation was found in diffusion coefficients (0.99-0.81 and coefficient ratios (0.94) between the models. The highest diagnostic accuracy was found by the DDC ratio (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.93) when compared with lesion DDC, ADC ratio, and lesion ADC (AUC = 0.91, 0.90, 0.90) but with no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). At optimal thresholds, the DDC ratio achieves 93% sensitivity, 80% specificity, and 87% overall diagnostic accuracy, while ADC ratio leads to 89% sensitivity, 78% specificity, and 83% overall diagnostic accuracy. The stretched exponential model fits better with signal intensity measurements from both lesion and glandular tissue ROIs. Although the DDC ratio estimated by using the model shows a higher diagnostic accuracy than the ADC ratio, lesion DDC, and ADC, it is not statistically significant. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1633-1641. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Dominant microbial composition and its vertical distribution in saline meromictic Lake Kaiike (Japan) as revealed by quantitative oligonucleotide probe membrane hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2004-08-01

    Vertical distributions of dominant bacterial populations in saline meromictic Lake Kaiike were investigated throughout the water column and sediment by quantitative oligonucleotide probe membrane hybridization. Three oligonucleotide probes specific for the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA of three groups of Chlorobiaceae were newly designed. In addition, three general domain (Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya)-specific probes, two delta-Proteobacteria-specific probes, a Chlorobiaceae-specific probe, and a Chloroflexi-specific probe were used after optimization of their washing conditions. The abundance of the sum of SSU rRNAs hybridizing with probes specific for three groups of Chlorobiaceae relative to total SSU rRNA peaked in the chemocline, accounting for up to 68%. The abundance of the delta-proteobacterial SSU rRNA relative to total SSU rRNA rapidly increased just below the chemocline up to 29% in anoxic water and peaked at the 2- to 3-cm sediment depth at ca. 34%. The abundance of SSU rRNAs hybridizing with the probe specific for the phylum Chloroflexi relative to total SSU rRNA was highest (31 to 54%) in the top of the sediment but then steeply declined with depth and became stable at 11 to 19%, indicating the robust coexistence of sulfate-reducing bacteria and Chloroflexi in the top of the sediment. Any SSU rRNA of Chloroflexi in the water column was under the detection limit. The summation of the signals of group-specific probes used in this study accounted for up to 89% of total SSU rRNA, suggesting that the DGGE-oligonucleotide probe hybridization approach, in contrast to conventional culture-dependent approaches, was very effective in covering dominant populations.

  19. The Quantitative Criteria Based on the Fractal Dimensions, Entropy and Lacunarity for the Spatial Distribution of Cancer Cell Nuclei Enable Identification of Low or High Aggressive Prostate Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemyslaw eWaliszewski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tumor grading, PSA concentration, and stage determine a risk of prostate cancer patients with accuracy of about 70%. An approach based on the fractal geometrical model was proposed to eliminate subjectivity from the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness and to improve the prediction. This study was undertaken to validate classes of equivalence for the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in a larger, independent set of prostate carcinomas.Methods: The global fractal capacity D0, information D1 and correlation D2 dimension, the local fractal dimension (LFD and the local connected fractal dimension (LCFD, Shannon entropy H and lacunarity were measured using computer algorithms in digitalized images of both the reference set (n = 60 and the test set (n = 208 of prostate carcinomas.Results: Prostate carcinomas were re-stratified into seven classes of equivalence. The cut-off D0 values 1.5450, 1.5820, 1.6270, 1.6490, 1.6980, 1.7640 defined the classes from C1 to C7, respectively. The other measures but the D1 failed to define the same classes of equivalence. The pairs (D0, LFD, (D0, H, (D0, , (D1, LFD, (D1, H, (D1,  characterized the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in each class. The co-application of those measures enabled the subordination of prostate carcinomas to one out of three clusters associated with different tumor aggressiveness. For D0 0.8, the class C1 or C2 contains low complexity low aggressive carcinomas exclusively. For D0 > 1.6980, LFD > 1.7644, LCFD > 1.7051, H > 0.9, and < 0.7, the class C6 or C7 contains high complexity high aggressive carcinomas. Conclusions: The cut-off D0 values defining the classes of equivalence were validated in this study. The cluster analysis suggested that the number of the subjective Gleason grades and the number of the objective classes of equivalence could be decreased from seven to three without a loss of clinically relevant information. Two novel quantitative

  20. The Quantitative Criteria Based on the Fractal Dimensions, Entropy, and Lacunarity for the Spatial Distribution of Cancer Cell Nuclei Enable Identification of Low or High Aggressive Prostate Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Tumor grading, PSA concentration, and stage determine a risk of prostate cancer patients with accuracy of about 70%. An approach based on the fractal geometrical model was proposed to eliminate subjectivity from the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness and to improve the prediction. This study was undertaken to validate classes of equivalence for the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in a larger, independent set of prostate carcinomas. The global fractal capacity D 0, information D 1 and correlation D 2 dimension, the local fractal dimension (LFD) and the local connected fractal dimension (LCFD), Shannon entropy H and lacunarity λ were measured using computer algorithms in digitalized images of both the reference set (n = 60) and the test set (n = 208) of prostate carcinomas. Prostate carcinomas were re-stratified into seven classes of equivalence. The cut-off D 0-values 1.5450, 1.5820, 1.6270, 1.6490, 1.6980, 1.7640 defined the classes from C1 to C7, respectively. The other measures but the D 1 failed to define the same classes of equivalence. The pairs (D 0, LFD), (D 0, H), (D 0, λ), (D 1, LFD), (D 1, H), (D 1, λ) characterized the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in each class. The co-application of those measures enabled the subordination of prostate carcinomas to one out of three clusters associated with different tumor aggressiveness. For D 0 1.5, H 0.8, the class C1 or C2 contains low complexity low aggressive carcinomas exclusively. For D 0 > 1.6980, LFD > 1.7644, LCFD > 1.7051, H > 0.9, and λ < 0.7, the class C6 or C7 contains high complexity high aggressive carcinomas. The cut-off D 0-values defining the classes of equivalence were validated in this study. The cluster analysis suggested that the number of the subjective Gleason grades and the number of the objective classes of equivalence could be decreased from seven to three without a loss of clinically relevant information. Two novel quantitative criteria based on the complexity

  1. Keeping Your Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen Gatin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This analysis began with inquiries into the substantive area of distance education using the classic grounded theory method. Analysis revealed a pattern of problemsolving behavior, from which the theory Keeping Your Distance emerged. The theory is an integrated set of concepts referring to the conscious and unconscious strategiesthat people use to regulate distance, physical and representative, in their everyday lives. Strategies are used to control physical, emotional, and psychological realities and to conserve personal energy in interactions with individuals and/or institutions.For all social interactions, people use a personalized algorithm of engagement that mitigates conditions and consequences and preserves optimal distance. Keeping Your Distance provides a theoretical starting point for considerations of the changing notions of distance. In part, these changes have been brought about bydevelopments in the fields of Information and Communication Technology (ICT and online social networking.

  2. 基于反距离权重插值的土壤盐分三维分布解析方法%Interpreting method of regional soil salinity 3D distribution based on inverse distance weighting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴亚坤; 刘广明; 杨劲松; 余世鹏

    2013-01-01

    In order to clarify the three-dimensional spatial pattern of soil salinity on a regional scale, the Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) method was used, combining the electromagnetic induction technique in this study. Apparent electrical conductivities were measured by electromagnetic induction, and thus layered salinity interpreting models with reasonable accuracy were established. The models showed a significant correlation between soil salt contents of different layers and apparent soil conductivities measured by electromagnetic induction, while soil moisture and clay content also significantly correlated with the apparent soil electrical conductivities. According to the classical statistical results, the minimum values (0.742-0.821 g/kg) of soil salt contents in different soil layers were substantially equal, but the maximum values differed from 5.943 to 9.810 g/kg, showing a significantly increased regularity with increasing depth, and the average values varied from 2.3 to 3.0 g/kg. Soil salinities of every layer belonged to moderate variability while the coefficients of variation increased with the increase of soil depth. Three-dimensional spatial distribution of soil salinity was characterized by IDW. Regional soil salinity spatial distribution characteristics were intuitively revealed by three-dimensional graphics. Profile soil salinity varied greatly with depth, showing different types of profile distribution characteristics in different locations across the study area. Soil of the main study area registered moderate or severe degree of salinization, which showed that there were more common and severe soil salinization in this study area. The 3D inverse distance weighting method combined apparent soil conductivity rapid determination by means of electromagnetic induction, and could achieve exact analytical evaluation of the three-dimensional spatial variability of regional soil salinity. This study and the results could provide a reliable technical method for

  3. The Quantitative Linear-Time–Branching-Time Spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Claus; Fahrenberg, Uli; Legay, Axel

    2011-01-01

    We present a distance-agnostic approach to quantitative verification. Taking as input an unspecified distance on system traces, or executions, we develop a game-based framework which allows us to define a spectrum of different interesting system distances corresponding to the given trace distance....... Thus we extend the classic linear-time–branching-time spectrum to a quantitative setting, parametrized by trace distance. We also prove a general transfer principle which allows us to transfer counterexamples from the qualitative to the quantitative setting, showing that all system distances...

  4. Normalized information distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitányi, P.M.B.; Balbach, F.J.; Cilibrasi, R.L.; Li, M.; Emmert-Streib, F.; Dehmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    The normalized information distance is a universal distance measure for objects of all kinds. It is based on Kolmogorov complexity and thus uncomputable, but there are ways to utilize it. First, compression algorithms can be used to approximate the Kolmogorov complexity if the objects have a string

  5. Normalized information distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitányi, P.M.B.; Balbach, F.J.; Cilibrasi, R.L.; Li, M.

    2008-01-01

    The normalized information distance is a universal distance measure for objects of all kinds. It is based on Kolmogorov complexity and thus uncomputable, but there are ways to utilize it. First, compression algorithms can be used to approximate the Kolmogorov complexity if the objects have a string

  6. Incremental Distance Transforms (IDT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Theo E.; van den Broek, Egon; Erçil, A.; Çetin, M.; Boyer, K.; Lee, S.-W.

    2010-01-01

    A new generic scheme for incremental implementations of distance transforms (DT) is presented: Incremental Distance Transforms (IDT). This scheme is applied on the cityblock, Chamfer, and three recent exact Euclidean DT (E2DT). A benchmark shows that for all five DT, the incremental implementation r

  7. ORDERED WEIGHTED DISTANCE MEASURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeshui XU; Jian CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop an ordered weighted distance (OWD) measure, which is thegeneralization of some widely used distance measures, including the normalized Hamming distance, the normalized Euclidean distance, the normalized geometric distance, the max distance, the median distance and the min distance, etc. Moreover, the ordered weighted averaging operator, the generalized ordered weighted aggregation operator, the ordered weighted geometric operator, the averaging operator, the geometric mean operator, the ordered weighted square root operator, the square root operator, the max operator, the median operator and the min operator axe also the special cases of the OWD measure. Some methods depending on the input arguments are given to determine the weights associated with the OWD measure. The prominent characteristic of the OWD measure is that it can relieve (or intensify) the influence of unduly large or unduly small deviations on the aggregation results by assigning them low (or high) weights. This desirable characteristic makes the OWD measure very suitable to be used in many actual fields, including group decision making, medical diagnosis, data mining, and pattern recognition, etc. Finally, based on the OWD measure, we develop a group decision making approach, and illustrate it with a numerical example.

  8. Duty and Distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Binder (C.); C. Heilmann (Conrad)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractEver since the publication of Peter Singer’s article ‘‘Famine, Affluence, and Morality’’ has the question of whether the (geographical) distance to people in need affects our moral duties towards them been a hotly debated issue. Does geographical distance affect our moral duties?

  9. Biomechanics of Distance Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Peter R., Ed.

    Contributions from researchers in the field of running mechanics are included in the 13 chapters of this book. The following topics are covered: (1) "The Mechanics of Distance Running: A Historical Perspective" (Peter Cavanagh); (2) "Stride Length in Distance Running: Velocity, Body Dimensions, and Added Mass Effects" (Peter Cavanagh, Rodger…

  10. Duty and Distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Binder (C.); C. Heilmann (Conrad)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractEver since the publication of Peter Singer’s article ‘‘Famine, Affluence, and Morality’’ has the question of whether the (geographical) distance to people in need affects our moral duties towards them been a hotly debated issue. Does geographical distance affect our moral

  11. Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M., E-mail: goodsitt@umich.edu; Shenoy, Apeksha; Howard, David; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Dewaraja, Yuni K. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Shen, Jincheng [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Schipper, Matthew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Wilderman, Scott [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chun, Se Young [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    for external calibrations exhibited much larger RMS errors than size matched internal calibration. Use of an average body size external-to-internal calibration correction factor reduced the errors to closer to those for internal calibration. RMS errors of less than 30% or about 0.01 for the bone and 0.1 for the red marrow volume fractions would likely be satisfactory for human studies. Such accuracies were achieved for 3 × 3 segmentation of 5 mm slice images for: (a) internal calibration with 4 times dose for all size body phantoms, (b) internal calibration with 2 times dose for the small and medium size body phantoms, and (c) corrected external calibration with 4 times dose and all size body phantoms. Conclusions: Phantom studies are promising and demonstrate the potential to use dual energy quantitative CT to estimate the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone within the vertebral spongiosa.

  12. Hypothesis testing using pairwise distances and associated kernels

    CERN Document Server

    Sejdinovic, Dino; Sriperumbudur, Bharath; Fukumizu, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    We provide a unifying framework linking two classes of statistics used in two-sample and independence testing: on the one hand, the energy distances and distance covariances from the statistics literature; on the other, distances between embeddings of distributions to reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS), as established in machine learning. The equivalence holds when energy distances are computed with semimetrics of negative type, in which case a kernel may be defined such that the RKHS distance between distributions corresponds exactly to the energy distance. We determine the class of probability distributions for which kernels induced by semimetrics are characteristic (that is, for which embeddings of the distributions to an RKHS are injective). Finally, we investigate the performance of this family of kernels in two-sample and independence tests: we show in particular that the energy distance most commonly employed in statistics is just one member of a parametric family of kernels, and that other choic...

  13. Estimating distances from parallaxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn

    2017-01-01

    In astrometric surveys such as Gaia and LSST, parallaxes will be measured for about a billion stars, but zero distances will be measured. Distances must be inferred from the parallaxes, and the common inference practice is by inverting the parallax. This, however, is only appropriate when there is no noise present. As noise will always be present and most stars in future surveys will have non-negligible fractional parallax uncertainties, we must treat distance estimation as an inference problem. The usage of prior assumptions become unavoidable. In this talk I will present a method on how to infer distances using Bayesian inference. Three minimalists, isotropic priors are used, as well an anisotropic prior derived from the observability of stars in a Milky Way model. The performance of these priors are investigated using a simulated Gaia-like catalogue. Recent results of distance estimation using the parallaxes of 2 million Gaia DR1 stars will also be discussed.

  14. Normalized Information Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Vitanyi, Paul M B; Cilibrasi, Rudi L; Li, Ming

    2008-01-01

    The normalized information distance is a universal distance measure for objects of all kinds. It is based on Kolmogorov complexity and thus uncomputable, but there are ways to utilize it. First, compression algorithms can be used to approximate the Kolmogorov complexity if the objects have a string representation. Second, for names and abstract concepts, page count statistics from the World Wide Web can be used. These practical realizations of the normalized information distance can then be applied to machine learning tasks, expecially clustering, to perform feature-free and parameter-free data mining. This chapter discusses the theoretical foundations of the normalized information distance and both practical realizations. It presents numerous examples of successful real-world applications based on these distance measures, ranging from bioinformatics to music clustering to machine translation.

  15. Quantitative studies of the regular distribution pattern for Salmonella enteritidis in the internal organs of mice after oral challenge by a specific real-time polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Xuan Deng; An-Chun Cheng; Ming-Shu Wang; Ping Cao; Bin Yan; Nian-Chun Yin; Sheng-Yan Cao; Zhen-Hua Zhang

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To identify and understand the regular distribution pattern for Salmonella enteritidis (S.enteritidis) in the internal organs of mice after an oral challenge over a 3 wk period.METHODS:Assays based on the serovar-specific DNA sequence of S.enteritidis from GenBank,and a serovar-specific real-time,fluorescence-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) were developed for the detection of S.enteritidis.We used this assay to detect genomic DNA of S.enteritidis in the blood and the internal organs,including heart,liver,spleen,kidney,pancreas,and gallbladder,from mice after oral challenge at different time points respectively.RESULTS:The results showed that the spleen was positive at 12 h post inoculation (PI),and the blood was at 14 h PI.The organism was detected in the liver and heart at 16 h PI,the pancreas was positive at 20 h PI,and the final organs to show positive results were the kidney and gallbladder at 22 h PI.The copy number of S.enteritidis DNA in each tissue reached a peak at 24-36 h PI,with the liver and spleen containing high concentrations of S.enteritidis,whereas the blood,heart,kidney,pancreas,and gallbladder had low concentrations.S.enteritidis populations began to decrease and were not detectable at 3 d PI,but were still present up to 12 d PI in the gallbladder,2 wk for the liver,and 3 wk for the spleen without causing apparent symptoms.CONCLUSION:The results provided significant data for understanding the life cycle of S.enteritidis in the internal organs,and showed that the liver and spleen may be the primary sites for setting itself up as a commensa over a long time after oral challenge.Interestingly,it may be the first time reported that the gallbladder is a site of carriage for S.enteritidis over a 12 d period.This study will help to understand the mechanisms of action of S.enteritidis infection in vivo.

  16. A glocal distance for network comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Jurman, Giuseppe; Riccadonna, Samantha; Filosi, Michele; Furlanello, Cesare

    2012-01-01

    When comparing networks (with the same number of nodes) with direct methods, a number of possible distances is already available in literature. Among others, two of the most common families are the set of edit-like distances and the spectral distances. The functions in the former family quantitatively evaluate the differences between two networks in terms of minimum number of edit operations (with possibly different costs) transforming one network into the other, that is, deletion and insertion of links, while spectral measures relies on functions of the eigenvalues of one of the connectivity matrices of the underlying graph. A noticeable issue affecting edit distance is the fact of being local, i.e. not taking into account the global structure of the networks but only summing the contributions coming from each single link. On the other hand, spectral measures cannot distinguish isomorphic or isospectral graphs. We propose here a possible solution to overcome both issues: combining together an edit and a spec...

  17. Estimating distances from parallaxes

    CERN Document Server

    Bailer-Jones, C A L

    2015-01-01

    Astrometric surveys such as Gaia and LSST will measure parallaxes for hundreds of millions of stars. Yet they will not measure a single distance. Rather, a distance must be estimated from a parallax. In this didactic article, I show that doing this is not trivial once the fractional parallax error is larger than about 20%, which will be the case for about 80% of stars in the Gaia catalogue. Estimating distances is an inference problem in which the use of prior assumptions is unavoidable. I investigate the properties and performance of various priors and examine their implications. A supposed uninformative uniform prior in distance is shown to give very poor distance estimates (large bias and variance). Any prior with a sharp cut-off at some distance has similar problems. The choice of prior depends on the information one has available - and is willing to use - concerning, for example, the survey and the Galaxy. I demonstrate that a simple prior which decreases asymptotically to zero at infinite distance has g...

