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Sample records for quantifying human vitamin

  1. Quantifying human vitamin kinetics using AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillegonds, D; Dueker, S; Ognibene, T; Buchholz, B; Lin, Y; Vogel, J; Clifford, A

    2004-02-19

    Tracing vitamin kinetics at physiologic concentrations has been hampered by a lack of quantitative sensitivity for chemically equivalent tracers that could be used safely in healthy people. Instead, elderly or ill volunteers were sought for studies involving pharmacologic doses with radioisotopic labels. These studies fail to be relevant in two ways: vitamins are inherently micronutrients, whose biochemical paths are saturated and distorted by pharmacological doses; and while vitamins remain important for health in the elderly or ill, their greatest effects may be in preventing slow and cumulative diseases by proper consumption throughout youth and adulthood. Neither the target dose nor the target population are available for nutrient metabolic studies through decay counting of radioisotopes at high levels. Stable isotopic labels are quantified by isotope ratio mass spectrometry at levels that trace physiologic vitamin doses, but the natural background of stable isotopes severely limits the time span over which the tracer is distinguishable. Indeed, study periods seldom ranged over a single biological mean life of the labeled nutrients, failing to provide data on the important final elimination phase of the compound. Kinetic data for the absorption phase is similarly rare in micronutrient research because the phase is rapid, requiring many consecutive plasma samples for accurate representation. However, repeated blood samples of sufficient volume for precise stable or radio-isotope quantitations consume an indefensible amount of the volunteer's blood over a short period. Thus, vitamin pharmacokinetics in humans has often relied on compartmental modeling based upon assumptions and tested only for the short period of maximal blood circulation, a period that poorly reflects absorption or final elimination kinetics except for the most simple models.

  2. Quantifying the vitamin D economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Robert P; Armas, Laura A G

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D enters the body through multiple routes and in a variety of chemical forms. Utilization varies with input, demand, and genetics. Vitamin D and its metabolites are carried in the blood on a Gc protein that has three principal alleles with differing binding affinities and ethnic prevalences. Three major metabolites are produced, which act via two routes, endocrine and autocrine/paracrine, and in two compartments, extracellular and intracellular. Metabolic consumption is influenced by physiological controls, noxious stimuli, and tissue demand. When administered as a supplement, varying dosing schedules produce major differences in serum metabolite profiles. To understand vitamin D's role in human physiology, it is necessary both to identify the foregoing entities, mechanisms, and pathways and, specifically, to quantify them. This review was performed to delineate the principal entities and transitions involved in the vitamin D economy, summarize the status of present knowledge of the applicable rates and masses, draw inferences about functions that are implicit in these quantifications, and point out implications for the determination of adequacy. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A New Method to Simultaneously Quantify the Antioxidants: Carotenes, Xanthophylls, and Vitamin A in Human Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariel Colmán-Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and accurate reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD method for simultaneously determining and quantifying the antioxidants carotenes, xanthophylls, and retinol in human plasma is presented in this paper. Compounds were extracted with hexane, a C30 column, and a mobile phase of methanol, methyl tert-butyl ether, and water were used for the separation of the compounds. A total of 8 carotenoids, 3 Z-β-carotene isomers, and 1 fat-soluble vitamin (retinol were resolved within 72 min at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min. Detection was achieved at 450 nm for carotenoids and 330 nm for retinol. To evaluate the effectiveness of themethod, it has been applied to an intervention study conducted on eight volunteers. Results. Limits of detection were between 0.1 μg/mL for lycopene and astaxanthin and 1.3 μg/mL for 15-Z-β-carotene. Recoveries were ranged between 89% and 113% for α-carotene and astaxanthin, respectively. Accuracy was between 90.7% and 112.2% and precision was between 1% and 15% RSD. In human plasma samples compounds studied were identified besides three lycopene isomers, demonstrated to be suitable for application in dietary intervention studies. Conclusions. Due to its accuracy, precision, selectivity, and reproducibility, this method is suitable to dietary habits and/or antioxidants status studies.

  4. A New Method to Simultaneously Quantify the Antioxidants: Carotenes, Xanthophylls, and Vitamin A in Human Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmán-Martínez, Mariel; Martínez-Huélamo, Miriam; Miralles, Esther; Estruch, Ramón; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M

    2015-01-01

    A simple and accurate reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) method for simultaneously determining and quantifying the antioxidants carotenes, xanthophylls, and retinol in human plasma is presented in this paper. Compounds were extracted with hexane, a C30 column, and a mobile phase of methanol, methyl tert-butyl ether, and water were used for the separation of the compounds. A total of 8 carotenoids, 3 Z-β-carotene isomers, and 1 fat-soluble vitamin (retinol) were resolved within 72 min at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min. Detection was achieved at 450 nm for carotenoids and 330 nm for retinol. To evaluate the effectiveness of themethod, it has been applied to an intervention study conducted on eight volunteers. Results. Limits of detection were between 0.1 μg/mL for lycopene and astaxanthin and 1.3 μg/mL for 15-Z-β-carotene. Recoveries were ranged between 89% and 113% for α-carotene and astaxanthin, respectively. Accuracy was between 90.7% and 112.2% and precision was between 1% and 15% RSD. In human plasma samples compounds studied were identified besides three lycopene isomers, demonstrated to be suitable for application in dietary intervention studies. Conclusions. Due to its accuracy, precision, selectivity, and reproducibility, this method is suitable to dietary habits and/or antioxidants status studies.

  5. Quantifying and simulating human sensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quantifying and simulating human sensation – relating science and technology of indoor climate research Abstract In his doctoral thesis from 1970 civil engineer Povl Ole Fanger proposed that the understanding of indoor climate should focus on the comfort of the individual rather than averaged...... this understanding of human sensation was adjusted to technology. I will look into the construction of the equipment, what it measures and the relationship between theory, equipment and tradition....

  6. Quantitation of vitamin K in human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canfield, L.M.; Hopkinson, J.M.; Lima, A.F.; Martin, G.S.; Sugimoto, K.; Burr, J.; Clark, L.; McGee, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative method was developed for the assay of vitamin K in human colostrum and milk. The procedure combines preparative and analytical chromatography on silica gel in a nitrogen atmosphere followed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Two HPLC steps were used: gradient separation with ultraviolet (UV) detection followed by isocratic separation detected electrochemically. Due to co-migrating impurities, UV detection alone is insufficient for identification of vitamin K. Exogenous vitamin K was shown to equilibrate with endogenous vitamin K in the samples. A statistical method was incorporated to control for experimental variability. Vitamin K1 was analyzed in 16 pooled milk samples from 7 donors and in individual samples from 15 donors at 1 month post-partum. Vitamin K1 was present at 2.94 +/- 1.94 and 3.15 +/- 2.87 ng/mL in pools and in individuals, respectively. Menaquinones, the bacterial form of the vitamin, were not detected. The significance of experimental variation to studies of vitamin K in individuals is discussed

  7. Dietary Vitamin C in Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Matthew; Eck, Peter

    Vitamin C is essential to prevent scurvy in humans and is implicated in the primary prevention of common and complex diseases such as coronary heart disease, stroke, and cancer. This chapter reviews the latest knowledge about dietary vitamin C in human health with an emphasis on studies of the molecular mechanisms of vitamin C maintenance as well as gene-nutrient interactions modifying these relationships. Epidemiological evidence indicates 5% prevalence for vitamin C deficiency and 13% prevalence for suboptimal status even in industrialized countries. The daily intake (dose) and the corresponding systemic concentrations (response) are related in a saturable relationship, and low systemic vitamin C concentrations in observational studies are associated with negative health outcomes. However, there is no evidence that vitamin C supplementation impacts the risks for all-cause mortality, impaired cognitive performance, reduced quality of life, the development of eye diseases, infections, cardiovascular disease, and cancers. This might be related to the fact that prevention would not be realized by supplementation in populations already adequately supplied through dietary sources. Recent genetic association studies indicate that the dietary intake might not be the sole determinant of systemic concentrations, since variations in genes participating in redox homeostasis and vitamin C transport had been associated with lowered plasma concentrations. However, impact sizes are generally low and these phenomena might only affect individual of suboptimal dietary supply. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Vitamin D metabolites in human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisman, Y.; Bawnik, J.C.; Eisenberg, Z.; Spirer, Z.

    1982-01-01

    The concentrations of unconjugated 25-OHD, 24, 25(OH)2D, and 1,25(OH)2D were measured in human milk by competitive protein-binding radioassays following successive preparative Sephadex LH-20 chromatography and HPLC. The mean (+/- SE) concentration of 25-OHD was 0.37 +/- 0.03 ng/ml, of 24,25(OH)2D was 24.8 +/- 1.9 pg/ml, and of 1,25(OH)2D was 2.2 +/-0.1 pg/ml. The concentration of 25-OHD3 in milk as determined by HPLC and UV detection at 254 nm was 0.27 +/- 0.08 ng/ml. The milk concentrations of vitamin D metabolites did not correlate with the maternal serum 25-OHD levels. The total amounts of unconjugated vitamin D metabolites correspond to the known low bioassayable vitamin D antirachitic activity in human milk

  9. [Folate, vitamin B12 and human health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Alex; Hertrampf, Eva; Olivares, Manuel; Gaitán, Diego; Sánchez, Hugo; Allen, Lindsay H; Uauy, Ricardo

    2012-11-01

    During the past decade the role of folate and vitamin B12 in human nutrition have been under constant re-examination. Basic knowledge on the metabolism and interactions between these essential nutrients has expanded and multiple complexities have been unraveled. These micronutrients have shared functions and intertwined metabolic pathways that define the size of the "methyl donor" pool utilized in multiple metabolic pathways; these include DNA methylation and synthesis of nucleic acids. In Chile, folate deficiency is virtually nonexistent, while vitamin B12 deficiency affects approximately 8.5-51% depending on the cut-off value used to define deficiency. Folate is found naturally mainly in vegetables or added as folic acid to staple foods. Vitamin B12 in its natural form is present only in foods of animal origin, which is why deficit is more common among strict vegetarians and populations with a low intake of animal foods. Poor folate status in vulnerable women of childbearing age increases the risk of neural tube birth defects, so the critical time for the contribution of folic acid is several months before conception since neural tube closure occurs during the first weeks of life. The absorption of vitamin B12 from food is lower in older adults, who are considered to have higher risk of gastric mucosa atrophy, altered production of intrinsic factor and acid secretion. Deficiency of these vitamins is associated with hematological disorders. Vitamin B12 deficiency can also induce clinical and sub-clinical neurological and of other disorders. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on recent advances in the basic and applied knowledge of these vitamins relative to human health.

  10. Vitamin D receptor and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the human male reproductive tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Nielsen, John E; Jørgensen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human testis, and vitamin D (VD) has been suggested to affect survival and function of mature spermatozoa. Indeed, VDR knockout mice and VD deficient rats show decreased sperm counts and low fertility. However, the cellular response to VD is complex...

  11. Vitamins in the prevention of human diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herrmann, Wolfgang, Prof; Obeid, Rima

    2011-01-01

    ... in ancient Egypt. One-sided nutrition, smoking, alcohol, genetic factors, and even geographical origin interfere with our dietary intake of the vitamins. Insufficient vitamin intake can impact our health and contribute significantly to the development of diseases. This book offers expert reviews and judgements on the role of vitamins in health and ...

  12. Vitamin D content in human breast milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Við Streym, Susanna; Højskov, Carsten S; Møller, Ulla Kristine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parents are advised to avoid the direct sun exposure of their newborns. Therefore, the vitamin D status of exclusively breastfed newborns is entirely dependent on the supply of vitamin D from breast milk. OBJECTIVES: We explored concentrations of ergocalciferol (vitamin D2......) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) (vitamin D) and 25-hydroxivitamin D2 plus D3 (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]) in foremilk and hindmilk during the first 9 mo of lactation and identified indexes of importance to the concentrations. DESIGN: We collected blood and breast-milk samples from mothers at 2 wk (n = 107), 4 mo......, (n = 90), and 9 mo (n = 48) postpartum. Blood samples from infants were collected 4 and 9 mo after birth. We measured concentrations of vitamin D metabolites in blood and milk samples with the use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Concentrations of vitamin D and 25(OH)D...

  13. Simultaneous quantitative analysis of nine vitamin D compounds in human blood using LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Kassim, Nur Sofiah; Gomes, Fabio P; Shaw, Paul Nicholas; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that each member of the family of vitamin D compounds may have different function(s). Therefore, selective quantification of each compound is important in clinical research. Development and validation attempts of a simultaneous determination method of 12 vitamin D compounds in human blood using precolumn derivatization followed by LC-MS/MS is described. Internal standard calibration with 12 stable isotope labeled analogs was used to correct for matrix effects in MS detector. Nine vitamin D compounds were quantifiable in blood samples with detection limits within femtomole levels. Serum (compared with plasma) was found to be a more suitable sample type, and protein precipitation (compared with saponification) a more effective extraction method for vitamin D assay.

  14. Analyzing B-vitamins in Human Milk: Methodological Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Daniela; Allen, Lindsay H

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life. However, there is insufficient information about the concentration of nutrients in human milk. For some nutrients, including B-vitamins, maternal intake affects their concentration in human milk but the extent to which inadequate maternal diets affect milk B-vitamin content is poorly documented. Little is known about infant requirements for B-vitamins; recommendations are generally set as Adequate Intakes (AI) calculated on the basis of the mean volume of milk (0.78 L/day) consumed by infants exclusively fed with human milk from well-nourished mothers during the first six months, and the concentration of each vitamin in milk based on reported values. Methods used for analyzing B-vitamins, commonly microbiological, radioisotope dilution or more recently chromatographic, coupled with UV, fluorometric and MS detection, have rarely been validated for the complex human milk matrix. Thus the validity, accuracy, and sensitivity of analytical methods is important for understanding infant requirements for these nutrients, the maternal intakes needed to support adequate concentrations in breast milk. This review summarizes current knowledge on methods used for analyzing the B-vitamins thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B-6 and pantothenic acid, vitamin B-12, folate, biotin, and choline in human milk, their chemical and physical properties, the different forms and changes in concentration during lactation, and the effects of deficiency on the infant.

  15. Vitamin Deficiencies in Humans: Can Plant Science Help?[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Teresa B.; Basset, Gilles J.C.; Borel, Patrick; Carrari, Fernando; DellaPenna, Dean; Fraser, Paul D.; Hellmann, Hanjo; Osorio, Sonia; Rothan, Christophe; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2012-01-01

    The term vitamin describes a small group of organic compounds that are absolutely required in the human diet. Although for the most part, dependency criteria are met in developed countries through balanced diets, this is not the case for the five billion people in developing countries who depend predominantly on a single staple crop for survival. Thus, providing a more balanced vitamin intake from high-quality food remains one of the grandest challenges for global human nutrition in the coming decade(s). Here, we describe the known importance of vitamins in human health and current knowledge on their metabolism in plants. Deficits in developing countries are a combined consequence of a paucity of specific vitamins in major food staple crops, losses during crop processing, and/or overreliance on a single species as a primary food source. We discuss the role that plant science can play in addressing this problem and review successful engineering of vitamin pathways. We conclude that while considerable advances have been made in understanding vitamin metabolic pathways in plants, more cross-disciplinary approaches must be adopted to provide adequate levels of all vitamins in the major staple crops to eradicate vitamin deficiencies from the global population. PMID:22374394

  16. The role of menaquinones (vitamin K₂) in human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beulens, Joline W J; Booth, Sarah L; van den Heuvel, Ellen G H M; Stoecklin, Elisabeth; Baka, Athanasia; Vermeer, Cees

    2013-10-01

    Recent reports have attributed the potential health benefits of vitamin K beyond its function to activate hepatic coagulation factors. Moreover, several studies have suggested that menaquinones, also known as vitamin K2, may be more effective in activating extra-hepatic vitamin K-dependent proteins than phylloquinone, also known as vitamin K1. Nevertheless, present dietary reference values (DRV) for vitamin K are exclusively based on phylloquinone, and its function in coagulation. The present review describes the current knowledge on menaquinones based on the following criteria for setting DRV: optimal dietary intake; nutrient amount required to prevent deficiency, maintain optimal body stores and/or prevent chronic disease; factors influencing requirements such as absorption, metabolism, age and sex. Dietary intake of menaquinones accounts for up to 25% of total vitamin K intake and contributes to the biological functions of vitamin K. However, menaquinones are different from phylloquinone with respect to their chemical structure and pharmacokinetics, which affects bioavailability, metabolism and perhaps impact on health outcomes. There are significant gaps in the current knowledge on menaquinones based on the criteria for setting DRV. Therefore, we conclude that further investigations are needed to establish how differences among the vitamin K forms may influence tissue specificities and their role in human health. However, there is merit for considering both menaquinones and phylloquinone when developing future recommendations for vitamin K intake.

