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Sample records for quantifying human vitamin

  1. Quantifying human vitamin kinetics using AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillegonds, D; Dueker, S; Ognibene, T; Buchholz, B; Lin, Y; Vogel, J; Clifford, A

    2004-02-19

    Tracing vitamin kinetics at physiologic concentrations has been hampered by a lack of quantitative sensitivity for chemically equivalent tracers that could be used safely in healthy people. Instead, elderly or ill volunteers were sought for studies involving pharmacologic doses with radioisotopic labels. These studies fail to be relevant in two ways: vitamins are inherently micronutrients, whose biochemical paths are saturated and distorted by pharmacological doses; and while vitamins remain important for health in the elderly or ill, their greatest effects may be in preventing slow and cumulative diseases by proper consumption throughout youth and adulthood. Neither the target dose nor the target population are available for nutrient metabolic studies through decay counting of radioisotopes at high levels. Stable isotopic labels are quantified by isotope ratio mass spectrometry at levels that trace physiologic vitamin doses, but the natural background of stable isotopes severely limits the time span over which the tracer is distinguishable. Indeed, study periods seldom ranged over a single biological mean life of the labeled nutrients, failing to provide data on the important final elimination phase of the compound. Kinetic data for the absorption phase is similarly rare in micronutrient research because the phase is rapid, requiring many consecutive plasma samples for accurate representation. However, repeated blood samples of sufficient volume for precise stable or radio-isotope quantitations consume an indefensible amount of the volunteer's blood over a short period. Thus, vitamin pharmacokinetics in humans has often relied on compartmental modeling based upon assumptions and tested only for the short period of maximal blood circulation, a period that poorly reflects absorption or final elimination kinetics except for the most simple models.

  2. Quantifying the vitamin D economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Robert P; Armas, Laura A G

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D enters the body through multiple routes and in a variety of chemical forms. Utilization varies with input, demand, and genetics. Vitamin D and its metabolites are carried in the blood on a Gc protein that has three principal alleles with differing binding affinities and ethnic prevalences. Three major metabolites are produced, which act via two routes, endocrine and autocrine/paracrine, and in two compartments, extracellular and intracellular. Metabolic consumption is influenced by physiological controls, noxious stimuli, and tissue demand. When administered as a supplement, varying dosing schedules produce major differences in serum metabolite profiles. To understand vitamin D's role in human physiology, it is necessary both to identify the foregoing entities, mechanisms, and pathways and, specifically, to quantify them. This review was performed to delineate the principal entities and transitions involved in the vitamin D economy, summarize the status of present knowledge of the applicable rates and masses, draw inferences about functions that are implicit in these quantifications, and point out implications for the determination of adequacy.

  3. A New Method to Simultaneously Quantify the Antioxidants: Carotenes, Xanthophylls, and Vitamin A in Human Plasma

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    Mariel Colmán-Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and accurate reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD method for simultaneously determining and quantifying the antioxidants carotenes, xanthophylls, and retinol in human plasma is presented in this paper. Compounds were extracted with hexane, a C30 column, and a mobile phase of methanol, methyl tert-butyl ether, and water were used for the separation of the compounds. A total of 8 carotenoids, 3 Z-β-carotene isomers, and 1 fat-soluble vitamin (retinol were resolved within 72 min at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min. Detection was achieved at 450 nm for carotenoids and 330 nm for retinol. To evaluate the effectiveness of themethod, it has been applied to an intervention study conducted on eight volunteers. Results. Limits of detection were between 0.1 μg/mL for lycopene and astaxanthin and 1.3 μg/mL for 15-Z-β-carotene. Recoveries were ranged between 89% and 113% for α-carotene and astaxanthin, respectively. Accuracy was between 90.7% and 112.2% and precision was between 1% and 15% RSD. In human plasma samples compounds studied were identified besides three lycopene isomers, demonstrated to be suitable for application in dietary intervention studies. Conclusions. Due to its accuracy, precision, selectivity, and reproducibility, this method is suitable to dietary habits and/or antioxidants status studies.

  4. Quantifying and simulating human sensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quantifying and simulating human sensation – relating science and technology of indoor climate research Abstract In his doctoral thesis from 1970 civil engineer Povl Ole Fanger proposed that the understanding of indoor climate should focus on the comfort of the individual rather than averaged...... archival material related to Lund Madsen’s efforts are preserved at the Technical University of Denmark and I have used these artefacts as the point of departure for my investigation. In this paper I will examine which factors the researchers perceived as important for human indoor comfort and how...... this understanding of human sensation was adjusted to technology. I will look into the construction of the equipment, what it measures and the relationship between theory, equipment and tradition....

  5. Common ecology quantifies human insurgency.

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    Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Gourley, Sean; Dixon, Alexander R; Spagat, Michael; Johnson, Neil F

    2009-12-17

    Many collective human activities, including violence, have been shown to exhibit universal patterns. The size distributions of casualties both in whole wars from 1816 to 1980 and terrorist attacks have separately been shown to follow approximate power-law distributions. However, the possibility of universal patterns ranging across wars in the size distribution or timing of within-conflict events has barely been explored. Here we show that the sizes and timing of violent events within different insurgent conflicts exhibit remarkable similarities. We propose a unified model of human insurgency that reproduces these commonalities, and explains conflict-specific variations quantitatively in terms of underlying rules of engagement. Our model treats each insurgent population as an ecology of dynamically evolving, self-organized groups following common decision-making processes. Our model is consistent with several recent hypotheses about modern insurgency, is robust to many generalizations, and establishes a quantitative connection between human insurgency, global terrorism and ecology. Its similarity to financial market models provides a surprising link between violent and non-violent forms of human behaviour.

  6. Quantitation of vitamin K in human milk

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    Canfield, L.M.; Hopkinson, J.M.; Lima, A.F.; Martin, G.S.; Sugimoto, K.; Burr, J.; Clark, L.; McGee, D.L. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1990-07-01

    A quantitative method was developed for the assay of vitamin K in human colostrum and milk. The procedure combines preparative and analytical chromatography on silica gel in a nitrogen atmosphere followed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Two HPLC steps were used: gradient separation with ultraviolet (UV) detection followed by isocratic separation detected electrochemically. Due to co-migrating impurities, UV detection alone is insufficient for identification of vitamin K. Exogenous vitamin K was shown to equilibrate with endogenous vitamin K in the samples. A statistical method was incorporated to control for experimental variability. Vitamin K1 was analyzed in 16 pooled milk samples from 7 donors and in individual samples from 15 donors at 1 month post-partum. Vitamin K1 was present at 2.94 +/- 1.94 and 3.15 +/- 2.87 ng/mL in pools and in individuals, respectively. Menaquinones, the bacterial form of the vitamin, were not detected. The significance of experimental variation to studies of vitamin K in individuals is discussed.

  7. Vitamin D and Human Health: Celebrating Diversity

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    Simon Spedding

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue of Nutrients: Vitamin D and Human Health celebrates diversity in vitamin D research with articles from bench-to-bedside, examining mechanisms, epidemiology, and clinical issues in the management of non-skeletal disease following themes set by an earlier review in Nutrients [1]. Vitamin D became synonymous with calcium and bone metabolism originating from Casimir Funk’s concept of “Vitamines”. This suggests that vitamin D is an amine found in food with a single mode of action affecting calcium and bone metabolism [2], whereas vitamin D is a secosteroid hormone derived from sunshine with a plethora of physiological functions (autocrine, paracrine, endocrine [3], and epigenetic [4] associating vitamin D deficiency with many illnesses [1]. Deficiency is pandemic and most prevalent where sun exposure is limited by culture climate and skin colour [5]. Whilst reports have focused on diet and bone metabolism [6], this Special Issue of Nutrients about Vitamin D and Human Health focuses on non-skeletal disease, and research driven by industry and community health concerns.

  8. Folate, vitamin B12 and human health

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    During the past decade the role of folate and vitamin B12 in human nutrition have been under constant re-examination. Basic knowledge on the metabolism and interactions between these essential nutrients has expanded and multiple complexities have been unraveled. These micronutrients have shared func...

  9. Vitamin D Signaling in the Bovine Immune System: A Model for Understanding Human Vitamin D Requirements

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    Corwin D. Nelson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The endocrine physiology of vitamin D in cattle has been rigorously investigated and has yielded information on vitamin D requirements, endocrine function in health and disease, general metabolism, and maintenance of calcium homeostasis in cattle. These results are relevant to human vitamin D endocrinology. The current debate regarding vitamin D requirements is centered on the requirements for proper intracrine and paracrine vitamin D signaling. Studies in adult and young cattle can provide valuable insight for understanding vitamin D requirements as they relate to innate and adaptive immune responses during infectious disease. In cattle, toll-like receptor recognition activates intracrine and paracrine vitamin D signaling mechanism in the immune system that regulates innate and adaptive immune responses in the presence of adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Furthermore, experiments with mastitis in dairy cattle have provided in vivo evidence for the intracrine vitamin D signaling mechanism in macrophages as well as vitamin D mediated suppression of infection. Epidemiological evidence indicates that circulating concentrations above 32 ng/mL of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are necessary for optimal vitamin D signaling in the immune system, but experimental evidence is lacking for that value. Experiments in cattle can provide that evidence as circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations can be experimentally manipulated within ranges that are normal for humans and cattle. Additionally, young and adult cattle can be experimentally infected with bacteria and viruses associated with significant diseases in both cattle and humans. Utilizing the bovine model to further delineate the immunomodulatory role of vitamin D will provide potentially valuable insights into the vitamin D requirements of both humans and cattle, especially as they relate to immune response capacity and infectious disease resistance.

  10. Vitamin D signaling in the bovine immune system: a model for understanding human vitamin D requirements.

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    Nelson, Corwin D; Reinhardt, Timothy A; Lippolis, John D; Sacco, Randy E; Nonnecke, Brian J

    2012-03-01

    The endocrine physiology of vitamin D in cattle has been rigorously investigated and has yielded information on vitamin D requirements, endocrine function in health and disease, general metabolism, and maintenance of calcium homeostasis in cattle. These results are relevant to human vitamin D endocrinology. The current debate regarding vitamin D requirements is centered on the requirements for proper intracrine and paracrine vitamin D signaling. Studies in adult and young cattle can provide valuable insight for understanding vitamin D requirements as they relate to innate and adaptive immune responses during infectious disease. In cattle, toll-like receptor recognition activates intracrine and paracrine vitamin D signaling mechanism in the immune system that regulates innate and adaptive immune responses in the presence of adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Furthermore, experiments with mastitis in dairy cattle have provided in vivo evidence for the intracrine vitamin D signaling mechanism in macrophages as well as vitamin D mediated suppression of infection. Epidemiological evidence indicates that circulating concentrations above 32 ng/mL of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are necessary for optimal vitamin D signaling in the immune system, but experimental evidence is lacking for that value. Experiments in cattle can provide that evidence as circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations can be experimentally manipulated within ranges that are normal for humans and cattle. Additionally, young and adult cattle can be experimentally infected with bacteria and viruses associated with significant diseases in both cattle and humans. Utilizing the bovine model to further delineate the immunomodulatory role of vitamin D will provide potentially valuable insights into the vitamin D requirements of both humans and cattle, especially as they relate to immune response capacity and infectious disease resistance.

  11. Rapid determination of vitamin B2 and B12 in human urine by isocratic liquid chromatography.

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    Mandal, Santi M; Mandal, Mahitosh; Ghosh, Ananta K; Dey, Satyahari

    2009-04-27

    A simple and rapid method for the identification and quantification of vitamin B(2) and B(12) in human urine has been developed using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the peaks identity were confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). HPLC separation was performed in single wavelength detector (lambda(365)) mode and separated isocratically using mobile phase methanol: 1mM aqueous TFA (1:4) in C18 column. The calibration graphs plotted with different concentrations of vitamin B(2) and B(12) was linear with a correlation coefficients (r(2))=0.9975 and 0.9985, respectively. The recoveries of vitamin B(2) and B(12) were above 87% and 90%, respectively. The results of this present study suggest that the proposed method may be simple and convenient way of identifying and quantifying vitamin B(2) and B(12) from human urine.

  12. Vitamin D receptor and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the human male reproductive tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Nielsen, John E; Jørgensen, Anne;

    2010-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human testis, and vitamin D (VD) has been suggested to affect survival and function of mature spermatozoa. Indeed, VDR knockout mice and VD deficient rats show decreased sperm counts and low fertility. However, the cellular response to VD is complex...

  13. Vitamin D content in human breast milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Við Streym, Susanna; Højskov, Carsten S; Møller, Ulla Kristine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parents are advised to avoid the direct sun exposure of their newborns. Therefore, the vitamin D status of exclusively breastfed newborns is entirely dependent on the supply of vitamin D from breast milk. OBJECTIVES: We explored concentrations of ergocalciferol (vitamin D2......) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) (vitamin D) and 25-hydroxivitamin D2 plus D3 (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]) in foremilk and hindmilk during the first 9 mo of lactation and identified indexes of importance to the concentrations. DESIGN: We collected blood and breast-milk samples from mothers at 2 wk (n = 107), 4 mo......, (n = 90), and 9 mo (n = 48) postpartum. Blood samples from infants were collected 4 and 9 mo after birth. We measured concentrations of vitamin D metabolites in blood and milk samples with the use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Concentrations of vitamin D and 25(OH)D...

  14. Vitamin deficiencies in humans: can plant science help?

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    Fitzpatrick, Teresa B; Basset, Gilles J C; Borel, Patrick; Carrari, Fernando; DellaPenna, Dean; Fraser, Paul D; Hellmann, Hanjo; Osorio, Sonia; Rothan, Christophe; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2012-02-01

    The term vitamin describes a small group of organic compounds that are absolutely required in the human diet. Although for the most part, dependency criteria are met in developed countries through balanced diets, this is not the case for the five billion people in developing countries who depend predominantly on a single staple crop for survival. Thus, providing a more balanced vitamin intake from high-quality food remains one of the grandest challenges for global human nutrition in the coming decade(s). Here, we describe the known importance of vitamins in human health and current knowledge on their metabolism in plants. Deficits in developing countries are a combined consequence of a paucity of specific vitamins in major food staple crops, losses during crop processing, and/or overreliance on a single species as a primary food source. We discuss the role that plant science can play in addressing this problem and review successful engineering of vitamin pathways. We conclude that while considerable advances have been made in understanding vitamin metabolic pathways in plants, more cross-disciplinary approaches must be adopted to provide adequate levels of all vitamins in the major staple crops to eradicate vitamin deficiencies from the global population.

  15. Vitamin Deficiencies in Humans: Can Plant Science Help?[W

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    Fitzpatrick, Teresa B.; Basset, Gilles J.C.; Borel, Patrick; Carrari, Fernando; DellaPenna, Dean; Fraser, Paul D.; Hellmann, Hanjo; Osorio, Sonia; Rothan, Christophe; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2012-01-01

    The term vitamin describes a small group of organic compounds that are absolutely required in the human diet. Although for the most part, dependency criteria are met in developed countries through balanced diets, this is not the case for the five billion people in developing countries who depend predominantly on a single staple crop for survival. Thus, providing a more balanced vitamin intake from high-quality food remains one of the grandest challenges for global human nutrition in the coming decade(s). Here, we describe the known importance of vitamins in human health and current knowledge on their metabolism in plants. Deficits in developing countries are a combined consequence of a paucity of specific vitamins in major food staple crops, losses during crop processing, and/or overreliance on a single species as a primary food source. We discuss the role that plant science can play in addressing this problem and review successful engineering of vitamin pathways. We conclude that while considerable advances have been made in understanding vitamin metabolic pathways in plants, more cross-disciplinary approaches must be adopted to provide adequate levels of all vitamins in the major staple crops to eradicate vitamin deficiencies from the global population. PMID:22374394

  16. The role of menaquinones (vitamin K₂) in human health.

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    Beulens, Joline W J; Booth, Sarah L; van den Heuvel, Ellen G H M; Stoecklin, Elisabeth; Baka, Athanasia; Vermeer, Cees

    2013-10-01

    Recent reports have attributed the potential health benefits of vitamin K beyond its function to activate hepatic coagulation factors. Moreover, several studies have suggested that menaquinones, also known as vitamin K2, may be more effective in activating extra-hepatic vitamin K-dependent proteins than phylloquinone, also known as vitamin K1. Nevertheless, present dietary reference values (DRV) for vitamin K are exclusively based on phylloquinone, and its function in coagulation. The present review describes the current knowledge on menaquinones based on the following criteria for setting DRV: optimal dietary intake; nutrient amount required to prevent deficiency, maintain optimal body stores and/or prevent chronic disease; factors influencing requirements such as absorption, metabolism, age and sex. Dietary intake of menaquinones accounts for up to 25% of total vitamin K intake and contributes to the biological functions of vitamin K. However, menaquinones are different from phylloquinone with respect to their chemical structure and pharmacokinetics, which affects bioavailability, metabolism and perhaps impact on health outcomes. There are significant gaps in the current knowledge on menaquinones based on the criteria for setting DRV. Therefore, we conclude that further investigations are needed to establish how differences among the vitamin K forms may influence tissue specificities and their role in human health. However, there is merit for considering both menaquinones and phylloquinone when developing future recommendations for vitamin K intake.

  17. Quantifying gender preferences across humans lifespan

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Asim; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Dunbar, Robin I M; Kaski, Kimmo

    2016-01-01

    In human relations individuals' gender and age play a key role in the structures and dynamics of their social arrangements. In order to analyze the gender preferences of individuals in interaction with others at different stages of their lives we study a large mobile phone dataset. To do this we consider four fundamental gender-related caller and callee combinations of human interactions, namely male to male, male to female, female to male, and female to female, which together with age, kinship, and different levels of friendship give rise to a wide scope of human sociality. Here we analyse the relative strength of these four types of interaction using a large dataset of mobile phone communication records. Our analysis suggests strong age dependence for an ego of one gender choosing to call an individual of either gender. We observe a strong opposite sex bonding across most of their reproductive age. However, older women show a strong tendency to connect to another female that is one generation younger in a w...

  18. Vitamin D: a critical and essential micronutrient for human health

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    Igor eBendik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a micronutrient that is needed for optimal health throughout the whole life. Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol can be either synthesized in the human skin upon exposure to the UV light of the sun, or it is obtained from the diet. If the photoconversion in the skin due to reduced sun exposure (e.g. in wintertime is insufficient, intake of adequate vitamin D from the diet is essential to health. Severe vitamin D deficiency can lead to multitude of avoidable illnesses; among them are well known bone diseases like osteoporosis, a number of autoimmune diseases, many different cancers and some cardiovascular diseases like hypertension are being discussed. Vitamin D is found naturally in only very few foods. Foods containing vitamin D include some fatty fish, fish liver oils, and eggs from hens that have been fed vitamin D and some fortified foods in countries with respective regulations. Base on geographic location or food availability adequate vitamin D intake might not be sufficient on a global scale. The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF has collected the 25-hydroxy-vitamin D plasma levels in populations of different countries using published data and developed a global vitamin D map. This map illustrates the parts of the world, where vitamin D did not reach adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D plasma levels: 6.7 % of the papers report 25-hydroxyvitamin D plasma levels below 25 nmol/L, which indicates vitamin D deficiency, 37.3 % are below 50 nmol/Land only 11.9% found 25-hydroxy-vitamin D plasma levels above 75 nmol/L target as suggested by vitamin D experts. The vitamin D map is adding further evidence to the vitamin D insufficiency pandemic debate, which is also an issue in the developed world. Besides malnutrition, a condition where the diet does not match to provide the adequate levels of nutrients including micronutrients for growth and maintenance, we obviously have a situation where enough nutrients were consumed, but lacked to

  19. Vitamins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Movies & More Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading ... What's in this article? Vitamins Hang Out in Water and Fat Vitamins Feed Your Needs Vitamin A ...

  20. Comparison of extraction methods for quantifying vitamin E from animal tissues.

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    Xu, Zhimin

    2008-12-01

    Four extraction methods: (1) solvent (SOL), (2) ultrasound assisted solvent (UA), (3) saponification and solvent (SP), and (4) saponification and ultrasound assisted solvent (SP-UA), were used in sample preparation for quantifying vitamin E (tocopherols) in chicken liver and plasma samples. The extraction yields of SOL, UA, SP, and SP-UA methods obtained by adding delta-tocopherol as internal reference were 95%, 104%, 65%, and 62% for liver and 98%, 103%, 97%, and 94% for plasma, respectively. The methods with saponification significantly affected the stabilities of tocopherols in liver samples. The measured values of alpha- and gamma-tocopherols using the solvent only extraction (SOL) method were much lower than that using any of the other extraction methods. This indicated that less of the tocopherols in those samples were in a form that could be extracted directly by solvent. The measured value of alpha-tocopherol in the liver sample using the ultrasound assisted solvent (UA) method was 1.5-2.5 times of that obtained from the saponification and solvent (SP) method. The differences in measured values of tocopherols in the plasma samples by using the two methods were not significant. However, the measured value of the saponification and ultrasound assisted solvent (SP-UA) method was lower than either the saponification and solvent (SP) or the ultrasound assisted solvent (UA) method. Also, the reproducibility of the ultrasound assisted solvent (UA) method was greater than any of the saponification methods. Compared with the traditional saponification method, the ultrasound assisted solvent method could effectively extract tocopherols from sample matrix without any chemical degradation reactions, especially for complex animal tissue such as liver.

  1. Is there a role for vitamin D in human reproduction?

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    Nandi, Anindita; Sinha, Nandita; Ong, Erwyn; Sonmez, Halis; Poretsky, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is a steroid hormone with canonical roles in calcium metabolism and bone modeling. However, in recent years there has been a growing body of literature presenting associations between vitamin D levels and a variety of disease processes, including metabolic disorders such as diabetes and prediabetes and autoimmune conditions such as thyroid disease. This review focuses on the potential role of vitamin D in both male and female reproductive function. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed throughout central and peripheral organs of reproduction. VDR is often co-localized with its metabolizing enzymes, suggesting the importance of tissue specific modulation of active vitamin D levels. Both animal and human studies in males links vitamin D deficiency with hypogonadism and decreased fertility. In females, there is evidence for its role in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, leiomyomas, in-vitro fertilization, and pregnancy outcomes. Studies evaluating the effects of replacing vitamin D have shown variable results. There remains some concern that the effects of vitamin D on reproduction are not direct, but rather secondary to the accompanying hypocalcemia or estrogen dysregulation.

  2. Vitamin D receptor and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the human male reproductive tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Nielsen, John E; Jørgensen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    , since it is not solely dependent on VDR expression, but also on cellular uptake of circulating VD and presence and activity of VD metabolizing enzymes. Expression of VD metabolizing enzymes has not previously been investigated in human testis and male reproductive tract. Therefore, we performed......The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human testis, and vitamin D (VD) has been suggested to affect survival and function of mature spermatozoa. Indeed, VDR knockout mice and VD deficient rats show decreased sperm counts and low fertility. However, the cellular response to VD is complex...

  3. Vitamin K plasma levels determination in human health.

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    Fusaro, Maria; Gallieni, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Stucchi, Andrea; Delanaye, Pierre; Cavalier, Etienne; Moysés, Rosa M A; Jorgetti, Vanda; Iervasi, Giorgio; Giannini, Sandro; Fabris, Fabrizio; Aghi, Andrea; Sella, Stefania; Galli, Francesco; Viola, Valentina; Plebani, Mario

    2017-05-01

    Vitamin K (phylloquinone or vitamin K1 and menaquinones or vitamin K2) plays an important role as a cofactor in the synthesis of hepatic blood coagulation proteins, but recently has also aroused an increasing interest for its action in extra-hepatic tissues, in particular in the regulation of bone and vascular metabolism. The accurate measurement of vitamin K status in humans is still a critical issue. Along with indirect assays, such as the undercarboxylated fractions of vitamin K-dependent proteins [prothrombin, osteocalcin (OC), and matrix gla protein], the direct analysis of blood levels of phylloquinone and menaquinones forms might be considered a more informative and direct method for assessing vitamin K status. Different methods for direct quantification of vitamin K serum levels are available. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods coupled with post-column reduction procedures and fluorimetric or electrochemical detection are commonly used for food and blood analysis of phylloquinone, but they show some limitations when applied to the analysis of serum menaquinones because of interferences from triglycerides. Recent advancements include liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/MS) detection, which assures higher specificity. The optimization and standardization of these methods requires specialized laboratories. The variability of results observed in the available studies suggests the need for further investigations to obtain more accurate analytical results.

  4. Vitamins

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    ... health problems, including heart disease, cancer, and poor bone health ( osteoporosis ). Vitamin A helps form and maintain healthy teeth, bones, soft tissue, mucus membranes, and skin. Vitamin B6 ...

  5. Vitamin D and gene networks in human osteoblasts

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    Jeroen evan de Peppel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bone formation is indirectly influenced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3 through the stimulation of calcium uptake in the intestine and re-absorption in the kidneys. Direct effects on osteoblasts and bone formation have also been established. The vitamin D receptor (VDR is expressed in osteoblasts and 1,25D3 modifies gene expression of various osteoblast differentiation and mineralization-related genes, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALPL, osteocalcin (BGLAP and osteopontin (SPP1. 1,25D3 is known to stimulate mineralization of human osteoblasts in vitro, and recently it was shown that 1,25D3 induces mineralization via effects in the period preceding mineralization during the pre-mineralization period. For a full understanding of the action of 1,25D3 in osteoblasts it is important to get an integrated network view of the 1,25D3-regulated genes during osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. The current data will be presented and discussed alluding to future studies to fully delineate the 1,25D3 action in osteoblast. Describing and understanding the vitamin D regulatory networks and identifying the dominant players in these networks may help develop novel (personalized vitamin D-based treatments. The following topics will be discussed in this overview: 1 Bone metabolism and osteoblasts, 2 Vitamin D, bone metabolism and osteoblast function, 3 Vitamin D induced transcriptional networks in the context of osteoblast differentiation and bone formation.

  6. Vitamins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Roso, Baltasar

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available A thermal treatment is an intrinsic part of most food processing procedures and may be employed to inactive enzimes and toxic '• factors, to change texture and flavour or to preserve. The vitamin degree of transformation or destruction in cooking methods depends on the temperature and on the time of exposure to this temperature. Oxigen, light and transition metals frequently play an active role in accelerating or promoting vitamin losses. Both chemical change and difussion proceed more rapidly as the temperature is raised. An advantage of deep frying consists of the fact that the temperature within the food does not exceed the temperature of the steam under the crust, and that frying times are in general very short compared to other cooking procedures. Another advantages may be the low content of dissolved oxygen in frying fats, and also in its high tocopherol content. There is no leaching of water-soluble vitamins in deep-frying. Speaking of vitamin stability we have to keep in mind that the concept of vitamins is a more physiological concept than a chemical one. The stability itself is not a property of the various vitamins but rather of the various chemical compounds sometimes called vitamers, of which a certain vitamin group consists. For practical purposes, vitamin losses should be considered only in foods wich substantially contribute to the vitamin supply of single people or population groups. There is little data in the literature about vitamin changes in deep-frying of food. However published experimental data on vitamin loses show that deep-frying is one of the most protective cooking procedures. For example, in ours results the vitamin C losses of stewed vegetable foods were twice higher than that of fried ones, (raw potatoes containing 19 mg/100g fresh weight, 13 mg/100 fried in olive oil, and 5 mg/100g stewed in the same oil.

  7. Quantifying dynamic characteristics of human walking for comprehensive gait cycle.

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    Mummolo, Carlotta; Mangialardi, Luigi; Kim, Joo H

    2013-09-01

    Normal human walking typically consists of phases during which the body is statically unbalanced while maintaining dynamic stability. Quantifying the dynamic characteristics of human walking can provide better understanding of gait principles. We introduce a novel quantitative index, the dynamic gait measure (DGM), for comprehensive gait cycle. The DGM quantifies the effects of inertia and the static balance instability in terms of zero-moment point and ground projection of center of mass and incorporates the time-varying foot support region (FSR) and the threshold between static and dynamic walking. Also, a framework of determining the DGM from experimental data is introduced, in which the gait cycle segmentation is further refined. A multisegmental foot model is integrated into a biped system to reconstruct the walking motion from experiments, which demonstrates the time-varying FSR for different subphases. The proof-of-concept results of the DGM from a gait experiment are demonstrated. The DGM results are analyzed along with other established features and indices of normal human walking. The DGM provides a measure of static balance instability of biped walking during each (sub)phase as well as the entire gait cycle. The DGM of normal human walking has the potential to provide some scientific insights in understanding biped walking principles, which can also be useful for their engineering and clinical applications.

  8. Relevance of vitamin D receptor target genes for monitoring the vitamin D responsiveness of primary human cells.

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    Vukić, Maja; Neme, Antonio; Seuter, Sabine; Saksa, Noora; de Mello, Vanessa D F; Nurmi, Tarja; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Virtanen, Jyrki K; Carlberg, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D3 has transcriptome- and genome-wide effects and activates, via the binding of its metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to the transcription factor vitamin D receptor (VDR), several hundred target genes. Using samples from a 5-month vitamin D3 intervention study (VitDmet), we recently reported that the expression of 12 VDR target genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as well as 12 biochemical and clinical parameters of the study participants are significantly triggered by vitamin D3. In this study, we performed a more focused selection of further 12 VDR target genes and demonstrated that changes of their mRNA expression in PBMCs of VitDmet subjects significantly correlate with alterations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 serum levels. Network and self-organizing map analysis of these datasets together with that of the other 24 parameters was followed by relevance calculations and identified changes in parathyroid hormone serum levels and the expression of the newly selected genes STS, BCL6, ITGAM, LRRC25, LPGAT1 and TREM1 as well as of the previously reported genes DUSP10 and CD14 as the most relevant parameters for describing vitamin D responsiveness in vivo. Moreover, parameter relevance ranking allowed the segregation of study subjects into high and low responders. Due to the long intervention period the vitamin D response was not too prominent on the level of transcriptional activation. Therefore, we performed in the separate VitDbol trial a short-term but high dose stimulation with a vitamin D3 bolus. In PBMCs of VitDbol subjects we observed direct transcriptional effects on the selected VDR target genes, such as an up to 2.1-fold increase already one day after supplementation onset. In conclusion, both long-term and short-term vitamin D3 supplementation studies allow monitoring the vitamin D responsiveness of human individuals and represent new types of human in vivo vitamin D3 investigations.

  9. Quantifying human response capabilities towards tsunami threats at community level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, J.; Mück, M.; Zosseder, K.; Wegscheider, S.; Taubenböck, H.; Strunz, G.; Muhari, A.; Anwar, H. Z.; Birkmann, J.; Gebert, N.

    2009-04-01

    Decision makers at the community level need detailed information on tsunami risks in their area. Knowledge on potential hazard impact, exposed elements such as people, critical facilities and lifelines, people's coping capacity and recovery potential are crucial to plan precautionary measures for adaptation and to mitigate potential impacts of tsunamis on society and the environment. A crucial point within a people-centred tsunami risk assessment is to quantify the human response capabilities towards tsunami threats. Based on this quantification and spatial representation in maps tsunami affected and safe areas, difficult-to-evacuate areas, evacuation target points and evacuation routes can be assigned and used as an important contribution to e.g. community level evacuation planning. Major component in the quantification of human response capabilities towards tsunami impacts is the factor time. The human response capabilities depend on the estimated time of arrival (ETA) of a tsunami, the time until technical or natural warning signs (ToNW) can be received, the reaction time (RT) of the population (human understanding of a tsunami warning and the decision to take appropriate action), the evacuation time (ET, time people need to reach a safe area) and the actual available response time (RsT = ETA - ToNW - RT). If RsT is larger than ET, people in the respective areas are able to reach a safe area and rescue themselves. Critical areas possess RsT values equal or even smaller ET and hence people whin these areas will be directly affected by a tsunami. Quantifying the factor time is challenging and an attempt to this is presented here. The ETA can be derived by analyzing pre-computed tsunami scenarios for a respective area. For ToNW we assume that the early warning center is able to fulfil the Indonesian presidential decree to issue a warning within 5 minutes. RT is difficult as here human intrinsic factors as educational level, believe, tsunami knowledge and experience

  10. Rapidly quantifying the relative distention of a human bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Companion, John A. (Inventor); Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Mineo, Beth A. (Inventor); Cavalier, Albert R. (Inventor); Blalock, Travis N. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A device and method was developed to rapidly quantify the relative distention of the bladder of a human subject. An ultrasonic transducer is positioned on the human subject near the bladder. A microprocessor controlled pulser excites the transducer by sending an acoustic wave into the human subject. This wave interacts with the bladder walls and is reflected back to the ultrasonic transducer where it is received, amplified, and processed by the receiver. The resulting signal is digitized by an analog to digital converter, controlled by the microprocessor again, and is stored in data memory. The software in the microprocessor determines the relative distention of the bladder as a function of the propagated ultrasonic energy. Based on programmed scientific measurements and the human subject's past history as contained in program memory, the microprocessor sends out a signal to turn on any or all of the available alarms. The alarm system includes and audible alarm, the visible alarm, the tactile alarm, and the remote wireless alarm.

  11. Controversies of antioxidant vitamins supplementation in exercise: ergogenic or ergolytic effects in humans?

    OpenAIRE

    Draeger, Cainara Lins; Naves, Andréia; Marques, Natália; Baptistella, Ana Beatriz; Carnauba, Renata Alves; Paschoal, Valéria; Nicastro, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this commentary was to discuss the last studies regarding the effect of antioxidant vitamins supplementation on oxidative stress in exercise in humans. The inclusion criteria encompassed published studies done in adult males and females between 2006 and 2013. The keywords used in the search engine were: endurance athlete, diet, oxidative stress, physical activity, diet, nutrition, antioxidant, antioxidant status, vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin E, β-carotene and combinations. Twelve ...

  12. Application of UPLC-MS/MS Method for Analyzing B-vitamins in Human Milk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xiang Nan; YIN Shi An; YANG Zhen Yu; YANG Xiao Guang; SHAO Bing; REN Yi Ping; ZHANG Jing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine ten B-vitamins in human milk by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Methods The pretreated human milk samples were adequately separated and quantified within 11 min by UPLC-MS/MS with an Acquity UPLC HSS T3 column (2.1×100 mm, 1.8 µm). The mobile phase was a gradient of 2.5 mmol/L ammonium formate aqueous solution and acetonitrile at a flow rate of 0.35 mL/min. Stable isotope internal standards were used in the analysis, to correct for the method variability, including matrix and ionization effects. The homogenized human milk samples were deproteinzed using methanol, unknown contaminants were extracted with diethyl ether and hydrophobic phase was discarded. The analytes were monitored via ESI+ionization and detected in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) with three acquisition functions. Results Calibration curves ranged from 0.5-160 ng/mL (thiamin, riboflavin, biotin, nicotinic acid, pyridoxine, pyridoxamine, pyridoxal), and 2.5-800 ng/mL (pantothenic acid, FAD and nicotinamide) (R2=0.990-0.999). The relative recovery ranged from 80.1% to 120.2%; accuracy was determined to be 98.3% to 108.0%. Intra-day and inter-day variation were 3.4%-19.9% and 5.9%-18.1%, respectively. The limit of quantification (LOQ) for all vitamins was between 0.25 and 3 µg/L. Conclusion This method was successfully applied for simultaneous analysis of ten B-vitamins in human milk.

  13. Quantifying human health risks from virginiamycin used in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Louis A; Popken, Douglas A

    2004-02-01

    The streptogramin antimicrobial combination Quinupristin-Dalfopristin (QD) has been used in the United States since late 1999 to treat patients with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) infections. Another streptogramin, virginiamycin (VM), is used as a growth promoter and therapeutic agent in farm animals in the United States and other countries. Many chickens test positive for QD-resistant E. faecium, raising concern that VM use in chickens might compromise QD effectiveness against VREF infections by promoting development of QD-resistant strains that can be transferred to human patients. Despite the potential importance of this threat to human health, quantifying the risk via traditional farm-to-fork modeling has proved extremely difficult. Enough key data (mainly on microbial loads at each stage) are lacking so that such modeling amounts to little more than choosing a set of assumptions to determine the answer. Yet, regulators cannot keep waiting for more data. Patients prescribed QD are typically severely ill, immunocompromised people for whom other treatment options have not readily been available. Thus, there is a pressing need for sound risk assessment methods to inform risk management decisions for VM/QD using currently available data. This article takes a new approach to the QD-VM risk modeling challenge. Recognizing that the usual farm-to-fork ("forward chaining") approach commonly used in antimicrobial risk assessment for food animals is unlikely to produce reliable results soon enough to be useful, we instead draw on ideas from traditional fault tree analysis ("backward chaining") to reverse the farm-to-fork process and start with readily available human data on VREF case loads and QD resistance rates. Combining these data with recent genogroup frequency data for humans, chickens, and other sources (Willems et al., 2000, 2001) allows us to quantify potential human health risks from VM in chickens in both the United States and Australia, two

  14. Vitamin D is positively associated with sperm motility and increases intracellular calcium in human spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Bjerrum, Poul J; Jessen, Torben E;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human spermatozoa, and VDR-knockout mice and vitamin D (VD) deficiency in rodents results in impaired fertility, low sperm counts and a low number of motile spermatozoa. We investigated the role of activated VD (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) in human...

  15. Vitamins K1 and K2: The Emerging Group of Vitamins Required for Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerry Kurt Schwalfenberg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To review the evidence for the use of vitamin K supplementation in clinical conditions such as osteoporosis, vascular calcification, arthritis, cancer, renal calculi, diabetes, and warfarin therapy. Quality of Evidence. PubMed was searched for articles on vitamin K (K1 and K2 along with books and conference proceedings and health conditions listed above. Level I and II evidence supports the use of vitamins K1 and K2 in osteoporosis and Level II evidence supports vitamin K2 in prevention of coronary calcification and cardiovascular disease. Evidence is insufficient for use in diabetes, arthritis, renal calculi, and cancer. Main Message. Vitamin K2 may be a useful adjunct for the treatment of osteoporosis, along with vitamin D and calcium, rivaling bisphosphonate therapy without toxicity. It may also significantly reduce morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular health by reducing vascular calcification. Vitamin K2 appears promising in the areas of diabetes, cancer, and osteoarthritis. Vitamin K use in warfarin therapy is safe and may improve INR control, although a dosage adjustment is required. Conclusion. Vitamin K supplementation may be useful for a number of chronic conditions that are afflicting North Americans as the population ages. Supplementation may be required for bone and cardiovascular health.

  16. 77 FR 52228 - Food Additives Permitted for Direct Addition to Food for Human Consumption; Vitamin D2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... to Food for Human Consumption; Vitamin D2 Bakers Yeast AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... regulations to provide for the safe use of vitamin D 2 bakers yeast as a source of vitamin D 2 and as a... vitamin D 2 per 100 grams (g) in the finished food. This action is in response to a petition filed...

  17. Measurements of vitamin B12 in human blood serum using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiminis, G.; Schartner, E. P.; Brooks, J. L.; Hutchinson, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin and its derivatives) deficiency has been identified as a potential modifiable risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Chronic deficiency of vitamin B12 has been significantly associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline. An effective and efficient method for measuring vitamin B12 concentration in human blood would enable ongoing tracking and assessment of this potential modifiable risk factor. In this work we present an optical sensor based on resonance Raman spectroscopy for rapid measurements of vitamin B12 in human blood serum. The measurement takes less than a minute and requires minimum preparation (centrifuging) of the collected blood samples.

  18. Relevance of vitamin D receptor target genes for monitoring the vitamin D responsiveness of primary human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Vukić

    Full Text Available Vitamin D3 has transcriptome- and genome-wide effects and activates, via the binding of its metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to the transcription factor vitamin D receptor (VDR, several hundred target genes. Using samples from a 5-month vitamin D3 intervention study (VitDmet, we recently reported that the expression of 12 VDR target genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs as well as 12 biochemical and clinical parameters of the study participants are significantly triggered by vitamin D3. In this study, we performed a more focused selection of further 12 VDR target genes and demonstrated that changes of their mRNA expression in PBMCs of VitDmet subjects significantly correlate with alterations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 serum levels. Network and self-organizing map analysis of these datasets together with that of the other 24 parameters was followed by relevance calculations and identified changes in parathyroid hormone serum levels and the expression of the newly selected genes STS, BCL6, ITGAM, LRRC25, LPGAT1 and TREM1 as well as of the previously reported genes DUSP10 and CD14 as the most relevant parameters for describing vitamin D responsiveness in vivo. Moreover, parameter relevance ranking allowed the segregation of study subjects into high and low responders. Due to the long intervention period the vitamin D response was not too prominent on the level of transcriptional activation. Therefore, we performed in the separate VitDbol trial a short-term but high dose stimulation with a vitamin D3 bolus. In PBMCs of VitDbol subjects we observed direct transcriptional effects on the selected VDR target genes, such as an up to 2.1-fold increase already one day after supplementation onset. In conclusion, both long-term and short-term vitamin D3 supplementation studies allow monitoring the vitamin D responsiveness of human individuals and represent new types of human in vivo vitamin D3 investigations.

  19. Role of Vitamin D in human Diseases and Disorders – An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanshee Gohil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin and generated in human skin by ultraviolet (UV light. Today, vitamin D is considered to be a steroidal hormone and plays a central role in bone mineralization and calcium homeostasis. The active form of the vitamin D is 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (DHCC] which mediatesproliferation, differentiation and various functions at the cellular level through Vitamin D receptors (VDR.Therefore, compromised vitamin D status is likely to be involved in progression or pathogenesis of various disorders. This assumption is consistent with findings from epidemiological studies that a compromised vitamin D status in humans increases the risk of autoimmune diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes mellitus. However, diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disorders and bone disorders are yet not focused. Thus the role of vitamin D in pathogenesis of various diseases is complex and controversial. This review briefly summarizes the role of vitamin D in development and progression of different human disorders.

  20. In vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy study of the vitamin A derivative perfusion through human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Laurita; Téllez Soto, Claudio A.; Favero, Priscila P.; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    In vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy is a powerful non-invasive technique able to analyse the skin constituents. This technique was applied to transdermal perfusion studies of the vitamin A derivative in human skin. The composition of the stratum corneum (lipid bilayer) is decisive for the affinity and transport of the vitamin through skin. The vitamin A is significantly absorbed by human skin when applied with water in oil emulsion or hydro-alcoholic gel. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the behaviour of vitamin A derivative into human skin without the presence of enhancers. The results showed that the intensity band of the derivative (around 1600 cm-1), which represents the -C=O vibrational mode, was detected in different stratum corneum depths (up to 20 μm). This Raman peak of vitamin A derivative has non-coincident band with the Raman spectra of the skin epidermis, demonstrating that compound penetrated in forearm skin.

  1. Photobiology of vitamin D in mushrooms and its bioavailability in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Keegan, Raphael-John H.; Lu, Zhiren; Bogusz, Jaimee M.; Williams, Jennifer E.; Holick, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms exposed to sunlight or UV radiation are an excellent source of dietary vitamin D2 because they contain high concentrations of the vitamin D precursor, provitamin D2. When mushrooms are exposed to UV radiation, provitamin D2 is converted to previtamin D2. Once formed, previtamin D2 rapidly isomerizes to vitamin D2 in a similar manner that previtamin D3 isomerizes to vitamin D3 in human skin. Continued exposure of mushrooms to UV radiation results in the production of lumisterol2 and ...

  2. Quantifying UV exposure, vitamin D status and their relationship in a group of high school students in an alpine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröbner, Matthias; Gröbner, Julian; Hülsen, Gregor

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between personal UV exposure and vitamin D status was studied among 7 high school students from Davos, Switzerland from March to August 2013. The personal UV exposure was monitored using electronic dosimeters, while blood samples were taken at monthly intervals to determine the serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3). During school days students were exposed to 1.7% of the ambient UV irradiance, while 85% of the cumulative UV dose was obtained on weekends and holidays. Insufficient vitamin D levels in March (9 ng ml(-1) 25(OH)D3) rose to 25(OH)D3 concentrations of over 40 ng ml(-1), meeting sufficient levels in August. The increase in vitamin D levels among 5 high school students correlated well (r = 0.89) with their measured personal UV exposure, yielding a mean increase in serum 25(OH)D3 concentration of 0.38 ± 0.22 ng ml(-1) per 100 J m(-2) of vitamin D-weighted UV exposure, a value consistent with other studies. During certain periods of the study, increases in vitamin D status and UV doses differed from the average of the whole study, implying that other factors must influence vitamin D metabolism.

  3. Serum vitamin D levels are not altered after controlled diesel exhaust exposures in healthy human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Past research has suggested that exposure to urban air pollution may be associated with vitamin D deficiency in human populations. Vitamin D is widely known for its importance in bone growth/remodeling, muscle metabolism, and its ability to promote calcium absorption in the gut; ...

  4. Competitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay for vitamin B12 analysis in human milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND Few accurate data exist on the concentration of vitamin B12 in human milk. Binding of the vitamin to haptocorrin (HC) can interfere with the assay if not removed by pretreatment, and very low values can occur in women with poor B12 status. This study evaluated two competitive enzyme bind...

  5. Vitamin D status is not associated with inflammatory cytokine levels during experimental human endotoxaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, M.; Berg, M.J. van den; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Wielders, J.P.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Pickkers, P.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D has been shown to modulate innate immune responses in vitro and ex vivo; however, human in-vivo data are lacking. At high latitudes, seasonal vitamin D deficiency is common due to alternating ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation exposure. In the present study, we investigated whether levels of 25

  6. Quantifying hypoxia in human cancers using static PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Edward; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Wouters, Bradley G.; Milosevic, Michael; Hedley, David W.; Jaffray, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Compared to FDG, the signal of 18F-labelled hypoxia-sensitive tracers in tumours is low. This means that in addition to the presence of hypoxic cells, transport properties contribute significantly to the uptake signal in static PET images. This sensitivity to transport must be minimized in order for static PET to provide a reliable standard for hypoxia quantification. A dynamic compartmental model based on a reaction-diffusion formalism was developed to interpret tracer pharmacokinetics and applied to static images of FAZA in twenty patients with pancreatic cancer. We use our model to identify tumour properties—well-perfused without substantial necrosis or partitioning—for which static PET images can reliably quantify hypoxia. Normalizing the measured activity in a tumour voxel by the value in blood leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to variations in ‘inter-corporal’ transport properties—blood volume and clearance rate—as well as imaging study protocols. Normalization thus enhances the correlation between static PET images and the FAZA binding rate K 3, a quantity which quantifies hypoxia in a biologically significant way. The ratio of FAZA uptake in spinal muscle and blood can vary substantially across patients due to long muscle equilibration times. Normalized static PET images of hypoxia-sensitive tracers can reliably quantify hypoxia for homogeneously well-perfused tumours with minimal tissue partitioning. The ideal normalizing reference tissue is blood, either drawn from the patient before PET scanning or imaged using PET. If blood is not available, uniform, homogeneously well-perfused muscle can be used. For tumours that are not homogeneously well-perfused or for which partitioning is significant, only an analysis of dynamic PET scans can reliably quantify hypoxia.

  7. Quantifying hypoxia in human cancers using static PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Edward; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Wouters, Bradley G; Milosevic, Michael; Hedley, David W; Jaffray, David A

    2016-11-21

    Compared to FDG, the signal of (18)F-labelled hypoxia-sensitive tracers in tumours is low. This means that in addition to the presence of hypoxic cells, transport properties contribute significantly to the uptake signal in static PET images. This sensitivity to transport must be minimized in order for static PET to provide a reliable standard for hypoxia quantification. A dynamic compartmental model based on a reaction-diffusion formalism was developed to interpret tracer pharmacokinetics and applied to static images of FAZA in twenty patients with pancreatic cancer. We use our model to identify tumour properties-well-perfused without substantial necrosis or partitioning-for which static PET images can reliably quantify hypoxia. Normalizing the measured activity in a tumour voxel by the value in blood leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to variations in 'inter-corporal' transport properties-blood volume and clearance rate-as well as imaging study protocols. Normalization thus enhances the correlation between static PET images and the FAZA binding rate K 3, a quantity which quantifies hypoxia in a biologically significant way. The ratio of FAZA uptake in spinal muscle and blood can vary substantially across patients due to long muscle equilibration times. Normalized static PET images of hypoxia-sensitive tracers can reliably quantify hypoxia for homogeneously well-perfused tumours with minimal tissue partitioning. The ideal normalizing reference tissue is blood, either drawn from the patient before PET scanning or imaged using PET. If blood is not available, uniform, homogeneously well-perfused muscle can be used. For tumours that are not homogeneously well-perfused or for which partitioning is significant, only an analysis of dynamic PET scans can reliably quantify hypoxia.

  8. The role of menaquinones (vitamin K2) in human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Europe convened experts in vitamin K selected from academia and industry to review the need for specific dietary reference values (DRVs) for vitamin K2, also known as menaquinones. This review describes the literature based on the following items required...

  9. Vitamin D supplementation and testosterone concentrations in male human subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijboer, Annemieke C.; Oosterwerff, Mirjam; Schroten, Nicolas F.; Eekhoff, Elisabeth M. W.; Chel, Victor G. M.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Blankenstein, Marinus A.; Lips, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveA possible association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and testosterone levels has been reported; however, contradictory results have emerged. DesignTo investigate a causal link between vitamin D and testosterone status, we studied the effect of vitamin D supplementation on serum testoste

  10. A method for routine estimation of vitamin D activity in human and bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, M T; Koskinen, T; Ala-Houhala, M; Visakorpi, J K

    1984-01-01

    To estimate the antirachitic activity of human and bovine milk, we developed a modern biochemical method for determining vitamin D metabolites in milk. Vitamin D metabolites were assayed from milk whey and from whole milk. Milk whey yielded poor recovery of both endogenous and added vitamin D, suggesting a marked loss of vitamin D activity to milk fat during homogenization and separation of the milk whey. A method for assaying the vitamin D metabolites in whole milk involves 1) lipid extraction, 2) cold methanol and ether precipitation, 3) alkaline backwash to reduce the amount of interfering lipids, 4) an efficient reverse-phase preparative purification, 5) an additional silica purification for vitamin D, 6) an analytical high-performance liquid chromatography, and 7) separate sensitized protein-binding assays for vitamin D and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. The method for whole milk resulted in good recovery of added vitamin D, and levels of assayed metabolites and their calculated antirachitic activity agreed well with earlier reports, that is, about 10-50 IU of vitamin D activity per liter.

  11. Quantifying Human Mobility Perturbation and Resilience in Natural Disasters

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Human mobility is influenced by environmental change and natural disasters. Researchers have used trip distance distribution, radius of gyration of movements, and individuals' visited locations to understand and capture human mobility patterns and trajectories. However, our knowledge of human movements during natural disasters is limited owing to both a lack of empirical data and the low precision of available data. Here, we studied human mobility using high-resolution movement data from individuals in New York City during and for several days after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. We found the human movements followed truncated power-law distributions during and after Hurricane Sandy, although the {\\beta} value was noticeably larger during the first 24 hours after the storm struck. Also, we examined two parameters: the center of mass and the radius of gyration of each individual's movements. We found that their values during perturbation states and steady states are highly correlated, suggesting human mobility data ...

  12. Microscopic Aspects of Autoschizic Cell Death in Human Ovarian Carcinoma (2774) Cells Following Vitamin C, Vitamin K3 or Vitamin C:K3 Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilloteaux, Jacques; Jamison, James M.; Arnold, David; Taper, Henryk S.; von Gruenigen, Vivian E.; Summers, Jack L.

    2003-08-01

    Human ovarian carcinoma cells (MDAH 2774) were treated with sodium ascorbate (VC), menadione (VK3), or with a VC:VK3 combination for 1 h and then studied using light microscopy (LM) and scanning (SEM) and transmission electron (TEM) microscopy. Plasma membrane damage (blisters and blebs, hairy aspect) results from vitamin C (VC) treatment, while cytoskeletal damage and self-morsellation are caused by vitamin K3 (VK3) treatment. VC:VK3-treated cells exhibit exacerbated injuries characteristic of both VC and VK3 treatment as well as a significant decrease in cell diameters from 20 35 [mu]m for control cells to 7 12 [mu]m for VC:VK3 treatment. Moreover, after a 1-h exposure to the vitamin combination, autoschizis (43%), apoptosis (3%), and oncosis (1.9%) are observed at the percentages indicated. All cellular changes associated with autoschizis observed with SEM were confirmed by LM and TEM observations and are consistent with cell death by autoschizis: decrease in cell size, cytoplasmic self-excisions, degradation of the nucleus and nucleolus without formation of apoptotic bodies and, ultimately, karyorrhexis and karyolysis. These results also suggest that the vitamin combination may find clinical use in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  13. Quantifying human mobility perturbation and resilience in Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Taylor, John E

    2014-01-01

    Human mobility is influenced by environmental change and natural disasters. Researchers have used trip distance distribution, radius of gyration of movements, and individuals' visited locations to understand and capture human mobility patterns and trajectories. However, our knowledge of human movements during natural disasters is limited owing to both a lack of empirical data and the low precision of available data. Here, we studied human mobility using high-resolution movement data from individuals in New York City during and for several days after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. We found the human movements followed truncated power-law distributions during and after Hurricane Sandy, although the β value was noticeably larger during the first 24 hours after the storm struck. Also, we examined two parameters: the center of mass and the radius of gyration of each individual's movements. We found that their values during perturbation states and steady states are highly correlated, suggesting human mobility data obtained in steady states can possibly predict the perturbation state. Our results demonstrate that human movement trajectories experienced significant perturbations during hurricanes, but also exhibited high resilience. We expect the study will stimulate future research on the perturbation and inherent resilience of human mobility under the influence of hurricanes. For example, mobility patterns in coastal urban areas could be examined as hurricanes approach, gain or dissipate in strength, and as the path of the storm changes. Understanding nuances of human mobility under the influence of such disasters will enable more effective evacuation, emergency response planning and development of strategies and policies to reduce fatality, injury, and economic loss.

  14. Quantifying human mobility perturbation and resilience in Hurricane Sandy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available Human mobility is influenced by environmental change and natural disasters. Researchers have used trip distance distribution, radius of gyration of movements, and individuals' visited locations to understand and capture human mobility patterns and trajectories. However, our knowledge of human movements during natural disasters is limited owing to both a lack of empirical data and the low precision of available data. Here, we studied human mobility using high-resolution movement data from individuals in New York City during and for several days after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. We found the human movements followed truncated power-law distributions during and after Hurricane Sandy, although the β value was noticeably larger during the first 24 hours after the storm struck. Also, we examined two parameters: the center of mass and the radius of gyration of each individual's movements. We found that their values during perturbation states and steady states are highly correlated, suggesting human mobility data obtained in steady states can possibly predict the perturbation state. Our results demonstrate that human movement trajectories experienced significant perturbations during hurricanes, but also exhibited high resilience. We expect the study will stimulate future research on the perturbation and inherent resilience of human mobility under the influence of hurricanes. For example, mobility patterns in coastal urban areas could be examined as hurricanes approach, gain or dissipate in strength, and as the path of the storm changes. Understanding nuances of human mobility under the influence of such disasters will enable more effective evacuation, emergency response planning and development of strategies and policies to reduce fatality, injury, and economic loss.

  15. Quantifying the Influence of Climate on Human Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiang, S. M.; Burke, M.; Miguel, E.

    2014-12-01

    A rapidly growing body of research examines whether human conflict can be affected by climatic changes. Drawing from archaeology, criminology, economics, geography, history, political science, and psychology, we assemble and analyze the most rigorous quantitative studies and document, for the first time, a striking convergence of results. We find strong causal evidence linking climatic events to human conflict across a range of spatial and temporal scales and across all major regions of the world. The magnitude of climate's influence is substantial: for each one standard deviation (1sd) change in climate toward warmer temperatures or more extreme rainfall, median estimates indicate that the frequency of interpersonal violence rises 4% and the frequency of intergroup conflict rises 14%. Because locations throughout the inhabited world are expected to warm 2sd to 4sd by 2050, amplified rates of human conflict could represent a large and critical impact of anthropogenic climate change.

  16. Quantifying risk factors for human brucellosis in rural northern Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunda John

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brucellosis is a zoonosis of veterinary, public health and economic significance in most developing countries. Human brucellosis is a severely debilitating disease that requires prolonged treatment with a combination of antibiotics. The disease can result in permanent and disabling sequel, and results in considerable medical expenses in addition to loss of income due to loss of working hours. A study was conducted in Northern Tanzania to determine the risk factors for transmission of brucellosis to humans in Tanzania. METHODS: This was a matched case-control study. Any patient with a positive result by a competitive ELISA (c-ELISA test for brucellosis, and presenting to selected hospitals with at least two clinical features suggestive of brucellosis such as headache, recurrent or continuous fever, sweating, joint pain, joint swelling, general body malaise or backache, was defined as a case. For every case in a district, a corresponding control was traced and matched by sex using multistage cluster sampling. Other criteria for inclusion as a control included a negative c-ELISA test result and that the matched individual would present to hospital if falls sick. RESULTS: Multivariable analysis showed that brucellosis was associated with assisted parturition during abortion in cattle, sheep or goat. It was shown that individuals living in close proximity to other households had a higher risk of brucellosis. People who were of Christian religion were found to have a higher risk of brucellosis compared to other religions. The study concludes that assisting an aborting animal, proximity to neighborhoods, and Christianity were associated with brucellosis infection. There was no association between human brucellosis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV serostatus. Protecting humans against contact with fluids and tissues during assisted parturition of livestock may be an important means of reducing the risk of transferring brucellosis from

  17. Quantifying Engagement: Measuring Player Involvement in Human-Avatar Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Anne E; Weger, Harry; Bullinger, Cory; Bowers, Alyssa

    2014-05-01

    This research investigated the merits of using an established system for rating behavioral cues of involvement in human dyadic interactions (i.e., face-to-face conversation) to measure involvement in human-avatar interactions. Gameplay audio-video and self-report data from a Feasibility Trial and Free Choice study of an effective peer resistance skill building simulation game (DRAMA-RAMA™) were used to evaluate reliability and validity of the rating system when applied to human-avatar interactions. The Free Choice study used a revised game prototype that was altered to be more engaging. Both studies involved girls enrolled in a public middle school in Central Florida that served a predominately Hispanic (greater than 80%), low-income student population. Audio-video data were coded by two raters, trained in the rating system. Self-report data were generated using measures of perceived realism, predictability and flow administered immediately after game play. Hypotheses for reliability and validity were supported: Reliability values mirrored those found in the human dyadic interaction literature. Validity was supported by factor analysis, significantly higher levels of involvement in Free Choice as compared to Feasibility Trial players, and correlations between involvement dimension sub scores and self-report measures. Results have implications for the science of both skill-training intervention research and game design.

  18. Chemotyping the distribution of vitamin D metabolites in human serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Miriam J.; Stokes, Caroline S.; Lammert, Frank; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2016-02-01

    Most studies examining the relationships between vitamin D and disease or health focus on the main 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) metabolite, thus potentially overlooking contributions and dynamic effects of other vitamin D metabolites, the crucial roles of several of which have been previously demonstrated. The ideal assay would determine all relevant high and low-abundant vitamin D species simultaneously. We describe a sensitive quantitative assay for determining the chemotypes of vitamin D metabolites from serum after derivatisation and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS). We performed a validation according to the ‘FDA Guidance for Industry Bioanalytical Method Validation’. The proof-of-concept of the method was then demonstrated by following the metabolite concentrations in patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD) during the course of a vitamin D supplementation study. The new quantitative profiling assay provided highly sensitive, precise and accurate chemotypes of the vitamin D metabolic process rather than the usually determined 25(OH)D3 concentrations.

  19. Quantifying exploratory low dose compounds in humans with AMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueker, Stephen R; Vuong, Le T; Lohstroh, Peter N; Giacomo, Jason A; Vogel, John S

    2011-06-19

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is an established technology whose essentiality extends beyond simply a better detector for radiolabeled molecules. Attomole sensitivity reduces radioisotope exposures in clinical subjects to the point that no population need be excluded from clinical study. Insights in human physiochemistry are enabled by the quantitative recovery of simplified AMS processes that provide biological concentrations of all labeled metabolites and total compound related material at non-saturating levels. In this paper, we review some of the exploratory applications of AMS (14)C in toxicological, nutritional, and pharmacological research. This body of research addresses the human physiochemistry of important compounds in their own right, but also serves as examples of the analytical methods and clinical practices that are available for studying low dose physiochemistry of candidate therapeutic compounds, helping to broaden the knowledge base of AMS application in pharmaceutical research.

  20. Simulating food web dynamics along a gradient: quantifying human influence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Jordán

    Full Text Available Realistically parameterized and dynamically simulated food-webs are useful tool to explore the importance of the functional diversity of ecosystems, and in particular relations between the dynamics of species and the whole community. We present a stochastic dynamical food web simulation for the Kelian River (Borneo. The food web was constructed for six different locations, arrayed along a gradient of increasing human perturbation (mostly resulting from gold mining activities along the river. Along the river, the relative importance of grazers, filterers and shredders decreases with increasing disturbance downstream, while predators become more dominant in governing eco-dynamics. Human activity led to increased turbidity and sedimentation which adversely impacts primary productivity. Since the main difference between the study sites was not the composition of the food webs (structure is quite similar but the strengths of interactions and the abundance of the trophic groups, a dynamical simulation approach seemed to be useful to better explain human influence. In the pristine river (study site 1, when comparing a structural version of our model with the dynamical model we found that structurally central groups such as omnivores and carnivores were not the most important ones dynamically. Instead, primary consumers such as invertebrate grazers and shredders generated a greater dynamical response. Based on the dynamically most important groups, bottom-up control is replaced by the predominant top-down control regime as distance downstream and human disturbance increased. An important finding, potentially explaining the poor structure to dynamics relationship, is that indirect effects are at least as important as direct ones during the simulations. We suggest that our approach and this simulation framework could serve systems-based conservation efforts. Quantitative indicators on the relative importance of trophic groups and the mechanistic modeling

  1. Simulating food web dynamics along a gradient: quantifying human influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordán, Ferenc; Gjata, Nerta; Mei, Shu; Yule, Catherine M

    2012-01-01

    Realistically parameterized and dynamically simulated food-webs are useful tool to explore the importance of the functional diversity of ecosystems, and in particular relations between the dynamics of species and the whole community. We present a stochastic dynamical food web simulation for the Kelian River (Borneo). The food web was constructed for six different locations, arrayed along a gradient of increasing human perturbation (mostly resulting from gold mining activities) along the river. Along the river, the relative importance of grazers, filterers and shredders decreases with increasing disturbance downstream, while predators become more dominant in governing eco-dynamics. Human activity led to increased turbidity and sedimentation which adversely impacts primary productivity. Since the main difference between the study sites was not the composition of the food webs (structure is quite similar) but the strengths of interactions and the abundance of the trophic groups, a dynamical simulation approach seemed to be useful to better explain human influence. In the pristine river (study site 1), when comparing a structural version of our model with the dynamical model we found that structurally central groups such as omnivores and carnivores were not the most important ones dynamically. Instead, primary consumers such as invertebrate grazers and shredders generated a greater dynamical response. Based on the dynamically most important groups, bottom-up control is replaced by the predominant top-down control regime as distance downstream and human disturbance increased. An important finding, potentially explaining the poor structure to dynamics relationship, is that indirect effects are at least as important as direct ones during the simulations. We suggest that our approach and this simulation framework could serve systems-based conservation efforts. Quantitative indicators on the relative importance of trophic groups and the mechanistic modeling of eco

  2. Simulating Food Web Dynamics along a Gradient: Quantifying Human Influence

    OpenAIRE

    Ferenc Jordán; Nerta Gjata; Shu Mei; Yule, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Realistically parameterized and dynamically simulated food-webs are useful tool to explore the importance of the functional diversity of ecosystems, and in particular relations between the dynamics of species and the whole community. We present a stochastic dynamical food web simulation for the Kelian River (Borneo). The food web was constructed for six different locations, arrayed along a gradient of increasing human perturbation (mostly resulting from gold mining activities) along the river...

  3. Quantifying Risk Factors for Human Brucellosis in Rural Northern Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Kunda John; Julie Fitzpatrick; Nigel French; Rudovick Kazwala; Dominic Kambarage; Mfinanga, Godfrey S; Alastair MacMillan; Sarah Cleaveland

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brucellosis is a zoonosis of veterinary, public health and economic significance in most developing countries. Human brucellosis is a severely debilitating disease that requires prolonged treatment with a combination of antibiotics. The disease can result in permanent and disabling sequel, and results in considerable medical expenses in addition to loss of income due to loss of working hours. A study was conducted in Northern Tanzania to determine the risk factors for transmission...