  18. MOTIVATION FOR DISTANCE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R zvan TEF NESCU

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Beginning with the 1980’s the new information, communication and computer based technologies stimulated the development of the distance education. In Romania the universities adapted rapidly to this type of learning that became an important financing source for most of them. In this article we approach the causes of attraction for the distance education. For this purpose we use an investigation we did on a group of students at Distance Education including interviews regarding their reasons for choosing this type of learning.

  19. Long distance travel ‘today’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Dane’s long distance travel. It is a part of the Drivers and Limits project about long distance travel. Long distance travel is in the project defined as infrequent travel with overnight stay. Danes 15-85 years-old travel in average 5.5 long distance travel...... per year og which a third is for international destinations, a third is for domestic second homes and a third are other domestic trips. However, 87% of the kilometres are for international destinations and only 4% are for domestic second homes. Travel activity is very uneven distributed with only half...... of the population having had a journey during the last three month. At the other hand 60% have travelled internationally during the last year and only 2% have never travelled abroad. The paper presents among other things how the travel activity is distributed on travel purpose and mode and how the mode choice...

  20. Distance learning perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandza, Haris; Masic, Izet

    2013-01-01

    The development of modern technology and the Internet has enabled the explosive growth of distance learning. distance learning is a process that is increasingly present in the world. This is the field of education focused on educating students who are not physically present in the traditional classrooms or student's campus. described as a process where the source of information is separated from the students in space and time. If there are situations that require the physical presence of students, such as when a student is required to physically attend the exam, this is called a hybrid form of distance learning. This technology is increasingly used worldwide. The Internet has become the main communication channel for the development of distance learning.

  1. Learning Pullback HMM Distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzolin, Fabio; Sapienza, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Recent work in action recognition has exposed the limitations of methods which directly classify local features extracted from spatio-temporal video volumes. In opposition, encoding the actions' dynamics via generative dynamical models has a number of attractive features: however, using all-purpose distances for their classification does not necessarily deliver good results. We propose a general framework for learning distance functions for generative dynamical models, given a training set of labelled videos. The optimal distance function is selected among a family of pullback ones, induced by a parametrised automorphism of the space of models. We focus here on hidden Markov models and their model space, and design an appropriate automorphism there. Experimental results are presented which show how pullback learning greatly improves action recognition performances with respect to base distances.

  2. The Quantitative Linear-Time–Branching-Time Spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Claus; Fahrenberg, Uli; Legay, Axel

    2011-01-01

    We present a distance-agnostic approach to quantitative verification. Taking as input an unspecified distance on system traces, or executions, we develop a game-based framework which allows us to define a spectrum of different interesting system distances corresponding to the given trace distance...

  3. Institutional and specialized Distance learning program accreditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehzabul Hoque Nahid

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Teaching and learning are no longer confined to the classroom or the school day. There are many technologies that can offer a great deal of flexibility in when, where, and how education is distributed. The Teacher's Guide to Distance Learning is intended for K-12 educators who are interested in implementing distance learning technologies. It provides an overview of the advantages and characteristics of the various technologies now being used to reach remote learners. Distance learning provides "access to learning when the source of information and the learners are separated by time and distance, or both." Distance education courses that require a physical on-site presence for any reason (excluding taking examinations may be referred to as hybrid or blended courses of study. Massive open online courses (MOOCs, aimed at large-scale interactive participation and open access via the web or other network technologies, are recent developments in distance education. A number of other terms are used roughly synonymously with distance education. However distance is the oldest and mostly commonly used term globally. It is also the broadest term and has the largest collection of related research articles. The main objective of this paper is develop an understanding of the characteristics and needs of distant students with little first-hand experience and limited, if any, face-to-face contact.

  4. Quantitative graph theory mathematical foundations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dehmer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The first book devoted exclusively to quantitative graph theory, Quantitative Graph Theory: Mathematical Foundations and Applications presents and demonstrates existing and novel methods for analyzing graphs quantitatively. Incorporating interdisciplinary knowledge from graph theory, information theory, measurement theory, and statistical techniques, this book covers a wide range of quantitative-graph theoretical concepts and methods, including those pertaining to real and random graphs such as:Comparative approaches (graph similarity or distance)Graph measures to characterize graphs quantitat

  5. An incremental clustering algorithm based on Mahalanobis distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aik, Lim Eng; Choon, Tan Wee

    2014-12-01

    Classical fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm is insufficient to cluster non-spherical or elliptical distributed datasets. The paper replaces classical fuzzy c-means clustering euclidean distance with Mahalanobis distance. It applies Mahalanobis distance to incremental learning for its merits. A Mahalanobis distance based fuzzy incremental clustering learning algorithm is proposed. Experimental results show the algorithm is an effective remedy for the defect in fuzzy c-means algorithm but also increase training accuracy.

  6. Presence at a distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddouk, Lise

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays in the context of the cyberculture, computer-mediated inter-subjective relationships are part of our everyday lives, in both the professional and personal spheres, and for all age groups. In the clinical field, many applications have been developed to facilitate the exchange of informations and mediate the relationship between patient and therapist. In psychology, more or less immersive technologies are used, to encourage the feeling of presence among the users, and to trigger certain psychological processes. In our research, we have explored the remote clinical interview through videoconferencing, with the development and utilisation of the iPSY platform, totally focused on this objective. In this context, we have considered the notion of intersubjectivity, despite the physical absence. This research is leading us today to envision the notions of distance and presence, and possibly to redefine them. Thus, can we still oppose physical distance to psychological distance? Can we still affirm that the physical absence does not permit a psychological co-presence in certain interactions, like this observed in video interviews? The results show that the psychological processes, activated in this context, are similar to those observed in "traditional" clinical consults between the patient and the therapist. However, certain specifics have led us to consider the concept of distance, here influenced by the framework, and to observe its effects. This distance could possibly constitute a therapeutic lever for some patients, notably for those who have difficulties establishing the right psychological distance in their relationships with others. According to these results, can "distance" still be opposed to "presence", or could it be re-defined? This also opens up questions on the more general concept of digital relationships, and the definition of their specificities.

  7. Star graphs: threaded distance trees and E-sets

    CERN Document Server

    Dejter, Italo J

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of distances in the star graph $ST_n$, ($1distances to the identity permutation, via a pruning algorithm followed by a threading algorithm. In the process, the distributions of distances of the efficient dominating sets of $ST_n$ are determined.

  8. Stereoscopic distance perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Limited cue, open-loop tasks in which a human observer indicates distances or relations among distances are discussed. By open-loop tasks, it is meant tasks in which the observer gets no feedback as to the accuracy of the responses. What happens when cues are added and when the loop is closed are considered. The implications of this research for the effectiveness of visual displays is discussed. Errors in visual distance tasks do not necessarily mean that the percept is in error. The error could arise in transformations that intervene between the percept and the response. It is argued that the percept is in error. It is also argued that there exist post-perceptual transformations that may contribute to the error or be modified by feedback to correct for the error.

  9. Pairwise-Distance-Analysis-Driven Dimensionality Reduction Model with Double Mappings for Hyperspectral Image Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Long

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel strategy for the visualization of hyperspectral imagery based on the analysis of image pixel pairwise distances. The goal of this approach is to generate a final color image with excellent interpretability and high contrast at the cost of distorting a few pairwise distances. Specifically, the principle of equal variance is introduced to divide all hyperspectral bands into three subgroups and to ensure the energy is distributed uniformly between them, as in natural color images. Then, after detecting both normal and outlier pixels, these three subgroups are mapped into three color components of the output visualization using two different mapping (i.e., dimensionality reduction schemes for the two types of pixels. The widely-used multidimensional scaling (MDS is used for normal pixels and a new objective function, taking into account the weighting of pairwise distances, is presented for the outlier pixels. The pairwise distance weighting is designed such that small pairwise distances between the outliers and their respective neighbors are emphasized and large deviations are suppressed. This produces an image with high contrast and good interpretability while retaining the detailed information content. The proposed algorithm is compared with several state-of-the-art visualization techniques and evaluated on the well-known AVIRIS hyperspectral images. The effectiveness of the proposed strategy is substantiated both visually and quantitatively.

  10. Distances to Dark Clouds: Comparing Extinction Distances to Maser Parallax Distances

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, Jonathan B; Benjamin, Robert A; Hoare, Melvin G; Jackson, James M

    2012-01-01

    We test two different methods of using near-infrared extinction to estimate distances to dark clouds in the first quadrant of the Galaxy using large near infrared (2MASS and UKIDSS) surveys. VLBI parallax measurements of masers around massive young stars provide the most direct and bias-free measurement of the distance to these dark clouds. We compare the extinction distance estimates to these maser parallax distances. We also compare these distances to kinematic distances, including recent re-calibrations of the Galactic rotation curve. The extinction distance methods agree with the maser parallax distances (within the errors) between 66% and 100% of the time (depending on method and input survey) and between 85% and 100% of the time outside of the crowded Galactic center. Although the sample size is small, extinction distance methods reproduce maser parallax distances better than kinematic distances; furthermore, extinction distance methods do not suffer from the kinematic distance ambiguity. This validatio...

  11. Sets avoiding integral distances

    CERN Document Server

    Kurz, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    We study open point sets in Euclidean spaces $\\mathbb{R}^d$ without a pair of points an integral distance apart. By a result of Furstenberg, Katznelson, and Weiss such sets must be of Lebesgue upper density zero. We are interested in how large such sets can be in $d$-dimensional volume. We determine the lower and upper bounds for the volumes of the sets in terms of the number of their connected components and dimension, and also give some exact values. Our problem can be viewed as a kind of inverse to known problems on sets with pairwise rational or integral distances.

  12. Distance Teaching on Bornholm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Finn J. S.; Clausen, Christian

    2001-01-01

    The case study represents an example of a top-down introduction of distance teaching as part of Danish trials with the introduction of multimedia in education. The study is concerned with the background, aim and context of the trial as well as the role and working of the technology and the organi......The case study represents an example of a top-down introduction of distance teaching as part of Danish trials with the introduction of multimedia in education. The study is concerned with the background, aim and context of the trial as well as the role and working of the technology...

  13. Distances to star forming regions

    CERN Document Server

    Loinard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The determination of accurate distances to star-forming regions are discussed in the broader historical context of astronomical distance measurements. We summarize recent results for regions within 1 kpc and present perspectives for the near and more distance future.

  14. Signaling Over Distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Atsushi; Cavalli, Valeria

    2016-02-01

    Neurons are extremely polarized cells. Axon lengths often exceed the dimension of the neuronal cell body by several orders of magnitude. These extreme axonal lengths imply that neurons have mastered efficient mechanisms for long distance signaling between soma and synaptic terminal. These elaborate mechanisms are required for neuronal development and maintenance of the nervous system. Neurons can fine-tune long distance signaling through calcium wave propagation and bidirectional transport of proteins, vesicles, and mRNAs along microtubules. The signal transmission over extreme lengths also ensures that information about axon injury is communicated to the soma and allows for repair mechanisms to be engaged. This review focuses on the different mechanisms employed by neurons to signal over long axonal distances and how signals are interpreted in the soma, with an emphasis on proteomic studies. We also discuss how proteomic approaches could help further deciphering the signaling mechanisms operating over long distance in axons. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Weighted Feature Distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortiz-Arroyo, Daniel; Yazdani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    The accuracy of machine learning methods for clustering depends on the optimal selection of similarity functions. Conventional distance functions for the vector space might cause an algorithm to being affected by some dominant features that may skew its final results. This paper introduces a flexib...

  16. Encyclopedia of Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Caroline, Ed.; Boettecher, Judith, Ed.; Justice, Lorraine, Ed.; Schenk, Karen, Ed.; Rogers, Patricia, Ed.; Berg, Gary, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The innovations in computer and communications technologies combined with on-going needs to deliver educational programs to students regardless of their physical locations, have lead to the innovation of distance education programs and technologies. To keep up with recent developments in both areas of technologies and techniques related to…

  17. Accreditation of Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Ergün

    2016-01-01

    The higher education institutes aspire to gain reputation of quality having accreditation from internationally recognized awarding bodies. The accreditation leads and provides quality assurance for education. Although distance learning becomes a significant part of the education system in the 21st century, there is still a common opinion that the…

  18. Prospect of Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Monsurur; Karim, Reza; Byramjee, Framarz

    2015-01-01

    Many educational institutions in the United States are currently offering programs through distance learning, and that trend is rising. In almost all spheres of education a developing country like Bangladesh needs to make available the expertise of the most qualified faculty to her distant people. But the fundamental question remains as to whether…

  19. Rapport in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Rodriguez-Manzanares, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Rapport has been recognized as important in learning in general but little is known about its importance in distance education (DE). The study we report on in this paper provides insights into the importance of rapport in DE as well as challenges to and indicators of rapport-building in DE. The study relied on interviews with 42 Canadian…

  20. Improving Pulsar Distances by Modelling Interstellar Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Deshpande, A A

    1998-01-01

    We present here a method to study the distribution of electron density fluctuations in pulsar directions as well as to estimate pulsar distances. The method, based on a simple two-component model of the scattering medium discussed by Gwinn et al. (1993), uses scintillation & proper motion data in addition to the measurements of angular broadening & temporal broadening to solve for the model parameters, namely, the fractional distance to a discrete scatterer and the ascociated relative scattering strength. We show how this method can be used to estimate pulsar distances reliably, when the location of a discrete scatterer (e.g. an HII region), if any, is known. Considering the specific example of PSR B0736-40, we illustrate how a simple characterization of the Gum nebula region (using the data on the Vela pulsar) is possible and can be used along with the temporal broadening measurements to estimate pulsar distances.

  1. The 5'-3' Distance of RNA Secondary Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recently, Yoffe and colleagues observed that the average distances between 5'-3' ends of RNA molecules are very small and largely independent of sequence length. This observation is based on numerical computations as well as theoretical arguments maximizing certain entropy functionals....... In this article, we compute the exact distribution of 5'-3' distances of RNA secondary structures for any finite n. Furthermore, we compute the limit distribution and show that for n = 30 the exact distribution and the limit distribution are very close. Our results show that the distances of random RNA secondary...... structures are distinctively lower than those of minimum free energy structures of random RNA sequences....

  2. Estimating shot distance from limited pellets pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebe, Alessio; Compagnini, Domenico

    2012-10-10

    Several methods are available for shooting range estimation based on pellets pattern on the target that have a remarkable degree of accuracy. The task is usually approached working under the assumption that the entire distribution of pellets is available for examination. These methods fail, however, when the victim has been hit by a portion of the pattern only. The problem can be solved with reasonable accuracy when there are areas of void in the victim that are adjacent to the area struck by pellets. This study presents a method that can be used in precisely this type of situation, allowing the estimation of shot distance in cases of partial pellet patterns. It is based on collecting distributions in test shots at several distances, and taking samples in the targets, constrained by the shape of the void and the pellet hit areas. Statistical descriptors of patterns are extracted from such samples, and fed into a neural network classifier, estimating shot ranges of distance.

  3. Mechanisms of long-distance dispersal of seeds by wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Ran; Katul, Gabriel G.; Horn, Henry S.; Thomas, Suvi M.; Oren, Ram; Avissar, Roni; Pacala, Stephen W.; Levin, Simon A.

    2002-07-01

    Long-distance dispersal (LDD) is central to species expansion following climate change, re-colonization of disturbed areas and control of pests. The current paradigm is that the frequency and spatial extent of LDD events are extremely difficult to predict. Here we show that mechanistic models coupling seed release and aerodynamics with turbulent transport processes provide accurate probabilistic descriptions of LDD of seeds by wind. The proposed model reliably predicts the vertical distribution of dispersed seeds of five tree species observed along a 45-m high tower in an eastern US deciduous forest. Simulations show that uplifting above the forest canopy is necessary and sufficient for LDD, hence, they provide the means to define LDD quantitatively rather than arbitrarily. Seed uplifting probability thus sets an upper bound on the probability of long-distance colonization. Uplifted yellow poplar seeds are on average lighter than seeds at the forest floor, but also include the heaviest seeds. Because uplifting probabilities are appreciable (as much as 1-5%), and tree seed crops are commonly massive, some LDD events will establish individuals that can critically affect plant dynamics on large scales.

  4. Quantitative measurements of air-fuel mixture distribution in a cylinder using LIF; LIF ni yoru tonai kongoki nodo no teiryoteki keisoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S.; Kadoi, N. [Subaru Research Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    It is necessary to understand the mechanisms of mixture formation in a cylinder to improve engine performance, especially for a gasoline direct injection engine. In this study, a quantitative air-fuel mixture measurement technique using PLIF was developed. Across a laser sheet, a transparent liner was placed between two calibration cells which increased the reliability of fuel concentration. This technique was applied to gasoline direct injection engine to clarify the effect of injection timing on stratified charged mixture. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. TRI12 based quantitative real-time PCR assays reveal the distribution of trichothecene genotype of F. graminearum and F. culmorum isolates in Danish small grain cereals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L. K.; Jensen, J. D.; Rodríguez, A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR assays, based on polymorphisms in the TRI12 gene of the trichothecene pathway, were developed to identify and quantify the trichothecene genotypes producing 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (3ADON), 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (15ADON) or nivalenol (NIV) in the Fusarium graminearum...... in the sample representing the years from 1997 to 2000. Detection of low amounts of the 15ADON genotype in these historical samples and the relatively high amounts of 15ADON genotype in 2003 and following years correspond well with the occurrence of F. graminearum and indicates that the 15ADON genotype...

  6. Distance Learning For Mobile Internet Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beran NECAT

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview on the current state of art in the field of Distance learning for mobile users. It mentions a large range of technologies, services and approaches that may be used to bring distance learning to mobile internet users. These technologies are supposed to considerably increase innovative e-learning solutions for the next generation. While this definitely appears to be true, I think what is not so clear are the implications for students, and lecturers etc. In this article I first evaluate distributed e-learning technologies. With some of the most vital topics, focusing on adaptive distributed e-learning for Mobile Internet Users (MIUs. I also provide a brief analysis of Broadband Network Services, Collaborative e-Learning Tools and Distributed Virtual Environments, Internet-Based Adaptive Learning Technologies and Personalised Distance Learning. I continue my discussion on to Internet Development Tools (IDTs for Distance Learning Solutions, Learning Technologies for MIUs, Semantic and Web-Based Services for Enriching Learning Interactivity, and Evaluations of Distributed Learning Technologies (DLTs.

  7. Elemental Quantitative Distribution and Statistical Analysis on Cross Section of Stainless Steel Sheet by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-hua LUO; Hai-zhou WANG

    2015-01-01

    An innovative application of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) technique in illustrating elemental distributions on stainless steel sheets was presented. The technique proved to be a systematic and accurate ap-proach in producing visual images or maps of elemental distributions at cross-sectional surface of a stainless steel sheet. Two stain-less steel sheets served as research objects: 3 mm×1 300 mm hot-rolled stainless steel plate and 1 mm×1 260 mm cold-rolled plate. The cross-sectional surfaces of the two samples at 1/4 position along the width direction were scanned (raster area-44 mm2 and 11 mm2) with a focused laser beam (wavelength 213 nm, diameter of laser crater 100 μm, and laser power 1.6 mJ) in a laser abla-tion chamber. The laser ablation system was coupled to a quadrupole ICP-MS, which made the detection of ion intensities of27Al+, 44Ca+,47Ti+,55Mn+ and56Fe+ within an area of interest possible. One-dimensional (1D) content line distribution maps and two-dimensional (2D) contour maps for speciifc positions or areas were plotted to indicate the element distribution of a target area with high accuracy. Statistic method was used to analyze the acquired data by calculating median contents, maximum segregation, sta-tistic segregation and content-frequency distribution.