  17. Vitamin D: a critical and essential micronutrient for human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor eBendik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a micronutrient that is needed for optimal health throughout the whole life. Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol can be either synthesized in the human skin upon exposure to the UV light of the sun, or it is obtained from the diet. If the photoconversion in the skin due to reduced sun exposure (e.g. in wintertime is insufficient, intake of adequate vitamin D from the diet is essential to health. Severe vitamin D deficiency can lead to multitude of avoidable illnesses; among them are well known bone diseases like osteoporosis, a number of autoimmune diseases, many different cancers and some cardiovascular diseases like hypertension are being discussed. Vitamin D is found naturally in only very few foods. Foods containing vitamin D include some fatty fish, fish liver oils, and eggs from hens that have been fed vitamin D and some fortified foods in countries with respective regulations. Base on geographic location or food availability adequate vitamin D intake might not be sufficient on a global scale. The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF has collected the 25-hydroxy-vitamin D plasma levels in populations of different countries using published data and developed a global vitamin D map. This map illustrates the parts of the world, where vitamin D did not reach adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D plasma levels: 6.7 % of the papers report 25-hydroxyvitamin D plasma levels below 25 nmol/L, which indicates vitamin D deficiency, 37.3 % are below 50 nmol/Land only 11.9% found 25-hydroxy-vitamin D plasma levels above 75 nmol/L target as suggested by vitamin D experts. The vitamin D map is adding further evidence to the vitamin D insufficiency pandemic debate, which is also an issue in the developed world. Besides malnutrition, a condition where the diet does not match to provide the adequate levels of nutrients including micronutrients for growth and maintenance, we obviously have a situation where enough nutrients were consumed, but lacked to

  18. Vitamin D receptor and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the human male reproductive tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Nielsen, John E; Jørgensen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    , since it is not solely dependent on VDR expression, but also on cellular uptake of circulating VD and presence and activity of VD metabolizing enzymes. Expression of VD metabolizing enzymes has not previously been investigated in human testis and male reproductive tract. Therefore, we performed......The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human testis, and vitamin D (VD) has been suggested to affect survival and function of mature spermatozoa. Indeed, VDR knockout mice and VD deficient rats show decreased sperm counts and low fertility. However, the cellular response to VD is complex...

  19. Comparison of extraction methods for quantifying vitamin E from animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhimin

    2008-12-01

    Four extraction methods: (1) solvent (SOL), (2) ultrasound assisted solvent (UA), (3) saponification and solvent (SP), and (4) saponification and ultrasound assisted solvent (SP-UA), were used in sample preparation for quantifying vitamin E (tocopherols) in chicken liver and plasma samples. The extraction yields of SOL, UA, SP, and SP-UA methods obtained by adding delta-tocopherol as internal reference were 95%, 104%, 65%, and 62% for liver and 98%, 103%, 97%, and 94% for plasma, respectively. The methods with saponification significantly affected the stabilities of tocopherols in liver samples. The measured values of alpha- and gamma-tocopherols using the solvent only extraction (SOL) method were much lower than that using any of the other extraction methods. This indicated that less of the tocopherols in those samples were in a form that could be extracted directly by solvent. The measured value of alpha-tocopherol in the liver sample using the ultrasound assisted solvent (UA) method was 1.5-2.5 times of that obtained from the saponification and solvent (SP) method. The differences in measured values of tocopherols in the plasma samples by using the two methods were not significant. However, the measured value of the saponification and ultrasound assisted solvent (SP-UA) method was lower than either the saponification and solvent (SP) or the ultrasound assisted solvent (UA) method. Also, the reproducibility of the ultrasound assisted solvent (UA) method was greater than any of the saponification methods. Compared with the traditional saponification method, the ultrasound assisted solvent method could effectively extract tocopherols from sample matrix without any chemical degradation reactions, especially for complex animal tissue such as liver.

  20. Vitamin D: a critical and essential micronutrient for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendik, Igor; Friedel, Angelika; Roos, Franz F; Weber, Peter; Eggersdorfer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D is a micronutrient that is needed for optimal health throughout the whole life. Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) can be either synthesized in the human skin upon exposure to the UV light of the sun, or it is obtained from the diet. If the photoconversion in the skin due to reduced sun exposure (e.g., in wintertime) is insufficient, intake of adequate vitamin D from the diet is essential to health. Severe vitamin D deficiency can lead to a multitude of avoidable illnesses; among them are well-known bone diseases like osteoporosis, a number of autoimmune diseases, many different cancers, and some cardiovascular diseases like hypertension are being discussed. Vitamin D is found naturally in only very few foods. Foods containing vitamin D include some fatty fish, fish liver oils, and eggs from hens that have been fed vitamin D and some fortified foods in countries with respective regulations. Based on geographic location or food availability adequate vitamin D intake might not be sufficient on a global scale. The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has collected the 25-hydroxy-vitamin D plasma levels in populations of different countries using published data and developed a global vitamin D map. This map illustrates the parts of the world, where vitamin D did not reach adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D plasma levels: 6.7% of the papers report 25-hydroxyvitamin D plasma levels below 25 nmol/L, which indicates vitamin D deficiency, 37.3% are below 50 nmol/Land only 11.9% found 25-hydroxyvitamin D plasma levels above 75 nmol/L target as suggested by vitamin D experts. The vitamin D map is adding further evidence to the vitamin D insufficiency pandemic debate, which is also an issue in the developed world. Besides malnutrition, a condition where the diet does not match to provide the adequate levels of nutrients including micronutrients for growth and maintenance, we obviously have a situation where enough nutrients were consumed, but lacked to reach sufficient

  1. Vitamin C degradation products and pathways in the human lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemet, Ina; Monnier, Vincent M

    2011-10-28

    Vitamin C and its degradation products participate in chemical modifications of proteins in vivo through non-enzymatic glycation (Maillard reaction) and formation of different products called advanced glycation end products. Vitamin C levels are particularly high in selected tissues, such as lens, brain and adrenal gland, and its degradation products can inflict substantial protein damage via formation of advanced glycation end products. However, the pathways of in vivo vitamin C degradation are poorly understood. Here we have determined the levels of vitamin C oxidation and degradation products dehydroascorbic acid, 2,3-diketogulonic acid, 3-deoxythreosone, xylosone, and threosone in the human lens using o-phenylenediamine to trap both free and protein-bound adducts. In the protein-free fraction and water-soluble proteins (WSP), all five listed degradation products were identified. Dehydroascorbic acid, 2,3-diketogulonic acid, and 3-deoxythreosone were the major products in the protein-free fraction, whereas in the WSP, 3-deoxythreosone was the most abundant measured dicarbonyl. In addition, 3-deoxythreosone in WSP showed positive linear correlation with age (p degradation product bound to human lens proteins provides in vivo evidence for the non-oxidative pathway of dehydroascorbate degradation into erythrulose as a major pathway for vitamin C degradation in vivo.

  2. Vitamins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it's time for them to be used, special carriers in your body take them to where they're needed. Vitamins A, D, E, and K are all fat-soluble vitamins. Water-soluble vitamins are different. When you eat foods ...

  3. Vitamins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Roso, Baltasar

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available A thermal treatment is an intrinsic part of most food processing procedures and may be employed to inactive enzimes and toxic '• factors, to change texture and flavour or to preserve. The vitamin degree of transformation or destruction in cooking methods depends on the temperature and on the time of exposure to this temperature. Oxigen, light and transition metals frequently play an active role in accelerating or promoting vitamin losses. Both chemical change and difussion proceed more rapidly as the temperature is raised. An advantage of deep frying consists of the fact that the temperature within the food does not exceed the temperature of the steam under the crust, and that frying times are in general very short compared to other cooking procedures. Another advantages may be the low content of dissolved oxygen in frying fats, and also in its high tocopherol content. There is no leaching of water-soluble vitamins in deep-frying. Speaking of vitamin stability we have to keep in mind that the concept of vitamins is a more physiological concept than a chemical one. The stability itself is not a property of the various vitamins but rather of the various chemical compounds sometimes called vitamers, of which a certain vitamin group consists. For practical purposes, vitamin losses should be considered only in foods wich substantially contribute to the vitamin supply of single people or population groups. There is little data in the literature about vitamin changes in deep-frying of food. However published experimental data on vitamin loses show that deep-frying is one of the most protective cooking procedures. For example, in ours results the vitamin C losses of stewed vegetable foods were twice higher than that of fried ones, (raw potatoes containing 19 mg/100g fresh weight, 13 mg/100 fried in olive oil, and 5 mg/100g stewed in the same oil.

  4. Changes in the human transcriptome upon vitamin D supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasing, Yvonne; Fenton, Christopher Graham; Jorde, Rolf; Paulssen, Ruth Hracky

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D is hydroxylated in the liver and kidneys to its active form, which can bind to the vitamin D receptor (VDR). The VDR is present in a wide variety of different cells types and tissues and acts as a transcription factor. Although activation of the VDR is estimated to regulate expression of up to 5% of the human genome, our study is the first analysing gene expression after supplementation in more than 10 subjects. Subjects of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) received either vitamin D 3 (n=47) in a weekly dose of 20,000 IU or placebo (n=47) for a period of three to five years. For this study, blood samples for preparation of RNA were drawn from the subjects and mRNA gene expression in blood was determined using microarray analysis. The two study groups were similar regarding gender, age, BMI and duration of supplementation, whereas the mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level as expected was significantly higher in the vitamin D group (119 versus 63nmol/L). When analysing all subjects, nearly no significant differences in gene expression between the two groups were found. However, when analysing men and women separately, significant effects on gene expression were observed for women. Furthermore, when only including subjects with the highest and lowest serum 25(OH)D levels, additional vitamin D regulated genes were disclosed. Thus, a total of 99 genes (p≤0.05, log2 fold change ≥|0.2|) were found to be regulated, of which 72 have not been published before as influenced by vitamin D. These genes were particularly involved in the interleukin signaling pathway, oxidative stress response, apoptosis signaling pathway and gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor pathway. Thus, our results open the possibility for many future studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantifying human response capabilities towards tsunami threats at community level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, J.; Mück, M.; Zosseder, K.; Wegscheider, S.; Taubenböck, H.; Strunz, G.; Muhari, A.; Anwar, H. Z.; Birkmann, J.; Gebert, N.

    2009-04-01

    Decision makers at the community level need detailed information on tsunami risks in their area. Knowledge on potential hazard impact, exposed elements such as people, critical facilities and lifelines, people's coping capacity and recovery potential are crucial to plan precautionary measures for adaptation and to mitigate potential impacts of tsunamis on society and the environment. A crucial point within a people-centred tsunami risk assessment is to quantify the human response capabilities towards tsunami threats. Based on this quantification and spatial representation in maps tsunami affected and safe areas, difficult-to-evacuate areas, evacuation target points and evacuation routes can be assigned and used as an important contribution to e.g. community level evacuation planning. Major component in the quantification of human response capabilities towards tsunami impacts is the factor time. The human response capabilities depend on the estimated time of arrival (ETA) of a tsunami, the time until technical or natural warning signs (ToNW) can be received, the reaction time (RT) of the population (human understanding of a tsunami warning and the decision to take appropriate action), the evacuation time (ET, time people need to reach a safe area) and the actual available response time (RsT = ETA - ToNW - RT). If RsT is larger than ET, people in the respective areas are able to reach a safe area and rescue themselves. Critical areas possess RsT values equal or even smaller ET and hence people whin these areas will be directly affected by a tsunami. Quantifying the factor time is challenging and an attempt to this is presented here. The ETA can be derived by analyzing pre-computed tsunami scenarios for a respective area. For ToNW we assume that the early warning center is able to fulfil the Indonesian presidential decree to issue a warning within 5 minutes. RT is difficult as here human intrinsic factors as educational level, believe, tsunami knowledge and experience

  6. Effect of fasting on the urinary excretion of water-soluble vitamins in humans and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Erina; Takahashi, Kei; Shibata, Katsumi

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies showed that the urinary excretion of the water-soluble vitamins can be useful as a nutritional index. To determine how fasting affects urinary excretion of water-soluble vitamins, a human study and an animal experiment were conducted. In the human study, the 24-h urinary excretion of water-soluble vitamins in 12 healthy Japanese adults fasting for a day was measured. One-day fasting drastically decreased urinary thiamin content to 30%, and increased urinary riboflavin content by 3-fold. Other water-soluble vitamin contents did not show significant change by fasting. To further investigate the alterations of water-soluble vitamin status by starvation, rats were starved for 3 d, and water-soluble vitamin contents in the liver, blood and urine were measured during starvation. Urinary excretion of thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B(6) metabolite 4-pyridoxic acid, nicotinamide metabolites and folate decreased during starvation, but that of vitamin B(12), pantothenic acid and biotin did not. As for blood vitamin levels, only blood vitamin B(1), plasma PLP and plasma folate levels decreased with starvation. All water-soluble vitamin contents in the liver decreased during starvation, whereas vitamin concentrations in the liver did not decrease. Starvation decreased only concentrations of vitamin B(12) and folate in the skeletal muscle. These results suggest that water-soluble vitamins were released from the liver, and supplied to the peripheral tissues to maintain vitamin nutrition. Our human study also suggested that the effect of fasting should be taken into consideration for subjects showing low urinary thiamin and high urinary riboflavin.

  7. Vitamin A metabolism, kinetic behavior and utilization: Rationale for the continued development and use of an isotope dilution technique for assessing vitamin A stores in human populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    The paper discusses the applicability of isotope dilution method in general and oral isotope dilution in particular to the assessment of vitamin A status in humans. It also highlights some aspects of vitamin A intake and metabolism as related to isotope dilution method. Areas of methodological research and development in vitamin A research are also proposed

  8. Quantifying anisotropy and fiber orientation in human brain histological sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Budde

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI has provided unparalleled insight into the microscopic structure and organization of the central nervous system. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and other models of the diffusion MRI signal extract microstructural properties of tissues with relevance to the normal and injured brain. Despite the prevalence of such techniques and applications, accurate and large-scale validation has proven difficult, particularly in the human brain. In this report, human brain sections obtained from a digital public brain bank were employed to quantify anisotropy and fiber orientation using structure tensor analysis. The derived maps depict the intricate complexity of white matter fibers at a resolution not attainable with current DWI experiments. Moreover, the effects of multiple fiber bundles (i.e. crossing fibers and intravoxel fiber dispersion were demonstrated. Examination of the cortex and hippocampal regions validated specific features of previous in vivo and ex vivo DTI studies of the human brain. Despite the limitation to two dimensions, the resulting images provide a unique depiction of white matter organization at resolutions currently unattainable with DWI. The method of analysis may be used to validate tissue properties derived from DTI and alternative models of the diffusion signal.

  9. Non-genomic effects of vitamin D in human spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Dissing, Steen

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum for vitamin D (VD) mediated effects has expanded in recent years. Activated VD (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) binds to the VD receptor (VDR) and mediates non-genomic effects through the alternative ligand binding-pocket (VDR-ap) or regulates gene transcription through the genomic binding......-pocket. VDR and VD-metabolizing enzymes are expressed in human testis, male reproductive tract and mature spermatozoa, and VD is considered important for male reproduction. Expression of the VD-inactivating enzyme CYP24A1 at the annulus of human spermatozoa distinguish normal and infertile men with high...... specificity, and CYP24A1 expression is positively correlated with all semen variables and suggested as a marker for both semen quality and VD responsiveness. Moreover, spermatozoa are transcriptionally silent and are therefore a unique model to study non-genomic effects. 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) induced a rapid...

  10. Vitamins K1 and K2: The Emerging Group of Vitamins Required for Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry Kurt

    2017-01-01

    To review the evidence for the use of vitamin K supplementation in clinical conditions such as osteoporosis, vascular calcification, arthritis, cancer, renal calculi, diabetes, and warfarin therapy. PubMed was searched for articles on vitamin K (K1 and K2) along with books and conference proceedings and health conditions listed above. Level I and II evidence supports the use of vitamins K1 and K2 in osteoporosis and Level II evidence supports vitamin K2 in prevention of coronary calcification and cardiovascular disease. Evidence is insufficient for use in diabetes, arthritis, renal calculi, and cancer. Vitamin K2 may be a useful adjunct for the treatment of osteoporosis, along with vitamin D and calcium, rivaling bisphosphonate therapy without toxicity. It may also significantly reduce morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular health by reducing vascular calcification. Vitamin K2 appears promising in the areas of diabetes, cancer, and osteoarthritis. Vitamin K use in warfarin therapy is safe and may improve INR control, although a dosage adjustment is required. Vitamin K supplementation may be useful for a number of chronic conditions that are afflicting North Americans as the population ages. Supplementation may be required for bone and cardiovascular health.

  11. Vitamins K1 and K2: The Emerging Group of Vitamins Required for Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerry Kurt Schwalfenberg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To review the evidence for the use of vitamin K supplementation in clinical conditions such as osteoporosis, vascular calcification, arthritis, cancer, renal calculi, diabetes, and warfarin therapy. Quality of Evidence. PubMed was searched for articles on vitamin K (K1 and K2 along with books and conference proceedings and health conditions listed above. Level I and II evidence supports the use of vitamins K1 and K2 in osteoporosis and Level II evidence supports vitamin K2 in prevention of coronary calcification and cardiovascular disease. Evidence is insufficient for use in diabetes, arthritis, renal calculi, and cancer. Main Message. Vitamin K2 may be a useful adjunct for the treatment of osteoporosis, along with vitamin D and calcium, rivaling bisphosphonate therapy without toxicity. It may also significantly reduce morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular health by reducing vascular calcification. Vitamin K2 appears promising in the areas of diabetes, cancer, and osteoarthritis. Vitamin K use in warfarin therapy is safe and may improve INR control, although a dosage adjustment is required. Conclusion. Vitamin K supplementation may be useful for a number of chronic conditions that are afflicting North Americans as the population ages. Supplementation may be required for bone and cardiovascular health.