  4. Vitamin D Deficiency in Human and Murine Sepsis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Dhruv; Patel, Jaimin M.; Scott, Aaron; Lax, Sian; Dancer, Rachel C. A.; D’Souza, Vijay; Greenwood, Hannah; Fraser, William D.; Gao, Fang; Sapey, Elizabeth; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated as a pathogenic factor in sepsis and ICU mortality but causality of these associations has not been demonstrated. To determine whether sepsis and severe sepsis are associated with vitamin D deficiency and to determine whether vitamin D deficiency influences the severity of sepsis. Design, Setting, and Patients: Sixty-one patients with sepsis and severe sepsis from two large U.K. hospitals and 20 healthy controls were recruited. Murine models of cecal ligation and puncture and intratracheal lipopolysaccharide were undertaken in normal and vitamin D deficient mice to address the issue of causality. Measurements and Main Results: Patients with severe sepsis had significantly lower concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 than patients with either mild sepsis or age-matched healthy controls (15.7 vs 49.5 vs 66.5 nmol/L; p = 0.0001). 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations were significantly lower in patients who had positive microbiologic culture than those who were culture negative (p = 0.0023) as well as those who died within 30 days of hospital admission (p = 0.025). Vitamin D deficiency in murine sepsis was associated with increased peritoneal (p = 0.037), systemic (p = 0.019), and bronchoalveolar lavage (p = 0.011) quantitative bacterial culture. This was associated with reduced local expression of the cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide as well as evidence of defective macrophage phagocytosis (p = 0.029). In the intratracheal lipopolysaccharide model, 1,500 IU of intraperitoneal cholecalciferol treatment 6 hours postinjury reduced alveolar inflammation, cellular damage, and hypoxia. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is common in severe sepsis. This appears to contribute to the development of the condition in clinically relevant murine models and approaches to correct vitamin D deficiency in patients with sepsis should be developed. PMID:27632669

  5. A human vitamin D receptor mutant activated by cholecalciferol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousley, Amanda M; Castillo, Hilda S; Duraj-Thatte, Anna; Doyle, Donald F; Azizi, Bahareh

    2011-07-01

    The human vitamin D receptor (hVDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, involved in calcium and phosphate homeostasis; hence implicated in a number of diseases, such as Rickets and Osteoporosis. This receptor binds 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (also referred to as 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) and other known ligands, such as lithocholic acid. Specific interactions between the receptor and ligand are crucial for the function and activation of this receptor, as implied by the single point mutation, H305Q, causing symptoms of Type II Rickets. In this work, further understanding of the significant and essential interactions between the ligand and the receptor was deciphered, through a combination of rational and random mutagenesis. A hVDR mutant, H305F, was engineered with increased sensitivity towards lithocholic acid, with an EC(50) value of 10 μM and 40±14 fold activation in mammalian cell assays, while maintaining wild-type activity with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3). Furthermore, via random mutagenesis, a hVDR mutant, H305F/H397Y, was discovered to bind a novel small molecule, cholecalciferol, a precursor in the 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) biosynthetic pathway, which does not activate wild-type hVDR. This variant, H305F/H397Y, binds and activates in response to cholecalciferol concentrations as low as 100 nM, with an EC(50) value of 300 nM and 70±11 fold activation in mammalian cell assays. In silico docking analysis of the variant displays a dramatic conformational shift of cholecalciferol in the ligand binding pocket in comparison to the docked analysis of cholecalciferol with wild-type hVDR. This shift is hypothesized to be due to the introduction of two bulkier residues, suggesting that the addition of these bulkier residues introduces molecular interactions between the ligand and receptor, leading to activation with cholecalciferol.

  6. Characterization of vitamin C-induced cell sheets formed from primary and immortalized human corneal stromal cells for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobe, Gesa Maria; Reichl, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the ability of primary human corneal stromal cells (HuFib cells) and SV40-immortalized human corneal keratocytes (HCK cells) to synthesize their own extracellular matrix induced by vitamin C supplementation. Therefore, the amount of collagen secreted and resulting biomechanical properties based on the culture duration were assessed. Cells were cultivated for several weeks with or without vitamin C. The amount of collagen secreted by the cells was quantified based on the culture duration. Cell viability was simultaneously determined via the MTT assay. Collagen secretion was increased as a result of vitamin C supplementation. The effect was stronger in primary cells. In addition, vitamin C supplementation had a positive effect on HuFib cell viability. Vitamin C supplementation induced the formation of detachable cell sheets in both primary and immortalized cells. The biomechanical properties of the sheets were evaluated using a static material testing machine, and the ultrastructure of the cell sheets was examined using scanning electron microscopy. The cell sheets formed from HuFib cells had a higher percentage of light transmission between 400 and 800 nm and were superior in terms of E-modulus and ultimate strength testing. Indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot confirmed the presence of collagen type I in the HuFib and HCK cell cultures. Stimulating secretion of the extracellular matrix in corneal stromal cells is a promising approach for corneal stroma reconstruction for tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The human environment and the vitamin D compromise: Scotland as a case study in human biocultural adaptation and disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, George; Jablonski, Nina G

    2013-08-01

    Year-round human habitation of environments with highly seasonal regimes of ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) depended on adaptive complexes of biological and cultural traits to ensure adequacy of vitamin D. Perturbations of such adaptive complexes resulting from changes in the physical environment, human behavior and culture, or both have had unexpected and untoward consequences for health. Scotland is an excellent case study of the changing nature of human biocultural adaptation to low-UVB environments. Occupation of Scotland after the last Pleistocene glaciation event about 14,000 YBP was made possible by maximally depigmented skin, which facilitated cutaneous biosynthesis of vitamin D3, and by a diet that emphasized foods rich in vitamin D. Changes in human subsistence and diet began with the introduction of agriculture and grazing about 5,000 YBP and accelerated greatly in the last 200 years through industrialization and urbanization. The resulting changes in domiciles, patterns of daily activity and behavior, and diet have led to reduced exposure to UVB and reduced consumption of vitamin D-rich foods. This has perturbed the "vitamin D compromise," an adaptive complex established in Scotland during the Mesolithic and Neolithic. We describe the UVB environment of Scotland from remotely sensed data and combine these data with information from the archaeological record to describe the vitamin D compromise in Scotland. Changes in human exposure to UVB and vitamin D consumption, which occurred as the result of urbanization and the dietary shift away from the consumption of oily fish, are traced. Vitamin D deficiency contributes to increased disease prevalence in Scotland, including that of the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis, a debilitating neurodegenerative disease caused by demyelination of the central nervous system. These conditions have created an "imperfect storm" of poor health that should command the attention of public health experts and policy makers.

  8. Human SRMAtlas: A Resource of Targeted Assays to Quantify the Complete Human Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusebauch, Ulrike; Campbell, David S; Deutsch, Eric W; Chu, Caroline S; Spicer, Douglas A; Brusniak, Mi-Youn; Slagel, Joseph; Sun, Zhi; Stevens, Jeffrey; Grimes, Barbara; Shteynberg, David; Hoopmann, Michael R; Blattmann, Peter; Ratushny, Alexander V; Rinner, Oliver; Picotti, Paola; Carapito, Christine; Huang, Chung-Ying; Kapousouz, Meghan; Lam, Henry; Tran, Tommy; Demir, Emek; Aitchison, John D; Sander, Chris; Hood, Leroy; Aebersold, Ruedi; Moritz, Robert L

    2016-07-28

    The ability to reliably and reproducibly measure any protein of the human proteome in any tissue or cell type would be transformative for understanding systems-level properties as well as specific pathways in physiology and disease. Here, we describe the generation and verification of a compendium of highly specific assays that enable quantification of 99.7% of the 20,277 annotated human proteins by the widely accessible, sensitive, and robust targeted mass spectrometric method selected reaction monitoring, SRM. This human SRMAtlas provides definitive coordinates that conclusively identify the respective peptide in biological samples. We report data on 166,174 proteotypic peptides providing multiple, independent assays to quantify any human protein and numerous spliced variants, non-synonymous mutations, and post-translational modifications. The data are freely accessible as a resource at http://www.srmatlas.org/, and we demonstrate its utility by examining the network response to inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in liver cells and to docetaxel in prostate cancer lines.

  9. Effects of Antioxidants and Vitamins on the Proliferation of Human Diploid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaziza Dаnlybaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microelements, essential nutrients that are needed in small amounts including minerals such as calcium, zinc, iron and other vitamins (A, B, C, and etc., are macronutrients necessary for a healthy life. The role of micronutrients in vivo is well known, and there are several publications that have examined the effects of micronutrients on genomic stability. Furthermore, a number of vitamins and microelements are substrates and/or cofactors in metabolic pathways, which regulate DNA synthesis and/or repair and gene expression. A deficiency in such nutrients may result in disruption of genomic integrity and alterations in DNA methylation patterns, linking cellular nutrition with change in gene expression. For example, lack of vitamin C is known to cause increased DNA oxidation and chromosomal damage. Vitamin A, as well as other micronutrients, have a protective effect, whereas higher concentrations are associated with increased DNA damage. Ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10 and dihydroquercetin are used in therapy as antioxidant compounds and electron carriers, which reduce lipid peroxidation of cell membranes. However, previous studies indicate that various ubiquinone analogs may cause a divergent effect on oxidative stress and oxidative phosphorylation. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of vitamins A and C, coenzyme Q10, and dihydroquercetin on the proliferative potential of cultured human embryonic diploid fibroblasts (M-22. Methods: In the first series of experiments, nontoxic concentrations of vitamins for the cells were identified using MTT assay. Results: Vitamins A and C, dihydroquercetin of 1µM, and coenzyme Q10 of 5µM were nontoxic for human skin fibroblasts. In the second series of experiments, cell cultivation was carried out with nontoxic concentrations. A vitamin C concentration of 1µM for 7 consecutive passages increased the proliferation index (PI compared to the control. Thus, the average PI in the

  10. Vitamin D and gene networks in human osteoblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van de Peppel (Jeroen); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBone formation is indirectly influenced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) through the stimulation of calcium uptake in the intestine and re-absorption in the kidneys. Direct effects on osteoblasts and bone formation have also been established. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed

  11. Non-genomic effects of vitamin D in human spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Dissing, Steen

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum for vitamin D (VD) mediated effects has expanded in recent years. Activated VD (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) binds to the VD receptor (VDR) and mediates non-genomic effects through the alternative ligand binding-pocket (VDR-ap) or regulates gene transcription through the genomic binding...

  12. Effect of vitamin E on human sperm motility and lipid peroxidation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AnilVerma

    1999-01-01

    Aim: To assess the protective efficacy of vitamin E to counteract the reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated damage onsperm motility, viability and lipid peroxidation. Melhods: Human semen samplns were obtained from the local hospi-tal. The split seminal fractions freed of seminal plasma v, ere reeonstimted in Ringer-Tymde and subjected to varied vita-min E concentrations (0.1-2 mmol/L), Results: Dose-dependent improvement in both motility and viability accom-panied by concomitant decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA an end product of lipid peroxidation) following vitamin Esuppllementation was noticed. Conclusion: Vitamin E protects against the ROS mediated damage on spermatozoa.Vimmth E supplementation could be of clinical importance for prolonged spermatozoal storage whenever needed.

  13. Hydrosoluble vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jasvinder; Kvarnberg, David

    2014-01-01

    The hydrosoluble vitamins are a group of organic substances that are required by humans in small amounts to prevent disorders of metabolism. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the biochemical, physiologic and nutritional aspects of the water-soluble vitamins. Deficiency of these particular vitamins, most commonly due to inadequate nutrition, can result in disorders of the nervous system. Many of these disorders have been successfully prevented in developed countries; however, they are still common in developing countries. Of the hydrosoluble vitamins, the nervous system depends the most on vitamins B and C (ascorbic acid) for proper functioning. The B group vitamins include thiamin (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), niacin or niacinamide (vitamin B3), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), pyridoxine or pyridoxal (vitamin B6) and cobalamin (vitamin B12). Clinical findings depend upon the deficiency of the underlying vitamin; generally, deficiency symptoms are seen from a combination rather than an isolated vitamin deficiency. True hereditary metabolic disorders and serious deficiency-associated diseases are rare and in general limited to particular geographic regions and high-risk groups. Their recognition is truly important as that determines the appropriate therapeutic management. The general availability of vitamins to practically everyone and several national health programs have saved many lives and prevented complications. However, there has been some apprehension for several decades about how harmless generous dosages of these vitamins are. Overt overdosages can cause vitamin toxicity affecting various body systems including the nervous system. Systemically, vitamin toxicity is associated with nonspecific symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and skin rash which are common with any acute or chronic vitamin overdose. At a national level, recommended daily allowances for vitamins become policy statements. Nutrition policy has far

  14. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  15. Vitamin D in the Pathophysiology of Hypertension, Kidney Disease, and Diabetes: Examining the Relationship Between Vitamin D and the Renin-Angiotensin System in Human Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Anand; Williams, Jonathan S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D has been implicated in the pathophysiology of extra-skeletal conditions such as hypertension, kidney disease, and diabetes, via its ability to negatively regulate the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). This article reviews the evidence supporting a link between vitamin D and the RAS in these conditions, with specific emphasis on translational observations and their limitations. Methods Literature review of animal and human studies evaluating the role of vitamin D in hypertension, kidney disease, and diabetes. Results Excess activity of the RAS has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, chronic kidney disease, decreased insulin secretion, and insulin resistance. Animal studies provide strong support for 1,25(OH)2D mediated down-regulation of renin expression and RAS activity via its interaction with the vitamin D receptor. Furthermore, the activity of vitamin D metabolites in animals is associated with reductions in blood pressure, proteinuria and renal injury, and with improved β–cell function. Many observational, and a few interventional, studies in humans have supported these findings; however, there is a lack of well designed prospective human interventional studies to definitively assess clinical outcomes. Conclusion Animal studies implicate vitamin D receptor agonist therapy to lower RAS activity as a potential method to reduce the risk of hypertension, kidney disease, and diabetes. There is a need for more well designed prospective interventional studies to validate this hypothesis in human clinical outcomes. PMID:22075270

  16. Methylmalonic acid quantified in dried blood spots provides a precise, valid, and stable measure of functional vitamin B-12 status in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Theresa H; Quay, Teo A W; Lamers, Yvonne

    2014-10-01

    Methylmalonic acid (MMA) is a sensitive and specific functional biomarker of vitamin B-12 status, commonly assessed in plasma or serum. Dried blood spots (DBSs) allow simpler and more cost-efficient blood sampling than plasma. To facilitate convenient testing for vitamin B-12 deficiency in large-scale surveys and in population groups from remote areas, we developed a method for MMA quantification in DBSs and tested its applicability as well as the long-term stability of MMA in DBSs at various temperatures. MMA was extracted from an 8-mm DBS punch with water:methanol (95:5, v:v) and methyl-d3-malonic acid as the internal standard. After sample cleanup by ultrafiltration and hexane extraction, MMA was quantified by using reversed-phase LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Extraction conditions were optimized to maximize the detection signal and achieve DBS extract concentrations above the lowest limit of quantification (signal-to-noise ratio ≥ 10) of 10 nmol/L. Recovery was between 93% and 96%. Intra- and interassay variation (CV%) for DBS MMA was 0.49% and 2.3%, respectively. Calibrators showed linearity (R(2) = 0.998) between 10 and 10,000 nmol/L. In 94 healthy women, MMA concentrations in DBS extract (min-max: 10.2-80.5 nmol/L) and plasma (min-max: 68-950 nmol/L) were correlated (ρ = 0.90) (P < 0.001). MMA concentrations in DBSs were stable at room temperature for 1 wk, in the refrigerator for 8 wk, and at -80°C for at least 1 y. This simple and robust method allows quantification of MMA in DBSs of healthy individuals. The linear relation between plasma and DBS MMA suggests that DBS MMA could predict plasma MMA, the current reference indicator for functional vitamin B-12 deficiency. With the advantages of minimally invasive specimen collection and no need for laborious blood processing steps, this method has the potential to be a reliable, convenient, and field-applicable alternative for assessment of vitamin B-12 status.

  17. Toll-like receptor 8 ligands activate a vitamin D mediated autophagic response that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Grant R; Spector, Stephen A

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are important in recognizing microbial pathogens and triggering host innate immune responses, including autophagy, and in the mediation of immune activation during human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV) infection. We report here that TLR8 activation in human macrophages induces the expression of the human cathelicidin microbial peptide (CAMP), the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and cytochrome P450, family 27, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 (CYP27B1), which 1α-hydroxylates the inactive form of vitamin D, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol, into its biologically active metabolite. Moreover, we demonstrate using RNA interference, chemical inhibitors and vitamin D deficient media that TLR8 agonists inhibit HIV through a vitamin D and CAMP dependent autophagic mechanism. These data support an important role for vitamin D in the control of HIV infection, and provide a biological explanation for the benefits of vitamin D. These findings also provide new insights into potential novel targets to prevent and treat HIV infection.

  18. Vitamin B-complex initiates growth and development of human embryonic brain cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielyan, K E; Abramyan, R A; Galoyan, A A; Kevorkian, G A

    2011-09-01

    We studied a combined effect of subcomponents of vitamin B complex on the growth, development, and death of human embryonic brain-derived cells (E90) cultured using a modified method of Matson. Cell death was detected by trypan blue staining. According to our results, vitamin B-complex in low-doses promote the development, maturation, and enlargement of human embryonic brain cells, on the one hand, and increases the percent of cell death, which attests to accelerated maturation and metabolism, on the other.

  19. Vitamin D derivatives enhance cytotoxic effects of H2O2 or cisplatin on human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Anna; Wierzbicka, Justyna; Ślebioda, Tomasz; Woźniak, Michał; Tuckey, Robert C; Slominski, Andrzej T; Żmijewski, Michał A

    2016-06-01

    Although the skin production of vitamin D is initiated by ultraviolet radiation type B (UVB), the role vitamin D plays in antioxidative or pro-oxidative responses remains to be elucidated. We have used immortalized human HaCaT keratinocytes as a model of proliferating epidermal cells to test the influence of vitamin D on cellular response to H2O2 or the anti-cancer drug, cisplatin. Incubation of keratinocytes with 1,25(OH)2D3 or its low calcemic analogues, 20(OH)D3, 21(OH)pD or calcipotriol, sensitized cells to ROS resulting in more potent inhibition of keratinocyte proliferation by H2O2 in the presence of vitamin D compounds. These results were supported by cell cycle and apoptosis analyses, and measurement of the mitochondrial transmembrane potentials (MMP), however some unique properties of individual secosteroids were observed. Furthermore, in HaCaT keratinocytes treated with H2O2, 1,25(OH)2D3, 21(OH)pD and calcipotriol stimulated the expression of SOD1 and CAT genes, but not SOD2, indicating a possible role of mitochondria in ROS-modulated cell death. 1,25(OH)2D3 also showed a short-term, protective effect on HaCaT keratinocytes, as exemplified by the inhibition of apoptosis and the maintenance of MMP. However, with prolonged incubation with H2O2 or cisplatin, 1,25(OH)2D3 caused an acceleration in the death of the keratinocytes. Therefore, we propose that lead vitamin D derivatives can protect the epidermis against neoplastic transformation secondary to oxidative or UV-induced stress through activation of vitamin D-signaling. Furthermore, our data suggest that treatment with low calcemic vitamin D analogues or the maintenance of optimal level of vitamin D by proper supplementation, can enhance the anticancer efficacy of cisplatin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Simultaneous quantification of vitamin D3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in human serum by LC-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burild, Anders; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Jakobsen, Jette

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D is the established biomarker of vitamin D status although serum concentrations of vitamin D and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D may also be of interest to understand the in vivo kinetics of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Method. An LC-MS/MS method was developed...... and validated to quantify vitamin D-3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-3 in serum. After protein precipitation of the serum it was loaded on a HybridSPE column to separate vitamin D metabolites from phospholipids. Vitamin D-3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-3 in the eluate...

  1. Competitive chemiluminescent anzyme immunoassay for vitamin B12 analysis in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent discoveries of matrix interferences by haptocorrin (HC) in human milk and serum show that past analyses of vitamin B12 in samples with high HC content might have been inaccurate (Lildballe et al., 2009; Carmel & Agrawal, 2012). We evaluated two competitive enzyme-binding immunoassays for seru...

  2. Metabolic effects of inflammation on vitamin A and carotenoids in humans and animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    The association between inflammation and vitamin A metabolism and status assessment has been documented in multiple studies with animals and humans. The relationship between inflammation and carotenoid status is less clear. Nonetheless, it is well-known that carotenoids are associated with certain h...

  3. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Pulito

    Full Text Available Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR. It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954 human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative. These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression.

  4. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulito, Claudio; Terrenato, Irene; Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression.

  5. Cdx2 Polymorphism Affects the Activities of Vitamin D Receptor in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Human Breast Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  6. Vitamin D receptor expression in human bone tissue and dose-dependent activation in resorbing osteoclasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Allahdad; Morovat, Alireza; Javaid, Kassim; Brown, Cameron P

    2016-01-01

    The effects of vitamin D on osteoblast mineralization are well documented. Reports of the effects of vitamin D on osteoclasts, however, are conflicting, showing both inhibition and stimulation. Finding that resorbing osteoclasts in human bone express vitamin D receptor (VDR), we examined their response to different concentrations of 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] (100 or 500 nmol·L−1) and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] (0.1 or 0.5 nmol·L−1) metabolites in cell cultures. Specifically, CD14+ monocytes were cultured in charcoal-stripped serum in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) histochemical staining assays and dentine resorption analysis were used to identify the size and number of osteoclast cells, number of nuclei per cell and resorption activity. The expression of VDR was detected in human bone tissue (ex vivo) by immunohistochemistry and in vitro cell cultures by western blotting. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to determine the level of expression of vitamin D-related genes in response to vitamin D metabolites. VDR-related genes during osteoclastogenesis, shown by qRT-PCR, was stimulated in response to 500 nmol·L−1 of 25(OH)D3 and 0.1–0.5 nmol·L−1 of 1,25(OH)2D3, upregulating cytochrome P450 family 27 subfamily B member 1 (CYP27B1) and cytochrome P450 family 24 subfamily A member 1 (CYP24A1). Osteoclast fusion transcripts transmembrane 7 subfamily member 4 (tm7sf4) and nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (nfatc1) where downregulated in response to vitamin D metabolites. Osteoclast number and resorption activity were also increased. Both 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2D3 reduced osteoclast size and number when co-treated with RANKL and M-CSF. The evidence for VDR expression in resorbing osteoclasts in vivo and low-dose effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on osteoclasts in vitro

  7. Vitamin B12 levels in human milk during the first nine months of lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, C; Rendle, M; Tracy, M; Richardson, V; Ford, H

    1996-01-01

    Vitamin B12 concentration was measured by competitive binding radioassay in 48 samples of human milk from healthy mothers eating unrestricted diets. Specimens were collected 1-35 weeks after full-term delivery and were subjected to proteolytic digestion before radioassay in order to destroy binding proteins. The distribution of the results was skewed, but the distribution of the logged values was not significantly different from normal. The geometric mean vitamin B12 level remained almost unchanged during the first 12 weeks postpartum (261-297 pmol/l) and then declined to a low of 139 pmol/l at 27-35 weeks. A significant (P = 0.033) decline in vitamin B12 concentration between 6-12 weeks and 19-25 weeks postpartum was observed.

  8. Controversies of antioxidant vitamins supplementation in exercise: ergogenic or ergolytic effects in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draeger, Cainara Lins; Naves, Andréia; Marques, Natália; Baptistella, Ana Beatriz; Carnauba, Renata Alves; Paschoal, Valéria; Nicastro, Humberto

    2014-02-19

    The aim of this commentary was to discuss the last studies regarding the effect of antioxidant vitamins supplementation on oxidative stress in exercise in humans. The inclusion criteria encompassed published studies done in adult males and females between 2006 and 2013. The keywords used in the search engine were: endurance athlete, diet, oxidative stress, physical activity, diet, nutrition, antioxidant, antioxidant status, vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin E, β-carotene and combinations. Twelve studies were identified and organized according to the methodology and results of supplementation: ergogenic, ergolytic, partial or no difference between groups. The results of these studies showed no effect on physiological parameters and activity of antioxidant enzymes (n = 07), better response of the placebo treatment (ergolytic effect; n = 02), partial results (n = 01) and ergogenic results of antioxidant supplementation (n = 02). It is concluded that supplementation with antioxidant vitamins has controversial effects to oxidative damage induced by endurance exercise. The discordances among the studies are presented and discussed.

  9. Vitamin E As a Potential Interventional Treatment for Metabolic Syndrome: Evidence from Animal and Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sok Kuan Wong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A constellation of medical conditions inclusive of central obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia is known as metabolic syndrome (MetS. The safest option in curtailing the progression of MetS is through maintaining a healthy lifestyle, which by itself, is a long-term commitment entailing much determination. A combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approach, as well as lifestyle modification is a more holistic alternative in the management of MetS. Vitamin E has been revealed to possess anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-obesity, anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hypertensive and anti-hypercholesterolemic properties. The pathways regulated by vitamin E are critical in the development of MetS and its components. Therefore, we postulate that vitamin E may exert some health benefits on MetS patients. This review intends to summarize the evidence in animal and human studies on the effects of vitamin E and articulate the contrasting potential of tocopherol (TF and tocotrienol (T3 in preventing the medical conditions associated with MetS. As a conclusion, this review suggests that vitamin E may be a promising agent for attenuating MetS.

  10. Vitamin D as an adjunctive therapy in asthma. Part 2: A review of human studies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kerley, Conor P

    2015-03-05

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is highly prevalent worldwide, with adverse effects on bone health but also potentially other unfavorable consequences. VDD and asthma-incidence\\/severity share many common risk factors, including winter season, industrialization, poor diet, obesity, dark skin pigmentation, and high latitude. Multiple anatomical areas relevant to asthma contain both the enzyme responsible for producing activated vitamin D and the vitamin D receptor suggesting that activated vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) may have important local effects at these sites. Emerging evidence suggests that VDD is associated with increased airway hyperresponsiveness, decreased pulmonary function, worse asthma control, and possibly decreased response to standard anti-asthma therapy. However the effect is inconsistent with preliminary evidence from different studies suggesting vitamin D is both beneficial and detrimental to asthma genesis and severity. Current evidence suggests that supplementation with moderate doses of vitamin D may be appropriate for maintenance of bone health in asthmatics, particularly steroid users. However emerging data from an increasing number of randomized, controlled, intervention studies of vitamin D supplementation in pediatric and adult asthma are becoming available and should help determine the importance, if any of vitamin D for asthma pathogenesis. The purpose of this second of a two-part review is to review the current human literature on vitamin D and asthma, discussing the possible consequences of VDD for asthma and the potential for vitamin D repletion as adjunct therapy.

  11. Expression of LRP1 by human osteoblasts: a mechanism for the delivery of lipoproteins and vitamin K1 to bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeier, Andreas; Kassem, Moustapha; Toedter, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Accumulating clinical and experimental data show the importance of dietary lipids and lipophilic vitamins, such as vitamin K1, for bone formation. The molecular mechanism of how they enter the osteoblast is unknown. Here we describe the expression of the multifunctional LRP1 by human osteoblasts...

  12. Vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B9 - Occurrence, Biosynthesis Pathways and Functions in Human Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolak, Natalia; Zawrotniak, Marcin; Gogol, Mariusz; Kozik, Andrzej; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Vitamins are chemical compounds whose derivatives are involved in vital metabolic pathways of all living organisms. The complete endogenous biosynthesis of vitamins can be performed by many bacteria, yeast and plants, but humans need to acquire most of these essential nutrients with food. In recent years, new types of action of the well-recognized vitamins or their more sophisticated relationships have been reported. In this review we present the current knowledge of factors that can influence the yield and regulation of vitamin B1, B2, B3 and B9 biosynthesis in plants which can be important for human nutrition. A summary of modern methods applied for vitamin analysis in biological materials is also provided. Contributions of selected vitamins to the homeostasis of the human organism, as well as their relations to the progress or prevention of some important diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and Alzheimer's disease are discussed in the light of recent investigations. Better understanding of the mechanisms of vitamin uptake by human tissues and possible metabolic or genetic backgrounds of vitamin deficiencies can open new perspectives on the medical strategies and biotechnological processes of food fortification. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Vitamin D Levels Are Associated with Cardiac Autonomic Activity in Healthy Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Ellis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency (≤50nmol/L 25-hydroxy vitamin D is a cardiovascular (CV risk factor that affects approximately one billion people worldwide, particularly those affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD. Individuals with CKD demonstrate abnormal cardiac autonomic nervous system activity, which has been linked to the significant rates of CV-related mortality in this population. Whether vitamin D deficiency has a direct association with regulation of cardiac autonomic activity has never been explored in humans. Methods: Thirty-four (34 healthy, normotensive subjects were studied and categorized based on 25-hydroxy vitamin D deficiency (deficient vs. non-deficient, n = 7 vs. 27, as well as 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D levels (above vs. below 25th percentile, n = 8 vs. 26. Power spectral analysis of electrocardiogram recordings provided measures of cardiac autonomic activity across low frequency (LF and high frequency (HF, representative of vagal contribution bands, representative of the sympathetic and vagal limbs of the autonomic nervous system when transformed to normalized units (nu, respectively, as well as overall cardiosympathovagal balance (LF:HF during graded angiotensin II (AngII challenge (3 ng/kg/min × 30 min, 6 ng/kg/min × 30 min. Results: At baseline, significant suppression of sympathovagal balance was observed in the 25-hydroxy vitamin D-deficient participants (LF:HF, p = 0.02 vs. non-deficient, although no other differences were observed throughout AngII challenge. Participants in the lowest 1,25-dihydroxy VD quartile experienced significant withdrawal of inhibitory vagal control, as well as altered overall sympathovagal balance throughout AngII challenge (HF, mean difference = −6.98 ± 3 nu, p = 0.05; LF:HF, mean difference = 0.34 ± 0.1, p = 0.043 vs. above 25th percentile. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with suppression of resting cardiac autonomic activity, while low 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D levels are

  14. An LC/MS method for d8-β-carotene and d4-retinyl esters: β-carotene absorption and its conversion to vitamin A in humans

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal absorption and metabolism of β-carotene is of vital importance in humans, especially in populations that obtain the majority of their vitamin A from provitamin A carotenoids. MS has provided a better understanding of the absorption of β-carotene, the most potent provitamin A carotenoid, through the use of stable isotopes of β-carotene. We report here an HPLC-MS method that eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation and allows us to detect and quantify newly absorbed...

  15. Activation of vitamin D regulates response of human bronchial epithelial cells to Aspergillus fumigatus in an autocrine fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Wu, Ting; Su, Xin; Shi, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is one of the most common fungi to cause diseases in humans. Recent evidence has demonstrated that airway epithelial cells play an important role in combating A. fumigatus through inflammatory responses. Human airway epithelial cells have been proven to synthesize the active vitamin D, which plays a key role in regulating inflammation. The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of A. fumigatus infection on the activation of vitamin D and the role of vitamin D activation in A. fumigatus-elicited antifungal immunity in normal human airway epithelial cells. We found that A. fumigatus swollen conidia (SC) induced the expression of 1α-hydroxylase, the enzyme catalyzing the synthesis of active vitamin D, and vitamin D receptor (VDR) in 16HBE cells and led to increased local generation of active vitamin D. Locally activated vitamin D amplified SC-induced expression of antimicrobial peptides in 16HBE cells but attenuated SC-induced production of cytokines in an autocrine fashion. Furthermore, we identified β-glucan, the major A. fumigatus cell wall component, as the causative agent for upregulation of 1α-hydroxylase and VDR in 16HBE cells. Therefore, activation of vitamin D is inducible and provides a bidirectional regulation of the responses to A. fumigatus in 16HBE cells.

  16. A fuzzy Bayesian network approach to quantify the human behaviour during an evacuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Nurulhuda; Ghani, Noraida Abdul; Ahmad, Nazihah

    2016-06-01

    Bayesian Network (BN) has been regarded as a successful representation of inter-relationship of factors affecting human behavior during an emergency. This paper is an extension of earlier work of quantifying the variables involved in the BN model of human behavior during an evacuation using a well-known direct probability elicitation technique. To overcome judgment bias and reduce the expert's burden in providing precise probability values, a new approach for the elicitation technique is required. This study proposes a new fuzzy BN approach for quantifying human behavior during an evacuation. Three major phases of methodology are involved, namely 1) development of qualitative model representing human factors during an evacuation, 2) quantification of BN model using fuzzy probability and 3) inferencing and interpreting the BN result. A case study of three inter-dependencies of human evacuation factors such as danger assessment ability, information about the threat and stressful conditions are used to illustrate the application of the proposed method. This approach will serve as an alternative to the conventional probability elicitation technique in understanding the human behavior during an evacuation.

  17. Vitamins, fatty acids, and antioxidant capacity stability during storage of freeze-dried human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Blanca; Castellote, Ana Isabel; Montes, Rosa; López-Sabater, M Carmen

    2014-09-01

    Although freezing is the most common method used to preserve human milk, nutritional and immunological components may be lost during storage. Freeze-drying could increase the shelf life of human milk, while preserving its original characteristics. Seventy-two samples of freeze-dried human milk were stored for different periods of time, up to a maximum of 3 months, at 4 °C or 40 °C. Vitamin C, tocopherols, antioxidant capacity, and fatty acids composition were analyzed. A new HILIC-UHPLC method improving vitamin C determination was also validated. Ascorbic acid and total vitamin C concentrations significantly decreased at both temperatures, while antioxidant capacity only decreased at 40 °C. Fatty acids composition and both γ-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol contents remained unaltered. The stability after storage of freeze-dried milk was higher than that reported for frozen or fresh milk indicating that freeze-drying is a promising option to improve the preservation of human milk in banks.

  18. Anti-aging effects of vitamin C on human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Young; Ku, Seung-Yup; Huh, Yul; Liu, Hung-Ching; Kim, Seok Hyun; Choi, Young Min; Moon, Shin Yong

    2013-10-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have arisen as a source of cells for biomedical research due to their developmental potential. Stem cells possess the promise of providing clinicians with novel treatments for disease as well as allowing researchers to generate human-specific cellular metabolism models. Aging is a natural process of living organisms, yet aging in human heart cells is difficult to study due to the ethical considerations regarding human experimentation as well as a current lack of alternative experimental models. hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) bear a resemblance to human cardiac cells and thus hPSC-derived CMs are considered to be a viable alternative model to study human heart cell aging. In this study, we used hPSC-derived CMs as an in vitro aging model. We generated cardiomyocytes from hPSCs and demonstrated the process of aging in both human embryonic stem cell (hESC)- and induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived CMs. Aging in hESC-derived CMs correlated with reduced membrane potential in mitochondria, the accumulation of lipofuscin, a slower beating pattern, and the downregulation of human telomerase RNA (hTR) and cell cycle regulating genes. Interestingly, the expression of hTR in hiPSC-derived CMs was not significantly downregulated, unlike in hESC-derived CMs. In order to delay aging, vitamin C was added to the cultured CMs. When cells were treated with 100 μM of vitamin C for 48 h, anti-aging effects, specifically on the expression of telomere-related genes and their functionality in aging cells, were observed. Taken together, these results suggest that hPSC-derived CMs can be used as a unique human cardiomyocyte aging model in vitro and that vitamin C shows anti-aging effects in this model.

  19. Cloning and expression of full-length cDNA encoding human vitamin D receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, A.R.; McDonnell, D.P.; Hughes, M.; Crisp, T.M.; Mangelsdorf, D.J.; Haussler, M.R.; Pike, J.W.; Shine, J.; O' Malley, B.W. (California Biotechnology Inc., Mountain View (USA))

    1988-05-01

    Complementary DNA clones encoding the human vitamin D receptor have been isolated from human intestine and T47D cell cDNA libraries. The nucleotide sequence of the 4605-base pair (bp) cDNA includes a noncoding leader sequence of 115 bp, a 1281-bp open reading frame, and 3209 bp of 3{prime} noncoding sequence. Two polyadenylylation signals, AATAAA, are present 25 and 70 bp upstream of the poly(A) tail, respectively. RNA blot hybridization indicates a single mRNA species of {approx} 4600 bp. Transfection of the cloned sequences into COS-1 cells results in the production of a single receptor species indistinguishable from the native receptor. Sequence comparisons demonstrate that the vitamin D receptor belongs to the steroid-receptor gene family and is closest in size and sequence to another member of this family, the thyroid hormone receptor.

  20. Vitamin C in human health and disease is still a mystery ? An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Naidu K Akhilender

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Ascorbic acid is one of the important water soluble vitamins. It is essential for collagen, carnitine and neurotransmitters biosynthesis. Most plants and animals synthesize ascorbic acid for their own requirement. However, apes and humans can not synthesize ascorbic acid due to lack of an enzyme gulonolactone oxidase. Hence, ascorbic acid has to be supplemented mainly through fruits, vegetables and tablets. The current US recommended daily allowance (RDA) for ascorbic acid ranges bet...

  1. Quantifying Human Visible Color Variation from High Definition Digital Images of Orb Web Spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuria Ibarra, Helena; Rao, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Digital processing and analysis of high resolution images of 30 individuals of the orb web spider Verrucosa arenata were performed to extract and quantify human visible colors present on the dorsal abdomen of this species. Color extraction was performed with minimal user intervention using an unsupervised algorithm to determine groups of colors on each individual spider, which was then analyzed in order to quantify and classify the colors obtained, both spatially and using energy and entropy measures of the digital images. Analysis shows that the colors cover a small region of the visible spectrum, are not spatially homogeneously distributed over the patterns and from an entropic point of view, colors that cover a smaller region on the whole pattern carry more information than colors covering a larger region. This study demonstrates the use of processing tools to create automatic systems to extract valuable information from digital images that are precise, efficient and helpful for the understanding of the underlying biology. PMID:27902724

  2. An Automated Method to Quantify Radiation Damage in Human Blood Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon K. Livingston, Mark S. Jenkins and Akio A. Awa

    2006-07-10

    Cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes is a well established method to assess the absorbed dose in persons exposed to ionizing radiation. Because mature lymphocytes circulate throughout the body, the dose to these cells is believed to represent the average whole body exposure. Cytogenetic methods measure the incidence of structural aberrations in chromosomes as a means to quantify DNA damage which occurs when ionizing radiation interacts with human tissue. Methods to quantify DNA damage at the chromosomal level vary in complexity and tend to be laborious and time consuming. In a mass casualty scenario involving radiological/nuclear materials, the ability to rapidly triage individuals according to radiation dose is critically important. For high-throughput screening for dicentric chromosomes, many of the data collection steps can be optimized with motorized microscopes coupled to automated slide scanning platforms.

  3. [Vitamin D metabolism and signaling in human hepatocellular carcinoma and surrounding non-tumorous liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Evelin; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János; Lakatos, Péter András; Lazáry, Áron; Németh, Dániel; Jozilan, Hasan; Somorácz, Áron; Korompay, Anna; Gyöngyösi, Benedek; Borka, Katalin; Kiss, András; Kupcsulik, Péter; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Szalay, Ferenc

    2016-11-01

    1,25-Dihydroxy vitamin D3 mediates antitumor effects in hepatocellular carcinoma. We examined mRNA and protein expression differences in 1,25-Dihydroxy vitamin D3-inactivating CYP24A1, mRNA of activating CYP27B1 enzymes, and that of VDR between human hepatocellular carcinoma and surrounding non-tumorous liver. Snap-frozen tissues from 13 patients were studied for mRNA and protein expression of CYP24A1. Paraffin-embedded tissues from 36 patients were used to study mRNA of VDR and CYP27B1. mRNA expression was measured by RT-PCR, CYP24A1 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry. Expression of VDR and CYP27B1 was significantly lower in hepatocellular carcinoma compared with non-tumorous liver (p<0.05). The majority of the HCC samples expressed CYP24A1 mRNA, but neither of the non-tumorous liver. The gene activation was followed by CYP24A1 protein synthesis. The presence of CYP24A1 mRNA and the reduced expression of VDR and CYP27B1 mRNA in human hepatocellular carcinoma samples indicate decreased bioavailability of 1,25-Dihydroxy vitamin D3, providing an escape mechanism from the anti-tumor effect. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(48), 1910-1918.

  4. β-Carotene Conversion to Vitamin A Decreases As the Dietary Dose Increases in Humans12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Janet A.; Harrison, Dawn J.; Pawlosky, Robert; Flanagan, Vincent P.; Harrison, Earl H.; Kurilich, Anne C.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that high doses of β-carotene limit its conversion to vitamin A, yet this effect has not been well established in humans. A feeding study was conducted in a randomized crossover design in which volunteers consumed 2 doses of deuterium-labeled β-carotene on 2 occasions, with β-carotene and vitamin A response assessed by plasma area under the concentration time curve (AUC). Seven volunteers (4 men, 3 women) consumed each of 2 doses of β-carotene-d8 and provided serial blood samples for 37 d after each dose. β-Carotene doses were 20 and 40 mg. Plasma β-carotene-d8 was assessed by HPLC-MS. Plasma retinol (ROH)-d4, which was derived from the β-carotene-d8, was evaluated by GC-MS after saponification to convert retinyl esters to ROH prior to the formation of the trimethylsilylether. The plasma AUC for β-carotene-d8 increased 2-fold from the 20-mg dose to the 40-mg dose. The plasma AUC for ROH-d4 increased 36% from the 20-mg dose to the 40-mg dose. These results establish that, in humans, β-carotene conversion to vitamin A decreases as the dietary dose increases. PMID:20237064

  5. Reconstructing and quantifying human impact in contrasting environments: a palynological and statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broothaerts, Nils; Verstraeten, Gert

    2016-04-01

    Reconstructing and quantifying human impact is an important step to understand human-environment interactions in the past. To fully understand the role of human impact in altering the environment during the Holocene, detailed reconstructions of the vegetation changes and quantitative measures of human impact on the landscape are needed. Statistical analysis of pollen data has recently been used to characterize vegetation changes and to extract semi-quantitative data on human impact. In this study, multivariate statistical analysis (cluster analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS)) of pollen data was used to reconstruct human induced land use changes in two contrasting environments: central Belgium and SW Turkey. For each region, pollen data from different study sites were integrated. The data from central Belgium shows the gradually increasing human impact from the Bronze Age onwards (ca. 3900 cal a BP), except for a temporary halt between 1900-1600 cal a BP, coupled with the Migration Period in Europe. Statistical analysis of pollen data from SW Turkey provides new integrated information on changing human impact through time in the Sagalassos territory, and shows that human impact was most intense during the Hellenistic and Roman Period (ca. 2200-1750 cal a BP) and decreased and changed in nature afterwards. In addition, regional vegetation estimates using the REVEALS model were made for each study site and were compared with the outcome of the statistical analysis of the pollen data. It shows that for some cases the statistical approach can be a more easily applicable alternative for the REVEALS model. Overall, the presented examples from two contrasting environments shows that cluster analysis and NMDS are useful tools to provide semi-quantitative insights in the temporal and spatial vegetation changes related to increasing human impact. Moreover, the technique can be used to compare and integrate pollen datasets from different study sites within

  6. Vitamin D reduces the inflammatory response by Porphyromonas gingivalis infection by modulating human β-defensin-3 in human gingival epithelium and periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Anna; Fiorentino, Margherita; Guida, Luigi; Annunziata, Marco; Nastri, Livia; Rizzo, Antonietta

    2017-04-03

    Periodontitis is a multifactorial polymicrobial infection characterized by a destructive inflammatory process. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative black-pigmented anaerobe, is a major pathogen in the initiation and progression of periodontitis; it produces several virulence factors that stimulate human gingival epithelium (HGE) cells and human periodontal ligament (HPL) cells to produce various inflammatory mediators. A variety of substances, such as vitamin D, have growth-inhibitory effects on some bacterial pathogens and have shown chemo-preventive and anti-inflammatory activity. We used a model with HGE and HPL cells infected with P. gingivalis to determine the influence of vitamin D on P. gingivalis growth and adhesion and the immunomodulatory effect on TNF-α, IL-8, IL-12 and human-β-defensin 3 production. Our results demonstrated, firstly, the lack of any cytotoxic effect on the HGE and HPL cells when treated with vitamin D; in addition, vitamin D inhibited P. gingivalis adhesion and infectivity in HGE and HPL cells. Our study then showed that vitamin D reduced TNF-α, IL-8, IL-12 production in P. gingivalis-infected HGE and HPL cells. In contrast, a significant upregulation of the human-β-defensin 3 expression in HGE and HPL cells induced by P. gingivalis was demonstrated. Our results indicate that vitamin D specifically enhances the production of the human-β-defensin 3 antimicrobial peptide and exerts an inhibitory effect on the pro-inflammatory cytokines, thus suggesting that vitamin D may offer possible therapeutic applications for periodontitis.

  7. Nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside: a molecular evaluation of NAD+ precursor vitamins in human nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Katrina L; Brenner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Although baseline requirements for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) synthesis can be met either with dietary tryptophan or with less than 20 mg of daily niacin, which consists of nicotinic acid and/or nicotinamide, there is growing evidence that substantially greater rates of NAD+ synthesis may be beneficial to protect against neurological degeneration, Candida glabrata infection, and possibly to enhance reverse cholesterol transport. The distinct and tissue-specific biosynthetic and/or ligand activities of tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and the newly identified NAD+ precursor, nicotinamide riboside, reviewed herein, are responsible for vitamin-specific effects and side effects. Because current data suggest that nicotinamide riboside may be the only vitamin precursor that supports neuronal NAD+ synthesis, we present prospects for human nicotinamide riboside supplementation and propose areas for future research.

  8. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  9. Oxidative stress in HEp-2 human laryngeal carcinoma cells induced by combination of vitamins B12b and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatov, V S; Solov'eva, M E; Leshchenko, V V; Teplova, V V

    2003-09-01

    Incubation of human laryngeal epidermoid carcinoma HEp-2 cells with hydroxocobalamin (vitamin B12b) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) for 1 h initiated oxidative stress accompanied by damage to mitochondria and increase in intracellular oxidative activity. Studies of the kinetics of these processes showed that the increase in intracellular H2O2 activity and mitochondrial damage are more likely a result, but not the cause of cell apoptosis during the first hour of their incubation with vitamins B12b and C.

  10. Detection of vitamin D binding protein on the surface of cytotrophoblasts isolated from human placentae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestler, J.E.; McLeod, J.F.; Kowalski, M.A.; Strauss, J.F. 3d.; Haddad, J.G. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Vitamin D binding protein (DBP), a Mr 56,000-58,000 alpha 2-glycoprotein, is the major serum protein involved in the transport of vitamin D sterols. Recently it has been suggested that DBP may also be involved in immunoglobulin G binding to cells. Because the trophoblast is involved in the transport of molecules such as vitamin D and immunoglobulin G to the fetus, we asked whether DBP could be detected on the surface of human placental trophoblast cells. Cytotrophoblasts purified from human term placentae were fixed and made permeant with Triton X-100 and examined by indirect immunofluorescence after incubation with a monoclonal antibody to DBP. Greater than 90% of these cells stained positively, whereas no staining was observed with nonimmune antiserum. The presence of DBP on/in the surface of cytotrophoblasts could also be demonstrated by fluorescent cytometry. When cell surface-associated proteins of cytotrophoblasts were radioiodinated, a Mr 57,000 radiolabeled protein could be immunoisolated from the cell lysate with a purified monospecific polyclonal antibody to DBP. Immunoisolation of this radiolabeled protein was prevented by the addition of excess unlabeled human DBP to the cell lysate before incubation with antibody. This Mr 57,000 radiolabeled protein could also be isolated by affinity chromatography selecting for proteins that bind to globular actin. When cytotrophoblasts were incubated with (/sup 35/S)methionine for 3 or 18 h, active synthesis of DBP could not be demonstrated by immunoisolation techniques. These studies demonstrate the presence of DBP on the surface of well washed, human cytotrophoblasts. This DBP may be maternally derived, since active synthesis of DBP could not be demonstrated.

  11. Quantifying nonverbal communicative behavior in face-to-face human dialogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skhiri, Mustapha; Cerrato, Loredana

    2002-11-01

    The referred study is based on the assumption that understanding how humans use nonverbal behavior in dialogues can be very useful in the design of more natural-looking animated talking heads. The goal of the study is twofold: (1) to explore how people use specific facial expressions and head movements to serve important dialogue functions, and (2) to show evidence that it is possible to measure and quantify the entity of these movements with the Qualisys MacReflex motion tracking system. Naturally elicited dialogues between humans have been analyzed with focus on the attention on those nonverbal behaviors that serve the very relevant functions of regulating the conversational flux (i.e., turn taking) and producing information about the state of communication (i.e., feedback). The results show that eyebrow raising, head nods, and head shakes are typical signals involved during the exchange of speaking turns, as well as in the production and elicitation of feedback. These movements can be easily measured and quantified, and this measure can be implemented in animated talking heads.

  12. Microarray analyses of glucocorticoid and vitamin D3 target genes in differentiating cultured human podocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiwen Cheng

    Full Text Available Glomerular podocytes are highly differentiated epithelial cells that are key components of the kidney filtration units. Podocyte damage or loss is the hallmark of nephritic diseases characterized by severe proteinuria. Recent studies implicate that hormones including glucocorticoids (ligand for glucocorticoid receptor and vitamin D3 (ligand for vitamin D receptor protect or promote repair of podocytes from injury. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying hormone-mediated podocyte-protecting activity from injury, we carried out microarray gene expression studies to identify the target genes and corresponding pathways in response to these hormones during podocyte differentiation. We used immortalized human cultured podocytes (HPCs as a model system and carried out in vitro differentiation assays followed by dexamethasone (Dex or vitamin D3 (VD3 treatment. Upon the induction of differentiation, multiple functional categories including cell cycle, organelle dynamics, mitochondrion, apoptosis and cytoskeleton organization were among the most significantly affected. Interestingly, while Dex and VD3 are capable of protecting podocytes from injury, they only share limited target genes and affected pathways. Compared to VD3 treatment, Dex had a broader and greater impact on gene expression profiles. In-depth analyses of Dex altered genes indicate that Dex crosstalks with a broad spectrum of signaling pathways, of which inflammatory responses, cell migration, angiogenesis, NF-κB and TGFβ pathways are predominantly altered. Together, our study provides new information and identifies several new avenues for future investigation of hormone signaling in podocytes.

  13. Vitamin D Promotes Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells via ERK Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Su-Mi; Lim, Hae-Soon; Jeong, Kyung-Yi; Kim, Seon-Mi; Kim, Won-Jae; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2015-07-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D such as 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) is a well-known key regulatory factor in bone metabolism. However, little is known about the potential of vitamin D as an odontogenic inducer in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin D3 metabolite, 1α,25(OH)2D3, on odontoblastic differentiation in HDPCs. HDPCs extracted from maxillary supernumerary incisors and third molars were directly cultured with 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the absence of differentiation-inducing factors. Treatment of HDPCs with 1α,25(OH)2D3 at a concentration of 10 nM or 100 nM significantly upregulated the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein1 (DMP1), the odontogenesis-related genes. Also, 1α,25(OH)2D3 enhanced the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization in HDPCs. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), whereas the ERK inhibitor U0126 ameliorated the upregulation of DSPP and DMP1 and reduced the mineralization enhanced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. These results demonstrated that 1α,25(OH)2D3 promoted odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs via modulating ERK activation.

  14. Vitamin D Promotes Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells via ERK Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Su-Mi; Lim, Hae-Soon; Jeong, Kyung-Yi; Kim, Seon-Mi; Kim, Won-Jae; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D such as 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) is a well-known key regulatory factor in bone metabolism. However, little is known about the potential of vitamin D as an odontogenic inducer in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin D3 metabolite, 1α,25(OH)2D3, on odontoblastic differentiation in HDPCs. HDPCs extracted from maxillary supernumerary incisors and third molars were directly cultured with 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the absence of differentiation-inducing factors. Treatment of HDPCs with 1α,25(OH)2D3 at a concentration of 10 nM or 100 nM significantly upregulated the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein1 (DMP1), the odontogenesis-related genes. Also, 1α,25(OH)2D3 enhanced the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization in HDPCs. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), whereas the ERK inhibitor U0126 ameliorated the upregulation of DSPP and DMP1 and reduced the mineralization enhanced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. These results demonstrated that 1α,25(OH)2D3 promoted odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs via modulating ERK activation. PMID:26062551

  15. Toll-like receptor 8 ligands activate a vitamin D mediated autophagic response that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant R Campbell

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLR are important in recognizing microbial pathogens and triggering host innate immune responses, including autophagy, and in the mediation of immune activation during human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV infection. We report here that TLR8 activation in human macrophages induces the expression of the human cathelicidin microbial peptide (CAMP, the vitamin D receptor (VDR and cytochrome P450, family 27, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 (CYP27B1, which 1α-hydroxylates the inactive form of vitamin D, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol, into its biologically active metabolite. Moreover, we demonstrate using RNA interference, chemical inhibitors and vitamin D deficient media that TLR8 agonists inhibit HIV through a vitamin D and CAMP dependent autophagic mechanism. These data support an important role for vitamin D in the control of HIV infection, and provide a biological explanation for the benefits of vitamin D. These findings also provide new insights into potential novel targets to prevent and treat HIV infection.

  16. Evidence for Vitamin D Receptor Expression and Direct Effects of 1α,25(OH)2D3 in Human Skeletal Muscle Precursor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Karl; Saini, Amarjit; Strömberg, Anna; Alam, Seher; Lilja, Mats; Rullman, Eric; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Presence of the vitamin D receptor and direct effects of vitamin D on the proliferation and differentiation of muscle precursor cells have been demonstrated in animal models. However, the effects and mechanisms of vitamin D actions in human skeletal muscle, and the presence of the vitamin D receptor in human adult skeletal muscle, remain to be established. Here, we investigated the role of vitamin D in human muscle cells at various stages of differentiation. We demonstrate that the components of the vitamin D-endocrine system are readily detected in human muscle precursor cells but are low to nondetectable in adult skeletal muscle and that human muscle cells lack the ability to convert the inactive vitamin D-metabolite 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 to the active 1α,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3). In addition, we show that 1α,25(OH)2D3 inhibits myoblast proliferation and differentiation by altering the expression of cell cycle regulators and myogenic regulatory factors, with associated changes in forkhead box O3 and Notch signaling pathways. The present data add novel information regarding the direct effects of vitamin D in human skeletal muscle and provide functional and mechanistic insight to the regulation of myoblast cell fate decisions by 1α,25(OH)2D3.

  17. Quantifying the Human Impacts on Papua New Guinea Reef Fish Communities across Space and Time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A Drew

    Full Text Available Describing the drivers of species loss and of community change are important goals in both conservation and ecology. However, it is difficult to determine whether exploited species decline due to direct effects of harvesting or due to other environmental perturbations brought about by proximity to human populations. Here we quantify differences in species richness of coral reef fish communities along a human population gradient in Papua New Guinea to understand the relative impacts of fishing and environmental perturbation. Using data from published species lists we categorize the reef fishes as either fished or non-fished based on their body size and reports from the published literature. Species diversity for both fished and non-fished groups decreases as the size of the local human population increases, and this relationship is stronger in species that are fished. Additionally, comparison of modern and museum collections show that modern reef communities have proportionally fewer fished species relative to 19th century ones. Together these findings show that the reef fish communities of Papua New Guinea experience multiple anthropogenic stressors and that even at low human population levels targeted species experience population declines across both time and space.

  18. Quantifying the Human Impacts on Papua New Guinea Reef Fish Communities across Space and Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Joshua A; Amatangelo, Kathryn L; Hufbauer, Ruth A

    2015-01-01

    Describing the drivers of species loss and of community change are important goals in both conservation and ecology. However, it is difficult to determine whether exploited species decline due to direct effects of harvesting or due to other environmental perturbations brought about by proximity to human populations. Here we quantify differences in species richness of coral reef fish communities along a human population gradient in Papua New Guinea to understand the relative impacts of fishing and environmental perturbation. Using data from published species lists we categorize the reef fishes as either fished or non-fished based on their body size and reports from the published literature. Species diversity for both fished and non-fished groups decreases as the size of the local human population increases, and this relationship is stronger in species that are fished. Additionally, comparison of modern and museum collections show that modern reef communities have proportionally fewer fished species relative to 19th century ones. Together these findings show that the reef fish communities of Papua New Guinea experience multiple anthropogenic stressors and that even at low human population levels targeted species experience population declines across both time and space.

  19. Actualité sur la vitamine K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaumont Marc

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty of quantifying vitamin K levels and determining the number of active molecules long impeded in investigations into the metabolism and physiological function of vitamin K. In the last ten years, since gamma carboxylation was first demonstrated, studies have essentially focused on: – vitamin K sources and requirements: the composition of foods and requirements with respect to molecules with vitamin K activity are beginning to be known; – vitamin K and bone: the role of osteocalcin in bone mineralization and its association with vitamin K have been studied, particularly in elderly subjects; – hemorrhagic disease of the newborn: after a number of controversies, it is now generally accepted that prophylactic treatment of all newborns should be systematic, and repeated for breast-fed infants. Vitamin K should be administerted orally except in cases of malabsorption. However, a number of essential questions remain unanswered, such as the precise role played by certain carboxyproteins (bone carboxyprotein or Gas6 and, in particular, the choice of markers for the accurate evaluation of vitamin K status in humans.

  20. In-Vitro Carbofuran Induced Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes and Its Mitigation by Vitamins C and E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnesh Kumar Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various efforts have been made in past in order to predict the underlying mechanism of pesticide-induced toxicity using in vitro and animal models, however, these predictions may or may not be directly correlated with humans. The present study was designed to investigate the carbofuran induced genotoxicity and its amelioration by vitamins C and E by treating human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs with different concentrations (0, 0.5, 1.25, 2.5, 3.75 and 5.0 μM of this compound. The treatment of PBLs with carbofuran displayed significant DNA damage in concentration dependent manner. The carbofuran induced genotoxicity could be ameliorated to considerable extent by pretreatment of PBLs with equimolar (10 μM concentration of each of the vitamins C and E; the magnitude of protection by vitamin E being higher than by vitamin C. Also, it was found that the level of protection by these vitamins was higher when PBLs were treated with lower concentrations of pesticide. The significant DNA damage as observed by H2O2, a positive control in the present study, and its amelioration by natural antioxidants (vitamins C and E lend an evidence to suggest that carbofuran would have caused genotoxicity via pesticide induced oxidative stress.

  1. In-vitro carbofuran induced genotoxicity in human lymphocytes and its mitigation by vitamins C and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ratnesh Kumar; Sharma, Bechan

    2012-01-01

    Various efforts have been made in past in order to predict the underlying mechanism of pesticide-induced toxicity using in vitro and animal models, however, these predictions may or may not be directly correlated with humans. The present study was designed to investigate the carbofuran induced genotoxicity and its amelioration by vitamins C and E by treating human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) with different concentrations (0, 0.5, 1.25, 2.5, 3.75 and 5.0 μM) of this compound. The treatment of PBLs with carbofuran displayed significant DNA damage in concentration dependent manner. The carbofuran induced genotoxicity could be ameliorated to considerable extent by pretreatment of PBLs with equimolar (10 μM) concentration of each of the vitamins C and E; the magnitude of protection by vitamin E being higher than by vitamin C. Also, it was found that the level of protection by these vitamins was higher when PBLs were treated with lower concentrations of pesticide. The significant DNA damage as observed by H_{2}O_{2}, a positive control in the present study, and its amelioration by natural antioxidants (vitamins C and E) lend an evidence to suggest that carbofuran would have caused genotoxicity via pesticide induced oxidative stress.

  2. Diagnosis and characterization of mania: Quantifying increased energy and activity in the human behavioral pattern monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, William; McIlwain, Meghan; Kloezeman, Karen; Henry, Brook L; Minassian, Arpi

    2016-06-30

    Increased energy or activity is now an essential feature of the mania of Bipolar Disorder (BD) according to DSM-5. This study examined whether objective measures of increased energy can differentiate manic BD individuals and provide greater diagnostic accuracy compared to rating scales, extending the work of previous studies with smaller samples. We also tested the relationship between objective measures of energy and rating scales. 50 hospitalized manic BD patients were compared to healthy subjects (HCS, n=39) in the human Behavioral Pattern Monitor (hBPM) which quantifies motor activity and goal-directed behavior in an environment containing novel stimuli. Archival hBPM data from 17 schizophrenia patients were used in sensitivity and specificity analyses. Manic BD patients exhibited higher motor activity than HCS and higher novel object interactions. hBPM activity measures were not correlated with observer-rated symptoms, and hBPM activity was more sensitive in accurately classifying hospitalized BD subjects than observer ratings. Although the findings can only be generalized to inpatient populations, they suggest that increased energy, particularly specific and goal-directed exploration, is a distinguishing feature of BD mania and is best quantified by objective measures of motor activity. A better understanding is needed of the biological underpinnings of this cardinal feature.

  3. Vitamin D and the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 enhance group a streptococcus resistance to killing by human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, John F; Tran-Winkler, Hien J; Wessels, Michael R

    2012-10-23

    The CsrRS two-component regulatory system of group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) responds to subinhibitory concentrations of the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. LL-37 signaling through CsrRS results in upregulation of genes that direct synthesis of virulence factors, including the hyaluronic acid capsule and streptolysin O (SLO). Here, we demonstrate that a consequence of this response is augmented GAS resistance to killing by human oropharyngeal keratinocytes, neutrophils, and macrophages. LL-37-induced upregulation of SLO and hyaluronic acid capsule significantly reduced internalization of GAS by keratinocytes and phagocytic killing by neutrophils and macrophages. Because vitamin D induces LL-37 production by macrophages, we tested its effect on macrophage killing of GAS. In contrast to the reported enhancement of macrophage function in relation to other pathogens, treatment of macrophages with 1α,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 paradoxically reduced the ability of macrophages to control GAS infection. These observations demonstrate that LL-37 signals through CsrRS to induce a virulence phenotype in GAS characterized by heightened resistance to ingestion and killing by both epithelial cells and phagocytes. By inducing LL-37 production in macrophages, vitamin D may contribute to this paradoxical exacerbation of GAS infection. IMPORTANCE It remains poorly understood why group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes asymptomatic colonization or localized throat inflammation in most individuals but rarely progresses to invasive infection. The human antimicrobial peptide LL-37, which is produced as part of the innate immune response to GAS infection, signals through the GAS CsrRS two-component regulatory system to upregulate expression of multiple virulence factors. This study reports that two CsrRS-regulated GAS virulence factors-streptolysin O and the hyaluronic acid capsule-are critical in LL-37-induced resistance of GAS to killing by human throat epithelial cells

  4. Functional significance of vitamin D receptor FokI polymorphism in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The FokI vitamin D receptor (VDR polymorphism results in different translation initiation sites on VDR. In the VDRff variant, initiation of translation occurs at the first ATG site, giving rise to a full length VDR protein of 427 amino acids. Conversely, in the VDRFF variant, translation begins at the second ATG site, resulting in a truncated protein with three less amino acids. Epidemiological studies have paradoxically implicated this polymorphism with increased breast cancer risk. 1α,25 (OH(2D(3, the active metabolite of vitamin D, is known to inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and potentiate differentiation in human breast cancer cells. It is well documented that 1α,25 (OH(2D(3 downregulates estrogen receptor α expression and inhibits estrogen mediated signaling in these cells. The functional significance of the VDR FokI polymorphism in vitamin D action is undefined. METHODS/FINDINGS: To elucidate the functional role of FokI polymorphism in breast cancer, MCF-7-Vector, MCF-7-VDRff and MCF-7-VDRFF stable cell lines were established from parental MCF-7 cells as single-cell clones. In response to 1α,25 (OH(2D(3 treatments, cell growth was inhibited by 60% in VDRFF cells compared to 28% in VDRff cells. The induction of the vitamin D target gene CYP24A1 mRNA was 1.8 fold higher in VDRFF cells than in VDRff cells. Estrogen receptor-α protein expression was downregulated by 62% in VDRFF cells compared to 25% in VDRff cells. VDR protein stability was greater in MCF-7-VDRFF cells in the presence of cycloheximide. PCR array analyses of VDRff and VDRFF cells revealed increased basal expression levels of pro-inflammatory genes Cyclooxygenase-2, Interleukin-8 and Chemokine (C-C Motif Ligand 2 in MCF-7-VDRff cells by 14, 52.7 and 5 fold, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that a VDRff genotype may play a role in amplifying aggressive breast cancer, paving the way for understanding why some breast

  5. A Bayesian approach to quantify the contribution of animal-food sources to human salmonellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Vose, D.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2004-01-01

    the estimated number of travel- and outbreak-associated cases from the total number of reported cases, i.e., the observed data. The most important food sources were found to be table eggs and domestically produced pork comprising 47.1% (95 % credibility interval, CI: 43.3-50.8%) and 9% (95% CI: 7......Based on the data from the integrated Danish Salmonella surveillance in 1999, we developed a mathematical model for quantifying the contribution of each of the major animal-food sources to human salmonellosis. The model was set up to calculate the number of domestic and sporadic cases caused...... salmonellosis was also included. The joint posterior distribution was estimated by fitting the model to the reported number of domestic and sporadic cases per Salmonella type in a Bayesian framework using Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation. The number of domestic and sporadic cases was obtained by subtracting...