  8. Fuzzy clustering with Minkowski distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); U. Kaymak (Uzay); J.M. van Rosmalen (Joost)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractDistances in the well known fuzzy c-means algorithm of Bezdek (1973) are measured by the squared Euclidean distance. Other distances have been used as well in fuzzy clustering. For example, Jajuga (1991) proposed to use the L_1-distance and Bobrowski and Bezdek (1991) also used the L_inf

  9. Distance-weighted city growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybski, Diego; García Cantú Ros, Anselmo; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2013-04-01

    Urban agglomerations exhibit complex emergent features of which Zipf's law, i.e., a power-law size distribution, and fractality may be regarded as the most prominent ones. We propose a simplistic model for the generation of citylike structures which is solely based on the assumption that growth is more likely to take place close to inhabited space. The model involves one parameter which is an exponent determining how strongly the attraction decays with the distance. In addition, the model is run iteratively so that existing clusters can grow (together) and new ones can emerge. The model is capable of reproducing the size distribution and the fractality of the boundary of the largest cluster. Although the power-law distribution depends on both, the imposed exponent and the iteration, the fractality seems to be independent of the former and only depends on the latter. Analyzing land-cover data, we estimate the parameter-value γ≈2.5 for Paris and its surroundings.

  10. The sound of distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaglia, Cristina D; Maglio, Sam J; Krehm, Madelaine; Seok, Jin H; Trope, Yaacov

    2016-07-01

    Human languages may be more than completely arbitrary symbolic systems. A growing literature supports sound symbolism, or the existence of consistent, intuitive relationships between speech sounds and specific concepts. Prior work establishes that these sound-to-meaning mappings can shape language-related judgments and decisions, but do their effects generalize beyond merely the linguistic and truly color how we navigate our environment? We examine this possibility, relating a predominant sound symbolic distinction (vowel frontness) to a novel associate (spatial proximity) in five studies. We show that changing one vowel in a label can influence estimations of distance, impacting judgment, perception, and action. The results (1) provide the first experimental support for a relationship between vowels and spatial distance and (2) demonstrate that sound-to-meaning mappings have outcomes that extend beyond just language and can - through a single sound - influence how we perceive and behave toward objects in the world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Refocusing distance of a standard plenoptic camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, Christopher; Aggoun, Amar; Velisavljevic, Vladan; Fiebig, Susanne; Pesch, Matthias

    2016-09-19

    Recent developments in computational photography enabled variation of the optical focus of a plenoptic camera after image exposure, also known as refocusing. Existing ray models in the field simplify the camera's complexity for the purpose of image and depth map enhancement, but fail to satisfyingly predict the distance to which a photograph is refocused. By treating a pair of light rays as a system of linear functions, it will be shown in this paper that its solution yields an intersection indicating the distance to a refocused object plane. Experimental work is conducted with different lenses and focus settings while comparing distance estimates with a stack of refocused photographs for which a blur metric has been devised. Quantitative assessments over a 24 m distance range suggest that predictions deviate by less than 0.35 % in comparison to an optical design software. The proposed refocusing estimator assists in predicting object distances just as in the prototyping stage of plenoptic cameras and will be an essential feature in applications demanding high precision in synthetic focus or where depth map recovery is done by analyzing a stack of refocused photographs.

  12. Tolman's Luminosity-Distance, Poincare's Light-Distance and Cayley-Klein's Hyperbolic Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Pierseaux, Yves

    2009-01-01

    We deduce Tolman's formula of luminosity-distance in Cosmology from Poincare's definition of light-distance with Lorentz Transformation (LT).In Minkowskian metric, if distance is proper time (as it is often argued) then light-distance must be also the shortest distance, like proper duration (unlike Einstein's longest length within rest system). By introducing Poincare's proper light-distance in Einstein's basic synchronization we deduce a dilated distance between observer and receding mirror (with relativistic Doppler factor). Such a distance corresponds not to an Euclidean distance (Einstein's rigid rod) but to an Hyperbolic distance (Cayley-Klein) with a Lobatchevskian Horizon. From a basic proportionality hyperbolic distance-velocity, we deduce the law of Hubble. By following Penrose's Lobatchevskian representation of LT, we transform Special Relativity (SR) into an Hyperbolic Cosmological Relativity (HCR). by using only the LT but the whole LT. In Hyperbolic Rotation motion (basic active LT or Einstein's ...

  13. Distance, Borders, and Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skillicorn, David; Walther, Olivier; Zheng, Quan

    is a combination of the physical geography of the target environment, and the mental and physical cost of following a seemingly random pattern of attacks. Focusing on the distance and time between attacks and taking into consideration the transaction costs that state boundaries impose, we wish to understand what......” of North and West Africa that depicts the permeability to violence. A better understanding of how location, time, and borders condition attacks enables planning, prepositioning, and response....

  14. Comparative QRA (Quantitative Risk Analysis) of natural gas distribution pipelines in urban areas; Analise comparativa dos riscos da operacao de linhas de gas natural em areas urbanas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luiz Fernando S. de [Energy Solutions South America (Brazil); Cardoso, Cassia de O.; Storch, Rafael [Det Norske Veritas (DNV) (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The natural gas pipeline network grows around the world, but its operation inherently imposes a risk to the people living next to pipelines. Due to this, it is necessary to conduct a risk analysis during the environmental licensing in Brazil. Despite the risk analysis methodology is well established, some points of its application for the distribution pipelines are still under discussion. This paper presents a methodology that examines the influences of major projects and operating parameters on the risk calculation of a distribution pipeline accident in urban areas as well as the possible accident scenarios assessment complexity. The impact of some scenarios has been evaluated using a Computational Fluid Dynamics tool. The results indicate that, under certain conditions, the risks from the pipeline operation under operating pressures of 20 bar may be acceptable in location class 3 or even in class 4. These results play a very important role if management decisions on the growth of the distribution of natural gas network in densely populated areas as well as in the improvement of laws to control the activity of distribution of natural gas. (author)

  15. Lumen narrowing after percutaneous transluminal coronary balloon angioplasty follows a near gaussian distribution: a quantitative angiographic study in 1,445 successfully dilated lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J.W.M. Rensing (Benno); W.R.M. Hermans (Walter); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); J.G.P. Tijssen (Jan); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J.W. Deckers (Jaap)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractTo determine whether significant angiographic narrowing and restenosis after successful coronary balloon angioplasty is a specific disease entity occurring in a subset of dilated lesions or whether it is the tail end of a gaussian distributed phenomenon, 1,445 successfully dilated lesion

  16. Activity and three-dimensional distribution of toluene-degrading Pseudomonas putida in a multispecies biofilm assessed by quantitative in situ hybridization and scanning confocal laser microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Pedersen, Anne Rathmann; Poulsen, L.K.

    1996-01-01

    As a representative member of the toluene-degrading population in a biofilter for waste gas treatment, Pseudomonas putida was investigated with a 16S rRNA targeting probe, The three-dimensional distribution of P. putida was visualized in the biofilm matrix by scanning confocal laser microscopy...

  17. On the importance of the distance measures used to train and test knowledge-based potentials for proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Martin; Koehl, Patrice; Røgen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge-based potentials are energy functions derived from the analysis of databases of protein structures and sequences. They can be divided into two classes. Potentials from the first class are based on a direct conversion of the distributions of some geometric properties observed in native protein structures into energy values, while potentials from the second class are trained to mimic quantitatively the geometric differences between incorrectly folded models and native structures. In this paper, we focus on the relationship between energy and geometry when training the second class of knowledge-based potentials. We assume that the difference in energy between a decoy structure and the corresponding native structure is linearly related to the distance between the two structures. We trained two distance-based knowledge-based potentials accordingly, one based on all inter-residue distances (PPD), while the other had the set of all distances filtered to reflect consistency in an ensemble of decoys (PPE). We tested four types of metric to characterize the distance between the decoy and the native structure, two based on extrinsic geometry (RMSD and GTD-TS*), and two based on intrinsic geometry (Q* and MT). The corresponding eight potentials were tested on a large collection of decoy sets. We found that it is usually better to train a potential using an intrinsic distance measure. We also found that PPE outperforms PPD, emphasizing the benefits of capturing consistent information in an ensemble. The relevance of these results for the design of knowledge-based potentials is discussed.

  18. Quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roger

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the basic tenets of quantitative research. The concepts of dependent and independent variables are addressed and the concept of measurement and its associated issues, such as error, reliability and validity, are explored. Experiments and surveys – the principal research designs in quantitative research – are described and key features explained. The importance of the double-blind randomised controlled trial is emphasised, alongside the importance of longitudinal surveys, as opposed to cross-sectional surveys. Essential features of data storage are covered, with an emphasis on safe, anonymous storage. Finally, the article explores the analysis of quantitative data, considering what may be analysed and the main uses of statistics in analysis.

  19. A Behavioral Distance for Fuzzy-Transition Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Yongzhi; Sun, Sherry X; Chen, Guoqing

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the existing approaches to bisimulation for fuzzy systems, we introduce a behavioral distance to measure the behavioral similarity of states in a nondeterministic fuzzy-transition system. This behavioral distance is defined as the greatest fixed point of a suitable monotonic function and provides a quantitative analogue of bisimilarity. The behavioral distance has the important property that two states are at zero distance if and only if they are bisimilar. Moreover, for any given threshold, we find that states with behavioral distances bounded by the threshold are equivalent. In addition, we show that two system combinators---parallel composition and product---are non-expansive with respect to our behavioral distance, which makes compositional verification possible.

  20. Quantitative comparison of semi- and fully-distributed hydrologic models in simulating flood hydrographs on a mountain watershed in southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张会兰; 王玉杰; 王云琦; 李丹勋; 王兴奎

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the performance of fully- and semi-distributed hydrologic models in simulating the process of transforma- tion from rainfall to runoff in mountain areas, the fully-distributed models Basin Pollution Calculation Center (BPCC) and HEC- HMS are calibrated for the Zhenjiangguan watershed located in the upper stream of Minjiang River Southwest China using stream- flow observations at the basin outlet. Semi-automatical optimization method is implemented to both models to improve simulated re- sults by removing artificial errors. Based on the consistency of the simulated hydrographs with the observed ones, the statistical coe- fficients such as the relative error, the probability distribution and the correlation coefficient, are further introduced to evaluate qua- ntitatively the performance of the two models. Analyses indicate that the hydrographs simulated by the BPCC are relatively closer to the observed ones than those simulated by the HEC-HMS in view of the spatial heterogeneity in terrain, soil texture, land cover and meteorological conditions in mountain areas.

  1. Distribution of immunoreactive glutamine synthetase in the adult human and mouse brain. Qualitative and quantitative observations with special emphasis on extra-astroglial protein localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bannier, Jana; Meyer-Lotz, Gabriela; Steiner, Johann; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Walter, Martin; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, thus playing a pivotal role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis. Despite a plethora of studies on this enzyme, knowledge about the regional and cellular distribution of this enzyme in human brain is still fragmentary. Therefore, we mapped fourteen post-mortem brains of psychically healthy individuals for the distribution of the glutamine synthetase immunoreactive protein. It was found that glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity is expressed in multiple gray and white matter astrocytes, but also in oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and certain neurons. Since a possible extra-astrocytic expression of glutamine synthetase is highly controversial, we paid special attention to its appearance in oligodendrocytes and neurons. By double immunolabeling of mouse brain slices and cultured mouse brain cells for glutamine synthetase and cell-type-specific markers we provide evidence that besides astrocytes subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, microglial cells and neurons express glutamine synthetase. Moreover, we show that glutamine synthetase-immunopositive neurons are not randomly distributed throughout human and mouse brain, but represent a subpopulation of nitrergic (i.e. neuronal nitric oxide synthase expressing) neurons. Possible functional implications of an extra-astrocytic localization of glutamine synthetase are discussed.

  2. The DDO IVC Distance Project

    CERN Document Server

    Gladders, M D; Burns, C R; Attard, A; Casey, M P; Hamilton, D; Mallén-Ornelas, G; Karr, J L; Poirier, S M; Sawicki, M; Barrientos, F; Barkhouse, W A; Brodwin, M; Clark, J; McNaughton, R; Ruetalo-Pacheco, M; Mochnacki, S W; Gladders, Michael D.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Burns, Christopher R.; Attard, Allen; Casey, Michael P.; Hamilton, Devon; Mallen-Ornelas, Gabriela; Karr, Jennifer L.; Poirier, Sara M.; Sawicki, Marcin; Barrientos, Felipe; Barkhouse, Wayne; Brodwin, Mark; Clark, Jason; Naughton, Rosemary Mc; Ruetalo-Pacheco, Marcelo; Mochnacki, Stefan W.

    1998-01-01

    We present the first set of distance limits from the David Dunlap Observatory Intermediate Velocity Cloud (DDO IVC) distance project. Such distance measures are crucial to understanding the origins and dynamics of IVCs, as the distances set most of the basic physical parameters for the clouds. Currently there are very few IVCs with reliably known distances. This paper describes in some detail the basic techniques used to measure distances, with particular emphasis on the the analysis of interstellar absorption line data, which forms the basis of our distance determinations. As an example, we provide a detailed description of our distance determination for the Draco Cloud. Preliminary distance limits for a total of eleven clouds are provided.

  3. Which Aspects of the English Language Do Distance Learners Find Difficult?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, George Boon Sai; Lin, Agnes Liau Wei; Belaja, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the findings of a research carried out on distance learners at the School of Distance Education (SDE), University Sains Malaysia (USM). The study was explorative in nature with the purpose identifying the aspects of the English language which distance learners found difficult to learn. A quantitative survey questionnaire design…

  4. Distance Metric Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-02

    520, 2004. 16 [12] E.C. Hall and R.M. Willett. Online convex optimization in dynamic environ- ments. Selected Topics in Signal Processing, IEEE Journal...Conference on Machine Learning, pages 1160–1167. ACM, 2008. [25] Eric P Xing, Michael I Jordan, Stuart Russell, and Andrew Y Ng. Distance metric...whereBψ is any Bregman divergence and ηt is the learning rate parameter. From ( Hall & Willett, 2015) we have: Theorem 1. G` = max θ∈Θ,`∈L ‖∇f(θ)‖ φmax = 1

  5. Long distance tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, B I

    2005-01-01

    Quantum tunneling between two potential wells in a magnetic field can be strongly increased when the potential barrier varies in the direction perpendicular to the line connecting the two wells and remains constant along this line. A periodic structure of the wave function is formed in the direction joining the wells. The resulting motion can be coherent like motion in a conventional narrow band periodic structure. A particle penetrates the barrier over a long distance which strongly contrasts to WKB-like tunneling. The whole problem is stationary. The coherent process can be influenced by dissipation.

  6. Distances on Lozenge Tilings

    CERN Document Server

    Bodini, Olivier; Fernique, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a structural property of the set of lozenge tilings of a 2n-gon is highlighted. We introduce a simple combinatorial value called Hamming-distance, which is a lower bound for the flipdistance (i.e. the number of necessary local transformations involving three lozenges) between two given tilings. It is here proven that, for n5, We show that there is some deficient pairs of tilings for which the flip connection needs more flips than the combinatorial lower bound indicates.

  7. Distance Teaching on Bornholm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Finn J. S.; Clausen, Christian

    2001-01-01

    and the organisational set-up. It is debated which kind of social learning that has taken place. The innovation process was based on the implementation of an inflexible video-conference system without any proactive considerations of organisational change or pedagocical development. User appropriation of the technology......The case study represents an example of a top-down introduction of distance teaching as part of Danish trials with the introduction of multimedia in education. The study is concerned with the background, aim and context of the trial as well as the role and working of the technology...

  8. Distance Learning. Volume I: Distance Learning Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The primary focus of this project is the determination of the feasibility and cost effectiveness of applying Distance Learning strategies to 22...selected PPSCP courses and development of a Distance Learning Analysis Procedures Manual.

  9. PERBANDINGAN EUCLIDEAN DISTANCE DENGAN CANBERRA DISTANCE PADA FACE RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendhy Rachmat Wurdianarto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Perkembangan ilmu pada dunia komputer sangatlah pesat. Salah satu yang menandai hal ini adalah ilmu komputer telah merambah pada dunia biometrik. Arti biometrik sendiri adalah karakter-karakter manusia yang dapat digunakan untuk membedakan antara orang yang satu dengan yang lainnya. Salah satu pemanfaatan karakter / organ tubuh pada setiap manusia yang digunakan untuk identifikasi (pengenalan adalah dengan memanfaatkan wajah. Dari permasalahan diatas dalam pengenalan lebih tentang aplikasi Matlab pada Face Recognation menggunakan metode Euclidean Distance dan Canberra Distance. Model pengembangan aplikasi yang digunakan adalah model waterfall. Model waterfall beriisi rangkaian aktivitas proses yang disajikan dalam proses analisa kebutuhan, desain menggunakan UML (Unified Modeling Language, inputan objek gambar diproses menggunakan Euclidean Distance dan Canberra Distance. Kesimpulan yang dapat ditarik adalah aplikasi face Recognation menggunakan metode euclidean Distance dan Canverra Distance terdapat kelebihan dan kekurangan masing-masing. Untuk kedepannya aplikasi tersebut dapat dikembangkan dengan menggunakan objek berupa video ataupun objek lainnya.   Kata kunci : Euclidean Distance, Face Recognition, Biometrik, Canberra Distance

  10. Chronic sensory stroke with and without central pain is associated with bilaterally distributed sensory abnormalities as detected by quantitative sensory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Thomas; Asseyer, Susanna; Geisler, Frederik; Fiebach, Jochen B; Oeltjenbruns, Jochen; Kopf, Andreas; Villringer, Kersten; Villringer, Arno; Jungehulsing, Gerhard J

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20% of patients suffering from stroke with pure or predominant sensory symptoms (referred to as sensory stroke patients) develop central poststroke pain (CPSP). It is largely unknown what distinguishes these patients from those who remain pain free. Using quantitative sensory testing (QST), we analyzed the somatosensory profiles of 50 patients with chronic sensory stroke, of which 25 suffered from CPSP. As compared with reference data from healthy controls, patients with CPSP showed alterations of thermal and mechanical thresholds on the body area contralateral to their stroke (P pain sensory stroke [NPSS] patients) exhibited similar albeit less pronounced contralesional changes. Paradoxical heat sensation (PHS) and dynamic mechanical allodynia (DMA) showed higher values in CPSP, and an elevated cold detection threshold (CDT) was seen more often in CPSP than in patients with NPSS (P pain summation (wind-up ratio) each correlated with the presence of pain (P < 0.05). On the homologous ipsilesional body area, both patient groups showed additional significant abnormalities as compared with the reference data, which strongly resembled the contralesional changes. In summary, our analysis reveals that CPSP is associated with impaired temperature perception and positive sensory signs, but differences between patients with CPSP and NPSS are subtle. Both patients with CPSP and NPSS show considerable QST changes on the ipsilesional body side. These results are in part paralleled by recent findings of bilaterally spread cortical atrophy in CPSP and might reflect chronic maladaptive cortical plasticity, particularly in patients with CPSP.

  11. Activity and three-dimensional distribution of toluene-degrading Pseudomonas putida in a multispecies biofilm assessed by quantitative in situ hybridization and scanning confocal laser microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Pedersen, Anne Rathmann; Poulsen, L.K.