  12. Measurements of vitamin B12 in human blood serum using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiminis, G.; Schartner, E. P.; Brooks, J. L.; Hutchinson, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin and its derivatives) deficiency has been identified as a potential modifiable risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Chronic deficiency of vitamin B12 has been significantly associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline. An effective and efficient method for measuring vitamin B12 concentration in human blood would enable ongoing tracking and assessment of this potential modifiable risk factor. In this work we present an optical sensor based on resonance Raman spectroscopy for rapid measurements of vitamin B12 in human blood serum. The measurement takes less than a minute and requires minimum preparation (centrifuging) of the collected blood samples.

  13. Role of Vitamin D in human Diseases and Disorders – An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanshee Gohil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin and generated in human skin by ultraviolet (UV light. Today, vitamin D is considered to be a steroidal hormone and plays a central role in bone mineralization and calcium homeostasis. The active form of the vitamin D is 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (DHCC] which mediatesproliferation, differentiation and various functions at the cellular level through Vitamin D receptors (VDR.Therefore, compromised vitamin D status is likely to be involved in progression or pathogenesis of various disorders. This assumption is consistent with findings from epidemiological studies that a compromised vitamin D status in humans increases the risk of autoimmune diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes mellitus. However, diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disorders and bone disorders are yet not focused. Thus the role of vitamin D in pathogenesis of various diseases is complex and controversial. This review briefly summarizes the role of vitamin D in development and progression of different human disorders.

  14. Vitamin D as an adjunctive therapy in asthma. Part 2: A review of human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerley, Conor P; Elnazir, Basil; Faul, John; Cormican, Liam

    2015-06-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is highly prevalent worldwide, with adverse effects on bone health but also potentially other unfavorable consequences. VDD and asthma-incidence/severity share many common risk factors, including winter season, industrialization, poor diet, obesity, dark skin pigmentation, and high latitude. Multiple anatomical areas relevant to asthma contain both the enzyme responsible for producing activated vitamin D and the vitamin D receptor suggesting that activated vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) may have important local effects at these sites. Emerging evidence suggests that VDD is associated with increased airway hyperresponsiveness, decreased pulmonary function, worse asthma control, and possibly decreased response to standard anti-asthma therapy. However the effect is inconsistent with preliminary evidence from different studies suggesting vitamin D is both beneficial and detrimental to asthma genesis and severity. Current evidence suggests that supplementation with moderate doses of vitamin D may be appropriate for maintenance of bone health in asthmatics, particularly steroid users. However emerging data from an increasing number of randomized, controlled, intervention studies of vitamin D supplementation in pediatric and adult asthma are becoming available and should help determine the importance, if any of vitamin D for asthma pathogenesis. The purpose of this second of a two-part review is to review the current human literature on vitamin D and asthma, discussing the possible consequences of VDD for asthma and the potential for vitamin D repletion as adjunct therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum vitamin D levels are not altered after controlled diesel exhaust exposures in healthy human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Past research has suggested that exposure to urban air pollution may be associated with vitamin D deficiency in human populations. Vitamin D is widely known for its importance in bone growth/remodeling, muscle metabolism, and its ability to promote calcium absorption in the gut; ...

  16. Vitamin E in human skin: organ-specific physiology and considerations for its use in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Jens J; Ekanayake-Mudiyanselage, Swarna

    2007-01-01

    Vitamin E has been used for more than 50 years in experimental and clinical dermatology. While a large number of case reports were published in this time, there is still a lack of controlled clinical studies providing a rationale for well defined dosages and clinical indications. In contrast, advances in basic research on the physiology, mechanism of action, penetration, bioconversion and photoprotection of vitamin E in human skin has led to the development of numerous new formulations for use in cosmetics and skin care products. This article reviews basic mechanisms and possible cosmetic as well as clinical implications of the recent advances in cutaneous vitamin E research. Experimental evidence suggests that topical and oral vitamin E has antitumorigenic, photoprotective, and skin barrier stabilizing properties. While the current use of vitamin E is largely limited to cosmetics, controlled clinical studies for indications such as atopic dermatitis or preventions of photocarcinogenesis are needed to evaluate the clinical benefit of vitamin E.

  17. Vitamin C Degradation Products and Pathways in the Human Lens*

    OpenAIRE

    Nemet, Ina; Monnier, Vincent M.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin C and its degradation products participate in chemical modifications of proteins in vivo through non-enzymatic glycation (Maillard reaction) and formation of different products called advanced glycation end products. Vitamin C levels are particularly high in selected tissues, such as lens, brain and adrenal gland, and its degradation products can inflict substantial protein damage via formation of advanced glycation end products. However, the pathways of in vivo vitamin C degradation ...

  18. Quantifying the impact of human activity on temperatures in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Susanne A.; Bayer, Peter; Blum, Philipp

    2017-04-01

    Human activity directly influences ambient air, surface and groundwater temperatures. Alterations of surface cover and land use influence the ambient thermal regime causing spatial temperature anomalies, most commonly heat islands. These local temperature anomalies are primarily described within the bounds of large and densely populated urban settlements, where they form so-called urban heat islands (UHI). This study explores the anthropogenic impact not only for selected cities, but for the thermal regime on a countrywide scale, by analyzing mean annual temperature datasets in Germany in three different compartments: measured surface air temperature (SAT), measured groundwater temperature (GWT), and satellite-derived land surface temperature (LST). As a universal parameter to quantify anthropogenic heat anomalies, the anthropogenic heat intensity (AHI) is introduced. It is closely related to the urban heat island intensity, but determined for each pixel (for satellite-derived LST) or measurement point (for SAT and GWT) of a large, even global, dataset individually, regardless of land use and location. Hence, it provides the unique opportunity to a) compare the anthropogenic impact on temperatures in air, surface and subsurface, b) to find main instances of anthropogenic temperature anomalies within the study area, in this case Germany, and c) to study the impact of smaller settlements or industrial sites on temperatures. For all three analyzed temperature datasets, anthropogenic heat intensity grows with increasing nighttime lights and declines with increasing vegetation, whereas population density has only minor effects. While surface anthropogenic heat intensity cannot be linked to specific land cover types in the studied resolution (1 km × 1 km) and classification system, both air and groundwater show increased heat intensities for artificial surfaces. Overall, groundwater temperature appears most vulnerable to human activity; unlike land surface temperature

  19. Natural Versus Synthetic Vitamin B Complexes in Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-12

    Healthy; Thiamine and Niacin Deficiency States; Pyridoxine Deficiency; Folic Acid Deficiency Anemia, Dietary; Vitamin B 12 Deficiency; Peroxidase; Defect; Polyphenols; Oxidative Stress; Homocystine; Metabolic Disorder

  20. PRA (probabilistic risk analysis) in the nuclear sector. Quantifying human error and human malice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyes, A.G.

    1995-01-01

    Regardless of the regulatory style chosen ('command and control' or 'functional') a vital prerequisite for coherent safety regulations in the nuclear power industry is the ability to assess accident risk. In this paper we present a critical analysis of current techniques of probabilistic risk analysis applied in the industry, with particular regard to the problems of quantifying risks arising from, or exacerbated by, human risk and/or human error. (Author)

  1. The solar UV exposure time required for vitamin D3 synthesis in the human body estimated by numerical simulation and observation in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Miyauchi, Masaatsu; Hirai, Chizuko

    2013-04-01

    After the discovery of Antarctic ozone hole, the negative effect of exposure of human body to harmful solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is widely known. However, there is positive effect of exposure to UV radiation, i.e., vitamin D synthesis. Although the importance of solar UV radiation for vitamin D3 synthesis in the human body is well known, the solar exposure time required to prevent vitamin D deficiency has not been well determined. This study attempted to identify the time of solar exposure required for vitamin D3 synthesis in the body by season, time of day, and geographic location (Sapporo, Tsukuba, and Naha, in Japan) using both numerical simulations and observations. According to the numerical simulation for Tsukuba at noon in July under a cloudless sky, 2.3 min of solar exposure are required to produce 5.5 μg vitamin D3 per 600 cm2 skin. This quantity of vitamin D represents the recommended intake for an adult by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, and the 2010 Japanese Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs). In contrast, it took 49.5 min to produce the same amount of vitamin D3 at Sapporo in the northern part of Japan in December, at noon under a cloudless sky. The necessary exposure time varied considerably with the time of the day. For Tsukuba at noon in December, 14.5 min were required, but at 09:00 68.7 min were required and at 15:00 175.8 min were required for the same meteorological conditions. Naha receives high levels of UV radiation allowing vitamin D3 synthesis almost throughout the year. According to our results, we are further developing an index to quantify the necessary time of UV radiation exposure to produce required amount of vitamin D3 from a UV radiation data.

  2. Serum levels of antioxidant vitamins and mineral elements of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and minerals (Zn, Fe, Cu) in 90 HIV positive subjects attending the Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital ... Matériel et méthodes:Travail le courant signale les niveaux de sérum de vitamines .... Determination of serum vitamins.

  3. The role of menaquinones (vitamin K2) in human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Europe convened experts in vitamin K selected from academia and industry to review the need for specific dietary reference values (DRVs) for vitamin K2, also known as menaquinones. This review describes the literature based on the following items required...

  4. Vitamin D supplementation and testosterone concentrations in male human subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijboer, Annemieke C.; Oosterwerff, Mirjam; Schroten, Nicolas F.; Eekhoff, Elisabeth M. W.; Chel, Victor G. M.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Blankenstein, Marinus A.; Lips, Paul

    ObjectiveA possible association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and testosterone levels has been reported; however, contradictory results have emerged. DesignTo investigate a causal link between vitamin D and testosterone status, we studied the effect of vitamin D supplementation on serum

  5. Vitamins C and K3 sensitize human urothelial tumors to gemcitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassouf, Wassim; Highshaw, Ralph; Nelkin, Gina M; Dinney, Colin P; Kamat, Ashish M

    2006-10-01

    We evaluated the antitumor effects of vitamins C and K3 for human urothelial carcinoma and the potential use of the combination of vitamins C plus K3 as a sensitizing agent for conventional chemotherapy for urothelial carcinoma. The antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of vitamin C alone, vitamin K3 alone, vitamins C plus K3, gemcitabine alone and gemcitabine plus vitamins C plus K3 were assessed in vitro by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. For in vivo studies we implanted UMUC-14 tumorigenic urothelial carcinoma cells into the subcutis of nude mice. One week later we treated 10 mice each with saline (control), vitamins C plus K3, gemcitabine or gemcitabine plus vitamins C plus K3. Treatment was continued for 4 weeks, followed by necropsy. Tumor volume was measured and tumor kinetics were established. Apoptosis and proliferation were evaluated in tumor sections using immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assay. Vitamins C plus K3 induced cytostasis and caused apoptosis to a greater degree than either vitamin alone (p Vitamins C plus K3 also substantially augmented the effects of gemcitabine in vitro. There were 32.3% apoptosis with gemcitabine plus vitamins C plus K3, 5.3% with gemcitabine alone and 15.8% with vitamins C plus K3 alone (p vitamins C plus K3 compared with that in the control or for either agent alone. Mean tumor weight and growth rate in the gemcitabine plus vitamins C plus K3 group (237 mg and 11.3 mm3 daily) were decreased compared with those in the control (530 mg and 34.3 mm3 daily), and those for vitamins C plus K3 alone (490 mg and 25.2 mm3 daily) and gemcitabine alone (400 mg and 21.3 mm3 daily) (p Vitamins C and K3 have significant antiproliferative and apoptotic effects when used in combination. This combination enhances the efficacy of gemcitabine against bladder cancer in vivo.

  6. Vitamin A levels and human immunodeficiency virus load in injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semba, R D; Farzadegan, H; Vlahov, D

    1997-01-01

    Although low plasma vitamin A levels are associated with increased mortality and higher vertical transmission during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, it is unknown whether plasma low vitamin A levels are a marker for circulating HIV load. We conducted a cross-sectional study within a prospective cohort study of injection drug users in order to evaluate the relationship between plasma vitamin A levels and HIV viral load. Plasma vitamin A level was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Infectious viral load was measured by quantitative microculture of serial fivefold dilutions of 10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells. A total of 284 HIV-infected adults (79 women, 205 men) were studied. Plasma vitamin A levels consistent with deficiency were found in 28.9% of adults. A total of 38.0% of women and 25.3% of men had vitamin A deficiency (P < 0.04). The median infectious viral load for the entire study population was 8 infectious units per million cells. No significant relationship between plasma vitamin A levels and infectious viral load was observed in these injection drug users. This study suggests that there is no correlation between HIV viral load and plasma vitamin A levels in injection drug users, and these variables may represent independent risk factors during HIV infection. HIV-infected adult women appear to be at higher risk of developing vitamin A deficiency. PMID:9008289

  7. Microscopic Aspects of Autoschizic Cell Death in Human Ovarian Carcinoma (2774) Cells Following Vitamin C, Vitamin K3 or Vitamin C:K3 Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilloteaux, Jacques; Jamison, James M.; Arnold, David; Taper, Henryk S.; von Gruenigen, Vivian E.; Summers, Jack L.

    2003-08-01

    Human ovarian carcinoma cells (MDAH 2774) were treated with sodium ascorbate (VC), menadione (VK3), or with a VC:VK3 combination for 1 h and then studied using light microscopy (LM) and scanning (SEM) and transmission electron (TEM) microscopy. Plasma membrane damage (blisters and blebs, hairy aspect) results from vitamin C (VC) treatment, while cytoskeletal damage and self-morsellation are caused by vitamin K3 (VK3) treatment. VC:VK3-treated cells exhibit exacerbated injuries characteristic of both VC and VK3 treatment as well as a significant decrease in cell diameters from 20 35 [mu]m for control cells to 7 12 [mu]m for VC:VK3 treatment. Moreover, after a 1-h exposure to the vitamin combination, autoschizis (43%), apoptosis (3%), and oncosis (1.9%) are observed at the percentages indicated. All cellular changes associated with autoschizis observed with SEM were confirmed by LM and TEM observations and are consistent with cell death by autoschizis: decrease in cell size, cytoplasmic self-excisions, degradation of the nucleus and nucleolus without formation of apoptotic bodies and, ultimately, karyorrhexis and karyolysis. These results also suggest that the vitamin combination may find clinical use in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  8. Vitamin D Is Required for IFN-γ–Mediated Antimicrobial Activity of Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Mario; Stenger, Steffen; Shin, Dong-Min; Yuk, Jae-Min; Liu, Philip T.; Realegeno, Susan; Lee, Hye-Mi; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Schenk, Mirjam; Sieling, Peter A.; Teles, Rosane; Montoya, Dennis; Iyer, Shankar S.; Bruns, Heiko; Lewinsohn, David M.; Hollis, Bruce W.; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.; Steinmeyer, Andreas; Zügel, Ulrich; Cheng, Genhong; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Bloom, Barry R.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Control of tuberculosis worldwide depends on our understanding of human immune mechanisms, which combat the infection. Acquired T cell responses are critical for host defense against microbial pathogens, yet the mechanisms by which they act in humans remain unclear. We report that T cells, by the release of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), induce autophagy, phagosomal maturation, the production of antimicrobial peptides such as cathelicidin, and antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages via a vitamin D–dependent pathway. IFN-γ induced the antimicrobial pathway in human macrophages cultured in vitamin D–sufficient sera, but not in sera from African-Americans that have lower amounts of vitamin D and who are more susceptible to tuberculosis. In vitro supplementation of vitamin D–deficient serum with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 restored IFN-γ–induced antimicrobial peptide expression, autophagy, phagosome-lysosome fusion, and antimicrobial activity. These results suggest a mechanism in which vitamin D is required for acquired immunity to overcome the ability of intracellular pathogens to evade macrophage-mediated antimicrobial responses. The present findings underscore the importance of adequate amounts of vitamin D in all human populations for sustaining both innate and acquired immunity against infection. PMID:21998409

  9. Vitamin D: Effects on human reproduction, pregnancy, and fetal well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyden, E L; Wimalawansa, S J

    2018-06-01

    Pregnancy places exceptional demands on vitamin D and calcium availability; thus, their deficiencies during pregnancy threaten the woman and her fetus. Globally, vitamin D and other micronutrient deficiencies are common during pregnancy, especially in developing countries where pregnant women have less access to nutritional supplements. Vitamin D deficiency has been reported to be as high as 40% among pregnant women. As a pregnancy progresses, the requirements for vitamin D increase and thus, can worsen preexisting hypovitaminosis D. Consequently, hypovitaminosis D is increasingly associated with a higher incidence of fetal miscarriage, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, bacterial vaginosis, and impaired fetal and childhood growth and development. This review explores the recent advances in the understanding of vitamin D and the pivotal role it plays in human reproduction, with an emphasis on pregnancy and its outcomes. Given the seriousness of the issue, there is a pressing need for clinicians to become aware of the risks associated with not identifying and correcting vitamin D deficiency. Identifying and correcting vitamin D deficiency, including safe exposure to sunlight, is particularly relevant for those who seek assistance with fertility issues or prenatal counseling, and those in the beginning of their pregnancy. The data point to a significant protective effects of vitamin D during pregnancy when the 25(OH)D serum level exceeds 30 ng/mL before pregnancy and during the first trimester and, sufficient levels are maintained throughout the pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantifying human mobility perturbation and resilience in Hurricane Sandy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available Human mobility is influenced by environmental change and natural disasters. Researchers have used trip distance distribution, radius of gyration of movements, and individuals' visited locations to understand and capture human mobility patterns and trajectories. However, our knowledge of human movements during natural disasters is limited owing to both a lack of empirical data and the low precision of available data. Here, we studied human mobility using high-resolution movement data from individuals in New York City during and for several days after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. We found the human movements followed truncated power-law distributions during and after Hurricane Sandy, although the β value was noticeably larger during the first 24 hours after the storm struck. Also, we examined two parameters: the center of mass and the radius of gyration of each individual's movements. We found that their values during perturbation states and steady states are highly correlated, suggesting human mobility data obtained in steady states can possibly predict the perturbation state. Our results demonstrate that human movement trajectories experienced significant perturbations during hurricanes, but also exhibited high resilience. We expect the study will stimulate future research on the perturbation and inherent resilience of human mobility under the influence of hurricanes. For example, mobility patterns in coastal urban areas could be examined as hurricanes approach, gain or dissipate in strength, and as the path of the storm changes. Understanding nuances of human mobility under the influence of such disasters will enable more effective evacuation, emergency response planning and development of strategies and policies to reduce fatality, injury, and economic loss.