  6. Computational Strategy for Quantifying Human Pesticide Exposure based upon a Saliva Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eTimchalk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative exposure data is important for evaluating toxicity risk and biomonitoring is a critical tool for evaluating human exposure. Direct personal monitoring provides the most accurate estimation of a subject’s true dose, and non-invasive methods are advocated for quantifying exposure to xenobiotics. In this regard, there is a need to identify chemicals that are cleared in saliva at concentrations that can be quantified to support the implementation of this approach. This manuscript reviews the computational modeling approaches that are coupled to in vivo and in vitro experiments to predict salivary uptake and clearance of xenobiotics and provides additional insight on species-dependent differences in partitioning that are of key importance for extrapolation. The primary mechanism by which xenobiotics leave the blood and enter saliva involves paracellular transport, passive transcellular diffusion, or trancellular active transport with the majority of xenobiotics transferred by passive diffusion. The transcellular or paracellular diffusion of unbound chemicals in plasma to saliva has been computationally modeled using compartmental and physiologically based approaches. Of key importance for determining the plasma:saliva partitioning was the utilization of the Schmitt algorithm that calculates partitioning based upon the tissue composition, pH, chemical pKa and plasma protein-binding. Sensitivity analysis identified that both protein-binding and pKa (for weak acids and bases have significant impact on determining partitioning and species dependent differences based upon physiological variance. Future strategies are focused on an in vitro salivary acinar cell based system to experimentally determine and computationally predict salivary gland uptake and clearance for xenobiotics. It is envisioned that a combination of salivary biomonitoring and computational modeling will enable the non-invasive measurement of chemical exposures in human

  7. Computational strategy for quantifying human pesticide exposure based upon a saliva measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timchalk, Charles; Weber, Thomas J; Smith, Jordan N

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative exposure data is important for evaluating toxicity risk and biomonitoring is a critical tool for evaluating human exposure. Direct personal monitoring provides the most accurate estimation of a subject's true dose, and non-invasive methods are advocated for quantifying exposure to xenobiotics. In this regard, there is a need to identify chemicals that are cleared in saliva at concentrations that can be quantified to support the implementation of this approach. This manuscript reviews the computational modeling approaches that are coupled to in vivo and in vitro experiments to predict salivary uptake and clearance of xenobiotics and provides additional insight on species-dependent differences in partitioning that are of key importance for extrapolation. The primary mechanism by which xenobiotics leave the blood and enter saliva involves paracellular transport, passive transcellular diffusion, or transcellular active transport with the majority of xenobiotics transferred by passive diffusion. The transcellular or paracellular diffusion of unbound chemicals in plasma to saliva has been computationally modeled using compartmental and physiologically based approaches. Of key importance for determining the plasma:saliva partitioning was the utilization of the Schmitt algorithm that calculates partitioning based upon the tissue composition, pH, chemical pKa, and plasma protein-binding. Sensitivity analysis identified that both protein-binding and pKa (for weak acids and bases) have significant impact on determining partitioning and species dependent differences based upon physiological variance. Future strategies are focused on an in vitro salivary acinar cell based system to experimentally determine and computationally predict salivary gland uptake and clearance for xenobiotics. It is envisioned that a combination of salivary biomonitoring and computational modeling will enable the non-invasive measurement of chemical exposures in human populations.

  8. Vitamin C in human health and disease is still a mystery? An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, K Akhilender

    2003-08-21

    Ascorbic acid is one of the important water soluble vitamins. It is essential for collagen, carnitine and neurotransmitters biosynthesis. Most plants and animals synthesize ascorbic acid for their own requirement. However, apes and humans can not synthesize ascorbic acid due to lack of an enzyme gulonolactone oxidase. Hence, ascorbic acid has to be supplemented mainly through fruits, vegetables and tablets. The current US recommended daily allowance (RDA) for ascorbic acid ranges between 100-120 mg/per day for adults. Many health benefits have been attributed to ascorbic acid such as antioxidant, anti-atherogenic, anti-carcinogenic, immunomodulator and prevents cold etc. However, lately the health benefits of ascorbic acid has been the subject of debate and controversies viz., Danger of mega doses of ascorbic acid? Does ascorbic acid act as a antioxidant or pro-oxidant? Does ascorbic acid cause cancer or may interfere with cancer therapy? However, the Panel on dietary antioxidants and related compounds stated that the in vivo data do not clearly show a relationship between excess ascorbic acid intake and kidney stone formation, pro-oxidant effects, excess iron absorption. A number of clinical and epidemiological studies on anti-carcinogenic effects of ascorbic acid in humans did not show any conclusive beneficial effects on various types of cancer except gastric cancer. Recently, a few derivatives of ascorbic acid were tested on cancer cells, among them ascorbic acid esters showed promising anticancer activity compared to ascorbic acid. Ascorbyl stearate was found to inhibit proliferation of human cancer cells by interfering with cell cycle progression, induced apoptosis by modulation of signal transduction pathways. However, more mechanistic and human in vivo studies are needed to understand and elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-carcinogenic property of ascorbic acid. Thus, though ascorbic acid was discovered in 17th century, the exact role of

  9. Vitamin C in human health and disease is still a mystery ? An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidu K Akhilender

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ascorbic acid is one of the important water soluble vitamins. It is essential for collagen, carnitine and neurotransmitters biosynthesis. Most plants and animals synthesize ascorbic acid for their own requirement. However, apes and humans can not synthesize ascorbic acid due to lack of an enzyme gulonolactone oxidase. Hence, ascorbic acid has to be supplemented mainly through fruits, vegetables and tablets. The current US recommended daily allowance (RDA for ascorbic acid ranges between 100–120 mg/per day for adults. Many health benefits have been attributed to ascorbic acid such as antioxidant, anti-atherogenic, anti-carcinogenic, immunomodulator and prevents cold etc. However, lately the health benefits of ascorbic acid has been the subject of debate and controversies viz., Danger of mega doses of ascorbic acid? Does ascorbic acid act as a antioxidant or pro-oxidant ? Does ascorbic acid cause cancer or may interfere with cancer therapy? However, the Panel on dietary antioxidants and related compounds stated that the in vivo data do not clearly show a relationship between excess ascorbic acid intake and kidney stone formation, pro-oxidant effects, excess iron absorption. A number of clinical and epidemiological studies on anti-carcinogenic effects of ascorbic acid in humans did not show any conclusive beneficial effects on various types of cancer except gastric cancer. Recently, a few derivatives of ascorbic acid were tested on cancer cells, among them ascorbic acid esters showed promising anticancer activity compared to ascorbic acid. Ascorbyl stearate was found to inhibit proliferation of human cancer cells by interfering with cell cycle progression, induced apoptosis by modulation of signal transduction pathways. However, more mechanistic and human in vivo studies are needed to understand and elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-carcinogenic property of ascorbic acid. Thus, though ascorbic acid was discovered in

  10. Quantifying human subjective experience and social interaction using the eXperience Induction Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardet, Ulysses; Väljamäe, Aleksander; Inderbitzin, Martin; Wierenga, Sytse; Mura, Anna; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2011-06-30

    With the advance of novel brain imaging technology more correlations between complex human properties and the neuronal substrate can be assessed. However, thus far, not many well-validated paradigms exist that would allow for a systematic and quantitative exploration of these phenomena. For instance, despite the rapid technological advances in the domain of mixed and virtual reality systems, a fundamental issue remains how we can define and quantify "presence". A standard approach has been to use questionnaires and self-report measures. However, it has been well established that humans' capabilities to access and externalize their internal states are limited. Hence, we have investigated the question whether other less subjective measures can be devised that can corroborate subjective self-reports on presence. In particular, we have developed a quantitative recollection task that assesses the ability of human subjects (N=40) to recollect the factual structure and organization of a structured and fully controlled experience in a human accessible mixed reality space, the eXperience Induction Machine (XIM). In this structured experience - referred to as the "Autodemo"--a virtual guide explains the key elements and properties of XIM while the user is able to freely move around in the space. To evaluate the users' experience and the amount of factual information retained about the Autodemo, we used the ITC-SOPI questionnaire and a recall test specifically designed for the Autodemo. We found significant correlations between spatial presence and engagement factors of ITC-SOPI and recall performance. Moreover we observed an interaction with the participants' gender. Our results show that we can assess correlates of "presence" by focusing on other dependent measures such as those related to memory and performance. Additionally, our work exemplifies how virtual and mixed reality systems provide new ways to address fundamental questions in psychology and cognitive neuroscience

  11. Expression of vitamin D receptor and cathelicidin in human corneal epithelium cells during fusarium solani infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Lin; Xia, Yi-Ping; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Lin, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Hu, Li-Ting; Qu, Jian-Qiu; Peng, Xu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    To observe the expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human specimen and immortalized human corneal epithelium cells (HCEC) when challenged with fusarium solani. Moreover, we decided to discover the pathway of VDR expression. Also, we would like to detect the expression of cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) in the downstream pathway of VDR. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the VDR expression in HCEC from healthy and fungal keratitis patients. Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to observe the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) change of VDR when immortalized HCEC were challenged with fusarium solani for different hours. CAMP was detected at both mRNA and protein levels. We found out that the VDR expression in fusarium solani keratitis patients' specimen was much more than that in healthy people. The mRNA and protein expression of VDR increased when we stimulated HCEC with fusarium solani antigen (Pfusarium solani antigen stimulation (Pfusarium solani antigen.

  12. Computational strategy for quantifying human pesticide exposure based upon a saliva measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Charles; Weber, Thomas J.; Smith, Jordan N.

    2015-05-27

    The National Research Council of the National Academies report, Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and Strategy, highlighted the importance of quantitative exposure data for evaluating human toxicity risk and noted that biomonitoring is a critical tool for quantitatively evaluating exposure from both environmental and occupational settings. Direct measurement of chemical exposures using personal monitoring provides the most accurate estimation of a subject’s true exposure, and non-invasive methods have also been advocated for quantifying the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of drugs and xenobiotics. In this regard, there is a need to identify chemicals that are readily cleared in saliva at concentrations that can be quantified to support the implementation of this approach.. The current manuscript describes the use of computational modeling approaches that are closely coupled to in vivo and in vitro experiments to predict salivary uptake and clearance of xenobiotics. The primary mechanism by which xenobiotics leave the blood and enter saliva is thought to involve paracellular transport, passive transcellular diffusion, or trancellular active transport with the majority of drugs and xenobiotics cleared from plasma into saliva by passive diffusion. The transcellular or paracellular diffusion of unbound chemicals in plasma to saliva has been computational modeled using a combination of compartmental and physiologically based approaches. Of key importance for determining the plasma:saliva partitioning was the utilization of a modified Schmitt algorithm that calculates partitioning based upon the tissue composition, pH, chemical pKa and plasma protein-binding. Sensitivity analysis of key model parameters specifically identified that both protein-binding and pKa (for weak acids and bases) had the most significant impact on the determination of partitioning and that there were clear species dependent differences based upon physiological variance between

  13. Statistical quantifiers of memory for an analysis of human brain and neuro-system diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demin, S. A.; Yulmetyev, R. M.; Panischev, O. Yu.; Hänggi, Peter

    2008-03-01

    On the basis of a memory function formalism for correlation functions of time series we investigate statistical memory effects by the use of appropriate spectral and relaxation parameters of measured stochastic data for neuro-system diseases. In particular, we study the dynamics of the walk of a patient who suffers from Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and compare against the data of healthy people (CO - control group). We employ an analytical method which is able to characterize the stochastic properties of stride-to-stride variations of gait cycle timing. Our results allow us to estimate quantitatively a few human locomotion function abnormalities occurring in the human brain and in the central nervous system (CNS). Particularly, the patient's gait dynamics are characterized by an increased memory behavior together with sizable fluctuations as compared with the locomotion dynamics of healthy patients. Moreover, we complement our findings with peculiar features as detected in phase-space portraits and spectral characteristics for the different data sets (PD, HD, ALS and healthy people). The evaluation of statistical quantifiers of the memory function is shown to provide a useful toolkit which can be put to work to identify various abnormalities of locomotion dynamics. Moreover, it allows one to diagnose qualitatively and quantitatively serious brain and central nervous system diseases.

  14. Vitamin D receptor expression is linked to potential markers of human thyroid papillary carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izkhakov, Elena; Somjen, Dalia; Sharon, Orli; Knoll, Esther; Aizic, Asaf; Fliss, Dan M; Limor, Rona; Stern, Naftali

    2016-05-01

    Genes regulated cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been screened as potential markers of malignant thyroid nodules. The mRNA expression levels of two of them, the ECM protein-1 (ECM1) and the type II transmembrane serine protease-4 (TMPRSS4), were shown to be an independent predictor of an existing thyroid carcinoma. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in epithelial cells of the normal thyroid gland, as well as in malignant dividing cells, which respond to the active metabolite of vitamin D by decreased proliferative activity in vitro. We evaluated the relationship between mRNA gene expressions of TMPRSS4, ECM1 and VDR in 21 papillary thyroid carcinoma samples and compared it to 21 normal thyroid tissues from the same patients. Gene expression was considered as up- or down-regulated if it varied by more or less than 2-fold in the cancer tissue relative to the normal thyroid tissue (Ca/N) from the same patient. We found an overall significant adjusted correlation between the mRNA expression ratio (ExR) of VDR and that of ECM1 in Ca/N thyroid tissue (R=0.648, Pthyroid tissue from the same patient (3.06±2.9), which also exhibited a high Ca/N ExR of ECM1 and/or of TMPRSS4 (>2, P=0.05).The finding that increased VDR expression in human thyroid cancer cells is often linked to increased ECM1 and/or TPMRSS4 expression warrants further investigation into the potential role of vitamin D analogs in thyroid carcinoma.

  15. Quantifying Age-Related Differences in Human Reaching while Interacting with a Rehabilitation Robotic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Yadav

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New movement assessment and data analysis methods are developed to quantify human arm motion patterns during physical interaction with robotic devices for rehabilitation. These methods provide metrics for future use in diagnosis, assessment and rehabilitation of subjects with affected arm movements. Specifically, the current study uses existing pattern recognition methods to evaluate the effect of age on performance of a specific motion, reaching to a target by moving the end-effector of a robot (an X-Y table. Differences in the arm motion patterns of younger and older subjects are evaluated using two measures: the principal component analysis similarity factor (SPCA to compare path shape and the number of Fourier modes representing 98% of the path ‘energy’ to compare the smoothness of movement, a particularly important variable for assessment of pathologic movement. Both measures are less sensitive to noise than others previously reported in the literature and preserve information that is often lost through other analysis techniques. Data from the SPCA analysis indicate that age is a significant factor affecting the shapes of target reaching paths, followed by reaching movement type (crossing body midline/not crossing and reaching side (left/right; hand dominance and trial repetition are not significant factors. Data from the Fourier-based analysis likewise indicate that age is a significant factor affecting smoothness of movement, and movements become smoother with increasing trial number in both younger and older subjects, although more rapidly so in younger subjects. These results using the proposed data analysis methods confirm current practice that age-matched subjects should be used for comparison to quantify recovery of arm movement during rehabilitation. The results also highlight the advantages that these methods offer relative to other reported measures.

  16. Vitamin Concentrations in Human Milk Vary with Time within Feed, Circadian Rhythm, and Single-Dose Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Daniela; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Islam, M Munirul; Peerson, Janet M; Allen, Lindsay H

    2017-04-01

    Background: Human milk is the subject of many studies, but procedures for representative sample collection have not been established. Our improved methods for milk micronutrient analysis now enable systematic study of factors that affect its concentrations.Objective: We evaluated the effects of sample collection protocols, variations in circadian rhythms, subject variability, and acute maternal micronutrient supplementation on milk vitamin concentrations.Methods: In the BMQ (Breast-Milk-Quality) study, we recruited 18 healthy women (aged 18-26 y) in Dhaka, Bangladesh, at 2-4 mo of lactation for a 3-d supplementation study. On day 1, no supplements were given; on days 2 and 3, participants consumed ∼1 time and 2 times, respectively, the US-Canadian Recommended Dietary Allowances for vitamins at breakfast (0800-0859). Milk was collected during every feeding from the same breast over 24 h. Milk expressed in the first 2 min (aliquot I) was collected separately from the remainder (aliquot II); a third aliquot (aliquot III) was saved by combining aliquots I and II. Thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamins B-6, B-12, A, and E and fat were measured in each sample.Results: Significant but small differences (14-18%) between aliquots were found for all vitamins except for vitamins B-6 and B-12. Circadian variance was significant except for fat-adjusted vitamins A and E, with a higher contribution to total variance with supplementation. Between-subject variability accounted for most of the total variance. Afternoon and evening samples best reflected daily vitamin concentrations for all study days. Acute supplementation effects were found for thiamin, riboflavin, and vitamins B-6 and A at 2-4 h postdosing, with 0.1-6.17% passing into milk. Supplementation was reflected in fasting, 24-h postdose samples for riboflavin and vitamin B-6. Maximum amounts of dose-responding vitamins in 1 feeding ranged from 4.7% to 21.8% (day 2) and 8.2% to 35.0% (day 3) of Adequate Intake

  17. Phenotypic and genotypic screening of human-originated lactobacilli for vitamin B12 production potential: process validation by micro-assay and UFLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Tomar, S K; Mandal, Surajit

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin B12 (B12) production is a strain specific, rare and hidden functional attribute of lactobacilli and a cogent protocol for selection of such isolates from the herd of lactobacilli is required. The present study included isolation of lactobacilli from human samples (milk and fecal), screening them by a polyphasic (three-phase) methodology for probable B12 production potential and validating the screening protocol by exploring selected strains for in vitro vitamin production (two-phase fermentation) and quantification [micro-assay and ultra fast liquid chromatography (UFLC)]. Fifty-nine Lactobacillus strains were recovered from tested biological samples. Contrary to screening inapplicabilities of first [growth potential (GP) in B12-free medium] and second phases (GP in B12-free and cobalt chloride-supplemented conditions), third phase (cbiK gene detection on genomic DNA) alone was revealed as a validated strategy for selection of two probable B12-producing lactobacilli. Microbiological assay confirmed production and bioavailability of produced vitamin, while UFLC testing validated the results by precisely quantifying the cyanocobalamin (industrially produced bio-available form of B12) in cell extracts of both possible B12 producers [BHM10 (10.91 ± 1.55 μg/l) and BCF20 (23.90 ± 1.73 μg/l)] and positive standard [Lactobacillus reuteri DSM20016 (20.03 ± 4.17 μg/l)]. Moreover, this study generates a novel report for genomic detection, partial amplification and sequencing of cbiK gene in Lactobacillus plantarum species (both BHM10 and BCF20). In conclusion, contrary to first two phases, cbiK gene detection strategy successfully selects B12-producing strains from a group of human-originated lactobacilli and can be used in the future for similar screening studies.

  18. Vitamin D3 analog maxacalcitol (OCT) induces hCAP-18/LL-37 production in human oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Takamitsu; Nagaoka, Isao; Takada, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Maxacalcitol (22-oxacalcitriol: OCT) is a synthetic vitamin D3 analog with a limited calcemic effect. In this study, we investigated whether OCT increases the production of LL-37/CAP-18, a human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, in human gingival/oral epithelial cells. A human gingival epithelial cell line (Ca9-22) and human oral epithelial cell lines (HSC-2, HSC-3, and HSC-4) exhibited the enhanced expression of LL-37 mRNA upon stimulation with OCT as well as active metabolites of vitamins D3 and D2. Among the human epithelial cell lines, Ca9-22 exhibited the strongest response to these vitamin D-related compounds. OCT induced the higher production of CAP-18 (ng/mL order) until 6 days time-dependently in Ca9-22 cells in culture. The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis was killed by treatment with the LL-37 peptide. These findings suggest that OCT induces the production of hCAP-18/LL-37 in a manner similar to that induced by the active metabolite of vitamin D3.

  19. An LC/MS method for d8-β-carotene and d4-retinyl esters: β-carotene absorption and its conversion to vitamin A in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleshman, Matthew K; Riedl, Ken M; Novotny, Janet A; Schwartz, Steven J; Harrison, Earl H

    2012-04-01

    The intestinal absorption and metabolism of β-carotene is of vital importance in humans, especially in populations that obtain the majority of their vitamin A from provitamin A carotenoids. MS has provided a better understanding of the absorption of β-carotene, the most potent provitamin A carotenoid, through the use of stable isotopes of β-carotene. We report here an HPLC-MS method that eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation and allows us to detect and quantify newly absorbed d8-β-carotene as well as its d4-retinyl ester metabolites in human plasma and chylomicron fractions. Both retinoids and β-carotene were recovered in a single simple extraction that did not involve saponification, thus allowing subsequent quantitation of individual fatty acyl esters of retinol. Separation of d8-β-carotene and its d4-retinyl ester metabolites was achieved using the same C30 reversed-phase liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring and negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization modes, respectively. Total time for the two successive runs was 30 min. This HPLC-MS method allowed us to quantify the absorption of intact d8-β-carotene as well as its extent of conversion to d4-retinyl esters in humans after consumption of a single 5 mg dose of d8-β-carotene.

  20. Latitudinal Clines of the Human Vitamin D Receptor and Skin Color Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dov Tiosano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The well-documented latitudinal clines of genes affecting human skin color presumably arise from the need for protection from intense ultraviolet radiation (UVR vs. the need to use UVR for vitamin D synthesis. Sampling 751 subjects from a broad range of latitudes and skin colors, we investigated possible multilocus correlated adaptation of skin color genes with the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR, using a vector correlation metric and network method called BlocBuster. We discovered two multilocus networks involving VDR promoter and skin color genes that display strong latitudinal clines as multilocus networks, even though many of their single gene components do not. Considered one by one, the VDR components of these networks show diverse patterns: no cline, a weak declining latitudinal cline outside of Africa, and a strong in- vs. out-of-Africa frequency pattern. We confirmed these results with independent data from HapMap. Standard linkage disequilibrium analyses did not detect these networks. We applied BlocBuster across the entire genome, showing that our networks are significant outliers for interchromosomal disequilibrium that overlap with environmental variation relevant to the genes’ functions. These results suggest that these multilocus correlations most likely arose from a combination of parallel selective responses to a common environmental variable and coadaptation, given the known Mendelian epistasis among VDR and the skin color genes.

  1. 维生素D缺乏和人类疾病%Vitamin D deficiency and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李卫国

    2011-01-01

    itamin D plays a crucial role in human health and diseases. Researches have showed that 50% of the population have a risk for vitamin D deficiency in the world. Vitamin D deficiency is caused by the lack of sunlight or by deficient dietary supplement. It does not only lead to rickets and osteomalacia, can also cause cancers, cardiovascular disease, endocrine system diseases, autoimmune diseases, nervous system diseases and tuberculosis susceptibility.%维生素D在人体健康和疾病中具有重要作用。研究表明全球约50%的人口存在维生素D缺乏风险。引起维生素D缺乏的主要原因是日照不足或通过膳食补充减少。维生素D缺乏对健康的损害不仅表现为佝偻病和骨软化症,还与癌症、心血管病、内分泌系统疾病、自身免疫性疾病、神经系统疾病及结核易患性有关。

  2. Vitamin D3 modulated gene expression patterns in human primary normal and cancer prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzey, Meral; Luo, Jianhua; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2004-10-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the steroid/retinoid receptor superfamily of nuclear receptors and has potential tumor-suppressive functions in prostate and other cancer types. Vitamin D3 (VD3) exerts its biological actions by binding within cells to VDR. The VDR then interacts with specific regions of the DNA in cells, and triggers changes in the activity of genes involved in cell division, cell survival, and cellular function. Using human primary cultures and the prostate cancer (PCa) cell line, ALVA-31, we examined the effects of VD3 under different culture conditions. Complete G0/G1 arrest of ALVA-31 cells and approximately 50% inhibition of tumor stromal cell growth was observed. To determine changes in gene expression patterns related to VD3 activity, microarray analysis was performed. More than approximately 20,000 genes were evaluated for twofold relative increases and decreases in expression levels. A number of the gene targets that were up- and down-regulated are related to potential mechanisms of prostatic growth regulation. These include estrogen receptor (ER), heat shock proteins: 70 and 90, Apaf1, Her-2/neu, and paxillin. Utilizing antibodies generated against these targets, we were able to confirm the changes at the protein level. These newly reported gene expression patterns provide novel information not only potential markers, but also on the genes involved in VD3 induced apoptosis in PCa.

  3. Latitudinal Clines of the Human Vitamin D Receptor and Skin Color Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiosano, Dov; Audi, Laura; Climer, Sharlee; Zhang, Weixiong; Templeton, Alan R; Fernández-Cancio, Monica; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Sánchez-Muro, José Miguel; El Kholy, Mohamed; Hochberg, Zèev

    2016-05-03

    The well-documented latitudinal clines of genes affecting human skin color presumably arise from the need for protection from intense ultraviolet radiation (UVR) vs. the need to use UVR for vitamin D synthesis. Sampling 751 subjects from a broad range of latitudes and skin colors, we investigated possible multilocus correlated adaptation of skin color genes with the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR), using a vector correlation metric and network method called BlocBuster. We discovered two multilocus networks involving VDR promoter and skin color genes that display strong latitudinal clines as multilocus networks, even though many of their single gene components do not. Considered one by one, the VDR components of these networks show diverse patterns: no cline, a weak declining latitudinal cline outside of Africa, and a strong in- vs. out-of-Africa frequency pattern. We confirmed these results with independent data from HapMap. Standard linkage disequilibrium analyses did not detect these networks. We applied BlocBuster across the entire genome, showing that our networks are significant outliers for interchromosomal disequilibrium that overlap with environmental variation relevant to the genes' functions. These results suggest that these multilocus correlations most likely arose from a combination of parallel selective responses to a common environmental variable and coadaptation, given the known Mendelian epistasis among VDR and the skin color genes.

  4. Pit-1 inhibits BRCA1 and sensitizes human breast tumors to cisplatin and vitamin D treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Samuel; Arias, Efigenia; Sigueiro, Rita; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Martinez-Ordoñez, Anxo; Castelao, Esteban; Eiró, Noemí; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Macia, Manuel; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Maestro, Miguel; Vizoso, Francisco; Mouriño, Antonio; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The POU class 1 homeobox 1 (POU1F1, also known as Pit-1), pertaining to the Pit-Oct-Unc (POU) family of transcription factors, has been related to tumor growth and metastasis in breast. However, its role in response to breast cancer therapy is unknown. We found that Pit-1 down-regulated DNA-damage and repair genes, and specifically inhibited BRCA1 gene expression, sensitizing breast cancer cells to DNA-damage agents. Administration of 1α, 25-dihydroxy-3-epi-vitamin D3 (3-Epi, an endogenous low calcemic vitamin D metabolite) reduced Pit-1 expression, and synergized with cisplatin, thus, decreasing cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro, and reducing tumor growth in vivo. In addition, fifteen primary cultures of human breast tumors showed significantly decreased proliferation when treated with 3-Epi+cisplatin, compared to cisplatin alone. This response positively correlated with Pit-1 levels. Our findings demonstrate that high levels of Pit-1 and reduced BRCA1 levels increase breast cancer cell susceptibility to 3-Epi+cisplatin therapy. PMID:25992773

  5. Retrieving quantifiable social media data from human sensor networks for disaster modeling and crisis mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulov, Oleg

    This dissertation presents a novel approach that utilizes quantifiable social media data as a human aware, near real-time observing system, coupled with geophysical predictive models for improved response to disasters and extreme events. It shows that social media data has the potential to significantly improve disaster management beyond informing the public, and emphasizes the importance of different roles that social media can play in management, monitoring, modeling and mitigation of natural and human-caused extreme disasters. In the proposed approach Social Media users are viewed as "human sensors" that are "deployed" in the field, and their posts are considered to be "sensor observations", thus different social media outlets all together form a Human Sensor Network. We utilized the "human sensor" observations, as boundary value forcings, to show improved geophysical model forecasts of extreme disaster events when combined with other scientific data such as satellite observations and sensor measurements. Several recent extreme disasters are presented as use case scenarios. In the case of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster of 2010 that devastated the Gulf of Mexico, the research demonstrates how social media data from Flickr can be used as a boundary forcing condition of GNOME oil spill plume forecast model, and results in an order of magnitude forecast improvement. In the case of Hurricane Sandy NY/NJ landfall impact of 2012, we demonstrate how the model forecasts, when combined with social media data in a single framework, can be used for near real-time forecast validation, damage assessment and disaster management. Owing to inherent uncertainties in the weather forecasts, the NOAA operational surge model only forecasts the worst-case scenario for flooding from any given hurricane. Geolocated and time-stamped Instagram photos and tweets allow near real-time assessment of the surge levels at different locations, which can validate model forecasts, give

  6. Effects of a Regional Chinese Diet and Its Vitamin Supplementation on Proliferation of Human Esophageal Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN JIANG; HuI-ZHANG DU; WEN-YI ZHU; HUI-JUAN XIAO; CHENG-YU HUANG

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of a local diet popular in Yanting region (YT diet) on the proliferation of two human cell lines (Eta-109 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma line and HL7702 normal liver epithelial cell line) in rats by a ero-physiological approach. Methods Male SD rats were divided into six groups and fed respectively with a conventional diet and the YT diet (one of the five experimental diets) supplemented with two vitamin mixtures (Mix.1: vitamins A, E, and folio acid; Mix.2: mix.l plus riboflavin and vitamin C) at two different doses. On the 30th day, sera were collected from the rats and added into a medium for cell culture, with 10% FBS used as a serum control. The effects were assessed by MTI" assay, DNA synthesis and flow cytometry assays. Results Compared with the control, the sera from rats fed with the YT diet significantly promoted the proliferation of Eca-109 cells, which was, however, reversed by the supplementation with two vitamin mixtures at high doses. Surprisingly, the same treatment produced contrary effects on HL7702 cells as compared with Eca-109 cells. Conclusion The sera from rats fed with the YT diet could promote the proliferation of human esophageal cancer cell line Eca-109, whereas the sera from those fed with the YT diet supplemented with vitamin mixtures might have inhibitory effects on the proliferation of Eca-109 cells.

  7. Quantifiable mRNA transcripts for tamoxifen-metabolising enzymes in human endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Maneesh N; Stringfellow, Helen F; Walsh, Michael J; Ashton, Kate M; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Abdo, Khalil R; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Phillips, David H; Martin, Francis L

    2008-07-10

    Tamoxifen has been used in the management of receptor-positive breast cancer for >20 years. Usage confers an elevated risk of developing endometrial carcinoma. Its mechanism of carcinogenicity remains unresolved with controversy as to whether or not this is mediated through a genotoxic mechanism. Usage is not only associated with an elevated occurrence of endometrioid endometrial carcinoma, but also type 2 and mixed epithelial-stromal tumours (MESTs) that have a poorer prognosis. Following hysterectomy, endometrial tissues (n=18) classified as benign (n=6), non-tamoxifen-associated carcinoma (n=6) and tamoxifen-associated carcinoma (n=6) were obtained; quantitative gene expression was performed. Employing real-time RT-PCR, the relative gene expressions of phase I/II metabolic enzymes CYP1A2, CYP1B1 and CYP3A4, cathechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and SULT2A1 were ascertained. Measurable mRNA transcripts, especially for those genes associated with tamoxifen bioactivation, were quantifiable in all the tissues examined. Whether this is evidence that generation of genotoxic tamoxifen metabolites may occur in human endometrial tissue remains to be ascertained.

  8. Quantifying Biodiversity Losses Due to Human Consumption: A Global-Scale Footprint Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilting, Harry C; Schipper, Aafke M; Bakkenes, Michel; Meijer, Johan R; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2017-03-21

    It is increasingly recognized that human consumption leads to considerable losses of biodiversity. This study is the first to systematically quantify these losses in relation to land use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production and consumption of (inter)nationally traded goods and services by presenting consumption-based biodiversity losses, in short biodiversity footprint, for 45 countries and world regions globally. Our results showed that (i) the biodiversity loss per citizen shows large variations among countries, with higher values when per-capita income increases; (ii) the share of biodiversity losses due to GHG emissions in the biodiversity footprint increases with income; (iii) food consumption is the most important driver of biodiversity loss in most of the countries and regions, with a global average of 40%; (iv) more than 50% of the biodiversity loss associated with consumption in developed economies occurs outside their territorial boundaries; and (v) the biodiversity footprint per dollar consumed is lower for wealthier countries. The insights provided by our analysis might support policymakers in developing adequate responses to avert further losses of biodiversity when population and incomes increase. Both the mitigation of GHG emissions and land use related reduction options in production and consumption should be considered in strategies to protect global biodiversity.

  9. Quantifying the human impact on water resources: a critical review of the water footprint concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, J.; Hadjikakou, M.; Zoumides, C.

    2014-06-01

    The water footprint is a consumption-based indicator of water use, referring to the total volume of freshwater used directly and indirectly by a nation or a company, or in the provision of a product or service. Despite widespread enthusiasm for the development and use of water footprints, some concerns have been raised about the concept and its usefulness. A variety of methodologies have been developed for water footprinting which differ with respect to how they deal with different forms of water use. The result is water footprint estimates which vary dramatically, often creating confusion. Despite these methodological qualms, the concept has had notable success in raising awareness about water use in agricultural and industrial supply chains, by providing a previously unavailable and (seemingly) simple numerical indicator of water use. Nevertheless, and even though a range of uses have already been suggested for water footprinting, its policy value remains unclear. Unlike the carbon footprint which provides a universal measure of human impact on the atmosphere's limited absorptive capacity, the water footprint in its conventional form solely quantifies a single production input without any accounting of the impacts of use, which vary spatially and temporally. Following an extensive review of the literature related to water footprints, this paper critically examines the present uses of the concept, focusing on its current strengths, shortcomings and promising research avenues to advance it.

  10. Simultaneous determination of oxysterols, cholesterol and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 in human plasma by LC-UV-MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Narayanaswamy

    Full Text Available Oxysterols are promising biomarkers of neurodegenerative diseases that are linked with cholesterol and vitamin D metabolism. There is an unmet need for methods capable of sensitive, and simultaneous quantitation of multiple oxysterols, vitamin D and cholesterol pathway biomarkers.A method for simultaneous determination of 5 major oxysterols, 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 and cholesterol in human plasma was developed. Total oxysterols were prepared by room temperature saponification followed by solid phase extraction from plasma spiked with deuterated internal standards. Oxysterols were resolved by reverse phase HPLC using a methanol/water/0.1% formic acid gradient. Oxysterols and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 were detected with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry in positive ion mode; in-series photodiode array detection at 204nm was used for cholesterol. Method validation studies were performed. Oxysterol levels in 220 plasma samples from healthy control subjects, multiple sclerosis and other neurological disorders patients were quantitated.Our method quantitated 5 oxysterols, cholesterol and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 from 200 μL plasma in 35 minutes. Recoveries were >85% for all analytes and internal standards. The limits of detection were 3-10 ng/mL for oxysterols and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 and 1 μg/mL for simultaneous detection of cholesterol. Analytical imprecision was <10 %CV for 24(S-, 25-, 27-, 7α-hydroxycholesterol (HC and cholesterol and ≤15 % for 7-keto-cholesterol. Multiple Sclerosis and other neurological disorder patients had lower 27-hydroxycholesterol levels compared to controls whereas 7α-hydroxycholesterol was lower specifically in Multiple Sclerosis.The method is suitable for measuring plasma oxysterols levels in human health and disease. Analysis of human plasma indicates that the oxysterol, bile acid precursors 7α-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol are lower in Multiple Sclerosis and may serve as potential

  11. Ultraviolet B Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) Are More Efficient and Effective in Producing Vitamin D3 in Human Skin Compared to Natural Sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalajian, T A; Aldoukhi, A; Veronikis, A J; Persons, K; Holick, M F

    2017-09-13

    Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin is important for health. Those with fat malabsorption disorders malabsorb vitamin D and thus must rely on cutaneous production of vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 is generated secondary to exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation (whether from the sun or from an artificial source). Light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been developed to emit ultraviolet radiation. Little is known about the efficiency of UVB emitting LEDs tuned to different wavelengths for producing vitamin D3 in human skin. Ampoules containing 7-dehydrocholesterol were exposed to a LED that emitted a peak wavelength at 293, 295, 298 or 305 nm to determine their efficiency to produce previtamin D3. The 293 nm LED was best suited for evaluating its effectiveness for producing vitamin D in human skin due to the shorter exposure time. This LED was found to be 2.4 times more efficient in producing vitamin D3 in human skin than the sun in less than 1/60(th) the time. This has significant health implications for medical device development in the future that can be used for providing vitamin D supplementation to patients with fat malabsorption syndromes as well as patients with other metabolic abnormalities including patients with chronic kidney disease.

  12. Identification of vitamin D3 target genes in human breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Lei; Anderson, Paul H; Turner, Andrew G; Pishas, Kathleen I; Dhatrak, Deepak J; Gill, Peter G; Morris, Howard A; Callen, David F

    2016-11-01

    Multiple epidemiological studies have shown that high vitamin D3 status is strongly associated with improved breast cancer survival. To determine the molecular pathways influenced by 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) in breast epithelial cells we isolated RNA from normal human breast and cancer tissues treated with 1,25D in an ex vivo explant system. RNA-Seq revealed 523 genes that were differentially expressed in breast cancer tissues in response to 1,25D treatment, and 127 genes with altered expression in normal breast tissues. GoSeq KEGG pathway analysis revealed 1,25D down-regulated cellular metabolic pathways and enriched pathways involved with intercellular adhesion. The highly 1,25D up-regulated target genes CLMN, SERPINB1, EFTUD1, and KLK6were selected for further analysis and up-regulation by 1,25D was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis in breast cancer cell lines and in a subset of human clinical samples from normal and cancer breast tissues. Ketoconazole potentiated 1,25D-mediated induction of CLMN, SERPINB1, and KLK6 mRNA through inhibition of 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) activity. Elevated expression levels of CLMN, SERPINB1, and KLK6 are associated with prolonged relapse-free survival for breast cancer patients. The major finding of the present study is that exposure of both normal and malignant breast tissue to 1,25D results in changes in cellular adhesion, metabolic pathways and tumor suppressor-like pathways, which support epidemiological data suggesting that adequate vitamin D3 levels may improve breast cancer outcome.

  13. Placental Vitamin D-Binding Protein Expression in Human Idiopathic Fetal Growth Restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice F. Wookey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D-binding protein is a multifunctional serum protein with multiple actions related to normal health. Vitamin D-binding protein transports vitamin D and influences the metabolism of this key hormone but it also has additional immunomodulatory and actin-clearing properties. We investigated whether vitamin D-binding protein expression is altered in fetal growth restriction-associated placental dysfunction. Protein was extracted from 35 placentae derived from 17 healthy control subjects and 18 gestation-matched subjects with fetal growth restriction (FGR. FGR subjects were further subdivided as idiopathic (n=9 and nonidiopathic (n=9. Vitamin D-binding protein and 25(OH vitamin D were measured by ELISA and normalized to protein concentration. The results showed significantly reduced levels of placental vitamin D-binding protein (control versus FGR, p<0.05, Student’s t-test that were strongly associated with idiopathic fetal growth restriction (p<0.01, Kruskal-Wallis, whereas levels of vitamin D-binding protein were not associated with placental 25(OH vitamin D stores (p=0.295, Pearson’s correlation. As such, vitamin D-binding protein may be a factor in unexplained placental dysfunction associated with idiopathic fetal growth restriction and may potentially serve as a biomarker of this disease.

  14. Vitamin A deficiency impairs adaptive B and T cell responses to a prototype monovalent attenuated human rotavirus vaccine and virulent human rotavirus challenge in a gnotobiotic piglet model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep S Chattha

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses (RV are a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Widespread vitamin A deficiency is associated with reduced efficacy of vaccines and higher incidence of diarrheal infections in children in developing countries. We established a vitamin A deficient (VAD gnotobiotic piglet model that mimics subclinical vitamin A deficiency in children to study its effects on an oral human rotavirus (HRV vaccine and virulent HRV challenge. Piglets derived from VAD and vitamin A sufficient (VAS sows were orally vaccinated with attenuated HRV or mock, with/without supplemental vitamin A and challenged with virulent HRV. Unvaccinated VAD control piglets had significantly lower hepatic vitamin A, higher severity and duration of diarrhea and HRV fecal shedding post-challenge as compared to VAS control pigs. Reduced protection coincided with significantly higher innate (IFNα cytokine and CD8 T cell frequencies in the blood and intestinal tissues, higher pro-inflammatory (IL12 and 2-3 fold lower anti-inflammatory (IL10 cytokines, in VAD compared to VAS control pigs. Vaccinated VAD pigs had higher diarrhea severity scores compared to vaccinated VAS pigs, which coincided with lower serum IgA HRV antibody titers and significantly lower intestinal IgA antibody secreting cells post-challenge in the former groups suggesting lower anamnestic responses. A trend for higher serum HRV IgG antibodies was observed in VAD vs VAS vaccinated groups post-challenge. The vaccinated VAD (non-vitamin A supplemented pigs had significantly higher serum IL12 (PID2 and IFNγ (PID6 compared to vaccinated VAS groups suggesting higher Th1 responses in VAD conditions. Furthermore, regulatory T-cell responses were compromised in VAD pigs. Supplemental vitamin A in VAD pigs did not fully restore the dysregulated immune responses to AttHRV vaccine or moderate virulent HRV diarrhea. Our findings suggest that that VAD in children in developing countries may partially contribute to more

  15. Leveraging Distant Relatedness to Quantify Human Mutation and Gene-Conversion Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamara, Pier Francesco; Francioli, Laurent C; Wilton, Peter R; Genovese, Giulio; Gusev, Alexander; Finucane, Hilary K; Sankararaman, Sriram; Sunyaev, Shamil R; de Bakker, Paul I W; Wakeley, John; Pe'er, Itsik; Price, Alkes L

    2015-12-01

    The rate at which human genomes mutate is a central biological parameter that has many implications for our ability to understand demographic and evolutionary phenomena. We present a method for inferring mutation and gene-conversion rates by using the number of sequence differences observed in identical-by-descent (IBD) segments together with a reconstructed model of recent population-size history. This approach is robust to, and can quantify, the presence of substantial genotyping error, as validated in coalescent simulations. We applied the method to 498 trio-phased sequenced Dutch individuals and inferred a point mutation rate of 1.66 × 10(-8) per base per generation and a rate of 1.26 × 10(-9) for conversion as 5.99 × 10(-6). We found that recombination does not have observable mutagenic effects after gene conversion is accounted for and that local gene-conversion rates reflect recombination rates. We detected a strong enrichment of recent deleterious variation among mismatching variants found within IBD regions and observed summary statistics of local sharing of IBD segments to closely match previously proposed metrics of background selection; however, we found no significant effects of selection on our mutation-rate estimates. We detected no evidence of strong variation of mutation rates in a number of genomic annotations obtained from several recent studies. Our analysis suggests that a mutation-rate estimate higher than that reported by recent pedigree-based studies should be adopted in the context of DNA-based demographic reconstruction.

  16. Quantifying the demographic cost of human-related mortality to a raptor population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, W. Grainger; Wiens, David; Law, Peter R.; Fuller, Mark R.; Hunt, Teresa L.; Driscoll, Daniel E.; Jackman, Ronald E.

    2017-01-01

    Raptors are exposed to a wide variety of human-related mortality agents, and yet population-level effects are rarely quantified. Doing so requires modeling vital rates in the context of species life-history, behavior, and population dynamics theory. In this paper, we explore the details of such an analysis by focusing on the demography of a resident, tree-nesting population of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the vicinity of an extensive (142 km2) windfarm in California. During 1994–2000, we tracked the fates of >250 radio-marked individuals of four life-stages and conducted five annual surveys of territory occupancy and reproduction. Collisions with wind turbines accounted for 41% of 88 uncensored fatalities, most of which were subadults and nonbreeding adults (floaters). A consistent overall male preponderance in the population meant that females were the limiting sex in this territorial, monogamous species. Estimates of potential population growth rate and associated variance indicated a stable breeding population, but one for which any further decrease in vital rates would require immigrant floaters to fill territory vacancies. Occupancy surveys 5 and 13 years later (2005 and 2013) showed that the nesting population remained intact, and no upward trend was apparent in the proportion of subadult eagles as pair members, a condition that would have suggested a deficit of adult replacements. However, the number of golden eagle pairs required to support windfarm mortality was large. We estimated that the entire annual reproductive output of 216–255 breeding pairs would have been necessary to support published estimates of 55–65 turbine blade-strike fatalities per year. Although the vital rates forming the basis for these calculations may have changed since the data were collected, our approach should be useful for gaining a clearer understanding of how anthropogenic mortality affects the health of raptor populations, particularly those species with delayed

  17. Quantifying the demographic cost of human-related mortality to a raptor population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger Hunt, W.; David Wiens, J.; Law, Peter R.; Fuller, Mark R.; Hunt, Teresa L.; Driscoll, Daniel E.; Jackman, Ronald E.

    2017-01-01

    Raptors are exposed to a wide variety of human-related mortality agents, and yet population-level effects are rarely quantified. Doing so requires modeling vital rates in the context of species life-history, behavior, and population dynamics theory. In this paper, we explore the details of such an analysis by focusing on the demography of a resident, tree-nesting population of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the vicinity of an extensive (142 km2) windfarm in California. During 1994–2000, we tracked the fates of >250 radio-marked individuals of four life-stages and conducted five annual surveys of territory occupancy and reproduction. Collisions with wind turbines accounted for 41% of 88 uncensored fatalities, most of which were subadults and nonbreeding adults (floaters). A consistent overall male preponderance in the population meant that females were the limiting sex in this territorial, monogamous species. Estimates of potential population growth rate and associated variance indicated a stable breeding population, but one for which any further decrease in vital rates would require immigrant floaters to fill territory vacancies. Occupancy surveys 5 and 13 years later (2005 and 2013) showed that the nesting population remained intact, and no upward trend was apparent in the proportion of subadult eagles as pair members, a condition that would have suggested a deficit of adult replacements. However, the number of golden eagle pairs required to support windfarm mortality was large. We estimated that the entire annual reproductive output of 216–255 breeding pairs would have been necessary to support published estimates of 55–65 turbine blade-strike fatalities per year. Although the vital rates forming the basis for these calculations may have changed since the data were collected, our approach should be useful for gaining a clearer understanding of how anthropogenic mortality affects the health of raptor populations, particularly those species with delayed

  18. 1β,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3: A new vitamin D metabolite in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Steven; Jans, Ivo; Billen, Jaak; Heijboer, Annemieke; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Carmeliet, Geert; Mathieu, Chantal; Maestro, Miguel; Waelkens, Etienne; Evenepoel, Pieter; Bouillon, Roger; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Vermeersch, Pieter

    2017-10-01

    The measurement of 1α,25(OH)2D3 in human serum poses a true challenge as concentrations are very low and structurally similar metabolites can interfere. During optimization of our in-house LC-MSMS method for serum 1α,25(OH)2D3 a previously co-eluting isobaric interference was separated. The isobar was identified as 1β,25(OH)2D3 by comparing retention time and fragmentation spectra to standards (other isobaric dihydroxylated vitamin D3 analogs). 1β,25(OH)2D3 showed specific cluster formation (water), not present in 1α,25(OH)2D3. 1β,25(OH)2D3 was measured in serum of apparently healthy human volunteers (n=20), patients with high serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations (>50ng/mL) (n=33 among which 4 with very high levels (>150ng/mL)) and patients with kidney failure (n=68; 39 stage 1-3, 29 stage 4-5). Pearson's r was calculated for correlations and Mann-Whitney statistic to compare group medians. Median serum 1β,25(OH)2D3 was 11pg/mL in apparently healthy volunteers and increased to 20pg/mL for serum 25(OH)D concentrations above 80ng/mL (n=22) (pD3 concentrations were significantly correlated to serum 25(OH)D concentrations (r=0.85) for the combined results from healthy volunteers and patient sera (n=53) (pD3 was 7pg/mL and not different from the median level in healthy volunteers (p=0.06). The median concentration did not vary with different stages. We present evidence for the widespread presence of 1β,25(OH)2D3, a new vitamin D metabolite, in human serum. The level increases with rising serum 25(OH)D concentrations and is particularly high in patients with very high 25(OH)D levels. We previously demonstrated that 1β,25(OH)2D3 is a poor genomic agonist but a potent non-genomic antagonist of 1α,25(OH)2D3. The clinical implications of the presence of this analog therefore require further exploration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A lentiviral vector-based genetic sensor system for comparative analysis of permeability and activity of vitamin D3 analogues in xenotransplanted human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunstrup, Nicklas Heine; Bak, Rasmus O; Cai, Yujia; Svensson, Lars; Petersen, Thomas K; Rosada, Cecilia; Stenderup, Karin; Bolund, Lars; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2013-03-01

    Vitamin D3 analogues are widely used topical and oral remedies for various ailments such as psoriasis, osteoporosis and secondary hyperparathyroidism. In topical treatment, high skin permeability and cellular uptake are key criteria for beneficial effects due to the natural barrier properties of skin. In this study, we wish to establish an in vivo model that allows the comparison of permeability and activity of vitamin D3 analogues in human skin. We generate a bipartite, genetic sensor technology that combines efficient lentivirus-directed gene delivery to xenotransplanted human skin with vitamin D3-induced expression of a luciferase reporter gene and live imaging of animals by bioluminescence imaging. Based on the induction of a transcriptional activator consisting of the vitamin D receptor fused to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain, the vitamin D3-responsive sensor facilitates non-invasive and rapid assessment of permeability and functional properties of vitamin D3 analogues. By topical application of a panel of vitamin D3 analogues onto 'sensorized' human skin, the sensor produces a drug-induced readout with a magnitude and persistence that allow a direct comparative analysis of different analogues. This novel genetic tool has great potential as a non-invasive in vivo screening system for further development and refinement of vitamin D3 analogues.

  20. Alterations in vitamin D signaling pathway in gastric cancer progression: a study of vitamin D receptor expression in human normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yanghui; Da, Mingxu; Zhang, Yongbin; Peng, Lingzhi; Yao, Jibin; Duan, Yaoxing

    2015-01-01

    Amount of studies in cells and animal models have proved vitamin D has multifarious antitumor effects. However, epidemiological studies showed inconsistent result on gastric cancer. The antitumor role is mainly mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Our hypothesis is that VDR may be abnormally (poorly) expressed in gastric cancer tissue. Present study is aimed at discovering and analyzing VDR expression in a series of human gastric tissues, including normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissue, and correlated VDR to the clinicopathological parameters of gastric cancer patients. VDR expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. The χ(2) test was used to analyze the VDR expression as well as the relationship between VDR and the clinicopathological factors of gastric cancer patients. Compared with normal (82.61%) and premalignant tissues (73.64%), VDR was lower expressed in cancer tissues (57.61%), with a statistically significant difference (P = 0.001). Among cancer tissues, VDR was higher expressed in well and moderate differentiated tissues contrasted with tissues with poor differentiation, and higher expressed in small tumors (gastric tissues. VDR expression has been on the decline from the premalignant stage, finally low expressed in gastric cancer tissues, especial in poorly differentiated tissues. VDR could be a potential prognostic factor for patients with gastric cancer.

  1. Production of functional human vitamin A transporter/RBP receptor (STRA6 for structure determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor J Breen

    Full Text Available STRA6 is a plasma membrane protein that mediates the transport of vitamin A, or retinol, from plasma retinol binding protein (RBP into the cell. Mutations in human STRA6 are associated with Matthew-Wood syndrome, which is characterized by severe developmental defects. Despite the obvious importance of this protein to human health, little is known about its structure and mechanism of action. To overcome the difficulties frequently encountered with the production of membrane proteins for structural determination, STRA6 has been expressed in Pichia pastoris as a fusion to green fluorescent protein (GFP, a strategy which has been a critical first step in solving the crystal structures of several membrane proteins. STRA6-GFP was correctly targeted to the cell surface where it bound RBP. Here we report the large-scale expression, purification and characterisation of STRA6-GFP. One litre of culture, corresponding to 175 g cells, yielded about 1.5 mg of pure protein. The interaction between purified STRA6 and its ligand RBP was studied by surface plasmon resonance-based binding analysis. The interaction between STRA6 and RBP was not retinol-dependent and the binding data were consistent with a transient interaction of 1 mole RBP/mole STRA6.

  2. Competitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay for vitamin B12 analysis in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Daniela; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Domek, Joseph M; Siddiqua, Towfida; Raqib, Rubhana; Allen, Lindsay H

    2014-06-15

    Recent discoveries of matrix interferences by haptocorrin (HC) in human milk and serum show that past analyses of vitamin B12 in samples with high HC content might have been inaccurate (Lildballe et al., 2009; Carmel & Agrawal, 2012). We evaluated two competitive enzyme-binding immunoassays for serum/plasma (IMMULITE and SimulTRAC-SNB) for B12 analysis in human milk. B12-recovery rates (United States Environmental Protection Agency, 2007) were determined to be 78.9 ± 9.1% with IMMULITE and 225 ± 108% (range 116-553%) using SimulTRAC-SNB, most likely due to the presence of excess HC. HC-interferences were not observed with the IMMULITE assay, rendering previously reported mandatory HC-removal (Lildballe et al., 2009) unnecessary. Linearity continued at low B12-concentrations (24-193 pM; r(2)>0.985). Milk B12 concentrations from Bangladeshi women (72-959 pM) were significantly lower than those from California (154-933 pM; pmilk matrix and its ability to measure low milk B12 concentrations.

  3. Applying Multiple Data Collection Tools to Quantify Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Communication on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Philip M; Leader, Amy; Yom-Tov, Elad; Budenz, Alexandra; Fisher, Kara; Klassen, Ann C

    2016-12-05

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. There are several vaccines that protect against strains of HPV most associated with cervical and other cancers. Thus, HPV vaccination has become an important component of adolescent preventive health care. As media evolves, more information about HPV vaccination is shifting to social media platforms such as Twitter. Health information consumed on social media may be especially influential for segments of society such as younger populations, as well as ethnic and racial minorities. The objectives of our study were to quantify HPV vaccine communication on Twitter, and to develop a novel methodology to improve the collection and analysis of Twitter data. We collected Twitter data using 10 keywords related to HPV vaccination from August 1, 2014 to July 31, 2015. Prospective data collection used the Twitter Search API and retrospective data collection used Twitter Firehose. Using a codebook to characterize tweet sentiment and content, we coded a subsample of tweets by hand to develop classification models to code the entire sample using machine learning procedures. We also documented the words in the 140-character tweet text most associated with each keyword. We used chi-square tests, analysis of variance, and nonparametric equality of medians to test for significant differences in tweet characteristic by sentiment. A total of 193,379 English-language tweets were collected, classified, and analyzed. Associated words varied with each keyword, with more positive and preventive words associated with "HPV vaccine" and more negative words associated with name-brand vaccines. Positive sentiment was the largest type of sentiment in the sample, with 75,393 positive tweets (38.99% of the sample), followed by negative sentiment with 48,940 tweets (25.31% of the sample). Positive and neutral tweets constituted the largest percentage of tweets mentioning prevention or protection (20

  4. Quantifying Stress Using mDFA: Heartbeats Exhibit Stress/Fear/Anxiety in Animal Model and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Yazawa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stress has not been fully defined in terms of neuroscience. But, it might be possible to quantify it, like body temperature. The aim of this study was to develop a method to quantify stress, fear and anxiety that has not been accomplished. In the present study, we present a method to quantify them using the biomedical vital information, i.e., the timing of heartbeat. Here electrocardiograms of both animal models and humans were analyzed by modified detrended fluctuation analysis (mDFA, which calculates a scaling exponent (SI from the heartbeat interval time series. The SI was able to numerically distinguish between normal and abnormal hearts. SI values varied with heart conditions, i.e., healthy basal or stressful conditions. This study suggests that mDFA has potential as a practical method for the construction of a device for health management.

  5. CCQM-K132: low-polarity analytes in a biological matrix: vitamin D metabolites in human serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Stephen A.; Tai, Susan S.-C.; Duewer, David L.; Bedner, Mary; Camara, Johanna E.; Lippa, Katrice A.; Qinde, Liu; Kang, Dukjin; Kim, Byungjoo; Quan, Can; Shi, Lianhua; Nammoonnoy, Jintana; Vamathevan, Veronica; Ceyhan Gören, Ahmet; Bilsel, Gökhan; Yilmaz, Hasibe

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that occurs primarily in two forms, vitamin D2 and vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 is produced naturally when skin is exposed to UV radiation, is naturally-occurring in foods (generally of animal origin), and is fortified in some foods and dietary supplements. Vitamin D2 occurs in food (generally plant sources) and until recently was the form most often used in dietary supplements. Vitamin D is metabolized in the body to produce several closely related, hydroxylated species (metabolites), with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] and 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 [25(OH)D2] as the most common metabolites measured in human serum. Concentrations of total vitamin D in human serum, calculated as the sum of 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3, are typically in the 16 ng/g to 30 ng/g (40 nmol/L to 75 nmol/L) range, with 25(OH)D3 usually accounting for more than 90 % of the total. An epimer of 25(OH)D3, 3-epi-25(OH)D3, can be present at levels up to 10 % of 25(OH)D3 concentration. Seven National Metrology Institutions participated in the Track C Key Comparison CCQM-K132 low-polarity analytes in a biological matrix: vitamin D metabolites in human serum. Participants were requested to evaluate the mass fractions, expressed in ng/g, of 25(OH)D3, 25(OH)D2, and 3-epi-25(OH)D3 in two human serum materials, termed Serum Pool I and Serum Pool II. Due to the known low levels of 3-epi-25(OH)D3 in both materials and the very low level of 25(OH)D2 in Serum Pool I, the study protocol stated that key comparison reference values (KCRVs) would be assigned only to 25(OH)D3 in both materials and 25(OH)D2 in Serum Pool II. Results for 3-epi-25(OH)D3 were requested to evaluate the separation technologies employed; 3-epi-25(OH)D3 needs to be chromatographically separated from 25(OH)D3 for proper quantification of 25(OH)D3. Results for 25(OH)D2 in Serum Pool I were requested to explore measurement performance at its low level. All participants used isotope dilution liquid chromatography with

  6. Role of Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) on human health- A review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These variations are unusual and point to the need for further research to establish ... The RDA for vitamin C should be more than the amount needed to prevent the ... Increased consumption of ascorbic acid raises serum ascorbic levels and could ... Keywords: Vitamin C, cancer, blood pressure, drug metabolism, immunity.

  7. Vitamin D analysis in plasma by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with C30 reversed phase column and UV detection - easy and acetonitrile-free

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hymøller, Lone; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Two physiologically important forms of vitamin D exist: vitamin D2 and vitamin D3, which by liver based hydroxylase enzymes are converted to 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, respectively. These hydroxylated metabolites of vitamin D are measured in plasma to assess the vtamin D status...... detection at 265nm for quantifying vitamin D2, vitamin D3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D2, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. The method proved versatile with respect to plasma lipid content, sample amount, and plasma concentration of the vitamin D metabolites as it was tested using plasma from six different species: cattle...... material® 972 “Vitamin D in human serum” from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (Gaithersburg, USA) the results for 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations were within the boundaries provided by NIST, reflected by Z-scores between 0.1 and 0.9....

  8. Vitamin C and E supplementation hampers cellular adaptation to endurance training in humans: a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Gøran; Cumming, Kristoffer T; Holden, Geir; Hallén, Jostein; Rønnestad, Bent Ronny; Sveen, Ole; Skaug, Arne; Paur, Ingvild; Bastani, Nasser E; Østgaard, Hege Nymo; Buer, Charlotte; Midttun, Magnus; Freuchen, Fredrik; Wiig, Havard; Ulseth, Elisabeth Tallaksen; Garthe, Ina; Blomhoff, Rune; Benestad, Haakon B; Raastad, Truls

    2014-04-15

    In this double-blind, randomised, controlled trial, we investigated the effects of vitamin C and E supplementation on endurance training adaptations in humans. Fifty-four young men and women were randomly allocated to receive either 1000 mg of vitamin C and 235 mg of vitamin E or a placebo daily for 11 weeks. During supplementation, the participants completed an endurance training programme consisting of three to four sessions per week (primarily of running), divided into high-intensity interval sessions [4-6 × 4-6 min; >90% of maximal heart rate (HRmax)] and steady state continuous sessions (30-60 min; 70-90% of HRmax). Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max ), submaximal running and a 20 m shuttle run test were assessed and blood samples and muscle biopsies were collected, before and after the intervention. Participants in the vitamin C and E group increased their VO2 max (mean ± s.d.: 8 ± 5%) and performance in the 20 m shuttle test (10 ± 11%) to the same degree as those in the placebo group (mean ± s.d.: 8 ± 5% and 14 ± 17%, respectively). However, the mitochondrial marker cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX4) and cytosolic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1 α (PGC-1α) increased in the m. vastus lateralis in the placebo group by 59 ± 97% and 19 ± 51%, respectively, but not in the vitamin C and E group (COX4: -13 ± 54%; PGC-1α: -13 ± 29%; P ≤ 0.03, between groups). Furthermore, mRNA levels of CDC42 and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) in the trained muscle were lower in the vitamin C and E group than in the placebo group (P ≤ 0.05). Daily vitamin C and E supplementation attenuated increases in markers of mitochondrial biogenesis following endurance training. However, no clear interactions were detected for improvements in VO2 max and running performance. Consequently, vitamin C and E supplementation hampered cellular adaptations in the exercised muscles, and although this did not translate to the performance tests

  9. Metabolomic analysis reveals extended metabolic consequences of marginal vitamin B-6 deficiency in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Jesse F; Park, Youngja; Lamers, Yvonne; Bandyopadhyay, Nirmalya; Chi, Yueh-Yun; Lee, Kichen; Kim, Steven; da Silva, Vanessa; Hove, Nikolas; Ranka, Sanjay; Kahveci, Tamer; Muller, Keith E; Stevens, Robert D; Newgard, Christopher B; Stacpoole, Peter W; Jones, Dean P

    2013-01-01

    Marginal deficiency of vitamin B-6 is common among segments of the population worldwide. Because pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) serves as a coenzyme in the metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, organic acids, and neurotransmitters, as well as in aspects of one-carbon metabolism, vitamin B-6 deficiency could have many effects. Healthy men and women (age: 20-40 y; n = 23) were fed a 2-day controlled, nutritionally adequate diet followed by a 28-day low-vitamin B-6 diet (deficiency, as reflected by a decline of plasma PLP from 52.6±14.1 (mean ± SD) to 21.5±4.6 nmol/L (Pamino acids and 45 acylcarnitines. These findings demonstrate that marginal vitamin B-6 deficiency has widespread metabolic perturbations and illustrate the utility of metabolomics in evaluating complex effects of altered vitamin B-6 intake.

  10. Effect of Light and Storage Time on Vitamin E in Pharmaceutical Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Phuoc Nhan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E is an important oxidant for both plant and animal and a lipid soluble vitamin which occurs naturally in edible plant oils and able to be synthesized by oxygenic bacteria. Besides, cooking oils and edible oil containing seeds, human can intake vitamin E via pharmaceutical products. With simply spectral method, vitamin E contents in tablets were quantified easily during storage. Vitamin E levels in medical products sold on Vietnamese market varied among producers ranging from 15 mg up to about 360 mg/tablet. Vitamin E in eight selected products was degraded gradually with prolonged storage time but much more rapidly in scatter light exposure condition than in the dark. The more vitamin E in the tablets, the quicker degradation occurred. Tablets exposed to natural sun light or UV source depleted vitamin E significantly within 5 h, approximately 50% for both lighted conditions. There was a relatively high tight correlation (R2 = 0.8266 between tablet price and its vitamin E content. Customer should buy the higher price products rather than the cheaper ones to get sufficient amount of vitamin E. Pharmaceutical vitamin E products should be used up soon after being bought or kept away any light sources.

  11. Effect of Progesterone-only Contraception on Vitamin D in Human Milk

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    Samira Heidary

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nowadays progesterone contraceptives are being used by lactating women. In the last century elements effective in bone growth in infants, such as calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D have been evaluated. Vitamin D has been mentioned mainly in relation to rickets prevention in infants. This study was initiated in order to investigate the effect of Progestin-only contraceptives on breast milk vitamin D.Material & Methods: In this cohort study 138 lactating women were assigned to either the hormonal (52 participants or non-hormonal (86 participants groups according to their chosen method of contraception. The characteristics and goals of the study were explained in detail and informed consent was obtained from all subjects before inclusion in the study. Research units started their method of contraception 45 (7 days postpartum and continued at least for 6 months afterward. 10 ml milk samples were obtained before the baby nursed at 6 mos postpartum, and kept at -20 °C until analysis. Vitamin D levels were measured with RIA method.Findings: Vitamin D levels were found to be 11.2 (7.2 nmol/L in the hormonal and 10.67±6.6 nmol/L in the non-hormonal groups, which was lower than other cultures. There was not a significant difference between the vitamin D levels of the two groups statistically (P>0.05. Conclusion: According the results, the consumption of progesterone-only contraceptives had no effect on the vitamin D levels of mothers' milk, although with regard to low levels of vitamin D in the milk of lactating mothers, it is necessary to enrich foods with vitamin D and for mothers to use vitamin D supplements.

  12. UV dependent vitamin D syntheses. UV exposure time balancing for optimum production of the vitamins D3 status in the human body. Final report; UV-abhaengige Vitamin D Synthese. Bilanzierung der Expositionszeit durch UV zur Produktion des optimalen Vitamin D{sub 3}-Bedarfes im menschlichen Koerper. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuschke, P.; Lehmann, B.; Pueschel, A.; Roensch, H.