    1996-01-01

    As a representative member of the toluene-degrading population in a biofilter for waste gas treatment, Pseudomonas putida was investigated with a 16S rRNA targeting probe, The three-dimensional distribution of P. putida was visualized in the biofilm matrix by scanning confocal laser microscopy....... demonstrating that P. putida was present throughout the biofilm. Acridine orange staining revealed a very heterogeneous structure of the fully hydrated biofilm, with cell-free channels extending ft om the surface Into the biofilm. This indicated that toluene may penetrate to deeper layers of the biofilm...

  12. Quantitative and analytical comparison of isodose distributions for shaped electron fields from ADAC Pinnacle treatment planning system and Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishmael Parsai, E., E-mail: e.parsai@utoledo.ed [University of Toledo Health Science Campus, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mail Stop 1151, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Shvydka, Diana; Kang, Jun; Chan, Philip; Pearson, David; Ahmad, Faheem [University of Toledo Health Science Campus, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mail Stop 1151, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We assess the accuracy of ADAC Pinnacle{sup 3} commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in computation of isodose distributions for shaped electron fields. The assessment is based on comparison of dose profiles generated by TPS and a Monte Carlo model for different beam energies, applicator sizes, and percentages of field blocking. Dose differences of up to 14% are observed at the depth of maximum dose. These discrepancies, often ignored in clinical evaluations, are attributable to inadequate modeling of scatter from applicators and blocks by TPS.

  13. Quantitative and analytical comparison of isodose distributions for shaped electron fields from ADAC Pinnacle treatment planning system and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsai, E Ishmael; Shvydka, Diana; Kang, Jun; Chan, Philip; Pearson, David; Ahmad, Faheem

    2010-12-01

    We assess the accuracy of ADAC Pinnacle(3) commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in computation of isodose distributions for shaped electron fields. The assessment is based on comparison of dose profiles generated by TPS and a Monte Carlo model for different beam energies, applicator sizes, and percentages of field blocking. Dose differences of up to 14% are observed at the depth of maximum dose. These discrepancies, often ignored in clinical evaluations, are attributable to inadequate modeling of scatter from applicators and blocks by TPS.

  14. Quantitative mapping of elemental distribution in leaves of the metallophytes Helichrysum candolleanum, Blepharis aspera, and Blepharis diversispina from Selkirk Cu–Ni mine, Botswana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koosaletse-Mswela, Pulane, E-mail: pulane.mswela@mopipi.ub.bw [Environmental Sciences Department, University of Botswana, Private Bag 00704, Gaborone (Botswana); Przybyłowicz, Wojciech J., E-mail: przybylowicz@tlabs.ac.za [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, National Research Foundation, PO Box 722, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa); AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics & Applied Computer Science, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Cloete, Karen J., E-mail: kcloete@tlabs.ac.za [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, National Research Foundation, PO Box 722, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa); Barnabas, Alban D., E-mail: alban@tlabs.ac.za [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, National Research Foundation, PO Box 722, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa); Torto, Nelson, E-mail: ntorto@bitri.co.bw [Department of Chemistry, Rhodes University, PO Box 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta, E-mail: mesjasz@tlabs.ac.za [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences, National Research Foundation, PO Box 722, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    Multi-element profiling is essential in understanding the metal-tolerant behavior of metallophytes. Although previous reports using multi-elemental analyses show that the metallophytes Blepharis aspera, Blepharis diversispina (Acanthaceae) and Helichrysum candolleanum (Asteraceae) take up metals, no information exists on elemental spatial distribution and concentrations in specific tissues of these plants. The aim of this study therefore was to assess the spatial distribution and concentration of copper, nickel and other elements in leaf tissues of these plants using micro-PIXE. Whole plants were collected with soil in pots from an operational copper and nickel mine (i.e., a copper and nickel mineralized area), Selkirk, about 40 km north-east of Francistown, Botswana. On the same day the samples were transported by air to iThemba LABS in South Africa. Leaf specimens were cryofixed in liquid propane cooled by LN2. Parallel samples were embedded in resin for anatomical studies to facilitate interpretation of elemental maps. The distribution and concentration of copper, nickel, and other elements in leaf tissues were determined using micro-PIXE and proton backscattering spectrometry. Data evaluation was performed using GeoPIXE II software. Micro-PIXE showed that H. candolleanum had the highest whole leaf content of copper (70 ± 3 μg g{sup −1} DW) and nickel (168 ± 5 μg g{sup −1} DW), followed by B. aspera (Cu: 25 ± 1 μg g{sup −1} DW; Ni: 166 ± 4 μg g{sup −1} DW) and B. diversispina (Cu: 3 ± 1 μg g{sup −1} DW; Ni, below detection limit). For specific leaf tissues, the highest levels of copper were found in the vascular bundle for H. candolleanum (167 ± 7 μg g{sup −1} DW) and the lower epidermis for B. aspera (70 ± 9 μg g{sup −1} DW). The highest levels of nickel were present in the vascular bundle of B. aspera (479 ± 10 μg g{sup −1} DW) and H. candolleanum (90 ± 5 μg g{sup −1} DW). Elemental maps showed a similar distribution pattern

  15. Minimal distances between SCFTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buican, Matthew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University,Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-01-28

    We study lower bounds on the minimal distance in theory space between four-dimensional superconformal field theories (SCFTs) connected via broad classes of renormalization group (RG) flows preserving various amounts of supersymmetry (SUSY). For N=1 RG flows, the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) endpoints of the flow can be parametrically close. On the other hand, for RG flows emanating from a maximally supersymmetric SCFT, the distance to the IR theory cannot be arbitrarily small regardless of the amount of (non-trivial) SUSY preserved along the flow. The case of RG flows from N=2 UV SCFTs is more subtle. We argue that for RG flows preserving the full N=2 SUSY, there are various obstructions to finding examples with parametrically close UV and IR endpoints. Under reasonable assumptions, these obstructions include: unitarity, known bounds on the c central charge derived from associativity of the operator product expansion, and the central charge bounds of Hofman and Maldacena. On the other hand, for RG flows that break N=2→N=1, it is possible to find IR fixed points that are parametrically close to the UV ones. In this case, we argue that if the UV SCFT possesses a single stress tensor, then such RG flows excite of order all the degrees of freedom of the UV theory. Furthermore, if the UV theory has some flavor symmetry, we argue that the UV central charges should not be too large relative to certain parameters in the theory.

  16. Predicting dispersal distance in mammals: a trait-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmee, Sarah; Orme, C David L

    2013-01-01

    Dispersal is one of the principal mechanisms influencing ecological and evolutionary processes but quantitative empirical data are unfortunately scarce. As dispersal is likely to influence population responses to climate change, whether by adaptation or by migration, there is an urgent need to obtain estimates of dispersal distance. Cross-species correlative approaches identifying predictors of dispersal distance can provide much-needed insights into this data-scarce area. Here, we describe the compilation of a new data set of natal dispersal distances and use it to test life-history predictors of dispersal distance in mammals and examine the strength of the phylogenetic signal in dispersal distance. We find that both maximum and median dispersal distances have strong phylogenetic signals. No single model performs best in describing either maximum or median dispersal distances when phylogeny is taken into account but many models show high explanatory power, suggesting that dispersal distance per generation can be estimated for mammals with comparatively little data availability. Home range area, geographic range size and body mass are identified as the most important terms across models. Cross-validation of models supports the ability of these variables to predict dispersal distances, suggesting that models may be extended to species where dispersal distance is unknown.

  17. Annual distribution of allergenic fungal spores in atmospheric particulate matter in the Eastern Mediterranean; a comparative study between ergosterol and quantitative PCR analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lang-Yona

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Airborne fungal spores are an important fraction of atmospheric particulate matter and are major causative agents of allergenic and infectious diseases. Predicting the variability and species of allergy-causing fungal spores requires detailed and reliable methods for identification and quantification. There are diverse methods for their detection in the atmosphere and in the indoor environments; yet, it is important to optimize suitable methods for characterization of fungal spores in atmospheric samples. In this study we sampled and characterized total and specific airborne fungal spores from PM10 samples collected in Rehovot, Israel over an entire year. The total fungal spore concentrations vary throughout the year although the species variability was nearly the same. Seasonal equivalent spore concentrations analyzed by real-time quantitative-PCR-based methods were fall > winter > spring > summer. Reported concentrations based on ergosterol analysis for the same samples were and fall > spring > winter > summer. Correlation between the two analytical methods was found only for the spring season. These poor associations may be due to the per-spore ergosterol variations that arise from both varying production rates, as well as molecular degradation of ergosterol. While conversion of genome copies to spore concentration is not yet straightforward, the potential for improving this conversion and the ability of qPCR to identify groups of fungi or specific species makes this method preferable for environmental spore quantification. Identifying tools for establishing the relation between the presence of species and the actual ability to induce allergies is still needed in order to predict the effect on human health.

  18. Annual distribution of allergenic fungal spores in atmospheric particulate matter in the eastern mediterranean; a comparative study between ergosterol and quantitative PCR analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lang-Yona

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Airborne fungal spores are an important fraction of atmospheric particulate matter and are major causative agents of allergenic and infectious diseases. Predicting the variability and species of allergy-causing fungal spores requires detailed and reliable methods for identification and quantification. There are diverse methods for their detection in the atmosphere and in the indoor environments; yet, it is important to optimize suitable methods for characterization of fungal spores in atmospheric samples. In this study we sampled and characterized total and specific airborne fungal spores from PM10 samples collected in Rohovot, Israel over an entire year. The total fungal spore concentrations vary throughout the year although the species variability was nearly the same. Seasonal equivalent spore concentrations analyzed by real-time quantitative-PCR-based methods were fall > winter > spring > summer. Reported concentrations based on ergosterol analysis for the same samples were and fall > spring > winter > summer. Correlation between the two analytical methods was found only for the spring season. These poor associations may be due to the per-spore ergosterol variations that arise from both varying production rates, as well as molecular degradation of ergosterol. While conversion of genome copies to spore concentration is not yet straightforward, the potential for improving this conversion and the ability of qPCR to identify groups of fungi or specific species makes this method preferable for environmental spore quantification. Identifying tools for establishing the relation between the presence of species and the actual ability to induce allergies is still needed in order to predict the effect on human health.

  19. Annual distribution of allergenic fungal spores in atmospheric particulate matter in the Eastern Mediterranean; a comparative study between ergosterol and quantitative PCR analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang-Yona, N.; Dannemiller, K.; Yamamoto, N.; Burshtein, N.; Peccia, J.; Yarden, O.; Rudich, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Airborne fungal spores are an important fraction of atmospheric particulate matter and are major causative agents of allergenic and infectious diseases. Predicting the variability and species of allergy-causing fungal spores requires detailed and reliable methods for identification and quantification. There are diverse methods for their detection in the atmosphere and in the indoor environments; yet, it is important to optimize suitable methods for characterization of fungal spores in atmospheric samples. In this study we sampled and characterized total and specific airborne fungal spores from PM10 samples collected in Rehovot, Israel over an entire year. The total fungal spore concentrations vary throughout the year although the species variability was nearly the same. Seasonal equivalent spore concentrations analyzed by real-time quantitative-PCR-based methods were fall > winter > spring > summer. Reported concentrations based on ergosterol analysis for the same samples were and fall > spring > winter > summer. Correlation between the two analytical methods was found only for the spring season. These poor associations may be due to the per-spore ergosterol variations that arise from both varying production rates, as well as molecular degradation of ergosterol. While conversion of genome copies to spore concentration is not yet straightforward, the potential for improving this conversion and the ability of qPCR to identify groups of fungi or specific species makes this method preferable for environmental spore quantification. Identifying tools for establishing the relation between the presence of species and the actual ability to induce allergies is still needed in order to predict the effect on human health.

  20. A fast method for the quantitative estimation of the distribution of hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments in alpha-helices of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzhkov, V B; Surkov, N F

    2000-01-01

    The work presents a fast quantitative approach for estimating the orientations of hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions in the helical wheels of membrane-spanning alpha-helices of transmembrane proteins. The common hydropathy analysis provides an estimate of the integral hydrophobicity in a moving window which scans an amino acid sequence. The new parameter, orientation hydrophobicity, is based on the estimate of hydrophobicity of the angular segment that scans the helical wheel of a given amino acid sequence. The corresponding procedure involves the treatment of transmembrane helices as cylinders with equal surface elements for each amino acid residue. The orientation hydrophobicity, P(phi), phi = 0-360 degrees, of a helical cylinder is given as a sum of hydrophobicities of individual amino acids which are taken as the S-shaped functions of the angle between the centre of amino acid surface element and the centre of the segment. Non-zero contribution to P(phi) comes only from the amino acids belonging to the angular segment for a given angle phi. The size of the angular segment is related to the size of the channel pore. The amplitudes of amino acid S-functions are calibrated in the way that their maximum values (reached when the amino acid is completely exposed into the pore) are equal to the corresponding hydropathy index in the selected scale (here taken as Goldman-Engelman-Steitz hydropathy scale). The given procedure is applied in the studies of three ionic channels with well characterized three-dimensional structures where the channel pore is formed by a bundle of alpha-helices: cholera toxin B, nicotinic acetylcholine homopentameric alpha7 receptor, and phospholamban. The estimated maximum of hydrophilic properties at the helical wheels are in a good agreement with the spatial orientations of alpha-helices in the corresponding channel pores.

  1. Distribution of bone density and cortical thickness in the proximal femur and their association with hip fracture in postmenopausal women: a quantitative computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L; Udall, W J M; McCloskey, E V; Eastell, R

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans in an individually matched case-control study of women with hip fracture were analysed. There were widespread deficits in the femoral volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and cortical thickness of cases, and cortical vBMD and thickness discriminated hip fracture independently of BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Acknowledging the limitations of QCT associated with partial volume effects, we used QCT in an individually matched case-control study of women with hip fracture to better understand its structural basis. Fifty postmenopausal women (55-89 years) who had sustained hip fractures due to low-energy trauma underwent QCT scans of the contralateral hip within 3 months of the fracture. For each case, postmenopausal women, matched by age (±5 years), weight (±5 kg) and height (±5 cm), were recruited as controls. We quantified cortical, trabecular and integral vBMD and apparent cortical thickness (AppCtTh) in four quadrants of cross-sections along the length of the femoral head (FH), femoral neck (FN), intertrochanter and trochanter and examined their association with hip fracture. Women with hip or intracapsular (IC) fracture had significantly (p hip and IC fractures independent of hip areal BMD (aBMD). The combination of AppCtTh and trabecular or integral vBMD discriminated hip fracture, whereas the combination of FH and FN AppCtTh discriminated IC fracture significantly (p hip aBMD. Deficits in vBMD and AppCtTh in cases were widespread in the proximal femur, and cortical vBMD and AppCtTh discriminated hip fracture independently of aBMD by DXA.

  2. Optimal architectures for long distance quantum communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Sreraman; Li, Linshu; Kim, Jungsang; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lukin, Mikhail D; Jiang, Liang

    2016-02-15

    Despite the tremendous progress of quantum cryptography, efficient quantum communication over long distances (≥ 1000 km) remains an outstanding challenge due to fiber attenuation and operation errors accumulated over the entire communication distance. Quantum repeaters (QRs), as a promising approach, can overcome both photon loss and operation errors, and hence significantly speedup the communication rate. Depending on the methods used to correct loss and operation errors, all the proposed QR schemes can be classified into three categories (generations). Here we present the first systematic comparison of three generations of quantum repeaters by evaluating the cost of both temporal and physical resources, and identify the optimized quantum repeater architecture for a given set of experimental parameters for use in quantum key distribution. Our work provides a roadmap for the experimental realizations of highly efficient quantum networks over transcontinental distances.

  3. Optimal architectures for long distance quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Sreraman; Li, Linshu; Kim, Jungsang; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-02-01

    Despite the tremendous progress of quantum cryptography, efficient quantum communication over long distances (≥1000 km) remains an outstanding challenge due to fiber attenuation and operation errors accumulated over the entire communication distance. Quantum repeaters (QRs), as a promising approach, can overcome both photon loss and operation errors, and hence significantly speedup the communication rate. Depending on the methods used to correct loss and operation errors, all the proposed QR schemes can be classified into three categories (generations). Here we present the first systematic comparison of three generations of quantum repeaters by evaluating the cost of both temporal and physical resources, and identify the optimized quantum repeater architecture for a given set of experimental parameters for use in quantum key distribution. Our work provides a roadmap for the experimental realizations of highly efficient quantum networks over transcontinental distances.

  4. Quantitative autonomic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Peter

    2011-07-19

    Disorders associated with dysfunction of autonomic nervous system are quite common yet frequently unrecognized. Quantitative autonomic testing can be invaluable tool for evaluation of these disorders, both in clinic and research. There are number of autonomic tests, however, only few were validated clinically or are quantitative. Here, fully quantitative and clinically validated protocol for testing of autonomic functions is presented. As a bare minimum the clinical autonomic laboratory should have a tilt table, ECG monitor, continuous noninvasive blood pressure monitor, respiratory monitor and a mean for evaluation of sudomotor domain. The software for recording and evaluation of autonomic tests is critical for correct evaluation of data. The presented protocol evaluates 3 major autonomic domains: cardiovagal, adrenergic and sudomotor. The tests include deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, head-up tilt, and quantitative sudomotor axon test (QSART). The severity and distribution of dysautonomia is quantitated using Composite Autonomic Severity Scores (CASS). Detailed protocol is provided highlighting essential aspects of testing with emphasis on proper data acquisition, obtaining the relevant parameters and unbiased evaluation of autonomic signals. The normative data and CASS algorithm for interpretation of results are provided as well.

  5. Semi-quantitative analysis of solid waste flows from nano-enabled consumer products in Europe, Denmark and the United Kingdom - Abundance, distribution and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heggelund, Laura Roverskov; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2016-01-01

    , and especially the knowledge of ENM behaviour and potential effects at the end-of-life stage of the products is scarce. To gain a better understanding of the end-of-life waste treatment of nano-enabled consumer product, we provide an overview of the ENMs flowing into and throughout waste systems in Europe......, Denmark and the United Kingdom. Using a nanoproduct inventory (nanodb.dk), we performed a four-step analysis to estimate the most abundant ENMs and in which waste fractions they are present. We found that in terms of number of products: (i) nano silver is the most used ENM in consumer products, and (ii......) plastic from used product containers is the largest waste fraction also comprising a large variety of ENMs, though possibly in very small masses. Also, we showed that the local waste management system can influence the distribution of ENMs. It is recommended that future research focus on recycling...

  6. Improved directional-distance filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a new spatial-distance weighting function.By combining the weighting function and the traditional directional-distance filter (DDF) in a novel way,a new vector filter-the adaptive distance-weighted directional-distance filter (ADWDDF)-is presented.The experimental results show that the proposed solution provides better filtering performance and preserves better image chromaticity and edge or detail information compared with the traditional DDF and some other typical vector filters.

  7. Isolation by distance, web service

    OpenAIRE

    Bohonak Andrew J; Jensen Jeffrey L; Kelley Scott T

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The population genetic pattern known as "isolation by distance" results from spatially limited gene flow and is a commonly observed phenomenon in natural populations. However, few software programs exist for estimating the degree of isolation by distance among populations, and they tend not to be user-friendly. Results We have created Isolation by Distance Web Service (IBDWS) a user-friendly web interface for determining patterns of isolation by distance. Using this site, ...