  11. Quantifying Trust, Distrust, and Suspicion in Human-System Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    communication, psychology , human factors, management, marketing, information technology, and brain/neurology. We first developed a generic model of state...task classification based upon topographic EEG data. Biological Psychology , 1995. 40: p. 239-250. 5. Gevins, A., et al., High-Resolution EEG...Interaction (submitted), 2013. 15. Pouliota, P., et al., Nonlinear hemodynamic responses in human epilepsy : A multimodal analysis with fNIRS-EEG and fMRI

  12. Quantifying the Influence of Climate on Human Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiang, S. M.; Burke, M.; Miguel, E.

    2014-12-01

    A rapidly growing body of research examines whether human conflict can be affected by climatic changes. Drawing from archaeology, criminology, economics, geography, history, political science, and psychology, we assemble and analyze the most rigorous quantitative studies and document, for the first time, a striking convergence of results. We find strong causal evidence linking climatic events to human conflict across a range of spatial and temporal scales and across all major regions of the world. The magnitude of climate's influence is substantial: for each one standard deviation (1sd) change in climate toward warmer temperatures or more extreme rainfall, median estimates indicate that the frequency of interpersonal violence rises 4% and the frequency of intergroup conflict rises 14%. Because locations throughout the inhabited world are expected to warm 2sd to 4sd by 2050, amplified rates of human conflict could represent a large and critical impact of anthropogenic climate change.

  13. Quantifying risk factors for human brucellosis in rural northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Kunda; Fitzpatrick, Julie; French, Nigel; Kazwala, Rudovick; Kambarage, Dominic; Mfinanga, Godfrey S; MacMillan, Alastair; Cleaveland, Sarah

    2010-04-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of veterinary, public health and economic significance in most developing countries. Human brucellosis is a severely debilitating disease that requires prolonged treatment with a combination of antibiotics. The disease can result in permanent and disabling sequel, and results in considerable medical expenses in addition to loss of income due to loss of working hours. A study was conducted in Northern Tanzania to determine the risk factors for transmission of brucellosis to humans in Tanzania. This was a matched case-control study. Any patient with a positive result by a competitive ELISA (c-ELISA) test for brucellosis, and presenting to selected hospitals with at least two clinical features suggestive of brucellosis such as headache, recurrent or continuous fever, sweating, joint pain, joint swelling, general body malaise or backache, was defined as a case. For every case in a district, a corresponding control was traced and matched by sex using multistage cluster sampling. Other criteria for inclusion as a control included a negative c-ELISA test result and that the matched individual would present to hospital if falls sick. Multivariable analysis showed that brucellosis was associated with assisted parturition during abortion in cattle, sheep or goat. It was shown that individuals living in close proximity to other households had a higher risk of brucellosis. People who were of Christian religion were found to have a higher risk of brucellosis compared to other religions. The study concludes that assisting an aborting animal, proximity to neighborhoods, and Christianity were associated with brucellosis infection. There was no association between human brucellosis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) serostatus. Protecting humans against contact with fluids and tissues during assisted parturition of livestock may be an important means of reducing the risk of transferring brucellosis from livestock to humans. These can be achieved

  14. Quantifying risk factors for human brucellosis in rural northern Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunda John

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a zoonosis of veterinary, public health and economic significance in most developing countries. Human brucellosis is a severely debilitating disease that requires prolonged treatment with a combination of antibiotics. The disease can result in permanent and disabling sequel, and results in considerable medical expenses in addition to loss of income due to loss of working hours. A study was conducted in Northern Tanzania to determine the risk factors for transmission of brucellosis to humans in Tanzania.This was a matched case-control study. Any patient with a positive result by a competitive ELISA (c-ELISA test for brucellosis, and presenting to selected hospitals with at least two clinical features suggestive of brucellosis such as headache, recurrent or continuous fever, sweating, joint pain, joint swelling, general body malaise or backache, was defined as a case. For every case in a district, a corresponding control was traced and matched by sex using multistage cluster sampling. Other criteria for inclusion as a control included a negative c-ELISA test result and that the matched individual would present to hospital if falls sick.Multivariable analysis showed that brucellosis was associated with assisted parturition during abortion in cattle, sheep or goat. It was shown that individuals living in close proximity to other households had a higher risk of brucellosis. People who were of Christian religion were found to have a higher risk of brucellosis compared to other religions. The study concludes that assisting an aborting animal, proximity to neighborhoods, and Christianity were associated with brucellosis infection. There was no association between human brucellosis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV serostatus. Protecting humans against contact with fluids and tissues during assisted parturition of livestock may be an important means of reducing the risk of transferring brucellosis from livestock to humans. These can be

  15. Considerations on the elements of quantifying human reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straeter, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    This paper attempts to provide a contribution for the discussion of what the term 'data' means and how the qualitative perspective can be linked with the quantitative one. It will argue that the terms 'quantitative data' and 'qualitative data' are not distinct but a continuum that spans over the entire spectrum of the expertise that has to be involved in the HRA process. It elaborates the rational behind any human reliability quantification figure and suggests a scientific way forward to better data for human reliability assessment

  16. Effects of Antioxidants and Vitamins on the Proliferation of Human Diploid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaziza Dаnlybaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microelements, essential nutrients that are needed in small amounts including minerals such as calcium, zinc, iron and other vitamins (A, B, C, and etc., are macronutrients necessary for a healthy life. The role of micronutrients in vivo is well known, and there are several publications that have examined the effects of micronutrients on genomic stability. Furthermore, a number of vitamins and microelements are substrates and/or cofactors in metabolic pathways, which regulate DNA synthesis and/or repair and gene expression. A deficiency in such nutrients may result in disruption of genomic integrity and alterations in DNA methylation patterns, linking cellular nutrition with change in gene expression. For example, lack of vitamin C is known to cause increased DNA oxidation and chromosomal damage. Vitamin A, as well as other micronutrients, have a protective effect, whereas higher concentrations are associated with increased DNA damage. Ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10 and dihydroquercetin are used in therapy as antioxidant compounds and electron carriers, which reduce lipid peroxidation of cell membranes. However, previous studies indicate that various ubiquinone analogs may cause a divergent effect on oxidative stress and oxidative phosphorylation. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of vitamins A and C, coenzyme Q10, and dihydroquercetin on the proliferative potential of cultured human embryonic diploid fibroblasts (M-22. Methods: In the first series of experiments, nontoxic concentrations of vitamins for the cells were identified using MTT assay. Results: Vitamins A and C, dihydroquercetin of 1µM, and coenzyme Q10 of 5µM were nontoxic for human skin fibroblasts. In the second series of experiments, cell cultivation was carried out with nontoxic concentrations. A vitamin C concentration of 1µM for 7 consecutive passages increased the proliferation index (PI compared to the control. Thus, the average PI in the

  17. Quantifying Engagement: Measuring Player Involvement in Human-Avatar Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Anne E.; Weger, Harry; Bullinger, Cory; Bowers, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated the merits of using an established system for rating behavioral cues of involvement in human dyadic interactions (i.e., face-to-face conversation) to measure involvement in human-avatar interactions. Gameplay audio-video and self-report data from a Feasibility Trial and Free Choice study of an effective peer resistance skill building simulation game (DRAMA-RAMA™) were used to evaluate reliability and validity of the rating system when applied to human-avatar interactions. The Free Choice study used a revised game prototype that was altered to be more engaging. Both studies involved girls enrolled in a public middle school in Central Florida that served a predominately Hispanic (greater than 80%), low-income student population. Audio-video data were coded by two raters, trained in the rating system. Self-report data were generated using measures of perceived realism, predictability and flow administered immediately after game play. Hypotheses for reliability and validity were supported: Reliability values mirrored those found in the human dyadic interaction literature. Validity was supported by factor analysis, significantly higher levels of involvement in Free Choice as compared to Feasibility Trial players, and correlations between involvement dimension sub scores and self-report measures. Results have implications for the science of both skill-training intervention research and game design. PMID:24748718

  18. Quantifying interictal metabolic activity in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, T.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Engel, J. Jr.; Christenson, P.D.; Zhang, J.X.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of patients with complex partial seizures of unilateral temporal lobe origin have interictal temporal hypometabolism on [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) studies. Often, this hypometabolism extends to ipsilateral extratemporal sites. The use of accurately quantified metabolic data has been limited by the absence of an equally reliable method of anatomical analysis of PET images. We developed a standardized method for visual placement of anatomically configured regions of interest on FDG PET studies, which is particularly adapted to the widespread, asymmetric, and often severe interictal metabolic alterations of temporal lobe epilepsy. This method was applied by a single investigator, who was blind to the identity of subjects, to 10 normal control and 25 interictal temporal lobe epilepsy studies. All subjects had normal brain anatomical volumes on structural neuroimaging studies. The results demonstrate ipsilateral thalamic and temporal lobe involvement in the interictal hypometabolism of unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy. Ipsilateral frontal, parietal, and basal ganglial metabolism is also reduced, although not as markedly as is temporal and thalamic metabolism

  19. Quantifying heterogeneity in human tumours using MRI and PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Marie-Claude; O'Connor, James P B; Boellaard, Ronald; Thacker, Neil A; Jackson, Alan

    2012-03-01

    Most tumours, even those of the same histological type and grade, demonstrate considerable biological heterogeneity. Variations in genomic subtype, growth factor expression and local microenvironmental factors can result in regional variations within individual tumours. For example, localised variations in tumour cell proliferation, cell death, metabolic activity and vascular structure will be accompanied by variations in oxygenation status, pH and drug delivery that may directly affect therapeutic response. Documenting and quantifying regional heterogeneity within the tumour requires histological or imaging techniques. There is increasing evidence that quantitative imaging biomarkers can be used in vivo to provide important, reproducible and repeatable estimates of tumoural heterogeneity. In this article we review the imaging methods available to provide appropriate biomarkers of tumour structure and function. We also discuss the significant technical issues involved in the quantitative estimation of heterogeneity and the range of descriptive metrics that can be derived. Finally, we have reviewed the existing clinical evidence that heterogeneity metrics provide additional useful information in drug discovery and development and in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Vitamin D(3) is more potent than vitamin D(2) in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Robert P; Recker, Robert R; Grote, James; Horst, Ronald L; Armas, Laura A G

    2011-03-01

    Current unitage for the calciferols suggests that equimolar quantities of vitamins D(2) (D2) and D(3) (D3) are biologically equivalent. Published studies yield mixed results. The aim of the study was to compare the potencies of D2 and D3. The trial used a single-blind, randomized design in 33 healthy adults. Calciferols were dosed at 50,000 IU/wk for 12 wk. Principal outcome variables were area under the curve for incremental total 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and change in calciferol content of sc fat. Incremental mean (sd) 25(OH)D area under the curve at 12 wk was 1366 ng · d/ml (516) for the D2-treated group and 2136 (606) for the D3 (P < 0.001). Mean (sd) steady-state 25(OH)D increments showed similar differences: 24 ng/ml for D2 (10.3) and 45 ng/ml (16.2) for D3 (P <0.001). Subcutaneous fat content of D2 rose by 50 μg/kg in the D2-treated group, and D3 content rose by 104 μg/kg in the D3-treated group. Total calciferol in fat rose by only 33 ng/kg in the D2-treated, whereas it rose by 104 μg/kg in the D3-treated group. Extrapolating to total body fat D3, storage amounted to just 17% of the administered dose. D3 is approximately 87% more potent in raising and maintaining serum 25(OH)D concentrations and produces 2- to 3-fold greater storage of vitamin D than does equimolar D2. For neither was there evidence of sequestration in fat, as had been postulated for doses in this range. Given its greater potency and lower cost, D3 should be the preferred treatment option when correcting vitamin D deficiency.

  1. Synergistic growth inhibition by sorafenib and vitamin K2 in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yafei; Zhang, Bicheng; Zhang, Anran; Zhao, Yong; Zhao, Jie; Liu, Jian; Gao, Jianfei; Fang, Dianchun; Rao, Zhiguo

    2012-09-01

    Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor that has been proven effective as a single-agent therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma, and there is a strong rationale for investigating its use in combination with other agents. Vitamin K2 is nearly non-toxic to humans and has been shown to inhibit the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we evaluated the effects of a combination of sorafenib and vitamin K2 on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Flow cytometry, 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) and nude mouse xenograft assays were used to examine the effects of sorafenib and vitamin K2 on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Western blotting was used to elucidate the possible mechanisms underlying these effects. Assays for 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) revealed a strong synergistic growth-inhibitory effect between sorafenib and vitamin K2. Flow cytometry showed an increase in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis after treatment with a combination of these two drugs at low concentrations. Sorafenib-mediated inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation was promoted by vitamin K2, and downregulation of Mcl-1, which is required for sorafenib-induced apoptosis, was observed after combined treatment. Vitamin K2 also attenuated the downregulation of p21 expression induced by sorafenib, which may represent the mechanism by which vitamin K2 promotes the inhibitory effects of sorafenib on cell proliferation. Moreover, the combination of sorafenib and vitamin K2 significantly inhibited the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. Our results determined that combined treatment with sorafenib and vitamin K2 can work synergistically to inhibit the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. This finding raises the possibility that this combined treatment strategy might be promising as a new therapy against hepatocellular carcinoma, especially for patients

  2. Cytotoxic activity of vitamins K1, K2 and K3 against human oral tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayasu, H; Ishihara, M; Satoh, K; Sakagami, H

    2001-01-01

    Vitamin K1, K2 and K3 were compared for their cytotoxic activity, radical generation and O2- scavenging activity. Among these compounds, vitamin K3 showed the highest cytotoxic activity against human oral tumor cell lines (HSC-2, HSG), human promyelocytic leukemic cell line (HL-60) and human gingival fibroblast (HGF). Vitamin K3 induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in HL-60 cells, but not in HSC-2 or HSG cells. The cytotoxic activity of vitamins K2 and K1 was one and two orders lower, respectively, than K3. Vitamin K2, but not vitamin K3, showed tumor-specific cytotoxic action. ESR spectroscopy showed that only vitamin K3 produced radical(s) under alkaline condition and most potently enhanced the radical intensity of sodium ascorbate and scavenged O2- (generated by hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase reaction system); vitamin K2 was much less active whereas vitamin K1 was inactive. These data suggest that the cytotoxic activity of vitamin K3 is generated by radical-mediated oxidation mechanism and that this vitamin has two opposing actions (that is, antioxidant and prooxidant), depending on the experimental conditions.

  3. Findings from analysing and quantifying human error using current methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, V.N.; Reer, B.

    1999-01-01

    In human reliability analysis (HRA), the scarcity of data means that, at best, judgement must be applied to transfer to the domain of the analysis what data are available for similar tasks. In particular for the quantification of tasks involving decisions, the analyst has to choose among quantification approaches that all depend to a significant degree on expert judgement. The use of expert judgement can be made more reliable by eliciting relative judgements rather than absolute judgements. These approaches, which are based on multiple criterion decision theory, focus on ranking the tasks to be analysed by difficulty. While these approaches remedy at least partially the poor performance of experts in the estimation of probabilities, they nevertheless require the calibration of the relative scale on which the actions are ranked in order to obtain the probabilities of interest. This paper presents some results from a comparison of some current HRA methods performed in the frame of a study of SLIM calibration options. The HRA quantification methods THERP, HEART, and INTENT were applied to derive calibration human error probabilities for two groups of operator actions. (author)

  4. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  5. Expression of LRP1 by human osteoblasts: a mechanism for the delivery of lipoproteins and vitamin K1 to bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeier, Andreas; Kassem, Moustapha; Toedter, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Accumulating clinical and experimental data show the importance of dietary lipids and lipophilic vitamins, such as vitamin K1, for bone formation. The molecular mechanism of how they enter the osteoblast is unknown. Here we describe the expression of the multifunctional LRP1 by human osteoblasts...... in vitro and in vivo. We provide evidence that LRP1 plays an important role in the uptake of postprandial lipoproteins and vitamin K1 by human osteoblasts....