    2012-10-15

    UV-dependent vitamin D{sub 3} synthesis - balancing of UV exposure time and the production of an optimal vitamin D{sub 3} status in men The adverse health effects on human skin and eyes by UV radiation have been well known for years. They are known to the public, too. Increased exposures by the UV-B fraction of solar radiation cause e.g. sun burn as an acute skin reaction or an increased risk on skin cancer as a chronic effect. Radiation of the same spectral UV-B range is necessary to induce the essential vitamin D metabolism in men. The UV-induced vitamin D synthesis in the skin supplies the body with more than 90 % while our typical nutrition contributes no more than 10 %. These photobiological effects are diametrically opposed. Therefore, up to now there are contradictory recommendations to the public concerning the health effects of solar UV exposure. The aim of this research project was to evaluate the quantitative and qualitative relations of UV exposure and the vitamin D status in men taking into account different conditions in the population. In result, well-balanced recommendations on optimal UV exposures for the different fractions of the population should be elaborated, realizing health protection aspects against detrimental UV effects. A literature survey (updated in 2011) summarizes the current knowledge on the vitamin D metabolism, on the effects of the hormone vitamin D and on the stage of the current discussion on the optimal vitamin D status. In a number of studies of this project the effects of UV exposure on the vitamin D status (25OH-vitamin D{sub 3} und 1,25OH-vitamin D{sub 3}) were investigated. Exposure parameters were the photobiologically effective UV dose (with respect to the minimal erythema dose MED = individual sun burn dose in each investigated volunteer) and the extent of the exposed skin area: face and hands (like everyday conditions) or whole body respectively. Serial UV exposures were applied by natural solar UV radiation or by

  13. Vitamin D Analogs Potentiate the Antitumor Effect of Imatinib Mesylate in a Human A549 Lung Tumor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Ewa; Filip-Psurska, Beata; Świtalska, Marta; Kutner, Andrzej; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2015-11-13

    In previous papers, we presented data on studies on the anticancer activity of the vitamin D₃ analogs, named PRI-2191 and PRI-2205, in different cancer models. In this study, we showed the improved antiproliferative activity of a combination of imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, GV) and cytostatic agents in in vitro studies, when used with a third compound, namely PRI-2191, in an A549 human lung cancer model. Furthermore, we analyzed the influence of both PRI-2191, as well as PRI-2205 on the anticancer activity of GV in mice bearing A549 tumors. The route of PRI-2191 analog administration showed a significant impact on the outcome of GV treatment: subcutaneous injection was more efficient and less toxic than oral gavage. Moreover, both vitamin D compounds increased the anticancer activity of GV; however, they might also potentiate some adverse effects. We also evaluated in tumor tissue the expression of VEGF, PDGF-BB, vitamin D receptor, CYP27B1, CYP24, p53 and Bcl-2, as well as PDGF receptors: α and β. We observed the upregulation of p53 expression and the downregulation of Bcl-2, as well as VEGF in A549 tumors as a result of the tested treatment. However, vitamin D analogs did not significantly influence the expression of these proteins.

  14. Vitamin D Analogs Potentiate the Antitumor Effect of Imatinib Mesylate in a Human A549 Lung Tumor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Ewa; Filip-Psurska, Beata; Świtalska, Marta; Kutner, Andrzej; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    In previous papers, we presented data on studies on the anticancer activity of the vitamin D3 analogs, named PRI-2191 and PRI-2205, in different cancer models. In this study, we showed the improved antiproliferative activity of a combination of imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, GV) and cytostatic agents in in vitro studies, when used with a third compound, namely PRI-2191, in an A549 human lung cancer model. Furthermore, we analyzed the influence of both PRI-2191, as well as PRI-2205 on the anticancer activity of GV in mice bearing A549 tumors. The route of PRI-2191 analog administration showed a significant impact on the outcome of GV treatment: subcutaneous injection was more efficient and less toxic than oral gavage. Moreover, both vitamin D compounds increased the anticancer activity of GV; however, they might also potentiate some adverse effects. We also evaluated in tumor tissue the expression of VEGF, PDGF-BB, vitamin D receptor, CYP27B1, CYP24, p53 and Bcl-2, as well as PDGF receptors: α and β. We observed the upregulation of p53 expression and the downregulation of Bcl-2, as well as VEGF in A549 tumors as a result of the tested treatment. However, vitamin D analogs did not significantly influence the expression of these proteins. PMID:26580599

  15. Vitamin D Analogs Potentiate the Antitumor Effect of Imatinib Mesylate in a Human A549 Lung Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Maj

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In previous papers, we presented data on studies on the anticancer activity of the vitamin D3 analogs, named PRI-2191 and PRI-2205, in different cancer models. In this study, we showed the improved antiproliferative activity of a combination of imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, GV and cytostatic agents in in vitro studies, when used with a third compound, namely PRI-2191, in an A549 human lung cancer model. Furthermore, we analyzed the influence of both PRI-2191, as well as PRI-2205 on the anticancer activity of GV in mice bearing A549 tumors. The route of PRI-2191 analog administration showed a significant impact on the outcome of GV treatment: subcutaneous injection was more efficient and less toxic than oral gavage. Moreover, both vitamin D compounds increased the anticancer activity of GV; however, they might also potentiate some adverse effects. We also evaluated in tumor tissue the expression of VEGF, PDGF-BB, vitamin D receptor, CYP27B1, CYP24, p53 and Bcl-2, as well as PDGF receptors: α and β. We observed the upregulation of p53 expression and the downregulation of Bcl-2, as well as VEGF in A549 tumors as a result of the tested treatment. However, vitamin D analogs did not significantly influence the expression of these proteins.

  16. Gene expression profiles in human and mouse primary cells provide new insights into the differential actions of vitamin D3 metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuohimaa, Pentti; Wang, Jing-Huan; Khan, Sofia

    2013-01-01

    and a systematic understanding is lacking. Here we performed the first systematic study of global gene expression to clarify their similarities and differences. Three metabolites at physiologically comparable levels were utilized to treat human and mouse fibroblasts prior to DNA microarray analyses. Human primary...... lateral sclerosis signaling, gene transcription, immunomodulation, epigenetics, cell differentiation, and membrane protein expression. In conclusion, there are three distinct vitamin D3 hormones with clearly different biological activities. This study presents a new conceptual insight into the vitamin D3...... endocrine system, which may guide the strategic use of vitamin D3 in disease prevention and treatment....

  17. 2D and 3D crystallization of a bacterial homologue of human vitamin C membrane transport proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Harder, Daniel; Ucurum, Zöhre; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2014-10-01

    Most organisms are able to synthesize vitamin C whereas humans are not. In order to contribute to the elucidation of the molecular working mechanism of vitamin C transport through biological membranes, we cloned, overexpressed, purified, functionally characterized, and 2D- and 3D-crystallized a bacterial protein (UraDp) with 29% of amino acid sequence identity to the human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 1 (SVCT1). Ligand-binding experiments by scintillation proximity assay revealed that uracil is a substrate preferably bound to UraDp. For structural analysis, we report on the production of tubular 2D crystals and present a first projection structure of UraDp from negatively stained tubes. On the other hand the successful growth of UraDp 3D crystals and their crystallographic analysis is described. These 3D crystals, which diffract X-rays to 4.2Å resolution, pave the way towards the high-resolution crystal structure of a bacterial homologue with high amino acid sequence identity to human SVCT1.

  18. Induction of CFTR gene expression by 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3, 25OH vitamin D3, and vitamin D3 in cultured human airway epithelial cells and in mouse airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFranco, Kristina M; Mulligan, Jennifer K; Sumal, Aman S; Diamond, Gill

    2017-01-24

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which often leads to protein misfolding and no CFTR surface localization. This then leads to chronic airway infections, inflammation, and tissue damage. Although vitamin D has been explored as a therapy to treat CF due to its antimicrobial-inducing and anti-inflammatory properties, the effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) on CFTR directly has not been studied. We treated cultured healthy and diseased bronchial epithelial cells (BEC) with 10nM 1α,25(OH)2D3 for 6 and 24h and found that 1α,25(OH)2D3 increases both mRNA and protein CFTR levels using RT-qPCR, flow cytometry and fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Treatment of CF cells with 10nM 1α,25(OH)2D3 led to an increase in both total and surface CFTR expression, suggesting 1α,25(OH)2D3 could be used to increase properly localized CFTR in airway cells. To determine if BEC could convert the more clinically relevant cholecalciferol to 25OHD3, cultured non-CF and CF BECs were treated with a range of cholecalciferol concentrations, and 25OHD3 levels were quantified by ELISA. We found that 25OHD3 levels increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of BEC with 10μM cholecalciferol led to increases in both CYP24A1 and CFTR mRNA levels, even when added to the apical surface of cells grown in an air-liquid interface, suggesting that topical administration of vitamin D could be used therapeutically. To demonstrate this in vivo, we intranasally delivered 1μM 1α,25(OH)2D3 into mice. After 6h, we observed induction of both Cyp24A1 and CFTR expression in the tracheas of treated mice. The major findings of this study are that vitamin D can be converted to the active form when topically administered to the airway, and this could be used to increase CFTR levels in patients with CF. This could potentially be useful as an adjunctive therapy, together with

  19. Metabolomic analysis reveals extended metabolic consequences of marginal vitamin B-6 deficiency in healthy human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse F Gregory

    Full Text Available Marginal deficiency of vitamin B-6 is common among segments of the population worldwide. Because pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP serves as a coenzyme in the metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, organic acids, and neurotransmitters, as well as in aspects of one-carbon metabolism, vitamin B-6 deficiency could have many effects. Healthy men and women (age: 20-40 y; n = 23 were fed a 2-day controlled, nutritionally adequate diet followed by a 28-day low-vitamin B-6 diet (<0.5 mg/d to induce marginal deficiency, as reflected by a decline of plasma PLP from 52.6±14.1 (mean ± SD to 21.5±4.6 nmol/L (P<0.0001 and increased cystathionine from 131±65 to 199±56 nmol/L (P<0.001. Fasting plasma samples obtained before and after vitamin B6 restriction were analyzed by (1H-NMR with and without filtration and by targeted quantitative analysis by mass spectrometry (MS. Multilevel partial least squares-discriminant analysis and S-plots of NMR spectra showed that NMR is effective in classifying samples according to vitamin B-6 status and identified discriminating features. NMR spectral features of selected metabolites indicated that vitamin B-6 restriction significantly increased the ratios of glutamine/glutamate and 2-oxoglutarate/glutamate (P<0.001 and tended to increase concentrations of acetate, pyruvate, and trimethylamine-N-oxide (adjusted P<0.05. Tandem MS showed significantly greater plasma proline after vitamin B-6 restriction (adjusted P<0.05, but there were no effects on the profile of 14 other amino acids and 45 acylcarnitines. These findings demonstrate that marginal vitamin B-6 deficiency has widespread metabolic perturbations and illustrate the utility of metabolomics in evaluating complex effects of altered vitamin B-6 intake.

  20. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Fridman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: Vitamin D deficiency in the adults could produce osteomalacia, secondary hyperparathyroidism with bone loss and increased risk of fractures. An increased prevalence of osteopenia, osteoporosis, decreased bone density, vitamin D deficiency and increased risk of fracture was found in HIV-positive patients. A study performed in Buenos Aires, Argentina that included non-HIV-infected adult patients showed 15% prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in winter and 0% prevalence in summer. There is no local data published of vitamin D deficiency in HIV-positive populations. The aim of the study is to determinate the prevalence of vitamin deficiency in our HIV-positive population receiving HAART. Methods: An observational, retrospective study was performed. We reviewed the clinical charts of the HIV-positive adult patients attending the infectious disease clinic. We collected data of vitamin D, parathormone and beta cross laps value; we recorded if the test was performed in winter or summer. We considered vitamin D deficiency if<10 ng/ml. We recorded age, sex, comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, renal failure, hepatic failure, HBV and/or HCV coinfection, menopause, malignancy and metabolic syndrome, months since HIV diagnosis, CD4 count, viral load and HAART. Summary of results: 60 patients were included, 49 (65% of whom were male. Mean age was 49.15 years. Mean time from diagnosis was 112 months. Mean CD4 count was 548 cells/mm3 and 6.6% presented CD4 <200; 83.3% had viral load <50 copies/mm3. All patients were on HAART; 50% received efavirenz, 65% received tenofovir and 11.6% recived atazanavir. Mean vitamin D value was 23.58 ng/ml (5–66.5 ng/ml. In winter, 15.3% of the patients had <10 ng/ml of vitamin D and mean value was 24.16 ng/ml (10–40 ng/ml. Although the mean value in summer was 25.8 ng/ml (11.6–66 ng/ml 10% of the patients had vitamin D deficiency. PTH value was abnormal in 31.6% of patients and beta cross laps was

  1. Combined vitamins Bl2b and C induce the glutathione depletion and the death of epidermoid human larynx carcinoma cells HEp-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatov, V S; Evtodienko, Y V; Leshchenko, V V; Teplova, V V; Potselueva, M M; Kruglov, A G; Lezhnev, E I; Yakubovskaya, R I

    2000-10-01

    The combination of hydroxocobalamin (vitamin B12b) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) can cause the death of tumor cells at the concentrations of the components at which they are nontoxic when administered separately. This cytotoxic action on epidermoid human larynx carcinoma cells HEp-2 in vitro is shown to be due to the hydrogen peroxide generated by the combination of vitamins B12b and C. The drop in the glutathione level preceding cell death was found to be the result of combined action of the vitamins. It is supposed that the induction of cell death by combined action of vitamins B12b and C is connected to the damage of the cell redox system.

  2. Quantifying Diet-Induced Metabolic Changes of the Human Gut Microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shoaie, Saeed; Ghaffari, Pouyan; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia

    2015-01-01

    The human gut microbiome is known to be associated with various human disorders, but a major challenge is to go beyond association studies and elucidate causalities. Mathematical modeling of the human gut microbiome at a genome scale is a useful tool to decipher microbe-microbe, diet-microbe and ...

  3. Vitamin C and Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Hemilä

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the early literature, vitamin C deficiency was associated with pneumonia. After its identification, a number of studies investigated the effects of vitamin C on diverse infections. A total of 148 animal studies indicated that vitamin C may alleviate or prevent infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The most extensively studied human infection is the common cold. Vitamin C administration does not decrease the average incidence of colds in the general population, yet it halved the number of colds in physically active people. Regularly administered vitamin C has shortened the duration of colds, indicating a biological effect. However, the role of vitamin C in common cold treatment is unclear. Two controlled trials found a statistically significant dose–response, for the duration of common cold symptoms, with up to 6–8 g/day of vitamin C. Thus, the negative findings of some therapeutic common cold studies might be explained by the low doses of 3–4 g/day of vitamin C. Three controlled trials found that vitamin C prevented pneumonia. Two controlled trials found a treatment benefit of vitamin C for pneumonia patients. One controlled trial reported treatment benefits for tetanus patients. The effects of vitamin C against infections should be investigated further.

  4. Vitamin K and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Geno J; Fink, James

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin K was discovered in the 1930s during cholesterol metabolism experiments in chickens. It is a fat-soluble vitamin which occurs naturally in plants as phylloquinone (vitamin K1) and is produced by gram-negative bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract as menaquinone (vitamin K2). This vitamin was found to be essential for normal functioning of hemostasis. In addition, a number of clinical conditions in which vitamin K deficiency was found to be the underlying pathophysiologic problem were discovered. These conditions include hemorrhagic disease of the newborn, obstructive jaundice, and malabsorption syndromes. The importance of this vitamin has become more apparent with the discovery of the anticoagulant warfarin which is a vitamin K antagonist. There are millions of patients on this therapy for a variety of thrombogenic conditions such as atrial fibrillation, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and prosthetic cardiac valves. The wide use of this narrow therapeutic index drug has resulted in significant risk for major bleeding. Vitamin K serves as one of the major reversing agent for patients over-anticoagulated with warfarin. In the past few years, research has focused on new areas of vitamin K metabolism, which include bone and endovascular metabolism; cell growth, regulation, migration, and proliferation; cell survival, apoptosis, phagocytosis, and adhesion. These new areas of research highlight the significance of vitamin K but raise new clinical questions for patients who must be maintained on long-term warfarin therapy.

  5. Nonclassical Vitamin D Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Zittermann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that vitamin D has a broad range of actions in the human body. Besides its well-known effects on calcium/phosphate homeostasis, vitamin D influences muscle function, cardiovascular homeostasis, nervous function, and the immune response. Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency has been associated with muscle weakness and a high incidence of various chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 and 2 diabetes. Most importantly, low vitamin D status has been found to be an independent predictor of all-cause mortality. Several recent randomized controlled trials support the assumption that vitamin D can improve muscle strength, glucose homeostasis, and cardiovascular risk markers. In addition, vitamin D may reduce cancer incidence and elevated blood pressure. Since the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is high throughout the world, there is a need to improve vitamin D status in the general adult population. However, the currently recommended daily vitamin D intake of 5–15 µg is too low to achieve an adequate vitamin D status in individuals with only modest skin synthesis. Thus, there is a need to recommend a vitamin D intake that is effective for achieving adequate circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (>75 nmol/L.

  6. A Novel Role for a Major Component of the Vitamin D Axis: Vitamin D Binding Protein-Derived Macrophage Activating Factor Induces Human Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis through Stimulation of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ruggiero

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of vitamin D in maintaining health appears greater than originally thought, and the concept of the vitamin D axis underlines the complexity of the biological events controlled by biologically active vitamin D (1,25(OH(2D3, its two binding proteins that are the vitamin D receptor (VDR and the vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF. In this study we demonstrate that GcMAF stimulates macrophages, which in turn attack human breast cancer cells, induce their apoptosis and eventually phagocytize them. These results are consistent with the observation that macrophages infiltrated implanted tumors in mice after GcMAF injections. In addition, we hypothesize that the last 23 hydrophobic amino acids of VDR, located at the inner part of the plasma membrane, interact with the first 23 hydrophobic amino acids of the GcMAF located at the external part of the plasma membrane. This al1ows 1,25(OH(2D3 and oleic acid to become sandwiched between the two vitamin D-binding proteins, thus postulating a novel molecular mode of interaction between GcMAF and VDR. Taken together, these results support and reinforce the hypothesis that GcMAF has multiple biological activities that could be responsible for its anti-cancer effects, possibly through molecular interaction with the VDR that in turn is responsible for a multitude of non-genomic as well as genomic effects.

  7. A novel role for a major component of the vitamin D axis: vitamin D binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor induces human breast cancer cell apoptosis through stimulation of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Fiore, Maria Giulia; Magherini, Stefano; Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-07-08

    The role of vitamin D in maintaining health appears greater than originally thought, and the concept of the vitamin D axis underlines the complexity of the biological events controlled by biologically active vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D3), its two binding proteins that are the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). In this study we demonstrate that GcMAF stimulates macrophages, which in turn attack human breast cancer cells, induce their apoptosis and eventually phagocytize them. These results are consistent with the observation that macrophages infiltrated implanted tumors in mice after GcMAF injections. In addition, we hypothesize that the last 23 hydrophobic amino acids of VDR, located at the inner part of the plasma membrane, interact with the first 23 hydrophobic amino acids of the GcMAF located at the external part of the plasma membrane. This allows 1,25(OH)(2)D3 and oleic acid to become sandwiched between the two vitamin D-binding proteins, thus postulating a novel molecular mode of interaction between GcMAF and VDR. Taken together, these results support and reinforce the hypothesis that GcMAF has multiple biological activities that could be responsible for its anti-cancer effects, possibly through molecular interaction with the VDR that in turn is responsible for a multitude of non-genomic as well as genomic effects.

  8. Characterization of the vitamin D endocrine system in human sebocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Christina; Seltmann, Holger; Seifert, Markus; Tilgen, Wolfgang; Zouboulis, Christos C; Reichrath, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Sebocytes are sebum-producing cells that form the sebaceous glands. We investigated the role of sebocytes as target cells for vitamin D metabolites and the existence of an enzymatic machinery for the local synthesis and metabolism of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3), calcitriol], the biologically active vitamin D metabolite, in these cell types. Expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR), vitamin D-25-hydroxylase (25 OHase), 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1alpha-hydroxylase (1 alphaOHase), and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-24-hydroxylase (24 OHase) was detected in SZ95 sebocytes in vitro using real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Splice variants of 1alphaOHase were identified by nested touchdown polymerase chain reaction. We demonstrated that incubation of SZ95 sebocytes with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) resulted in a cell culture condition-, time-, and dose-dependent modulation of cell proliferation, cell cycle regulation, lipid content and interleukin-6/interleukin-8 secretion in vitro. RNA expression of VDR and 24 OHase was upregulated along with vitamin D analogue treatment. Although several other splice variants of 1alphaOHase were detected, our findings indicate that the full length product represents the major 1 alphaOHase gene product in SZ95 cells. In conclusion, SZ95 sebocytes express VDR and the enzymatic machinery to synthesize and metabolize biologically active vitamin D analogues. Sebocytes represent target cells for biologically active metabolites. Our findings indicate that the vitamin D endocrine system is of high importance for sebocyte function and physiology. We conclude that sebaceous glands represent potential targets for therapy with vitamin D analogues or for pharmacological modulation of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) synthesis/metabolism.

  9. Influence of vitamin E on the antiplatelet effect of acetylsalicylic acid in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Correa, J A; Arrebola, M M; Guerrero, A; Muñoz-Marín, J; Ruiz-Villafranca, D; Sánchez de La Cuesta, F; De La Cruz, J P

    2005-01-01

    We analysed the in vitro interaction between acetylsalicylic acid and vitamin E on the principal antiplatelet sites of action of acetylsalicylic acid, i.e., platelet aggregation, prostanoid production in platelets and leukocytes, and nitric oxide synthesis. Aggregation was measured in whole blood and in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) with ADP, collagen or arachidonic acid as platelet inducers, and we measured the production of thromboxane B2, prostacyclin and nitric oxide. Vitamin E potentiated the antiplatelet effect of acetylsalicylic acid in both whole blood and PRP. In PRP induced with collagen the IC50 for acetylsalicylic acid alone was 339+/-11.26, and that of acetylsalicylic acid+vitamin E was 0.89+/-0.09 (Pacetylsalicylic acid. Vitamin E spared or even increased prostacyclin levels, and acetylsalicylic acid+vitamin E diminished the inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis by acetylsalicylic acid (IC50 acetylsalicylic acid alone=1.81+/-0.15 microM; IC50 acetylsalicylic acid+vitamin E= 12.92+/-1.10 microM, Pacetylsalicylic acid on neutrophil nitric oxide production 42-fold (Pacetylsalicylic acid in vitro, and thus merits further research in ex vivo studies.

  10. A novel salting-out assisted extraction coupled with HPLC- fluorescence detection for trace determination of vitamin K homologues in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sameh; Mahmoud, Ashraf M

    2015-11-01

    Recently, new physiological roles of vitamin K homologues have been established in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and leukemia. However, relatively high plasma protein binding, low plasma concentrations and occurrences of interfering lipids make accurate determination of vitamin K homologues a challenging task. Therefore, a sensitive and reliable salting-out assisted liquid/liquid extraction (SALLE) method coupled with HPLC-Fluorescence detection was designed for efficient extraction and quantification of trace levels of vitamin K homologues in human plasma. The investigated vitamin K homologues were phylloquinone (PK, vitamin K1), menaquinone-4 (MK-4) and menaquinone-7 (MK-7). The method employed a new efficient fluorescence derivatization reaction using ethanolic solution of stannous chloride in acidic solution to generate highly fluorescent naphthohydroquinone derivatives. Correlation coefficients were more than 0.998 in the concentration ranges of 0.3-100 ng mL(-1) with detection limits of 0.1-0.17 ng mL(-1) in human plasma. The developed HPLC-FL system was successfully applied for sensitive determination of vitamin K homologues in plasma of healthy volunteers. The developed method may provide a valuable tool in the pharmacoinformatic studies concerning the roles of vitamin K homologues.

  11. The effect of digestive enzymes on the binding and bacteriostatic properties of lactoferrin and vitamin B12 binder in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, R R; Mirtle, C; McClelland, D B

    1980-07-01

    Human milk contains unsaturated lactoferrin and vitamin B12 binding protein. It has been suggested that these proteins may exert antibacterial effects in the intestine of the breast fed infant, but the effect of the intestinal environment on the antibacterial effect of these proteins has not been described. In this study human milk was treated with pepsin and trypsin and the influence of digestion on iron and vitamin B12 binding capacity, bacterial uptake of iron and vitamin B12 from milk and bacteriostatic effect was studied. Pepsin digestion had no effect on vitamin B12 binding capacity, or the ability of bacteria to take up vitamin B12, or the growth inhibitory effect on a vitamin B12 dependent strain. In contrast, trypsin digestion did not affect iron binding or bacteriostatic effects attributable to lactoferrin. The. findings support an in vivo bacteriostatic role for lactoferrin in the breast fed neonate's intestine but do not support a similar role for the vitamin B12 binding protein.

  12. Rapid, high performance method for the determination of vitamin K(1), menaquinone-4 and vitamin K(1) 2,3-epoxide in human serum and plasma using liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Alessandra; Cafolla, Arturo; Gasperi, Tecla; Bellante, Simona; Caretti, Fulvia; Curini, Roberta; Fernández, Virginia Pérez

    2014-04-18

    Unlike the other fat-soluble vitamins, vitamin K circulates in the human bloodstream at very low levels because of a low intake in the diet. Mammals have developed an efficient recycling system, known as vitamin K-epoxide cycle, which involve quinone, hydroquinone and epoxide forms of the vitamin. Phylloquinone (K(1)) is the main homologue, while menaquinone-4 (MK-4) is both a member of the vitamin K(2) family and metabolite of K(1) in extra-hepatic tissues. Notwithstanding the recent advances, many aspects of the complex vitamin K physiology still remain to be investigated. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop more reliable analytical methods for determining the vitamin K and its metabolites in biological fluids and tissues. Nevertheless, relatively low concentrations, unavailability of some authentic standards and occurrence of interfering lipids make this a challenging task. The method proposed in the present paper can directly and accurately estimate K(1), K(1) 2,3-epoxide (K(1)O), and MK-4 in human serum and plasma at concentrations in the ng/L-μg/L range, using labelled internal standards and a quadrupole linear ion trap instrument operated in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. High sensitivity was achieved by removing signal "endogenous suppressors" and making the composition of the non-aqueous mobile phase suitable to support the positive atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the analytes. An excellent selectivity resulted from the combination of some factors: the MRM acquisition, the adoption of an identification point system, an extraction optimized to remove most of the lipids and a tandem-C18 column-system necessary to separate isobaric interferences from analytes. The method was validated according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines and its accuracy was assessed by analysing 9 samples from the Vitamin K External Quality Assessment Scheme (KEQAS). Its feasibility in evaluating vitamin K status in human serum was

  13. Quantifying human exposure to air pollution - moving from static monitoring to spatio-temporally resolved personal exposure assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinle, Susanne; Reis, Stefan; Sabel, Clive E

    2013-01-01

    results from multifaceted relationships and interactions between environmental and human systems, adding complexity to the assessment process. Traditionally, approaches to quantify human exposure have relied on pollutant concentrations from fixed air quality network sites and static population...... distributions. New developments in sensor technology now enable us to monitor personal exposure to air pollutants directly while people are moving through their activity spaces and varying concentration fields. The literature review on which this paper is based on reflects recent developments in the assessment...... for the integrated assessment of human exposure to air pollutants taking into account latest technological capabilities and contextual information. Highlights ? We review and discuss recent developments and advances of research into personal exposure to air pollution. ? We emphasise the importance of personal...

  14. Vitamin D up-regulates the vitamin D receptor by protecting it from proteasomal degradation in human CD4+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Martin; von Essen, Marina R; Boding, Lasse;

    2014-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D3, 1,25(OH)2D3, has significant immunomodulatory properties and is an important determinant in the differentiation of CD4+ effector T cells. The biological actions of 1,25(OH)2D3 are mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and are believed to correlate with the VDR...

  15. Vitamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin A plays a role in your Vision Bone growth Reproduction Cell functions Immune system Vitamin A is an antioxidant. It can come from ...

  16. Vitamin E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin E is an antioxidant. It plays a role ... immune system and metabolic processes. Good sources of vitamin E include Vegetable oils Margarine Nuts and seeds ...

  17. Vitamin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin K helps your body by making proteins for ... blood clotting. If you don't have enough vitamin K, you may bleed too much. Newborns have ...

  18. Vitamin D and vitamin A receptor expression and the proliferative effects of ligand activation of these receptors on the development of pancreatic progenitor cells derived from human fetal pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ka Yan; Ma, Man Ting; Leung, Kwan Keung; Leung, Po Sing

    2011-03-01

    The growth and development of pancreatic islet cells are regulated by various morphogens. Vitamin A modulates in vitro differentiation of islet cells and vitamin D affects beta-cell insulin secretion, while both vitamin ligands act through heterodimerization with the retinoid X receptor (RXR). However, their effects in modulating pancreatic development have not been determined. In this study, cultured human pancreatic progenitor cells (PPCs) isolated from human fetal pancreas were stimulated to differentiate into islet-like cell clusters (ICCs). RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were used to examine the expression and localization of vitamin D receptor (VDR), retinoic acid receptor (RAR), and RXR in PPCs. The effects of added all-trans retinoic acid (atRA, a form of vitamin A), calcitriol (activated vitamin D) and of these ligands together on PPC cell viability, proliferation and apoptosis were assessed by MTT, BrdU and ELISA assays, respectively. Post-treatment neurogenin-3 (NGN3) expression, necessary for islet-cell lineage development, was examined by real-time RT-PCR. Results showed that RAR, RXR and VDR were expressed in PPCs. RAR and RXR were localized in nuclei, and the VDR in nuclei, cytoplasm and plasma membrane. atRA and calcitriol each increased PPC viability and proliferation; atRA additionally decreased PPC apoptosis. Co-addition of atRA and calcitriol had no additive effects on cell viability but did increase ngn3 responses. In conclusion, RAR, RXR and VDR are expressed in human fetal PPCs and PPC proliferation can be promoted by calcitriol, atRA or both together, data valuable for elucidating mechanisms underlying islet development and for developing clinical islet transplantation.

  19. Topically applied vitamin C increases the density of dermal papillae in aged human skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koop Urte

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influence of ageing on the density of the functional entities of the papillae containing nutritive capillaries, here in terms as the papillary index, and the effect of topically applied vitamin C were investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM in vivo. Methods The age dependency of the papillary index was determined by CLSM on 3 different age groups. Additionally, we determined the effect of a topical cream containing 3% vitamin C against the vehicle alone using daily applications for four months on the volar forearm of 33 women. Results There were significant decreases in the papillary index showing a clear dependency on age. Topical vitamin C resulted in a significant increase of the density of dermal papillae from 4 weeks onward compared to its vehicle. Reproducibility was determined in repeated studies. Conclusions Vitamin C has the potential to enhance the density of dermal papillae, perhaps through the mechanism of angiogenesis. Topical vitamin C may have therapeutical effects for partial corrections of the regressive structural changes associated with the aging process.

  20. Quantifying the impact of human immunodeficiency virus-1 escape from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich D Kadolsky

    Full Text Available HIV-1 escape from the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL response leads to a weakening of viral control and is likely to be detrimental to the patient. To date, the impact of escape on viral load and CD4(+ T cell count has not been quantified, primarily because of sparse longitudinal data and the difficulty of separating cause and effect in cross-sectional studies. We use two independent methods to quantify the impact of HIV-1 escape from CTLs in chronic infection: mathematical modelling of escape and statistical analysis of a cross-sectional cohort. Mathematical modelling revealed a modest increase in log viral load of 0.051 copies ml(-1 per escape event. Analysis of the cross-sectional cohort revealed a significant positive association between viral load and the number of "escape events", after correcting for length of infection and rate of replication. We estimate that a single CTL escape event leads to a viral load increase of 0.11 log copies ml(-1 (95% confidence interval: 0.040-0.18, consistent with the predictions from the mathematical modelling. Overall, the number of escape events could only account for approximately 6% of the viral load variation in the cohort. Our findings indicate that although the loss of the CTL response for a single epitope results in a highly statistically significant increase in viral load, the biological impact is modest. We suggest that this small increase in viral load is explained by the small growth advantage of the variant relative to the wildtype virus. Escape from CTLs had a measurable, but unexpectedly low, impact on viral load in chronic infection.

  1. Vitamin D inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages through the induction of autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant R Campbell

    Full Text Available Low vitamin D levels in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV infected persons are associated with more rapid disease progression and increased risk for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We have previously shown that 1α,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25D3, the active form of vitamin D, inhibits HIV replication in human macrophages through the induction of autophagy. In this study, we report that physiological concentrations of 1,25D3 induce the production of the human cathelicidin microbial peptide (CAMP and autophagic flux in HIV and M. tuberculosis co-infected human macrophages which inhibits mycobacterial growth and the replication of HIV. Using RNA interference for Beclin-1 and the autophagy-related 5 homologue, combined with the chemical inhibitors of autophagic flux, bafilomycin A₁, an inhibitor of autophagosome-lysosome fusion and subsequent acidification, and SID 26681509 an inhibitor of the lysosome hydrolase cathepsin L, we show that the 1,25D3-mediated inhibition of HIV replication and mycobacterial growth during single infection or dual infection is dependent not only upon the induction of autophagy, but also through phagosomal maturation. Moreover, through the use of RNA interference for CAMP, we demonstrate that cathelicidin is essential for the 1,25D3 induced autophagic flux and inhibition of HIV replication and mycobacterial growth. The present findings provide a biological explanation for the benefits and importance of vitamin D sufficiency in HIV and M. tuberculosis-infected persons, and provide new insights into novel approaches to prevent and treat HIV infection and related opportunistic infections.

  2. HYDROSOLUBLE VITAMINS AND SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladmila Bojanić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamins are organic substances needed for normal cell functioning in the human body, and therefore human health. People who train sports require an optimal psychophysical performance in order to achieve the best sports results. Athletes’ needs for vitamins may be higher than in general population, also they are taking vitamin supplements more often than other people. Thus, it is very important for them to be familiar with the vitamins’ roles and recommended intake levels.Hydrosoluble vitamins are easily absorbed into the blood and excreted in urine, and so very little stored in the body. They are less likely to cause toxic effects compared to the liposoluble vitamins, but their deficiency may occur much faster. The B group of vitamins takes part in many biochemical processes, and is especially important for athletes, as these vitamins help conversion of energy from food into the muscle energy. Vitamin C is known as an antioxidant that protects against oxygen free radicals. It has a number of other roles in metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and minerals.Athletes are likely to intake sufficient quantities of vitamins through the nutrition. Vitamins’ supplements are usually unnecessary and without additional benefits on sports performance. However, if vitamins’ supplements are taken, attention must be paid for their tolerable upper intake levels.

  3. Curcumin induces human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene expression through a vitamin D receptor-independent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Chunxiao; Rosoha, Elena; Lowry, Malcolm B

    2013-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) mediates the pleiotropic biologic effects of 1α,25 dihydroxy-vitamin D(3). Recent in vitro studies suggested that curcumin and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) also bind to VDR with low affinity. As potential ligands for the VDR, we hypothesized that curcumin...... cancer cell line HT-29 and keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. We demonstrated that PUFAs failed to induce CAMP or CYP24A1 mRNA expression in all three cell lines, but curcumin up-regulated CAMP mRNA and protein levels in U937 cells. Curcumin treatment induced CAMP promoter activity from a luciferase reporter...... construct lacking the VDR binding site and did not increase binding of the VDR to the CAMP promoter as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. These findings indicate that induction of CAMP by curcumin occurs through a vitamin D receptor-independent manner. We conclude that PUFAs and curcumin do...

  4. Human gut microbes use multiple transporters to distinguish vitamin B12 analogs and compete in the gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, Patrick H.; Barry, Natasha A.; Mok, Kenny C.; Taga, Michiko E.; Goodman, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Genomic and metagenomic sequencing efforts, including human microbiome projects, reveal that microbes often encode multiple systems that appear to accomplish the same task. Whether these predictions reflect actual functional redundancies is unclear. We report that the prominent human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron employs three functional, homologous vitamin B12 transporters that in at least two cases confer a competitive advantage in the presence of distinct B12 analogs (corrinoids). In the mammalian gut, microbial fitness can be determined by the presence or absence of a single transporter. The total number of distinct corrinoid transporter families in the human gut microbiome likely exceeds those observed in B. thetaiotaomicron by an order of magnitude. These results demonstrate that human gut microbes use elaborate mechanisms to capture and differentiate corrinoids in vivo and that apparent redundancies observed in these genomes can instead reflect hidden specificities that determine whether a microbe will colonize its host. PMID:24439897

  5. Quantifying the magnitude of the impact of climate change and human activity on runoff decline in Mian River Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing; Tian, Fei; Yang, Yonghui; Han, Shumin; Qiu, Guoyu

    2010-01-01

    Runoff in North China has been dramatically declining in recent decades. Although climate change and human activity have been recognized as the primary driving factors, the magnitude of impact of each of the above factors on runoff decline is still not entirely clear. In this study, Mian River Basin (a watershed that is heavily influenced by human activity) was used as a proxy to quantify the contributions of human and climate to runoff decline in North China. SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model was used to isolate the possible impacts of man and climate. SWAT simulations suggest that while climate change accounts for only 23.89% of total decline in mean annual runoff, human activity accounts for the larger 76.11% in the basin. The gap between the simulated and measured runoff has been widening since 1978, which can only be explained in terms of increasing human activity in the region. Furthermore, comparisons of similar annual precipitation in 3 dry-years and 3 wet-years representing hydrological processes in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s were used to isolate the magnitude of runoff decline under similar annual precipitations. The results clearly show that human activity, rather than climate, is the main driving factor of runoff decline in the basin.

  6. A human vitamin D receptor mutation causes rickets and impaired Th1/Th17 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Eerden, Bram C J; van der Heyden, Josine C; van Hamburg, Jan Piet; Schreuders-Koedam, Marijke; Asmawidjaja, Patrick S; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M; Boot, Annemieke M; Lubberts, Erik; Drop, Stenvert L S; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2014-12-01

    We present a brother and sister with severe rickets, alopecia and highly elevated serum levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D3). Genomic sequencing showed a homozygous point mutation (A133G) in the vitamin D receptor gene, leading to an amino acid change in the DNA binding domain (K45E), which was described previously. Hereditary vitamin D resistant rickets (HVDRR) was diagnosed. Functional studies in skin biopsy fibroblasts confirmed this. 1,25-(OH)2D3 reduced T helper (Th) cell population-specific cytokine expression of interferon γ (Th1), interleukins IL-17A (Th17) and IL-22 (Th17/Th22) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from the patient's parents, whereas IL-4 (Th2) levels were higher, reflecting an immunosuppressive condition. None of these factors were regulated by 1,25-(OH)2D3 in PBMCs from the boy. At present, both patients (boy is 23 years of age, girl is 7) have not experienced any major immune-related disorders. Although both children developed alopecia, the girl did so earlier than the boy. The boy showed complete recovery from the rickets at the age of 17 and does not require any vitamin D supplementations to date. In conclusion, we characterized two siblings with HVDRR, due to a mutation in the DNA binding domain of VDR. Despite a defective T cell response to vitamin D, no signs of any inflammatory-related abnormalities were seen, thus questioning an essential role of vitamin D in the immune system. Despite the fact that currently medicine is not required, close monitoring in the future of these patients is warranted for potential recurrence of vitamin D dependence and diagnosis of (chronic) inflammatory-related diseases.

  7. Vitamin D Combined with Aminolevulinate (ALA)-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) for Human Psoriasis: A Proof-of-Principle Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytin, Edward V; Honari, Golara; Khachemoune, Amor; Taylor, Charles R; Ortel, Bernhard; Pogue, Brian W; Sznycer-Taub, Nathaniel; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2012-09-01

    We previously showed that select agents (methotrexate or Vitamin D), when administered as a preconditioning regimen, are capable of promoting cellular differentiation of epithelial cancer cells while simultaneously enhancing the efficacy of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT). In solid tumors, pretreatment with Vitamin D simultaneously promotes cellular differentiation and leads to selective accumulation of target porphyrins (mainly protoporphyrin IX, PpIX) within diseased tissue. However, questions of whether or not the effects upon cellular differentiation are inexorably linked to PpIX accumulation, and whether these effects might occur in hyperproliferative noncancerous tissues, have remained unanswered. In this paper, we reasoned that psoriasis, a human skin disease in which abnormal cellular proliferation and differentiation plays a major role, could serve as a useful model to test the effects of pro-differentiating agents upon PpIX levels in a non-neoplastic setting. In particular, Vitamin D, a treatment for psoriasis that restores (increases) differentiation, might increase PpIX levels in psoriatic lesions and facilitate their responsiveness to ALA-PDT. This concept was tested in a pilot study of 7 patients with bilaterally-matched psoriatic plaques. A regimen in which calcipotriol 0.005% ointment was applied for 3 days prior to ALA-PDT with blue light, led to preferential increases in PpIX (~130%), and reductions in thickness, redness, scaling, and itching in the pretreated plaques. The results suggest that a larger clinical trial is warranted to confirm a role for combination treatments with Vitamin D and ALA-PDT for psoriasis.

  8. A tool kit for quantifying eukaryotic rRNA gene sequences from human microbiome samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollive, Serena; Peterfreund, Gregory L; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Bittinger, Kyle; Sinha, Rohini; Hoffmann, Christian; Nabel, Christopher S; Hill, David A; Artis, David; Bachman, Michael A; Custers-Allen, Rebecca; Grunberg, Stephanie; Wu, Gary D; Lewis, James D; Bushman, Frederic D

    2012-07-03

    Eukaryotic microorganisms are important but understudied components of the human microbiome. Here we present a pipeline for analysis of deep sequencing data on single cell eukaryotes. We designed a new 18S rRNA gene-specific PCR primer set and compared a published rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene primer set. Amplicons were tested against 24 specimens from defined eukaryotes and eight well-characterized human stool samples. A software pipeline https://sourceforge.net/projects/brocc/ was developed for taxonomic attribution, validated against simulated data, and tested on pyrosequence data. This study provides a well-characterized tool kit for sequence-based enumeration of eukaryotic organisms in human microbiome samples.

  9. Towards a complete description of grasping kinematics: a framework for quantifying human grasping and manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiushi; Santello, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework for tracking both human hand kinematics and object contour during grasping task. The framework is based on modeling the object as point cloud and the use of marker-based tracking. We introduce how to estimate contact sites on both the hand and object, hand enclosing space, and graspable features from recorded data. Two experiments were performed to 1) verify the accuracy of contact site estimation (less than 5 mm), and 2) validate the feature extraction. Our approach can provide significant insight into how humans plan grasping and manipulation based on object recognition.

  10. Quantifying the mechanical properties of human skin to optimise future microneedle device design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, R B; Coulman, S A; Birchall, J C; Evans, S L

    2012-01-01

    Microneedle devices are a promising minimally invasive means of delivering drugs/vaccines across or into the skin. However, there is currently a diversity of microneedle designs and application methods that have, primarily, been intuitively developed by the research community. To enable the rational design of optimised microneedle devices, a greater understanding of human skin biomechanics under small deformations is required. This study aims to develop a representative stratified model of human skin, informed by in vivo data. A multilayer finite element model incorporating the epidermis, dermis and hypodermis was established. This was correlated with a series of in-vivo indentation measurements, and the Ogden material coefficients were optimised using a material parameter extraction algorithm. The finite element simulation was subsequently used to model microneedle application to human skin before penetration and was validated by comparing these predictions with the in-vivo measurements. Our model has provided an excellent tool to predict micron-scale human skin deformation in vivo and is currently being used to inform optimised microneedle designs.

  11. Quantifying the Role of Homophily in Human Cooperation Using Multiplex Evolutionary Game Theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Di Stefano

    Full Text Available Nature shows as human beings live and grow inside social structures. This assumption allows us to explain and explore how it may shape most of our behaviours and choices, and why we are not just blindly driven by instincts: our decisions are based on more complex cognitive reasons, based on our connectedness on different spaces. Thus, human cooperation emerges from this complex nature of social network. Our paper, focusing on the evolutionary dynamics, is intended to explore how and why it happens, and what kind of impact is caused by homophily among people. We investigate the evolution of human cooperation using evolutionary game theory on multiplex. Multiplexity, as an extra dimension of analysis, allows us to unveil the hidden dynamics and observe non-trivial patterns within a population across network layers. More importantly, we find a striking role of homophily, as the higher the homophily between individuals, the quicker is the convergence towards cooperation in the social dilemma. The simulation results, conducted both macroscopically and microscopically across the network layers in the multiplex, show quantitatively the role of homophily in human cooperation.

  12. Quantifying the Role of Homophily in Human Cooperation Using Multiplex Evolutionary Game Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Alessandro; Scatà, Marialisa; La Corte, Aurelio; Liò, Pietro; Catania, Emanuele; Guardo, Ermanno; Pagano, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Nature shows as human beings live and grow inside social structures. This assumption allows us to explain and explore how it may shape most of our behaviours and choices, and why we are not just blindly driven by instincts: our decisions are based on more complex cognitive reasons, based on our connectedness on different spaces. Thus, human cooperation emerges from this complex nature of social network. Our paper, focusing on the evolutionary dynamics, is intended to explore how and why it happens, and what kind of impact is caused by homophily among people. We investigate the evolution of human cooperation using evolutionary game theory on multiplex. Multiplexity, as an extra dimension of analysis, allows us to unveil the hidden dynamics and observe non-trivial patterns within a population across network layers. More importantly, we find a striking role of homophily, as the higher the homophily between individuals, the quicker is the convergence towards cooperation in the social dilemma. The simulation results, conducted both macroscopically and microscopically across the network layers in the multiplex, show quantitatively the role of homophily in human cooperation.

  13. Algorithm for quantifying advanced carotid artery atherosclerosis in humans using MRI and active contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Gareth; Vick, G. W., III; Bordelon, Cassius; Insull, William; Morrisett, Joel

    2002-05-01

    A new algorithm for measuring carotid artery volumes and estimating atherosclerotic plaque volumes from MRI images has been developed and validated using pressure-perfusion-fixed cadaveric carotid arteries. Our method uses an active contour algorithm with the generalized gradient vector field force as the external force to localize the boundaries of the artery on each MRI cross-section. Plaque volume is estimated by an automated algorithm based on estimating the normal wall thickness for each branch of the carotid. Triplicate volume measurements were performed by a single observer on thirty-eight pairs of cadaveric carotid arteries. The coefficient of variance (COV) was used to quantify measurement reproducibility. Aggregate volumes were computed for nine contiguous slices bounding the carotid bifurcation. The median (mean +/- SD) COV for the 76 aggregate arterial volumes was 0.93% (1.47% +/- 1.52%) for the lumen volume, 0.95% (1.06% +/- 0.67%) for the total artery volume, and 4.69% (5.39% +/- 3.97%) for the plaque volume. These results indicate that our algorithm provides repeatable measures of arterial volumes and a repeatable estimate of plaque volume of cadaveric carotid specimens through analysis of MRI images. The algorithm also significantly decreases the amount of time necessary to generate these measurements.

  14. Adaptive Thermogenesis in Resistance to Obesity Therapies: Issues in Quantifying Thrifty Energy Expenditure Phenotypes in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulloo, Abdul G; Schutz, Yves

    2015-06-01

    Dieting and exercise are likely to remain the core approaches in the management of obesity in the foreseeable future despite their well-documented failures for achieving long-term weight loss. Explanations for such poor prognosis are centered on patient's self-regulatory failure and lack of compliance to the prescribed diet or exercise regimen. While a role for physiological adaptations leading to diminished rates of heat production has also been advocated, there are considerable uncertainties about the quantitative importance of such regulated heat production (i.e., adaptive thermogenesis) to the less-than-expected weight loss and ease for weight regain. This paper first reviews the most compelling evidence of what is often considered as weight loss-induced adaptive thermogenesis in various compartments of daily energy expenditure. It then discusses the major limitations and issues in quantifying such thrifty energy expenditure phenotypes and underscores the plausibility of diminished core temperature as a thrifty metabolic trait in resistance to weight loss. Although an accurate quantification of adaptive thermogenesis will have to await the applications of deep body composition phenotyping and better discrimination of physical activity energy expenditures, the magnitude of diminished energy expenditure in response to weight loss in certain individuals is large enough to support the concept that adaptive thermogenesis contribute importantly to their resistance to obesity therapies.

  15. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay identifies vitamin D binding protein (Gc-globulin) in human, rat, and mouse sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, W X; Bazaraa, H M; Magiera, H; Cooke, N E; Haddad, J G

    1996-06-01

    Serum vitamin D binding protein (DBP, also known as Gc-globulin) is a multifunctional protein capable of binding both vitamin D metabolites and actin. DBP can be visualized when analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by staining. Confirmation of its identity had previously required immunoprecipitation with specific anti-DBP antisera or occupancy of the protein with radioactive vitamin D sterols. We present studies showing that preincubation of G-actin with mammalian sera produced a discernible DBP protein band shift on native gel electrophoresis. Addition of DNaseI, a 33-kDa intracellular protein with an avid actin-binding site, to the incubations resulted in a supershift of DBP-actin complexes to an even more cathodal region of the gels. Following incubations with human, rat, and murine sera the same actin shift occurred as did the actin plus DNaseI supershift. The migrations of each complex were correlated with purified DBP migrations under identical conditions. It was confirmed that the supershifted bands contained DBP by Western blotting and detection of DBP by binding of 25-OH[3H]D3. After intravenous G-actin injections into living mice, a serum DBP-actin complex could be detected on native gels as the uncomplexed DBP band decreased in intensity. This simple, direct-staining technique appears to be suitable for identifying DBP/Gc phenotypes in human populations as well as for semiquantitatively monitoring the plasma actin-scavenger system in vivo in animal models or in human diseases.

  16. Mass spectrometry identifies and quantifies 74 unique histone H4 isoforms in differentiating human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanstiel, Doug; Brumbaugh, Justin; Berggren, W Travis; Conard, Kevin; Feng, Xuezhu; Levenstein, Mark E; McAlister, Graeme C; Thomson, James A; Coon, Joshua J

    2008-03-18

    Epigenetic regulation through chromatin is thought to play a critical role in the establishment and maintenance of pluripotency. Traditionally, antibody-based technologies were used to probe for specific posttranslational modifications (PTMs) present on histone tails, but these methods do not generally reveal the presence of multiple modifications on a single-histone tail (combinatorial codes). Here, we describe technology for the discovery and quantification of histone combinatorial codes that is based on chromatography and mass spectrometry. We applied this methodology to decipher 74 discrete combinatorial codes on the tail of histone H4 from human embryonic stem (ES) cells. Finally, we quantified the abundances of these codes as human ES cells undergo differentiation to reveal striking changes in methylation and acetylation patterns. For example, H4R3 methylation was observed only in the presence of H4K20 dimethylation; such context-specific patterning exemplifies the power of this technique.

  17. Quantifying the impacts of climate and human activities on water and sediment discharge in a karst region of southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenwei; Xu, Xianli; Yu, Bofu; Xu, Chaohao; Liu, Meixian; Wang, Kelin

    2016-11-01

    Quantifying the impacts of climate and human activities on water and sediment discharge has become a central topic in climate and hydrologic research. This issue, however, has so far received little attention in karst regions around the world. Seven karst catchments located in southwest China were chosen to explore water and sediment discharge responses to different driving factors during the period from the 1950s to 2011. The non-parametric Mann-Kendall test was used to detect both the trends and abrupt changes in water and sediment discharge. The double mass curve method was used to quantify the effects of climate and human activities on water and sediment discharge. Results indicated that the annual water discharge showed a decreasing trend in all catchments (-0.21 to -3.68 × 108 m3 yr-1), and the sediment discharge exhibited a significant decreasing trend (-7 to -101 × 104 t yr-1) for six out of the seven catchments. A rapid decline (abrupt change) in sediment discharge occurred since 2000 for all except Liujiang catchment where the sediment discharge has a slight increase since 1983 as no large dams were constructed in this catchment. Specifically, the magnitude of reduction in sediment discharge (%) significantly increases with the extent of flow regulation as measured by the ratio of the area upstream the dam to the total catchment area for the seven catchments (R2 = 0.98, P China.

  18. Using GPS technology to quantify human mobility, dynamic contacts and infectious disease dynamics in a resource-poor urban environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo M Vazquez-Prokopec

    Full Text Available Empiric quantification of human mobility patterns is paramount for better urban planning, understanding social network structure and responding to infectious disease threats, especially in light of rapid growth in urbanization and globalization. This need is of particular relevance for developing countries, since they host the majority of the global urban population and are disproportionally affected by the burden of disease. We used Global Positioning System (GPS data-loggers to track the fine-scale (within city mobility patterns of 582 residents from two neighborhoods from the city of Iquitos, Peru. We used ∼2.3 million GPS data-points to quantify age-specific mobility parameters and dynamic co-location networks among all tracked individuals. Geographic space significantly affected human mobility, giving rise to highly local mobility kernels. Most (∼80% movements occurred within 1 km of an individual's home. Potential hourly contacts among individuals were highly irregular and temporally unstructured. Only up to 38% of the tracked participants showed a regular and predictable mobility routine, a sharp contrast to the situation in the developed world. As a case study, we quantified the impact of spatially and temporally unstructured routines on the dynamics of transmission of an influenza-like pathogen within an Iquitos neighborhood. Temporally unstructured daily routines (e.g., not dominated by a single location, such as a workplace, where an individual repeatedly spent significant amount of time increased an epidemic's final size and effective reproduction number by 20% in comparison to scenarios modeling temporally structured contacts. Our findings provide a mechanistic description of the basic rules that shape human mobility within a resource-poor urban center, and contribute to the understanding of the role of fine-scale patterns of individual movement and co-location in infectious disease dynamics. More generally, this study

  19. Subjective valuation of cushioning in a human drop landing task as quantified by trade-offs in mechanical work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Nathaniel E; Zelik, Karl E; Kuo, Arthur D

    2015-07-16

    Humans can perform motor tasks in a variety of ways, yet often favor a particular strategy. Some factors governing the preferred strategy may be objective and quantifiable, (e.g. metabolic energy or mechanical work) while others may be more subjective and less measurable, (e.g. discomfort, pain, or mental effort). Subjectivity can make it challenging to explain or predict preferred movement strategies. We propose that subjective factors might nevertheless be characterized indirectly by their trade-offs against more objective measures such as work. Here we investigated whether subjective costs that influence human movement during drop landings could be indirectly assessed by quantifying mechanical work performed. When landing on rigid ground, humans typically absorb much of the collision actively by bending their knees, perhaps to avoid the discomfort of stiff-legged landings. We measured how work performed by healthy adults (N=8) changed as a function of surface cushioning for drop landings (fixed at about 0.4m) onto varying amounts of foam. Landing on more foam dissipated more energy passively in the surface, thus reducing the net dissipation required of subjects, due to relatively fixed landing energy. However, subjects actually performed even less work in the dissipative collision, as well as in the subsequent active, positive work to return to upright stance (approximately linear decrease of about 1.52 J per 1 cm of foam thickness). As foam thickness increased, there was also a corresponding reduction in center-of-mass vertical displacement after initial impact by up to 43%. Humans appear to subjectively value cushioning, revealed by the extra work they perform landing without it. Cushioning is thus worth more than the energy it dissipates, in an amount that indicates the subjective discomfort of stiff landings.

  20. Using GPS technology to quantify human mobility, dynamic contacts and infectious disease dynamics in a resource-poor urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M; Bisanzio, Donal; Stoddard, Steven T; Paz-Soldan, Valerie; Morrison, Amy C; Elder, John P; Ramirez-Paredes, Jhon; Halsey, Eric S; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Scott, Thomas W; Kitron, Uriel

    2013-01-01

    Empiric quantification of human mobility patterns is paramount for better urban planning, understanding social network structure and responding to infectious disease threats, especially in light of rapid growth in urbanization and globalization. This need is of particular relevance for developing countries, since they host the majority of the global urban population and are disproportionally affected by the burden of disease. We used Global Positioning System (GPS) data-loggers to track the fine-scale (within city) mobility patterns of 582 residents from two neighborhoods from the city of Iquitos, Peru. We used ∼2.3 million GPS data-points to quantify age-specific mobility parameters and dynamic co-location networks among all tracked individuals. Geographic space significantly affected human mobility, giving rise to highly local mobility kernels. Most (∼80%) movements occurred within 1 km of an individual's home. Potential hourly contacts among individuals were highly irregular and temporally unstructured. Only up to 38% of the tracked participants showed a regular and predictable mobility routine, a sharp contrast to the situation in the developed world. As a case study, we quantified the impact of spatially and temporally unstructured routines on the dynamics of transmission of an influenza-like pathogen within an Iquitos neighborhood. Temporally unstructured daily routines (e.g., not dominated by a single location, such as a workplace, where an individual repeatedly spent significant amount of time) increased an epidemic's final size and effective reproduction number by 20% in comparison to scenarios modeling temporally structured contacts. Our findings provide a mechanistic description of the basic rules that shape human mobility within a resource-poor urban center, and contribute to the understanding of the role of fine-scale patterns of individual movement and co-location in infectious disease dynamics. More generally, this study emphasizes the need for

  1. Quantifying Human Response: Linking metrological and psychometric characterisations of Man as a Measurement Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendrill, L. R.; Fisher, William P., Jr.

    2013-09-01

    A better understanding of how to characterise human response is essential to improved person-centred care and other situations where human factors are crucial. Challenges to introducing classical metrological concepts such as measurement uncertainty and traceability when characterising Man as a Measurement Instrument include the failure of many statistical tools when applied to ordinal measurement scales and a lack of metrological references in, for instance, healthcare. The present work attempts to link metrological and psychometric (Rasch) characterisation of Man as a Measurement Instrument in a study of elementary tasks, such as counting dots, where one knows independently the expected value because the measurement object (collection of dots) is prepared in advance. The analysis is compared and contrasted with recent approaches to this problem by others, for instance using signal error fidelity.

  2. Quantifying Human Movement Using the Movn Smartphone App: Validation and Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Ralph; Gemming, Luke; Monedero, Javier; Bolger, Linda; Belton, Sarahjane; Issartel, Johann; Marsh, Samantha; Direito, Artur; Solenhill, Madeleine; Zhao, Jinfeng; Exeter, Daniel John; Vathsangam, Harshvardhan; Rawstorn, Jonathan Charles

    2017-08-17

    The use of embedded smartphone sensors offers opportunities to measure physical activity (PA) and human movement. Big data-which includes billions of digital traces-offers scientists a new lens to examine PA in fine-grained detail and allows us to track people's geocoded movement patterns to determine their interaction with the environment. The objective of this study was to examine the validity of the Movn smartphone app (Moving Analytics) for collecting PA and human movement data. The criterion and convergent validity of the Movn smartphone app for estimating energy expenditure (EE) were assessed in both laboratory and free-living settings, compared with indirect calorimetry (criterion reference) and a stand-alone accelerometer that is commonly used in PA research (GT1m, ActiGraph Corp, convergent reference). A supporting cross-validation study assessed the consistency of activity data when collected across different smartphone devices. Global positioning system (GPS) and accelerometer data were integrated with geographical information software to demonstrate the feasibility of geospatial analysis of human movement. A total of 21 participants contributed to linear regression analysis to estimate EE from Movn activity counts (standard error of estimation [SEE]=1.94 kcal/min). The equation was cross-validated in an independent sample (N=42, SEE=1.10 kcal/min). During laboratory-based treadmill exercise, EE from Movn was comparable to calorimetry (bias=0.36 [-0.07 to 0.78] kcal/min, t82=1.66, P=.10) but overestimated as compared with the ActiGraph accelerometer (bias=0.93 [0.58-1.29] kcal/min, t89=5.27, Psmartphone app can provide valid passive measurement of EE and can enrich these data with contextualizing temporospatial information. Although enhanced understanding of geographic and temporal variation in human movement patterns could inform intervention development, it also presents challenges for data processing and analytics.

  3. Roles of Fas signaling pathway in vitamin E succinate-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Wu; Yao Li; Yan Zhao; Yu-Juan Shan; Wei Xia; Wei-Ping Yu; Lan Zhao

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the roles of Fas signaling pathway in vitamin E succinate-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.METHODS: Human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells were treated with VES at 5, 10, 20 mg@L-1, succinic acid and vitamin E as vehicle control and condition media only as untreated (UT) control. Apoptotic morphology was observed by DAPI staining. Western blot analysis was applied to measure the expression of Fas, FADD and caspase-8 proteins. After the cells were transiently transfected with Fas and FADD antisense oligonucleotides, respectively, caspase-8 activity was determined by flurometric method.RESULTS: The morphologically apoptotic changes were observed after VES treatment by DAPI staining. 23.7 % and 89.6 % apoptosis occurred after 24 h and 48 h of 20 mg@L-1 VES treatment, respectively. The protein levels of Fas, FADD and caspase-8 were evidently increased in a dose-dependent manner after 24 h of VES treatment. The blockage of Fas by transfection with Fas antisense oligonucleotides obviously inhibited the expression of FADD protein. After SGC-7901 cells were transfected with Fas and FADD antisense oligonucleotides, caspase-8 activity was obviously decreased (P<0.01), whereas Fas blocked more than FADD.CONCLUSION: VES-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells involves Fas signaling pathway including the interaction of Fas, FADD and caspase-8.

  4. Infrared imaging to quantify the effects of nicotine-induced vasoconstriction in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Siegfried; Kargel, Christian

    2009-05-01

    Smoking is the most significant source of preventable morbidity and premature mortality worldwide (WHO-2008). One of the many effects of nicotine is vasoconstriction which is triggered by the autonomic nervous system. The constriction of blood vessels e.g. of the skin's vascular bed is responsible for a decrease of the supply with oxygen and nutrients and a lowering of the skin temperature. We used infrared imaging to quantify temperature decreases caused by cigarette smoking in the extremities of smokers and also monitored heart rate as well as blood pressure. The results - including thermograms showing "temporary amputations" of the fingertips due to a significant temperature drop - can help increase the awareness of the dangers of smoking and the success of withdrawal programs. Surprisingly, in our control persons (3 brave non-smoking volunteers who smoked a cigarette) we also found temperature increases suggesting that vasodilation (widening of blood vessels) was provoked by cigarettes. To verify this unexpected finding and eliminate effects from the 4000 chemical compounds in the smoke, we repeated the experiment following a stringent protocol ruling out physiological and psychological influences with 9 habitual smokers and 17 nonsmokers who all chew gums with 2 mg of nicotine. Task-optimized digital image processing techniques (target detection, image-registration and -segmentation) were applied to the acquired infrared image sequences to automatically yield temperature plots of the fingers and palm. In this paper we present the results of our study in detail and show that smokers and non-smokers respond differently to the administration of nicotine.

  5. B vitamins and n-3 fatty acids for brain development and function: review of human studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, van de O.; Hooijdonk, L.W.A.; Doets, E.L.; Schiepers, O.J.G.; Eilander, J.H.C.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nutrition is one of many factors that affect brain development and functioning, and in recent years the role of certain nutrients has been investigated. B vitamins and n–3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are two of the most promising and widely studied nutritional factors. Methods: In

  6. Vitamin D content in human breast milk: a 9-mo follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Iva Susanna vio Streym; Højskov, Carsten Schriver; Liendgaard, Ulla Kristine Møller;

    2016-01-01

    .24-0.47 μg), respectively, which were equal to a median (IQR) antirachitic activity of 77 IU/d (52-110 IU/d). CONCLUSIONS: The supply of vitamin D from breast milk is limited. Exclusively breastfed infants received Institute of Medicine for infants during the first...

  7. Quantifying human impact on hydrological drought using an Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huijgevoort, Marjolein; Chaney, Nathaniel; Malyshev, Sergey; Shevliakova, Elena; Milly, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Predicting the human impact on the present and future hydrological cycle remains a significant scientific challenge. Anthropogenic impact includes water management practices like diverting water for irrigation, abstraction of groundwater, and reservoirs. Hydrological extremes, in particular, are heavily affected by water management practices, due to the existing stress on the system during droughts and floods. Therefore, to prepare adaptation plans for hydrological extremes in the future, it is essential to account for water management and other human influences in Earth System Models. In this study we have implemented water management practices in the state-of-the-art GFDL land model, which includes terrestrial water, energy, and carbon balances. Both irrigation practices and reservoirs have been added in the land surface model component of the model. Irrigation amounts are determined from the soil water balance, the evaporative demand of the vegetation and fractional coverage of croplands. The resulting water demand is fulfilled by abstractions from surface water and groundwater. Reservoir outflow is dynamically coupled to the downstream water demand and available reservoir storage. Retrospective model simulations over the contiguous United States indicate a strong human influence on hydrological drought. A water management attribution analysis shows a significant impact on the water availability, mostly in the Midwest of the United States and California. Implementation of reservoirs alters the flow regime, thereby decreasing the short-term drought impact, however, in the case of multi-year drought, impacts are delayed due to the dependency on the reservoir outflow. Irrigation, on the other hand, decreases the water availability in rivers due to increased evapotranspiration leading to a higher drought impact. The average increase in evapotranspiration amounted up to 2 mm/day for cropland areas in California and Texas. Overall, the results show the importance of

  8. Dose-dependent vitamin C uptake and radical scavenging activity in human skin measured with in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Anna-Christina; Groth, Norbert; Haag, Stefan F; Darvin, Maxim E; Lademann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina C

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin C is a potent radical scavenger and a physiological part of the antioxidant system in human skin. The aim of this study was to measure changes in the radical-scavenging activity of human skin in vivo due to supplementation with different doses of vitamin C and at different time points. Therefore, 33 volunteers were supplemented with vitamin C or placebo for 4 weeks. The skin radical-scavenging activity was measured with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. After 4 weeks, the intake of 100 mg vitamin C/day resulted in a significant increase in the radical-scavenging activity by 22%. Intake of 180 mg/day even resulted in a significant increase of 37%. No changes were found in the placebo group. A part of the study population was additionally measured after 2 weeks: in this group radical scavenging had already reached maximal activity after 2 weeks. In conclusion, orally administered vitamin C increases the radical-scavenging activity of the skin. The effect occurs fast and is enhanced with higher doses of vitamin C.