  8. COOPERATIVE LEARNING IN DISTANCE LEARNING: A MIXED METHODS STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Kupczynski

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Distance learning has facilitated innovative means to include Cooperative Learning (CL in virtual settings. This study, conducted at a Hispanic-Serving Institution, compared the effectiveness of online CL strategies in discussion forums with traditional online forums. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 56 graduate student participants. Quantitative results revealed no significant difference on student success between CL and Traditional formats. The qualitative data revealed that students in the cooperative learning groups found more learning benefits than the Traditional group. The study will benefit instructors and students in distance learning to improve teaching and learning practices in a virtual classroom.

  9. Evaluating distance learning in health informatics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Barbara L; Barefield, Amanda C; Turnbull, Diane; Leibach, Elizabeth; Pretlow, Lester

    2008-04-24

    The purpose of this study was to compare academic performance between distance-learning and on-campus health informatics students. A quantitative causal-comparative research design was utilized, and academic performance was measured by final GPA scores and Registered Health Information Administrator certification exam scores. Differences in previous academic performance between the two groups were also determined by comparing overall admission GPA and math/science admission GPA. The researchers found no difference in academic performance between the two groups when final GPA scores and total certification scores were compared. However, there were statistically significant differences between the two groups in 4 of the 17 sub-domains of the certification examination, with the on-campus students scoring slightly higher than the distance students. Correlation studies were also performed, and the researchers found significant correlations between overall admission GPA, math/science admission GPA, final GPA, and certification scores.

  10. Reconsidering Moore's Transactional Distance Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giossos, Yiannis; Koutsouba, Maria; Lionarakis, Antonis; Skavantzos, Kosmas

    2009-01-01

    One of the core theories of distance education is Michael Graham Moore's "Theory of Transactional Distance" that provides the broad framework of the pedagogy of distance education and allows the generation of almost infinite number of hypotheses for research. However, the review of the existing studies relating to the theory showed the use of a…

  11. Measuring genetic distances between breeds: use of some distances in various short term evolution models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SanCristobal Magali

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many works demonstrate the benefits of using highly polymorphic markers such as microsatellites in order to measure the genetic diversity between closely related breeds. But it is sometimes difficult to decide which genetic distance should be used. In this paper we review the behaviour of the main distances encountered in the literature in various divergence models. In the first part, we consider that breeds are populations in which the assumption of equilibrium between drift and mutation is verified. In this case some interesting distances can be expressed as a function of divergence time, t, and therefore can be used to construct phylogenies. Distances based on allele size distribution (such as (δμ2 and derived distances, taking a mutation model of microsatellites, the Stepwise Mutation Model, specifically into account, exhibit large variance and therefore should not be used to accurately infer phylogeny of closely related breeds. In the last section, we will consider that breeds are small populations and that the divergence times between them are too small to consider that the observed diversity is due to mutations: divergence is mainly due to genetic drift. Expectation and variance of distances were calculated as a function of the Wright-Malécot inbreeding coefficient, F. Computer simulations performed under this divergence model show that the Reynolds distance [57]is the best method for very closely related breeds.

  12. Sybr Green- and TaqMan-Based Quantitative PCR Approaches Allow Assessment of the Abundance and Relative Distribution of Frankia Clusters in Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Tekaya, Seifeddine; Ganesan, Abirama Sundari; Guerra, Trina; Dawson, Jeffrey O; Forstner, Michael R J; Hahn, Dittmar

    2017-03-01

    The nodule-forming actinobacterial genus Frankia can generally be divided into 4 taxonomic clusters, with clusters 1, 2, and 3 representing nitrogen-fixing strains of different host infection groups and cluster 4 representing atypical, generally non-nitrogen-fixing strains. Recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based quantification methods have been developed for frankiae of clusters 1 and 3; however, similar approaches for clusters 2 and 4 were missing. We amended a database of partial 23S rRNA gene sequences of Frankia strains belonging to clusters 1 and 3 with sequences of frankiae representing clusters 2 and 4. The alignment allowed us to design primers and probes for the specific detection and quantification of these Frankia clusters by either Sybr Green- or TaqMan-based qPCR. Analyses of frankiae in different soils, all obtained from the same region in Illinois, USA, provided similar results, independent of the qPCR method applied, with abundance estimates of 10 × 10(5) to 15 × 10(5) cells (g soil)(-1) depending on the soil. Diversity was higher in prairie soils (native, restored, and cultivated), with frankiae of all 4 clusters detected and those of cluster 4 dominating, while diversity in soils under Alnus glutinosa, a host plant for cluster 1 frankiae, or Betula nigra, a related nonhost plant, was restricted to cluster 1 and 3 frankiae and generally members of subgroup 1b were dominating. These results indicate that vegetation affects the basic composition of frankiae in soils, with higher diversity in prairie soils compared to much more restricted diversity under some host and nonhost trees.IMPORTANCE Root nodule formation by the actinobacterium Frankia is host plant specific and largely, but not exclusively, correlates with assignments of strains to specific clusters within the genus. Due to the lack of adequate detection and quantification tools, studies on Frankia have been limited to clusters 1 and 3 and generally excluded clusters 2 and 4. We have

  13. Measuring the distance between time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeckel, Richard; Murray, Brad

    1997-02-01

    To evaluate models of dynamical systems, researchers have traditionally used quantitative measures of short term prediction errors. However, for chaotic or stochastic systems, comparison of long term, qualitative behaviors may be more relevant. Let x = ( x0,…, xn) be a sequence of real numbers generated by sampling a dynamical system or stochastic process and suppose y = ( y0,…, yn) is another sequence, generated by a mathematical model of the process which generated x. In this paper we consider several ways of assigning a distance d( x, y) which measures the difference in long term behavior.

  14. Quantitative x-ray diffraction analysis of bimodal damage distributions in Tm implanted Al0.15Ga0.85N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, S.; Fialho, M.; Peres, M.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this work radial symmetric x-ray diffraction scans of Al0.15Ga0.85N thin films implanted with Tm ions were measured to determine the lattice deformation and crystal quality as functions of depth. The alloys were implanted with 300 keV Tm with 10° off-set to the sample normal to avoid channelling, with fluences varying between 1013 Tm cm-2 and 5  ×  1015 Tm cm-2. Simulations of the radial 2θ-ω scans were performed under the frame of the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction assuming Gaussian distributions of the lattice strain induced by implantation defects. The structure factor of the individual layers is multiplied by a static Debye-Waller factor in order to take into account the effect of lattice disorder due to implantation. For higher fluences two asymmetric Gaussians are required to describe well the experimental diffractograms, although a single asymmetric Gaussian profile for the deformation is found in the sample implanted with 1013 Tm cm-2. After thermal treatment at 1200 °C, the crystal quality partially recovers as seen in a reduction of the amplitude of the deformation maximum as well as the total thickness of the deformed layer. Furthermore, no evidence of changes with respect to the virgin crystal mosaicity is found after implantation and annealing.

  15. Quantitative analysis of axon bouton distribution of subthalamic nucleus neurons in the rat by single neuron visualization with a viral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimizu, Yoshinori; Fujiyama, Fumino; Nakamura, Kouichi C; Furuta, Takahiro; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2013-06-15

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) of the basal ganglia plays a key role in motor control, and STN efferents are known to mainly target the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe), entopeduncular nucleus (Ep), and substantia nigra (SN) with some axon collaterals to the other regions. However, it remains to be clarified how each STN neuron projects axon fibers and collaterals to those target nuclei of the STN. Here we visualized the whole axonal arborization of single STN neurons in the rat brain by using a viral vector expressing membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein, and examined the distribution of axon boutons in those target nuclei. The vast majority (8-9) of 10 reconstructed STN neurons projected to the GPe, SN, caudate-putamen (CPu), and Ep, which received, on average ± SD, 457 ± 425, 400 ± 347, 126 ± 143, and 106 ± 100 axon boutons per STN neuron, respectively. Furthermore, the density of axon boutons in the GPe was highest among these nuclei. Although these target nuclei were divided into calbindin-rich and -poor portions, STN projection showed no exclusive preference for those portions. Since STN neurons mainly projected not only to the GPe, SN, and Ep but also to the CPu, the subthalamostriatal projection might serve as a positive feedback path for the striato-GPe-subthalamic disinhibitory pathway, or work as another route of cortical inputs to the striatum through the corticosubthalamostriatal disynaptic excitatory pathway.

  16. Semi-quantitative analysis of solid waste flows from nano-enabled consumer products in Europe, Denmark and the United Kingdom - Abundance, distribution and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggelund, Laura; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard; Boldrin, Alessio

    2016-10-01

    Many nano-enabled consumer products are known to be in the global market. At the same, little is known about the quantity, type, location etc. of the engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) inside the products. This limits the scientific investigations of potential environmental effects of these materials, and especially the knowledge of ENM behaviour and potential effects at the end-of-life stage of the products is scarce. To gain a better understanding of the end-of-life waste treatment of nano-enabled consumer product, we provide an overview of the ENMs flowing into and throughout waste systems in Europe, Denmark and the United Kingdom. Using a nanoproduct inventory (nanodb.dk), we performed a four-step analysis to estimate the most abundant ENMs and in which waste fractions they are present. We found that in terms of number of products: (i) nano silver is the most used ENM in consumer products, and (ii) plastic from used product containers is the largest waste fraction also comprising a large variety of ENMs, though possibly in very small masses. Also, we showed that the local waste management system can influence the distribution of ENMs. It is recommended that future research focus on recycling and landfilling of nano-enabled products since these compartments represent hot spots for end-of-life nanoproducts.

  17. Keeping Your Distance is Hard

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Kyle; Heubach, Silvia; Huggan, Melissa; Huntemann, Svenja

    2016-01-01

    We study the computational complexity of distance games, a class of combinatorial games played on graphs. A move consists of colouring an uncoloured vertex subject to it not being at certain distances determined by two sets, D and S. D is the set of forbidden distances for colouring vertices in different colors, while S is the set of forbidden distances for the same colour. The last player to move wins. Well-known examples of distance games are Node-Kayles, Snort, and Col, whose complexities ...

  18. Distance learning and perioperative nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruendemann, Barbara J

    2007-03-01

    Distance learning in nursing education is arriving with unprecedented speed, which has led to much uncertainty among educators. This article provides an overview of distance learning and its application to perioperative nursing. Lack of face-to-face interaction is of foremost concern in distance learning, and educators must develop new teaching strategies to address this problem. Models for assessing outcomes and effectiveness are important tools to use when implementing a distance learning program. Basic perioperative nursing concepts, skills, procedures, and recommended practices can be introduced effectively with online distance learning modalities and then reinforced through a clinical component.

  19. Visualizing Mixed Variable-Type Multidimensional Data Using Tree Distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    VARIABLE-TYPE MULTIDIMENSIONAL DATA USING TREE DISTANCES by Yoav Shaham September 2015 Thesis Advisor: Lyn R. Whitaker Second Reader...TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE VISUALIZING MIXED VARIABLE-TYPE MULTIDIMENSIONAL DATA USING TREE DISTANCES 5...public release; distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) This research explores the use of the tree

  20. SU-E-I-15: Quantitative Evaluation of Dose Distributions From Axial, Helical and Cone-Beam CT Imaging by Measurement Using a Two-Dimensional Diode-Array Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacko, M; Aldoohan, S; Sonnad, J; Ahmad, S; Ali, I [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate quantitatively dose distributions from helical, axial and cone-beam CT clinical imaging techniques by measurement using a two-dimensional (2D) diode-array detector. Methods: 2D-dose distributions from selected clinical protocols used for axial, helical and cone-beam CT imaging were measured using a diode-array detector (MapCheck2). The MapCheck2 is composed from solid state diode detectors that are arranged in horizontal and vertical lines with a spacing of 10 mm. A GE-Light-Speed CT-simulator was used to acquire axial and helical CT images and a kV on-board-imager integrated with a Varian TrueBeam-STx machine was used to acquire cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Results: The dose distributions from axial, helical and cone-beam CT were non-uniform over the region-of-interest with strong spatial and angular dependence. In axial CT, a large dose gradient was measured that decreased from lateral sides to the middle of the phantom due to large superficial dose at the side of the phantom in comparison with larger beam attenuation at the center. The dose decreased at the superior and inferior regions in comparison to the center of the phantom in axial CT. An asymmetry was found between the right-left or superior-inferior sides of the phantom which possibly to angular dependence in the dose distributions. The dose level and distribution varied from one imaging technique into another. For the pelvis technique, axial CT deposited a mean dose of 3.67 cGy, helical CT deposited a mean dose of 1.59 cGy, and CBCT deposited a mean dose of 1.62 cGy. Conclusions: MapCheck2 provides a robust tool to measure directly 2D-dose distributions for CT imaging with high spatial resolution detectors in comparison with ionization chamber that provides a single point measurement or an average dose to the phantom. The dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 consider medium heterogeneity and can represent specific patient dose.

  1. New distances to RAVE stars

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James; Kordopatis, Georges; McMillan, Paul J; Sharma, Sanjib; Zwitter, Tomaz; Bienayme, Olivier; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Steinmetz, Matthias; Gilmore, Gerry; Williams, Mary E K; Navarro, Julio; Grebel, Eva K; Helmi, Amina; Parker, Quentin; Reid, Warren A; Seabroke, George; Watson, Fred; Wyse, Rosie F G

    2013-01-01

    Probability density functions are determined from new stellar parameters for the distance moduli of stars for which the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) has obtained spectra with S/N>=10. The expectation value of distance is larger than the distance implied by the expectation of distance modulus; the latter is itself larger than the distance implied by the expectation value of the parallax. Our parallaxes of Hipparcos stars agree well with the values measured by Hipparcos, so the expectation of parallax is the most reliable distance indicator. The latter are improved by taking extinction into account. We provide one- two- or three-Gaussian fits to the distance pdfs. The effective temperature absolute-magnitude diagram of our stars is significantly improved when these pdfs are used to make the diagram. We use the method of kinematic corrections devised by Schoenrich, Binney & Asplund to check for systematic errors in our estimators for ordinary stars and confirm the conclusion reached from the Hipparcos s...

  2. Distance-decay and taxa-area relationships for bacteria, archaea and methanogenic archaea in a tropical lake sediment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Pedroni Barreto

    Full Text Available The study of of the distribution of microorganisms through space (and time allows evaluation of biogeographic patterns, like the species-area index (z. Due to their high dispersal ability, high reproduction rates and low rates of extinction microorganisms tend to be widely distributed, and they are thought to be virtually cosmopolitan and selected primarily by environmental factors. Recent studies have shown that, despite these characteristics, microorganisms may behave like larger organisms and exhibit geographical distribution. In this study, we searched patterns of spatial diversity distribution of bacteria and archaea in a contiguous environment. We collected 26 samples of a lake sediment, distributed in a nested grid, with distances between samples ranging from 0.01 m to 1000 m. The samples were analyzed using T-RFLP (Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism targeting mcrA (coding for a subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase and the genes of Archaeal and Bacterial 16S rRNA. From the qualitative and quantitative results (relative abundance of operational taxonomic units we calculated the similarity index for each pair to evaluate the taxa-area and distance decay relationship slopes by linear regression. All results were significant, with mcrA genes showing the highest slope, followed by Archaeal and Bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We showed that the microorganisms of a methanogenic community, that is active in a contiguous environment, display spatial distribution and a taxa-area relationship.

  3. Semiconductor Laser Tracking Frequency Distance Gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James D.; Reasenberg, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced astronomical missions with greatly enhanced resolution and physics missions of unprecedented accuracy will require a spaceworthy laser distance gauge of substantially improved performance. The Tracking Frequency Gauge (TFG) uses a single beam, locking a laser to the measurement interferometer. We have demonstrated this technique with pm (10(exp -12) m) performance. We report on the version we are now developing based on space-qualifiable, fiber-coupled distributed-feedback semiconductor lasers.

  4. A distance based test on random trees

    OpenAIRE

    Flesia, Ana Georgina; Fraiman, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we address the question of comparison between populations of trees. We study an statistical test based on the distance between empirical mean trees, as an analog of the two sample z statistic for comparing two means. Despite its simplicity, we can report that the test is quite powerful to separate distributions with different means but it does not distinguish between different populations with the same mean, a more complicated test should be applied in that setting. The perform...

  5. Fast computation of distance estimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagergren Jens

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some distance methods are among the most commonly used methods for reconstructing phylogenetic trees from sequence data. The input to a distance method is a distance matrix, containing estimated pairwise distances between all pairs of taxa. Distance methods themselves are often fast, e.g., the famous and popular Neighbor Joining (NJ algorithm reconstructs a phylogeny of n taxa in time O(n3. Unfortunately, the fastest practical algorithms known for Computing the distance matrix, from n sequences of length l, takes time proportional to l·n2. Since the sequence length typically is much larger than the number of taxa, the distance estimation is the bottleneck in phylogeny reconstruction. This bottleneck is especially apparent in reconstruction of large phylogenies or in applications where many trees have to be reconstructed, e.g., bootstrapping and genome wide applications. Results We give an advanced algorithm for Computing the number of mutational events between DNA sequences which is significantly faster than both Phylip and Paup. Moreover, we give a new method for estimating pairwise distances between sequences which contain ambiguity Symbols. This new method is shown to be more accurate as well as faster than earlier methods. Conclusion Our novel algorithm for Computing distance estimators provides a valuable tool in phylogeny reconstruction. Since the running time of our distance estimation algorithm is comparable to that of most distance methods, the previous bottleneck is removed. All distance methods, such as NJ, require a distance matrix as input and, hence, our novel algorithm significantly improves the overall running time of all distance methods. In particular, we show for real world biological applications how the running time of phylogeny reconstruction using NJ is improved from a matter of hours to a matter of seconds.

  6. Planning with Reachable Distances

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Xinyu

    2009-01-01

    Motion planning for spatially constrained robots is difficult due to additional constraints placed on the robot, such as closure constraints for closed chains or requirements on end effector placement for articulated linkages. It is usually computationally too expensive to apply sampling-based planners to these problems since it is difficult to generate valid configurations. We overcome this challenge by redefining the robot\\'s degrees of freedom and constraints into a new set of parameters, called reachable distance space (RD-space), in which all configurations lie in the set of constraint-satisfying subspaces. This enables us to directly sample the constrained subspaces with complexity linear in the robot\\'s number of degrees of freedom. In addition to supporting efficient sampling, we show that the RD-space formulation naturally supports planning, and in particular, we design a local planner suitable for use by sampling-based planners. We demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach for several systems including closed chain planning with multiple loops, restricted end effector sampling, and on-line planning for drawing/sculpting. We can sample single-loop closed chain systems with 1000 links in time comparable to open chain sampling, and we can generate samples for 1000-link multi-loop systems of varying topology in less than a second. © 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Deterministic quantitative risk assessment development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Jane; Colquhoun, Iain [PII Pipeline Solutions Business of GE Oil and Gas, Cramlington Northumberland (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Current risk assessment practice in pipeline integrity management is to use a semi-quantitative index-based or model based methodology. This approach has been found to be very flexible and provide useful results for identifying high risk areas and for prioritizing physical integrity assessments. However, as pipeline operators progressively adopt an operating strategy of continual risk reduction with a view to minimizing total expenditures within safety, environmental, and reliability constraints, the need for quantitative assessments of risk levels is becoming evident. Whereas reliability based quantitative risk assessments can be and are routinely carried out on a site-specific basis, they require significant amounts of quantitative data for the results to be meaningful. This need for detailed and reliable data tends to make these methods unwieldy for system-wide risk k assessment applications. This paper describes methods for estimating risk quantitatively through the calibration of semi-quantitative estimates to failure rates for peer pipeline systems. The methods involve the analysis of the failure rate distribution, and techniques for mapping the rate to the distribution of likelihoods available from currently available semi-quantitative programs. By applying point value probabilities to the failure rates, deterministic quantitative risk assessment (QRA) provides greater rigor and objectivity than can usually be achieved through the implementation of semi-quantitative risk assessment results. The method permits a fully quantitative approach or a mixture of QRA and semi-QRA to suit the operator's data availability and quality, and analysis needs. For example, consequence analysis can be quantitative or can address qualitative ranges for consequence categories. Likewise, failure likelihoods can be output as classical probabilities or as expected failure frequencies as required. (author)

  8. Lipschitz correspondence between metric measure spaces and random distance matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Gadgil, Siddhartha

    2011-01-01

    Given a metric space with a Borel probability measure, for each integer $N$ we obtain a probability distribution on $N\\times N$ distance matrices by considering the distances between pairs of points in a sample consisting of $N$ points chosen indepenedently from the metric space with respect to the given measure. We show that this gives an asymptotically bi-Lipschitz relation between metric measure spaces and the corresponding distance matrices. This is an effective version of a result of Vershik that metric measure spaces are determined by associated distributions on infinite random matrices.