  6. Hydrosoluble vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jasvinder; Kvarnberg, David

    2014-01-01

    The hydrosoluble vitamins are a group of organic substances that are required by humans in small amounts to prevent disorders of metabolism. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the biochemical, physiologic and nutritional aspects of the water-soluble vitamins. Deficiency of these particular vitamins, most commonly due to inadequate nutrition, can result in disorders of the nervous system. Many of these disorders have been successfully prevented in developed countries; however, they are still common in developing countries. Of the hydrosoluble vitamins, the nervous system depends the most on vitamins B and C (ascorbic acid) for proper functioning. The B group vitamins include thiamin (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), niacin or niacinamide (vitamin B3), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), pyridoxine or pyridoxal (vitamin B6) and cobalamin (vitamin B12). Clinical findings depend upon the deficiency of the underlying vitamin; generally, deficiency symptoms are seen from a combination rather than an isolated vitamin deficiency. True hereditary metabolic disorders and serious deficiency-associated diseases are rare and in general limited to particular geographic regions and high-risk groups. Their recognition is truly important as that determines the appropriate therapeutic management. The general availability of vitamins to practically everyone and several national health programs have saved many lives and prevented complications. However, there has been some apprehension for several decades about how harmless generous dosages of these vitamins are. Overt overdosages can cause vitamin toxicity affecting various body systems including the nervous system. Systemically, vitamin toxicity is associated with nonspecific symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and skin rash which are common with any acute or chronic vitamin overdose. At a national level, recommended daily allowances for vitamins become policy statements. Nutrition policy has far

  7. Genetic, anatomic, and clinical determinants of human serum sterol and vitamin D levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Ashlee R; Kozlitina, Julia; Thompson, Bonne M; McDonald, Jeffrey G; King, Kevin S; Russell, David W

    2014-09-23

    An unknown fraction of the genome participates in the metabolism of sterols and vitamin D, two classes of lipids with diverse physiological and pathophysiological roles. Here, we used mass spectrometry to measure the abundance of >60 sterol and vitamin D derivatives in 3,230 serum samples from a well-phenotyped patient population. Twenty-nine of these lipids were detected in a majority of samples at levels that varied over thousands of fold in different individuals. Pairwise correlations between sterol and vitamin D levels revealed evidence for shared metabolic pathways, additional substrates for known enzymes, and transcriptional regulatory networks. Serum levels of multiple sterols and vitamin D metabolites varied significantly by sex, ethnicity, and age. A genome-wide association study identified 16 loci that were associated with levels of 19 sterols and 25-hydroxylated derivatives of vitamin D (P < 10(-7)). Resequencing, expression analysis, and biochemical experiments focused on one such locus (CYP39A1), revealed multiple loss-of-function alleles with additive effects on serum levels of the oxysterol, 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a substrate of the encoded enzyme. Body mass index, serum lipid levels, and hematocrit were strong phenotypic correlates of interindividual variation in multiple sterols and vitamin D metabolites. We conclude that correlating population-based analytical measurements with genotype and phenotype provides productive insight into human intermediary metabolism.

  8. Regulation of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase expression by vitamin D3 metabolites in human prostate stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.-H.; Tuohimaa, Pentti

    2006-01-01

    Vitamin D 3 plays an important role in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation. Cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) is an enzyme converting cholesterol into 25-hydroxycholesterol. Vitamin D 3 as well as 25-hydroxycholesterol has been shown to inhibit cell growth and induce cell apoptosis. Here we show that 10 nM 1α,25(OH) 2 D 3 and 500 nM 25OHD 3 upregulate CH25H mRNA expression in human primary prostate stromal cells (P29SN). Protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide does not block 1α,25(OH) 2 D 3 mediated upregulation of CH25H mRNA. Transcription inhibitor actinomycin D blocks basal level as well as 1α,25(OH) 2 D 3 induced CH25H mRNA expression. 1α,25(OH) 2 D 3 has no effect on CH25H mRNA stability. 25-Hydroxycholesterol significantly decreased the P29SN cell number. A CH25H enzyme inhibitor, desmosterol, increases basal cell number but has no significant effect on vitamin D 3 treated cells. Our data suggest that ch25h could be a vitamin D 3 target gene and may partly mediate anti-proliferative action of vitamin D 3 in human primary prostate stromal cells

  9. The human serum metabolome of vitamin B-12 deficiency and repletion, and associations with neurological function

    Science.gov (United States)

    We characterize the human serum metabolome in sub-clinical vitamin B-12 (B-12) deficiency and repletion. A pre-post treatment study provided one injection of 10 mg B-12 to 27 community-dwelling elderly Chileans with B-12 deficiency evaluated with serum B-12, plasma homocysteine, methylmalonic acid a...

  10. Human intrinsic factor expression for bioavailable vitamin B12 enrichment in microalgae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, Serena; Webb, Conner L.; Deery, Evelyne

    2018-01-01

    Dietary supplements and functional foods are becoming increasingly popular complements to regular diets. A recurring ingredient is the essential cofactor vitamin B12(B12). Microalgae are making their way into the dietary supplement and functional food market but do not produce B12, and their B12 ...... that is suitable for vegetarians and, potentially, more bioavailable for humans....

  11. Cdx2 Polymorphism Affects the Activities of Vitamin D Receptor in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Human Breast Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  12. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Pulito

    Full Text Available Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR. It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954 human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative. These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression.

  13. Effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and vitamin D3 on the expression of the vitamin D receptor in human skeletal muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression and action in non-human skeletal muscle have recently been reported in several studies, yet data on the activity and expression of VDR in human muscle cells are scarce. We conducted a series of studies to examine the (1) effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH...

  14. Vitamin E As a Potential Interventional Treatment for Metabolic Syndrome: Evidence from Animal and Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sok Kuan Wong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A constellation of medical conditions inclusive of central obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia is known as metabolic syndrome (MetS. The safest option in curtailing the progression of MetS is through maintaining a healthy lifestyle, which by itself, is a long-term commitment entailing much determination. A combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approach, as well as lifestyle modification is a more holistic alternative in the management of MetS. Vitamin E has been revealed to possess anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-obesity, anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hypertensive and anti-hypercholesterolemic properties. The pathways regulated by vitamin E are critical in the development of MetS and its components. Therefore, we postulate that vitamin E may exert some health benefits on MetS patients. This review intends to summarize the evidence in animal and human studies on the effects of vitamin E and articulate the contrasting potential of tocopherol (TF and tocotrienol (T3 in preventing the medical conditions associated with MetS. As a conclusion, this review suggests that vitamin E may be a promising agent for attenuating MetS.

  15. Protective role of vitamin E preconditioning of human dermal fibroblasts against thermal stress in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Hira; Mehmood, Azra; Ali, Muhammad; Tasneem, Saba; Anjum, Muhammad Sohail; Tarar, Moazzam N; Khan, Shaheen N; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2017-09-01

    Oxidative microenvironment of burnt skin restricts the outcome of cell based therapies of thermal skin injuries. The aim of this study was to precondition human dermal fibroblasts with an antioxidant such as vitamin E to improve their survival and therapeutic abilities in heat induced oxidative in vitro environment. Fibroblasts were treated with 100μM vitamin E for 24h at 37°C followed by heat shock for 10min at 51°C in fresh serum free medium. Preconditioning with vitamin E reduced cell injury as demonstrated by decreased expression of annexin-V, cytochrome p450 (CYP450) mediated oxidative reactions, senescence and release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) accomplished by down-regulated expression of pro-apoptotic BAX gene. Vitamin E preconditioned cells exhibited remarkable improvement in cell viability, release of paracrine factors such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), stromal derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1α) and also showed significantly up-regulated levels of PCNA, VEGF, BCL-XL, FGF7, FGF23, FLNβ and Col7α genes presumably through activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/Akt pathway. The results suggest that pretreatment of fibroblasts with vitamin E prior to transplantation in burnt skin speeds up the wound healing process by improving the antioxidant scavenging responses in oxidative environment of transplanted burn wounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Vitamin D as an adjunctive therapy in asthma. Part 2: A review of human studies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kerley, Conor P

    2015-03-05

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is highly prevalent worldwide, with adverse effects on bone health but also potentially other unfavorable consequences. VDD and asthma-incidence\\/severity share many common risk factors, including winter season, industrialization, poor diet, obesity, dark skin pigmentation, and high latitude. Multiple anatomical areas relevant to asthma contain both the enzyme responsible for producing activated vitamin D and the vitamin D receptor suggesting that activated vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) may have important local effects at these sites. Emerging evidence suggests that VDD is associated with increased airway hyperresponsiveness, decreased pulmonary function, worse asthma control, and possibly decreased response to standard anti-asthma therapy. However the effect is inconsistent with preliminary evidence from different studies suggesting vitamin D is both beneficial and detrimental to asthma genesis and severity. Current evidence suggests that supplementation with moderate doses of vitamin D may be appropriate for maintenance of bone health in asthmatics, particularly steroid users. However emerging data from an increasing number of randomized, controlled, intervention studies of vitamin D supplementation in pediatric and adult asthma are becoming available and should help determine the importance, if any of vitamin D for asthma pathogenesis. The purpose of this second of a two-part review is to review the current human literature on vitamin D and asthma, discussing the possible consequences of VDD for asthma and the potential for vitamin D repletion as adjunct therapy.

  17. Vitamin D-metabolites from human plasma and mass spectrometric analysis by fast heavy ion induced desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fohlman, J; Peterson, P A [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Cell Research; Kamensky, I; Hakansson, P; Sundqvist, B [Tandemacceleratorlaboratoriet, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1982-07-01

    D-vitamin metabolites have been isolated from human serum employing chromatographic techniques. The serum carrier protein for vitamin D (DBP) was first isolated by immunosorbent chromatography. Lipid ligands associated with DBP were then extracted with hexane and separated by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Detection of vitamin D metabolites by their absorbance of ultraviolet light is not sufficiently sensitive to monitor all vitamin D derivatives from a few millilitres of serum. Therefore, further analyses are necessary to quantitative these compounds. We have begun to develop a mass spectrometric method to achieve a reliable, quantitative procedure. As a first step towards this goal a number of pure samples of vitamin D compounds have been studied in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on fast heavy ion induced desorption. All vitamin D compounds examined could be detected and identified by their molecular ion and fragment spectra.

  18. Vitamin D-metabolites from human plasma and mass spectrometric analysis by fast heavy ion induced desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fohlman, J.; Peterson, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    D-vitamin metabolites have been isolated from human serum employing chromatographic techniques. The serum carrier protein for vitamin D (DBP) was first isolated by immunosorbent chromatography. Lipid ligands associated with DBP were then extracted with hexane and separated by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Detection of vitamin D metabolites by their absorbance of ultraviolet light is not sufficiently sensitive to monitor all vitamin D derivatives from a few millilitres of serum. Therefore, further analyses are necessary to quantitative these compounds. We have begun to develop a mass spectrometric method to achieve a reliable, quantitative procedure. As a first step towards this goal a number of pure samples of vitamin D compounds have been studied in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on fast heavy ion induced desorption. All vitamin D compounds examined could be detected and identified by their molecular ion and fragment spectra. (orig.)

  19. B-Vitamin Levels in Human Milk among Different Lactation Stages and Areas in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiangnan; Yang, Zhenyu; Shao, Bing; Yin, Shi-An; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2015-01-01

    To determine the contents of B-vitamins in human milk in China, we analyzed 1778 human milk samples from the sample bank of the National High Technique R & D Program (863 Projects) which was a cross-sectional survey and covered 6419 human milk samples from healthy lactating mothers who were at different stages of lactation (0-330 days postpartum) in 11 provinces of China. The contents of free forms of six B-vitamins in these human milk samples were analyzed by using UPLC-MS/MS. The median concentrations of free form of 6 B-vitamins in colostrums, transitional milk, 15-180 d mature milk and 181-330 d mature milk were respectively as follows: thiamin 5.0 µg/L, 6.7 µg/L, 21.1 µg/L and 40.7 µg/L; riboflavin 29.3 µg/L, 40.6 µg/L, 33.6 µg/L and 29.6 µg/L; niacin 470.7 µg/L, 661.3 µg/L, 687.0 µg/L and 571.3 µg/L; vitamin B-6 4.6 µg/L, 16.1 µg/L, 62.7 µg/L and 80.7 µg/L; flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) 808.7 µg/L, 1162.8 µg/L, 1023.9 µg/L and 1057.2 µg/L; pantothenic acid 1770.9 µg/L, 2626.8 µg/L, 2213.0 µg/L and 1895.5 µg/L. The contents of 6 B-vitamins varied significantly among the different lactation stages and different areas (coastal area vs inland area, rural area vs urban area). The present study indicated that the concentrations of B-vitamins in colostrum were generally much lower than those in transitional milk and mature milk. Further studies are warranted for their roles and significance on B-vitamins in colostrum in nutrition and metabolism of neonates.

  20. Vitamin D is positively associated with sperm motility and increases intracellular calcium in human spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Bjerrum, Poul J; Jessen, Torben E

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human spermatozoa, and VDR-knockout mice and vitamin D (VD) deficiency in rodents results in impaired fertility, low sperm counts and a low number of motile spermatozoa. We investigated the role of activated VD (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) in human...... spermatozoa and whether VD serum levels are associated with semen quality. METHODS Cross-sectional association study of semen quality and VD serum level in 300 men from the general population, and in vitro studies on spermatozoa from 40 men to investigate the effects of VD on intracellular calcium, sperm......M). 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) increased intracellular calcium concentration in human spermatozoa through VDR-mediated calcium release from an intracellular calcium storage, increased sperm motility and induced the acrosome reaction in vitro. CONCLUSIONS 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) increased intracellular calcium...

  1. Vitamin E concentration in human milk and associated factors: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Mayara S R; Dimenstein, Roberto; Ribeiro, Karla D S

    2014-01-01

    To systematize information about vitamin E concentration in human milk and the variables associated with this composition in order to find possible causes of deficiency, supporting strategies to prevent it in postpartum women and infants. Studies published between 2004 and 2014 that assayed alpha-tocopherol in human milk of healthy women by high performance liquid chromatography were evaluated. The keywords used were "vitamin E", "alpha-tocopherol", "milk, human", "lactation", and equivalents in Portuguese, in the BIREME, CAPES, PubMed, SciELO, ISI Web of Knowledge, HighWire Press, Ingenta, and Brazilian Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations databases. Of the 41 publications found on the subject, 25 whose full text was available and met the inclusion criteria were selected. The alpha-tocopherol concentrations found in milk were similar in most populations studied. The variable phase of lactation was shown to influence vitamin E content in milk, which is reduced until the mature milk appears. Maternal variables parity, anthropometric nutritional status, socioeconomic status, and habitual dietary intake did not appear to affect the alpha-tocopherol levels in milk. However, the influence of the variables maternal age, gestational age, biochemical nutritional status in alpha-tocopherol, and maternal supplementation with vitamin E had conflicting results in the literature. Alpha-tocopherol concentration in milk decreases during lactation, until the mature milk appears. To confirm the influence of some maternal and child variables on milk vitamin E content, further studies with adequate design are needed. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Simultaneous absorption of vitamins C and E from topical microemulsions using reconstructed human epidermis as a skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozman, Branka; Gasperlin, Mirjana; Tinois-Tessoneaud, Estelle; Pirot, Fabrice; Falson, Francoise

    2009-05-01

    Antioxidants provide the mainstay for skin protection against free radical damage. The structure of microemulsions (ME), colloidal thermodynamically stable dispersions of water, oil and surfactant, allows the incorporation of both lipophilic (vitamin E) and hydrophilic (vitamin C) antioxidants in the same system. The objective of this work was to investigate the potential of non-thickened (o/w, w/o and gel-like) and thickened (with colloidal silica) ME as carriers for the two vitamins using reconstructed human epidermis (RHE). The amounts of these vitamins accumulated in and permeated across the RHE were determined, together with factors affecting skin deposition and permeation. Notable differences were observed between formulations. The absorption of vitamins C and E in RHE layers was in general enhanced by ME compared to solutions. The incorporation of vitamins in the outer phase of ME resulted in greater absorption than that when vitamins were in the inner phase. The location of the antioxidants in the ME and affinity for the vehicle appear to be crucial in the case of non-thickened ME. Addition of thickener enhanced the deposition of vitamins E and C in the RHE. By varying the composition of ME, RHE absorption of the two vitamins can be significantly modulated.

  3. Anti-aging effects of vitamin C on human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Young; Ku, Seung-Yup; Huh, Yul; Liu, Hung-Ching; Kim, Seok Hyun; Choi, Young Min; Moon, Shin Yong

    2013-10-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have arisen as a source of cells for biomedical research due to their developmental potential. Stem cells possess the promise of providing clinicians with novel treatments for disease as well as allowing researchers to generate human-specific cellular metabolism models. Aging is a natural process of living organisms, yet aging in human heart cells is difficult to study due to the ethical considerations regarding human experimentation as well as a current lack of alternative experimental models. hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) bear a resemblance to human cardiac cells and thus hPSC-derived CMs are considered to be a viable alternative model to study human heart cell aging. In this study, we used hPSC-derived CMs as an in vitro aging model. We generated cardiomyocytes from hPSCs and demonstrated the process of aging in both human embryonic stem cell (hESC)- and induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived CMs. Aging in hESC-derived CMs correlated with reduced membrane potential in mitochondria, the accumulation of lipofuscin, a slower beating pattern, and the downregulation of human telomerase RNA (hTR) and cell cycle regulating genes. Interestingly, the expression of hTR in hiPSC-derived CMs was not significantly downregulated, unlike in hESC-derived CMs. In order to delay aging, vitamin C was added to the cultured CMs. When cells were treated with 100 μM of vitamin C for 48 h, anti-aging effects, specifically on the expression of telomere-related genes and their functionality in aging cells, were observed. Taken together, these results suggest that hPSC-derived CMs can be used as a unique human cardiomyocyte aging model in vitro and that vitamin C shows anti-aging effects in this model.