  9. The effect of Centella asiatica, vitamins, glycolic acid and their mixtures preparations in stimulating collagen and fibronectin synthesis in cultured human skin fibroblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Puziah

    2014-03-01

    Centella asiatica (Linn.) Urban is well known in promoting wound healing and provides significant benefits in skin care and therapeutic products formulation. Glycolic acid and vitamins also play a role in the enhancement of collagen and fibronectin synthesis. Here, we evaluate the specific effect of Centella asiatica (CA), vitamins, glycolic acid and their mixture preparations to stimulate collagen and fibronectin synthesis in cultured human fibroblast cells. The fibroblast cells are incubated with CA, glycolic acid, vitamins and their mixture preparations for 48 h. The cell lysates were analyzed for protein content and collagen synthesis by direct binding enzyme immunoassay. The fibronectin of the cultured supernatant was measured by sandwich enzyme immunoassay. The results showed that CA, glycolic acid, vitamins A, E and C significantly stimulate collagen and fibronectin synthesis in the fibroblast. Addition of glycolic acid and vitamins to CA further increased the levels of collagen and fibronectin synthesis to 8.55 and 23.75 μg/100 μg, respectively. CA, glycolic acid, vitamins A, E, and C, and their mixtures demonstrated stimulatory effect on both extra-cellular matrix synthesis of collagen and fibronectin in in vitro studies on human foreskin fibroblasts, which is beneficial to skin care and therapeutic products formulation.

  10. Uptake of (/sup 3/H)vitamin D/sub 3/ from low and high density lipoproteins by cultured human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shireman, R.B.; Williams, D.; Remsen, J.F.

    1986-03-01

    The plasma distribution and cellular uptake of (/sup 3/H)vitamin D/sub 3/ was studied in vitro using cultured human fibroblasts. Incubation of (/sup 3/H)vitamin D/sub 3/ (cholecalciferol) with plasma followed by sequential ultracentrifugal fractionation of the lipoproteins indicated that 2-4% of the radioactivity associated with the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), 12% with low density lipoprotein (LDL), and approximately 60% with the high density lipoprotein (HDL). The remaining radioactivity, 25%, was associated with the sedimented plasma fractions. By comparison, an average of 86% of the radioactivity from (/sup 3/H) 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol associated with the sedimented plasma fractions. The uptake of (/sup 3/H)vitamin D/sub 3/ from plasma, LDL, or HDL was studied in cultured human cells; uptake by normal fibroblasts was greatest from LDL and least from plasma. The cellular association of vitamin D/sub 3/ was time, concentration, and temperature dependent. At a concentration of 50 ..mu..g LDL/ml of medium, the uptake of (/sup 3/H)vitamin D/sub 3/ from LDL at 37/sup 0/C was rapid and reached a maximum at approximately 4 hr; it was slower from HDL but continued to increase slowly up to 24 hr. The significance of these in vitro findings is uncertain since much of the vitamin D/sub 3/ absorbed from the intestine reportedly associates with chylomicrons and is rapidly taken up by the liver.

  11. A virtual infection model quantifies innate effector mechanisms and Candida albicans immune escape in human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Hünniger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans bloodstream infection is increasingly frequent and can result in disseminated candidiasis associated with high mortality rates. To analyze the innate immune response against C. albicans, fungal cells were added to human whole-blood samples. After inoculation, C. albicans started to filament and predominantly associate with neutrophils, whereas only a minority of fungal cells became attached to monocytes. While many parameters of host-pathogen interaction were accessible to direct experimental quantification in the whole-blood infection assay, others were not. To overcome these limitations, we generated a virtual infection model that allowed detailed and quantitative predictions on the dynamics of host-pathogen interaction. Experimental time-resolved data were simulated using a state-based modeling approach combined with the Monte Carlo method of simulated annealing to obtain quantitative predictions on a priori unknown transition rates and to identify the main axis of antifungal immunity. Results clearly demonstrated a predominant role of neutrophils, mediated by phagocytosis and intracellular killing as well as the release of antifungal effector molecules upon activation, resulting in extracellular fungicidal activity. Both mechanisms together account for almost [Formula: see text] of C. albicans killing, clearly proving that beside being present in larger numbers than other leukocytes, neutrophils functionally dominate the immune response against C. albicans in human blood. A fraction of C. albicans cells escaped phagocytosis and remained extracellular and viable for up to four hours. This immune escape was independent of filamentation and fungal activity and not linked to exhaustion or inactivation of innate immune cells. The occurrence of C. albicans cells being resistant against phagocytosis may account for the high proportion of dissemination in C. albicans bloodstream infection. Taken together, iterative experiment

  12. Vitamin Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Vitamin Chart KidsHealth > For Teens > Vitamin Chart Print A A A en español Tabla de las vitaminas Type Benefits Sources Quantity Vitamin A Vitamin A prevents eye problems, promotes a ...

  13. Vitamin Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Vitamin Chart KidsHealth > For Teens > Vitamin Chart A A A en español Tabla de las vitaminas Type Benefits Sources Quantity Vitamin A Vitamin A prevents eye problems, promotes a ...

  14. Ptychographic X-ray nanotomography quantifies mineral distributions in human dentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanette, I.; Enders, B.; Dierolf, M.; Thibault, P.; Gradl, R.; Diaz, A.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Menzel, A.; Pfeiffer, F.; Zaslansky, P.

    2015-03-01

    Bones are bio-composites with biologically tunable mechanical properties, where a polymer matrix of nanofibrillar collagen is reinforced by apatite mineral crystals. Some bones, such as antler, form and change rapidly, while other bone tissues, such as human tooth dentine, develop slowly and maintain constant composition and architecture for entire lifetimes. When studying apatite mineral microarchitecture, mineral distributions or mineralization activity of bone-forming cells, representative samples of tissue are best studied at submicrometre resolution while minimizing sample-preparation damage. Here, we demonstrate the power of ptychographic X-ray tomography to map variations in the mineral content distribution in three dimensions and at the nanometre scale. Using this non-destructive method, we observe nanostructures surrounding hollow tracts that exist in human dentine forming dentinal tubules. We reveal unprecedented quantitative details of the ultrastructure clearly revealing the spatially varying mineralization density. Such information is essential for understanding a variety of natural and therapeutic effects for example in bone tissue healing and ageing.

  15. A model observer based on human perception to quantify the detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharian, Georges; Guyader, Nathalie; Vignolle, Jean-Michel; Jutten, Christian

    2014-03-01

    In medical imaging, model observers such as the "Hotelling observer" and the "Non Prewhitening Matched Filter" have been proposed to detect objects in X-ray images. These models, based on decision theory, are applied over the entire image. In this paper, we developed a model that mimics some processes of human visual perception. The proposed model is locally applied on some particular areas that correspond to the salient areas of the object. By doing this, the model mimics the sequence of eye fixations that we make when we explore an image for example in order to detect an object. The study is divided into three parts: a psychophysical experiment to obtain human's performance to detect various objects in noises, a theoretical part to develop the proposed model, and finally, a result part. During the experiment, several participants were asked to detect objects in noisy images using a free search task. The luminance contrast of objects was adaptively adjusted according to their responses to obtain a percentage of correct detection for each object of 50 %. The proposed model, based on decision theory, was applied locally on some areas of the image that has a size corresponding to the high visual acuity of foveal vision. Areas were chosen according to their high saliency values computed through a bio-inspired model of visual attention. For each area, our model returned a detectability index. By supposing statistical independence between areas, the local indexes are combined into a global detectability index. Results show that the proposed model fits the results of the psychophysical experiment and outperforms classical models of the literature.

  16. Quantifying glucose and lipid components in human serum by Raman spectroscopy and multivariate statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Landulfo; Borges, Rita de Cássia Fernandes; Navarro, Ricardo Scarparo; Giana, Hector Enrique; Zângaro, Renato Amaro; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu Tavares; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha

    2017-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed in the quantitative analysis of biochemical components in human serum. This study aimed to develop a spectral model to estimate the concentration of glucose and lipid fractions in human serum, thus evaluating the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy technique for diagnostic purposes. A total of 44 samples of blood serum were collected from volunteers submitted to routine blood biochemical assay analysis. The biochemical concentrations of glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, and high-density and low-density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) were obtained by colorimetric method. Serum samples (200 μL) were submitted to Raman spectroscopy (830 nm, 250 mW, 50-s accumulation). The spectra of sera present peaks related to the main constituents, particularly proteins and lipids. A quantitative model based on partial least squares (PLS) regression has been developed to estimate the concentration of these compounds, taking the biochemical concentrations assayed by the colorimetric method as sample's actual concentrations. The PLS model based on leave-one-out cross-validation approach estimated the concentration of triglycerides and cholesterol with r = 0.98 and 0.96, and root mean square error of 35.4 and 15.9 mg/dL, respectively. For the other biochemicals, the r was ranging from 0.75 to 0.86. These results evidenced the possibility of performing biochemical assay in blood serum samples by Raman spectroscopy and PLS regression and may be employed as a means of diagnosis in routine clinical analysis.

  17. Complexity of vitamin E metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lisa Schm?lz; Marc Birringer; Stefan Lorkowski; Maria Wallert

    2016-01-01

    detecting and quantifying vitamin E and its metabolites are crucial. The latest methods in analytics are presented.

  18. Multiple Vitamin K Forms Exist in Dairy Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    The plant-based form of vitamin K (phylloquinone, PK, vitamin K1) has been well-quantified in the U.S. diet. Menaquinones (MK, vitamin K2) are another class of vitamin K compounds that differ from PK in the length and saturation of their side chain but have not been well characterized in foods. The...

  19. Experimental vitamin B12 deficiency in a human subject: a longitudinal investigation of the performance of the holotranscobalamin (HoloTC, Active-B12) immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Paul Henry

    2016-01-01

    Based on Victor Herbert's model for sequential stages in the development of vitamin B12 deficiency, the holotranscobalamin (HoloTC) immunoassay has controversially been promoted as a more specific and sensitive replacement for the total vitamin B12 test, for the diagnosis of deficiency. There have been no longitudinal studies, by means of experimental cobalamin deficiency, because ethical considerations prevent such risky studies on patients or healthy human volunteers. The objective was to provide a detailed record of the response of HoloTC, compared to total vitamin B12 and metabolites, to the development of experimental vitamin B12 deficiency in an initially replete human subject. This 54 year old male, with a vitamin B12 deficiency possibly caused by a defect in the intracellular cobalamin metabolism, ensured an initially replete condition by means of oral doses of cyanocobalamin supplements at 1000 μg/day for 12 weeks. The subject then depleted himself of vitamin B12, by withholding treatment and using a low-cobalamin diet, until significant metabolic disturbances were observed. The responses of serum total vitamin B12 and HoloTC and the two metabolites, plasma methylmalonic acid and homocysteine, were monitored by weekly blood tests. HoloTC was not significantly more sensitive than either total serum vitamin B12 or total homocysteine, and was much less sensitive than methylmalonic acid. HoloTC decreased from an initial concentration of >128 pmol/L to a minimum of 33 pmol/L on day 742, the only day on which it fell below the lower limit of the reference interval. Total vitamin B12 decreased from an initial concentration of 606 pmol/L to a minimum of 171 pmol/L on day 728. Total homocysteine increased from an initial concentration of 8.4 μmol/L to a maximum of 14.2 μmol/L on day 609. Methylmalonic acid unexpectedly contained four distinct peaks; initially at 0.17 μmol/L, it first exceeded the upper limit of the reference interval on day 386

  20. Vitamin D and female fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Rabe, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Apart from the well known effects of vitamin D on maintaining calcium homeostasis and promoting bone mineralization, there is some evidence suggesting that vitamin D also modulates human reproductive processes. We will review the most interesting and relevant studies on vitamin D and female fertility published over the past year. In the past year, several observational studies reported a better in-vitro fertilization outcome in women with sufficient vitamin D levels (≥30 ng/ml), which was mainly attributed to vitamin D effects on the endometrium. One randomized controlled trial found an increased endometrial thickness in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) receiving vitamin D during intrauterine insemination cycles. Further, vitamin D supplementation had a beneficial effect on serum lipids in PCOS women. Vitamin D treatment improved endometriosis in a rat model and increased vitamin D intake was related to a decreased risk of incident endometriosis. Vitamin D was also favorably associated with primary dysmenorrhea, uterine leiomyoma, and ovarian reserve in late reproductive aged women. In women undergoing in-vitro fertilization, a sufficient vitamin D level (≥30 ng/ml) should be obtained. Vitamin D supplementation might improve metabolic parameters in women with PCOS. A high vitamin D intake might be protective against endometriosis.

  1. Quantifying turbulent wall shear stress in a subject specific human aorta using large eddy simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Jonas; Gårdhagen, Roland; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-10-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation (LES) is employed to calculate the disturbed flow field and the wall shear stress (WSS) in a subject specific human aorta. Velocity and geometry measurements using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are taken as input to the model to provide accurate boundary conditions and to assure the physiological relevance. In total, 50 consecutive cardiac cycles were simulated from which a phase average was computed to get a statistically reliable result. A decomposition similar to Reynolds decomposition is introduced, where the WSS signal is divided into a pulsating part (due to the mass flow rate) and a fluctuating part (originating from the disturbed flow). Oscillatory shear index (OSI) is plotted against time-averaged WSS in a novel way, and locations on the aortic wall where elevated values existed could easily be found. In general, high and oscillating WSS values were found in the vicinity of the branches in the aortic arch, while low and oscillating WSS were present in the inner curvature of the descending aorta. The decomposition of WSS into a pulsating and a fluctuating part increases the understanding of how WSS affects the aortic wall, which enables both qualitative and quantitative comparisons.

  2. A novel approach to quantify different iron forms in ex-vivo human brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravin; Bulk, Marjolein; Webb, Andrew; van der Weerd, Louise; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H.; Huber, Martina; Bossoni, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel combination of methods to study the physical properties of ferric ions and iron-oxide nanoparticles in post-mortem human brain, based on the combination of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and SQUID magnetometry. By means of EPR, we derive the concentration of the low molecular weight iron pool, as well as the product of its electron spin relaxation times. Additionally, by SQUID magnetometry we identify iron mineralization products ascribable to a magnetite/maghemite phase and a ferrihydrite (ferritin) phase. We further derive the concentration of magnetite/maghemite and of ferritin nanoparticles. To test out the new combined methodology, we studied brain tissue of an Alzheimer’s patient and a healthy control. Finally, we estimate that the size of the magnetite/maghemite nanoparticles, whose magnetic moments are blocked at room temperature, exceeds 40–50 nm, which is not compatible with the ferritin protein, the core of which is typically 6–8 nm. We believe that this methodology could be beneficial in the study of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease which are characterized by abnormal iron accumulation in the brain. PMID:27941952

  3. A novel approach to quantify different iron forms in ex-vivo human brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravin; Bulk, Marjolein; Webb, Andrew; van der Weerd, Louise; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H.; Huber, Martina; Bossoni, Lucia

    2016-12-01

    We propose a novel combination of methods to study the physical properties of ferric ions and iron-oxide nanoparticles in post-mortem human brain, based on the combination of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and SQUID magnetometry. By means of EPR, we derive the concentration of the low molecular weight iron pool, as well as the product of its electron spin relaxation times. Additionally, by SQUID magnetometry we identify iron mineralization products ascribable to a magnetite/maghemite phase and a ferrihydrite (ferritin) phase. We further derive the concentration of magnetite/maghemite and of ferritin nanoparticles. To test out the new combined methodology, we studied brain tissue of an Alzheimer’s patient and a healthy control. Finally, we estimate that the size of the magnetite/maghemite nanoparticles, whose magnetic moments are blocked at room temperature, exceeds 40-50 nm, which is not compatible with the ferritin protein, the core of which is typically 6-8 nm. We believe that this methodology could be beneficial in the study of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease which are characterized by abnormal iron accumulation in the brain.

  4. Quantifying relative uncertainties in the detection and attribution of human-induced climate change on winter streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kuk-Hyun; Merwade, Venkatesh; Ojha, C. S. P.; Palmer, Richard N.

    2016-11-01

    In spite of recent popularity for investigating human-induced climate change in regional areas, understanding the contributors to the relative uncertainties in the process remains unclear. To remedy this, this study presents a statistical framework to quantify relative uncertainties in a detection and attribution study. Primary uncertainty contributors are categorized into three types: climate data, hydrologic, and detection uncertainties. While an ensemble of climate models is used to define climate data uncertainty, hydrologic uncertainty is defined using a Bayesian approach. Before relative uncertainties in the detection and attribution study are quantified, an optimal fingerprint-based detection and attribution analysis is employed to investigate changes in winter streamflow in the Connecticut River Basin, which is located in the Eastern United States. Results indicate that winter streamflow over a period of 64 years (1950-2013) lies outside the range expected from natural variability of climate alone with a 90% confidence interval in the climate models. Investigation of relative uncertainties shows that the uncertainty linked to the climate data is greater than the uncertainty induced by hydrologic modeling. Detection uncertainty, defined as the uncertainty related to time evolution of the anthropogenic climate change in the historical data (signal) above the natural internal climate variability (noise), shows that uncertainties in natural internal climate variability (piControl) scenarios may be the source of the significant degree of uncertainty in the regional Detection and Attribution study.

  5. Sun exposure and vitamin D supplementation in relation to vitamin D status of breastfeeding mothers and infants in the global exploration of human milk study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawodu, Adekunle; Davidson, Barbara; Woo, Jessica G; Peng, Yong-Mei; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M; de Lourdes Guerrero, Maria; Morrow, Ardythe L

    2015-02-05

    Although vitamin D (vD) deficiency is common in breastfed infants and their mothers during pregnancy and lactation, a standardized global comparison is lacking. We studied the prevalence and risk factors for vD deficiency using a standardized protocol in a cohort of breastfeeding mother-infant pairs, enrolled in the Global Exploration of Human Milk Study, designed to examine longitudinally the effect of environment, diet and culture. Mothers planned to provide breast milk for at least three months post-partum and were enrolled at four weeks postpartum in Shanghai, China (n=112), Cincinnati, Ohio (n=119), and Mexico City, Mexico (n=113). Maternal serum 25(OH)D was measured by radioimmunoassay (Mexico City) seen at 26 weeks of age during fall and winter seasons. Data collected prospectively included vD supplementation, season and sun index (sun exposure×body surface area exposed while outdoors). Differences and factors associated with vD deficiency were evaluated using appropriate statistical analysis. vD deficiency in order of magnitude was identified in 62%, 52% and 17% of Mexican, Shanghai and Cincinnati mothers, respectively (pseason (p=0.001) and sites (pSeason (p=0.022), adding formula feeding (p<0.001) and a higher sun index (p=0.085) predicted higher infant vD status. vD deficiency appears to be a global problem in mothers and infants, though the prevalence in diverse populations may depend upon sun exposure behaviors and vD supplementation. Greater attention to maternal and infant vD status starting during pregnancy is warranted worldwide.

  6. Vitamin C conjugates of genotoxic lipid peroxidation products: Structural characterization and detection in human plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Sowell, John; Frei, Balz; Stevens, Jan F.

    2004-01-01

    α,β-Unsaturated aldehydes such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and other electrophilic lipid peroxidation (LPO) products may contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and other age-related diseases by cytotoxic, genotoxic, and proinflammatory mechanisms. The notion that vitamin C (ascorbic acid) acts as a biological antioxidant has been challenged recently by an in vitro study showing that ascorbic acid promotes, rather than inhibits, the formation of genotoxic LPO produ...

  7. Maternal Vitamin D Deficiency and Fetal Programming - Lessons Learned from Humans and Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Reichetzeder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cardiovascular disease partially originates from poor environmental and nutritional conditions in early life. Lack of micronutrients like 25 hydroxy vitamin D3 (25OHD during pregnancy may be an important treatable causal factor. The present study explored the effect of maternal 25OHD deficiency on the offspring. Methods: We performed a prospective observational study analyzing the association of maternal 25OHD deficiency during pregnancy with birth outcomes considering confounding. To show that vitamin D deficiency may be causally involved in the observed associations, mice were set on either 25OHD sufficient or insufficient diets before and during pregnancy. Growth, glucose tolerance and mortality was analyzed in the F1 generation. Results: The clinical study showed that severe 25OHD deficiency was associated with low birth weight and low gestational age. ANCOVA models indicated that established confounding factors such as offspring sex, smoking during pregnancy and maternal BMI did not influence the impact of 25OHD on birth weight. However, there was a significant interaction between 25OHD and gestational age. Maternal 25OHD deficiency was also independently associated with low APGAR scores 5 minutes postpartum. The offspring of 25OHD deficient mice grew slower after birth, had an impaired glucose tolerance shortly after birth and an increased mortality during follow-up. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates an association between maternal 25OHD and offspring birth weight. The effect of 25OHD on birth weight seems to be mediated by vitamin D controlling gestational age. Results from an animal experiment suggest that gestational 25OHD insufficiency is causally linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Since birth weight and prematurity are associated with an adverse cardiovascular outcome in later life, this study emphasizes the need for novel monitoring and treatment guidelines of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy.

  8. Hydroxytyrosol supplementation increases vitamin C levels in vivo. A human volunteer trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Lopez-Huertas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxytyrosol (HT is a main phenolic component of olive oil. In this study, we investigated the safety and effects produced by HT purified (99.5% from olive mill waste. HT was administered at a daily dosage of 45 mg for 8 weeks to volunteers with mild hyperlipidemia (n=14. We measured markers of cardiovascular disease risk, enzyme markers of several clinical conditions, hematology, antioxidant parameters, vitamins and minerals at baseline (T0, 4 weeks (T4 and 8 weeks (T8. The values obtained at T4 and T8 were compared with baseline. We found that the HT dose administered was safe and mostly did not influence markers of cardiovascular disease, blood lipids, inflammatory markers, liver or kidney functions and the electrolyte balance. Serum iron levels remained constant but a significant (P<0.05 decrease in ferritin at T4 and T8 was found. Serum folate and red blood cell folate levels were also reduced at T4 and T8. Finally, vitamin C increased by two-fold at T4 and T8 compared with levels at baseline. These results indicate a physiologically relevant antioxidant function for HT through increasing endogenous vitamin C levels.

  9. Metabolic Profiling of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Influence of Vitamin D Status and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Stepien

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC could serve as a less invasive and more direct alternative to tissue biopsies or serum in metabolomic research. We conducted two exploratory independent studies in order to characterise PBMC’s metabolomic profile following short-term vitamin D3 supplementation and to determine gender effects. In the first study, eight healthy males and females aged 40–65 y were randomly selected for profiling of PBMCs after receiving either 15 µg of vitamin D3 or placebo for four weeks. In the second study, twenty younger healthy males and females were studied. Cell metabolites were extracted and deproteinised using methanol/chloroform/water method and analysed by GC-MS. Higher vitamin D status had no effect on the fatty acid profile of PBMCs, but inflammatory biomarkers and adipokines correlated positively with stearic acid levels. In the second study, no gender-specific metabolites were identified. Valine, leucine and aspartic acid were identified as potential BMI-sensitive amino acids. Larger studies are needed to confirm the influence of BMI on these parameters. This work clearly demonstrates the utility of metabolomics profiling of PBMCs and paves the way for future applications of metabolomics in identifying metabolic profiles of blood cells as a measure for dietary intakes or physiological status.

  10. Hydrogen sulphide in human nasal air quantified using thermal desorption and selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondimu, Taddese; Wang, Rui; Ross, Brian

    2014-09-01

    The discovery that hydrogen sulphide (H2S) acts as a gasotransmitter when present at very low concentrations (sub-parts per billion (ppbv)) has resulted in the need to quickly quantify trace amounts of the gas in complex biological samples. Selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) is capable of real-time quantification of H2S but many SIFT-MS instruments lack sufficient sensitivity for this application. In this study we investigate the utility of combining thermal desorption with SIFT-MS for quantifying H2S in the 0.1-1 ppbv concentration range. Human orally or nasally derived breath, and background ambient air, were collected in sampling bags and dried by passing through CaCl2 and H2S pre-concentrated using a sorbent trap optimised for the capture of this gas. The absorbed H2S was then thermally desorbed and quantified by SIFT-MS. H2S concentrations in ambient air, nasal breath and oral breath collected from 10 healthy volunteers were 0.12  ±  0.02 (mean ± SD), 0.40  ±  0.11 and 3.1  ±  2.5 ppbv respectively, and in the oral cavity H2S, quantified by SIFT-MS without pre-concentration, was present at 13.5  ±  8.6 ppbv. The oral cavity H2S correlates well with oral breath H2S but not with nasal breath H2S, suggesting that oral breath H2S derives mainly from the oral cavity but nasal breath is likely pulmonary in origin. The successful quantification of such low concentrations of H2S in nasal air using a rapid analytical procedure paves the way for the straightforward analysis of H2S in breath and may assist in elucidating the role that H2S plays in biological systems.

  11. A pilot trial comparing the availability of vitamins C, B6, and B12 from a vitamin-fortified water and food source in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Douglas S; Lou, Lidia; Schwartz, Howard I; Feldman, Samantha; Krieger, Diane R

    2009-01-01

    In a cross-over randomized pilot study, the relative absorption of vitamins C, B(6) and B(12) were tested using a commercial vitamin-water (VW) and a standardized mixed meal (MM). Twelve adults (22.9+/-3.7 years), received the VW and the MM, randomly ordered, with a minimum 7-day washout period between. Blood was drawn pre-ingestion and over a post-ingestion period of 300+ min. Test meal quantities were formulated to contain equal amounts of vitamins B(6), B(12), and C as per the water label. Analysis revealed that a scaling factor had to be used to balance the actual content differences between test products. Using the adjusted numbers for actual water vitamin concentration, there were no differences in the maximum concentration and the 5-h area under the curve for vitamins B(6), B(12) or C between the VW and the MM. VW was found to provide similar in vivo nutrition as the test MM at a caloric saving.

  12. Quantifying Human Appropriated Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) in a Ghanaian Cocoa System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, A.; Adu-Bredu, S.; Adu Sasu, M.; Ashley Asare, R.; Boyd, E.; Hirons, M. A.; Malhi, Y.; Mason, J.; Norris, K.; Robinson, E. J. Z.; McDermott, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Ghana is the second largest producer of cocoa (Theobroma cacoa), exporting approximately 18 percent of global volumes. These cocoa farms are predominantly small-scale, ranging in size from 2-4 hectares (ha). Traditionally, the model of cocoa expansion in Ghana relied on clearing new areas of forest and establishing a farm under remnant forest trees. This is increasingly less practical due to few unprotected forest areas remaining and management practices favoring close to full sun cocoa to maximize short-term yields. This study is part of a larger project, ECOLMITS, which is an interdisciplinary, ESPA-funded[1] initiative exploring the ecological limits of ecosystem system services (ESS) for alleviating poverty in small-scale agroforestry systems. The ecological study plots are situated within and around the Kakum National Forest, a well-protected, moist-evergreen forest of the Lower Guinea Forest region. Net primary productivity (NPP) is a measure of the rate at which carbon dioxide (CO2) is incorporated into plant tissues (e.g. canopy, stem and root). For this study, NPP was monitored in situ using methods developed by the Global Environmental Monitoring Network (GEM, http://gem.tropicalforests.ox.ac.uk/). By comparing NPP measured in intact forest and farms, the human appropriated NPP (HANPP) of this system can be estimated. The forest measures provide the "potential" NPP of the region, and then the reduction in NPP for farm plots is calculated for both land-cover change (HANPPLUC) and cocoa harvesting (HANPPHARV). The results presented are of the first year of NPP measurements across the cocoa landscape, including measurements from intact forest, logged forest and cocoa farms across a shade gradient and located at varying distances from the forest edge (e.g. 100 m, 500 m, 1 km and 5 km). These measures will have implications for carbon sequestration potential over the region and long-term sustainability of the Ghanaian cocoa sector. [1] Ecosystem Services for

  13. Peranan Vitamin D Pada Pencegahan Penyakit Degeneratif: Persfektif Baru

    OpenAIRE

    Siagian, Albiner

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D is one of the fat soluble vitamins. This vitamin is usually known as vitamin that takes apart in bone health thorough its role in increasing efficiency of calcium absorption in small intestine. Without vitamin D, human small intestine can only absorb calcium up to 15%. Vitamin D can increase efficiency of dietary calcium absorption up to 30%. Until 1980s, vitamin D was primarily known by its role in bone and tooth formation However, recent epidemiologic studies have revealed...

  14. Vitamin C Inhibits Benzo[a]pyrene-lnduced Cell Cycle Changes Partly via Cyclin D1/ E2F Pathway in Human Embryo Lung Fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI GAO; BING-CI LIU; XIANG-LIN SHI; CHUAN-SHU HUANG; XIAO-WEI JLA; BAO-RONG YOU; MENG YE; FU-HAI SHEN; HONG-JU DU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the molecular mechanism of the inhibitory effects of vitamin C on benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)-induced changes of cell cycle in human embryo lung fibroblast (HELF) cells. Methods The stable transfectants, HELF transfected with antisense cyclin D1 and antisense CDK4, were established. Cells were cultured and pretreated with vitamin C before stimulation with B[a]P for 24 h. The expression levels of cyclin D1, CDK4, E2F1, and E2F4 were determined by Western blot. Flow cytometric analysis was employed to detect the distributions of cell cycle. Results B[a]P significantly elevated the expression levels of cyclin D1, E2F1, and E2F4 in HELF cells. Vitamin C decreased the expression levels of cyclin D1, E2F1, and E2F4 in B[a]P-stimulated HELF cells. Dose-dependent relationships were not found between the different concentrations of vitamin C (10, 100, 500, 1000, and 5000 μmol/L) and the expression levels of cyclin D1, E2F1, and E2F4 in HELF cells. The expression levels of cyclin D1, E2F1, and E2F4 in B[a]P-treated transfectants were lower than those in B[a]P-treated HELF cells. The expression levels of cyclin D1 and E2F4 treated with vitamin C and antisense cyclin D1 were decreased compared with those treated with antisense cyclin D1 alone. The effects of vitamin C combined with antisense CDK4 on the expression levels of cyclin D1 and E2F1/E2F4 were similar to those of antisense CDK4 alone. B[a]P progressed HELF cells from G1 to S phase. Both vitamin C and antisense cyclin D1 suppressed the changes of cell cycle progressed by B[a]P. However, antisenseCDK4 did not attenuate the above changes. Vitamin C combined with antisense CDK4 markedly suppressed B[a]P-induced changes of cell cycle as compared with antisense CDK4. But the inhibitory effects of vitamin C combined with antisense cyclin D1 on B[a]P-induced changes of cell cycle were similar to those of vitamin C alone or antisense cyclin D1 alone. Conclusions B[a]P progressed HELF cells from G1 to S phase via

  15. Concentração de vitamina A no leite humano maduro Vitamin A concentration in mature human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Souza

    2012-12-01

    ência devem ser estendidas a todas as gestantes e puérperas, independentemente das condições sociodemográficas e do grau de conhecimento de nutrição, visando melhorar a saúde do binômio mãe/filho.OBJECTIVE: To quantify vitamin A levels in mature milk of 196 nursing women who were treated at the Maternity School of Rio de Janeiro and to evaluate its correlation with sociodemographic variables and degree of nutrition knowledge. METHODS: To quantify retinol concentrations, 10 mL of mature milk were collected by manual expression of one breast, 2 hours after the last feed, in the morning period. Values below 1.05 µmol/L and 2.3 µmol/L were considered inadequate to meet satisfactory intake and to constitute vitamin A liver reserve, respectively. The following variables were also assessed: sex, age, familiar income, maternal education, basic sanitation conditions, number of people in the household, maternal age, prenatal care, and degree of nutrition knowledge. RESULTS: Among the 196 lactating mothers analyzed, the average vitamin A concentration observed in mature milk was 1.76±0.85 µmol/L and prevalence of vitamin A deficiency was observed in 20.5% mothers. There was no significant difference between vitamin A levels in maternal milk and the variables socioeconomic status and nutrition knowledge. Only 38.9% of lactating women presented enough vitamin A concentrations in milk for the infants' liver reserves (2.3 µmol/L. CONCLUSIONS: These findings reveal high prevalence of inadequate vitamin A nutritional status of mothers and infants, consistent with the national prevalence reported in women of childbearing age and Brazilian children, and that the intervention measures to fight this shortage should be extended to all pregnant and postpartum women, regardless of sociodemographic conditions and degree of nutrition knowledge, in order to improve the health of mother and child.

  16. Calciotrophic hormones and hyperglycemia modulate vitamin D receptor and 25 hydroxyy vitamin D 1-α hydroxylase mRNA expression in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somjen, D; Knoll, E; Sharon, O; Many, A; Stern, N

    2015-04-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ), the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and 25 hydroxyy vitamin D 1-α hydroxylase (1OHase) mRNA are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In these cells estrogenic hormones modulate cell proliferation as measured by DNA synthesis (DNA). In the present study we determined whether or not the calciotrophic hormones PTH 1-34 (PTH) and less- calcemic vitamin D analog QW as well as hyperglycemia can regulate DNA synthesis and CK. E2 had a bimodal effect on VSMC DNA synthesis, such that proliferation was inhibited at 30nM but stimulated at 0.3nM. PTH at 50nM increased, whereas QW at 10nM inhibited DNA synthesis. Hyperglycemia inhibited the effects on high E2, QW and PTH on DNA only. Both QW and PTH increased ERα mRNA expression, but only PTH increased ERβ expression. Likewise, both PTH and QW stimulated VDR and 1OHase expression and activity. ERβ, VDR and 1OHase expression and activity were inhibited by hyperglycemia, but ERα expression was unaffected by hyperglycemia. In conclusion, calcitrophic hormones modify VSMC growth and concomitantly affect ER expression in these cells as well as the endogenous VSMC vitamin D system elements, including VDR and 1OHase. Some of the later changes may likely participate in growth effects. Of importance in the observation is that several regulatory effects are deranged in the presence of hyperglycemia, particularly the PTH- and vitamin D-dependent up regulation of VDR and 1OHase in these cells. The implications of these effects require further studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  17. Vitamin D deficiency: a global perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Bandeira,Francisco; Griz,Luiz; Dreyer,Patricia; Eufrazino,Catia; Bandeira,Cristina; Freese,Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    Vitamin D is essential for the maintenance of good health. Its sources can be skin production and diet intake. Most humans depend on sunlight exposure (UVB 290­315 nm) to satisfy their requirements for vitamin D. Solar ultraviolet B photons are absorbed by the skin, leading to transformation of 7-dehydrocholesterol into vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol). Season, latitude, time of day, skin pigmentation, aging, sunscreen use, all influence the cutaneous production of vitamin D3. Vitamin D defic...

  18. The effect of calcium and vitamin D3 supplementation on the healing of the proximal humerus fracture: a randomized placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, A M; Faber, J; Lynnerup, N

    2004-01-01

    scan, WHO criteria), and not taking any drugs related to bone formation, including calcium or vitamin D supplementation, were randomly assigned to either oral 800 IU vitamin D3 plus 1 g calcium or placebo, in a double-blind prospective study. We measured biochemical, radiographic, and bone mineral......The purpose of this study was to (1) quantify the healing process of the human osteoporotic proximal humerus fracture (PHF) expressed in terms of callus formation over the fracture region using BMD scanning, and (2) quantify the impact of medical intervention with vitamin D3 and calcium......, with peak levels in week 6. By week 6 BMD levels were higher in the active group (0.623 g/cm2) compared with the placebo group (0.570 g/cm2, P = 0.006). Thirty seven percent of the patients presented with vitamin D levels below 30 nmol/l, indicative of mild vitamin D insufficiency. In conclusion, we have...

  19. Vitamin D3 metabolite calcidiol primes human dendritic cells to promote the development of immunomodulatory IL-10-producing T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakdash, G.; Capel, T.M. van; Mason, L.M.; Kapsenberg, M.L.; Jong, E.C. de

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D is recognized as a potent immunosuppressive drug. The suppressive effects of vitamin D are attributed to its physiologically active metabolite 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D3 (calcitriol), which was shown, to prime dendritic cells (DCs) to promote the development of regulatory T (Treg) cells. De

  20. Seasonal variation in vitamin D3 levels is paralleled by changes in the peripheral blood human T cell compartment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoo, A.L.; Koenen, H.J.P.M.; Chai, L.Y.; Sweep, F.C.; Netea, M.G.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Joosten, I.

    2012-01-01

    It is well-recognized that vitamin D(3) has immune-modulatory properties and that the variation in ultraviolet (UV) exposure affects vitamin D(3) status. Here, we investigated if and to what extent seasonality of vitamin D(3) levels are associated with changes in T cell numbers and phenotypes. Every

  1. Transcobalamin derived from bovine milk stimulates apical uptake of vitamin B12 into human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Brad; Boggs, Irina; Green, Ralph; Miller, Joshua W; Hovey, Russell C; Humphrey, Rex; Wheeler, Thomas T

    2014-11-01

    Intestinal uptake of vitamin B12 (hereafter B12) is impaired in a significant proportion of the human population. This impairment is due to inherited or acquired defects in the expression or function of proteins involved in the binding of diet-derived B12 and its uptake into intestinal cells. Bovine milk is an abundant source of bioavailable B12 wherein it is complexed with transcobalamin. In humans, transcobalamin functions primarily as a circulatory protein, which binds B12 following its absorption and delivers it to peripheral tissues via its cognate receptor, CD320. In the current study, the transcobalamin-B12 complex was purified from cows' milk and its ability to stimulate uptake of B12 into cultured bovine, mouse and human cell lines was assessed. Bovine milk-derived transcobalamin-B12 complex was absorbed by all cell types tested, suggesting that the uptake mechanism is conserved across species. Furthermore, the complex stimulated the uptake of B12 via the apical surface of differentiated Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells. These findings suggest the presence of an alternative transcobalamin-mediated uptake pathway for B12 in the human intestine other than that mediated by the gastric glycoprotein, intrinsic factor. Our findings highlight the potential for transcobalamin-B12 complex derived from bovine milk to be used as a natural bioavailable alternative to orally administered free B12 to overcome B12 malabsorption.

  2. High throughput LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous analysis of multiple vitamin D analytes in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Carl; Taylor, Angela E; Hassan-Smith, Zaki K; Adams, John S; Stewart, Paul M; Hewison, Martin; Keevil, Brian G

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that vitamin D-deficiency is linked to increased risk of common human health problems. To define vitamin D 'status' most routine analytical methods quantify one particular vitamin D metabolite, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD3). However, vitamin D is characterized by complex metabolic pathways, and simultaneous measurement of multiple vitamin D metabolites may provide a more accurate interpretation of vitamin D status. To address this we developed a high-throughput liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to analyse multiple vitamin D analytes, with particular emphasis on the separation of epimer metabolites. A supportive liquid-liquid extraction (SLE) and LC-MS/MS method was developed to quantify 10 vitamin D metabolites as well as separation of an interfering 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (7αC4) isobar (precursor of bile acid), and validated by analysis of human serum samples. In a cohort of 116 healthy subjects, circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD3), 3-epi-25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (3-epi-25OHD3), 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (24R,25(OH)2D3), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 (25OHD2) were quantifiable using 220μL of serum, with 25OHD3 and 24R,25(OH)2D3 showing significant seasonal variations. This high-throughput LC-MS/MS method provides a novel strategy for assessing the impact of vitamin D on human health and disease.

  3. Quantifying Human Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    interaction, including obstacles that impede movement between people or groups can encourage flow and reduce these kinds of conflicts. Designing...Mathematical algorithms help determine trends, pathways, and perform nodal analysis. Trigonometry triangulates locations while physics describes collection

  4. Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium. Calcium is one ... building blocks of bone. A lack of vitamin D can lead to bone diseases such as osteoporosis ...

  5. Vitamin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dietary Reference Intakes: Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron Manganese, Molybdenium, Nickel, Silicon, ... provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  6. Vitamin C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin C is an antioxidant. It is important for your ... healing and helps the body absorb iron. Vitamin C comes from fruits and vegetables. Good sources include ...

  7. Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thin, and brittle bones, a condition known as rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Vitamin D ... the body. In children, vitamin D deficiency causes rickets, where the bones become soft and bend. It's ...

  8. Vitamin E

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamin E combined with other antioxidants, zinc, and copper showed promise for slowing down the rate of ... several years had an increased risk of prostate cancer. Are there any interactions with vitamin E that ...

  9. Expression of the vitamin D metabolizing enzyme CYP24A1 at the annulus of human spermatozoa may serve as a novel marker of semen quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Blomberg; Jørgensen, A; Nielsen, J E;

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D (VD) is important for male reproduction in mammals and the VD receptor (VDR) and VD-metabolizing enzymes are expressed in human spermatozoa. The VD-inactivating enzyme CYP24A1 titrates the cellular responsiveness to VD, is transcriptionally regulated by VD, and has a distinct expression...

  10. Sun Exposure and Vitamin D Supplementation in Relation to Vitamin D Status of Breastfeeding Mothers and Infants in the Global Exploration of Human Milk Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekunle Dawodu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although vitamin D (vD deficiency is common in breastfed infants and their mothers during pregnancy and lactation, a standardized global comparison is lacking. We studied the prevalence and risk factors for vD deficiency using a standardized protocol in a cohort of breastfeeding mother-infant pairs, enrolled in the Global Exploration of Human Milk Study, designed to examine longitudinally the effect of environment, diet and culture. Mothers planned to provide breast milk for at least three months post-partum and were enrolled at four weeks postpartum in Shanghai, China (n = 112, Cincinnati, Ohio (n = 119, and Mexico City, Mexico (n = 113. Maternal serum 25(OHD was measured by radioimmunoassay (<50 nmol/L was categorized as deficient. Serum 25(OHD was measured in a subset of infants (35 Shanghai, 47 Cincinnati and 45 Mexico City seen at 26 weeks of age during fall and winter seasons. Data collected prospectively included vD supplementation, season and sun index (sun exposure × body surface area exposed while outdoors. Differences and factors associated with vD deficiency were evaluated using appropriate statistical analysis. vD deficiency in order of magnitude was identified in 62%, 52% and 17% of Mexican, Shanghai and Cincinnati mothers, respectively (p < 0.001. In regression analysis, vD supplementation (p < 0.01, obesity (p = 0.03, season (p = 0.001 and sites (p < 0.001 predicted maternal vD status. vD deficiency in order of  magnitude was found in 62%, 28%, and 6% of Mexican, Cincinnati and Shanghai infants, respectively (p < 0.001. Season (p = 0.022, adding formula feeding (p < 0.001 and a higher sun index (p = 0.085 predicted higher infant vD status. vD deficiency appears to be a global problem in mothers and infants, though the prevalence in diverse populations may depend upon sun exposure behaviors and vD supplementation. Greater attention to maternal and infant vD status starting during pregnancy is warranted worldwide.

  11. Vitamin D and psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, K E; Norman, A W

    1992-05-01

    Skin can serve as the source of vitamin D when exposed to sunlight so that cutaneous 7-dehydrocholesterol can be converted to the vitamin. Skin is also a target organ for the hormone form of vitamin D: 1,25-(OH)2D3. Both skin keratinocytes grown in tissue culture and samples of human skin have the nuclear receptor for 1,25(OH)2D3. New results suggest that this hormone or its analogs may be effective in treating some forms of psoriasis.

  12. Prediction of object detection, recognition, and identification [DRI] ranges at color scene images based on quantifying human color contrast perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, Ephi; Levin, Ilia; Yaron, Ofer

    2016-10-01

    We propose a novel approach to predict, for specified color imaging system and for objects with known characteristics, their detection, recognition, identification (DRI) ranges in a colored dynamic scene, based on quantifying the human color contrast perception. The method refers to the well established L*a*b*, 3D color space. The nonlinear relations of this space are intended to mimic the nonlinear response of the human eye. The metrics of L*a*b* color space is such that the Euclidian distance between any two colors in this space is approximately proportional to the color contrast as perceived by the human eye/brain. The result of this metrics leads to the outcome that color contrast of any two points is always greater (or equal) than their equivalent grey scale contrast. This meets our sense that looking on a colored image, contrast is superior to the gray scale contrast of the same image. Yet, color loss by scattering at very long ranges should be considered as well. The color contrast derived from the distance between the colored object pixels and to the nearby colored background pixels, as derived from the L*a*b* color space metrics, is expressed in terms of gray scale contrast. This contrast replaces the original standard gray scale contrast component of that image. As expected, the resulted DRI ranges are, in most cases, larger than those predicted by the standard gray scale image. Upon further elaboration and validation of this method, it may be combined with the next versions of the well accepted TRM codes for DRI predictions. Consistent prediction of DRI ranges implies a careful evaluation of the object and background color contrast reduction along the range. Clearly, additional processing for reconstructing the objects and background true colors and hence the color contrast along the range, will further increase the DRI ranges.

  13. Supplementation with vitamins C and E inhibits the release of interleukin-6 from contracting human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Christian P; Hiscock, Natalie J; Penkowa, Milena

    2004-01-01

    to Control. Plasma 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha), a marker of lipid peroxidation, increased in response to exercise in Control, but not in Treatment. In both Control and Treatment, skeletal muscle IL-6 mRNA and protein levels increased between 0 and 3 h. In contrast, the net release of IL-6 from the leg......Contracting human skeletal muscle is a major contributor to the exercise-induced increase of plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6). Although antioxidants have been shown to attenuate the exercise-induced increase of plasma IL-6, it is unknown whether antioxidants inhibit transcription, translation...... (6 h). Leg blood flow was measured using Doppler ultrasonography. Plasma IL-6 concentration was measured in blood sampled from the femoral artery and vein. The net release of IL-6 was calculated using Fick's principle. Plasma vitamin C and E concentrations were elevated in Treatment compared...

  14. Development and Comparison of Three Liquid Chromatography-Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization/Mass Spectrometry Methods for Determining Vitamin D Metabolites in Human Serum

    OpenAIRE

    Bedner, Mary; Karen W. Phinney

    2012-01-01

    Liquid chromatographic methods with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry were developed for the determination of the vitamin D metabolites 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 (25(OH)D2), 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3), and 3-epi-25-hydroxyvitamin-D3 (3-epi-25(OH)D3) in the four Levels of SRM 972, Vitamin D in Human Serum. One method utilized a C18 column, which separates 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3, and one method utilized a CN column that also resolves the diastereomers 25(OH)D3 and 3-epi-...

  15. Expression of the vitamin D receptor, 25-hydroxylases, 1alpha-hydroxylase and 24-hydroxylase in the human kidney and renal clear cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Andersen, Claus B.; Nielsen, John E

    2010-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR), CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 are expressed in the human kidney, but the segmental expression of the 25-hydroxylases is unknown. A comprehensive analysis of CYP2R1, CYP27A1, CYP27B1, VDR and CYP24A1 expression in normal kidney and renal clear cell cancer (CCc) would reveal...... the segmental location of expression, and clarify whether the reported loss of VDR in CCc is coincident with alterations of vitamin D metabolism....

  16. Expression of the vitamin D receptor, 25-hydroxylases, 1alpha-hydroxylase and 24-hydroxylase in the human kidney and renal clear cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Andersen, Claus B.; Nielsen, John E;

    2010-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR), CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 are expressed in the human kidney, but the segmental expression of the 25-hydroxylases is unknown. A comprehensive analysis of CYP2R1, CYP27A1, CYP27B1, VDR and CYP24A1 expression in normal kidney and renal clear cell cancer (CCc) would reveal...... the segmental location of expression, and clarify whether the reported loss of VDR in CCc is coincident with alterations of vitamin D metabolism....

  17. Synthesis of B6 vitamin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučijak Nevena Ž.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of vitamin B6 has been known since its discovery in the 1940's. Chemical tests, elestrometric titration determinations, and absorption spectrum studies showed that this vitamin exists in three major chemical forms: pyridoxine (an alcohol, pyridoxal (an aldehyde, and pyridoxamine (a primary amine. Vitamin B6 is needed for more than 100 enzymes involved in protein metabolism, and it is assumed that this vitamin is cofactor of metabolic processes more important than any other substance. A deficiency of vitamin B6 in the human diet leads to severe disorders. Vitamin B6 is necessary for the proper function of the immune and nervous system, and helps the body convert protein to energy. This paper describes the history, properties and applications of vitamin B6, elucidation of chemical structure, and different procedures for synthesis of pyridoxine and pyridoxamine.

  18. Human vitamin B12 absorption measurement by accelerator mass spectrometry using specifically labeled (14)C-cobalamin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carkeet, Colleen; Dueker, Stephen R; Lango, Jozsef; Buchholz, Bruce A; Miller, Joshua W; Green, Ralph; Hammock, Bruce D; Roth, John R; Anderson, Peter J

    2006-04-11

    There is a need for an improved test of human ability to assimilate dietary vitamin B(12). Assaying and understanding absorption and uptake of B(12) is important because defects can lead to hematological and neurological complications. Accelerator mass spectrometry is uniquely suited for assessing absorption and kinetics of carbon-14 ((14)C)-labeled substances after oral ingestion because it is more sensitive than decay counting and can measure levels of (14)C in microliter volumes of biological samples with negligible exposure of subjects to radioactivity. The test we describe employs amounts of B(12) in the range of normal dietary intake. The B(12) used was quantitatively labeled with (14)C at one particular atom of the dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) moiety by exploiting idiosyncrasies of Salmonella metabolism. To grow aerobically on ethanolamine, Salmonella enterica must be provided with either preformed B(12) or two of its precursors, cobinamide and DMB. When provided with (14)C-DMB specifically labeled in the C2 position, cells produced (14)C-B(12) of high specific activity (2.1 GBq/mmol, 58 mCi/mmol) (1 Ci = 37 GBq) and no detectable dilution of label from endogenous DMB synthesis. In a human kinetic study, a physiological dose (1.5 microg, 2.2 kBq/59 nCi) of purified (14)C-B(12) was administered and showed plasma appearance and clearance curves consistent with the predicted behavior of the pure vitamin. This method opens new avenues for study of B(12) assimilation.

  19. Human Vitamin B12 Absorption and Metabolism are Measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Using Specifically Labeled 14C-Cobalamin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carkeet, C; Dueker, S R; Lango, J; Buchholz, B A; Miller, J W; Green, R; Hammock, B D; Roth, J R; Anderson, P J

    2006-01-26

    There is need for an improved test of human ability to assimilate dietary vitamin B{sub 12}. Assaying and understanding absorption and uptake of B{sub 12} is important because defects can lead to hematological and neurological complications. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is uniquely suited for assessing absorption and kinetics of {sup 14}C-labeled substances after oral ingestion because it is more sensitive than decay counting and can measure levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) in microliter volumes of biological samples, with negligible exposure of subjects to radioactivity. The test we describe employs amounts of B{sub 12} in the range of normal dietary intake. The B{sub 12} used was quantitatively labeled with {sup 14}C at one particular atom of the DMB moiety by exploiting idiosyncrasies of Salmonellametabolism. In order to grow aerobically on ethanolamine, S. entericamust be provided with either pre-formed B{sub 12} or two of its precursors: cobinamide and dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). When provided with {sup 14}C-DMB specifically labeled in the C2 position, cells produced {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} of high specific activity (2.1 GBq/mmol, 58 mCi/mmol) and no detectable dilution of label from endogenous DMB synthesis. In a human kinetic study, a physiological dose (1.5 mg, 2.2 KBq/59 nCi) of purified {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} was administered and showed plasma appearance and clearance curves consistent with the predicted behavior of the pure vitamin. This method opens new avenues for study of B{sub 12} assimilation.

  20. Characterization of the autocrine/paracrine function of vitamin D in human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaining Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously demonstrated that 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3, the precursor of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3, is abundant around periodontal soft tissues. Here we investigate whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3 is converted to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3 in periodontal soft tissue cells and explore the possibility of an autocrine/paracrine function of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3 in periodontal soft tissue cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established primary cultures of human gingival fibroblasts and human periodontal ligament cells from 5 individual donors. We demonstrated that 1α-hydroxylase was expressed in human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells, as was cubilin. After incubation with the 1α-hydroxylase substrate 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3, human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells generated detectable 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3 that resulted in an up-regulation of CYP24A1 and RANKL mRNA. A specific knockdown of 1α-hydroxylase in human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells using siRNA resulted in a significant reduction in both 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3 production and mRNA expression of CYP24A1 and RANKL. The classical renal regulators of 1α-hydroxylase (parathyroid hormone, calcium and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3 and Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide did not influence 1α-hydroxylase expression significantly, however, interleukin-1β and sodium butyrate strongly induced 1α-hydroxylase expression in human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, the expression, activity and functionality of 1α-hydroxylase were detected in human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells, raising the possibility that vitamin D acts in an autocrine/paracrine manner in these cells.

  1. Effect of the vitamin B12-binding protein haptocorrin present in human milk on a panel of commensal and pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Laursen, Martin Frederik; Lildballe, Dorte L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Haptocorrin is a vitamin B12-binding protein present in high amounts in different body fluids including human milk. Haptocorrin has previously been shown to inhibit the growth of specific E. coli strains, and the aim of the present study was to elucidate whether the antibacterial...... commensal and pathogenic bacteria to which infants are likely to be exposed. Well-diffusion assays addressing antibacterial effects were performed with human milk, haptocorrin-free human milk, porcine holo-haptocorrin (saturated with B-12) and human apo-haptocorrin (unsaturated). Human milk inhibited...

  2. A modelling framework to evaluate human-induced alterations of network sediment connectivity and quantify their unplanned adverse impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzi, S.; Schmitt, R. J. P.; Giuliani, M.; Castelletti, A.

    2016-12-01

    World-wide human-induced alterations of sediment transport, e.g. due to dams, sand and gravel mining along rivers and channel maintenance, translated into geomorphic changes, which have had major effects on ecosystem integrity, human livelihoods, ultimately negatively impacting also on the expected benefit from building water infrastructures. Despite considerable recent advances in modelling basin-scale hydrological and geomorphological processes, our ability to quantitatively simulate network sediment transport, foresee effects of alternative scenarios of human development on fluvial morpho-dynamics, and design anticipatory planning adaptation measures is still limited. In this work, we demonstrate the potential of a novel modelling framework called CASCADE (CAtchment SEdiment Connectivity And Delivery (Schmitt et al., 2016)) to characterize sediment connectivity at the whole river network scale, predict the disturbing effect of dams on the sediment transport, and quantify the associated loss with respect to the level of benefits that provided the economic justification for their development. CASCADE allows tracking the fate of a sediment from its source to its multiple sinks across the network. We present the results from two major, transboundary river systems (3S and Red River) in South-East Asia. We first discuss the ability of CASCADE to properly represent sediment connectivity at the network scale using available remote sensing data and information from monitoring networks. Secondly, we assess the impacts on sediment connectivity induced by existing and planned dams in the 3S and Red River basins and compare these alterations with revenues in terms of hydropower production. CASCADE outputs support a broader understanding of sediment connectivity tailored for water management issues not yet available, and it is suitable to enrich assessments of food-energy-water nexus. The model framework can be embedded into the design of optimal siting and sizing of water

  3. Quantifying Cell Fate Decisions for Differentiation and Reprogramming of a Human Stem Cell Network: Landscape and Biological Paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhe; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming has been recently intensively studied experimentally. We developed a global potential landscape and kinetic path framework to explore a human stem cell developmental network composed of 52 genes. We uncovered the underlying landscape for the stem cell network with two basins of attractions representing stem and differentiated cell states, quantified and exhibited the high dimensional biological paths for the differentiation and reprogramming process, connecting the stem cell state and differentiated cell state. Both the landscape and non-equilibrium curl flux determine the dynamics of cell differentiation jointly. Flux leads the kinetic paths to be deviated from the steepest descent gradient path, and the corresponding differentiation and reprogramming paths are irreversible. Quantification of paths allows us to find out how the differentiation and reprogramming occur and which important states they go through. We show the developmental process proceeds as moving from the stem cell basin of attraction to the differentiation basin of attraction. The landscape topography characterized by the barrier heights and transition rates quantitatively determine the global stability and kinetic speed of cell fate decision process for development. Through the global sensitivity analysis, we provided some specific predictions for the effects of key genes and regulation connections on the cellular differentiation or reprogramming process. Key links from sensitivity analysis and biological paths can be used to guide the differentiation designs or reprogramming tactics. PMID:23935477

  4. Review article: Quantifying the human impact on water resources: a critical review of the water footprint concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, J.; Hadjikakou, M.; Zoumides, C.

    2013-07-01

    The water footprint is a consumption-based indicator of water use, referring to the total volume of freshwater used directly and indirectly by a nation or a company, or in the provision of a product or service. Despite widespread enthusiasm for the development and use of water footprints, some concerns have been raised about the concept and its usefulness. A variety of methodologies have been developed for water footprinting which differ with respect to how they deal with different forms of water use. The result is water footprint estimates which vary dramatically, often creating confusion. Despite these methodological qualms, the concept has had notable success in raising awareness about water use in agricultural and industrial supply chains, by providing a previously unavailable and (seemingly) simple numerical indicator of water use. Nevertheless, and even though a range of uses have already been suggested for water footprinting, its policy value remains unclear. Unlike the carbon footprint which provides a universal measure of human impact on the atmosphere's limited absorptive capacity, the water footprint in its conventional form solely quantifies a single production input without any accounting of the impacts of use, which vary spatially and temporally. Following an extensive review of the literature related to water footprints, this paper critically examines the present uses of the concept, focusing on its current strengths, shortcomings and promising research avenues to advance it.

  5. Human plasma levels of vitamin E and carotenoids are associated with genetic polymorphisms in genes involved in lipid metabolism. : Plasma vitamin E and carotenoid levels and genes

    OpenAIRE

    Borel, Patrick; Moussa, Myriam; Reboul, Emmanuelle; Lyan, Bernard; Defoort, Catherine; Vincent-Baudry, Stéphanie; Maillot, Matthieu; Gastaldi, Marguerite; Darmon, Michel; Portugal, Henri; Planells, Richard; Lairon, Denis

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Vitamin E and carotenoids are fat-soluble micronutrients carried by plasma lipoproteins. Their plasma concentrations are governed by several factors, some of which are genetic, but data on these genetic factors remain scarce. We hypothesized that genes involved in lipid metabolism, i.e. the genes implicated in intestinal uptake, intracellular trafficking, and the lipoprotein distribution of lipids, play a role in the plasma concentrations of these micronutrients. To ve...

  6. Humans and Tits in the City: Quantifying the Effects of Human Presence on Great Tit and Blue Tit Reproductive Trait Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Corsini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Environmental conditions are key drivers of life-history evolution, and the urban environment is an extreme form of land-use readily inhabited by avian wildlife, whose life-history variation in such altered environment is still poorly understood. Recently, the study of environmental variables associated with urban living—which include shifts in temperature, light, noise or food availability—has attracted increased attention. Another environmental axis that sets the urban space at odds relative to natural habitats is high human abundance, yet very little is known about its effect on avian fitness. We developed a protocol to quantify human presence by performing repeated counts of humans on the ground within a 15 m radius of nestboxes monitored in two centrally-located study areas of a European capital city. In parallel, a GIS-based approach was used to infer nestbox distance to the nearest path and road. Multiple counts of human presence around each nestbox yielded moderate to high repeatabilities (0.6 ≤ r ≤ 0.8 while requiring considerable resources time- and people- wise. In contrast, GIS-based estimates of nestbox distance to paths and roads were time efficient and generated highly repeatable results. The effects of (i human presence around each nestbox, (ii nestbox distance to the nearest path and (iii nestbox distance to the nearest road were tested on reproductive traits of blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus and great tits Parus major breeding in two urban sites. Human presence did not influence blue tit or great tit life-history traits and reproductive success, suggesting reproductive habituation to humans in an urban landscape. In contrast, nestbox distance to roads shortened incubation time in great tits while nestbox distance to paths increased incubation time in blue tits. Moreover, blue tit offspring 2 weeks after hatching were lighter closer to roads. Our study confirms the reliability of a field protocol capturing human presence

  7. Bulgarian Marine and Freshwater Fishes as a Source of Fat-Soluble Vitamins for a Healthy Human Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Stancheva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study evaluates the fat-soluble vitamins all-trans retinol (vitamin A, cholecalciferol (vitamin D3 and α-tocopherol (vitamin E content in the fresh edible tissue of Bulgarian fish species: marine—grey mullet (Mugil cephalus and bonito (Sarda sarda, and freshwater—rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and common carp (Cyprinus carpio. The sample preparation procedure includes alkaline saponification, followed by liquid-liquid extraction with n-hexane. All-trans retinol, cholecalciferol and α-tocopherol were analyzed simultaneously using RP-HPLCUVFL system with analytical column C18 ODS2 Hypersil™. The fat soluble vitamins content (μg per 100 g wet weight in the fresh edible fish tissue of analyzed fishes are in the ranges: vitamin A from 2.7 ± 0.4 to 37.5 ± 3.4 μg/100 g ww; vitamin D3 from 1.1 ± 0.1 to 11.4 ± 0.6 μg/100 g ww; vitamin E from 121.4 ± 9.6 to 1274.2 ± 44.1 μg/100 g ww. Three fat-soluble vitamins occur in higher amounts in rainbow trout and grey mullet species. According to recommended daily intake (RDI, they are a good source of cholecalciferol.

  8. Vitamin D4 in mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katherine M; Horst, Ronald L; Koszewski, Nicholas J; Simon, Ryan R

    2012-01-01

    An unknown vitamin D compound was observed in the HPLC-UV chromatogram of edible mushrooms in the course of analyzing vitamin D(2) as part of a food composition study and confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be vitamin D(4) (22-dihydroergocalciferol). Vitamin D(4) was quantified by HPLC with UV detection, with vitamin [(3)H] itamin D(3) as an internal standard. White button, crimini, portabella, enoki, shiitake, maitake, oyster, morel, chanterelle, and UV-treated portabella mushrooms were analyzed, as four composites each of a total of 71 samples from U.S. retail suppliers and producers. Vitamin D(4) was present (>0.1 µg/100 g) in a total of 18 composites and in at least one composite of each mushroom type except white button. The level was highest in samples with known UV exposure: vitamin D enhanced portabella, and maitake mushrooms from one supplier (0.2-7.0 and 22.5-35.4 µg/100 g, respectively). Other mushrooms had detectable vitamin D(4) in some but not all samples. In one composite of oyster mushrooms the vitamin D(4) content was more than twice that of D(2) (6.29 vs. 2.59 µg/100 g). Vitamin D(4) exceeded 2 µg/100 g in the morel and chanterelle mushroom samples that contained D(4), but was undetectable in two morel samples. The vitamin D(4) precursor 22,23-dihydroergosterol was found in all composites (4.49-16.5 mg/100 g). Vitamin D(4) should be expected to occur in mushrooms exposed to UV light, such as commercially produced vitamin D enhanced products, wild grown mushrooms or other mushrooms receiving incidental exposure. Because vitamin D(4) coeluted with D(3) in the routine HPLC analysis of vitamin D(2) and an alternate mobile phase was necessary for resolution, researchers analyzing vitamin D(2) in mushrooms and using D(3) as an internal standard should verify that the system will resolve vitamins D(3) and D(4).

  9. Effect of vitamin E and human placenta cysteine peptidase inhibitor on expression of cathepsins B and L in implanted hepatoma Morris 5123 tumor model in Wistar rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tadeusz Sebzda; Piotr Hanczyc; Yousif Saleh; Bernice F Akinpelumi; Maciej Siewinski; Jerzy Rudnicki

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effectiveness of human placental inhibitors, by injecting vitamin E to rats with transplanted Norris-5123 hepatoma, on the expression of cathepsins B and L in tumor, liver, lung and blood sera after transplantation of Norris 5123 hepatoma.METHODS: Animals were divided into 10 groups receiving three different concentrations of vitamin E and inhibitors along or in combination and compared with negative control (healthy rats) and positive control (tumor rats). Effectiveness of treatment was evaluated with regard to survival time,tumor response and determination of the activities of proteolytic enzymes and their inhibitors using flurogenic substrates.RESULTS: Cathepsins B and L activities were elevated by 16-fold in comparison with negative control tissues, and their endogenous inhibitor activity decreased by 1.2-fold before treatment. In several cases, tumors completely disappeared following vitamin E plus human placental cyteine protease inhibitor (CPI) compared with controls.The number of complete tumor responses was higher when 20 m/kg vitamin E plus 400 μg of CPI was used, i.e.7/10 rats survived more than two mo. Cathepsins B and L were expressed significantly in tumor, liver, lung tissues and sera in parallel to the increasing of the endogenous inhibitor activity compared with the controls after treatment (P<0.0001).CONCLUSION: The data indicate formation of metastasis significantly reduced in treated rats, which might provide a therapeutic basis for anti-cancer therapy.

  10. Comparison of Roche MONITOR and Organon Teknika NucliSens assays to quantify human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, P; Fiscus, S A; Smith, R M; Shepard, R; Johnson, B; Nicotera, J; Harris, V L; Clough, L A; McKinsey, J; Haas, D W

    2001-04-01

    We compared Roche MONITOR and Organon Teknika NucliSens assays for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Results of 282 assays were highly correlated (r = 0.826), with MONITOR values being 0.29 +/- 0.4 log(10) copies/ml (mean +/- standard deviation) values. Both assays can reliably quantify HIV-1 RNA in CSF.