  9. Grading vascularity from histopathological images based on traveling salesman distance and vessel size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, M. Khalid Khan; Hemminger, Jessica; Kurt, Habibe; Lozanski, Gerard; Gurcan, Metin

    2014-03-01

    Vascularity represents an important element of tissue/tumor microenvironment and is implicated in tumor growth, metastatic potential and resistence to therapy. Small blood vessels can be visualized using immunohistochemical stains specific to vascular cells. However, currently used manual methods to assess vascular density are poorly reproducible and are at best semi quantitative. Computer based quantitative and objective methods to measure microvessel density are urgently needed to better understand and clinically utilize microvascular density information. We propose a new method to quantify vascularity from images of bone marrow biopsies stained for CD34 vascular lining cells protein as a model. The method starts by automatically segmenting the blood vessels by methods of maxlink thresholding and minimum graph cuts. The segmentation is followed by morphological post-processing to reduce blast and small spurious objects from the bone marrow images. To classify the images into one of the four grades, we extracted 20 features from the segmented blood vessel images. These features include first four moments of the distribution of the area of blood vessels, first four moments of the distribution of 1) the edge weights in the minimum spanning tree of the blood vessels, 2) the shortest distance between blood vessels, 3) the homogeneity of the shortest distance (absolute difference in distance between consecutive blood vessels along the shortest path) between blood vessels and 5) blood vessel orientation. The method was tested on 26 bone marrow biopsy images stained with CD34 IHC stain, which were evaluated by three pathologists. The pathologists took part in this study by quantifying blood vessel density using gestalt assessment in hematopoietic bone marrow portions of bone marrow core biopsies images. To determine the intra-reader variability, each image was graded twice by each pathologist with two-week interval in between their readings. For each image, the ground

  10. A quantitative analysis of IRAS maps of molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.; Adams, Fred C.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of IRAS maps of five molecular clouds: Orion, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Taurus, and Lupus. For the classification and description of these astrophysical maps, we use a newly developed technique which considers all maps of a given type to be elements of a pseudometric space. For each physical characteristic of interest, this formal system assigns a distance function (a pseudometric) to the space of all maps: this procedure allows us to measure quantitatively the difference between any two maps and to order the space of all maps. We thus obtain a quantitative classification scheme for molecular clouds. In this present study we use the IRAS continuum maps at 100 and 60 micrometer(s) to produce column density (or optical depth) maps for the five molecular cloud regions given above. For this sample of clouds, we compute the 'output' functions which measure the distribution of density, the distribution of topological components, the self-gravity, and the filamentary nature of the clouds. The results of this work provide a quantitative description of the structure in these molecular cloud regions. We then order the clouds according to the overall environmental 'complexity' of these star-forming regions. Finally, we compare our results with the observed populations of young stellar objects in these clouds and discuss the possible environmental effects on the star-formation process. Our results are consistent with the recently stated conjecture that more massive stars tend to form in more 'complex' environments.

  11. Nonrandom seedling establishment corresponds with distance-dependent decline in mycorrhizal abundance in two terrestrial orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waud, Michael; Wiegand, Thorsten; Brys, Rein; Lievens, Bart; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2016-07-01

    In plant species that critically rely on mycorrhizal symbionts for germination and seedling establishment, distance-dependent decline of mycorrhizal fungi in the soil can be hypothesized to lead to significant spatial clustering as a result of nonrandom spatial patterns of seedling establishment. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the abundance and distribution of mycorrhizal fungi in the soil and how they relate to spatial patterns of adults and seedling recruitment in two related orchid species. We combined assessments of spatial variation in fungal abundance using quantitative PCR (qPCR) with spatial point pattern analyses based on long-term demographic data and cluster point process models. qPCR analyses showed that fungal abundance declined rapidly with distance from the adult host plants. Spatial point pattern analyses showed that successful recruitment in both species was clustered significantly around adult plants and that the decline in the neighborhood density of recruits around adults coincided with the decline of fungal abundance around adult plants. Overall, these results indicate that the distribution and abundance of fungal associates in the soil may have a strong impact on the aboveground distribution of its partner.

  12. TOPSIS with statistical distances: A new approach to MADM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Babu Vommi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple attribute decision making (MADM methods are very useful in choosing the best alternative among the available finite but conflicting alternatives. TOPSIS is one of the MADM methods, which is simple in its methodology and logic. In TOPSIS, Euclidean distances of each alternative from the positive and negative ideal solutions are utilized to find the best alternative. In literature, apart from Euclidean distances, the city block distances have also been tried to find the separations measures. In general, the attribute data are distributed with unequal ranges and also possess moderate to high correlations. Hence, in the present paper, use of statistical distances is proposed in place of Euclidean distances. Procedures to find the best alternatives are developed using statistical and weighted statistical distances respectively. The proposed methods are illustrated with some industrial problems taken from literature. Results show that the proposed methods can be used as new alternatives in MADM for choosing the best solutions.

  13. Estimating distances from parallaxes. II. Performance of Bayesian distance estimators on a Gaia-like catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Astraatmadja, Tri L

    2016-01-01

    Estimating a distance by inverting a parallax is only valid in the absence of noise. As most stars in the Gaia catalogue will have non-negligible fractional parallax errors, we must treat distance estimation as a constrained inference problem. Here we investigate the performance of various priors for estimating distances, using a simulated Gaia catalogue of one billion stars. We use three minimalist, isotropic priors, as well an anisotropic prior derived from the observability of stars in a Milky Way model. The two priors that assume a uniform distribution of stars--either in distance or in space density---give poor results: The root mean square fractional distance error, f_RMS, grows far in excess of 100% once the fractional parallax error, f_true, is larger than 0.1. A prior assuming an exponentially decreasing space density with increasing distance performs well once its single scale length parameter has been set to an appropriate value: f_RMS is roughly equal to f_true for f_true < 0.4, yet does not in...

  14. Cooperative Learning in Distance Learning: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczynski, Lori; Mundy, Marie Anne; Goswami, Jaya; Meling, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Distance learning has facilitated innovative means to include Cooperative Learning (CL) in virtual settings. This study, conducted at a Hispanic-Serving Institution, compared the effectiveness of online CL strategies in discussion forums with traditional online forums. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 56 graduate student…

  15. On distances between phylogenetic trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DasGupta, B. [Rutgers Univ., Camden, NJ (United States); He, X. [SUNY, Buffalo, NY (United States); Jiang, T. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    Different phylogenetic trees for the same group of species are often produced either by procedures that use diverse optimality criteria or from different genes in the study of molecular evolution. Comparing these trees to find their similarities and dissimilarities, i.e. distance, is thus an important issue in computational molecular biology. The nearest neighbor interchange distance and the subtree-transfer distance are two major distance metrics that have been proposed and extensively studied for different reasons. Despite their many appealing aspects such as simplicity and sensitivity to tree topologies, computing these distances has remained very challenging. This article studies the complexity and efficient approximation algorithms for computing the nni distance and a natural extension of the subtree-transfer distance, called the linear-cost subtree-transfer distance. The linear-cost subtree-transfer model is more logical than the subtree-transfer model and in fact coincides with the nni model under certain conditions. The following results have been obtained as part of our project of building a comprehensive software package for computing distances between phylogenies. (1) Computing the nni distance is NP-complete. This solves a 25 year old open question appearing again and again in, for example, under the complexity-theoretic assumption of P {ne} NP. We also answer an open question regarding the nni distance between unlabeled trees for which an erroneous proof appeared in. We give an algorithm to compute the optimal nni sequence in time O(n{sup 2} logn + n {circ} 2{sup O(d)}), where the nni distance is at most d. (2) Biological applications require us to extend the nni and linear-cost subtree-transfer models to weighted phylogenies, where edge weights indicate the length of evolution along each edge. We present a logarithmic ratio approximation algorithm for nni and a ratio 2 approximation algorithm for linear-cost subtree-transfer, on weighted trees.

  16. DISTANCE EDUCATOR: A Multiskill Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta MALIK

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When we talk about a distance educator and a conventional educator the difference we found nd about both of them is that, a distance educator needs to play multiple roles as compared to a conventional educator. They require more skills and knowledge cater to the needs of the learner. In this article we will cover all the responsible areas of a distance educator & why we should consider them as a multiskill personality?

  17. Engineered antifouling microtopographies: surface pattern effects on cell distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Joseph T; Sheats, Julian T; Brennan, Anthony B

    2014-12-23

    Microtopography has been observed to lead to altered attachment behavior for marine fouling organisms; however, quantification of this phenomenon is lacking in the scientific literature. Here, we present quantitative measurement of the disruption of normal attachment behavior of the fouling algae Ulva linza by antifouling microtopographies. The distribution of the diatom Navicula incerta was shown to be unaffected by the presence of topography. The radial distribution function was calculated for both individual zoospores and cells as well as aggregates of zoospores from attachment data for a variety topographic configurations and at a number of different attachment densities. Additionally, the screening distance and maximum values were mapped according to the location of zoospore aggregates within a single unit cell. We found that engineered topographies decreased the distance between spore aggregates compared to that for a smooth control surface; however, the distributions for individual spores were unchanged. We also found that the local attachment site geometry affected the screening distance for aggregates of zoospores, with certain geometries decreasing screening distance and others having no measurable effect. The distribution mapping techniques developed and explored in this article have yielded important insight into the design parameters for antifouling microtopographies that can be implemented in the next generation of antifouling surfaces.

  18. Doctoral education from a distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effken, Judith A

    2008-12-01

    This article describes the environmental factors that have contributed to the recent rapid growth of nursing doctoral education at a distance. Early and recent efforts to deliver distance doctoral education are discussed, using The University of Arizona College of Nursing experience as the key exemplar. The Community of Inquiry model is introduced as an appropriate model for doctoral education and then used as a framework to evaluate the current state of the art in distance doctoral nursing education. Successes and challenges in delivering doctoral education from a distance are described.

  19. The Extended Edit Distance Metric

    CERN Document Server

    Fuad, Muhammad Marwan Muhammad

    2007-01-01

    Similarity search is an important problem in information retrieval. This similarity is based on a distance. Symbolic representation of time series has attracted many researchers recently, since it reduces the dimensionality of these high dimensional data objects. We propose a new distance metric that is applied to symbolic data objects and we test it on time series data bases in a classification task. We compare it to other distances that are well known in the literature for symbolic data objects. We also prove, mathematically, that our distance is metric.

  20. 环Fpm+uFpm+…+uk-1Fpm上的长为ps的(1+λu)循环码的距离分布%The distributions of distances of (1+λu)-constacyclic codes of length ps over Fpm +uFpm+… +uk-1Fpm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓娟; 朱士信

    2012-01-01

    Let R=Fpm+uFpm+…+uk-1Fpm. The Homogeneous weight over the ring R is defined, and (1+μλ)-constacyclic codes of length ps over R are studied, where λ is a unit of the ring R. In view of the fact that (1+μλ)-constacyclic codes of length ps over R are the ideals of the chain ring R[x]/〈xps-1〉 , the Hamming distance distribution of such constacyclic codes and the structure of their dual codes were obtained. Furthermore, the distributions of the Homogeneous distance of (1 +μλ )-constacyclic codes of length ps over R were established.[x]/〈xps-%设R=Fpm+uFpm+…+uk-1Fpm.定义了R上的Homogeneous重量,研究了R上长度为ps的(1+uλ)常循环码,其中λ是R的一个单位.利用R上长度为ps的(1+uλ)常循环码恰好是链环R[x]/〈xps-1〉的理想这一结构,给出了R上长度为ps的(1+uλ)常循环码的Hamming距离分布以及它的对偶码的结构;进而确定了环R上长度为ps的(1+uλ)常循环码的Homogeneous距离分布.

  1. Transactional Distance and Autonomy in a Distance Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiloudis, G.; Koutsouba, M.; Giossos, Y.; Mavroidis, I.

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the transactional distance between the students and the tutor as well as the autonomy of students in a postgraduate course of the Hellenic Open University (HOU). The aim of the paper is to examine how the relation between autonomy and transactional distance evolves during an academic year and how this relation is affected by…

  2. Distance spectra and Distance energy of Integral Circulant Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    c, Aleksandar Ili\\'

    2011-01-01

    The distance energy of a graph $G$ is a recently developed energy-type invariant, defined as the sum of absolute values of the eigenvalues of the distance matrix of $G$. There was a vast research for the pairs and families of non-cospectral graphs having equal distance energy, and most of these constructions were based on the join of graphs. A graph is called circulant if it is Cayley graph on the circulant group, i.e. its adjacency matrix is circulant. A graph is called integral if all eigenvalues of its adjacency matrix are integers. Integral circulant graphs play an important role in modeling quantum spin networks supporting the perfect state transfer. In this paper, we characterize the distance spectra of integral circulant graphs and prove that these graphs have integral eigenvalues of distance matrix $D$. Furthermore, we calculate the distance spectra and distance energy of unitary Cayley graphs. In conclusion, we present two families of pairs $(G_1, G_2)$ of integral circulant graphs with equal distanc...

  3. Distances to Galaxies from the Brightest Stars in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kudritzki, R -P

    2011-01-01

    Blue Supergiants (BSGs) are the brightest stars in the universe at visual light with absolute magnitudes up to Mv=-10 mag. They are ideal stellar objects for the determination of extragalactic distances, in particular, because the perennial uncertainties troubling most of the other stellar distance indicators, interstellar extinction and metallicity, do not affect them. The quantitative spectral analysis of low resolution spectra of individual BSGs provides accurate stellar parameters and chemical composition, which are then used to determine accurate reddening and extinction from photometry for each individual object. Accurate distances can be determined from stellar gravities and effective temperatures using the "Flux Weighted Gravity - Luminosity Relationship (FGLR)". Most recent results of the quantitative spectral analysis of BSGs in galaxies within and beyond the Local Group based on medium and low resolution spectra obtained with the ESO VLT and the Keck telescopes on Mauna Kea are presented and distan...

  4. Electric Field Quantitative Measurement System and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and system are provided for making a quantitative measurement of an electric field. A plurality of antennas separated from one another by known distances are arrayed in a region that extends in at least one dimension. A voltage difference between at least one selected pair of antennas is measured. Each voltage difference is divided by the known distance associated with the selected pair of antennas corresponding thereto to generate a resulting quantity. The plurality of resulting quantities defined over the region quantitatively describe an electric field therein.

  5. Rock avalanche deposits store quantitative evidence on internal shear during runout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; McSaveney, M. J.

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the quantitative effect of internal shear on grain breakage during rock avalanche runout, by means of 38 ring-shear experiments on identical sand samples at different normal stresses, shear strains and shear strain rates. We compared sample grain-size characteristics before and after shearing. We found that grain size decreased with increase in normal stress and shear strain. Reduction in grain size was inferred to occur through grain breakage associated with grain interactions in strong force chains during strain. The results were consistent with observations of both inverse-grading structure in deep rock avalanche exposures, and fining and grading of particles with increasing rock avalanche travel distance. Our study suggested that with appropriate calibration, variations in grain-size distributions within a rock avalanche deposit would provide quantitative information on the distribution of internal shear during its runout.

  6. Distance stereotest using a 3-dimensional monitor for adult subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongshin; Yang, Hee Kyung; Kim, Youngmin; Lee, Byoungho; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the validity and test-retest reliability of a contour-based 3-dimensional (3-D) monitor distance stereotest (distance 3-D stereotest) and to measure the maximum horizontal disparity that can be fused with disparity vergence for determining the largest measurable disparity of true stereopsis. Observational case series. Sixty-four normal adult subjects (age range, 23 to 39 years) were recruited. Contour-based circles (crossed disparity, 5000 to 20 seconds of arc; Microsoft Visual Studio C(++) 6.0; Microsoft, Inc, Seattle, Washington, USA) were generated on a 3-D monitor (46-inch stereoscopic display) using polarization glasses and were presented to subjects with normal binocularity at 3 m. While the position of the stimulus changed among 4 possible locations, the subjects were instructed to press the corresponding position of the stimulus on a keypad. The results with the new distance 3-D stereotest were compared with those from the distance Randot stereotest. The results of the distance 3-D stereotest and the distance Randot stereotests were identical in 64% and within 1 disparity level in 97% of normal adults. Scores obtained with the 2 tests showed a statistically significant correlation (r = 0.324, P = .009). The half-width of the 95% limit of agreement was 0.47 log seconds of arc (1.55 octaves) using the distance 3-D stereotest--similar to or better than that obtained with conventional distance stereotests. The maximum binocular disparity that can be fused with vergence was 1828 ± 794 seconds of arc (range, 4000 to 500). The distance 3-D stereotest showed good concordance with the distance Randot stereotest and relatively good test-retest reliability, supporting the validity of the distance 3-D stereotest. The normative data set obtained from the present study can serve as a useful reference for quantitative assessment of a wide range of binocular sensory abnormalities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The quantitative Morse theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Loi, Ta Le; Phien, Phan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we give a proof of the quantitative Morse theorem stated by {Y. Yomdin} in \\cite{Y1}. The proof is based on the quantitative Sard theorem, the quantitative inverse function theorem and the quantitative Morse lemma.

  8. Virtual Bioinformatics Distance Learning Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolvanen, Martti; Vihinen, Mauno

    2004-01-01

    Distance learning as a computer-aided concept allows students to take courses from anywhere at any time. In bioinformatics, computers are needed to collect, store, process, and analyze massive amounts of biological and biomedical data. We have applied the concept of distance learning in virtual bioinformatics to provide university course material…

  9. The Psychology of Psychic Distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkanson, Lars; Ambos, Björn; Schuster, Anja

    2016-01-01

    and their theoretical underpinnings assume psychic distances to be symmetric. Building on insights from psychology and sociology, this paper demonstrates how national factors and cognitive processes interact in the formation of asymmetric distance perceptions. The results suggest that exposure to other countries...