  4. Simultaneous quantification of 21 water soluble vitamin circulating forms in human plasma by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisser Redeuil, Karine; Longet, Karin; Bénet, Sylvie; Munari, Caroline; Campos-Giménez, Esther

    2015-11-27

    This manuscript reports a validated analytical approach for the quantification of 21 water soluble vitamins and their main circulating forms in human plasma. Isotope dilution-based sample preparation consisted of protein precipitation using acidic methanol enriched with stable isotope labelled internal standards. Separation was achieved by reversed-phase liquid chromatography and detection performed by tandem mass spectrometry in positive electrospray ionization mode. Instrumental lower limits of detection and quantification reached water soluble vitamins in human plasma single donor samples. The present report provides a sensitive and reliable approach for the quantification of water soluble vitamins and main circulating forms in human plasma. In the future, the application of this analytical approach will give more confidence to provide a comprehensive assessment of water soluble vitamins nutritional status and bioavailability studies in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. UV dependent vitamin D syntheses. UV exposure time balancing for optimum production of the vitamins D3 status in the human body. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knuschke, P.; Lehmann, B.; Pueschel, A.; Roensch, H.

    2012-01-01

    UV-dependent vitamin D 3 synthesis - balancing of UV exposure time and the production of an optimal vitamin D 3 status in men The adverse health effects on human skin and eyes by UV radiation have been well known for years. They are known to the public, too. Increased exposures by the UV-B fraction of solar radiation cause e.g. sun burn as an acute skin reaction or an increased risk on skin cancer as a chronic effect. Radiation of the same spectral UV-B range is necessary to induce the essential vitamin D metabolism in men. The UV-induced vitamin D synthesis in the skin supplies the body with more than 90 % while our typical nutrition contributes no more than 10 %. These photobiological effects are diametrically opposed. Therefore, up to now there are contradictory recommendations to the public concerning the health effects of solar UV exposure. The aim of this research project was to evaluate the quantitative and qualitative relations of UV exposure and the vitamin D status in men taking into account different conditions in the population. In result, well-balanced recommendations on optimal UV exposures for the different fractions of the population should be elaborated, realizing health protection aspects against detrimental UV effects. A literature survey (updated in 2011) summarizes the current knowledge on the vitamin D metabolism, on the effects of the hormone vitamin D and on the stage of the current discussion on the optimal vitamin D status. In a number of studies of this project the effects of UV exposure on the vitamin D status (25OH-vitamin D 3 und 1,25OH-vitamin D 3 ) were investigated. Exposure parameters were the photobiologically effective UV dose (with respect to the minimal erythema dose MED = individual sun burn dose in each investigated volunteer) and the extent of the exposed skin area: face and hands (like everyday conditions) or whole body respectively. Serial UV exposures were applied by natural solar UV radiation or by simulated solar

  6. Vitamin K2 downregulates the expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ke; Liu, Weidong; Nakamura, Hideji; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Yamamoto, Teruhisa; Saito, Masaki; Imanishi, Hiroyasu; Shimomura, Soji; Cao, Peiguo; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2009-11-01

    Vitamin K2 exerts an antitumor activity on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), however, its inhibitory mechanism has not yet been clarified. This study was designed to identify the attractive target molecule of vitamin K2 and shed some light on its effects on fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)3 in HCC cells. The changes in the gene expression of HuH-7 after vitamin K2 treatment were evaluated by a DNA chip analysis. The mRNA and protein levels of FGFR were evaluated by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), real-time PCR and western blot analysis. The promoter activity of the FGFR3 gene was measured by a dual-luciferase assay. The DNA chip analysis revealed different inhibitory rates of gene expression of FGFR3 (60.6%) and FGFR1 (19.4%) after vitamin K2 treatment. Vitamin K2 suppresses the proliferation of HuH-7 in a dose-dependent manner and its inhibitory rate reached approximately 61.8% at the dose of 30 microM. FGFR3 mRNA was significantly reduced based on semiquantitative RT-PCR and decreased 61.5% by a real-time PCR method after vitamin K2 treatment, but FGFR1 mRNA was not. The level of FGFR3 protein was also reduced by vitamin K2 treatment. The luciferase assay demonstrated that vitamin K2 significantly suppressed the promoter activity of FGFR3. Furthermore, the FGFR3-ERK1/2 signaling pathway was suppressed by vitamin K2 treatment. These findings suggest that vitamin K2 may suppress the proliferation of HCC cells through the downregulation of the FGFR3 expression. The transcriptional suppression of FGFR3 may be a novel mechanism of the vitamin K2 action for HCC cells.

  7. Multiple sequential failure model: A probabilistic approach to quantifying human error dependency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta

    1985-01-01

    This paper rpesents a probabilistic approach to quantifying human error dependency when multiple tasks are performed. Dependent human failures are dominant contributors to risks from nuclear power plants. An overview of the Multiple Sequential Failure (MSF) model developed and its use in probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) depending on the available data are discussed. A small-scale psychological experiment was conducted on the nature of human dependency and the interpretation of the experimental data by the MSF model show remarkable accommodation of the dependent failure data. The model, which provides an unique method for quantification of dependent failures in human reliability analysis, can be used in conjunction with any of the general methods currently used for performing the human reliability aspect in PRAs

  8. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of alpha-tocopherol for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05%. Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of 60 Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t50%). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t50% values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt50%) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose

  9. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  10. Quantifying temporal bone morphology of great apes and humans: an approach using geometric morphometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Charles A; Lynch, John M; Kimbel, William H

    2002-01-01

    The hominid temporal bone offers a complex array of morphology that is linked to several different functional systems. Its frequent preservation in the fossil record gives the temporal bone added significance in the study of human evolution, but its morphology has proven difficult to quantify. In this study we use techniques of 3D geometric morphometrics to quantify differences among humans and great apes and discuss the results in a phylogenetic context. Twenty-three landmarks on the ectocranial surface of the temporal bone provide a high level of anatomical detail. Generalized Procrustes analysis (GPA) is used to register (adjust for position, orientation and scale) landmark data from 405 adults representing Homo, Pan, Gorilla and Pongo. Principal components analysis of residuals from the GPA shows that the major source of variation is between humans and apes. Human characteristics such as a coronally orientated petrous axis, a deep mandibular fossa, a projecting mastoid process, and reduced lateral extension of the tympanic element strongly impact the analysis. In phenetic cluster analyses, gorillas and orangutans group together with respect to chimpanzees, and all apes group together with respect to humans. Thus, the analysis contradicts depictions of African apes as a single morphotype. Gorillas and orangutans lack the extensive preglenoid surface of chimpanzees, and their mastoid processes are less medially inflected. These and other characters shared by gorillas and orangutans are probably primitive for the African hominid clade. PMID:12489757

  11. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Pregnant Women is Associated with Preterm Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Jennifer; Freimanis, Laura; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M; Cohen, Rachel A; Monteiro, Jacqueline Pontes; Cruz, Maria Leticia; Branch, Andrea; Sperling, Rhoda S; Siberry, George K

    2017-04-01

    Background  Low maternal vitamin D has been associated with preterm birth (PTB). Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected pregnant women are at risk for PTB, but data on maternal vitamin D and PTB in this population are scarce. Methods  In a cohort of Latin American HIV-infected pregnant women from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development International Site Development Initiative protocol, we examined the association between maternal vitamin D status and PTB. Vitamin D status was defined as the following 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels: severe deficiency (PTBs = 36 weeks [interquartile range: 34-36]). In multivariate analysis, severe vitamin D deficiency was associated with PTB (odds ratio = 4.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.3-16.8]). Conclusion  Severe maternal vitamin D deficiency is associated with PTB in HIV-infected Latin American pregnant women. Further studies are warranted to determine if vitamin D supplementation in HIV-infected women may impact PTB. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Detection of vitamin D binding protein on the surface of cytotrophoblasts isolated from human placentae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestler, J.E.; McLeod, J.F.; Kowalski, M.A.; Strauss, J.F. III; Haddad, J.G. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Vitamin D binding protein (DBP), a Mr 56,000-58,000 alpha 2-glycoprotein, is the major serum protein involved in the transport of vitamin D sterols. Recently it has been suggested that DBP may also be involved in immunoglobulin G binding to cells. Because the trophoblast is involved in the transport of molecules such as vitamin D and immunoglobulin G to the fetus, we asked whether DBP could be detected on the surface of human placental trophoblast cells. Cytotrophoblasts purified from human term placentae were fixed and made permeant with Triton X-100 and examined by indirect immunofluorescence after incubation with a monoclonal antibody to DBP. Greater than 90% of these cells stained positively, whereas no staining was observed with nonimmune antiserum. The presence of DBP on/in the surface of cytotrophoblasts could also be demonstrated by fluorescent cytometry. When cell surface-associated proteins of cytotrophoblasts were radioiodinated, a Mr 57,000 radiolabeled protein could be immunoisolated from the cell lysate with a purified monospecific polyclonal antibody to DBP. Immunoisolation of this radiolabeled protein was prevented by the addition of excess unlabeled human DBP to the cell lysate before incubation with antibody. This Mr 57,000 radiolabeled protein could also be isolated by affinity chromatography selecting for proteins that bind to globular actin. When cytotrophoblasts were incubated with [ 35 S]methionine for 3 or 18 h, active synthesis of DBP could not be demonstrated by immunoisolation techniques. These studies demonstrate the presence of DBP on the surface of well washed, human cytotrophoblasts. This DBP may be maternally derived, since active synthesis of DBP could not be demonstrated

  13. Towards quantifying dynamic human-human physical interactions for robot assisted stroke therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Mayumi; Mendonca, Rochelle; Johnson, Michelle J

    2017-07-01

    Human-Robot Interaction is a prominent field of robotics today. Knowledge of human-human physical interaction can prove vital in creating dynamic physical interactions between human and robots. Most of the current work in studying this interaction has been from a haptic perspective. Through this paper, we present metrics that can be used to identify if a physical interaction occurred between two people using kinematics. We present a simple Activity of Daily Living (ADL) task which involves a simple interaction. We show that we can use these metrics to successfully identify interactions.

  14. Microarray analyses of glucocorticoid and vitamin D3 target genes in differentiating cultured human podocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiwen Cheng

    Full Text Available Glomerular podocytes are highly differentiated epithelial cells that are key components of the kidney filtration units. Podocyte damage or loss is the hallmark of nephritic diseases characterized by severe proteinuria. Recent studies implicate that hormones including glucocorticoids (ligand for glucocorticoid receptor and vitamin D3 (ligand for vitamin D receptor protect or promote repair of podocytes from injury. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying hormone-mediated podocyte-protecting activity from injury, we carried out microarray gene expression studies to identify the target genes and corresponding pathways in response to these hormones during podocyte differentiation. We used immortalized human cultured podocytes (HPCs as a model system and carried out in vitro differentiation assays followed by dexamethasone (Dex or vitamin D3 (VD3 treatment. Upon the induction of differentiation, multiple functional categories including cell cycle, organelle dynamics, mitochondrion, apoptosis and cytoskeleton organization were among the most significantly affected. Interestingly, while Dex and VD3 are capable of protecting podocytes from injury, they only share limited target genes and affected pathways. Compared to VD3 treatment, Dex had a broader and greater impact on gene expression profiles. In-depth analyses of Dex altered genes indicate that Dex crosstalks with a broad spectrum of signaling pathways, of which inflammatory responses, cell migration, angiogenesis, NF-κB and TGFβ pathways are predominantly altered. Together, our study provides new information and identifies several new avenues for future investigation of hormone signaling in podocytes.

  15. Vitamin D supplementation does not improve human skeletal muscle contractile properties in insufficient young males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Daniel J; Webber, Daniel; Impey, Samuel G; Tang, Jonathan; Donovan, Timothy F; Fraser, William D; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2014-06-01

    Vitamin D may be a regulator of skeletal muscle function, although human trials investigating this hypothesis are limited to predominantly elderly populations. We aimed to assess the effect of oral vitamin D3 in healthy young males upon skeletal muscle function. Participants (n = 29) received an oral dose of 10,000 IU day(-1) vitamin D3 (VITD) or a visually identical placebo (PLB) for 3 months. Serum 25[OH]D and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were measured at baseline and at week 4, 8 and 12. Muscle function was assessed in n = 22 participants by isokinetic dynamometry and percutaneous isometric electromyostimulation at baseline and at week 6 and 12. Baseline mean total serum 25[OH]D was 40 ± 17 and 41 ± 20 nmol L(-1) for PLB and VITD, respectively. VITD showed a significant improvement in total 25[OH]D at week 4 (150 ± 31 nmol L(-1)) that remained elevated throughout the trial (P L(-1)) compared with baseline. Despite marked increases in total serum 25[OH]D in VITD and a decrease in PLB, there were no significant changes in any of the muscle function outcome measures at week 6 or 12 for either group (P > 0.05). Elevating total serum 25[OH]D to concentrations > 120 nmol L(-1) has no effect on skeletal muscle function. We postulate that skeletal muscle function is only perturbed in conditions of severe deficiency (L(-1)).

  16. A Bayesian approach to quantify the contribution of animal-food sources to human salmonellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Vose, D.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2004-01-01

    Based on the data from the integrated Danish Salmonella surveillance in 1999, we developed a mathematical model for quantifying the contribution of each of the major animal-food sources to human salmonellosis. The model was set up to calculate the number of domestic and sporadic cases caused...... salmonellosis was also included. The joint posterior distribution was estimated by fitting the model to the reported number of domestic and sporadic cases per Salmonella type in a Bayesian framework using Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation. The number of domestic and sporadic cases was obtained by subtracting.......8-10.4%) of the cases, respectively. Taken together, imported foods were estimated to account for 11.8% (95% CI: 5.0-19.0%) of the cases. Other food sources considered had only a minor impact, whereas 25% of the cases could not be associated with any source. This approach of quantifying the contribution of the various...

  17. Effects of Vitamin K3 and K5 on Daunorubicin-resistant Human T Lymphoblastoid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Eri; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2015-11-01

    Anticancer efficacy of vitamin K derivatives on multidrug-resistant cancer cells has been scarcely investigated. The effects of vitamins K3 and K5 on proliferation of human leukemia MOLT-4 cells and on daunorubicin-resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells were estimated by a WST assay. Apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, followed by flow cytometry. Vitamins K3 and K5 significantly inhibited proliferation of leukemic cells at 10 and 100 μM (pVitamin K3 induced cell apoptosis at 10 and 100 μM in both MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cells (pVitamin K5 also increased apoptotic cells, while rather inducing necrotic cell death. Vitamins K3 and K5 suppress MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cell-proliferation partially through induction of apoptosis, and these vitamin derivatives can overcome drug resistance due to P-glycoprotein expression. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Quantifying altitude of human habitation in studies of human health using geographical name server data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Thielke

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Almost all studies examining the effects of altitude on human health have estimated the geographical altitude of defined regions, yet the primary interest lies in where people live, not the land around them. Populations are not homogenously distributed across altitudes. We propose a straightforward and computationally simple method for estimating the average altitude of habitation within the regional units for which health statistics are typically reported (such as counties. The United States Board on Geographical Names database contains records for over 2.7 million places, which can be processed to select places that are associated with human habitation. These points can easily be averaged by region yielding a representative altitude of human habitation within city, county, state regions, or by longitude and latitude zones. We provide an example of using this approach in a study of human health, and compare it with three other previously used methods of estimating altitude for counties.