  11. Quantifying the effect of interannual ocean variability on the attribution of extreme climate events to human influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Mark D.; Stone, Dáithí A.; Paciorek, Christopher J.; Wehner, Michael F.; Angélil, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the climate change research community has become highly interested in describing the anthropogenic influence on extreme weather events, commonly termed "event attribution." Limitations in the observational record and in computational resources motivate the use of uncoupled, atmosphere/land-only climate models with prescribed ocean conditions run over a short period, leading up to and including an event of interest. In this approach, large ensembles of high-resolution simulations can be generated under factual observed conditions and counterfactual conditions that might have been observed in the absence of human interference; these can be used to estimate the change in probability of the given event due to anthropogenic influence. However, using a prescribed ocean state ignores the possibility that estimates of attributable risk might be a function of the ocean state. Thus, the uncertainty in attributable risk is likely underestimated, implying an over-confidence in anthropogenic influence. In this work, we estimate the year-to-year variability in calculations of the anthropogenic contribution to extreme weather based on large ensembles of atmospheric model simulations. Our results both quantify the magnitude of year-to-year variability and categorize the degree to which conclusions of attributable risk are qualitatively affected. The methodology is illustrated by exploring extreme temperature and precipitation events for the northwest coast of South America and northern-central Siberia; we also provides results for regions around the globe. While it remains preferable to perform a full multi-year analysis, the results presented here can serve as an indication of where and when attribution researchers should be concerned about the use of atmosphere-only simulations.

  12. Sunbed radiation provokes cutaneous vitamin D synthesis in humans--a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieden, Elisabeth; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2008-01-01

    or polymorphic light eruption. The results showed that sunbeds emitting 0.5% and 1.4% UVB increased 25(OH)D serum levels. The increases were dose dependent but reached a plateau after few sessions. Sunbed use as vitamin D source is, however, not generally recommendable due to the well-known carcinogenicity......We wanted to investigate whether the use of sunbeds with sunlamps emitting mainly UVA and only 0.5% or 1.4% UVB will increase the level of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D). In a randomized, controlled, open study on healthy, Caucasian females (> 50 years) sunbed radiation was given as follows......: four 6-min sunbed sessions (days 0, 2, 4 and 7) and four 12-min sunbed sessions (days 9, 11, 14 and 16 ) with sunlamps emitting 0.5% UVB (n = 20) or with sunlamps emitting 1.4% UVB (n = 15). The controls (n = 21) had no intervention. Serum levels of 25(OH)D were measured on days 0, 9 and 18 in all...

  13. Dimethoate-induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes and the protective effect of vitamins C and E in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Fatma Ben; Gargouri, Bochra; Bejaoui, Hafedh; Lassoued, Saloua; Ammar-Keskes, Leila

    2011-06-01

    Organophosphorus insecticides may induce oxidative stress leading to the generation of free radicals and alteration in the antioxidant system. The aim of this study was to examine the potency of Dimethoate (Dim) to induce oxidative stress response in human erythrocyte in vitro and the role of Vitamins C (Vit C) and E (Vit E) in alleviating the cytotoxic effects. Erythrocytes were divided into three groups. The first group, erythrocytes were incubated for 4 h at 37 °C with different concentrations (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 mM) of Dim. The second and third groups were preincubated with Vit C or Vit E, respectively, for 30 min and followed by Dim incubation for 4 h at 37 °C. Following in vitro exposure, Dim caused a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) in erythrocytes at different concentrations. Vit E or Vit C pretreated erythrocytes showed a significant protection against the cytotoxic effects inducted by Dim on the studied parameters. In conclusion, antioxidant Vit E and C could protect against Dim-induced oxidative stress by decreasing lipid peroxidation and hyperactivity of SOD and CAT in human erythrocytes.

  14. The Intestine Plays a Substantial Role in Human Vitamin B6 Metabolism : A Caco-2 Cell Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albersen, Monique; Bosma, Marjolein; Knoers, Nine V. V. A. M.; de Ruiter, Berna H. B.; Diekman, Eugene F.; de Ruijter, Jessica; Visser, Wouter F.; de Koning, Tom J.; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vitamin B6 is present in various forms (vitamers) in the diet that need to be metabolized to pyridoxal phosphate (PLP), the active cofactor form of vitamin B6. In literature, the liver has been reported to be the major site for this conversion, whereas the exact role of the intestine rem

  15. Proteome analysis demonstrates profound alterations in human dendritic cell nature by TX527, an analogue of vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, G. B.; van Etten, E.; Lage, K.

    2009-01-01

    Structural analogues of vitamin D have been put forward as therapeutic agents able to exploit the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D, without its undesired calcemic side effects. We have demonstrated that TX527 affects dendritic cell (DC) maturation in vitro, resulting in the generation of a t...

  16. The phenomenon of vitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata M. Gruber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The receptor of vitamin D (VDR is present in most non-skeletal human cells, suggesting its role beyond the bone and calcium metabolism. The relationship between vitamin D and the respiratory tract is a consequence of its activity in the immune system. Some gastrointestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, coeliac disease, liver, pancreas or cardiac diseases, lead to vitamin D deficiency. Many studies indicate a correlation between vitamin D and diabetes. VDR and 1α-hydroxylase have been detected in the cutaneous capillary vessels, endothelium, vascular smooth muscles, myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts. The influence of vitamin D on the expression of genes related to the vascular walls implies its role in the pathomechanisms of vascular diseases and the cardiovascular system. Due to the VDR detected in most immunocompetent cells, calcitriol can modulate the congenital and acquired immune system. The correlation between vitamin D and cancer development is also not surprising because of many functions which vitamin D has in the organism. The vitamin D-regulated genes encode the proteins which participate in differentiation, proliferation or apoptosis. This paper aims to focus on the less well known roles of vitamin D in the organism, especially considering that most “sun consumers” know only its antirachitic and bone reinforcing action. So, this article may be surprising, and first of all it should convince everyone to vitamin D supplemention.

  17. Quantification of vitamin B6 vitamers in human cerebrospinal fluid by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, M. van der, E-mail: M.vanderHam-3@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Albersen, M., E-mail: M.Albersen@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Koning, T.J. de, E-mail: T.deKoning@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Pediatric Metabolic Diseases, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC03.063.0, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Visser, G., E-mail: G.Visser-4@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Pediatric Metabolic Diseases, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC03.063.0, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Middendorp, A., E-mail: Alfred_Middendorp@waters.com [Waters Chromatography B.V., Florijnstraat 19, Postbus 379, 4870 AJ Etten-Leur (Netherlands); Bosma, M., E-mail: M.Bosma@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Verhoeven-Duif, N.M., E-mail: N.Verhoeven@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Sain-van der Velden, M.G.M. de, E-mail: M.G.deSain@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a sensitive UPLC-MS/MS method for quantification of B6 vitamers in human CSF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our method is very accurate since stable isotope labeled internal standards are used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present data on light sensitivity, temperature dependence and rostrocaudal gradient. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With PN supplementation, concentrations of PL, PM, PN and PA in CSF are increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our fully validated method is suitable for implementation in a diagnostic setting. - Abstract: Since vitamin B6 is essential for normal functioning of the central nervous system, there is growing need for sensitive analysis of B6 vitamers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This manuscript describes the development and validation of a rapid, sensitive and accurate method for quantification of the vitamin B6 vitamers pyridoxal (PL), pyridoxamine (PM), pyridoxine (PN), pyridoxic acid (PA), pyridoxal 5 Prime -phosphate (PLP), pyridoxamine 5 Prime -phosphate (PMP) and pyridoxine 5 Prime -phosphate (PNP) in human CSF. The method is based on ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) with a simple sample preparation procedure of protein precipitation using 50 g L{sup -1} trichloroacetic acid containing stable isotope labeled internal standards: PL-D{sub 3} for PL and PM, PN-{sup 13}C{sub 4} for PN, PA-D{sub 2} for PA and PLP-D{sub 3} for the phosphorylated vitamers. B6 vitamers were separated (Acquity HSS-T3 UPLC column) with a buffer containing acetic acid, heptafluorobutyric acid and acetonitrile. Positive electrospray ionization was used to monitor transitions m/z 168.1 {yields} 150.1 (PL), 169.1 {yields} 134.1 (PM), 170.1 {yields} 134.1 (PN), 184.1 {yields} 148.1 (PA), 248.1 {yields} 150.1 (PLP), 249.1 {yields} 232.1 (PMP) and 250.1 {yields} 134.1 (PNP). The method was validated at three concentration levels for each B6 vitamer in CSF

  18. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... worldwide take supplemental vitamins as part of their health regimen. back to top Why Buy Vitamins? There ...

  19. Vitamin D and Immune Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Amrein

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D metabolizing enzymes and vitamin D receptors are present in many cell types including various immune cells such as antigen-presenting-cells, T cells, B cells and monocytes. In vitro data show that, in addition to modulating innate immune cells, vitamin D also promotes a more tolerogenic immunological status. In vivo data from animals and from human vitamin D supplementation studies have shown beneficial effects of vitamin D on immune function, in particular in the context of autoimmunity. In this review, currently available data are summarized to give an overview of the effects of vitamin D on the immune system in general and on the regulation of inflammatory responses, as well as regulatory mechanisms connected to autoimmune diseases particularly in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  20. Vitamin E and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Vitamin E and Health Table of Contents Introduction: Vitamin ... Vitamin E and Other Chronic Diseases References Introduction: Vitamin E and Disease Prevention Vitamin E’s main function ...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5930 - Vitamin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin A. 582.5930 Section 582.5930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5930 Vitamin A. (a) Product. Vitamin A. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  2. Efficacy of the dietary histone deacetylase inhibitor butyrate alone or in combination with vitamin A against proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, F.O. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nagamine, M.K. [Laboratório de Oncologia Experimental, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); De Conti, A. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Chaible, L.M. [Laboratório de Oncologia Experimental, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fontelles, C.C. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Jordão Junior, A.A.; Vannucchi, H. [Divisão de Nutrição, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Dagli, M.L.Z. [Laboratório de Oncologia Experimental, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bassoli, B.K.; Moreno, F.S.; Ong, T.P. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-06-22

    The combined treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and retinoids has been suggested as a potential epigenetic strategy for the control of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treatment with butyrate, a dietary HDACi, combined with vitamin A on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation was evaluated by the crystal violet staining method. MCF-7 cells were plated at 5 x 10{sup 4} cells/mL and treated with butyrate (1 mM) alone or combined with vitamin A (10 µM) for 24 to 120 h. Cell proliferation inhibition was 34, 10 and 46% following treatment with butyrate, vitamin A and their combination, respectively, suggesting that vitamin A potentiated the inhibitory activities of butyrate. Furthermore, exposure to this short-chain fatty acid increased the level of histone H3K9 acetylation by 9.5-fold (Western blot), but not of H4K16, and increased the expression levels of p21{sup WAF1} by 2.7-fold (Western blot) and of RARβ by 2.0-fold (quantitative real-time PCR). Our data show that RARβ may represent a molecular target for butyrate in breast cancer cells. Due to its effectiveness as a dietary HDACi, butyrate should be considered for use in combinatorial strategies with more active retinoids, especially in breast cancers in which RARβ is epigenetically altered.

  3. In vivo production of novel vitamin D2 hydroxy-derivatives by human placentas, epidermal keratinocytes, Caco-2 colon cells and the adrenal gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Andrzej T.; Kim, Tae-Kang; Shehabi, Haleem Z.; Tang, Edith; Benson, Heather A. E.; Semak, Igor; Lin, Zongtao; Yates, Charles R.; Wang, Jin; Li, Wei; Tuckey, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the metabolism of vitamin D2 to hydroxyvitamin D2 metabolites ((OH)D2) by human placentas ex-utero, adrenal glands ex-vivo and cultured human epidermal keratinocytes and colonic Caco-2 cells, and identified 20(OH)D2, 17,20(OH)2D2, 1,20(OH)2D2, 25(OH)D2 and 1,25(OH)2D2 as products. Inhibition of product formation by 22R-hydroxycholesterol indicated involvement of CYP11A1 in 20- and 17-hydroxylation of vitamin D2, while use of ketoconazole indicated involvement of CYP27B1 in 1α-hydroxylation of products. Studies with purified human CYP11A1 confirmed the ability of this enzyme to convert vitamin D2 to 20(OH)D2 and 17,20(OH)2D2. In placentas and Caco-2 cells, production of 20(OH)D2 was higher than 25(OH)D2 while in human keratinocytes the production of 20(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D2 were comparable. HaCaT keratinocytes showed high accumulation of 1,20(OH)2D2 relative to 20(OH)D2 indicating substantial CYP27B1 activity. This is the first in vivo evidence for a novel pathway of vitamin D2 metabolism initiated by CYP11A1 and modified by CYP27B1, with the product profile showing tissue- and cell-type specificity. PMID:24382416

  4. Blood biomarkers of vitamin D status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zerwekh, Joseph E

    2008-01-01

    .... To date, only a few of these have been quantified in blood, but this has widened our understanding of the pathologic role that altered vitamin D metabolism plays in the development of diseases of calcium homeostasis...

  5. Vitamin D in pregnancy: A metabolic outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manila Kaushal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a preventable health problem. Vitamin D deficiency among pregnant women is frequent in many populations over the world. Research indicates that adequate vitamin D intake in pregnancy is optimal for maternal, fetal and child health. Adverse health outcomes during pregnancy are preeclampsia; gestational diabetes mellitus and caesarean section. Consequences in newborns are low birth weight, neonatal rickets, a risk of neonatal hypocalcaemia, asthma and/or type 1 diabetes. Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy is the origin for a host of future perils for the child, especially effect on neurodevelopment and immune system. Some of this damage done by maternal Vitamin D deficiency gets evident after many years. Therefore, prevention of vitamin D deficiency among pregnant women is essential. The currently recommended supplementation amount of vitamin D is not sufficient to maintain a value of 25 hydroxy vitamin D above 30 ng/ml, during pregnancy. Studies are underway to establish the recommended daily doses of vitamin D in pregnant women. Clearly, further investigation is required into the effects of vitamin D, of vitamin D supplementation, and of vitamin D analogs for improvement in human health generally and mothers and children specifically. This review discusses vitamin D metabolism, dietary requirements and recommendations and implications of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy and lactation.

  6. Vitamin K the basics--what's new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Frank R

    2010-07-01

    Relatively little is known about the vitamin K status and requirements in term and preterm infants, though hemorrhagic disease of the newborn infant continues to be a worldwide problem. This brief review of vitamin K metabolism, vitamin K dependent proteins, and the vitamin K cycle covers some new thoughts about the importance of vitamin K to human health including the preterm infant. A review of perinatal vitamin K metabolism concludes that little vitamin K actually crosses the placenta from mother to infant. The neonatal sources of vitamin K are generally limited to the vitamin K prophylaxis given at the time of birth, dietary sources, and questionable amounts from vitamin K present in the intestinal tract synthesized from bacteria. Preterm infants receive large quantities of vitamin K from prophylaxis, TPN solutions, infant formula and breast milk fortifiers. Thus, vitamin serum concentration in preterm infants is up to one hundred times higher than those found in adults and 10-20 times those found in term formula-fed infants. Though no toxicity has been reported, the elevation of epoxide reductase (VKOR) from the vitamin K cycle found in the serum of preterm infants is worthy of additional study. PIVKA-II (abnormal prothrombin) is not a reliable indicator of vitamin K deficiency in preterm or term infants.

  7. B Vitamins

    Science.gov (United States)

    The B vitamins are B1 (thiamine) B2 (riboflavin) B3 (niacin) B5 (pantothenic acid) B6 B7 (biotin) B12 Folic acid ... help form red blood cells. You can get B vitamins from proteins such as fish, poultry, meat, ...

  8. Compound list: vitamin A [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available vitamin A VA 00059 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/vitamin..._A.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/vitamin..._A.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/vitamin...pen-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/vitamin_A.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  9. Vitamin D deficiency promotes growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer in a rodent model of osteosclerotic bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Li Laine; Zheng, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Trivedi, Trupti; Conigrave, Arthur D; Seibel, Markus J; Dunstan, Colin R

    2010-10-01

    Breast cancer metastases to bone are common in advanced stage disease. We have recently demonstrated that vitamin D deficiency enhances breast cancer growth in an osteolytic mouse model of breast cancer metastasis. In this study, we examined the effects of vitamin D deficiency on tumor growth in an osteosclerotic model of intra-skeletal breast cancer in mice. The effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)] on proliferation and apoptosis of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and changes in the expression of genes within the vitamin D metabolic pathway (VDR, 1α- and 24-hydroxylase) were examined in vitro. MCF-7 breast cancer cells were injected intra-tibially into vitamin D deficient and vitamin D sufficient mice co-treated with and without osteoprotegerin (OPG). The development of tumor-related lesions was monitored via serial X-ray analysis. Tumor burden and indices of proliferation and apoptosis were determined by histology along with markers of bone turnover and serum intact PTH levels. In vitro, MCF-7 cells expressed critical genes for vitamin D signalling and metabolism. Treatment with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) inhibited cell growth and proliferation, and increased apoptosis. In vivo, osteosclerotic lesions developed faster and were larger at endpoint in the tibiae of vitamin D deficient mice compared to vitamin D sufficient mice (1.49±0.08 mm(2) versus 1.68±0.15 mm(2), Pbone turnover and caused an increase in PTH levels, while tumor burden was reduced by 90.4% in vitamin D sufficient mice and by 92.6% in vitamin D deficient mice. Tumor mitotic activity was increased in the tibiae of vitamin D deficient mice and apoptosis was decreased, consistent with faster growth. Vitamin D deficiency enhances both the growth of tumors and the tumor-induced osteosclerotic changes in the tibiae of mice following intratibial implantation of MCF-7 cells. Enhancement of tumor growth appears dependent on increased bone resorption rather than increased bone formation induced by these

  10. Vitamin D [1,25(OH)2D3] Differentially Regulates Human Innate Cytokine Responses to Bacterial versus Viral Pattern Recognition Receptor Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Natascha; Becker, Allan B; HayGlass, Kent T

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin D plays multiple roles in regulation of protective and maladaptive immunity. Although epidemiologic studies link poor in vivo 25(OH)D status to increased viral respiratory infections, we poorly understand how vitamin D affects viral pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-driven cytokine production. In this study, we hypothesized that the biologically active metabolite of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, inhibits human proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory innate cytokine responses stimulated by representative bacterial or viral PRR ligands. Fresh PBMCs or CD14(+) monocytes were stimulated with TLR4, TLR7/8-selective ligands, or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) ± 1,25(OH)2D3. Proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses resulting from TLR4 stimulation were inhibited ∼50% in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3. Conversely, its usage at physiologic through pharmacologic concentrations inhibited neither proinflammatory nor anti-inflammatory responses evoked by viral PRR ligands or infectious RSV. This differential responsiveness was attributed to the finding that TLR7/8, but not TLR4, stimulation markedly inhibited vitamin D receptor mRNA and protein expression, selectively reducing the sensitivity of viral PRR responses to modulation. 1,25(OH)2D3 also enhanced expression of IkBa, a potent negative regulator of NF-κB and cytokine production, in TLR4-stimulated monocytes while not doing so upon TLR7/8 stimulation. Thus, 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits both proinflammatory and a broad panel of anti-inflammatory responses elicited by TLR4 stimulation, arguing that the common view of it as an anti-inflammatory immune response modifier is an oversimplification. In viral responses, it consistently fails to modify TLR7/8- or RSV-stimulated innate cytokine production, even at supraphysiologic concentrations. Collectively, the data call into question the rationale for increasingly widespread self-medication with vitamin D supplements.

  11. c-Jun N-terminal kinase is required for vitamin E succinate-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Wu; Yan Zhao; Gui-Chang Li; Wei-Ping Yu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the roles of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)signaling pathway in vitamin E succinate-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.METHODS: Human gastric cancer cell lines (SGC-7901)were treated with vitamin E succinate (VES) at 5, 10, 20 mg/L.Succinic acid and vitamin E were used as vehicle controls and condition medium only as an untreated (UT) control.Apoptosis was observed by 4′, 6-diamidine-2′-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining for morphological changes and by DNA fragmentation for biochemical alterations.Western blot analysis was applied to measure the expression ofJNK and phosphorylated JNK. After the cells were transiently transfected with dominant negative mutant of JNK (DNJNK) followed by treatment of VES, the expression of JNK and c-Jun protein was determined.RESULTS: The apoptotic changes were observed after VES treatment by DNA fragmentation. DNA ladder in the 20 mg/L VES group was more clearly seen than that in 10 mg/L VES group and was not detected following treatment of UT control, succinate and vitamin E. VES at 5, 10 and 20 mg/L increased the expression of p-JNK by 2.5-, 2.8- and 4.2-fold, respectively. VES induced the phosphorylation of JNK beginning at 1.5 h and produced a sustained increase for 24 h with the peak level at 12 h. Transient transfection of DN-JNK blocked VES-triggered apoptosis by 52%. DN-JNK significantly increased the level of JNK, while decreasing the expression of VES-induced c-Jun protein.CONCLUSION: VES-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells involves JNK signaling pathway via c-Jun and its downstream transcription factor.

  12. Quantifying Concordance

    CERN Document Server

    Seehars, Sebastian; Amara, Adam; Refregier, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the concordance between different cosmological experiments is important for testing the validity of theoretical models and systematics in the observations. In earlier work, we thus proposed the Surprise, a concordance measure derived from the relative entropy between posterior distributions. We revisit the properties of the Surprise and describe how it provides a general, versatile, and robust measure for the agreement between datasets. We also compare it to other measures of concordance that have been proposed for cosmology. As an application, we extend our earlier analysis and use the Surprise to quantify the agreement between WMAP 9, Planck 13 and Planck 15 constraints on the $\\Lambda$CDM model. Using a principle component analysis in parameter space, we find that the large Surprise between WMAP 9 and Planck 13 (S = 17.6 bits, implying a deviation from consistency at 99.8% confidence) is due to a shift along a direction that is dominated by the amplitude of the power spectrum. The Surprise disa...

  13. Safety pharmacology, toxicology and pharmacokinetic assesment of human Gc globulin (vitamin d binding protein)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Jørgensen, Charlotte Sværke; Santoni Rugiu, Eric

    2010-01-01

    of the kallikrein system or the complement system and cellular studies showed no toxic effects on a variety of human cell lines. In vivo studies showed no acute toxic effects in mice, rats or guinea pigs upon intravenous infusion. A 14-day local tolerance study in rabbits showed no adverse effects, and 14-day...

  14. TSLP is differentially regulated by vitamin D3 and cytokines in human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landheer, Janneke; Giovannone, Barbara; Sadekova, Svetlana; Tjabringa, Sandra; Hofstra, Claudia; Dechering, Koen; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Chang, Charlie; Ying, Yu; de Waal Malefyt, Rene; Hijnen, DirkJan; Knol, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays an important role in allergic diseases and is highly expressed in keratinocytes in human lesional atopic dermatitis (AD) skin. In nonlesional AD skin TSLP expression can be induced by applying house dust mite allergen onto the skin in the atopy patch test. S

  15. TSLP is differentially regulated by vitamin D3 and cytokines in human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landheer, Janneke; Giovannone, Barbara; Sadekova, Svetlana; Tjabringa, Sandra; Hofstra, Claudia; Dechering, Koen; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Chang, Charlie; Ying, Yu; de Waal Malefyt, Rene; Hijnen, DirkJan; Knol, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays an important role in allergic diseases and is highly expressed in keratinocytes in human lesional atopic dermatitis (AD) skin. In nonlesional AD skin TSLP expression can be induced by applying house dust mite allergen onto the skin in the atopy patch test.

  16. Thiazide diuretics affect osteocalcin production in human osteoblasts at the transcription level without affecting vitamin D3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajeunesse, D; Delalandre, A; Guggino, S E

    2000-05-01

    Besides their natriuretic and calciuretic effect, thiazide diuretics have been shown to decrease bone loss rate and improve bone mineral density. Clinical evidence suggests a specific role of thiazides on osteoblasts, because it reduces serum osteocalcin (OC), an osteoblast-specific protein, yet the mechanisms implicated are unknown. We therefore investigated the role of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) on OC production by the human osteoblast-like cell line MG-63. HCTZ dose-dependently (1-100 microM) inhibited 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3]-induced OC release by these cells (maximal effect, -40-50% and p ethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) only partly prevented the inhibitory effect of the diuretic on OC secretion (maximal effect, -22.5+/-6.9%), suggesting that thiazide-dependent Ca2+ influx is not sufficient to elicit the inhibition of OC secretion. Because OC production is strictly dependent on the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3 in human osteoblasts, we next evaluated the possible role of HCTZ on vitamin D3 receptors (VDR) at the mRNA and protein levels. Both Northern and Western blot analyses showed no effect of HCTZ (1-100 microM) on VDR levels. The presence of EGTA in the culture media reduced slightly the VDR mRNA levels under basal condition but this was not modified in the presence of increasing levels of HCTZ. The OC gene promoter also is under the control of transcription factors such as Yin Yang 1 (YY1) and cFOS. Western blot analysis revealed no changes in YY1 levels in response to HCTZ either in the presence or in the absence of 0.5 mM EGTA in the culture media. In contrast, HCTZ induced a dose-dependent increase in cFOS levels (p production by HCTZ could explain its preventive role in bone loss rate.

  17. Vitamin D and colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lidija; Klampfer

    2014-01-01

    Calcitriol, 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3(1,25(OH)2D3), the most active form of vitamin D, is a pleotropic hormone with a wide range of biological activities. Due to its ability to regulate calcium and phosphate metabolism, 1,25D3 plays a major role in bone health. In addition, 1,25D3 binds to the vitamin D receptor and thereby regulates the expression of a number of genes which control growth, differentiation and survival of cancer cells. In agreement, the levels of vitamin D3 appear to be an essential determinant for the development and progression of colon cancer and supplementation with vitamin D3 is effective in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis in animal models. Vitamin D3 has been estimated to lower the incidence of colorectal cancer by 50%, which is consistent with the inverse correlation between dietary vitamin D3 intake or sunlight exposure and human colorectal cancer. Several studies confirmed that increasing vitamin D3 lowers colon cancer incidence, reduces polyp recurrence, and that sufficient levels of vitamin D3 are associated with better overall survival of colon cancer patients. Vitamin D regulates the homeostasis of intestinal epithelium by modulating the oncogenic Wnt signaling pathway and by inhibiting tumor-promoting inflammation. Both activities contribute to the ability of 1,25D3 to prevent the development and progression of colon cancer.

  18. Vitamin D and the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Mona; Kerr, Philip E; Slade, Karren; Grant-Kels, Jane E

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble nutrient that humans obtain through the diet and by synthesis in the skin upon exposure to ultraviolet B. Vitamin D is then converted by the liver to 25-hydroxyvitamin D, its major circulating form. This form is the best indicator of vitamin D nutritional status and is easily measured. Under the influence of parathyroid hormone, the kidney then converts 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the biologically active, hormonal form of the nutrient that is important in the metabolism of calcium and phosphorus and is critical in building and maintaining healthy bones. Many cell types outside of the skeletal system, including various cells in the skin, also express the vitamin D receptor. In addition, many cell types convert circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D for local use. This metabolite has been shown to exert potent effects on cellular differentiation, cellular proliferation, and immune regulation. It is theorized that by these mechanisms vitamin D and its analogues are effective treatment options for psoriasis and other skin diseases. Insufficient vitamin D nutritional status has been associated with a host of other diseases, most notably cancer. There is evidence that supplementation with vitamin D reduces the overall incidence of cancer, although current evidence is insufficient to prove a causative effect. Sunscreen use blocks the ability of the skin to photosynthesize vitamin D, although the effect this has on the vitamin D status of the general population is unclear.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Vitamin D on Human Immune Cells in the Context of Bacterial Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoe, Edwin; Nathanielsz, Jordan; Toh, Zheng Quan; Spry, Leena; Marimla, Rachel; Balloch, Anne; Mulholland, Kim; Licciardi, Paul V.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D induces a diverse range of biological effects, including important functions in bone health, calcium homeostasis and, more recently, on immune function. The role of vitamin D during infection is of particular interest given data from epidemiological studies suggesting that vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of infection. Vitamin D has diverse immunomodulatory functions, although its role during bacterial infection remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of 1,25(OH)2D3, the active metabolite of vitamin D, on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and purified immune cell subsets isolated from healthy adults following stimulation with the bacterial ligands heat-killed pneumococcal serotype 19F (HK19F) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that 1,25(OH)2D3 significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-1β as well as the chemokine IL-8 for both ligands (three- to 53-fold), while anti-inflammatory IL-10 was increased (two-fold, p = 0.016) in HK19F-stimulated monocytes. Levels of HK19F-specific IFN-γ were significantly higher (11.7-fold, p = 0.038) in vitamin D-insufficient adults (50 nmol/L). Vitamin D also shifted the pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory balance towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype and increased the CD14 expression on monocytes (p = 0.008) in response to LPS but not HK19F stimulation. These results suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 may be an important regulator of the inflammatory response and supports further in vivo and clinical studies to confirm the potential benefits of vitamin D in this context. PMID:27973447

  20. Vitamine D2 ou vitamine D3?

    OpenAIRE

    MISTRETTA, Virginie; Delanaye, Pierre; Chapelle, Jean-Paul; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Cavalier, Etienne

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nearly one billion people around the world are deficient in vitamin D and need to be supplemented. Vitamin D is available in medicines and fortified foods. It is available in two forms: vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol). KEY POINTS: The pharmacopeiae consider these steroid hormones as equivalent and interchangeable. However, several studies have showed that serum level of 25(OH)D is increased more effectively with vitamin D3 than vitamin D2. Vitamin D2 has ...

  1. TSLP is differentially regulated by vitamin D3 and cytokines in human skin

    OpenAIRE

    Landheer, Janneke; Giovannone, Barbara; Sadekova, Svetlana; Tjabringa, Sandra; Hofstra, Claudia; Dechering, Koen; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Chang, Charlie; Ying, Yu; de Waal Malefyt, Rene; Hijnen, DirkJan; Knol, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays an important role in allergic diseases and is highly expressed in keratinocytes in human lesional atopic dermatitis (AD) skin. In nonlesional AD skin TSLP expression can be induced by applying house dust mite allergen onto the skin in the atopy patch test. Several studies have demonstrated that the induction of TSLP expression in mouse skin does not only lead to AD-like inflammation of the skin, but also predisposes to severe inflammation of the airwa...

  2. Cysteine peptidase and its inhibitor activity levels and vitamin E concentration in normal human serum and colorectal carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Szwed; Zygmunt Grzebieniak; Yousif Saleh; Godwin Bwire Ekonjo; Maciej Siewinski

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Cysteine peptidase (CP) and its inhibitor (CPI) are a matrix protease that may be associated with colorectal carcinoma invasion and progression, and vitamin E is also a stimulator of the immunological system. Our purpose was to determine the correlation between the expression of cysteine peptidases and their endogenous inhibitors,and the level of vitamin E in sera of patients with colorectal cancer in comparison with healthy individuals.METHODS: The levels of cysteine peptidases and their inhibitors were determined in the sera of patients with primary and metastatic colorectal carcinoma and healthy individuals using fluorogenic substrate, and the level of vitamin E was determined by HPLC.RESULTS: The levels of cysteine peptidases and their inhibitors were significantly higher in the metastatic colorectal cancer patients than that in the healthy controls (P<0.05).The activity of CP increased 2.2-fold, CPI 2.8-fold and vitamin E decreased 3.4-fold in sera of patients with metastasis in comparison with controls. The level of vitamin E in healthy individuals was higher, whereas the activity of cysteine peptidases and their inhibitors associated with complexes was lower than that in patients with cancer of the digestive tract.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the serum levels of CP and their inhibitors could be an indicator of the prognosis for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Vitamin E can be administered prophylactically to prevent digestive tract neoplasmas.

  3. Vitamin D and colon cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pereira, Fábio; Larriba, María Jesús; Muñoz, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    .... In addition, recent epidemiological and experimental studies support the association of vitamin D deficiency with a large variety of human diseases, and particularly with the high risk of colorectal cancer...

  4. [Anatomical Vitamin C-Research during National Socialism and the Post-war Period: Max Clara's Human Experiments at the Munich Anatomical Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schûtz, Mathias; Schochow, Maximilian; Waschke, Jens; Marckmann, Georg; Steger, Florian

    2014-01-01

    In autumn of 1942, Max Clara (1899-1966) became chairman of the anatomical institute Munich. There, he intensified his research concerning the proof of vitamin C with the bodies of executed prisoners which were delivered by the Munich-Stadelheim prison. This research on human organs was pursued by applying ascorbic acid (Cebion) to prisoners before their execution. The paper investigates this intensified and radicalized anatomical research through human experiments, which Max Clara conducted in Munich and published from Istanbul during the postwar years, as well as its scientific references from the Nazi period.

  5. Vitamin D Status in Danish Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rikke Agnete

    . In addition to skeletal health, vitamin D has also been associated with several extra-skeletal conditions including cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes. Evaluation of Vitamin D status is complex because it is modified by several factors and because the level of optimal vitamin D concentration...... is uncertain. The primary source of vitamin D in humans is believed to be the synthesis that occurs in the skin upon sun exposure while intake from diet, supplements, and potential fortified foods are secondary sources. Yet, synthesis of vitamin D from sun exposure is negligible during winter at northern...... latitudes such as Denmark and low winter concentrations have been observed in Danish children. Also, very few foods are naturally rich in vitamin D and little is known on the effect of dietary vitamin D on children’s vitamin D status. The overall aim of this PhD project was to investigate aspects of Danish...

  6. Vitamin K deficiency and hemorrhage in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, F R

    1995-09-01

    Hemorrhage in the infant from vitamin K deficiency is still a concern in pediatrics. Vitamin K given intramuscularly will largely prevent hemorrhagic disease in the newborn, even in infants who are exclusively breast-fed and are thus at the greatest risk for bleeding. The vitamin K content of human milk is very low compared with standard infant formulas. Results with oral vitamin K prophylaxis, currently used in some countries following the association found in a single report between childhood cancer and intramuscular vitamin K, are far more controversial. Any role of vitamin K in the prevention of IVH in premature infants has not been sufficiently demonstrated. Ongoing developments in this field will lead to improved methods of detecting early vitamin K deficiency and perhaps suitable alternatives to intramuscular vitamin K prophylaxis in the newborn.

  7. Vitamin D signalling in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Cherlyn; Gao, Dan; Wilding, John; Trayhurn, Paul; Bing, Chen

    2012-12-14

    Vitamin D deficiency and the rapid increase in the prevalence of obesity are both considered important public health issues. The classical role of vitamin D is in Ca homoeostasis and bone metabolism. Growing evidence suggests that the vitamin D system has a range of physiological functions, with vitamin D deficiency contributing to the pathogenesis of several major diseases, including obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Clinical studies have shown that obese individuals tend to have a low vitamin D status, which may link to the dysregulation of white adipose tissue. Recent studies suggest that adipose tissue may be a direct target of vitamin D. The expression of both the vitamin D receptor and 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) genes has been shown in murine and human adipocytes. There is evidence that vitamin D affects body fat mass by inhibiting adipogenic transcription factors and lipid accumulation during adipocyte differentiation. Some recent studies demonstrate that vitamin D metabolites also influence adipokine production and the inflammatory response in adipose tissue. Therefore, vitamin D deficiency may compromise the normal metabolic functioning of adipose tissue. Given the importance of the tissue in energy balance, lipid metabolism and inflammation in obesity, understanding the mechanisms of vitamin D action in adipocytes may have a significant impact on the maintenance of metabolic health. In the present review, we focus on the signalling role of vitamin D in adipocytes, particularly the potential mechanisms through which vitamin D may influence adipose tissue development and function.

  8. Epigenetic Regulation of Vitamin D 24-Hydroxylase/CYP24A1 in Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Karpf, Adam R.; Deeb, Kristin K.; Muindi, Josephia R.; Morrison, Carl D.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    Calcitriol, a regulator of calcium homeostasis with antitumor properties, is degraded by the product of the CYP24A1 gene which is downregulated in human prostate cancer by unknown mechanisms. We found that CYP24A1 expression is inversely correlated with promoter DNA methylation in prostate cancer cell lines. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC) activates CYP24A1 expression in prostate cancer cells. In vitro methylation of the CYP24A1 promoter represses its promoter activity. Furthermore, inhibition of histone deacetylases by trichostatin A (TSA) enhances the expression of CYP24A1 in prostate cancer cells. ChIP-qPCR reveals that specific histone modifications are associated with the CYP24A1 promoter region. Treatment with TSA increases H3K9ac and H3K4me2 and simultaneously decreases H3K9me2 at the CYP24A1 promoter. ChIP-qPCR assay reveals that treatment with DAC and TSA increases the recruitment of VDR to the CYP24A1 promoter. RT-PCR analysis of paired human prostate samples reveals that CYP24A1 expression is down-regulated in prostate malignant lesions compared to adjacent histologically benign lesions. Bisulfite pyrosequencing shows that CYP24A1 gene is hypermethylated in malignant lesions compared to matched benign lesions. Our findings indicate that repression of CYP24A1 gene expression in human prostate cancer cells is mediated in part by promoter DNA methylation and repressive histone modifications. PMID:20587525

  9. Safety Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmacokinetic Assessment of Human Gc Globulin (Vitamin D Binding Protein)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Jørgensen, Charlotte Svaerke; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric

    2010-01-01

    of the kallikrein system or the complement system and cellular studies showed no toxic effects on a variety of human cell lines. In vivo studies showed no acute toxic effects in mice, rats or guinea pigs upon intravenous infusion. A 14-day local tolerance study in rabbits showed no adverse effects, and 14-day...... toxicity studies in rats and horses did not show any unwanted reactions. In a 14-day toxicology study in beagle dogs, formation of antibodies was seen and in the end of the study period, three out of four dogs showed clinical immunological reactions, which could be ascribed to the formation of antibodies...

  10. Safety pharmacology, toxicology and pharmacokinetic assesment of human Gc globulin (vitamin d binding protein)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Jørgensen, Charlotte Sværke; Santoni Rugiu, Eric

    2010-01-01

    of the kallikrein system or the complement system and cellular studies showed no toxic effects on a variety of human cell lines. In vivo studies showed no acute toxic effects in mice, rats or guinea pigs upon intravenous infusion. A 14-day local tolerance study in rabbits showed no adverse effects, and 14-day...... toxicity studies in rats and horses did not show any unwanted reactions. In a 14-day toxicology study in beagle dogs, formation of antibodies was seen and in the end of the study period, three out of four dogs showed clinical immunological reactions, which could be ascribed to the formation of antibodies...

  11. Biopsy method for human adipose with vitamin E and lipid measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, G J; Epstein, W L; Machlin, L J; van Kuijk, F J; Dratz, E A

    1988-06-01

    An adaptation of the needle biopsy procedure of Beynen and Katan for human adipose tissue, which yields 2-10 mg adipose samples, is described and evaluated. Micromethods are presented for the analysis of alpha-tocopherol, cholesterol and fatty acids in each adipose specimen. The needle biopsy procedure, which uses a Vacutainer to create suction, is compared with a punch biopsy method. The needle biopsy is rapid (6 samples/hr), simple and unobjectionable to the subjects, and provides samples with reproducible ratios of cholesterol and alpha-tocopherol. Unlike the punch biopsy, the needle biopsy reliably obtains specimens with a lipid composition typical of adipocytes. The needle biopsy method is adaptable to nutritional studies of tocopherol and fatty acid metabolism in adipose, and to studies of hazardous compounds stored in adipose. The linoleic acid content of adipose from residents of the West Coast was found to be considerably higher than values reported earlier. The adipose fatty acid data indicate an increase in human adipose linoleate when compared with earlier reports and suggest a trend toward increasing linoleic acid in the American diet.

  12. 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3-26,23-lactam analogues function as vitamin D receptor antagonists in human and rodent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Seiichi; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Hiruma, Yuko; Miura, Daishiro; Namekawa, Jun-ichi; Tamura, Azusa; Kato-Nakamura, Yuko; Nakano, Yusuke; Takenouchi, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Roodman, G. David

    2008-01-01

    (23S,25S)-N-Benzyl-1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-26,23-lactam ((23S,25S)-N-benzyl- 1α,25-(OH)2D3-26,23-lactam, (23S,25S)-DLAM-1P) antagonizes nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR)-mediated differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells [Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 14, 2579–2583(2004)]. To enhance its VDR antagonistic actions, we synthesized multiple analogues of 1α,25-(OH)2D3-26,23-lactam. Among these analogues, (23S,25S)-N-phenetyl-1α,25-(OH)2D3-26,23-lactam, ((23S,25S)- DLAM-2P) had the strongest VDR binding affinity, which was 3 times higher than that of (23S,25S)-DLAM-1P. The 1α,25-(OH)2D3-26,23-lactam analogues never induced HL-60 cell differentiation even at 10−6M, but (23S,25S)-DLAM-1P and (23S,25S)-DLAM-2P significantly and dose-dependently inhibited HL-60 differentiation induced by 10−8M 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25-(OH)2D3). These compounds also inhibited human and mouse cultures of osteoclast formation by marrow cells treated with 1α,25-(OH)2D3. Moreover, the 1α,25-(OH)2D3-26,23-lactam analogues minimally induced 25-hydroxy- vitamin D3-24-hydroxylase gene expression in HL-60 cells and human and mouse osteoblastic cells, but 10−6M (23S,25S)-DLAM-1P or (23S,25S)-DLAM-2P significantly blocked 24-hydroxylase gene expression induced by 10−8M 1α,25-(OH)2D3. (23S,25S)- DLAM-2P was 5 to 12 times more potent as a Vitamin D antagonist than (23S,25S)-DLAM-1P in HL-60 cells, human and mouse bone marrow cultures. These results demonstrate that (23S,25S)-DLAM-1P and (23S,25S)-DLAM-2P antagonize HL-60 cell differentiation and osteoclast formation by human and mouse osteoclast precursors induced by 1α,25-(OH)2D3 through blocking VDR-mediated gene transcription. In contrast, (23S)-25-deoxy-1α-hydroxyvitamin D3-26,23-lactone, which only blocks human VDR, these vitamin D antagonists can block VDR in human cells and rodent cells. PMID:18501591

  13. Vitamin C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cataracts AMD and cataracts are two of the leading causes of vision loss in older people. Researchers do not believe that vitamin C and other antioxidants affect the risk of getting AMD. However, research ...

  14. Vitamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carotenoid is beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is an antioxidant. Antioxidants protect cells from damage caused by substances called ... A can lead to hyperkeratosis or dry, scaly skin. If you get too much vitamin A, you ...

  15. Vitamin D status in a Brazilian cohort of adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Schtscherbyna

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to determine the prevalence and related factors of vitamin D (VitD insufficiency in adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus. A cohort of 65 patients (17.6 ± 2 years at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were examined for pubertal development, nutrition, serum parathormone and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [s25(OHD]. s25(OHD levels < 30 ng/mL (< 75 nmol/L were defined as VitD insufficiency. CD4+ T-cell counts and viral load, history of worst clinical status, immunologic status as nadir, current immunologic status, and antiretroviral (ART regimen were also evaluated as risk factors for VitD insufficiency. Mean s25(OHD was 37.7 ± 13.9 ng/mL and 29.2% had VitD insufficiency. There was no difference between VitD status and gender, age, nutritional status, clinical and immunological classification, and type of ART. Only VitD consumption showed tendency of association with s25(OHD (p = 0.064. Individuals analysed in summer/autumn season had a higher s25(OHD compared to the ones analysed in winter/spring (42.6 ± 14.9 vs. 34.0 ± 11.9, p = 0.011. Although, the frequency of VitD insufficiency did not differ statistically between the groups (summer/autumn 17.9% vs. winter/spring 37.8%, p = 0.102, we suggest to monitor s25(OHD in seropositive adolescents and young adults, especially during winter/spring months, even in sunny regions.

  16. Vitamin D status in a Brazilian cohort of adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schtscherbyna, Annie; Gouveia, Carla; Pinheiro, Maria Fernanda Miguens Castelar; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss; Machado, Elizabeth Stankiewicz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the prevalence and related factors of vitamin D (VitD) insufficiency in adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus. A cohort of 65 patients (17.6 ± 2 years) at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were examined for pubertal development, nutrition, serum parathormone and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [s25(OH)D]. s25(OH)D levels < 30 ng/mL (< 75 nmol/L) were defined as VitD insufficiency. CD4+ T-cell counts and viral load, history of worst clinical status, immunologic status as nadir, current immunologic status, and antiretroviral (ART) regimen were also evaluated as risk factors for VitD insufficiency. Mean s25(OH)D was 37.7 ± 13.9 ng/mL and 29.2% had VitD insufficiency. There was no difference between VitD status and gender, age, nutritional status, clinical and immunological classification, and type of ART. Only VitD consumption showed tendency of association with s25(OH)D (p = 0.064). Individuals analysed in summer/autumn season had a higher s25(OH)D compared to the ones analysed in winter/spring (42.6 ± 14.9 vs. 34.0 ± 11.9, p = 0.011). Although, the frequency of VitD insufficiency did not differ statistically between the groups (summer/autumn 17.9% vs. winter/spring 37.8%, p = 0.102), we suggest to monitor s25(OH)D in seropositive adolescents and young adults, especially during winter/spring months, even in sunny regions. PMID:26872341

  17. The role of vitamin D in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Khanh vinh quoc; Nguyen, Lan Thi Hoàng

    2012-04-01

    Vitamin D metabolites are important immune-modulatory hormones and are able to suppress Th2-mediated allergic airway disease. Some genetic factors that may contribute to asthma are regulated by vitamin D, such as vitamin D receptor (VDR), human leukocyte antigen genes (HLA), human Toll-like receptors (TLR), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a disintegrin and metalloprotein-33 (ADAM-33), and poly(ADP-ribosyl) polymerase- 1 (PARP-1). Vitamin D has also been implicated in asthma through its effects on the obesity, bacillus Calmettee Guérin (BCG) vaccination and high vitamin D level, vitamin D supplement, checkpoint protein kinase 1 (Chk1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and gamma delta T cells (gdT). Vitamin D plays a role in asthma and exerts its action through either genomic and/or non-genomic ways.

  18. [Treatment of vitamin D deficiency in the general population and in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzillo, Giusi Rosaria; Scognamiglio, Bernadette; Russo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D is an essential micronutrient for humans. Vitamin D functions are not limited to the regulation of bone; it plays many pleiotropic effects due to ubiquitous distribution of VDR (Vitamin D Receptor). The vitamin D deficiency (defined as plasma levels of 25 - OH - vitamin D vitamin D in the general population and in patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and indications on the use of different Vitamins D available.

  19. Vitamin B12 sources and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Fumio

    2007-11-01

    The usual dietary sources of vitamin B(12) are animal foods, meat, milk, egg, fish, and shellfish. As the intrinsic factor-mediated intestinal absorption system is estimated to be saturated at about 1.5-2.0 microg per meal under physiologic conditions, vitamin B(12) bioavailability significantly decreases with increasing intake of vitamin B(12) per meal. The bioavailability of vitamin B(12) in healthy humans from fish meat, sheep meat, and chicken meat averaged 42%, 56%-89%, and 61%-66%, respectively. Vitamin B(12) in eggs seems to be poorly absorbed (vitamin B(12) is absorbed by healthy adults with normal gastro-intestinal function. Some plant foods, dried green and purple lavers (nori) contain substantial amounts of vitamin B(12), although other edible algae contained none or only traces of vitamin B(12). Most of the edible blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) used for human supplements predominantly contain pseudovitamin B(12), which is inactive in humans. The edible cyanobacteria are not suitable for use as vitamin B(12) sources, especially in vegans. Fortified breakfast cereals are a particularly valuable source of vitamin B(12) for vegans and elderly people. Production of some vitamin B(12)-enriched vegetables is also being devised.

  20. Molecular Approaches for Optimizing Vitamin D Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D can be synthesized endogenously within UV-B exposed human skin. However, avoidance of sufficient sun exposure via predominant indoor activities, textile coverage, dark skin at higher latitude, and seasonal variations makes the intake of vitamin D fortified food or direct vitamin D supplementation necessary. Vitamin D has via its biologically most active metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and the transcription factor vitamin D receptor a direct effect on the epigenome and transcriptome of many human tissues and cell types. Different interpretation of results from observational studies with vitamin D led to some dispute in the field on the desired optimal vitamin D level and the recommended daily supplementation. This chapter will provide background on the epigenome- and transcriptome-wide functions of vitamin D and will outline how this insight may be used for determining of the optimal vitamin D status of human individuals. These reflections will lead to the concept of a personal vitamin D index that may be a better guideline for an optimized vitamin D supplementation than population-based recommendations. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vitamins and bone health: beyond calcium and vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadieh, Hala; Arabi, Asma

    2011-10-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health disorder associated with an increased risk of fracture. Nutrition is among the modifiable factors that influence the risk of osteoporosis and fracture. Calcium and vitamin D play important roles in improving bone mineral density and reducing the risk of fracture. Other vitamins appear to play a role in bone health as well. In this review, the findings of studies that related the intake and/or the status of vitamins other than vitamin D to bone health in animals and humans are summarized. Studies of vitamin A showed inconsistent results. Excessive, as well as insufficient, levels of retinol intake may be associated with compromised bone health. Deficiencies in vitamin B, along with the consequent elevated homocysteine level, are associated with bone loss, decreased bone strength, and increased risk of fracture. Deficiencies in vitamins C, E, and K are also associated with compromised bone health; this effect may be modified by smoking, estrogen use or hormonal therapy after menopause, calcium intake, and vitamin D. These findings highlight the importance of adequate nutrition in preserving bone mass and reducing the risk of osteoporosis and fractures.

  2. Quantifying the fitness advantage of polymerase substitutions in Influenza A/H7N9 viruses during adaptation to humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith M Fonville

    Full Text Available Adaptation of zoonotic influenza viruses towards efficient human-to-human transmissibility is a substantial public health concern. The recently emerged A/H7N9 influenza viruses in China provide an opportunity for quantitative studies of host-adaptation, as human-adaptive substitutions in the PB2 gene of the virus have been found in all sequenced human strains, while these substitutions have not been detected in any non-human A/H7N9 sequences. Given the currently available information, this observation suggests that the human-adaptive PB2 substitution might confer a fitness advantage to the virus in these human hosts that allows it to rise to proportions detectable by consensus sequencing over the course of a single human infection. We use a mathematical model of within-host virus evolution to estimate the fitness advantage required for a substitution to reach predominance in a single infection as a function of the duration of infection and the fraction of mutant present in the virus population that initially infects a human. The modeling results provide an estimate of the lower bound for the fitness advantage of this adaptive substitution in the currently sequenced A/H7N9 viruses. This framework can be more generally used to quantitatively estimate fitness advantages of adaptive substitutions based on the within-host prevalence of mutations. Such estimates are critical for models of cross-species transmission and host-adaptation of influenza virus infections.

  3. Quantified Faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette-Marie Zacher

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The article presents three contemporary art projects that, in various ways, thematise questions regarding numerical representation of the human face in relation to the identification of faces, for example through the use of biometric video analysis software, or DNA technology. The Dutch...... and critically examine bias in surveillance technologies, as well as scientific investigations, regarding the stereotyping mode of the human gaze. The American artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg creates three-dimensional portraits of persons she has “identified” from their garbage. Her project from 2013 entitled....... The three works are analysed with perspectives to historical physiognomy and Francis Galton's composite portraits from the 1800s. It is argued that, rather than being a statistical compression like the historical composites, contemporary statistical visual portraits (composites) are irreversible...

  4. Method for simultaneous analysis of eight analogues of vitamin D using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Iltaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite considerable global investigation over several decades, the roles of vitamin D in health and disease development remains convoluted. One recognised issue is the difficulty of accurately measuring the active forms of vitamin D. Advances made include some new methods addressing the potential interference by excluding epimers and isobars. However, there is no evidence that epimers are without function. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and validate, for the first time, a new assay to simultaneously measure levels of six forms of vitamin D along with two epimers. The assay was applied to multilevel certified reference material (CRM and 25 pooled human sera samples, obtained from the Vitamin D External Quality Assessment Scheme (DEQAS, to demonstrate its efficiency. Results The assay is capable of simultaneously measuring eight vitamin D analogues over the calibration ranges and LODs (in nmol/L of: 1α25(OH2D2 [0.015-1; 0.01], 1α25(OH2D3 [0.1-100; 0.01], 25OHD3 [0.5-100, 0.025], 3-epi-25OHD3 [0.1-100, 0.05], 25OHD2 [0.5-100, 0.025], 3-epi-25OHD2 [0.1-100, 0.05], vitamin D3 [0.5-100, 0.05] and vitamin D2 [0.5-100, 0.05], using stanozolol-d3 as internal standard. Certified reference material and external quality control samples (DEQAS were analysed to meet the standards outlined by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST. Validation steps included recovery and both precision and accuracy under inter- and intra-day variation limit of detection, and analysis of each analyte over a linear range. All validation parameters were in line with acceptable Food and Drug Administration (FDA guidelines. All eight analogues were quantified with the 25OHD levels being commensurate with DEQAS data. Conclusions This report details the application of a new LC-MS/MS based assay for the efficient analysis of eight analogues of vitamin D over a range of samples, which is a significant advance over the existing

  5. Dietary vitamin D₂--a potentially underestimated contributor to vitamin D nutritional status of adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Kevin D; Kinsella, Michael; McNulty, Breige A; Walton, Janette; Gibney, Michael J; Flynn, Albert; Kiely, Mairead

    2014-07-28

    It has been suggested that vitamin D₂ is not very prevalent in the human food chain. However, data from a number of recent intervention studies suggest that the majority of subjects had measurable serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D₂ (25(OH)D₂) concentrations. Serum 25(OH)D₂, unlike 25(OH)D₃, is not directly influenced by exposure of skin to sun and thus has dietary origins; however, quantifying dietary vitamin D₂ is difficult due to the limitations of food composition data. Therefore, the present study aimed to characterise serum 25(OH)D₂ concentrations in the participants of the National Adult Nutrition Survey (NANS) in Ireland, and to use these serum concentrations to estimate the intake of vitamin D₂ using a mathematical modelling approach. Serum 25(OH)D₂ concentration was measured by a liquid chromatography-tandem MS method, and information on diet as well as subject characteristics was obtained from the NANS. Of these participants, 78.7 % (n 884) had serum 25(OH)D₂ concentrations above the limit of quantification, and the mean, maximum, 10th, 50th (median) and 90th percentile values of serum 25(OH)D₂ concentrations were 3.69, 27.6, 1.71, 2.96 and 6.36 nmol/l, respectively. To approximate the intake of vitamin D₂ from these serum 25(OH)D₂ concentrations, we used recently published data on the relationship between vitamin D intake and the responses of serum 25(OH)D concentrations. The projected 5th to 95th percentile intakes of vitamin D₂ for adults were in the range of 0.9-1.2 and 5-6 μg/d, respectively, and the median intake ranged from 1.7 to 2.3 μg/d. In conclusion, the present data demonstrate that 25(OH)D₂ concentrations are present in the sera of adults from this nationally representative sample. Vitamin D₂ may have an impact on nutritional adequacy at a population level and thus warrants further investigation.

  6. Feasibility study of novel endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging system in detecting and quantifying gastrointestinal disease: first human results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hao; Li, Shujun; Yao, Liping; Liang, Jie; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun [Fourth Military Medical University, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); Cao, Xin; Lin, Yenan; Liu, Muhan; Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli [Xidian University, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an (China); Kang, Fei; Wang, Jing [Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); Wang, Min [Xi' an Children' s Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Xi' an (China)

    2015-06-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides potential to use clinical radiotracers for optical imaging. The goal of this study was to present a newly developed endoscopic CLI (ECLI) system and illustrate its feasibility and potential in distinguishing and quantifying cancerous lesions of the GI tract. The ECLI system was established by integrating an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera with a flexible fibre endoscope. Phantom experiments and animal studies were conducted to test and illustrate the system in detecting and quantifying the presence of radionuclide in vitro and in vivo. A pilot clinical study was performed to evaluate our system in clinical settings. Phantom and mice experiments demonstrated its ability to acquire both the luminescent and photographic images with high accuracy. Linear quantitative relationships were also obtained when comparing the ECLI radiance with the radiotracer activity (r{sup 2} = 0.9779) and traditional CLI values (r{sup 2} = 0.9025). Imaging of patients revealed the potential of ECLI in the identification and quantification of cancerous tissue from normal, which showed good consistence with the clinical PET examination. The new ECLI system shows good consistence with the clinical PET examination and has great potential for clinical translation and in aiding detection of the GI tract disease. (orig.)

  7. The Vitamin D Receptor, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, and Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Rong; Wu, Shaoping; Xia, Yinglin; Sun, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear receptor is an emerging therapeutic target in various human diseases. Vitamin D receptor (VDR), a nuclear receptor, mediates the biological functions of vitamin D. Classically, vitamin D is recognized as an essential contributor to mineral and bone homeostasis. Increasing evidence demonstrates that vitamin D is involved in inflammatory responses. Persistent intestinal inflammation is associated with colon cancer. This review focuses on vitamin D and VDR in inflammatory bowel disea...

  8. Unsuccessful vitamin D treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmedes, Anne; Hey, Henrik; Larsson, Iben

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D3 (25-OHD3) analyses have increased exponentially and vitamin D deficiency (vitamin D2). Lack of effect of treatment can be due to: 1......) too low dose, 2) incorrect analytical methods when injection treatment (vitamin D2) is used, 3) obesity, 4) seasonal variations, and 5) poor compliance. Treatment is mandatory in order to prevent osteopenia and osteoporosis. Vitamin D3 is more potent than vitamin D2. Injections with vitamin D2 should...... be replaced by vitamin D3....

  9. Ultraviolet index and location are important determinants of vitamin D status in people with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Karen M; Fairley, Christopher K; Kimlin, Michael G; Kelly, Mark; Read, Tim R H; Broom, Jennifer; Russell, Darren B; Ebeling, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to document the vitamin D status of HIV-infected individuals across a wide latitude range in one country and to examine associated risk factors for low vitamin D. Using data from patients attending four HIV specialist clinics across a wide latitude range in Australia, we constructed logistic regression models to investigate risk factors associated with 25(OH)D origin (aOR 2.82, 95% CI 2.12, 3.75, P product of an alternative steroid pathway with a common precursor steroid, modified the effect of antiretroviral therapy on serum 25(OH)D.

  10. Vitamin A homeostasis endangered by environmental pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zile, M.H. (Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Normal vitamin A function depends on adequate stores of the vitamin, a finely regulated supply of the vitamin to target tissues, and an ability of cells to generate functionally active forms of the vitamin. Both endogenous and exogenous factors can adversely affect vitamin A homeostasis. Polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons are ubiquitous environmental pollutants and cause severe disturbances in vitamin A metabolism, manifested by an accelerated metabolism and breakdown of vitamin A and its metabolites and a depletion of vitamin A from the body; this sequence of events accounts for the vitamin A deficiency-like symptoms associated with PHAH intoxication. The mechanism(s) responsible for these events most likely includes altered activities of enzymes that are either directly or indirectly involved in critical vitamin A metabolic pathways. Human populations that continue to be exposed to environmental pollutants, may accumulate critical levels of polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and will be at risk for inadequate vitamin A function as well as for other health impairments that have been difficult to link to any specific causes. Therefore, it is important to seriously evaluate the similarities in physiological disturbances across species that have become apparent in studies with wildlife inhabiting polluted environments similar to ours; the relevance to human health is evident.197 references.

  11. Efeito do processamento do leite humano sobre os níveis de retinol The effect of processing on the Vitamin A content of human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla D. S. Ribeiro

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Analisar o efeito do processamento sobre os níveis de retinol no leite humano ordenhado, bem como avaliar se o mesmo supre o requerimento nutricional de vitamina A do lactente. MÉTODOS: Foram coletadas 60 amostras de leite humano ordenhado no Banco de Leite Humano da Maternidade Escola Januário Cicco e divididas em duas alíquotas de 5 ml cada, sendo uma não processada termicamente, enquanto a outra foi submetida à pasteurização. As amostras foram analisadas por cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência. Para a análise estatística, foi utilizado o teste t de Student, sendo a diferença entre as médias considerada significativa quando p OBJECTIVES: To analyze the effect of processing on the Vitamin A levels of milk that is donated to the Human Milk Bank at the University Maternity Hospital, and to evaluate whether this milk supplies the infants' Vitamin A requirement. METHODS: Sixty milk samples from the Human Milk Bank were divided into two equal portions. One milk portion was extracted prior to processing, while another fraction was subjected to pasteurization and later extracted. The samples were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography. Analysis with Student's t test indicated that the difference between mean retinol levels was statistically significant at the p < 0.05 level. RESULTS: The retinol content found in the milk prior to processing was 55.4±34.0 µg/100 ml, whereas for the processed milk this level was 36.6±26.1 µg/100 ml (p < 0.001. CONCLUSION: It was found that retinol loss occurs during milk processing and that the milk from the Human Milk Bank does not meet infants' Vitamin A requirement.

  12. Vitamin C protects against UV irradiation-induced apoptosis through reactivating silenced tumor suppressor genes p21 and p16 in a Tet-dependent DNA demethylation manner in human skin cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-ran; Qin, Hai-hong; Wu, Wen-yu; He, Shu-juan; Xu, Jin-hua

    2014-08-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in various kinds of carcinogenesis. Vitamin C could induce Tet-dependent DNA demethylation in embryonic stem cells. Therefore, the antagonizing activity of vitamin C on ultraviolet (UV)-induced apoptosis was investigated in this study. Apoptosis of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells and p16-knockout (KO) or p21-KO fibroblasts was assessed by a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Real-time PCR and western blot were used to determine the relative expression levels of p12, p21, and Tet1/2/3 genes. The global DNA methylation levels were determined using MethylFlash Methylated DNA Quantification Kit in A431 cells with or without vitamin C treatment. To examine the DNA demethylation activity of vitamin C, DNA immunoprecipitation (DIP)-qPCR was performed to determine the relative levels of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in p16 and p21 promoter regions containing cytosine-phosphorothiolated guanine (CpG) islands. The increasing apoptosis of A431 cells under prolonged UV irradiation was remarkably decreased by the combination of vitamin C treatment, suggesting that vitamin C protects against UV-induced apoptosis. Concurrently, vitamin C induced a significant reduction of global DNA methylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner in A431 cells. Vitamin C also reactivated the expression of p16 and p21 at mRNA and protein levels. Mechanistically, about 27% 5hmC-positive cells were observed in vitamin C-treated A431 cells, and the 5hmC enrichment at p16 and p21 promoter regions was also largely increased by vitamin C. Moreover, the expression of p16 and p21 was decreased in Tet1/2 double-knockdown cells, in which the inhibitory effect of vitamin C on UV-induced apoptosis was dismissed. Furthermore, the inhibition of UV-induced apoptosis on vitamin C treatment nearly disappeared in p16- or p21-knockout primary cultured fibroblasts. These results demonstrate that vitamin C effectively antagonizes UV

  13. Electrical signature analysis to quantify human and animal performance on fitness and therapy equipment such as a treadmill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daryl F.; Hochanadel, Charles D.; Haynes, Howard D.

    2010-05-18

    The invention is a human and animal performance data acquisition, analysis, and diagnostic system for fitness and therapy devices having an interface box removably disposed on incoming power wiring to a fitness and therapy device, at least one current transducer removably disposed on said interface box for sensing current signals to said fitness and therapy device, and a means for analyzing, displaying, and reporting said current signals to determine human and animal performance on said device using measurable parameters.

  14. Vitamin D and Human Health: from the Gamete to the Grave”: Report on a meeting held at Queen Mary University of London, 23rd–25th April 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Martineau

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The inaugural Vitamin D and Human Health conference was held on the London Whitechapel campus of Queen Mary University’s Barts and The London Medical School, from the 23rd to 25th of April, 2014. This three-day meeting set out to achieve two main aims: to create a forum for researchers to meet and forge new collaborations, and to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the latest findings from clinical research in the field of vitamin D. Over 300 clinical researchers, students and commercial representatives attended. Thirty international experts in the field of clinical vitamin D research presented talks organised into a programme spanning the human life course. Commencing with a session of talks providing overviews of randomised trials of supplementation and global vitamin D status, the meeting proceeded with a session on pre-birth related vitamin D research—evolution, genetics & fertility—which led into several talks in the area of child health. Sessions on respiratory health, immune function, cancer biology, and neurodegenerative diseases preceded an overview of research in the area of ageing-related health outcomes, including musculoskeletal health and metabolic diseases. Finally sessions on the economy of vitamin D and public health, along with future directions for research were held. Several themes emerged during the course of the meeting. The anticipation of results from very large (n > 5000 randomised controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation (“mega-trials” and Individual Patient Data (IPD meta-analyses were hot topics of discussion. Mega-trials have the potential to detect small effect sizes of vitamin D supplementation on end-points such as incidence and mortality from cardiovascular disease and cancer. IPD meta-analyses have the potential to investigate the causes of heterogeneity often seen in the results of individual primary trials by allowing clinically important subgroup effects of vitamin D supplementation to be

  15. Urinary water-soluble vitamins and their metabolite contents as nutritional markers for evaluating vitamin intakes in young Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2008-06-01

    Little information is available to estimate water-soluble vitamin intakes from urinary vitamins and their metabolite contents as possible nutritional markers. Determination of the relationships between the oral dose and urinary excretion of water-soluble vitamins in human subjects contributes to finding valid nutrition markers of water-soluble vitamin intakes. Six female Japanese college students were given a standard Japanese diet in the first week, the same diet with a synthesized water-soluble vitamin mixture as a diet with approximately onefold vitamin mixture based on Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) for Japanese in the second week, with a threefold vitamin mixture in the third week, and a sixfold mixture in the fourth week. Water-soluble vitamins and their metabolites were measured in the 24-h urine collected each week. All urinary vitamins and their metabolite levels except vitamin B(12) increased linearly in a dose-dependent manner, and highly correlated with vitamin intake (r=0.959 for vitamin B(1), r=0.927 for vitamin B(2), r=0.965 for vitamin B(6), r=0.957 for niacin, r=0.934 for pantothenic acid, r=0.907 for folic acid, r=0.962 for biotin, and r=0.952 for vitamin C). These results suggest that measuring urinary water-soluble vitamins and their metabolite levels can be used as good nutritional markers for assessing vitamin intakes.