  10. The Distance to M104

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuinn, Kristen. B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Berg, Danielle; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-11-01

    M104 (NGC 4594; the Sombrero galaxy) is a nearby, well-studied elliptical galaxy included in scores of surveys focused on understanding the details of galaxy evolution. Despite the importance of observations of M104, a consensus distance has not yet been established. Here, we use newly obtained Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging to measure the distance to M104 based on the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method. Our measurement yields the distance to M104 to be 9.55 ± 0.13 ± 0.31 Mpc equivalent to a distance modulus of 29.90 ± 0.03 ± 0.07 mag. Our distance is an improvement over previous results as we use a well-calibrated, stable distance indicator, precision photometry in a optimally selected field of view, and a Bayesian maximum likelihood technique that reduces measurement uncertainties. The most discrepant previous results are due to Tully-Fisher method distances, which are likely inappropriate for M104 given its peculiar morphology and structure. Our results are part of a larger program to measure accurate distances to a sample of well-known spiral galaxies (including M51, M74, and M63) using the TRGB method. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  11. Quality Content in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Ezgi Pelin; Isman, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    In parallel with technological advances in today's world of education activities can be conducted without the constraints of time and space. One of the most important of these activities is distance education. The success of the distance education is possible with content quality. The proliferation of e-learning environment has brought a need for…

  12. Virtual Bioinformatics Distance Learning Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolvanen, Martti; Vihinen, Mauno

    2004-01-01

    Distance learning as a computer-aided concept allows students to take courses from anywhere at any time. In bioinformatics, computers are needed to collect, store, process, and analyze massive amounts of biological and biomedical data. We have applied the concept of distance learning in virtual bioinformatics to provide university course material…

  13. Distance labeling schemes for trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Gørtz, Inge Li; Bistrup Halvorsen, Esben;

    2016-01-01

    We consider distance labeling schemes for trees: given a tree with n nodes, label the nodes with binary strings such that, given the labels of any two nodes, one can determine, by looking only at the labels, the distance in the tree between the two nodes. A lower bound by Gavoille et al. [Gavoill...

  14. New distances to RAVE stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binney, J.; Burnett, B.; Kordopatis, G.; McMillan, P. J.; Sharma, S.; Zwitter, T.; Bienayme, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Steinmetz, M.; Gilmore, G.; Williams, M. E. K.; Navarro, J.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Parker, Q.; Reid, W. A.; Seabroke, G.; Watson, F.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    Probability density functions (pdfs) are determined from new stellar parameters for the distance moduli of stars for which the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) has obtained spectra with S/N >= 10. Single-Gaussian fits to the pdf in distance modulus suffice for roughly half the stars, with most of

  15. Distance labeling schemes for trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Gørtz, Inge Li; Bistrup Halvorsen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    variants such as, for example, small distances in trees [Alstrup et al., SODA, 2003]. We improve the known upper and lower bounds of exact distance labeling by showing that 1/4 log2(n) bits are needed and that 1/2 log2(n) bits are sufficient. We also give (1 + ε)-stretch labeling schemes using Theta...

  16. Faculty Attitudes about Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidt, Esther; McDyre, Brian; Bunk, Jennifer; Li, Rui; Gatenby, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in distance learning in higher education. Given this, it is extremely important to understand faculty attitudes about distance education, not only because they can vary widely, but also because it is the faculty, through their design and implementation of online courses, that will shape the…

  17. Distance-constrained grid colouring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aszalós László

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Distance-constrained colouring is a mathematical model of the frequency assignment problem. This colouring can be treated as an optimization problem so we can use the toolbar of the optimization to solve concrete problems. In this paper, we show performance of distance-constrained grid colouring for two methods which are good in map colouring.

  18. Hierarchical traits distances explain grassland Fabaceae species’ ecological niches distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eFort

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fabaceae species play a key role in ecosystem functioning through their capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen via their symbiosis with Rhizobium bacteria. To increase benefits of using Fabaceae in agricultural systems, it is necessary to find ways to evaluate species or genotypes having potential adaptations to sub-optimal growth conditions. We evaluated the relevance of phylogenetic distance, absolute trait distance and hierarchical trait distance for comparing the adaptation of 13 grassland Fabaceae species to different habitats, i.e. ecological niches. We measured a wide range of functional traits (root traits, leaf traits and whole plant traits in these species. Species phylogenetic and ecological distances were assessed from a species-level phylogenetic tree and species’ ecological indicator values, respectively. We demonstrated that differences in ecological niches between grassland Fabaceae species were related more to their hierarchical trait distances than to their phylogenetic distances. We showed that grassland Fabaceae functional traits tend to converge among species with the same ecological requirements. Species with acquisitive root strategies (thin roots, shallow root systems are competitive species adapted to non-stressful meadows, while conservative ones (coarse roots, deep root systems are able to tolerate stressful continental climates. In contrast, acquisitive species appeared to be able to tolerate low soil-P availability, while conservative ones need high P availability. Finally we highlight that traits converge along the ecological gradient, providing the assumption that species with similar root-trait values are better able to coexist, regardless of their phylogenetic distance.

  19. Distance labeling schemes for trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Gørtz, Inge Li; Bistrup Halvorsen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    We consider distance labeling schemes for trees: given a tree with n nodes, label the nodes with binary strings such that, given the labels of any two nodes, one can determine, by looking only at the labels, the distance in the tree between the two nodes. A lower bound by Gavoille et al. [Gavoille...... variants such as, for example, small distances in trees [Alstrup et al., SODA, 2003]. We improve the known upper and lower bounds of exact distance labeling by showing that 1/4 log2(n) bits are needed and that 1/2 log2(n) bits are sufficient. We also give (1 + ε)-stretch labeling schemes using Theta......(log(n)) bits for constant ε> 0. (1 + ε)-stretch labeling schemes with polylogarithmic label size have previously been established for doubling dimension graphs by Talwar [Talwar, STOC, 2004]. In addition, we present matching upper and lower bounds for distance labeling for caterpillars, showing that labels...

  20. Unconditional Security In Quantum Key Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Yuen, Horace P

    2012-01-01

    It has been widely claimed and believed that many protocols in quantum key distribution, especially the single-photon BB84 protocol, have been proved unconditionally secure at least in principle, for both asymptotic and finite protocols with realistic bit lengths. In this paper it is pointed out that the only known quantitative justification for such claims is based on incorrect assertions. The precise security requirements are described in terms of the attacker's sequence and bit error probabilities in estimating the key. The extent to which such requirements can be met from a proper trace distance criterion is established. The results show that the quantitative security levels obtainable in concrete protocols with ideal devices do not rule out drastic breach of security unless privacy amplification is more properly applied.

  1. The 5'-3' distance of RNA secondary structures

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Hillary S W

    2011-01-01

    Recently Yoffe {\\it et al.} \\citep{Yoffe} observed that the average distances between 5'-3' ends of RNA molecules are very small and largely independent of sequence length. This observation is based on numerical computations as well as theoretical arguments maximizing certain entropy functionals. In this paper we compute the exact distribution of 5'-3' distances of RNA secondary structures for any finite $n$. We furthermore compute the limit distribution and show that already for $n=30$ the exact distribution and the limit distribution are very close. Our results show that the distances of random RNA secondary structures are distinctively lower than those of minimum free energy structures of random RNA sequences.

  2. Cosmological parameters from lenses distance ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, Vincenzo F; Scudellaro, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Strong lensing provides popular techniques to investigate the mass distribution of intermediate redshift galaxies, testing galaxy evolution and formation scenarios. It especially probes the background cosmic expansion, hence constraining cosmological parameters. The measurement of Einstein radii and central velocity dispersions indeed allows to trace the ratio D_s/D_ls between the distance D_s from the observer to the source and the distance D_ls from the lens to the source. We present an improved method to explicitly include the two - component structure in the galaxy lens modeling, in order to analyze the role played by the redshift and the model dependence on a nuisance parameter, F_E, which is usually marginalized in the cosmological applications. We show how to deal with these problems and carry on a Fisher matrix analysis to infer the accuracy on cosmological parameters achieved by this method.

  3. Crossover behavior in the distance dependence of hydrophobic force law

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, Tuhin; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-01-01

    Understanding about both the range and the strength of the effective force between two hydrophobic surfaces suspended in water is important in many areas of natural science but unfortunately has remained imperfect. Even the experimental observations have not been explained quantitatively. Here we find by varying distance (d) between two hydrophobic walls in computer simulations of water that the force exhibits a bi-exponential distance dependence. The long range part of the force can be fitted to an exponential force law with correlation length of 2 nm while the short range part displays a correlation length of only 0.5 nm. The crossover from shorter range to longer range force law is rather sharp. We show that the distance dependence of the tetrahedrality order parameter provides a reliable marker of the force law, and exhibits similar distance dependence.

  4. Leader–Member Skill Distance, Team Cooperation, and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Longwei; Li, Yuan; Li, Peter Ping

    2015-01-01

    performance. Building upon input-process-output framework from the perspective of individualist and collectivist cultures, we propose that the association between leader–member skill distance and team performance has an inverted-U shape in individualist cultures. Further, in such cultures, team cooperation...... can augment the positive effect of leader–member skill distance on team performance. In contrast, in collectivist cultures, the association between leader–member skill distance and team performance has a monotonic and positive shape, and team cooperation will attenuate the positive effect of leader......–member skill distance on team performance. We find the empirical support for our views with a mixed-methods design: a qualitative study interviewing informants in different cultures to clarify the psychological mechanisms, and also a quantitative study analyzing the data from US’s National Basketball...

  5. Minimization of disinfection byproduct formation and regrowth in the distribution network of long distance distribution systems. Final report; Minimierung der Desinfektionsnebenproduktbildung und der Wiederverkeimung im Verteilungsnetz von Fernwasserversorgungssystemen. Teilprojekt 1: Optimierung des Desinfektionsregimes. Teilprojekt 2: Optimierung des Betriebes von Fernleitungssystemen. Teilprojekt 3: Mischung von Waessern, Ortsnetze. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wricke, B.; Krueger, M.; Weber, A.; Petzoldt, H.; Korth; Andrusch; Boehm; Haeusler

    2002-03-27

    The objective of the research project was to estimate the main processes which determine the bacterial water quality change in a long distance distribution system (DS) with a low biodegradable organic matter (BOM) content and without or only with low disinfectant residuals. As a result, a model should be developed, which allows to describe the quality change. The investigations were carried out on the long distance DS of the Fernwasserversorgung Elbaue - Ostharz GmbH (FWV) and on the local DS on the Hallesche Wasser und Abwasser GmbH (HWA). A measurement program in the DS was the major topic of the project, in order to get information about the real quality change under different operational conditions. In consequence of the investigation it could be shown, that the increase of the CFU number in the DS is the result of the release of bacteria from the biofilm, whereas the growth of bacteria in water does not play an important role. Using disinfectants leads to the formation biodegradable organic matters. Major factors influencing the biofilm formation are the BOM content of the water and the kind of pipe material. Especially it could be shown, that there is an higher biofilm growth in pipes which are lined with bitumen, whereas in consequence of an high pH-value, there is an obstruction of the biological activity on surfaces of pipes out off cement. Under normal conditions there is only a low release of bacteria in the water. Whereas an higher release is being caused by obstructions of the biofilm. These obstructions are caused by surface-renewing processes on the pipe material, and increase of the BOM concentration in the water, as well as by disinfectant residuals. During the investigation, a model allowing a description of the water quality change in systems fed with water containing only little BOM, and working without or with low disinfectants residuals, has been developed. Using this model in connection with the results of measurements in a system, it is

  6. Quantitative evaluation of local pulmonary distribution of TiO2 in rats following single or multiple intratracheal administrations of TiO2 nanoparticles using X-ray fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guihua; Shinohara, Naohide; Kano, Hirokazu; Senoh, Hideki; Suzuki, Masaaki; Sasaki, Takeshi; Fukushima, Shoji; Gamo, Masashi

    2016-10-01

    Uneven pulmonary nanoparticle (NP) distribution has been described when using single-dose intratracheal administration tests. Multiple-dose intratracheal administrations with small quantities of NPs are expected to improve the unevenness of each dose. The differences in local pulmonary NP distribution (called microdistribution) between single- and multiple-dose administrations may cause differential pulmonary responses; however, this has not been evaluated. Here, we quantitatively evaluated the pulmonary microdistribution (per mesh: 100 μm × 100 μm) of TiO2 in lung sections from rats following one, two, three, or four doses of TiO2 NPs at a same total dosage of 10 mg kg(-1) using X-ray fluorescence microscopy. The results indicate that: (i) multiple-dose administrations show lower variations in TiO2 content (ng mesh(-1) ) for sections of each lobe; (ii) TiO2 appears to be deposited more in the right caudal and accessory lobes located downstream of the administration direction of NP suspensions, and less so in the right middle lobes, irrespective of the number of doses; (iii) there are not prominent differences in the pattern of pulmonary TiO2 microdistribution between rats following single and multiple doses of TiO2 NPs. Additionally, the estimation of pulmonary TiO2 deposition for multiple-dose administrations imply that every dose of TiO2 would be randomly deposited only in part of the fixed 30-50% of lung areas. The evidence suggests that multiple-dose administrations do not offer remarkable advantages over single-dose administration on the pulmonary NP microdistribution, although multiple-dose administrations may reduce variations in the TiO2 content for each lung lobe. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The Distance Field Model and Distance Constrained MAP Adaptation Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUPeng; WANGZuoying

    2003-01-01

    Spatial structure information, i.e., the rel-ative position information of phonetic states in the feature space, is long to be carefully researched yet. In this pa-per, a new model named “Distance Field” is proposed to describe the spatial structure information. Based on this model, a modified MAP adaptation algorithm named dis-tance constrained maximum a poateriori (DCMAP) is in-troduced. The distance field model gives large penalty when the spatial structure is destroyed. As a result the DCMAP reserves the spatial structure information in adaptation process. Experiments show the Distance Field Model improves the performance of MAP adapta-tion. Further results show DCMAP has strong cross-state estimation ability, which is used to train a well-performed speaker-dependent model by data from only part of pho-

  8. Quantitative traits and diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzJohn, Richard G

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative traits have long been hypothesized to affect speciation and extinction rates. For example, smaller body size or increased specialization may be associated with increased rates of diversification. Here, I present a phylogenetic likelihood-based method (quantitative state speciation and extinction [QuaSSE]) that can be used to test such hypotheses using extant character distributions. This approach assumes that diversification follows a birth-death process where speciation and extinction rates may vary with one or more traits that evolve under a diffusion model. Speciation and extinction rates may be arbitrary functions of the character state, allowing much flexibility in testing models of trait-dependent diversification. I test the approach using simulated phylogenies and show that a known relationship between speciation and a quantitative character could be recovered in up to 80% of the cases on large trees (500 species). Consistent with other approaches, detecting shifts in diversification due to differences in extinction rates was harder than when due to differences in speciation rates. Finally, I demonstrate the application of QuaSSE to investigate the correlation between body size and diversification in primates, concluding that clade-specific differences in diversification may be more important than size-dependent diversification in shaping the patterns of diversity within this group.

  9. The Distance to M104

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Dolphin, Andrew E; Berg, Danielle; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    M104 (NGC 4594; the Sombrero galaxy) is a nearby, well-studied elliptical galaxy included in scores of surveys focused on understanding the details of galaxy evolution. Despite the importance of observations of M104, a consensus distance has not yet been established. Here, we use newly obtained Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging to measure the distance to M104 based on the tip of the red giant branch method. Our measurement yields the distance to M104 to be 9.55 +/- 0.13 +/- 0.31 Mpc equivalent to a distance modulus of 29.90 +/- 0.03 +/- 0.07 mag. Our distance is an improvement over previous results as we use a well-calibrated, stable distance indicator, precision photometry in a optimally selected field of view, and a Bayesian Maximum Likelihood technique that reduces measurement uncertainties. The most discrepant previous results are due to Tully-Fisher method distances, which are likely inappropriate for M104 given its peculiar morphology and structure. Our results are part of a larger program to measu...

  10. Reducing the distance in distance-caregiving by technology innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazelle E Benefield

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Lazelle E Benefield1, Cornelia Beck21College of Nursing, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA; 2Pat & Willard Walker Family Memory Research Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USAAbstract: Family caregivers are responsible for the home care of over 34 million older adults in the United States. For many, the elder family member lives more than an hour’s distance away. Distance caregiving is a growing alternative to more familiar models where: 1 the elder and the family caregiver(s may reside in the same household; or 2 the family caregiver may live nearby but not in the same household as the elder. The distance caregiving model involves elders and their family caregivers who live at some distance, defined as more than a 60-minute commute, from one another. Evidence suggests that distance caregiving is a distinct phenomenon, differs substantially from on-site family caregiving, and requires additional assistance to support the physical, social, and contextual dimensions of the caregiving process. Technology-based assists could virtually connect the caregiver and elder and provide strong support that addresses the elder’s physical, social, cognitive, and/or sensory impairments. Therefore, in today’s era of high technology, it is surprising that so few affordable innovations are being marketed for distance caregiving. This article addresses distance caregiving, proposes the use of technology innovation to support caregiving, and suggests a research agenda to better inform policy decisions related to the unique needs of this situation.Keywords: caregiving, family, distance, technology, elders

  11. Distribution of C16:0, C18:0, C24:1, and C24:0 sulfatides in central nervous system lipid rafts by quantitative ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, Ana Lis; Li, Guannan; Lopez-Rosas, Aurora; Månsson, Jan-Eric; van Breemen, Richard B; Givogri, Maria Irene

    2014-12-15

    Sulfated galactosylceramides (sulfatides) are glycosphingolipids associated with cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) and are highly expressed in brain tissue. Although it is known that sulfatide species show heterogeneity in their fatty acid acyl group composition throughout brain development, their lipid raft distribution and biological relevance is poorly understood. We validated a fast and sensitive ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method to measure developmentally regulated sulfatide species (C16:0, C18:0, C24:1, and C24:0) in central nervous system (CNS) lipid rafts isolated without using detergent. Our UHPLC-MS/MS assay showed good accuracy and precision with a linear range of 5 to 1,000 nM for C18:0 and C24:1 sulfatides and 10 to 1,000 nM for C16:0 and C24:0 sulfatides. We applied this quantitative analysis to detergent-free lipid rafts isolated from wild-type mice and arylsulfatase A-deficient (ASA knockout) mice that accumulate sulfatides. All four sulfatide species were more abundant in raft membranes than in non-raft membranes, with a significant increase in lipid rafts isolated from ASA knockout mice. This is the first description of an analytical method to study these sulfatide species in raft and non-raft membranes and has the potential to be applied to preparations from other tissues.

  12. Matrimonial distance, inbreeding coefficient and population size: Dhangar data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, P P; Malhotra, K C

    1979-01-01

    Data on the distance between the birthplaces of spouses (matrimonial distance) were collected from 2,260 married individuals belonging to 21 endogamous castes of the Dhangar (shepherd) cast-cluster of Maharashtra, India. The general form of the distribution of matrimonial distances is one which is extremely positively skewed and leptokurtic. The percentage of intra-village marriages generally decreases from the southern areas of Maharashtra to the northern areas of the state, as does the inbreeding coefficient. This situation is in conformity with the socio-cultural norms regulating matrimonial choice in south and north India. An attempt has been made to relate the degree of inbreeding to the mean matrimonial distance and population size. The mean matrimonial distance is more useful in predicting the degree of inbreeding than population size.

  13. Distance education: a case study with applications for DoD and the Marine Corps

    OpenAIRE

    Biggs, Christopher H.

    1994-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This thesis is a qualitative analysis in the field of distance education. The author's research first established what technology is required for an organization to engage in distance education. Next, an argument was made through interviews throughout DoD and the Marine Corps indicating that implementation of distance education required strategic thinking and vision. Standardizing, outsou...

  14. Distance Education in Australia : Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Mavis, Kelly

    1991-01-01

    Compared with most other countries, Distance Education in Australia has a long history, spanning most of this century and is now used at all levels of education from elementary school to postgraduate courses as well as in vocational and in-service training in business and industry. In this paper, which focuses mainly on Distance Education at the post-secondary level, the author first outlines the current pattern of provision in the light of Australia's geography, population distribution and t...