  19. Uptake of [3H]vitamin D3 from low and high density lipoproteins by cultured human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shireman, R.B.; Williams, D.; Remsen, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The plasma distribution and cellular uptake of [ 3 H]vitamin D 3 was studied in vitro using cultured human fibroblasts. Incubation of [ 3 H]vitamin D 3 (cholecalciferol) with plasma followed by sequential ultracentrifugal fractionation of the lipoproteins indicated that 2-4% of the radioactivity associated with the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), 12% with low density lipoprotein (LDL), and approximately 60% with the high density lipoprotein (HDL). The remaining radioactivity, 25%, was associated with the sedimented plasma fractions. By comparison, an average of 86% of the radioactivity from [ 3 H] 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol associated with the sedimented plasma fractions. The uptake of [ 3 H]vitamin D 3 from plasma, LDL, or HDL was studied in cultured human cells; uptake by normal fibroblasts was greatest from LDL and least from plasma. The cellular association of vitamin D 3 was time, concentration, and temperature dependent. At a concentration of 50 μg LDL/ml of medium, the uptake of [ 3 H]vitamin D 3 from LDL at 37 0 C was rapid and reached a maximum at approximately 4 hr; it was slower from HDL but continued to increase slowly up to 24 hr. The significance of these in vitro findings is uncertain since much of the vitamin D 3 absorbed from the intestine reportedly associates with chylomicrons and is rapidly taken up by the liver

  20. Selenium and vitamin E concentrations in human milk and formula milk from Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sziklai-Laszlo, I.; Majchrzak, D.; Elmadfa, I.; Cser, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic roles of vitamin E and selenium are closely related, and to a very great extent, each can compensate for the deficiency of the other. The aim of the study was to determine and compare the Se and vitamin E (α- and γ-tocopherol) contents of breast milk and commercially available infant formulas in Hungary. The Se content was measured by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), while the α-, and γ-tocopherol concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The mean Se concentration was 17.4±2.8 μg/L in transitional and 13.8±2.3 μg/L in mature milk. It was found that, all of the starter (ST), the follow-on (FO) and the specialized formulas (SF) had lower Se content than breast milk. Transitional breast milk resulted in a higher Se intake (14 μg/day) than mature milk (11 μg/day). The daily Se intakes in Hungarian infants were within the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) range. The natural vitamin E contents of human milk were similar during the early and late lactation. Mature breast milk had 3.30±1.13 mg/L α-TE concentration and this was significantly higher than that of in ST (1.98±1.57), and FO (1.77±0.78), or in SF ready to feed preparations (1.03±0.74). The present study suggests that the formulas for the optimal development of young infants, should contain concentrations of these antioxidants on a level which is comparable to that of the human milk. (author)

  1. Foundations for a time reliability correlation system to quantify human reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, E.M. Jr.; Fragola, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Time reliability correlations (TRCs) have been used in human reliability analysis (HRA) in conjunction with probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to quantify post-initiator human failure events. The first TRCs were judgmental but recent data taken from simulators have provided evidence for development of a system of TRCs. This system has the equational form: t = tau R X tau U , where the first factor is the lognormally distributed random variable of successful response time, derived from the simulator data, and the second factor is a unitary lognormal random variable to account for uncertainty in the model. The first random variable is further factored into a median response time and a factor to account for the dominant type of behavior assumed to be involved in the response and a second factor to account for other influences on the reliability of the response

  2. Actualité sur la vitamine K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaumont Marc

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty of quantifying vitamin K levels and determining the number of active molecules long impeded in investigations into the metabolism and physiological function of vitamin K. In the last ten years, since gamma carboxylation was first demonstrated, studies have essentially focused on: – vitamin K sources and requirements: the composition of foods and requirements with respect to molecules with vitamin K activity are beginning to be known; – vitamin K and bone: the role of osteocalcin in bone mineralization and its association with vitamin K have been studied, particularly in elderly subjects; – hemorrhagic disease of the newborn: after a number of controversies, it is now generally accepted that prophylactic treatment of all newborns should be systematic, and repeated for breast-fed infants. Vitamin K should be administerted orally except in cases of malabsorption. However, a number of essential questions remain unanswered, such as the precise role played by certain carboxyproteins (bone carboxyprotein or Gas6 and, in particular, the choice of markers for the accurate evaluation of vitamin K status in humans.

  3. Approach to quantify human dermal skin aging using multiphoton laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschmann, Stefan; Rahn, Christian-Dennis; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Fischer, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Extracellular skin structures in human skin are impaired during intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Assessment of these dermal changes is conducted by subjective clinical evaluation and histological and molecular analysis. We aimed to develop a new parameter for the noninvasive quantitative determination of dermal skin alterations utilizing the high-resolution three-dimensional multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) technique. To quantify structural differences between chronically sun-exposed and sun-protected human skin, the respective collagen-specific second harmonic generation and the elastin-specific autofluorescence signals were recorded in young and elderly volunteers using the MPLSM technique. After image processing, the elastin-to-collagen ratio (ELCOR) was calculated. Results show that the ELCOR parameter of volar forearm skin significantly increases with age. For elderly volunteers, the ELCOR value calculated for the chronically sun-exposed temple area is significantly augmented compared to the sun-protected upper arm area. Based on the MPLSM technology, we introduce the ELCOR parameter as a new means to quantify accurately age-associated alterations in the extracellular matrix.

  4. Negative regulation of human parathyroid hormone gene promoter by vitamin D3 through nuclear factor Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeaeskelaeinen, T.; Huhtakangas, J.; Maeenpaeae, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    The negative regulation of the human parathyroid hormone (PTH) gene by biologically active vitamin D 3 (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 ; 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ) was studied in rat pituitary GH4C1 cells, which express factors needed for the negative regulation. We report here that NF-Y binds to sequences downstream of the site previously reported to bind the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Additional binding sites for NF-Y reside in the near vicinity and were shown to be important for full activity of the PTH gene promoter. VDR and NF-Y were shown to exhibit mutually exclusive binding to the VDRE region. According to our results, sequestration of binding partners for NF-Y by VDR also affects transcription through a NF-Y consensus binding element in GH4C1 but not in ROS17/2.8 cells. These results indicate that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 may affect transcription of the human PTH gene both by competitive binding of VDR and NF-Y, and by modulating transcriptional activity of NF-Y

  5. Vitamin C in human health and disease is still a mystery ? An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidu K Akhilender

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ascorbic acid is one of the important water soluble vitamins. It is essential for collagen, carnitine and neurotransmitters biosynthesis. Most plants and animals synthesize ascorbic acid for their own requirement. However, apes and humans can not synthesize ascorbic acid due to lack of an enzyme gulonolactone oxidase. Hence, ascorbic acid has to be supplemented mainly through fruits, vegetables and tablets. The current US recommended daily allowance (RDA for ascorbic acid ranges between 100–120 mg/per day for adults. Many health benefits have been attributed to ascorbic acid such as antioxidant, anti-atherogenic, anti-carcinogenic, immunomodulator and prevents cold etc. However, lately the health benefits of ascorbic acid has been the subject of debate and controversies viz., Danger of mega doses of ascorbic acid? Does ascorbic acid act as a antioxidant or pro-oxidant ? Does ascorbic acid cause cancer or may interfere with cancer therapy? However, the Panel on dietary antioxidants and related compounds stated that the in vivo data do not clearly show a relationship between excess ascorbic acid intake and kidney stone formation, pro-oxidant effects, excess iron absorption. A number of clinical and epidemiological studies on anti-carcinogenic effects of ascorbic acid in humans did not show any conclusive beneficial effects on various types of cancer except gastric cancer. Recently, a few derivatives of ascorbic acid were tested on cancer cells, among them ascorbic acid esters showed promising anticancer activity compared to ascorbic acid. Ascorbyl stearate was found to inhibit proliferation of human cancer cells by interfering with cell cycle progression, induced apoptosis by modulation of signal transduction pathways. However, more mechanistic and human in vivo studies are needed to understand and elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-carcinogenic property of ascorbic acid. Thus, though ascorbic acid was discovered in

  6. Proteome analysis demonstrates profound alterations in human dendritic cell nature by TX527, an analogue of vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, G. B.; van Etten, E.; Lage, K.

    2009-01-01

    Structural analogues of vitamin D have been put forward as therapeutic agents able to exploit the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D, without its undesired calcemic side effects. We have demonstrated that TX527 affects dendritic cell (DC) maturation in vitro, resulting in the generation...... of a tolerogenic cell. In the present study, we aimed to explore the global protein changes induced by the analogue in immature DC (iDC) and mature human DC and to correlate them with alterations in DC morphology and function. Human CD14(+) monocytes were differentiated toward iDC or mature DCs, in the presence...

  7. Quantifying human-environment interactions using videography in the context of infectious disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Timothy R; Bustos, Carla; Kwong, Laura H; Badilla, Alejandro D; Lee, Julia; Bischel, Heather N; Canales, Robert A

    2018-05-08

    Quantitative data on human-environment interactions are needed to fully understand infectious disease transmission processes and conduct accurate risk assessments. Interaction events occur during an individual's movement through, and contact with, the environment, and can be quantified using diverse methodologies. Methods that utilize videography, coupled with specialized software, can provide a permanent record of events, collect detailed interactions in high resolution, be reviewed for accuracy, capture events difficult to observe in real-time, and gather multiple concurrent phenomena. In the accompanying video, the use of specialized software to capture humanenvironment interactions for human exposure and disease transmission is highlighted. Use of videography, combined with specialized software, allows for the collection of accurate quantitative representations of human-environment interactions in high resolution. Two specialized programs include the Virtual Timing Device for the Personal Computer, which collects sequential microlevel activity time series of contact events and interactions, and LiveTrak, which is optimized to facilitate annotation of events in real-time. Opportunities to annotate behaviors at high resolution using these tools are promising, permitting detailed records that can be summarized to gain information on infectious disease transmission and incorporated into more complex models of human exposure and risk.

  8. Quantifying human-environment interactions using videography in the context of infectious disease transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R. Julian

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative data on human-environment interactions are needed to fully understand infectious disease transmission processes and conduct accurate risk assessments. Interaction events occur during an individual’s movement through, and contact with, the environment, and can be quantified using diverse methodologies. Methods that utilize videography, coupled with specialized software, can provide a permanent record of events, collect detailed interactions in high resolution, be reviewed for accuracy, capture events difficult to observe in real-time, and gather multiple concurrent phenomena. In the accompanying video, the use of specialized software to capture humanenvironment interactions for human exposure and disease transmission is highlighted. Use of videography, combined with specialized software, allows for the collection of accurate quantitative representations of human-environment interactions in high resolution. Two specialized programs include the Virtual Timing Device for the Personal Computer, which collects sequential microlevel activity time series of contact events and interactions, and LiveTrak, which is optimized to facilitate annotation of events in real-time. Opportunities to annotate behaviors at high resolution using these tools are promising, permitting detailed records that can be summarized to gain information on infectious disease transmission and incorporated into more complex models of human exposure and risk.

  9. Quantifying multi-dimensional attributes of human activities at various geographic scales based on smartphone tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolu; Li, Dongying

    2018-05-09

    Advancement in location-aware technologies, and information and communication technology in the past decades has furthered our knowledge of the interaction between human activities and the built environment. An increasing number of studies have collected data regarding individual activities to better understand how the environment shapes human behavior. Despite this growing interest, some challenges exist in collecting and processing individual's activity data, e.g., capturing people's precise environmental contexts and analyzing data at multiple spatial scales. In this study, we propose and implement an innovative system that integrates smartphone-based step tracking with an app and the sequential tile scan techniques to collect and process activity data. We apply the OpenStreetMap tile system to aggregate positioning points at various scales. We also propose duration, step and probability surfaces to quantify the multi-dimensional attributes of activities. Results show that, by running the app in the background, smartphones can measure multi-dimensional attributes of human activities, including space, duration, step, and location uncertainty at various spatial scales. By coordinating Global Positioning System (GPS) sensor with accelerometer sensor, this app can save battery which otherwise would be drained by GPS sensor quickly. Based on a test dataset, we were able to detect the recreational center and sports center as the space where the user was most active, among other places visited. The methods provide techniques to address key issues in analyzing human activity data. The system can support future studies on behavioral and health consequences related to individual's environmental exposure.

  10. Quantifying over-activity in bipolar and schizophrenia patients in a human open field paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, William; Minassian, Arpi; Henry, Brook; Kincaid, Meegin; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A

    2010-06-30

    It has been suggested that a cardinal symptom of mania is over-activity and exaggerated goal-directed behavior. Nevertheless, few attempts have been made to quantify this behavior objectively in a laboratory environment. Having a methodology to assess over-activity reliably might be useful in distinguishing manic bipolar disorder (BD) from schizophrenia (SCZ) during highly activated states. In the current study, quantifiable measures of object interaction were assessed using a multivariate approach. Additionally, symptom correlates of over-activity were assessed. Patients admitted to an acute care psychiatric hospital for either BD with mania or SCZ (paranoid and non-paranoid subtypes) as well as non-patient comparison (NC) participants were assessed in an open field setting referred to as the human Behavioral Pattern Monitor (hBPM). Activity and interactions with novel and engaging objects were recorded for 15min via a concealed video camera and rated for exploratory behavior. Both BD and SCZ patients spent more time near the objects and exhibited more overall walking compared to NC. In contrast, BD patients exhibited greater physical contact with objects (number of object interactions and time spent with objects) relative to SCZ patients or NC participants, as well as more perseverative and socially disinhibited behaviors, indicating a unique pattern of over-activity and goal-directed behavior. Further analyses revealed a distinction between SCZ patients according to their subtype. The current study extends our methodology for quantifying exploration and over-activity in a controlled laboratory setting and aids in assessing the overlap and distinguishing characteristics of BD and SCZ.

  11. Vitamin D3 analog maxacalcitol (OCT) induces hCAP-18/LL-37 production in human oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Takamitsu; Nagaoka, Isao; Takada, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Maxacalcitol (22-oxacalcitriol: OCT) is a synthetic vitamin D3 analog with a limited calcemic effect. In this study, we investigated whether OCT increases the production of LL-37/CAP-18, a human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, in human gingival/oral epithelial cells. A human gingival epithelial cell line (Ca9-22) and human oral epithelial cell lines (HSC-2, HSC-3, and HSC-4) exhibited the enhanced expression of LL-37 mRNA upon stimulation with OCT as well as active metabolites of vitamins D3 and D2. Among the human epithelial cell lines, Ca9-22 exhibited the strongest response to these vitamin D-related compounds. OCT induced the higher production of CAP-18 (ng/mL order) until 6 days time-dependently in Ca9-22 cells in culture. The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis was killed by treatment with the LL-37 peptide. These findings suggest that OCT induces the production of hCAP-18/LL-37 in a manner similar to that induced by the active metabolite of vitamin D3.

  12. Latitudinal Clines of the Human Vitamin D Receptor and Skin Color Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dov Tiosano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The well-documented latitudinal clines of genes affecting human skin color presumably arise from the need for protection from intense ultraviolet radiation (UVR vs. the need to use UVR for vitamin D synthesis. Sampling 751 subjects from a broad range of latitudes and skin colors, we investigated possible multilocus correlated adaptation of skin color genes with the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR, using a vector correlation metric and network method called BlocBuster. We discovered two multilocus networks involving VDR promoter and skin color genes that display strong latitudinal clines as multilocus networks, even though many of their single gene components do not. Considered one by one, the VDR components of these networks show diverse patterns: no cline, a weak declining latitudinal cline outside of Africa, and a strong in- vs. out-of-Africa frequency pattern. We confirmed these results with independent data from HapMap. Standard linkage disequilibrium analyses did not detect these networks. We applied BlocBuster across the entire genome, showing that our networks are significant outliers for interchromosomal disequilibrium that overlap with environmental variation relevant to the genes’ functions. These results suggest that these multilocus correlations most likely arose from a combination of parallel selective responses to a common environmental variable and coadaptation, given the known Mendelian epistasis among VDR and the skin color genes.

  13. Vitamin K3 triggers human leukemia cell death through hydrogen peroxide generation and histone hyperacetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Changjun; Kang, Jiuhong; Zheng, Rongliang

    2005-10-01

    Vitamin K3 (VK3) is a well-known anticancer agent, but its mechanism remains elusive. In the present study, VK3 was found to simultaneously induce cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, including superoxide anion (O2*-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation, and histone hyperacetylation in human leukemia HL-60 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Catalase (CAT), an antioxidant enzyme that specifically scavenges H2O2, could significantly diminish both histone acetylation increase and cell death caused by VK3, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD), an enzyme that specifically eliminates O2*-, showed no effect on both of these, leading to the conclusion that H2O2 generation, but not O2*- generation, contributes to VK3-induced histone hyperacetylation and cell death. This conclusion was confirmed by the finding that enhancement of VK3-induced H2O2 generation by vitamin C (VC) could significantly promote both the histone hyperacetylation and cell death. Further studies suggested that histone hyperacetylation played an important role in VK3-induced cell death, since sodium butyrate, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, showed no effect on ROS generation, but obviously potentiated VK3-induced histone hyperacetylation and cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate a novel mechanism for the anticancer activity of VK3, i.e., VK3 induced tumor cell death through H2O2 generation, which then further induced histone hyperacetylation.

  14. The rat closely mimics oxidative stress and inflammation in humans after exercise but not after exercise combined with vitamin C administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Goutianos, Georgios; Paschalis, Vassilis; Margaritelis, Nikos V; Tzioura, Aikaterini; Dipla, Konstantina; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Kyparos, Antonios; Nikolaidis, Michalis G

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to directly compare oxidative stress and inflammation responses between rats and humans. We contrasted rat and human oxidative stress and inflammatory responses to exercise (pro-oxidant stimulus) and/or vitamin C (anti-oxidant stimulus) administration. Vitamin C was administered orally in both species (16 mg kg(-1) of body weight). Twelve redox biomarkers and seven inflammatory biomarkers were determined in plasma and erythrocytes pre- and post-exercise or pre- and post-exercise combined with vitamin C administration. Exercise increased oxidative stress and induced an inflammatory state in rats and humans. There were only 1/19 significant species × exercise interactions (catalase), indicating similar responses to exercise between rats and humans in redox and inflammatory biomarkers. Vitamin C decreased oxidative stress and increased antioxidant capacity only in humans and did not affect the redox state of rats. In contrast, vitamin C induced an anti-inflammatory state only in rats and did not affect the inflammatory state of humans. There were 10/19 significant species × vitamin C interactions, indicating that rats poorly mimic human oxidative stress and inflammatory responses to vitamin C administration. Exercise after acute vitamin C administration altered redox state only in humans and did not affect the redox state of rats. On the contrary, inflammation biomarkers changed similarly after exercise combined with vitamin C in both rats and humans. The rat adequately mimics human responses to exercise in basic blood redox/inflammatory profile, yet this is not the case after exercise combined with vitamin C administration.