  16. : Vitamin E transport in enterocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Reboul, Emmanuelle; Klein, Alexis; Bietrix, Florence; Gleize, Béatrice; Malezet-Desmoulins, Christiane; Schneider, Martina; Margotat, Alain; Lagrost, Laurent; Collet, Xavier; Borel, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Although cellular uptake of vitamin E was initially described as a passive process, recent studies in the liver and brain have shown that SR-BI (scavenger receptor class B type I) is involved in this phenomenon. As SR-BI is expressed at high levels in the intestine, the present study addressed the involvement of SR-BI in vitamin E trafficking across enterocytes. Apical uptake and efflux of the main dietary forms of vitamin E were examined using Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers as a model of human ...

  17. Development of an Advanced HPLC–MS/MS Method for the Determination of Carotenoids and Fat-Soluble Vitamins in Human Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Hrvolová

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of carotenoids and fat-soluble vitamins in human plasma may play a significant role in numerous chronic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and some types of cancer. Although these compounds are of utmost interest for human health, methods for their simultaneous determination are scarce. A new high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS method for the quantification of selected carotenoids and fat-soluble vitamins in human plasma was developed, validated, and then applied in a pilot dietary intervention study with healthy volunteers. In 50 min, 16 analytes were separated with an excellent resolution and suitable MS signal intensity. The proposed HPLC–MS/MS method led to improvements in the limits of detection (LOD and quantification (LOQ for all analyzed compounds compared to the most often used HPLC–DAD methods, in some cases being more than 100-fold lower. LOD values were between 0.001 and 0.422 µg/mL and LOQ values ranged from 0.003 to 1.406 µg/mL, according to the analyte. The accuracy, precision, and stability met with the acceptance criteria of the AOAC (Association of Official Analytical Chemists International. According to these results, the described HPLC-MS/MS method is adequately sensitive, repeatable and suitable for the large-scale analysis of compounds in biological fluids.

  18. Development of an Advanced HPLC–MS/MS Method for the Determination of Carotenoids and Fat-Soluble Vitamins in Human Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrvolová, Barbora; Martínez-Huélamo, Miriam; Colmán-Martínez, Mariel; Hurtado-Barroso, Sara; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria; Kalina, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of carotenoids and fat-soluble vitamins in human plasma may play a significant role in numerous chronic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and some types of cancer. Although these compounds are of utmost interest for human health, methods for their simultaneous determination are scarce. A new high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method for the quantification of selected carotenoids and fat-soluble vitamins in human plasma was developed, validated, and then applied in a pilot dietary intervention study with healthy volunteers. In 50 min, 16 analytes were separated with an excellent resolution and suitable MS signal intensity. The proposed HPLC–MS/MS method led to improvements in the limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) for all analyzed compounds compared to the most often used HPLC–DAD methods, in some cases being more than 100-fold lower. LOD values were between 0.001 and 0.422 µg/mL and LOQ values ranged from 0.003 to 1.406 µg/mL, according to the analyte. The accuracy, precision, and stability met with the acceptance criteria of the AOAC (Association of Official Analytical Chemists) International. According to these results, the described HPLC-MS/MS method is adequately sensitive, repeatable and suitable for the large-scale analysis of compounds in biological fluids. PMID:27754400

  19. Vitamin K absorption and kinetics in human subjects after consumption of 13C-labeled phylloquinone from kale

    Science.gov (United States)

    The absorption and plasma elimination of vitamin K was investigated by uniformly labeling phylloquinone in kale with carbon-13 and feeding the kale to study subjects. Seven healthy volunteers ingested a single 400 g serving of kale with 30 g vegetable oil. The kale provided 156 nmol of phylloquino...

  20. Assessing the potential of biofortified cassava for improving indices of vitamin A status: Update on human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassava usually contains essentially no beta-carotene (BC). However, cassava is being bred to increase its BC content. Our objective was to test how effective biofortified cassava is at increasing serum BC and vitamin A (VA) concentrations in healthy adult women. Ten American women participated in ...

  1. Real-time PCR-based assay to quantify the relative amount of human and mouse tissue present in tumor xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcoser Sergio Y

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenograft samples used to test anti-cancer drug efficacies and toxicities in vivo contain an unknown mix of mouse and human cells. Evaluation of drug activity can be confounded by samples containing large amounts of contaminating mouse tissue. We have developed a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR assay using TaqMan technology to quantify the amount of mouse tissue that is incorporated into human xenograft samples. Results The forward and reverse primers bind to the same DNA sequence in the human and the mouse genome. Using a set of specially designed fluorescent probes provides species specificity. The linearity and sensitivity of the assay is evaluated using serial dilutions of single species and heterogeneous DNA mixtures. We examined many xenograft samples at various in vivo passages, finding a wide variety of human:mouse DNA ratios. This variation may be influenced by tumor type, number of serial passages in vivo, and even which part of the tumor was collected and used in the assay. Conclusions This novel assay provides an accurate quantitative assessment of human and mouse content in xenograft tumors. This assay can be performed on aberrantly behaving human xenografts, samples used in bioinformatics studies, and periodically for tumor tissue frequently grown by serial passage in vivo.

  2. Quantifying resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Craig R.; Angeler, David G.

    2016-01-01

    The biosphere is under unprecedented pressure, reflected in rapid changes in our global ecological, social, technological and economic systems. In many cases, ecological and social systems can adapt to these changes over time, but when a critical threshold is surpassed, a system under stress can undergo catastrophic change and reorganize into a different state. The concept of resilience, introduced more than 40 years ago in the ecological sciences, captures the behaviour of systems that can occur in alternative states. The original definition of resilience forwarded by Holling (1973) is still the most useful. It defines resilience as the amount of disturbance that a system can withstand before it shifts into an alternative stable state. The idea of alternative stable states has clear and profound implications for ecological management. Coral reefs, for example, are high-diversity systems that provide key ecosystem services such as fisheries and coastal protection. Human impacts are causing significant, ongoing reef degradation, and many reefs have shifted from coral- to algal-dominated states in response to anthropogenic pressures such as elevated water temperatures and overfishing. Understanding and differentiating between the factors that help maintain reefs in coral-dominated states vs. those that facilitate a shift to an undesired algal-dominated state is a critical step towards sound management and conservation of these, and other, important social–ecological systems.

  3. Vitamin D Status in Danish Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rikke Agnete

    A principal function of vitamin D is facilitation of intestinal calcium absorption and maintenance of calcium homeostasis. This is essential to several functions in the body, and vitamin D is believed to be particularly crucial during childhood growth as the requirement for calcium increases....... In addition to skeletal health, vitamin D has also been associated with several extra-skeletal conditions including cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes. Evaluation of Vitamin D status is complex because it is modified by several factors and because the level of optimal vitamin D concentration...... is uncertain. The primary source of vitamin D in humans is believed to be the synthesis that occurs in the skin upon sun exposure while intake from diet, supplements, and potential fortified foods are secondary sources. Yet, synthesis of vitamin D from sun exposure is negligible during winter at northern...

  4. Vitamin D and the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzosek, Małgorzata; Łukaszkiewicz, Jacek; Wrzosek, Michał; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Matsumoto, Halina; Piątkiewicz, Paweł; Radziwoń-Zaleska, Maria; Wojnar, Marcin; Nowicka, Grażyna

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D is formed in human epithelial cells via photochemical synthesis and is also acquired from dietary sources. The so-called classical effect of this vitamin involves the regulation of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. Apart from this, non-classical effects of vitamin D have recently gained renewed attention. One important yet little known of the numerous functions of vitamin D is the regulation of nervous system development and function. The neuroprotective effect of vitamin D is associated with its influence on neurotrophin production and release, neuromediator synthesis, intracellular calcium homeostasis, and prevention of oxidative damage to nervous tissue. Clinical studies suggest that vitamin D deficiency may lead to an increased risk of disease of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis. Adequate intake of vitamin D during pregnancy and the neonatal period seems to be crucial in terms of prevention of these diseases.

  5. Human O-sulfated metabolites of (-)-epicatechin and methyl-(-)-epicatechin are poor substrates for commercial aryl-sulfatases: implications for studies concerned with quantifying epicatechin bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S; Hollands, W; Needs, P W; Ostertag, L M; de Roos, B; Duthie, G G; Kroon, P A

    2012-06-01

    Epicatechin is a widely consumed dietary flavonoid and there is substantial evidence that it contributes to the health benefits reported for flavanol-rich cocoa products including dark chocolate. Numerous reports have described the appearance of epicatechin and epicatechin phase-2 conjugates (sulfates and glucuronides of epicatechin and methylepicatechin) in blood and urine samples of subjects following ingestion of epicatechin. The most widely reported method of quantifying total epicatechin in plasma and urine samples involves hydrolysis with a mixture of β-glucuronidase and sulfatase to convert the conjugates to epicatechin aglycone which is subsequently quantified. We observed a lack of hydrolysis of epicatechin sulfates and methylepicatechin sulfates using commercial sulfatases and investigated this further. Samples of urine or plasma from subjects who had consumed epicatechin were subjected to enzyme hydrolysis and then analysed using LC-MS/MS, or analysed without enzyme hydrolysis. Attempts to increase the extent of hydrolysis of epicatechin conjugates were made by increasing the amount of enzyme, hydrolysis pH and length of incubations, and using alternative sources of enzyme. The standard hydrolysis conditions failed to hydrolyse the majority of epicatechin sulfates and methylepicatechin sulfates. Even when the quantity of enzyme and incubation period was increased, the pH optimised, or alternative sources of sulfatases were used, epicatechin monosulfates and methylepicatechin monosulfates remained as major peaks in the chromatograms of the samples. An assessment of literature data strongly suggested that the majority of reports where enzyme hydrolysis was used had significantly underestimated epicatechin bioavailability in humans. Methods for quantifying epicatechin concentrations in blood and urine need to take account of the lack of hydrolysis of (methyl)epicatechin-sulfates, for example by quantifying these directly using LC-MS/MS. Copyright © 2012

  6. Quantifying urban heat island effects and human comfort for cities of variable size and urban morphology in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.; Koopmans, S.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Hove, van B.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the canopy layer urban heat island (UHI) and human comfort in a range of small to large cities and villages in the Netherlands. So far, this subject has not been substantially studied in the Netherlands, since it has a relatively mild Cfb climate and impact was assumed to be mi

  7. Lack of megalin expression in adult human terminal ileum suggests megalin‐independent cubilin/amnionless activity during vitamin B12 absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Louise L.; Andersen, Rikke K.; Hager, Henrik; Madsen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cubilin plays an essential role in terminal ileum and renal proximal tubules during absorption of vitamin B12 and ligands from the glomerular ultrafiltrate. Cubilin is coexpressed with amnionless, and cubilin and amnionless are mutually dependent on each other for correct processing to the plasma membrane upon synthesis. Patients with defects in either protein suffer from vitamin B12‐malabsorption and in some cases proteinuria. Cubilin lacks a transmembrane region and signals for endocytosis and is dependent on a transmembrane coreceptor during internalization. Amnionless has been shown to be able to mediate internalization of cubilin in a cell‐based model system. Cubilin has additionally been suggested to function together with megalin, and a recent study of megalin‐deficient patients indicates that uptake of cubilin ligands in the kidney is critically dependent on megalin. To further investigate the potential role of amnionless and megalin in relation to cubilin function in terminal ileum and vitamin B12 uptake, we initiated a study of CUBN/cubilin, AMN/amnionless, and LRP2/megalin expression in adult human terminal ileum. Our study is the first to reveal the expression pattern of cubilin, amnionless, and megalin in adult human terminal ileum, where cubilin and amnionless localize to the epithelial cells. Surprisingly, we did not detect any megalin protein in adult terminal ileum and consistently, only extremely low amounts of LRP2 mRNA. Our data therefore advocate that cubilin and amnionless act independently of megalin in adult terminal ileum and that the cubilin‐megalin interdependency accordingly should be considered as tissue and ligand specific. PMID:25052491

  8. Lack of megalin expression in adult human terminal ileum suggests megalin-independent cubilin/amnionless activity during vitamin B12 absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Louise L; Andersen, Rikke K; Hager, Henrik; Madsen, Mette

    2014-07-01

    Cubilin plays an essential role in terminal ileum and renal proximal tubules during absorption of vitamin B12 and ligands from the glomerular ultrafiltrate. Cubilin is coexpressed with amnionless, and cubilin and amnionless are mutually dependent on each other for correct processing to the plasma membrane upon synthesis. Patients with defects in either protein suffer from vitamin B12-malabsorption and in some cases proteinuria. Cubilin lacks a transmembrane region and signals for endocytosis and is dependent on a transmembrane coreceptor during internalization. Amnionless has been shown to be able to mediate internalization of cubilin in a cell-based model system. Cubilin has additionally been suggested to function together with megalin, and a recent study of megalin-deficient patients indicates that uptake of cubilin ligands in the kidney is critically dependent on megalin. To further investigate the potential role of amnionless and megalin in relation to cubilin function in terminal ileum and vitamin B12 uptake, we initiated a study of CUBN/cubilin, AMN/amnionless, and LRP2/megalin expression in adult human terminal ileum. Our study is the first to reveal the expression pattern of cubilin, amnionless, and megalin in adult human terminal ileum, where cubilin and amnionless localize to the epithelial cells. Surprisingly, we did not detect any megalin protein in adult terminal ileum and consistently, only extremely low amounts of LRP2 mRNA. Our data therefore advocate that cubilin and amnionless act independently of megalin in adult terminal ileum and that the cubilin-megalin interdependency accordingly should be considered as tissue and ligand specific.

  9. Determination of water-soluble vitamins in soft drinks and vitamin supplements using capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Matthias; Razzazi, Ebrahim; Luf, Wolfgang

    2003-08-01

    A method for the determination of six water-soluble vitamins based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) operated in micellar mode was developed. Thiamine hydrochloride (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), pyridoxine hydrochloride (vitamin B6), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), nicotinamide (vitamin B3), and cobalamin (Vitamin B12) could be separated in a single run. All CE parameters such as buffer composition and operation temperature were optimized in order to achieve better separation. Relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the described method ranged from 1.08 to 3.68% (intra-day precision) and 1.26 to 3.35% (inter-day precision). The method was then used for measuring various soft drinks and vitamin supplements directly without any step of sample cleanup. The determination of niacin was successful for all samples tested, reaching recoveries near 100%. Riboflavin and pyridoxine were quantified successfully in some but not all samples. Therefore, an evaluation on a case-by-case basis is mandatory. When applicable, this method provides a fast, accurate, simple, and inexpensive way to quantify selected vitamins, and is therefore well suited for routine analysis in soft drink industry.

  10. Vitamin K status of lactating mothers and their infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, F R

    1999-08-01

    Vitamin K deficiency remains a world-wide problem in the newborn. Vitamin K traverses the placenta from mother to infant very poorly and is present only in very low concentrations in human milk. Thus, it is not surprising that the newborn infant has undetectable vitamin K serum levels with abnormal amounts of the coagulation proteins and undercarboxylated prothrombin. Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn, secondary to vitamin K deficiency, remains largely a disease of breastfed infants. Lactating mothers easily achieve the recommended dietary allowance for vitamin K (1 microg kg(-1) d(-1)) and the breast milk concentration is readily increased by increasing maternal vitamin K intake. Breastfed infants do not receive the recommended vitamin K intake via human milk. To prevent vitamin K deficiency in the newborn, intramuscular or oral vitamin K prophylaxis is necessary.

  11. Quantifying the environmental impact of an integrated human/industrial-natural system using life cycle assessment; a case study on a forest and wood processing chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaubroeck, Thomas; Alvarenga, Rodrigo A F; Verheyen, Kris; Muys, Bart; Dewulf, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a tool to assess the environmental sustainability of a product; it quantifies the environmental impact of a product's life cycle. In conventional LCAs, the boundaries of a product's life cycle are limited to the human/industrial system, the technosphere. Ecosystems, which provide resources to and take up emissions from the technosphere, are not included in those boundaries. However, similar to the technosphere, ecosystems also have an impact on their (surrounding) environment through their resource usage (e.g., nutrients) and emissions (e.g., CH4). We therefore propose a LCA framework to assess the impact of integrated Techno-Ecological Systems (TES), comprising relevant ecosystems and the technosphere. In our framework, ecosystems are accounted for in the same manner as technosphere compartments. Also, the remediating effect of uptake of pollutants, an ecosystem service, is considered. A case study was performed on a TES of sawn timber production encompassing wood growth in an intensively managed forest ecosystem and further industrial processing. Results show that the managed forest accounted for almost all resource usage and biodiversity loss through land occupation but also for a remediating effect on human health, mostly via capture of airborne fine particles. These findings illustrate the potential relevance of including ecosystems in the product's life cycle of a LCA, though further research is needed to better quantify the environmental impact of TES.

  12. B-vitamin Supplementation Mitigates Effects of Fine Particles on Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction and Inflammation: A Pilot Human Intervention Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jia; Trevisi, Letizia; Urch, Bruce; Lin, Xinyi; Speck, Mary; Coull, Brent A.; Liss, Gary; Thompson, Aaron; Wu, Shaowei; Wilson, Ander; Koutrakis, Petros; Silverman, Frances; Gold, Diane R.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2017-04-01

    Ambient fine particle (PM2.5) pollution triggers acute cardiovascular events. Individual-level preventions are proposed to complement regulation in reducing the global burden of PM2.5-induced cardiovascular diseases. We determine whether B vitamin supplementation mitigates PM2.5 effects on cardiac autonomic dysfunction and inflammation in a single-blind placebo-controlled crossover pilot trial. Ten healthy adults received two-hour controlled-exposure-experiment to sham under placebo, PM2.5 (250 μg/m3) under placebo, and PM2.5 (250 μg/m3) under B-vitamin supplementation (2.5 mg/d folic acid, 50 mg/d vitamin B6, and 1 mg/d vitamin B12), respectively. At pre-, post-, 24 h-post-exposure, we measured resting heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) with electrocardiogram, and white blood cell (WBC) counts with hematology analyzer. Compared to sham, PM2.5 exposure increased HR (3.8 bpm, 95% CI: 0.3, 7.4; P = 0.04), total WBC count (11.5%, 95% CI: 0.3%, 24.0%; P = 0.04), lymphocyte count (12.9%, 95% CI: 4.4%, 22.1%; P = 0.005), and reduced low-frequency power (57.5%, 95% CI: 2.5%, 81.5%; P = 0.04). B-vitamin supplementation attenuated PM2.5 effect on HR by 150% (P = 0.003), low-frequency power by 90% (P = 0.01), total WBC count by 139% (P = 0.006), and lymphocyte count by 106% (P = 0.02). In healthy adults, two-hour PM2.5 exposure substantially increases HR, reduces HRV, and increases WBC. These effects are reduced by B vitamin supplementation.

  13. Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Because exposure to sunlight is a risk for skin cancer, you should use sunscreen after a few minutes in the sun. People who do not live in sunny places may not make enough vitamin D. Skin that is exposed to sunshine indoors through a ...

  14. Retinoids modulate expression of the endocytic partners megalin, cubilin, and disabled-2 and uptake of vitamin D-binding protein in human mammary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlon, Timothy M; Taffany, David A; Welsh, Joellen; Rowling, Matthew J

    2008-07-01

    The major circulating form of vitamin D, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25D3), circulates bound to vitamin D-binding protein (DBP). Prior to activation to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol in the kidney, the 25D3-DBP complex is internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis, which is absolutely dependent on the membrane receptors megalin and cubilin and the adaptor protein disabled-2 (Dab2). We recently reported that mammary epithelial cells (T-47D) expressing megalin, cubilin, and Dab2 rapidly internalize DBP via endocytosis, whereas cells that do not express all 3 proteins (MCF-7) do not. The objectives of this study were to characterize megalin, cubilin, and Dab2 expression and transport of DBP in human mammary epithelial cells. Using immunoblotting and real-time PCR, we found that megalin, cubilin, and Dab2 were expressed and dose dependently induced by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) in T-47D human breast cancer cells and that RA-treated T-47D cells exhibited enhanced DBP internalization. These are the first studies to our knowledge to demonstrate that mammary epithelial cells express megalin, cubilin, and Dab2, which are enhanced during differentiation and may explain, at least in part, our finding that receptor-mediated endocytosis of DBP is upregulated in differentiated mammary epithelial cells.

  15. Vitamin A and Retinoids as Mitochondrial Toxicants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Roberto de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A and its derivatives, the retinoids, are micronutrient necessary for the human diet in order to maintain several cellular functions from human development to adulthood and also through aging. Furthermore, vitamin A and retinoids are utilized pharmacologically in the treatment of some diseases, as, for instance, dermatological disturbances and some types of cancer. In spite of being an essential micronutrient with clinical application, vitamin A exerts several toxic effects regarding redox environment and mitochondrial function. Moreover, decreased life quality and increased mortality rates among vitamin A supplements users have been reported. However, the exact mechanism by which vitamin A elicits its deleterious effects is not clear yet. In this review, the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the mechanism of vitamin A-induced toxicity is discussed.

  16. Connected Car: Quantified Self becomes Quantified Car

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Swan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The automotive industry could be facing a situation of profound change and opportunity in the coming decades. There are a number of influencing factors such as increasing urban and aging populations, self-driving cars, 3D parts printing, energy innovation, and new models of transportation service delivery (Zipcar, Uber. The connected car means that vehicles are now part of the connected world, continuously Internet-connected, generating and transmitting data, which on the one hand can be helpfully integrated into applications, like real-time traffic alerts broadcast to smartwatches, but also raises security and privacy concerns. This paper explores the automotive connected world, and describes five killer QS (Quantified Self-auto sensor applications that link quantified-self sensors (sensors that measure the personal biometrics of individuals like heart rate and automotive sensors (sensors that measure driver and passenger biometrics or quantitative automotive performance metrics like speed and braking activity. The applications are fatigue detection, real-time assistance for parking and accidents, anger management and stress reduction, keyless authentication and digital identity verification, and DIY diagnostics. These kinds of applications help to demonstrate the benefit of connected world data streams in the automotive industry and beyond where, more fundamentally for human progress, the automation of both physical and now cognitive tasks is underway.

  17. In Vivo Determination of Vitamin D Function Using Transgenic Mice Carrying a Human Osteocalcin Luciferase Reporter Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Nakanishi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is an essential factor for ossification, and its deficiency causes rickets. Osteocalcin, which is a noncollagenous protein found in bone matrix and involved in mineralization and calcium ion homeostasis, is one of the major bone morphogenetic markers and is used in the evaluation of osteoblast maturation and osteogenic activation. We established transgenic mouse line expressing luciferase under the control of a 10-kb osteocalcin enhancer/promoter sequence. Using these transgenic mice, we evaluated the active forms of vitamins D2 and D3 for their bone morphogenetic function by in vivo bioluminescence. As the result, strong activity for ossification was observed with 1α,25-hydroxyvitamin D3. Our mouse system can offer a feasible detection method for assessment of osteogenic activity in the development of functional foods and medicines by noninvasive screening.

  18. Vitamin D deficiency in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashman, Kevin D.; Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency has been described as being pandemic, but serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] distribution data for the European Union are of very variable quality. The NIH-led international Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing existing...... 25(OH)D values from national health/nutrition surveys. OBJECTIVE: This study applied VDSP protocols to serum 25(OH)D data from representative childhood/teenage and adult/older adult European populations, representing a sizable geographical footprint, to better quantify the prevalence of vitamin D...... deficiency in Europe. DESIGN: The VDSP protocols were applied in 14 population studies [reanalysis of subsets of serum 25(OH)D in 11 studies and complete analysis of all samples from 3 studies that had not previously measured it] by using certified liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry on biobanked...

  19. Effect of vitamin K on bone health in humans%维生素K在人类骨健康中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙燕; 张昌华

    2013-01-01

    骨质疏松及其引发的骨折高发病率已成为世界公共健康问题,探索营养物质对骨健康的有效性具有重要意义。本文综述的目的是对维生素K在人类骨健康中的防治作用进行评价分析。虽然大量观察性研究显示膳食叶绿醌(维生素K1)或MK-7与人体骨密度的提高或骨折发生率的下降有着密切关系,但干预性研究尚不能明确维生素K1或MK-4补剂对骨骼的保护作用。此外,研究资料也未证实维生素K营养状况与骨健康之间的关联性。目前相关研究资料不充分,研究方案及研究结论不一致,维生素K在人类骨健康中的有效防治作用仍存在争议。%The high prevalence of osteoporosis and the consequential fractures has become a public health problem all around the world.Therefore, it is important to explore the effectiveness of nutrients on bone health .The objective of this review is to evaluate the effect of the prevention and treatment effect of vitamin K on bone health in humans .Though several observational studies have reported an association of dietary phylloquinone or MK-7 with high bone mineral density or low risk of fractures , the intervention studies have not yet determined the protective effect of intake daily phylloquinone (vitamin K1) or MK-4 supplementation on bone health.In addition, the data of randomized studies have not shown the correlation between the vitamin K status and bone health .Actually, the effect of vitamin K on bone health in humans remains controversial due to the difference regarding results and /or methodologies of studies , and the insufficiency of available data .

  20. Farnesoid X receptor-dependent and -independent pathways mediate the transcriptional control of human fibroblast growth factor 19 by vitamin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Daniel; Sutor, Dominic; Dorbath, Donata; Weiß, Johannes; Götze, Oliver; Schmitt, Johannes; Hermanns, Heike M; Geier, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a gut-derived hormone that controls bile acid (BA), carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Whereas strong evidence supports a key role of BAs and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) for the control of FGF19 expression, information on other regulators is limited. In mice, FGF15 expression (ortholog of human FGF19) is induced by vitamin A (VitA) in an FXR-dependent manner. However, the significance of this finding for human FGF19 is currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that VitA derivatives induce FGF19 in human intestinal cell lines by a direct transcriptional mechanism. In contrast to mouse FGF15, however, this direct regulation is not dependent on FXR but mediated by retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and their interaction with a novel DR-5 element in the human FGF19 gene. In addition to this direct effect, VitA derivatives impacted on the BA-mediated control of FGF19 by regulation of FXR protein levels. In conclusion, VitA regulates human FGF19 expression through FXR-dependent and -independent pathways. Moreover, we suggest that considerable mechanistic differences exist between humans and mice with regard to the nuclear receptors controlling the VitA-FGF15/19 axis. These findings may implicate a clinical relevance of RAR-activating VitA derivatives for the regulation of FGF19 levels in humans.

  1. The Potential Role of Vitamin D Enhanced Foods in Improving Vitamin D Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Stepien

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Low vitamin D intake and status have been reported worldwide and many studies have suggested that this low status may be involved in the development of several chronic diseases. There are a limited number of natural dietary sources of vitamin D leading to a real need for alternatives to improve dietary intake. Enhancement of foods with vitamin D is a possible mode for ensuring increased consumption and thus improved vitamin D status. The present review examines studies investigating effects of vitamin D enhanced foods in humans and the feasibility of the approach is discussed.

  2. Transrepression of the estrogen receptor promoter by calcitriol in human breast cancer cells via two negative vitamin D response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Srilatha; Krishnan, Aruna V; Peng, Lihong; Lundqvist, Johan; Feldman, David

    2013-08-01

    Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3), the hormonally active metabolite of vitamin D, exerts its anti-proliferative activity in breast cancer (BCa) cells by multiple mechanisms including the downregulation of the expression of estrogen receptor α (ER). We analyzed an ∼3.5 kb ER promoter sequence and demonstrated the presence of two potential negative vitamin D response elements (nVDREs), a newly identified putative nVDRE upstream at -2488 to -2473 bp (distal nVDRE) and a previously published sequence (proximal nVDRE) at -94 to -70 bp proximal to the P1 start site. Transactivation analysis using ER promoter deletion constructs and heterologous promoter-reporter constructs revealed that both nVDREs functioned to mediate calcitriol transrepression. In the electrophoretic mobility shift assay, the vitamin D receptor (VDR) showed strong binding to both nVDREs in the presence of calcitriol, and the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated the recruitment of the VDR to the distal nVDRE site. Mutations in the 5' hexameric DNA sequence of the distal nVDRE resulted in the loss of calcitriol-mediated transrepression and the inhibition of protein-DNA complex formation, demonstrating the importance of these nucleotides in VDR DNA binding and transrepression. A putative nuclear factor-Y (NFY) binding site, identified within the distal nVDRE, led to the findings that NFY bound to the distal nVDRE site interfered with the binding of the VDR at the site and reduced calcitriol-mediated transrepression. In conclusion, the ER promoter region contains two negative VDREs that act in concert to bind to the VDR and both nVDREs are required for the maximal inhibition of ER expression by calcitriol. The suppression of ER expression and estrogen-mediated signaling by calcitriol in BCa cells suggests that vitamin D may be useful in the treatment of ER+ BCa.

  3. Vitamins and cancer prevention: issues and dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, V R; Newberne, P M

    1981-03-01

    Vitamins are a class of organic compounds that are components of an adequate diet. They or their derivatives function as coenzymes, cellular antioxidants, and/or regulators of gene expression. Fourteen vitamins are recognized in human nutrition (Vitamins A, D, E, K, B1, B2, B6, B12, C, niacin, folacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, choline), with deficiencies or excesses in intake leading to changes in protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrates, fat and/or mineral metabolism. Thus, the integrity of physiological systems, including those associated with detoxification, cellular repair, immune processes, and neural and endocrine function, depends upon the nutritional and vitamin status of the host. For these reasons, it may be anticipated that the adequacy of the vitamin supply to cells and tissues would affect the development, progress, and outcome of cancers. In this review, the definition and functions of and requirements and recommended allowance for vitamins are discussed briefly before exploring the evidence, largely from studies in experimental animals, that indicates the nature of the link between vitamins and cancer. Although evidence based on studies in animal systems reveals that vitamin intake and status can modulate the outcome of experimental carcinogenesis, the findings are often conflicting and difficult to interpret. Furthermore, it is not yet possible to develop a suitable prediction of the role of the individual vitamins in tumor development. The significance of these observations for human nutrition and cancer prevention, particularly in reference to ascorbic acid (vitamin C), vitamin E, and B-complex vitamins is considered. Vitamin A and retinoid compounds are discussed elsewhere in the symposium. The many popular misconceptions and unsound advice concerning vitamins and health, including "fake" vitamins-pangamic acid ("vitamin B15") and laetrile ("vitamin B17")-are also discussed. On the basis of current evidence, it would be inappropriate to recommend

  4. Regulation of Vitamin C Homeostasis during Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Jens Lykkesfeldt; Pernille Tveden-Nyborg; Maiken Lindblad

    2013-01-01

    Large cross-sectional population studies confirm that vitamin C deficiency is common in humans, affecting 5%–10% of adults in the industrialized world. Moreover, significant associations between poor vitamin C status and increased morbidity and mortality have consistently been observed. However, the absorption, distribution and elimination kinetics of vitamin C in vivo are highly complex, due to dose-dependent non-linearity, and the specific regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. Par...

  5. Vitamin D up-regulates the vitamin D receptor by protecting it from proteasomal degradation in human CD4+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Martin; von Essen, Marina R; Boding, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    protein expression level in a given cell. The aim of this study was to determine if and how 1,25(OH)2D3 by itself regulates VDR expression in human CD4+ T cells. We found that activated CD4+ T cells have the capacity to convert the inactive 25(OH)D3 to the active 1,25(OH)2D3 that subsequently up......-regulates VDR protein expression approximately 2-fold. 1,25(OH)2D3 does not increase VDR mRNA expression but increases the half-life of the VDR protein in activated CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, 1,25(OH)2D3 induces a significant intracellular redistribution of the VDR. We show that 1,25(OH)2D3 stabilizes the VDR...... by protecting it from proteasomal degradation. Finally, we demonstrate that proteasome inhibition leads to up-regulation of VDR protein expression and increases 1,25(OH)2D3-induced gene activation. In conclusion, our study shows that activated CD4+ T cells can produce 1,25(OH)2D3, and that 1,25(OH)2D3 induces...

  6. 25-hydroxyvitamin D circulates in different fractions of calf plasma if the parent compound is vitamin D₂ or vitamin D₃, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymøller, Lone; Jensen, Søren K

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D has become one of the most discussed nutrients in human nutrition, which has led to an increased interest in milk as a vitamin D source. Problems related to fortifying milk with synthetic vitamin D can be avoided by securing a high content of natural vitamin D in the milk by supplying dairy cows with sufficient vitamin D. However, choosing the most efficient route and form of supplementation requires insight into how different vitamin D metabolites are transported in the body of cattle. There are two forms of vitamin D: vitamin D2 (D2) and vitamin D3 (D3). Vitamin D2 originates from fungi on roughage. Vitamin D3 originates either from endogenous synthesis in the skin or from feed supplements. Vitamin D2 is chemically different from, and less physiologically active than, D3. Endogenous and dietary D3 is chemically similar but dietary D3 is toxic, whereas endogenous D3 appears well regulated in the body.

  7. 25-hydroxyvitamin D circulates in different fractions of calf plasma if the parent compound is vitamin D2 or vitamin D3 respectively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hymøller, Lone; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2016-01-01

    dairy cows with sufficient vitamin D. However, choosing the most efficient route and form of supplementation requires insight into how different vitamin D metabolites are transported in the body of cattle. There are two forms of vitamin D: vitamin D2 (D2) and vitamin D3 (D3). Vitamin D2 originates from...... fungi on roughage. Vitamin D3 originates either from endogenous synthesis in the skin or from feed supplements. Vitamin D2 is chemically different from, and less physiologically active than, D3. Endogenous and dietary D3 is chemically similar but dietary D3 is toxic, whereas endogenous D3 appears well......Vitamin D has become one of the most discussed nutrients in human nutrition, which has led to an increased interest in milk as a vitamin D source. Problems related to fortifying milk with synthetic vitamin D can be avoided by securing a high content of natural vitamin D in the milk by supplying...

  8. Attempt at quantifying human-induced land-cover change during the Holocene in central eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Furong; Gaillard, Marie-José; Mazier, Florence; Sugita, Shinya; Xu, Qinghai; Li, Yuecong; Zhou, Zhongze

    2016-04-01

    China is one of the key regions of the world where agricultural civilizations already flourished several millennia ago. However, the role of human activity in vegetation change is not yet fully understood. As a contribution to the PAGES LandCover6k initiative, this study aims to achieve a first attempt at Holocene land-cover reconstructions in the temperate zone of China using the REVEALS model (Sugita, 2007). Pollen productivity estimates (PPEs) are key parameters required for the model and were lacking so far for major taxa characteristic of ancient cultural landscapes in that part of the world. Remains of traditional agricultural structures and practices are still found in the low mountain ranges of the Shandong province located in central-eastern China. The area was chosen for a study of pollen-vegetation relationships and calculation of pollen productivity estimates. Pollen counts and vegetation data from 37 random sites within an area of 200 x 100 km are used for calculation. The vegetation inventory within 100 meters from the pollen sampling site follows the standard methods of Bunting et al. (2013). Vegetation data beyond 100 meters up to 1.5 km from the pollen sampling site is extracted from satellite images. The PPEs are calculated using the three sub-models of the Extended R-value model and compared with existing PPEs from northern China's biomes and temperate Europe. The PPEs' relevance for reconstruction of past human-induced land-cover change in temperate China are evaluated. Key words China, traditional agricultural landscape, ERV model, pollen productivity estimates References Bunting, M. J., et al. (2013). "Palynological perspectives on vegetation survey: a critical step for model-based reconstruction of Quaternary land cover." Quaternary Science Reviews 82: 41-55. Sugita, S. (2007). "Theory of quantitative reconstruction of vegetation I: pollen from large sites REVEALS regional vegetation composition." The Holocene 17(2): 229-241.

  9. In Pursuit of Vitamin D in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Lucinda J.; Lucas, Robyn M.; Sherriff, Jill L.; Björn, Lars Olof; Bornman, Janet F.

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a global concern. Much research has concentrated on the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D in human skin following exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280–315 nm). In many regions of the world there is insufficient UV-B radiation during winter months for adequate vitamin D production, and even when there is sufficient UV-B radiation, lifestyles and concerns about the risks of sun exposure may lead to insufficient exposure and to vitamin D deficiency. In these situations, dietary intake of vitamin D from foods or supplements is important for maintaining optimal vitamin D status. Some foods, such as fatty fish and fish liver oils, certain meats, eggs, mushrooms, dairy, and fortified foods, can provide significant amounts of vitamin D when considered cumulatively across the diet. However, little research has focussed on assessing edible plant foods for potential vitamin D content. The biosynthesis of vitamin D in animals, fungi and yeasts is well established; it is less well known that vitamin D is also biosynthesised in plants. Research dates back to the early 1900s, beginning with in vivo experiments showing the anti-rachitic activity of plants consumed by animals with induced rickets, and in vitro experiments using analytical methods with limited sensitivity. The most sensitive, specific and reliable method for measuring vitamin D and its metabolites is by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). These assays have only recently been customised to allow measurement in foods, including plant materials. This commentary focuses on the current knowledge and research gaps around vitamin D in plants, and the potential of edible plants as an additional source of vitamin D for humans. PMID:28208834

  10. Effect of the vitamin B12-binding protein haptocorrin present in human milk on a panel of commensal and pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nexø Ebba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haptocorrin is a vitamin B12-binding protein present in high amounts in different body fluids including human milk. Haptocorrin has previously been shown to inhibit the growth of specific E. coli strains, and the aim of the present study was to elucidate whether the antibacterial properties of this protein may exert a general defense against pathogens and/or affect the composition of the developing microbiota in the gastrointestinal tracts of breastfed infants. Findings The present work was the first systematic study of the effect of haptocorrin on bacterial growth, and included 34 commensal and pathogenic bacteria to which infants are likely to be exposed. Well-diffusion assays addressing antibacterial effects were performed with human milk, haptocorrin-free human milk, porcine holo-haptocorrin (saturated with B-12 and human apo-haptocorrin (unsaturated. Human milk inhibited the growth of S. thermophilus and the pathogenic strains L. monocytogenes LO28, L. monocytogenes 4446 and L. monocytogenes 7291, but the inhibition could not be ascribed to haptocorrin. Human apo-haptocorrin inhibited the growth of only a single bacterial strain (Bifidobacterium breve, while porcine holo-haptocorrin did not show any inhibitory effect. Conclusions Our results suggest that haptocorrin does not have a general antibacterial activity, and thereby contradict the existing hypothesis implicating such an effect. The study contributes to the knowledge on the potential impact of breastfeeding on the establishment of a healthy microbiota in infants.

  11. Neglect in Human Communication: Quantifying the Cost of Cell-Phone Interruptions in Face to Face Dialogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rosenfeld, Matías; Calero, Cecilia I.; Fernandez Slezak, Diego; Garbulsky, Gerry; Bergman, Mariano; Trevisan, Marcos; Sigman, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    There is a prevailing belief that interruptions using cellular phones during face to face interactions may affect severely how people relate and perceive each other. We set out to determine this cost quantitatively through an experiment performed in dyads, in a large audience in a TEDx event. One of the two participants (the speaker) narrates a story vividly. The listener is asked to deliberately ignore the speaker during part of the story (for instance, attending to their cell-phone). The speaker is not aware of this treatment. We show that total amount of attention is the major factor driving subjective beliefs about the story and the conversational partner. The effects are mostly independent on how attention is distributed in time. All social parameters of human communication are affected by attention time with a sole exception: the perceived emotion of the story. Interruptions during day-to-day communication between peers are extremely frequent. Our data should provide a note of caution, by indicating that they have a major effect on the perception people have about what they say (whether it is interesting or not . . .) and about the virtues of the people around them. PMID:26039326

  12. Neglect in human communication: quantifying the cost of cell-phone interruptions in face to face dialogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rosenfeld, Matías; Calero, Cecilia I; Fernandez Slezak, Diego; Garbulsky, Gerry; Bergman, Mariano; Trevisan, Marcos; Sigman, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    There is a prevailing belief that interruptions using cellular phones during face to face interactions may affect severely how people relate and perceive each other. We set out to determine this cost quantitatively through an experiment performed in dyads, in a large audience in a TEDx event. One of the two participants (the speaker) narrates a story vividly. The listener is asked to deliberately ignore the speaker during part of the story (for instance, attending to their cell-phone). The speaker is not aware of this treatment. We show that total amount of attention is the major factor driving subjective beliefs about the story and the conversational partner. The effects are mostly independent on how attention is distributed in time. All social parameters of human communication are affected by attention time with a sole exception: the perceived emotion of the story. Interruptions during day-to-day communication between peers are extremely frequent. Our data should provide a note of caution, by indicating that they have a major effect on the perception people have about what they say (whether it is interesting or not . . .) and about the virtues of the people around them.

  13. Measuring Center of Pressure Signals to Quantify Human Balance Using Multivariate Multiscale Entropy by Designing a Force Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Huang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To assess the improvement of human body balance, a low cost and portable measuring device of center of pressure (COP, known as center of pressure and complexity monitoring system (CPCMS, has been developed for data logging and analysis. In order to prove that the system can estimate the different magnitude of different sways in comparison with the commercial Advanced Mechanical Technology Incorporation (AMTI system, four sway tests have been developed (i.e., eyes open, eyes closed, eyes open with water pad, and eyes closed with water pad to produce different sway displacements. Firstly, static and dynamic tests were conducted to investigate the feasibility of the system. Then, correlation tests of the CPCMS and AMTI systems have been compared with four sway tests. The results are within the acceptable range. Furthermore, multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD and enhanced multivariate multiscale entropy (MMSE analysis methods have been used to analyze COP data reported by the CPCMS and compare it with the AMTI system. The improvements of the CPCMS are 35% to 70% (open eyes test and 60% to 70% (eyes closed test with and without water pad. The AMTI system has shown an improvement of 40% to 80% (open eyes test and 65% to 75% (closed eyes test. The results indicate that the CPCMS system can achieve similar results to the commercial product so it can determine the balance.

  14. Quantifying behavioural interactions between humans and mosquitoes: Evaluating the protective efficacy of insecticidal nets against malaria transmission in rural Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathenge Evan

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African malaria vectors bite predominantly indoors at night so sleeping under an Insecticide-Treated Net (ITN can greatly reduce malaria risk. Behavioural adaptation by mosquitoes to increasing ITN coverage could allow vector mosquitoes to bite outside of peak sleeping hours and undermine efficacy of this key malaria prevention measure. Methods High coverage with largely untreated nets has been achieved in the Kilombero Valley, southern Tanzania through social marketing programmes. Direct surveys of nightly biting activity by An. gambiae Giles were conducted in the area before (1997 and after (2004 implementation of ITN promotion. A novel analytical model was applied to estimate the effective protection provided by an ITN, based on published experimental hut trials combined with questionnaire surveys of human sleeping behaviour and recorded mosquito biting patterns. Results An. gambiae was predominantly endophagic and nocturnal in both surveys: Approximately 90% and 80% of exposure occurred indoors and during peak sleeping hours, respectively. ITNs consistently conferred >70% protection against exposure to malaria transmission for users relative to non-users. Conclusion As ITN coverage increases, behavioural adaptation by mosquitoes remains a future possibility. The approach described allows comparison of mosquito biting patterns and ITN efficacy at multiple study sites and times. Initial results indicate ITNs remain highly effective and should remain a top-priority intervention. Combined with recently developed transmission models, this approach allows rapid, informative and cost-effective preliminary comparison of diverse control strategies in terms of protection against exposure before more costly and intensive clinical trials.

  15. Neglect in human communication: quantifying the cost of cell-phone interruptions in face to face dialogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Lopez-Rosenfeld

    Full Text Available There is a prevailing belief that interruptions using cellular phones during face to face interactions may affect severely how people relate and perceive each other. We set out to determine this cost quantitatively through an experiment performed in dyads, in a large audience in a TEDx event. One of the two participants (the speaker narrates a story vividly. The listener is asked to deliberately ignore the speaker during part of the story (for instance, attending to their cell-phone. The speaker is not aware of this treatment. We show that total amount of attention is the major factor driving subjective beliefs about the story and the conversational partner. The effects are mostly independent on how attention is distributed in time. All social parameters of human communication are affected by attention time with a sole exception: the perceived emotion of the story. Interruptions during day-to-day communication between peers are extremely frequent. Our data should provide a note of caution, by indicating that they have a major effect on the perception people have about what they say (whether it is interesting or not . . . and about the virtues of the people around them.

  16. Concentrações de vitamina A no leite humano e características socioeconômicas e nutricionais maternas: resultados de estudos brasileiros Vitamin A in human milk and socioeconomic and maternal nutritional factors: some results of Brazilian studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julicristie Machado de Oliveira

    2009-03-01

    study outcomes described average vitamin A concentrations in human milk ranging from 0.62 to 4.50 µmol/L. CONCLUSIONS: there was no consensus as to the relationship between the vitamin A content of human milk and a diet with a suitable vitamin A content, maternal nutritional status, maternal obstetric and demographical characteristics and duration of pregnancy. The review indicates that future studies should use casual samples of mature milk, and use high performance liquid chromatography - HPLC - as the laboratory technique in order to quantify vitamin A.

  17. Vitamin C Nutrition in Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, T.

    2012-01-01

    Domestic animals, including ruminants, can synthesize vitamin C (VC) in their liver; as such, the dietary requirement for VC has not been confirmed in these animals. The adequacy of VC has been evaluated by quantifying VC levels in plasma, but the reported values in bovine plasma have been widely variable. Plasma VC concentration is decreased by heat stress, hepatic lesions, fattening, and infectious diseases such as mastitis in cattle. Therefore, VC supplementation is potentially beneficial ...

  18. Quantified self and human movement: a review on the clinical impact of wearable sensing and feedback for gait analysis and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Pete B; Jirattigalachote, Wisit; Hunt, Michael A; Cutkosky, Mark R; Delp, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    The proliferation of miniaturized electronics has fueled a shift toward wearable sensors and feedback devices for the mass population. Quantified self and other similar movements involving wearable systems have gained recent interest. However, it is unclear what the clinical impact of these enabling technologies is on human gait. The purpose of this review is to assess clinical applications of wearable sensing and feedback for human gait and to identify areas of future research. Four electronic databases were searched to find articles employing wearable sensing or feedback for movements of the foot, ankle, shank, thigh, hip, pelvis, and trunk during gait. We retrieved 76 articles that met the inclusion criteria and identified four common clinical applications: (1) identifying movement disorders, (2) assessing surgical outcomes, (3) improving walking stability, and (4) reducing joint loading. Characteristics of knee and trunk motion were the most frequent gait parameters for both wearable sensing and wearable feedback. Most articles performed testing on healthy subjects, and the most prevalent patient populations were osteoarthritis, vestibular loss, Parkinson's disease, and post-stroke hemiplegia. The most widely used wearable sensors were inertial measurement units (accelerometer and gyroscope packaged together) and goniometers. Haptic (touch) and auditory were the most common feedback sensations. This review highlights the current state of the literature and demonstrates substantial potential clinical benefits of wearable sensing and feedback. Future research should focus on wearable sensing and feedback in patient populations, in natural human environments outside the laboratory such as at home or work, and on continuous, long-term monitoring and intervention.

  19. Vitamin D Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Vitamin D Tests Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Ergocalciferol (Vitamin D 2 ); Cholecalciferol (Vitamin D 3 ); Calcidiol (25-hydroxyvitamin ...

  20. Vitamin A Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Vitamin A Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Comprehensive Metabolic Panel , Vitamin B12 and Folate , Vitamin D Tests , Iron Tests , ...

  1. Vitamin A blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003570.htm Vitamin A blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The vitamin A test measures the level of vitamin A ...

  2. Vitamin D and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Vitamin D and Health Table of Contents Vitamin D Deficiency: ... and Colds Risk of Premature Death References Vitamin D Deficiency: A Global Concern If you live north ...

  3. CORRECTION OF VITAMIN-DEFICIENT CONDITIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Vishneva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important biochemical processes in human organism are carried out with vitamins and microelements involved. Acting as biological catalysts, vitamins have an impact on metabolism and provide protection against unfavourable environmental factors. The key source of vitamins and microelements for a person is food. The content of vitamins in a diet varies and depends on a range of various reasons. However, now the diet may not fully meet vitamin and microelement requirements. The result of this is widespread prevalence of sub-clinical deficiency of vitamins and microelements. Patients from one of the risk groups, children with atopy, are especially susceptible to this condition. Hypoallergenic diet prescribed as part of the therapeutic measures, is often the cause of imbalanced and irrational nutrition. Modern vitamin complexes may solve the issue of subnormal supply of vitamins and apparent hypovitaminosis in children with allergic diseases.Key words: polyvitamin complexes, atopy, allergic diseases, subnormal supply of vitamins, children.

  4. Human arachnoid granulations Part I: a technique for quantifying area and distribution on the superior surface of the cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holman David W

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arachnoid granulations (AGs are herniations of the arachnoid membrane into the dural venous sinuses on the surface of the brain. Previous morphological studies of AGs have been limited in scope and only one has mentioned surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to investigate the topographic distribution of AGs on the superior surface of the cerebral cortex. Methods En face images were taken of the superior surface of 35 formalin-fixed human brains. AGs were manually identified using Adobe Photoshop, with a pixel location containing an AG defined as 'positive'. A set of 25 standard fiducial points was marked on each hemisphere for a total of 50 points on each image. The points were connected on each hemisphere to create a segmented image. A standard template was created for each hemisphere by calculating the average position of the 25 fiducial points from all brains. Each segmented image was mapped to the standard template using a linear transformation. A topographic distribution map was produced by calculating the proportion of AG positive images at each pixel in the standard template. The AG surface area was calculated for each hemisphere and for the total brain superior surface. To adjust for different brain sizes, the proportional involvement of AGs was calculated by dividing the AG area by the total area. Results The total brain average surface area of AGs was 78.53 ± 13.13 mm2 (n = 35 and average AG proportional involvement was 57.71 × 10-4 ± 7.65 × 10-4. Regression analysis confirmed the reproducibility of AG identification between independent researchers with r2 = 0.97. The surface AGs were localized in the parasagittal planes that coincide with the region of the lateral lacunae. Conclusion The data obtained on the spatial distribution and en face surface area of AGs will be used in an in vitro model of CSF outflow. With an increase in the number of samples, this analysis technique can be used

  5. Relative Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Variations in Human Retinal Electrical Responses Quantified in a Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Taha; Tariq, Ambreen; Shen, Ting; Williams, Katie M; Hammond, Christopher J; Mahroo, Omar A

    2017-08-01

    To estimate heritability of parameters of human retinal electrophysiology and to explore which parameters change with age. Prospective, classic twin study. Adult monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs recruited from the TwinsUK cohort. Electroretinogram responses were recorded using conductive fiber electrodes in response to stimuli incorporating standards set by the International Society for the Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision. These parameters were extracted; in addition, photopic negative-response (PhNR; originating from retinal ganglion cells) and i-wave components were extracted from responses to the photopic single flash. Parameter values were averaged from both eyes. Mean values were calculated for the cohort. Correlation coefficients with age were calculated (averaging parameters from both twins from each pair). Coefficients of intrapair correlation were calculated for monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Age-adjusted heritability estimates were derived using standard maximum likelihood structural equation twin modeling. Responses were recorded from 210 participants in total (59 monozygotic and 46 dizygotic twin pairs). Ninety-three percent were women. Mean age for the cohort was 62.4 years (standard deviation, 11.4 years). In general, response amplitudes correlated negatively, and implicit times positively, with age. Correlations were statistically significant (P 0.35) for the following parameters: scotopic standard and bright-flash a-wave implicit times, photopic 30-Hz flicker and single-flash b-wave implicit times, and PhNR and i-wave implicit times. Intrapair correlations were higher for monozygotic than dizygotic twins, suggesting important genetic influences. Age-adjusted estimates of heritability were significant for all parameters (except scotopic dim-flash b-wave implicit time), ranging from 0.34 to 0.85. Highest estimates were for photopic single-flash a-wave and b-wave amplitudes (0.84 and 0.85, respectively). This study explored heritability of

  6. Vitamin D and adolescent health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino R Pérez-López

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Faustino R Pérez-López, Gonzalo Pérez-Roncero, María T López-BaenaGrupo de Investigación sobre Salud de la Mujer en Aragón (GRISAMAR, Universidad de Zaragoza, Hospital Clínico Zaragoza, SpainAbstract: Vitamin D is a hormone sequentially produced at different body sites, and which plays a significant role in human health, particularly bone health. However, other roles are emerging. When the serum concentration of vitamin D is very low, the risk of rickets, osteomalacia and osteoporosis is increased. In children and adolescents there is a high prevalence of low vitamin D status, especially in females and during the winter–the prevalence being lower than during the summer. Although there is no unanimous agreement over the minimum values necessary for good health, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] levels below 20 ng/mL may be regarded as a vitamin D-deficient condition, and levels between 20–30 ng/mL may be the range of vitamin D insufficiency. Mild low levels have been associated with bone mass accrual alterations in children and adolescents, diminished muscle strength, negative cardiovascular outcomes, insulin resistance and obesity, and neurological disorders. Effective preventive strategies are needed to guarantee adequate vitamin D levels throughout childhood and adolescence, taking into account the geographical setting, season of the year, the level of environmental pollution, skin characteristics, eating habits and body weight, with a view to securing optimum health during these phases, and the prevention of complications in adulthood. There needs to be a renewed appreciation of the beneficial effect of moderate sunlight for providing all humans with the vitamin D needed for ensuring good health. Prolonged sun exposure is not advised, however, due to the risk of skin cancer. In addition, a balanced diet is indicated, since vitamin D-rich foods are better assimilated than supplements. When such conditions cannot be met, then the

  7. Vitamin D - roles in women's reproductive health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grundmann Magdalena

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the past few years a growing interest in vitamin D can be observed in the lay and biomedical literature due to findings demonstrating a low vitamin D status in the population. In addition to its importance for the regulation of calcium and phosphorus homeostasis recent epidemiologic studies have observed relationships between low vitamin D levels and multiple disease states. This secosteroid hormone also regulates the expression of a large number of genes in reproductive tissues implicating a role for vitamin D in female reproduction. In this report we summarize the recent evidence that vitamin D status influences female reproductive and pregnancy outcomes. Human and animal data suggest that low vitamin D status is associated with impaired fertility, endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome. Evidence from observational studies shows higher rates of preeclampsia, preterm birth, bacterial vaginosis and gestational diabetes in women with low vitamin D levels. However, confirmation of experimental observations establishing an association of vitamin D deficiency with adverse reproductive outcomes by high quality observational and large-scale randomized clinical trials is still lacking. The determination of optimal 25(OHD3 levels in the reproductive period and the amount of vitamin D supplementation required to achieve those levels for the numerous actions of vitamin D throughout a woman's life would have important public health implications.

  8. Vitamin D and fertility: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2012-05-01

    Vitamin D has been well-known for its function in maintaining calcium and phosphorus homeostasis and promoting bone mineralization. There is some evidence that in addition to sex steroid hormones, the classic regulators of human reproduction, vitamin D also modulates reproductive processes in women and men. The aim of this review was to assess the studies that evaluated the relationship between vitamin D and fertility in women and men as well as in animals. We performed a systematic literature search in Pubmed for relevant English language publications published until October 2011. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes are found in reproductive tissues of women and men. Vdr knockout mice have significant gonadal insufficiency, decreased sperm count and motility, and histological abnormalities of testis, ovary and uterus. Moreover, we present evidence that vitamin D is involved in female reproduction including IVF outcome (clinical pregnancy rates) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In PCOS women, low 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels are associated with obesity, metabolic, and endocrine disturbances and vitamin D supplementation might improve menstrual frequency and metabolic disturbances in those women. Moreover, vitamin D might influence steroidogenesis of sex hormones (estradiol and progesterone) in healthy women and high 25(OH)D levels might be associated with endometriosis. In men, vitamin D is positively associated with semen quality and androgen status. Moreover, vitamin D treatment might increase testosterone levels. Testiculopathic men show low CYP21R expression, low 25(OH)D levels, and osteoporosis despite normal testosterone levels.

  9. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vitamins that the body absolutely needs: vitamins A, C, D, E, K, and the B vitamins (thiamine, ... excessive amounts of water-soluble vitamins, like vitamins C and B, are not used by the body ...

  10. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vitamins that the body absolutely needs: vitamins A, C, D, E, K, and the B vitamins (thiamine, ... excessive amounts of water-soluble vitamins, like vitamins C and B, are not used by the body ...

  11. Calcium and Vitamin D increase mRNA levels for the growth control hIK1 channel in human epidermal keratinocytes but functional channels are not observed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossie Sandra

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermediate-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels (IKs modulate proliferation and differentiation in mesodermal cells by enhancing calcium influx, and they contribute to the physiology of fluid movement in certain epithelia. Previous reports suggest that IK channels stimulate proliferative growth in a keratinocyte cell line; however, because these channels indirectly promote calcium influx, a critically unique component of the keratinocyte differentiation program, an alternative hypothesis is that they would be anti-proliferative and pro-differentiating. This study addresses these hypotheses. Methods Real-time PCR, patch clamp electrophysiology, and proliferation assays were used to determine if human IK1 (hIK1 expression and function are correlated with either proliferation or differentiation in cultured human skin epidermal keratinocytes, and skin biopsies grown in explant culture. Results hIK1 mRNA expression in human keratinocytes and skin was increased in response to anti-proliferative/pro-differentiating stimuli (elevated calcium and Vitamin D. Correspondingly, the hIK1 agonist 1-EBIO inhibited keratinocyte proliferation suggesting that the channel could be anti-proliferative and pro-differentiating. However, this proliferative inhibition by 1-EBIO was not reversed by a panel of hIK1 blockers, calling into question the mechanism of 1-EBIO action. Subsequent patch clamp electrophysiological analysis failed to detect hIK1 channel currents in keratinocytes, even those expressing substantial hIK1 mRNA in response to calcium and Vitamin D induced differentiation. Identical electrophysiological recording conditions were then used to observe robust IK1 currents in fibroblasts which express IK1 mRNA levels comparable to those of keratinocytes. Thus, the absence of observable hIK1 currents in keratinocytes was not a function of the electrophysiological techniques. Conclusion Human keratinocyte differentiation is

  12. Genetic Variation in Vitamin B-12 Content of Bovine Milk and Its Association with SNP along the Bovine Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.M.; Bouwman, A.C.; Sprong, R.C.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Visker, M.H.P.W.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B-12 (also called cobalamin) is essential for human health and current intake levels of vitamin B-12 are considered to be too low. Natural enrichment of the vitamin B-12 content in milk, an important dietary source of vitamin B-12, may help to increase vitamin B-12 intake. Natural enrichment

  13. The human intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin: molecular characterization and chromosomal mapping of the gene to 10p within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozyraki, R; Kristiansen, M; Silahtaroglu, A

    1998-01-01

    Uptake of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) is facilitated by the cobalamin-binder gastric intrinsic factor (IF), which recognizes a 460-kD receptor, cubilin, present in the epithelium of intestine and kidney. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of ligand-affinity-purified human cubilin demonstrated...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1810 - Vitamin B12 test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin B12 test system. 862.1810 Section 862.1810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....1810 Vitamin B12 test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin B12 test system is a device intended to...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5933 - Vitamin A acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin A acetate. 582.5933 Section 582.5933 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5933 Vitamin A acetate. (a) Product. Vitamin A acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1805 - Vitamin A test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin A test system. 862.1805 Section 862.1805 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....1805 Vitamin A test system. (a) Identification. A vitamin A test system is a device intended to measure...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5936 - Vitamin A palmitate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin A palmitate. 582.5936 Section 582.5936 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5936 Vitamin A palmitate. (a) Product. Vitamin A palmitate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5953 - Vitamin D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin D3. 582.5953 Section 582.5953 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5953 Vitamin D3. (a) Product. Vitamin D3. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5950 - Vitamin D2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin D2. 582.5950 Section 582.5950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5950 Vitamin D2. (a) Product. Vitamin D2. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  1. 76 FR 11502 - Notice of Vitamin D Standardization Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice of Vitamin D Standardization Program SUMMARY: The... through the newly created CDC Vitamin D Standardization Coordinating Center (VDSCC). While the main focus of the Vitamin D Standardization Program is on standardizing measurements done in national...

  2. The membrane topology of vitamin K epoxide reductase is conserved between human isoforms and the bacterial enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhenbo; van Lith, Marcel; Mitchell, Lorna J; Pringle, Marie Anne; Inaba, Kenji; Bulleid, Neil J

    2016-04-01

    The membrane topology of vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) is controversial with data supporting both a three transmembrane and a four transmembrane model. The positioning of the transmembrane domains and the loops between these domains is critical if we are to understand the mechanism of vitamin K oxidation and its recycling by members of the thioredoxin family of proteins and the mechanism of action of warfarin, an inhibitor of VKOR. Here we show that both mammalian VKOR isoforms adopt the same topology, with the large loop between transmembrane one and two facing the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We used a redox sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the N- or C-terminus to show that these regions face the cytosol, and introduction of glycosylation sites along with mixed disulfide formation with thioredoxin-like transmembrane protein (TMX) to demonstrate ER localization of the major loop. The topology is identical with the bacterial homologue from Synechococcussp., for which the structure and mechanism of recycling has been characterized. Our results provide a resolution to the membrane topology controversy and support previous results suggesting a role for members of the ER protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family in recycling VKOR.

  3. Vitamin C for DNA damage prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sram, Radim J., E-mail: sram@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 14220 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Binkova, Blanka; Rossner, Pavel [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 14220 Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2012-05-01

    The ability of vitamin C to affect genetic damage was reviewed in human studies that used molecular epidemiology methods, including analysis of DNA adducts, DNA strand breakage (using the Comet assay), oxidative damage measured as levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroxy-2 Prime -deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei, and the induction of DNA repair proteins. The protective effect of vitamin C was observed at plasma levels > 50 {mu}mol/l. Vitamin C supplementation decreased the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in groups with insufficient dietary intake who were occupationally exposed to mutagens, and also decreased the sensitivity to mutagens as assessed using the bleomycin assay. High vitamin C levels in plasma decreased the frequency of genomic translocations in groups exposed to ionizing radiation or c-PAHs in polluted air. The frequency of micronuclei was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in smokers challenged with {gamma}-irradiation, and higher vitamin C levels in plasma counteracted the damage induced by air pollution. The prevalence of DNA adducts inversely correlated with vitamin C levels in groups environmentally exposed to high concentrations of c-PAHs. Increased vitamin C levels decreased DNA strand breakage induced by air pollution. Oxidative damage (8-oxodG levels) was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in groups with plasma levels > 50 {mu}mol/l exposed to PM2.5 and c-PAHs. Modulation of DNA repair by vitamin C supplementation was observed both in poorly nourished subjects and in groups with vitamin C plasma levels > 50 {mu}mol/l exposed to higher concentrations of c-PAHs. It is possible that the impact of vitamin C on DNA damage depends both on background values of vitamin C in the individual as well as on the level of exposure to xenobiotics or oxidative stress.

  4. Instrumental evaluation of anti-aging effects of cosmetic formulations containing palmitoyl peptides, Silybum marianum seed oil, vitamin E and other functional ingredients on aged human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Jung, Ho Jung; Schrammek-Drusios, Med Christine; Lee, Sung Nae; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Kwon, Seung Bin; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2016-08-01

    Anti-aging cosmetics are widely used for improving signs of aged skin such as skin wrinkles, decreased elasticity, low dermal density and yellow skin tone. The present study evaluated the effects of cosmetic formulations, eye cream and facial cream, containing palmitoyl peptides, Silybum marianum (S. marianum) seed oil, vitamin E and other functional ingredients on the improvement of facial wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone after 4 weeks period of application on aged human skin. Healthy volunteers (n=20) with aged skin were recruited to apply the test materials facially twice per day for 4 weeks. Skin wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone were measured instrumentally for assessing the improvement of skin aging. All the measurements were conducted prior to the application of test materials and at 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. Crow's feet wrinkles were decreased 5.97% after 2 weeks of test material application and 14.07% after 4 weeks of application in comparison of pre-application. Skin elasticity was increased 6.81% after 2 weeks and 8.79% after 4 weeks. Dermal density was increased 16.74% after 2 weeks and 27.63% after 4 weeks. With the L* value indicating skin brightness and the a* value indicating erythema (redness), the results showed that brightness was increased 1.70% after 2 weeks and 2.14% after 4 weeks, and erythema was decreased 10.45% after 2 weeks and 22.39% after 4 weeks. Hence, the test materials appear to exert some degree of anti-aging effects on aged human skin. There were no abnormal skin responses from the participants during the trial period. We conclude that the facial and eye cream containing palmitoyl peptides and S. marianum seed oil, vitamin E and other ingredients have effects on the improvement of facial wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone.

  5. Physiological Insights from the Vitamin D receptor knockout mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Demay, Marie B.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of vitamin D as a potent anti-rachitic factor almost a century ago, prompted investigations aimed at addressing its mechanism of action and key target tissues. Studies in vitamin D deficiency models and in kindreds with impaired hormone activation and function were critical in identifying key steps in the vitamin D signaling pathway. Studies in humans with vitamin D receptor mutations provided a tremendous amount of information regarding the role of this receptor in calcium and...