  15. Distance Learning for Special Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Rodger A.

    2012-01-01

    Distance education strategies for remotely deployed, highly mobile, or institutionalized populations are reviewed and critiqued. Specifically, asynchronous, offline responses for special military units, Native Americans on remote reservations, prison populations and other geographically, temporally or technologically isolated niche populations are…

  16. ECONOMICS OF DISTANCE EDUCATION RECONSIDERED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram LAASER

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT According to Gartner a certain hype of e-Learning was followed by a downturn but eLearning will continue to be an important factor in learning scenarios. However the economic viability of e-learning projects will be questioned with more scrutiny than in earlier periods. Therefore it seems to be a good opportunity to see what can be learned from past experience in costing distance learning projects and what aspects are added by current attempts to measure economic efficiency. After reviewing early research about costing distance learning some more recent approaches will be discussed, such as eLearning ROI-calculators and the concept of total cost of ownership. Furthermore some microeconomic effects referring to localization of distance learning courses are outlined. Finally several unsolved issues in costing distance education are summarized.

  17. Distance Education in Technological Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R .C. SHARMA

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance Education in Technological AgeRomesh Verma (Editor, New Delhi: Anmol Publications, 2005, ISBN 81-261-2210-2, pp. 419 Reviewed by R C SHARMARegional DirectorIndira Gandhi National Open University-INDIA The advancements in information and communication technologies have brought significant changes in the way the open and distance learning are provided to the learners. The impact of such changes is quite visible in both developed and developing countries. Switching over to online mode, joining hands with private initiatives and making a presence in foreign waters, are some of the hallmarks of the open and distance education (ODE institutions in developing countries. The compilation of twenty six essays on themes as applicable to ODE has resulted in the book, “Distance Education in Technological Age”. These essays follow a progressive style of narration, starting from describing conceptual framework of distance education, how the distance education was emerged on the global scene and in India, and then goes on to discuss emergence of online distance education and research aspects in ODE. The initial four chapters provide a detailed account of historical development and growth of distance education in India and State Open University and National Open University Model in India . Student support services are pivot to any distance education and much of its success depends on how well the support services are provided. These are discussed from national and international perspective. The issues of collaborative learning, learning on demand, life long learning, learning-unlearning and re-learning model and strategic alliances have also given due space by the authors. An assortment of technologies like communication technology, domestic technology, information technology, mass media and entertainment technology, media technology and educational technology give an idea of how these technologies are being adopted in the open universities. The study

  18. KNOWLEDGE DISTANCE IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhua QIAN; Jiye LIANG; Chuangyin DANG; Feng WANG; Wei XU

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we first introduce the concepts of knowledge closeness and knowledge distance for measuring the sameness and the difference among knowledge in an information system, respectively.The relationship between these two concepts is a strictly mutual complement relation. We then investigate some important properties of knowledge distance and perform experimental analyses on two public data sets, which show the presented measure appears to be well suited to characterize the nature of knowledge in an information system. Finally, we establish the relationship between the knowledge distance and knowledge granulation, which shows that two variants of the knowledge distance can also be used to construct the knowledge granulation. These results will be helpful for studying uncertainty in information systems.

  19. Graph distance for complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yutaka; Hirata, Yoshito; Ikeguchi, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-10-01

    Networks are widely used as a tool for describing diverse real complex systems and have been successfully applied to many fields. The distance between networks is one of the most fundamental concepts for properly classifying real networks, detecting temporal changes in network structures, and effectively predicting their temporal evolution. However, this distance has rarely been discussed in the theory of complex networks. Here, we propose a graph distance between networks based on a Laplacian matrix that reflects the structural and dynamical properties of networked dynamical systems. Our results indicate that the Laplacian-based graph distance effectively quantifies the structural difference between complex networks. We further show that our approach successfully elucidates the temporal properties underlying temporal networks observed in the context of face-to-face human interactions.

  20. Are contemporary tourists consuming distance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunvor Riber

    2012. Background The background for this research, which explores how tourists represent distance and whether or not distance can be said to be consumed by contemporary tourists, is the increasing leisure mobility of people. Travelling for the purpose of visiting friends and relatives is increasing...... of understanding mobility at a conceptual level, and distance matters to people's manifest mobility: how they travel and how far they travel are central elements of their movements. Therefore leisure mobility (indeed all mobility) is the activity of relating across distance, either through actual corporeal...... that is an inherent part of manifest mobility. Numerous definitions and conceptualisations of tourism have been discussed over the years, with MacCannell (1976) pioneering studies of tourism and leisure travel through to Lash and Urry's (1994) post tourist and Jansson's (2002) hyper-tourist. These definitions...

  1. Academy Distance Learning Tools (IRIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — IRIS is a suite of front-end web applications utilizing a centralized back-end Oracle database. The system fully supports the FAA Academy's Distance Learning Program...

  2. Distance education: turf and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, M R

    1992-07-01

    Distance learning fits with the mission and strategic plan of the University of Texas at Arlington. We believe these educational opportunities in nursing are highly desirable. The Board of Nurse Examiners for the State of Texas has approved this project and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has approved it as a pilot project. The school will continue evaluation and creative problem-solving in the use of distance education.

  3. Categorical perception of tactile distance

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, F. L. C.; Longo, M. R.; Bremner, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The tactile surface forms a continuous sheet covering the body. And yet, the perceived distance between two touches varies across stimulation sites. Perceived tactile distance is larger when stimuli cross over the wrist, compared to when both fall on either the hand or the forearm. This effect could reflect a categorical distortion of tactile space across body-part boundaries (in which stimuli crossing the wrist boundary are perceptually elongated) or may simply reflect a localised increased ...

  4. Investigating the Effect of Situational Awareness on Persistence of Doctoral Distance Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harleman, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study sought to identify the effect of heightened situational awareness (SA) on persistence of doctoral distance learners. Factors in the distance learners' micro-environment, vis-à-vis Urie Bronfenbrenner's (1979) ecology theory of human development, were the focus. Study participants included new doctoral candidates continuing…

  5. Methods to calibrate and scale axial distances in confocal microscopy as a function of refractive index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besseling, T. H.; Jose, J.; Blaaderen, A. Van

    2015-01-01

    Accurate distance measurement in 3D confocal microscopy is important for quantitative analysis, volume visualization and image restoration. However, axial distances can be distorted by both the point spread function (PSF) and by a refractive-index mismatch between the sample and immersion liquid, wh

  6. Categorical perception of tactile distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Frances Le Cornu; Longo, Matthew R; Bremner, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    The tactile surface forms a continuous sheet covering the body. And yet, the perceived distance between two touches varies across stimulation sites. Perceived tactile distance is larger when stimuli cross over the wrist, compared to when both fall on either the hand or the forearm. This effect could reflect a categorical distortion of tactile space across body-part boundaries (in which stimuli crossing the wrist boundary are perceptually elongated) or may simply reflect a localised increased in acuity surrounding anatomical landmarks (in which stimuli near the wrist are perceptually elongated). We tested these two interpretations across two experiments, by comparing a well-documented bias to perceive mediolateral tactile distances across the forearm/hand as larger than proximodistal ones along the forearm/hand at three different sites (hand, wrist, and forearm). According to the 'categorical' interpretation, tactile distances should be elongated selectively in the proximodistal axis thus reducing the anisotropy. According to the 'localised acuity' interpretation, distances will be perceptually elongated in the vicinity of the wrist regardless of orientation, leading to increased overall size without affecting anisotropy. Consistent with the categorical account, we found a reduction in the magnitude of anisotropy at the wrist, with no evidence of a corresponding localised increase in precision. These findings demonstrate that we reference touch to a representation of the body that is categorically segmented into discrete parts, which consequently influences the perception of tactile distance.

  7. On the importance of the distance measures used to train and test knowledge-based potentials for proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Carlsen

    Full Text Available Knowledge-based potentials are energy functions derived from the analysis of databases of protein structures and sequences. They can be divided into two classes. Potentials from the first class are based on a direct conversion of the distributions of some geometric properties observed in native protein structures into energy values, while potentials from the second class are trained to mimic quantitatively the geometric differences between incorrectly folded models and native structures. In this paper, we focus on the relationship between energy and geometry when training the second class of knowledge-based potentials. We assume that the difference in energy between a decoy structure and the corresponding native structure is linearly related to the distance between the two structures. We trained two distance-based knowledge-based potentials accordingly, one based on all inter-residue distances (PPD, while the other had the set of all distances filtered to reflect consistency in an ensemble of decoys (PPE. We tested four types of metric to characterize the distance between the decoy and the native structure, two based on extrinsic geometry (RMSD and GTD-TS*, and two based on intrinsic geometry (Q* and MT. The corresponding eight potentials were tested on a large collection of decoy sets. We found that it is usually better to train a potential using an intrinsic distance measure. We also found that PPE outperforms PPD, emphasizing the benefits of capturing consistent information in an ensemble. The relevance of these results for the design of knowledge-based potentials is discussed.

  8. Distance Education with a Computerized Astronomy Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Martin

    1992-12-01

    Distance Education is the presentation of an educational curriculum through self-study materials supplemented by regular contact with an instructor. As such it is suitable for offering educational opportunities to students in widely dispersed locations typical of Canada. Since 1989 Athabasca University has offered Science 280, Introduction to Astronomy and Astrophysics, as a broad introduction to Astronomy at a pre-calculus level. The course includes a computer-based laboratory (observing simulation) set done in students' homes. The laboratory allows simulation of naked eye astronomical observations, starting with the motions of the sun and moon. The logical jump to motions not apparently centered on Earth (planetary retrograde motion and periods) seems to present difficulty to students. Stellar proper motions are made observable by the use of long observing intervals of up to 30000 years. The distribution of nearby stars in space is studied through use of stellar color and the assumption that all stars are on the Main Sequence. The erroneous results which this engenders are not recognized as such by most students, who happily submit reports with red stars at .02 parsec distance. Star counts enable rough determination of Galactic structure. Widespread availability of PC-compatible computers has enabled distance education to bring astronomical education, including an 'observational' component, to Canadians who otherwise would not have access to it.

  9. Inverse Distance Weighted Interpolation Involving Position Shading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zhengquan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the shortcomings of inverse distance weighted (IDW interpolation in practical applications, this study improved the IDW algorithm and put forward a new spatial interpolation method that named as adjusted inverse distance weighted (AIDW. In interpolating process, the AIDW is capable of taking into account the comprehensive influence of distance and position of sample point to interpolation point, by adding a coefficient (K into the normal IDW formula. The coefficient (K is used to adjust interpolation weight of the sample point according to its position in sample points. Theoretical analysis and practical application indicates that the AIDW algorithm could diminish or eliminate the IDW interpolation defect of non-uniform distribution of sample points. Consequently the AIDW interpolating is more reasonable, compared with the IDW interpolating. On the other hand, the contour plotting of the AIDW interpolation could effectively avoid the implausible isolated and concentric circles that originated from the defect of the IDW interpolation, with the result that the contour derived from the AIDW interpolated surface is more similar to the professional manual identification.

  10. Flow Distances on Open Flow Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Liangzhu; Shi, Peiteng; Wang, Jun; Huang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Open flow network is a weighted directed graph with a source and a sink, depicting flux distributions on networks in the steady state of an open flow system. Energetic food webs, economic input-output networks, and international trade networks, are open flow network models of energy flows between species, money or value flows between industrial sectors, and goods flows between countries, respectively. Flow distances (first-passage or total) between any given two nodes $i$ and $j$ are defined as the average number of transition steps of a random walker along the network from $i$ to $j$ under some conditions. They apparently deviate from the conventional random walk distance on a closed directed graph because they consider the openness of the flow network. Flow distances are explicitly expressed by underlying Markov matrix of a flow system in this paper. With this novel theoretical conception, we can visualize open flow networks, calculating centrality of each node, and clustering nodes into groups. We apply fl...

  11. DISTANCE LEARNING AND ATTITUDES OF GREEK BASKETBALL COACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tsamourtzis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the present research was the determination of the attitudes of Greek Basketball coaches towards their distance learning with the use of ICT in comparison with the classical learning and the examination of the perspective of their distance learning with the use of ICT. Therefore a closed questionnaire was used which included 3 different parts. 60 basketball coaches from Northern Greece comprised the sample (N=60. An interactive software was created which included the teaching of an offensive basketball system. The methodology of distance learning was used for the creation of the offensive system. The software was copied to a CD-Rom and accompanied with the questionnaires it was given to 20 Basketball coaches of Northern Greece as a pilot program. After the corrections of the primary questionnaires, the distribution of the final questionnaire accompanied with the CD-Rom followed. Multiple reciprocations were used for the data analysis. According to the results the more relaxing, easier and faster distance learning was considered in relation to the conventional one, a the fewer difficulties would the Basketball coaches face by using the distance learning method and b the friendlier and more relaxing would the distance learning method be. Also according to data research: a the more attractive the reading of software was, b the fewer the difficulties during the reading of software and c the more relaxing, easier and faster distance learning was considered in relation to the conventional one, the stronger was the perspective of Basketball coaches to believe in distance learning. In conclusion the more relaxing, easier and faster distance learning was considered in relation to the conventional one, the more positive were the attitudes of Basketball coaches towards their distance learning, while a positive perspective of Basketball coaches towards their distance learning is being formed.

  12. Perception of light source distance from shading patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Heiko H; Baier, Franziska; Fleming, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    Varying the distance of a light source from an object alters both the intensity and spatial distribution of surface shading patterns. We tested whether observers can use such cues to infer light source distance. Participants viewed stereoscopic renderings of rough objects with diffuse and glossy surfaces, which were illuminated by a point source at a range of distances. In one task, they adjusted the position of a small probe dot in three dimensions to report the apparent location of the light in the scene. In a second task, they adjusted the shading on one object (by moving an invisible light source) until it appeared to be illuminated from the same distance as another object. Participants' responses increased linearly with the true light source distance, suggesting that they have clear intuitions about how light source distance affects shading patterns for a variety of different surfaces. However, there were also systematic errors: Subjects overestimated light source distance in the probe adjustment task, and in both experiments, roughness and glossiness affected responses. We find the pattern of results is predicted surprisingly well by a simplistic model based only on the area of the image that exceeds a certain intensity threshold. Thus, although subjects can report light source distance, they may rely on simple--sometimes erroneous--heuristics to do so.

  13. Definition of distance for nonlinear time series analysis of marked point process data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwayama, Koji, E-mail: koji@sat.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Research Institute for Food and Agriculture, Ryukoku Univeristy, 1-5 Yokotani, Seta Oe-cho, Otsu-Shi, Shiga 520-2194 (Japan); Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2017-01-30

    Marked point process data are time series of discrete events accompanied with some values, such as economic trades, earthquakes, and lightnings. A distance for marked point process data allows us to apply nonlinear time series analysis to such data. We propose a distance for marked point process data which can be calculated much faster than the existing distance when the number of marks is small. Furthermore, under some assumptions, the Kullback–Leibler divergences between posterior distributions for neighbors defined by this distance are small. We performed some numerical simulations showing that analysis based on the proposed distance is effective. - Highlights: • A new distance for marked point process data is proposed. • The distance can be computed fast enough for a small number of marks. • The method to optimize parameter values of the distance is also proposed. • Numerical simulations indicate that the analysis based on the distance is effective.

  14. Conceptualizing Educational Research in Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ryan; Schlosser, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Suggests a starting place for formal inquiry into distance education. Topics covered include: background on educational research and research on distance education; research paradigms that are applicable to distance education; subsystems of a distance education program; and a matrix for conceptualizing distance education research. (MES)

  15. Computing Distances between Probabilistic Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Tracol

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We present relaxed notions of simulation and bisimulation on Probabilistic Automata (PA, that allow some error epsilon. When epsilon is zero we retrieve the usual notions of bisimulation and simulation on PAs. We give logical characterisations of these notions by choosing suitable logics which differ from the elementary ones, L with negation and L without negation, by the modal operator. Using flow networks, we show how to compute the relations in PTIME. This allows the definition of an efficiently computable non-discounted distance between the states of a PA. A natural modification of this distance is introduced, to obtain a discounted distance, which weakens the influence of long term transitions. We compare our notions of distance to others previously defined and illustrate our approach on various examples. We also show that our distance is not expansive with respect to process algebra operators. Although L without negation is a suitable logic to characterise epsilon-(bisimulation on deterministic PAs, it is not for general PAs; interestingly, we prove that it does characterise weaker notions, called a priori epsilon-(bisimulation, which we prove to be NP-difficult to decide.

  16. Distance sampling methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Buckland, S T; Marques, T A; Oedekoven, C S

    2015-01-01

    In this book, the authors cover the basic methods and advances within distance sampling that are most valuable to practitioners and in ecology more broadly. This is the fourth book dedicated to distance sampling. In the decade since the last book published, there have been a number of new developments. The intervening years have also shown which advances are of most use. This self-contained book covers topics from the previous publications, while also including recent developments in method, software and application. Distance sampling refers to a suite of methods, including line and point transect sampling, in which animal density or abundance is estimated from a sample of distances to detected individuals. The book illustrates these methods through case studies; data sets and computer code are supplied to readers through the book’s accompanying website.  Some of the case studies use the software Distance, while others use R code. The book is in three parts.  The first part addresses basic methods, the ...

  17. Individual differences in distance perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Russell E

    2009-05-07

    Distance perception is among the most pervasive mental phenomena and the oldest research topics in behavioural science. However, we do not understand well the most pervasive finding of distance perception research, that of large individual differences. There are large individual differences in acrophobia (fear of heights), which we commonly assume consists of an abnormal fear of stimuli perceived normally. Evolved navigation theory (ENT) instead suggests that acrophobia consists of a more normal fear of stimuli perceived abnormally. ENT suggests that distance perception individual differences produce major components of acrophobia. Acrophobia tested over a broad range in the present study predicted large individual differences in distance estimation of surfaces that could produce falls. This fear of heights correlated positively with distance estimates of a vertical surface-even among non-acrophobic individuals at no risk of falling and without knowledge of being tested for acrophobia. Acrophobia score predicted magnitude of the descent illusion, which is thought to reflect the risk of falling. These data hold important implications in environmental navigation, clinical aetiology and the evolution of visual systems.

  18. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  19. Development of Quantitative electron nano-diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is a step towards development of quantitative parallel beam electron nano-diffraction (PBED). It is focused on the superstructure determination of zig-zag and zig-zig NaxCoO2 and analysis of charge distribution in the two polymorphs Nb12O29 using PBED. It has been shown that quantitative

  20. Asymmetric distances for binary embeddings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordo, Albert; Perronnin, Florent; Gong, Yunchao; Lazebnik, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    In large-scale query-by-example retrieval, embedding image signatures in a binary space offers two benefits: data compression and search efficiency. While most embedding algorithms binarize both query and database signatures, it has been noted that this is not strictly a requirement. Indeed, asymmetric schemes that binarize the database signatures but not the query still enjoy the same two benefits but may provide superior accuracy. In this work, we propose two general asymmetric distances that are applicable to a wide variety of embedding techniques including locality sensitive hashing (LSH), locality sensitive binary codes (LSBC), spectral hashing (SH), PCA embedding (PCAE), PCAE with random rotations (PCAE-RR), and PCAE with iterative quantization (PCAE-ITQ). We experiment on four public benchmarks containing up to 1M images and show that the proposed asymmetric distances consistently lead to large improvements over the symmetric Hamming distance for all binary embedding techniques.