  6. Vitamin D3 regulates the formation and degradation of gap junctions in androgen-responsive human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Kelsey

    Full Text Available 1α-25(OH2 vitamin D3 (1-25D, an active hormonal form of Vitamin D3, is a well-known chemopreventive and pro-differentiating agent. It has been shown to inhibit the growth of several prostate cancer cell lines. Gap junctions, formed of proteins called connexins (Cx, are ensembles of cell-cell channels, which permit the exchange of small growth regulatory molecules between adjoining cells. Cell-cell communication mediated by gap junctional channels is an important homeostatic control mechanism for regulating cell growth and differentiation. We have investigated the effect of 1-25D on the formation and degradation of gap junctions in an androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, which expresses retrovirally-introduced Cx32. Connexin32 is expressed by the luminal and well-differentiated cells of normal prostate and prostate tumors. Our results document that 1-25D enhances the expression of Cx32 and its subsequent assembly into gap junctions. Our results further show that 1-25D prevents androgen-regulated degradation of Cx32, post-translationally, independent of androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling. Finally, our findings document that formation of gap junctions sensitizes Cx32-expressing LNCaP cells to the growth inhibitory effects of 1-25D and alters their morphology. These findings suggest that the growth-inhibitory effects of 1-25D in LNCaP cells may be related to its ability to modulate the assembly of Cx32 into gap junctions.

  7. Facts about Vitamin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facts about Vitamin K 1 R. Elaine Turner and Wendy J. Dahl 2 FCS8666 Figure 1. Vitamin K is mostly found in vegetables, especially green ... ColognePhotos/iStock/Thinkstock, © ColognePhotos Why do we need vitamin K? Vitamin K is one of the fat- ...

  8. Vitamin B-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in vitamin B12 if I’m vegetarian or vegan?ResourcesNational Institutes of Health: MedlinePlus, Vitamin B12 Last Updated: March 2017 This article was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Tags: B12, B12 deficiency, diet, nutrition, vitamin B12, vitamins Food and Nutrition, Nutrients ...

  9. Vitamin B6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Datos en español Health Professional Other Resources Vitamin B6 Fact Sheet for Consumers Have a question? ... out more about vitamin B6? Disclaimer What is vitamin B6 and what does it do? Vitamin B6 ...

  10. Vitamin B12

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Datos en español Health Professional Other Resources Vitamin B12 Fact Sheet for Consumers Have a question? ... out more about vitamin B12? Disclaimer What is vitamin B12 and what does it do? Vitamin B12 ...

  11. Facts about Vitamin C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facts About Vitamin C 1 Linda B. Bobroff and Isabel Valentín-Oquendo 2 FCS8702 Why do we need vitamin C? Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, has a ... maintain healthy body tissues and the immune system. Vitamin C also helps the body absorb iron from ...

  12. FATSOLUBLE VITAMINS AND SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novica Bojanić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamins are the cell biocatalysts, indispensable factors in performing the basic body functions. Fat-soluble vitamins are not involved in processes related to musscle contractions and energy expenditure, but they can affect physical performance indirectly because they are important for immune function (vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, antioxidant function (vitamin A, vitamin E or bone methabolism (vitamin D, vitamin K. Currently there are no clear recommendations for increase of fat-solubile vitamins intake in athletes, as well as evidence that athletic performance may be improved due to fat-solubile vitamins supplementation. In a small number of studies, it was shown that an antioxidant effect of beta carotene and vitamin E can prevent muscle damage and facilitate recovery after exercise. Also, athletes who perform the exercises in the halls should be informed about the necessity of sun exposure, as vitamin D is synthesised in the skin. Most athletes are not familiar with their needs for vitamins and trace elements, and take these compounds as supplements without consulting a nutritionist. It is important to emphasize that liposulubile vitamins are deposited in the body and can cause hypervitaminosis and toxic effects if taken in excess. It is indisputable that the lack of any fat-soluble vitamin cause problems in normal physiological processes, but supplementation is generally not required in athlets who have a well-balanced diet.

  13. Vitamin B6 and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friso, Simonetta; Lotto, V; Corrocher, R; Choi, Sang Woon

    2012-01-01

    While overt vitamin B6 deficiency is not a frequent finding nowadays in medical practice, evidence suggests that insufficiency of this vitamin is rather widespread in a quite large portion of the population such as the elderly or in not unusual conditions such as that of alcohol addiction. Moreover, a mild deficiency in B6 vitamin is a state that may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Epidemiologic evidence from case control and prospective studies have suggested that low dietary intake or reduced blood concentrations of vitamin B6 is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, although most recent trials demonstrated the ineffectiveness of vitamin B6 supplementation on the prevention of cardiovascular events recurrence. Due to limited and somewhat inconsistent data together with the ample variety of critical functions in which vitamin B6 is involved in the human body, it is very challenging to attempt at establishing a cause and effect relationship between vitamin B6 and risk of cardiovascular disease as it is to delineate the exact mechanism(s) by which vitamin B6 may modulate such risk. In the present chapter we review the currently available knowledge deriving from both epidemiological and mechanistic studies designed to define potential candidate mechanisms for the association of vitamin B6 impairment and risk of cardiovascular disease development.

  14. Dietary Supplements and Health Aids: A Critical Evaluation, Part 1- Vitamins and Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubick, Michael A.; Rucker, Robert B.

    1983-01-01

    Evaluates vitamins/minerals, distinguishing whether studies cited used animal or human subjects. Vitamins discussed include niacin and vitamins B-12, C, A, D, E, and megavitamin supplementation (intake of vitamins at levels 10 times the recommended daily allowance). Minerals considered include dolomite/bone meal, chromium (glucose tolerance…

  15. Vitamin D in ocular and systemic health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solani D. Mathebula

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated data supports the argument that vitamin D possesses several biological and molecular actions apart from its role in calcium absorption and facilitation of gene expression. Vitamin D deficiency has been an associated risk factor for cardiovascular disease,metabolic syndrome and ocular complications. The aim of this review is to summarise the most relevant data regarding these associations and to try to clarify whether, and to what extent, oral vitamin D supplementation could be used as a beneficial intervention in such diseases.Vitamin D is produced in skin exposed to sunlight UVB radiation and is then metabolised by the kidney into calciferol, which is an active form. The main function of vitamin D is to promote calcium and phosphorus absorption, and studies have shown that a lack of itplays an important role in ocular conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Recent studies have suggested that vitamin D may protect the diabetic retina; however, other vitamin D-associated conditions (diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases may result in secondary ocular manifestations and the potential forsight-threatening complications. The purpose of this review is to describe the current literature on the role of vitamin D in ocular and systemic wellness. However, more research is needed to determine if increasing levels of this vitamin can assist in preventing age-related macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy. Since vitamin D is a circulating steroid hormone, its receptors are found in almost every cell in the human body, and this suggests that vitamin D might have a very broad role for overall health. However, there is still demand for further research to clarify the clinical use of vitamin D in the prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases.

  16. The association between personal sun exposure, serum vitamin D and global methylation in human lymphocytes in a population of healthy adults in South Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair-Shalliker, Visalini, E-mail: visalinin@nswcc.org.au [Cancer Research Division, Cancer Council New South Wales (Australia); Dhillon, Varinderpal [CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences (Australia); Clements, Mark [Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Armstrong, Bruce K. [Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney (Australia); Fenech, Michael [CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences (Australia)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Solar UV exposure is positively correlated with LINE 1 hypomethylation. • This was observed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. • There was no evident effect modification by serum vitamin D (25OHD) levels. • This was observed in a population of healthy adults from South Australia. - Abstract: Background: There is a positive association between solar UV exposure and micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and this association may be stronger when serum vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels are insufficient (<50 nmol/L). Micronucleus formation can result from global hypomethylation of DNA repeat sequences. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the relationship between solar UV exposure and methylation pattern in LINE-1 repetitive elements in PBL DNA and to see if serum 25(OH)D levels modify it. Method: Personal solar UV exposure was estimated from hours of outdoor exposure over 6 weeks recalled at the time of blood collection in 208 male and female participants living in South Australia. Methylation in LINE-1 repetitive elements was assessed in PBL using pyrosequencing. Results: Methylation in LINE-1 decreased with increasing solar UV exposure (% decrease = 0.5% per doubling of sUV; 95%CI: −0.7 to −0.2 p{sub value} = 0.00003). Although there was no correlation between LINE-1 methylation and micronucleus frequency, there was a 4.3% increase (95%CI: 0.6–8.1 p-value = 0.02) in nucleoplasmic bridges and a 4.3% increase in necrosis (CI: 1.9–6.8 p-value = 0.0005) for every 1% increase in LINE-1 methylation. Serum 25(OH)D was not associated with DNA methylation; or did it modify the association of solar UV with DNA methylation. Conclusion: Exposure to solar UV radiation may reduce DNA methylation in circulating lymphocytes. This association does not appear to be influenced or mediated by vitamin D status.

  17. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... worldwide take supplemental vitamins as part of their health regimen. This Consumer Update video includes an interview ...

  18. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration A to ... Although most people get all the vitamins they need from the foods they eat, millions of people ...

  19. Thiamin and Riboflavin in Human Milk: Effects of Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplementation and Stage of Lactation on Vitamer Secretion and Contributions to Total Vitamin Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Daniela; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Adair, Linda S; Bentley, Margaret E; Flax, Valerie L; Jamieson, Denise J; Ellington, Sascha R; Tegha, Gerald; Chasela, Charles S; Kamwendo, Debbie; Allen, Lindsay H

    2016-01-01

    While thiamin and riboflavin in breast milk have been analyzed for over 50 years, less attention has been given to the different forms of each vitamin. Thiamin-monophosphate (TMP) and free thiamin contribute to total thiamin content; flavin adenine-dinucleotide (FAD) and free riboflavin are the main contributors to total riboflavin. We analyzed milk collected at 2 (n = 258) or 6 (n = 104), and 24 weeks (n = 362) from HIV-infected Malawian mothers within the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals and Nutrition (BAN) study, randomly assigned at delivery to lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) or a control group, to investigate each vitamer's contribution to total milk vitamin content and the effects of supplementation on the different thiamin and riboflavin vitamers at early and later stages of lactation, and obtain insight into the transport and distribution of these vitamers in human milk. Thiamin vitamers were derivatized into thiochrome-esters and analyzed by high-performance liquid-chromatography-fluorescence-detection (HPLC-FLD). Riboflavin and FAD were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass-spectrometry (ULPC-MS/MS). Thiamin-pyrophosphate (TPP), identified here for the first time in breast milk, contributed 1.9-4.5% to total thiamin. Free thiamin increased significantly from 2/6 to 24 weeks regardless of treatment indicating an active transport of this vitamer in milk. LNS significantly increased TMP and free thiamin only at 2 weeks compared to the control: median 170 versus 151 μg/L (TMP), 13.3 versus 10.5 μg/L (free thiamin, pmilk. The continuous presence of FAD in breast milk suggests an active transport and secretion system for this vitamer or possibly formation of this co-enymatic form in the mammary gland.

  20. Immune Function of Vitamin D in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Li

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a well-known fat-soluble vitamin which is essential in the homeostasis of calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D deficiency causes skeletal disorders, including rickets, osteomalacia, and osteoporosis. However, recent studies revealing the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D have opened up a new understanding and possibility in this field. It has been proved that vitamin D is related to a variety of autoimmune diseases. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, being generally accepted as autoimmune mediated, is also proposed to be associated with the vitamin D status of the human body. Here, we reviewed briefly the epidemiological correlation between the vitamin D status and prevalence of T1DM, the possible mechanisms underlying this correlation, and clinical trials focusing on the therapeutic prospects of vitamin D in the treatment of T1DM.

  1. Vitamin D Every Day to Keep the Infection Away?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Castro Kroner

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the last decade, vitamin D has emerged as a central regulator of host defense against infections. In this regard, vitamin D triggers effective antimicrobial pathways against bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens in cells of the human innate immune system. However, vitamin D also mediates potent tolerogenic effects: it is generally believed that vitamin D attenuates inflammation and acquired immunity, and thus potentially limits collateral tissue damage. Nevertheless, several studies indicate that vitamin D promotes aspects of acquired host defense. Clinically, vitamin D deficiency has been associated with an increased risk for various infectious diseases in epidemiological studies; yet, robust data from controlled trials investigating the use of vitamin D as a preventive or therapeutic agent are missing. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the effect of vitamin D on innate and acquired host defense, and speculate on the difficulties to translate the available molecular medicine data into practical therapeutic or preventive recommendations.

  2. Vitamin K metabolism: current knowledge and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, David J; Gorska, Renata; Cutler, Jacky; Harrington, Dominic J

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin K is an essential fat-soluble micronutrient that is required for the post-translational γ-carboxylation of specific glutamic acid residues in hepatic and extra-hepatic proteins involved in blood coagulation and preventing cartilage and vasculature calcification. In humans, sources of vitamin K are derived from plants as phylloquinone and bacteria as the menaquinones. Menadione is a synthetic product used as a pharmaceutical but also represents an intermediate in the tissue-specific conversion of vitamin K to menaquinone-4, which preferentially resides in tissues such as brain. Research into vitamin K metabolism is essential for the understanding of vitamin K biology in health and disease. Progress in this area, driven by knowledge of vitamin K and the availability of markers of vitamin K status, has already proved beneficial in many areas of medicine and further opportunities present themselves. Areas of interest discussed in this review include prophylactic administration of vitamin K1 in term and preterm neonates, interactions between vitamins K and E, the industrial conversion of vitamin K to dihydro-vitamin K in foods, tissue-specific conversion of vitamin K to menaquinone-4, the biological activity of the five and seven carbon metabolites of vitamin K and circadian variations.

  3. Neuroprotective Effects of Palm vitamin E Tocotrienols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Kah Hay

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell and animal studies have convincingly shown the tocotrienols to be neuro protective. However, many compounds have been proven neuro protective in pre-clinical studies but none succeeded in human trials. Such failures can be attributed to the use of a wrong study model, example acute ischemic stroke. Stroke has a short treatment time window of about 4.5 hours and hence the difficulty of giving the compound within this time period. Furthermore, disruption of blood flow to the affected areas will limit the administered agent from reaching the target tissues. Therefore, the compound should best be given before the stroke event, like in the animal studies. Considering the above, the present study was conducted to investigate the neuro protective effects of palm vitamin E tocotrienols using human volunteers with white matter lesions (WMLs. WMLs are associated with ischemic small blood vessel disease of the brain leading to bundles of nerve fibers degenerating. The lesions are self-progressive and can be quantified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. In the present study, 121 volunteers with WMLs were randomized 200mg palm tocotrienols twice daily or placebo and imaged at baseline, after 1 year and 2 years of supplementation. Changes in the volume of WMLs from baseline were then determined. Results obtained showed that the mean WML volume of the treated group remained essentially unchanged after 2 years, whereas the placebo group showed a mark progression. The change in the mean WML volume of the 2 groups was significantly different (p<0.05 after 2 years. Hence, the present study provided clinical evidence that palm vitamin E tocotrienols are neuro protective and may help to minimize tissue injury of the brain during a stroke event, thus making a difference in the stroke outcome when taken as a supplement.

  4. Validation of a method to quantify chromium, cadmium, manganese, nickel and lead in human whole blood, urine, saliva and hair samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmedo, P.; Pla, A.; Hernandez, A.F.; Lopez-Guarnido, O.; Rodrigo, L. [Department of Legal Medicine and Toxicology, University of Granada, School of Medicine (Spain); Gil, F., E-mail: fgil@ugr.es [Department of Legal Medicine and Toxicology, University of Granada, School of Medicine (Spain)

    2010-02-05

    For biological monitoring of heavy metal exposure in occupational toxicology, usually whole blood and urine samples are the most widely used and accepted matrix to assess internal xenobiotic exposure. Hair samples and saliva are also of interest in occupational and environmental health surveys but procedures for the determination of metals in saliva and hair are very scarce and to our knowledge there is no validation of a method to quantify Cr, Cd, Mn, Ni and Pb in four different human biological materials (whole blood, urine, saliva and axilary hair) by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). In the present study, quantification methods for the determination of Cr, Cd, Mn, Ni and Pb in whole blood, urine, saliva and axilary hair were validated according to the EU common standards. Pyrolisis and atomization temperatures have been determined. The main parameters evaluated were: detection and quantification limits, linearity range, repeatability, reproducibility, recovery and uncertainty. Accuracy of the methods was tested with the whole blood, urine and hair certified reference materials and recoveries of the spiked samples were acceptable ranged from 96.3 to 107.8%.

  5. Technical advance: introducing a novel metric, directionality time, to quantify human neutrophil chemotaxis as a function of matrix composition and stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Xian M; Loosley, Alex J; Oakley, Katie E; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S

    2014-06-01

    A direct consequence of cellular movement and navigation, migration incorporates elements of speed, direction, and persistence of motion. Current techniques to parameterize the trajectory of a chemotaxing cell most commonly pair migration speed with some measure of persistence by calculating MSD, RMS speed, TAD, and/or CI. We address inherent limitations in TAD and CI for comparative analysis by introducing two new analytical tools to quantify persistence: directionality index and directionality time. With the use of these tools, we show that the mechanical properties of the underlying substrate contribute significantly to the regulation of human neutrophil chemotaxis toward fMLP on Fgn-, Col-, and Fn-coated gels of varying elasticity. The β₁-integrin ligand Col demonstrated mechanosensitive speed. In contrast, β₂-integrin ligand Fgn supported mechanosensitive persistence. Fn, recognized by β₁ and β₂ integrins, mechanoregulated speed and persistence. Blocking β₂ integrins of cells migrating on Fn identified an underlying β₂-integrin-directed modulation of persistence. These data demonstrate that individual components of the neutrophil chemotactic response show integrin dependence and are finely tunable with different ligand, mechanotactic, and chemotactic cues, underscoring the need for sensitive analytical methods.

  6. A sensitive high throughput ELISA for human eosinophil peroxidase: a specific assay to quantify eosinophil degranulation from patient-derived sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochkur, Sergei I; Kim, John Dongil; Protheroe, Cheryl A; Colbert, Dana; Condjella, Rachel M; Bersoux, Sophie; Helmers, Richard A; Moqbel, Redwan; Lacy, Paige; Kelly, Elizabeth A; Jarjour, Nizar N; Kern, Robert; Peters, Anju; Schleimer, Robert P; Furuta, Glenn T; Nair, Parameswaran; Lee, James J; Lee, Nancy A

    2012-10-31

    Quantitative high throughput assays of eosinophil-mediated activities in fluid samples from patients in a clinical setting have been limited to ELISA assessments for the presence of the prominent granule ribonucleases, ECP and EDN. However, the demonstration that these ribonucleases are expressed by leukocytes other than eosinophils, as well as cells of non-hematopoietic origin, limits the usefulness of these assays. Two novel monoclonal antibodies recognizing eosinophil peroxidase (EPX) were used to develop an eosinophil-specific and sensitive sandwich ELISA. The sensitivity of this EPX-based ELISA was shown to be similar to that of the commercially available ELISA kits for ECP and EDN. More importantly, evidence is also presented confirming that among these granule protein detection options, EPX-based ELISA is the only eosinophil-specific assay. The utility of this high throughput assay to detect released EPX was shown in ex vivo degranulation studies with isolated human eosinophils. In addition, EPX-based ELISA was used to detect and quantify eosinophil degranulation in several in vivo patient settings, including bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained following segmental allergen challenge of subjects with allergic asthma, induced sputum derived from respiratory subjects following hypotonic saline inhalation, and nasal lavage of chronic rhinosinusitis patients. This unique EPX-based ELISA thus provides an eosinophil-specific assay that is sensitive, reproducible, and quantitative. In addition, this assay is adaptable to high throughput formats (e.g., automated assays utilizing microtiter plates) using the diverse patient fluid samples typically available in research and clinical settings.

  7. Validation of a method to quantify chromium, cadmium, manganese, nickel and lead in human whole blood, urine, saliva and hair samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, P; Pla, A; Hernández, A F; López-Guarnido, O; Rodrigo, L; Gil, F

    2010-02-05

    For biological monitoring of heavy metal exposure in occupational toxicology, usually whole blood and urine samples are the most widely used and accepted matrix to assess internal xenobiotic exposure. Hair samples and saliva are also of interest in occupational and environmental health surveys but procedures for the determination of metals in saliva and hair are very scarce and to our knowledge there is no validation of a method to quantify Cr, Cd, Mn, Ni and Pb in four different human biological materials (whole blood, urine, saliva and axilary hair) by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). In the present study, quantification methods for the determination of Cr, Cd, Mn, Ni and Pb in whole blood, urine, saliva and axilary hair were validated according to the EU common standards. Pyrolisis and atomization temperatures have been determined. The main parameters evaluated were: detection and quantification limits, linearity range, repeatability, reproducibility, recovery and uncertainty. Accuracy of the methods was tested with the whole blood, urine and hair certified reference materials and recoveries of the spiked samples were acceptable ranged from 96.3 to 107.8%.

  8. Calculating radiation exposures during use of (14)C-labeled nutrients, food components, and biopharmaceuticals to quantify metabolic behavior in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kelly, Peter B; Clifford, Andrew J

    2010-04-28

    (14)C has long been used as a tracer for quantifying the in vivo human metabolism of food components, biopharmaceuticals, and nutrients. Minute amounts (nutrients to be organized into models suitable for quantitative hypothesis testing and determination of metabolic parameters. In vivo models are important for specification of intake levels for food components, biopharmaceuticals, and nutrients. Accurate estimation of the radiation exposure from ingested (14)C is an essential component of the experimental design. Therefore, this paper illustrates the calculation involved in determining the radiation exposure from a minute dose of orally administered (14)C-beta-carotene, (14)C-alpha-tocopherol, (14)C-lutein, and (14)C-folic acid from four prior experiments. The administered doses ranged from 36 to 100 nCi, and radiation exposure ranged from 0.12 to 5.2 microSv to whole body and from 0.2 to 3.4 microSv to liver with consideration of tissue weighting factor and fractional nutrient. In comparison, radiation exposure experienced during a 4 h airline flight across the United States at 37000 ft was 20 microSv.

  9. Efferent loop small intestinal vitamin D receptor concentration and bone mineral density after Billroth II (Polya) gastrectomy in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazianas, M; Zaidi, M; Subhani, J M; Finch, P J; Ang, L; Maxwell, J D

    2003-04-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated that the highest concentration of vitamin D receptors (and greatest capacity for active calcium absorption) occurs in the proximal duodenum. By passing the duodenum following Polya/Billroth II gastrectomy could result in the development of a metabolic bone disease and low bone mineral density (BMD). We thus compared the vitamin D receptor (VDR) concentration in mucosal biopsies taken at endoscopy from two functionally corresponding areas of the small intestine: the jejunum (or efferent loop) in 21 patients with a history of Polya/Billroth II gastrectomy and the second part of the duodenum in age/sex-matched control subjects. We also measured the BMD by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The mean VDR concentration was not significantly different between the two groups (patients vs controls, fmol/mg protein, mean +/- SE: 34.99 +/- 2.57 vs 34.67 +/- 3.71; P = 0.22), even when subgrouped as males (36.22 +/- 3.16 vs 31.2 +/- 4.24; P = 0.351) or females (31.93 +/- 4.7 vs 43 +/- 6.76; P = 0.193). In Polya/Billroth II gastrectomy patients, the VDR concentration in the efferent loop declined with age (r = -0.78, P = 0.02). In the same group, BMD, as compared with matched controls, was significantly reduced at the lumbar spine (Z-score: patients vs controls: -1.138 vs 0.099, P = 0.01), but not at the femoral neck (Z-score: -0.69 vs 0.7, P = 0.084). There was no correlation between VDR and time since operation or BMD. These results suggest that following Polya/Billroth II gastrectomy, the functional capacity of the jejunal efferent loop in reference to VDR concentration is similar to that of the second part of the duodenum in normal subjects. Therefore, the reduced BMD in our patients, also a common finding in other studies, may not be secondary to the reduced capacity of the VDR system that facilitates the active calcium transport pathway in the proximal small intestine.

  10. Vitamin D Deficiency Among Professional Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Matthew P; Lombardo, Stephen J; Kharrazi, F Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in several systems of the human body. Various studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to stress and insufficiency fractures, muscle recovery and function, and athletic performance. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the elite athletic population has not been extensively studied, and very few reports exist among professional athletes. There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency among players attending the National Basketball Association (NBA) Combine. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. This is a retrospective review of data previously collected as part of the routine medical evaluation of players in the NBA Combines from 2009 through 2013. Player parameters evaluated were height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and vitamin D level. Statistical analysis using t tests and analysis of variance was used to detect any correlation between the player parameters and vitamin D level. Vitamin D levels were categorized as deficient (32 ng/mL). After institutional review board approval was submitted to the NBA, the NBA released deidentified data on 279 players who participated in the combines from 2009 through 2013. There were 90 players (32.3%) who were deficient, 131 players (47.0%) who were insufficient, and 58 players (20.8%) who were sufficient. A total of 221 players (79.3%) were either vitamin D deficient or insufficient. Among all players included, the average vitamin D level was 25.6 ± 10.2 ng/mL. Among the players who were deficient, insufficient, and sufficient, the average vitamin D levels were 16.1 ± 2.1 ng/mL, 25.0 ± 3.4 ng/mL, and 41.6 ± 8.6 ng/mL, respectively. Player height and weight were significantly increased in vitamin D-sufficient players compared with players who were not sufficient (P = .0008 and .009, respectively). Player age and BMI did not significantly differ depending on vitamin D status (P = .15 and .77, respectively). There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency

  11. Effects of Vitamins K in Neonates and Young Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria Pacifici

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K is required for the hepatic production of blood coagulation factors II, VII, IX and X. The term vitamin K refers to a variety of fat-soluble 2-methyl-1, 4-naphthoquinone derivatives. Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone occurs in green plants, while vitamin K2 (menaquinone is synthesized by microbial in the gut. The recommended dose of vitamin K in neonates is 1 mg intramuscularly. For infants below 2.5 kg, the dose is 0.3 mg/kg to a maximum dose of 1 mg. Vitamin K crosses the placenta poorly, and neonates are relatively deficient of vitamin K at birth. Human milk contains about 1.5 µg/l of vitamin K, whereas most formula milks contain about three times as much as this. Vitamin K1 prophylaxis with 0.2 mg administered intramuscularly maintains adequate vitamin K1 status of preterm infants until a median age of 25 postnatal days and did not cause early vitamin K1 2, 3-epoxide accumulation. There is need for intramuscularly vitamin K prophylaxis for all newborns in order to eradicate hemorrhagic disease of the newborn. Some authors found that the antenatal administration of vitamin K1 to pregnant women in preterm delivery increases the blood coagulation activity in neonates whereas other authors found that the antennal administration of vitamin K1 has no effects on neonates. Vitamin K1 crosses the placenta poorly and it is not surprising that vitamin K1 has limited effects on neonates. The aim of this study was to review the effects of vitamins K in neonates and young infants.

  12. Vitamin K absorption and kinetics in human subjects after consumption of 13C-labelled phylloquinone from kale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Janet A; Kurilich, Anne C; Britz, Steven J; Baer, David J; Clevidence, Beverly A

    2010-09-01

    The absorption and plasma disappearance of vitamin K were investigated by uniformly labelling phylloquinone in kale with carbon-13, and by feeding the kale to study subjects. Seven healthy volunteers ingested a single 400 g serving of kale with 30 g vegetable oil. The kale provided 156 nmol of phylloquinone. Serial plasma samples were collected and analysed for the appearance of 13C-phylloquinone by HPLC-MS. Six of the subjects showed significant amounts of labelled phylloquinone in plasma, though one subject's plasma was not consistently enriched above the detection limit, and this subject's baseline plasma phylloquinone level was the lowest in the group. After ingestion of the labelled kale, plasma 13C-phylloquinone concentration increased rapidly to a peak between 6 and 10 h, and then rapidly decreased. Average peak plasma concentration for the six subjects with detectable 13C-phylloquinone was 2.1 nmol/l. Plasma concentration-time data were analysed by compartmental modelling. Modelling results demonstrated a mean (n 6) bioavailability of phylloquinone from kale to be 4.7%. Plasma and tissue half-times for phylloquinone were found to be 8.8 and 215 h, respectively.

  13. Lipid peroxidation as pathway of aluminium cytotoxicity in human skin fibroblast cultures: prevention by superoxide dismutase+catalase and vitamins E and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anane, R; Creppy, E E

    2001-09-01

    Lipid peroxidation is one of the main manifestations of oxidative damage and has been found to play an important role in the toxicity and carcinogenicity of many xenobiotics. In the present study, we investigated the possible induction of lipid peroxidation by aluminium in human foreskin fibroblast cultures by assaying the malondialdehyde (MDA) produced inside the cells. The MDA-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) adduct was assayed by HPLC using fluorometric quantification after extraction in n-butanol. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was used as a marker of aluminium toxicity. MDA production was significantly increased after 24 h incubation with aluminium and paralleled LDH release. Superoxide dismutase (SOD)+catalase and vitamins C and E added in the culture medium as oxygen radical and free radical scavengers were efficient in preventing MDA production by aluminium, indicating that oxidative processes are one of the main pathways whereby this metal induces cytotoxicity. The latter is also largely prevented, thus confirming the link between oxidative stress induced by aluminium and its cytotoxicity in human skin fibroblasts.

  14. The Association of Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphisms with Multiple Sclerosis in a Case-Control Study from Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Temaimi, Rabeah Abbas; Al-Enezi, Anwar; Al-Serri, Ahmad; Alroughani, Raed; Al-Roughani, Raed; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with several diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS). Several factors influence vitamin D levels and its optimal multi-function maintenance. Our objective was to assess quantifiable variables influencing vitamin D level and metabolism in MS patients from Kuwait. In a case-control study involving 50 MS patients, and 50 healthy control individuals for which plasma vitamin D levels, supplement use, vitamin D receptor (VDR) variants, and skin pigmentation indices were ascertained; we found overall vitamin D levels to be deficient in both groups, and supplement use to be common practice. VDR variants TaqI and BsmI associated with MS risk, and ApaI associated with low disease progression. VDR variant FokI associated with higher vitamin D levels in both groups. We conclude that several quantifiable variables related to vitamin D associate with MS suggesting a possible clinical immuno-modulatory application of vitamin D for MS patients in Kuwait.

  15. The role of vitamin D in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dębińska, Anna; Sikorska-Szaflik, Hanna; Urbanik, Magdalena; Boznański, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D has been suggested to have an important impact on a much wider aspects on human health than calcium homeostasis and mineral metabolism, specifically in the field of human immunology. It has been reported that vitamin D influences the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems, which makes the association between vitamin D and allergic diseases a field of interest. Although many studies have sought to determine whether vitamin D has an influence on progression of allergic disease, the impact of vitamin D on atopic dermatitis development and severity remains unclear. In this review, we summarize recent studies relating vitamin D to atopic dermatitis and discuss its possible role in the pathogenesis of allergic skin diseases, emphasizing the need for well-designed, prospective trials on vitamin D supplementation in the context of prevention and treatment for allergic conditions.

  16. Effects of vitamin E succinate on the expression of Fas and PCNA proteins in human gastric carcinoma cells and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Wu; Lan Zhao; Yao Li; Yu-Juan Shan; Li-Jie Wu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of vitamin E succinate (VES) on the expression of Fas and PCNA proteins as well as its clinical significance in human gastric carcinoma, and to explore the mechanism of VES-induced inhibition of gastric carcinoma cell growth.METHODS: Immunohistochemical methods were used to detect Fas and PCNA expression both in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells treated with VES at different doses and in human gastric carcinoma tissues.RESULTS: After the SGC-7901 cells were treated with VES at 5, 10, 20 mg/L for 48 h, the positive rates of Fas expression were 16%, 27% and 48%, respectively, significantly increased compared to that of control group (P<0.05); while the positive rates of PCNA expression in groups treated with different doses of VES were 20%, 18% and 7%, respectively, which were significantly decreased compared to that of the control group (P<0.05). In human gastric carcinoma tissues, the Fas positive expression rate was 42.4%(25/59), which declined with the decrease in the degree of tumor differentiation (P<0.05) and with the existence of lymph node metastasis (P<0.001). While the PCNA positive expression rate was 91.5%(54/59), no relationship was observed between PCNA expression and clinicopathologic parameters.CONCLUSION: VES inhibited the growth of gastric cancer cells by inducing Fas expression and inhibiting PCNA expression.It is, therefore, considered that the expression of Fas and PCNA genes, through tumor cell apoptosis and proliferation,respectively, may be useful as a clinical predictive index in the application of VES to gastric carcinoma therapy, where as Fas may be of more value than PCNA.

  17. Seaweed vitamins as nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrovánková, Soňa

    2011-01-01

    Seaweeds are a good source of some water- (B(1), B(2), B(12), C) and fat-soluble (β-carotene with vitamin A activity, vitamin E) vitamins. To ensure that the adequate intake of all vitamins is received in the diet, people (especially people on special diet, strict vegetarians, and vegans) can consume foods enriched with vitamins, for example, in the form of functional foods with vitamins as nutraceuticals, extracted from natural sources such as seaweeds. Seaweed vitamins are important not only due to their biochemical functions and antioxidant activity but also due to other health benefits such as decreasing of blood pressure (vitamin C), prevention of cardiovascular diseases (β-carotene), or reducing the risk of cancer (vitamins E and C, carotenoids). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vitamin D and allergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gafvelin Guro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing amount of evidence has established that the biologically active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3, possesses immunoregulatory properties. Vitamin D exerts its effects through binding to the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR, which is expressed by cells of the immune system. Most of the immunological effects mediated by vitamin D-VDR are regulatory, inhibiting adaptive immune responses. It has become apparent that the incidence of vitamin D insufficiency is surprisingly high in the general population. A link between low vitamin D serum levels and the increased prevalence of allergic diseases has been proposed. This possible connection has been investigated in numerous studies on associations between vitamin D serum concentrations and different allergic conditions, as well as studies on the effect of vitamin D supplementation. Although there is some evidence for a protective role of vitamin D in asthma, no consensus on the role of vitamin D in allergic disease has yet been reached. Still, treatment strategies involving vitamin D supplementation to risk groups, combinatorial corticosteroid and vitamin D treatment in asthma and vitamin D as an immunomodulator in allergen specific immunotherapy show promise for the future.

  19. The role of vitamin D in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lương, Khanh Vinh Quốc; Nguyễn, Lan Thi Hoàng

    2015-01-15

    An abnormal calcium-parathyroid hormone (PTH)-vitamin D axis has been reported in patients with malaria infection. A role for vitamin D in malaria has been suggested by many studies. Genetic studies have identified numerous factors that link vitamin D to malaria, including human leukocyte antigen genes, toll-like receptors, heme oxygenase-1, angiopoietin-2, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors, and Bcl-2. Vitamin D has also been implicated in malaria via its effects on the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine, matrix metalloproteinases, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, prostaglandins, reactive oxidative species, and nitric oxide synthase. Vitamin D may be important in malaria; therefore, additional research on its role in malaria is needed.

  20. Evidence for auto/paracrine actions of vitamin D in bone: 1α-Hydroxylase expression and activity in human bone cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Driel (Marjolein); M. Koedam (Marijke); C.J. Buurman (Cok); M. Hewison; H. Chiba (Hideki); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractVitamin D is an important regulator of mineral homeostasis and bone metabolism. 1α-Hydroxylation of 25-(OH)D3 to form the bioactive vitamin D hormone, 1α,25-(OH)2D3, is classically considered to take place in the kidney. However, 1α-hydroxylase has been reported at extrarenal sites. Whet

  1. Why clinical trials of vitamin E and cardiovascular diseases may be fatally flawed. Commentary on "The Relationship Between Dose of Vitamin E and Suppression of Oxidative Stress in Humans"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many investigators have pondered the apparent paradox in the conflicting evidence about the cardiovascular benefits of vitamin E suggested by experimental and observational studies versus that reported from randomized clinical trials. In the light of recent evidence, particularly a new clinical tria...

  2. Molecular and cellular effects of vitamin B12 forms on human trophoblast cells in presence of excessive folate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Tejas; Joshi, Kalpana; Mishra, Sanjay; Otiv, Suhas; Kumbar, Vijay

    2016-12-01

    Folic acid (FA) and iron are essential supplements during pregnancy. Similarly effects of vitamin B12 (B12) inadequacy and high folate and low B12 status, on pregnancy outcome are available. However there are no mandatory recommendations for B12. There are many forms of B12 viz. Cyanocobalamin (Cbl), Methylcobalamin (MeCbl), Adenosylcobalamin (AdCbl), and Hydroxycobalamin (HCbl) though there is limited consensus on which form has better efficacy. In the present study we have determined effect of various forms of B12 in the presence of two FA concentrations namely normal physiological (20ng/mL; NPFA) and supra-physiological (2000ng/mL; SPFA) concentration to mimic real time situation where FA is in excess due to supplementation. We assessed trophoblastic proliferation, viability, TNFα and EGFr mRNA expression, homocysteine, β-hCG and MDA levels. Trophoblastic viability was significantly suppressed at SPFA concentration and was restored by B12 treatment with Cbl, AdCbl and combination of MeCbl+AdCbl. The mRNA expressions of TNFα were up-regulated, while EGFr were down-regulated at SPFA concentrations, as validated by RT-PCR. Treatment with MeCbl+AdCbl significantly decreased homocysteine and MDA levels at SPFA concentrations. High levels of FA alone had a detrimental effect on placental health and functions as reflected by decreased viability, EGFr expression and increased TNFα expression, homocysteine and MDA levels. Combination of B12 active forms i.e. MeCbl+AdCbl was found to be most effective in neutralising excess folate effect in-vitro.

  3. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E, K, and the B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B- ... back to top Water-soluble Vitamins B-3 (niacin): flushing, redness of the skin, upset stomach. B- ...

  4. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mail Consumer Updates RSS Feed Download PDF (422 K) On this page: Why Buy Vitamins? Vitamin Facts ... body absolutely needs: vitamins A, C, D, E, K, and the B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic ...

  5. Quantifying the importance of MSP1-19 as a target of growth-inhibitory and protective antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny W Wilson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies targeting blood stage antigens are important in protection against malaria, but the key targets and mechanisms of immunity are not well understood. Merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1 is an abundant and essential protein. The C-terminal 19 kDa region (MSP1-19 is regarded as a promising vaccine candidate and may also be an important target of immunity. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Growth inhibitory antibodies against asexual-stage parasites and IgG to recombinant MSP1-19 were measured in plasma samples from a longitudinal cohort of 206 children in Papua New Guinea. Differential inhibition by samples of mutant P. falciparum lines that expressed either the P. falciparum or P. chabaudi form of MSP1-19 were used to quantify MSP1-19 specific growth-inhibitory antibodies. The great majority of children had detectable IgG to MSP1-19, and high levels of IgG were significantly associated with a reduced risk of symptomatic P. falciparum malaria during the 6-month follow-up period. However, there was little evidence of PfMSP1-19 specific growth inhibition by plasma samples from children. Similar results were found when testing non-dialysed or dialysed plasma, or purified antibodies, or when measuring growth inhibition in flow cytometry or microscopy-based assays. Rabbit antisera generated by immunization with recombinant MSP1-19 demonstrated strong MSP1-19 specific growth-inhibitory activity, which appeared to be due to much higher antibody levels than human samples; antibody avidity was similar between rabbit antisera and human plasma. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that MSP1-19 is not a major target of growth inhibitory antibodies and that the protective effects of antibodies to MSP1-19 are not due to growth inhibitory activity, but may instead be mediated by other mechanisms. Alternatively, antibodies to MSP1-19 may act as a marker of protective immunity.

  6. 1,25-Vitamin D3 Deficiency Induces Albuminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneveld, Ramon; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Stavenuiter, Andrea W D; Ferrantelli, Evelina; Baltissen, Marijke P A; Dijkman, Henry B; Florquin, Sandrine; Rops, Angelique L; Wetzels, Jack F M; Berden, Jo H M; van der Vlag, Johan; Nijenhuis, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in renal (patho)physiology. Patients with glomerular diseases have an injured renal filtration barrier, leading to proteinuria and reduced renal function. An impaired renal function also leads to 1,25-vitamin D3 deficiency as a result of reduced renal 1α-hydroxylase activity. Vitamin D treatment to reduce proteinuria remains controversial, although there is an inverse correlation between vitamin D levels and proteinuria. Herein, we showed that 1,25-vitamin D3-deficient 25-hydroxy-vitamin-D3-1α-hydroxylase knockout mice and 1,25-vitamin D3-deficient rats develop podocyte injury and renal dysfunction. Glomerular injury was characterized by proteinuria and partial podocyte foot process effacement. Expression of nephrin, podocin, desmin, and transient receptor potential channel C6 in the podocyte was significantly altered in 1,25-vitamin D3-deficient animals. Supplementation with 1,25-vitamin D3 or 1,25-vitamin D2 prevented podocyte effacement or reversed glomerular and tubulointerstitial damage in 1,25-vitamin D3-deficient animals, thereby preserving and restoring renal function, respectively. The effect of 1,25-vitamin D3 deficiency and 1,25-vitamin D3 and 1,25-vitamin D2 repletion on proteinuria could not be explained by hypocalcemia, changes in parathyroid hormone, or fibroblast growth factor 23. This study demonstrates that 1,25-vitamin D3 deficiency directly leads to renal injury in rodents. Translated to human subjects, this would underline the need for early vitamin D supplementation in patients with glomerular disease and chronic renal insufficiency, which might inhibit or potentially reverse renal injury.

  7. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12 and folate). AAFP cites two categories of vitamins. ... magnesium, and vitamin E (for children and adolescents) vitamin B-12, iron, folic acid, and vitamins E and D ( ...

  8. Breastfeeding: Vitamin D Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Vitamin D Supplementation Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... not provide infants with an adequate intake of vitamin D. Most breastfed infants are able to synthesize ...

  9. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  10. Vitamin B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prize Alfred Nobel's Life and Work Teachers' Questionnaire Vitamin B1 - About The Chicken Farm educational game and ... the game window. Reading: "Christian Eijkman, Beriberi and Vitamin B1" - Who was Eijkman and why did he ...

  11. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  12. Vitamin B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prize Alfred Nobel's Life and Work Teachers' Questionnaire Vitamin B1 - About The Chicken Farm educational game and ... the game window. Reading: "Christian Eijkman, Beriberi and Vitamin B1" - Who was Eijkman and why did he ...

  13. Safety and Efficacy of High-Dose Daily Vitamin D3 Supplementation in Children and Young Adults Infected With Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Kelly A.; Schall, Joan I.; Zemel, Babette S.; Tuluc, Florin; Hou, Xiaoling; Rutstein, Richard M.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Suboptimal vitamin D (vitD) status is common in children and young adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The vitD supplemental dose needed to normalize vitD status in this population is unknown. Methods In this double-blind trial, subjects infected with HIV ages 8.3 to 24.9 years were randomized to vitD3 supplementation of 4000 IU/day or 7000 IU/day and evaluated at 6 and 12 week for changes in vitD status and HIV indicators. A dose was considered unsafe if serum calcium was elevated (above age and sex-specific range) associated with elevated serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D); >160 ng/mL). Results At baseline, 95% of subjects (n = 44; 43% with perinatally acquired HIV, 57% with behaviorally acquired HIV) had a suboptimal serum 25(OH)D concentration of 80% of subjects. Change in serum 25(OH)D did not differ between HIV acquisition groups. Conclusions A 7000 IU/day D3 supplementation was safe and effective in children and young adults infected with HIV. PMID:26625449

  14. Down-Regulation of Ca2+-Activated K+ Channel KCa1.1 in Human Breast Cancer MDA-MB-453 Cells Treated with Vitamin D Receptor Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Anowara; Fujimoto, Mayu; Kito, Hiroaki; Niwa, Satomi; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Ohya, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D (VD) reduces the risk of breast cancer and improves disease prognoses. Potential VD analogs are being developed as therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatments. The large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel KCa1.1 regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling pathways and is associated with high grade tumors and poor prognoses. In the present study, we examined the effects of treatments with VD receptor (VDR) agonists on the expression and activity of KCa1.1 in human breast cancer MDA-MB-453 cells using real-time PCR, Western blotting, flow cytometry, and voltage-sensitive dye imaging. Treatments with VDR agonists for 72 h markedly decreased the expression levels of KCa1.1 transcripts and proteins in MDA-MB-453 cells, resulting in the significant inhibition of depolarization responses induced by paxilline, a specific KCa1.1 blocker. The specific proteasome inhibitor MG132 suppressed VDR agonist-induced decreases in KCa1.1 protein expression. These results suggest that KCa1.1 is a new downstream target of VDR signaling and the down-regulation of KCa1.1 through the transcriptional repression of KCa1.1 and enhancement of KCa1.1 protein degradation contribute, at least partly, to the antiproliferative effects of VDR agonists in breast cancer cells. PMID:27973439

  15. Down-Regulation of Ca2+-Activated K+ Channel KCa1.1 in Human Breast Cancer MDA-MB-453 Cells Treated with Vitamin D Receptor Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anowara Khatun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D (VD reduces the risk of breast cancer and improves disease prognoses. Potential VD analogs are being developed as therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatments. The large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel KCa1.1 regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling pathways and is associated with high grade tumors and poor prognoses. In the present study, we examined the effects of treatments with VD receptor (VDR agonists on the expression and activity of KCa1.1 in human breast cancer MDA-MB-453 cells using real-time PCR, Western blotting, flow cytometry, and voltage-sensitive dye imaging. Treatments with VDR agonists for 72 h markedly decreased the expression levels of KCa1.1 transcripts and proteins in MDA-MB-453 cells, resulting in the significant inhibition of depolarization responses induced by paxilline, a specific KCa1.1 blocker. The specific proteasome inhibitor MG132 suppressed VDR agonist-induced decreases in KCa1.1 protein expression. These results suggest that KCa1.1 is a new downstream target of VDR signaling and the down-regulation of KCa1.1 through the transcriptional repression of KCa1.1 and enhancement of KCa1.1 protein degradation contribute, at least partly, to the antiproliferative effects of VDR agonists in breast cancer cells.

  16. SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF VITAMIN A AND E IN MICROAMOUNT OF HUMAN SERUM BY DISPERSIVE LIQUID PHASE MICRO-EXTRACTION-HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY%DLPME-HPLC同时测定微量人血清中的维生素A和E

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑凤家; 别明江; 孙成均

    2011-01-01

    [目的]建立人血清中维生素A和E的分散液相微萃取(dispersive liquid phase microextraetion,DLPME)-高效液相色谱分析方法.[方法]取血清20μl,加入50μl甲醇,漩涡震荡10s后加50μl三氯甲烷超声萃取,高速离心后吸取下层三氯甲烷层供高效液相色谱分析,标准曲线法定量.色谱分析条件为:色谱柱为Eclipse XDB-C8(150mm×4.6 mm,5μm);流动相为甲醇-水(964+4);流速为0.80 ml/min;柱温为25℃;紫外检测波长:维生素A为325nm,维生素E为292nm.[结果]维生素A和E标准曲线的相关系数均大干0.999;相对标准偏差均小于5%.对于20μl血清,本法的检出限维生素A为0.035μg/ml;维生素E为0.09μg/ml.维生素A和E的加标回收率分别为90.4%-103.2%和81.0%-92.1%.[结论]本法灵敏、准确、快速、简便,节约有机溶剂,适合于血清中维生素A和E的快速测定,是环境友好型的绿色分析方法.%[Objective] To establish a dispersive liquid phase micmextraction - high performance liquid chromatography for simultaneous determination of vitamin A and E in human serum. [Methods] 20 μl of human serum was taken and 50μl methanol added to precipitate the protein, and 50μl chloroform added to extract vitamin A and E ultrasonically. After centrifuged at 12 000 r/min for 5 min, the lower chloroform layer was taken and injected for HPLC analysis. The optimized chromatographic conditions were as follows: analytical column: (Edipse XDB-C8, 150 mm × 4.6 mm, 5μm) ; Mobile phase: methanol-water ( 96+4) ; flow rate : 0.80 ml/min; column temperature: 25℃; detection wavelength: 325nm for vitamin A and 292nm for vitamin E, respectively. [ Results] The correlation coefiicients for the standard curves were greater than 0.999 for both vitamin A and E; the detection limits of the method were 0.035μg / ml for vitamin A and 0.09μg/ml for vitamin E.The recoveries of vitamin A and E in human serum ranged from 90.4%-103.2% and 81.0%-92.1% , respectively

  17. Dietary phenolic compounds and vitamin e bioavailability

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The human diet contains a vast number of dietary phenolic compounds of which vitamin E represents only one class. Vitamin E is a generic name for all substances exerting the biological functions of α-tocopherol. The two quantitatively most important E vitamers are α- and γ-tocopherol (α-T and γ-T). The fat soluble vitamin E is absorbed and transported in the circulation to the liver where α-T is preferentially re-secreted into the bloodstream while the other vitamers are degraded by cytochrom...

  18. Vitamins, Are They Safe?

    OpenAIRE

    Hadi Hamishehkar; Farhad Ranjdoost; Parina Asgharian; Ata Mahmoodpoor; Sarvin Sanaie

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of a daily multivitamin among people all over the world is dramatically increasing in recent years. Most of the people believe that if vitamins are not effective, at least they are safe. However, the long term health consequences of vitamins consumption are unknown. This study aimed to assess the side effects and possible harmful and detrimental properties of vitamins and to discuss whether vitamins can be used as safe health products or dietary supplements. We performed a MED...

  19. The pigments of sorghum pericarp are associated with the contents of cartenoids and pro-vitamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum is a staple crop consumed in certain regions of Africa and Asia, where vitamin A deficiency is prevalent. However, the correlation of sorghum intake and vitamin A deficiency is contradictory. The objective of this study was to identify and quantify the carotenoids and pro-vitamin A in the se...

  20. TAp63γ and ΔNp63β promote osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells: regulation by vitamin D3 Metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M Curtis

    Full Text Available The transcription factor p63 is required for skeletal formation, and is important for the regulation of 1α,25(OH2D3 receptor (VDR in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC. Herein we report that TAp63γ and ΔNp63β appear to be an integral part of the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSC and are differentially regulated by the vitamin D3 metabolites 1α,25(OH2D3 and 24R,25(OH2D3. We compared the endogenous expression of p63 isoforms (TA- and ΔNp63 and splice variants (p63α, -β, -γ, in naive hMSC and during osteoblastic differentiation of hMSC. TAp63α and -β were the predominant p63 variants in naive, proliferating hMSC. In contrast, under osteoblastic differentiation conditions, expression of p63 changed from the TAp63α and -β to the TAp63γ and ΔNp63β variants. Transient overexpression of the p63 variants demonstrated that TAp63β, ΔNp63β, and ΔNp63γ increased alkaline phosphatase activity and ΔNp63α and -γ increased the expression of mRNA for osteocalcin and osterix. Our results support the hypothesis that TAp63α and -β promote a naive state in hMSC. Moreover, TAp63γ is increased during and promotes early osteoblastic differentiation through the expression of pro-osteogenic genes; VDR, Osterix, Runx2 and Osteopontin. ΔNp63β also appears to support osteogenic maturation through increased alkaline phosphatase activity. Treatment with 1α,25(OH2D3 increased the expression of mRNA for ΔNp63, while addition of 24R,25(OH2D3 increased the expression of TA- and ΔNp63γ variants. These novel findings demonstrate for the first time that p63 variants are differentially expressed in naive hMSC (TAp63α,β, are important during the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSC (TAp63γ and ΔNp63β, and are differentially regulated by the vitamin D3 metabolites, 1α,25(OH2D3 and 24R,25(OH2D3. The molecular nuances and mechanisms of osteoblastic differentiation presented here will hopefully improve our understanding of bone development

  1. Facts about Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gorse/iStock/Thinkstock.com Food Eggs, sardines, and salmon contain vitamin D. Most fluid milk and some brands of ... 2. Typical Vitamin D Content in Food Food Vitamin D in IU (mcg) Salmon, cooked, 3 oz. 320 (8) Sardines, canned in ...

  2. Vitamin D and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolden-Kirk, Heidi; Overbergh, Lut; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that vitamin D may play a role in the defense against type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Epidemiological data have established a link between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of both T1D and T2D, whereas early and long-term vitamin...

  3. Vitamin D and Reproduction: From Gametes to Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista D. Sowell

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is well recognized for its essentiality in maintaining skeletal health. Recent research has suggested that vitamin D may exert a broad range of roles throughout the human life cycle starting from reproduction to adult chronic disease risk. Rates of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy remain high worldwide. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with an increased risk of fertility problems, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, and allergic disease in the offspring. Vitamin D is found naturally in only a few foods thus supplementation can provide an accessible and effective way to raise vitamin D status when dietary intakes and sunlight exposure are low. However, the possibility of overconsumption and possible adverse effects is under debate. The effect of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy and early life on maternal and infant outcomes will be of particular focus in this review.

  4. Bone health. New role for vitamin K?

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan-Harshman, Milly; Aldoori, Walid

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess growing evidence that vitamin K (phylloquinone) plays an important role in bone health and, subsequently, in prevention of osteoporotic fractures. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: We searched MEDLINE from January 1972 to December 2002 using the key words vitamin K and bone health. We reviewed 30 articles that seemed relevant or had a human focus. All evidence can be categorized as level II. MAIN MESSAGE: Evidence suggests that dietary phylloquinone intake of

  5. [Biological role and importance in the skin metabolism of vitamin C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleszczewska, Ewa

    2007-12-01

    Vitamins are a group of compounds indispensable for the development, normal growth and functioning of the human body. Lack of vitamins causes serious diseases for human, even though small amounts of them are required to maintain good health. Therefore there is growing interest conceding the role of vitamin C in biochemical-physiological conditions. This article reviews the role of water--soluble vitamin C in metabolic processes and discusses criteria used for recommended ingestion and presents recommendations for vitamin C intake. In the paper is discussed in detail the influence of level vitamin C (physico-chemical aspects) on the metabolism in skin.

  6. Use of basic mobile phase to improve chromatography and boost sensitivity for quantifying tetrahydrocurcumin in human plasma by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aimin; Wu, Yanxin; Wong, Molly; Licollari, Albert; Bolger, Gordon; Fanaras, John C; Shopp, George; Helson, Lawrence

    2016-08-15

    Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), a major metabolite of curcumin, is often quantified by LC-MS or LC-MS/MS using acidic mobile phases due to the concern of its instability in a basic medium. However, acidic mobile phases often lead to poor chromatography (e.g. split or double peaks) and reduced detection sensitivity in the commonly used negative ionization mode. To overcome these shortcomings, a basic mobile phase was used for the first time in the LC-MS/MS quantification of THC. In comparison with the acidic mobile phases, a single symmetrical chromatographic peak was obtained and the sensitivity increased by 7-fold or more under the equivalent conditions. The new LC-MS/MS method using the basic mobile phase has been successfully validated for the quantification of THC in human EDTA plasma over the concentration range of 5-2500ng/ml. The within-batch accuracy (% nominal concentration) was between 88.7 and 104.9 and the between-batch accuracy ranged from 96.7 to 108.6. The CVs for within- and between-batch precisions were equal to or less than 5.5% and 9.1%, respectively. No significant matrix interference or matrix effect was observed from normal or lipemic and hemolytic plasma matrices. In addition, the common stabilities with adequate durations were established, including up to 5days of post-preparative stability. Furthermore, when the validated method was applied to a clinical study, the passing rate of ISR samples was 83%, indicating the good reproducibility of the method. The success of the unconventional approach presented in this article demonstrates that a mobile phase could be selected based mainly on its merits to facilitate LC separation and/or MS detection. There is no need for excessive concern about the stability of the compound(s) of interest in the selected mobile phase because the run time of modern LC-MS or LC-MS/MS methods is typically only a few minutes.

  7. Vitamin D dependent rickets type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Jong Kim

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is present in two forms, ergocalciferol (vitamin D2 produced by plants and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3 produced by animal tissues or by the action of ultraviolet light on 7-dehydrocholesterol in human skin. Both forms of vitamin D are biologically inactive pro-hormones that must undergo sequential hydroxylations in the liver and the kidney before they can bind to and activate the vitamin D receptor. The hormonally active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH2D], plays an essential role in calcium and phosphate metabolism, bone growth, and cellular differentiation. Renal synthesis of 1,25(OH2D from its endogenous precursor, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD, is the rate-limiting and is catalyzed by the 1?#7016;ydroxylase. Vitamin D dependent rickets type I (VDDR-I, also referred to as vitamin D 1?#7016;ydroxylase deficiency or pseudovitamin D deficiency rickets, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized clinically by hypotonia, muscle weakness, growth failure, hypocalcemic seizures in early infancy, and radiographic findings of rickets. Characteristic laboratory features are hypocalcemia, increased serum concentrations of parathyroid hormone (PTH, and low or undetectable serum concentrations of 1,25(OH2D despite normal or increased concentrations of 25OHD. Recent advances have showed in the cloning of the human 1?#7016;ydroxylase and revealed mutations in its gene that cause VDDR-I. This review presents the biology of vitamin D, and 1?#7016;ydroxylase mutations with clinical findings.

  8. Lack of megalin expression in adult human terminal ileum suggests megalin‐independent cubilin/amnionless activity during vitamin B12 absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Louise L.; Andersen, Rikke K.; Hager, Henrik; Madsen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cubilin plays an essential role in terminal ileum and renal proximal tubules during absorption of vitamin B12 and ligands from the glomerular ultrafiltrate. Cubilin is coexpressed with amnionless, and cubilin and amnionless are mutually dependent on each other for correct processing to the plasma membrane upon synthesis. Patients with defects in either protein suffer from vitamin B12‐malabsorption and in some cases proteinuria. Cubilin lacks a transmembrane region and signals for end...

  9. Quantifiers, Anaphora and Intensionality

    CERN Document Server

    Dalrymple, M; Pereira, F C N; Saraswat, V; Dalrymple, Mary; Lamping, John; Pereira, Fernando; Saraswat, Vijay

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between Lexical-Functional Grammar (LFG) {\\em functional structures} (f-structures) for sentences and their semantic interpretations can be expressed directly in a fragment of linear logic in a way that correctly explains the constrained interactions between quantifier scope ambiguity, bound anaphora and intensionality. This deductive approach to semantic interpretaion obviates the need for additional mechanisms, such as Cooper storage, to represent the possible scopes of a quantified NP, and explains the interactions between quantified NPs, anaphora and intensional verbs such as `seek'. A single specification in linear logic of the argument requirements of intensional verbs is sufficient to derive the correct reading predictions for intensional-verb clauses both with nonquantified and with quantified direct objects. In particular, both de dicto and de re readings are derived for quantified objects. The effects of type-raising or quantifying-in rules in other frameworks here just follow as li...

  10. Effects of Vitamin E in Neonates and Young Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria Pacifici

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol is a potent and natural antioxidant. Vitamin E is concentrated from soybean oil. The Committee on Fetus and Newborn of the Academy of the American of Pediatrics endorsed 1 to 2 mg/dl as the normal range of serum tocopherol level. Human infants are born with low stores of vitamin E, thus they require an adequate intake of vitamin E soon after birth. The optimum intravenous dose of vitamin E is 2.8 mg/kg per day (maximum 7 mg/kg per day. Treating very-low-birth-weight infants with 100 mg/kg vitamin E for >1 week results in levels >3.5 mg/dl and significantly reduces the risks of severe retinopathy, intracranial hemorrhage, hemolytic anemia, chronic lung disease, retrolental fibroplasia and incidence and severity of intraventricular hemorrhage, but increases the risks of sepsis, necrotizing enterocolitis and can cause retinal hemorrhage in very-low-birth-weight infants. Vitamin E supplementation prevents the isolated vitamin E deficiency that causes spinocerebellar symptoms. The major benefits arising from elevated dosages of vitamin E have been the relief of symptoms of vitamin E deficiency in infants with abetalipoproteinamia and chronic cholestasis. Excessive doses of vitamin E may result in side effects and careful monitoring of vitamin E is thus essential. Neonates born to mothers treated with high doses of vitamin E have significantly lower birth weight compared to neonates born to untreated mothers. Vitamin E is not teratogenic. The aim of this study was to review the effects of vitamin E in neonates and young infants.

  11. Sequence elements in the human osteocalcin gene confer basal activation and inducible response to hormonal vitamin D sub 3

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    Kerner, S.A.; Scott, R.A.; Pike, J.W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Osteoblast-specific expression of the bone protein osteocalcin is controlled at the transcriptional level by the steroid hormone 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. As this protein may represent a marker for bone activity in human disease, the authors examined the regulation of its expression at the molecular level by evaluating human osteocalcin gene promoter function. They describe regions within the promoter that contribute to basal expression of the gene in osteoblast-like cells in culture. Further, they define a 21-base-pair DNA element with the sequence 5{prime}-GTGACTCACCGGGTGAACGGG-3{prime}, which acts in cis to mediate 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} inducibility of the osteocalcin gene. This response element bears sequence similarity with other short DNA segments, particularly those for estrogen and thyroid hormone, which act together with their respective trans-acting receptors to modulate gene transcription.

  12. Relationship between botanical origin and antioxidants vitamins of bee-collected pollen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla C. L. S. Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study quantified vitamin C, E and β-carotene in samples of fresh bee-collected pollen and correlating them with the botanical origin. Vitamin content varied between 13.5 and 42.5 µg/g for vitamin E; 56.3 and 198.9 µg/g for β-carotene and 273.9 and 560.3 µg/g for vitamin C. It was concluded that the botanical origin and collecting season influenced the vitamin contents. There is a relationship between the vitamins and its botanical origin: Raphanus sp and Macroptilium sp, Mimosa caesalpineafolia with β-carotene; Raphanus sp, Eucalyptus sp, Macroptilium sp, Mimosa caesalpineafolia with vitamin E and Anadenanthera sp, Arecaceae type and Philodendron sp with vitamin C.

  13. Rediscovering vitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasr Anaizi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 2 years there has been a radical change in standard clinical practice with respect to vitamin D. As a result of a growing body of knowledgeable physicians are assessing the vitamin D nutritional status of their patients and prescribing aggressive repletion regimens of a vitamin D supplement. The present paper summarizes some basic information about this essential nutrient and reviews some of the more recent data implicating vitamin D deficiency in disease etiology with an emphasis on cardiovascular disease and cancer. Finally a rational approach to the dosing of vitamin D in different patient populations is provided.

  14. Crosstalk between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human breast cancer cells: PPARγ binds to VDR and inhibits 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 mediated transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimirah, Fatouma; Peng, Xinjian; Yuan, Liang; Mehta, Rajeshwari R; von Knethen, Andreas; Choubey, Divaker; Mehta, Rajendra G

    2012-11-15

    Heterodimerization and cross-talk between nuclear hormone receptors often occurs. For example, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) physically binds to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and inhibits its transcriptional activity. The interaction between PPARγ and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) however, is unknown. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms linking PPARγ and VDR signaling, and for the first time we show that PPARγ physically associates with VDR in human breast cancer cells. We found that overexpression of PPARγ decreased 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25D(3)) mediated transcriptional activity of the vitamin D target gene, CYP24A1, by 49% and the activity of VDRE-luc, a vitamin D responsive reporter, by 75% in T47D human breast cancer cells. Deletion mutation experiments illustrated that helices 1 and 4 of PPARγ's hinge and ligand binding domains, respectively, governed this suppressive function. Additionally, abrogation of PPARγ's AF2 domain attenuated its repressive action on 1,25D(3) transactivation, indicating that this domain is integral in inhibiting VDR signaling. PPARγ was also found to compete with VDR for their binding partner retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα). Overexpression of RXRα blocked PPARγ's suppressive effect on 1,25D(3) action, enhancing VDR signaling. In conclusion, these observations uncover molecular mechanisms connecting the PPARγ and VDR pathways.

  15. 应该高度关注维生素D在人体中的广泛生物学作用%More attention should be paid to the comprehensive biological effects of vitamin D on human beings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱明才; 马中书

    2013-01-01

    [Summary] Vitamin D is one of the fat-soluble vitamins which,eventually through activation in the liver and kidneys within the human body,becomes an important hormone——1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.Not only may 1,25dihydroxyvitamin D3 promote calcium and phosphate absorption by the intestine,but also stimulate the macrophages to secrete a protein(cathelicidin) which is able to digest the microbacterias,including viruses and bacteria,playing an antiinfective effects.Theofore,a proper supplementation of vitamin D would be beneficial for human health.%维生素D是一种脂溶性维生素.其在人体内经过肝脏和肾脏羟化后成为一种重要的激素,即1,25-二羟维生素D3.这种激素不仅促进肠道钙磷的吸收,维护骨骼的健康,还可刺激人体内的巨噬细胞分泌一种抗菌蛋白(cathelicidin),能有效吞噬包括病毒和细菌在内的多种微生物.适量补充维生素D对于维护人体健康十分重要.

  16. [VITAMIN D AND PREGNANCY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitrova-Nikolova, St; Nikolov, A

    2015-01-01

    This arcicle reviews the role of vitimin D during pregnancy. Adequate intake of vitamin D during pregnancy is very important for the health of mother and infant. A number of epidemiological data worldwide show widespread suboptimal levels of vitamin D in pregnant women. Vitamin D deficiency may be associated with an increased risk of infection, bacterial vaginosis, pre-eclampsia, low serum vitamin D levels in the newborn and others. There are not universal recommendations for dosage and intake of vitamin D for pregnant women in the world. It is recommended that serum level of vitamin D in all pregnant women and its adequate supplementation. Normal maternal vitamin D levels would provide sufficient its accumulation in the fetus.

  17. The vitamin K controversy.