  15. Computational Strategy for Quantifying Human Pesticide Exposure based upon a Saliva Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eTimchalk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative exposure data is important for evaluating toxicity risk and biomonitoring is a critical tool for evaluating human exposure. Direct personal monitoring provides the most accurate estimation of a subject’s true dose, and non-invasive methods are advocated for quantifying exposure to xenobiotics. In this regard, there is a need to identify chemicals that are cleared in saliva at concentrations that can be quantified to support the implementation of this approach. This manuscript reviews the computational modeling approaches that are coupled to in vivo and in vitro experiments to predict salivary uptake and clearance of xenobiotics and provides additional insight on species-dependent differences in partitioning that are of key importance for extrapolation. The primary mechanism by which xenobiotics leave the blood and enter saliva involves paracellular transport, passive transcellular diffusion, or trancellular active transport with the majority of xenobiotics transferred by passive diffusion. The transcellular or paracellular diffusion of unbound chemicals in plasma to saliva has been computationally modeled using compartmental and physiologically based approaches. Of key importance for determining the plasma:saliva partitioning was the utilization of the Schmitt algorithm that calculates partitioning based upon the tissue composition, pH, chemical pKa and plasma protein-binding. Sensitivity analysis identified that both protein-binding and pKa (for weak acids and bases have significant impact on determining partitioning and species dependent differences based upon physiological variance. Future strategies are focused on an in vitro salivary acinar cell based system to experimentally determine and computationally predict salivary gland uptake and clearance for xenobiotics. It is envisioned that a combination of salivary biomonitoring and computational modeling will enable the non-invasive measurement of chemical exposures in human

  16. Calcitriol-modulated human antibiotics: New pathophysiological aspects of vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado Diago, Carlos Antonio; García-Unzueta, María Teresa; Fariñas, María del Carmen; Amado, Jose Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Traditionally, calcitriol has been considered a calcium and phosphate regulating hormone, but has recently been shown to play a pivotal role in innate immunity. Many barrier and immune cells have membrane and intracellular receptors that recognize different microbial antigens. Activation of these receptors induces synthesis of 1α-hydroxylase, which acts on 25 hydroxyvitamin D to generate intracellular calcitriol. Calcitriol activates its receptor and enhances the synthesis of important human antibiotics like cathelicidin and β2-defensin while inhibiting hepcidin. These pluripotent peptides have an important role in innate immunity, and their regulation is abnormal in hypovitaminosis D. The literature on their secretion mechanisms, levels in different organic fluids, mechanism of action, and relationship with vitamin D is reviewed here. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Computational strategy for quantifying human pesticide exposure based upon a saliva measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Charles; Weber, Thomas J.; Smith, Jordan N.

    2015-05-27

    The National Research Council of the National Academies report, Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and Strategy, highlighted the importance of quantitative exposure data for evaluating human toxicity risk and noted that biomonitoring is a critical tool for quantitatively evaluating exposure from both environmental and occupational settings. Direct measurement of chemical exposures using personal monitoring provides the most accurate estimation of a subject’s true exposure, and non-invasive methods have also been advocated for quantifying the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of drugs and xenobiotics. In this regard, there is a need to identify chemicals that are readily cleared in saliva at concentrations that can be quantified to support the implementation of this approach.. The current manuscript describes the use of computational modeling approaches that are closely coupled to in vivo and in vitro experiments to predict salivary uptake and clearance of xenobiotics. The primary mechanism by which xenobiotics leave the blood and enter saliva is thought to involve paracellular transport, passive transcellular diffusion, or trancellular active transport with the majority of drugs and xenobiotics cleared from plasma into saliva by passive diffusion. The transcellular or paracellular diffusion of unbound chemicals in plasma to saliva has been computational modeled using a combination of compartmental and physiologically based approaches. Of key importance for determining the plasma:saliva partitioning was the utilization of a modified Schmitt algorithm that calculates partitioning based upon the tissue composition, pH, chemical pKa and plasma protein-binding. Sensitivity analysis of key model parameters specifically identified that both protein-binding and pKa (for weak acids and bases) had the most significant impact on the determination of partitioning and that there were clear species dependent differences based upon physiological variance between

  18. Quantifying effects of humans and climate on groundwater resources of Hawaii through sharp-interface modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotzoll, K.; Izuka, S. K.; Nishikawa, T.; Fienen, M. N.; El-Kadi, A. I.

    2016-12-01

    Some of the volcanic-rock aquifers of the islands of Hawaii are substantially developed, leading to concerns related to the effects of groundwater withdrawals on saltwater intrusion and stream base-flow reduction. A numerical modeling analysis using recent available information (e.g., recharge, withdrawals, hydrogeologic framework, and conceptual models of groundwater flow) advances current understanding of groundwater flow and provides insight into the effects of human activity and climate change on Hawaii's water resources. Three island-wide groundwater-flow models (Kauai, Oahu, and Maui) were constructed using MODFLOW 2005 coupled with the Seawater-Intrusion Package (SWI2), which simulates the transition between saltwater and freshwater in the aquifer as a sharp interface. This approach allowed coarse vertical discretization (maximum of two layers) without ignoring the freshwater-saltwater system at the regional scale. Model construction (FloPy3), parameter estimation (PEST), and analysis of results were streamlined using Python scripts. Model simulations included pre-development (1870) and recent (average of 2001-10) scenarios for each island. Additionally, scenarios for future withdrawals and climate change were simulated for Oahu. We present our streamlined approach and results showing estimated effects of human activity on the groundwater resource by quantifying decline in water levels, rise of the freshwater-saltwater interface, and reduction in stream base flow. Water-resource managers can use this information to evaluate consequences of groundwater development that can constrain future groundwater availability.

  19. Quantifying Age-Related Differences in Human Reaching while Interacting with a Rehabilitation Robotic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Yadav

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New movement assessment and data analysis methods are developed to quantify human arm motion patterns during physical interaction with robotic devices for rehabilitation. These methods provide metrics for future use in diagnosis, assessment and rehabilitation of subjects with affected arm movements. Specifically, the current study uses existing pattern recognition methods to evaluate the effect of age on performance of a specific motion, reaching to a target by moving the end-effector of a robot (an X-Y table. Differences in the arm motion patterns of younger and older subjects are evaluated using two measures: the principal component analysis similarity factor (SPCA to compare path shape and the number of Fourier modes representing 98% of the path ‘energy’ to compare the smoothness of movement, a particularly important variable for assessment of pathologic movement. Both measures are less sensitive to noise than others previously reported in the literature and preserve information that is often lost through other analysis techniques. Data from the SPCA analysis indicate that age is a significant factor affecting the shapes of target reaching paths, followed by reaching movement type (crossing body midline/not crossing and reaching side (left/right; hand dominance and trial repetition are not significant factors. Data from the Fourier-based analysis likewise indicate that age is a significant factor affecting smoothness of movement, and movements become smoother with increasing trial number in both younger and older subjects, although more rapidly so in younger subjects. These results using the proposed data analysis methods confirm current practice that age-matched subjects should be used for comparison to quantify recovery of arm movement during rehabilitation. The results also highlight the advantages that these methods offer relative to other reported measures.

  20. Patient-specific in silico models can quantify primary implant stability in elderly human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Juri A; Hofmann, Urs A T; Christen, Patrik; Favre, Jean M; Ferguson, Stephen J; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2018-03-01

    Secure implant fixation is challenging in osteoporotic bone. Due to the high variability in inter- and intra-patient bone quality, ex vivo mechanical testing of implants in bone is very material- and time-consuming. Alternatively, in silico models could substantially reduce costs and speed up the design of novel implants if they had the capability to capture the intricate bone microstructure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to validate a micro-finite element model of a multi-screw fracture fixation system. Eight human cadaveric humerii were scanned using micro-CT and mechanically tested to quantify bone stiffness. Osteotomy and fracture fixation were performed, followed by mechanical testing to quantify displacements at 12 different locations on the instrumented bone. For each experimental case, a micro-finite element model was created. From the micro-finite element analyses of the intact model, the patient-specific bone tissue modulus was determined such that the simulated apparent stiffness matched the measured stiffness of the intact bone. Similarly, the tissue modulus of a small damage region around each screw was determined for the instrumented bone. For validation, all in silico models were rerun using averaged material properties, resulting in an average coefficient of determination of 0.89 ± 0.04 with a slope of 0.93 ± 0.19 and a mean absolute error of 43 ± 10 μm when correlating in silico marker displacements with the ex vivo test. In conclusion, we validated a patient-specific computer model of an entire organ bone-implant system at the tissue-level at high resolution with excellent overall accuracy. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:954-962, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Synergistic cytotoxic action of vitamin C and vitamin K3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Negoro, T; Satoh, K; Jiang, Y; Hashimoto, K; Kikuchi, H; Nishikawa, H; Miyata, T; Yamamoto, Y; Nakano, K; Yasumoto, E; Nakayachi, T; Mineno, K; Satoh, T; Sakagami, H

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the combination effect of sodium ascorbate (vitamin C) and menadione (vitamin K3) on the viability of various cultured cells. Human oral squamous cell carcinoma (HSC-2, HSC-3) and human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells were more sensitive to these vitamins as compared to normal cells (human gingival fibroblast HGF, human periodontal ligament fibroblast HPLF, human pulp cell HPC). The combination of vitamin C and vitamin K3 produced synergistic cytotoxicity against all these 6 cell lines. Treatment with vitamin C or vitamin K3, or their combination, induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation only in HL-60 cells, but not in the oral tumor cell lines (HSC-2, HSC-3, HSG). ESR spectroscopy showed that vitamins C and K3 produce radicals under alkaline conditions and that the combination of these two vitamins synergistically enhanced their respective radical intensities.

  2. Vitamin A deficiency impairs adaptive B and T cell responses to a prototype monovalent attenuated human rotavirus vaccine and virulent human rotavirus challenge in a gnotobiotic piglet model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep S Chattha

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses (RV are a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Widespread vitamin A deficiency is associated with reduced efficacy of vaccines and higher incidence of diarrheal infections in children in developing countries. We established a vitamin A deficient (VAD gnotobiotic piglet model that mimics subclinical vitamin A deficiency in children to study its effects on an oral human rotavirus (HRV vaccine and virulent HRV challenge. Piglets derived from VAD and vitamin A sufficient (VAS sows were orally vaccinated with attenuated HRV or mock, with/without supplemental vitamin A and challenged with virulent HRV. Unvaccinated VAD control piglets had significantly lower hepatic vitamin A, higher severity and duration of diarrhea and HRV fecal shedding post-challenge as compared to VAS control pigs. Reduced protection coincided with significantly higher innate (IFNα cytokine and CD8 T cell frequencies in the blood and intestinal tissues, higher pro-inflammatory (IL12 and 2-3 fold lower anti-inflammatory (IL10 cytokines, in VAD compared to VAS control pigs. Vaccinated VAD pigs had higher diarrhea severity scores compared to vaccinated VAS pigs, which coincided with lower serum IgA HRV antibody titers and significantly lower intestinal IgA antibody secreting cells post-challenge in the former groups suggesting lower anamnestic responses. A trend for higher serum HRV IgG antibodies was observed in VAD vs VAS vaccinated groups post-challenge. The vaccinated VAD (non-vitamin A supplemented pigs had significantly higher serum IL12 (PID2 and IFNγ (PID6 compared to vaccinated VAS groups suggesting higher Th1 responses in VAD conditions. Furthermore, regulatory T-cell responses were compromised in VAD pigs. Supplemental vitamin A in VAD pigs did not fully restore the dysregulated immune responses to AttHRV vaccine or moderate virulent HRV diarrhea. Our findings suggest that that VAD in children in developing countries may partially contribute to more

  3. The Effects of First-Line Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs on the Actions of Vitamin D in Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesdachai, Supavit; Zughaier, Susu M; Hao, Li; Kempker, Russell R; Blumberg, Henry M; Ziegler, Thomas R; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem. Patients with TB have a high rate of vitamin D deficiency, both at diagnosis and during the course of treatment with anti-tuberculosis drugs. Although data on the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) clearance is uncertain from randomized controlled trials (RCTs), vitamin D enhances the expression of the anti-microbial peptide human cathelicidin (hCAP18) in cultured macrophages in vitro. One possible explanation for the mixed (primarily negative) results of RCTs examining vitamin D treatment in TB infection is that anti-TB drugs given to enrolled subjects may impact actions of vitamin D to enhance cathelicidin in macrophages. To address this hypothesis, human macrophage-like monocytic (THP-1) cells were treated with varying doses of first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs in the presence of the active form of vitamin D, 1N1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ). The expression of hCAP18 was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 strongly induced expression of hCAP18 mRNA in THP-1 cells (fold-change from control). The combination of the standard 4-drug TB therapy (isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol) in the cultured THP-1 cells demonstrated a significant decrease of hCAP18 mRNA at the dosage of 10 ug/mL. In 31 subjects with newly diagnosed drug-sensitive TB randomized to either high-dose vitamin D 3 (1.2 million IU over 8 weeks, n=13) versus placebo (n=18), there was no change from baseline to week 8 in hCAP18 mRNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells or in plasma concentrations of LL-37, the protein product of hCAP18.These data suggest that first-line anti-TB drugs may alter the vitamin D-dependent increase in hCAP18 and LL-37 human macrophages.

  4. Retrieving quantifiable social media data from human sensor networks for disaster modeling and crisis mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulov, Oleg

    This dissertation presents a novel approach that utilizes quantifiable social media data as a human aware, near real-time observing system, coupled with geophysical predictive models for improved response to disasters and extreme events. It shows that social media data has the potential to significantly improve disaster management beyond informing the public, and emphasizes the importance of different roles that social media can play in management, monitoring, modeling and mitigation of natural and human-caused extreme disasters. In the proposed approach Social Media users are viewed as "human sensors" that are "deployed" in the field, and their posts are considered to be "sensor observations", thus different social media outlets all together form a Human Sensor Network. We utilized the "human sensor" observations, as boundary value forcings, to show improved geophysical model forecasts of extreme disaster events when combined with other scientific data such as satellite observations and sensor measurements. Several recent extreme disasters are presented as use case scenarios. In the case of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster of 2010 that devastated the Gulf of Mexico, the research demonstrates how social media data from Flickr can be used as a boundary forcing condition of GNOME oil spill plume forecast model, and results in an order of magnitude forecast improvement. In the case of Hurricane Sandy NY/NJ landfall impact of 2012, we demonstrate how the model forecasts, when combined with social media data in a single framework, can be used for near real-time forecast validation, damage assessment and disaster management. Owing to inherent uncertainties in the weather forecasts, the NOAA operational surge model only forecasts the worst-case scenario for flooding from any given hurricane. Geolocated and time-stamped Instagram photos and tweets allow near real-time assessment of the surge levels at different locations, which can validate model forecasts, give

  5. Quantifying seasonal and diel variation in Anopheline and Culex human biting rates in Southern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sadie J; Lippi, Catherine A; Boersch-Supan, Philipp H; Heydari, Naveed; Silva, Mercy; Adrian, Jefferson; Noblecilla, Leonardo F; Ayala, Efraín B; Encalada, Mayling D; Larsen, David A; Krisher, Jesse T; Krisher, Lyndsay; Fregosi, Lauren; Stewart-Ibarra, Anna M

    2017-11-22

    Quantifying mosquito biting rates for specific locations enables estimation of mosquito-borne disease risk, and can inform intervention efforts. Measuring biting itself is fraught with ethical concerns, so the landing rate of mosquitoes on humans is often used as a proxy measure. Southern coastal Ecuador was historically endemic for malaria (Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax), although successful control efforts in the 2000s eliminated autochthonous transmission (since 2011). This study presents an analysis of data collected during the elimination period. Human landing catch (HLC) data for three mosquito taxa: two malaria vectors, Anopheles albimanus and Anopheles punctimacula, and grouped Culex spp. were examined for this study. These data were collected by the National Vector Control Service of the Ministry of Health over a 5-year time span (2007-2012) in five cities in southern coastal Ecuador, at multiple households, in all months of the year, during dusk-dawn (18:00-6:00) hours, often at both indoor and outdoor locations. Hurdle models were used to determine if biting activity was fundamentally different for the three taxa, and to identify spatial and temporal factors influencing bite rate. Due to the many different approaches to studying and quantifying bite rates in the literature, a glossary of terms was created, to facilitate comparative studies in the future. Biting trends varied significantly with species and time. All taxa exhibited exophagic feeding behavior, and outdoor locations increased both the odds and incidence of bites across taxa. Anopheles albimanus was most frequently observed biting, with an average of 4.7 bites/h. The highest and lowest respective months for significant biting activity were March and July for An. albimanus, July and August for An. punctimacula, and February and July for Culex spp. Fine-scale differences in endophagy and exophagy, and temporal differences among months and hours exist in biting patterns among

  6. Placental vitamin D metabolism and its associations with circulating vitamin D metabolites in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Heyjun; Wood, Madeleine R; Malysheva, Olga V; Jones, Sara; Mehta, Saurabh; Brannon, Patsy M; Caudill, Marie A

    2017-12-01

    Background: Little is known about placental vitamin D metabolism and its impact on maternal circulating vitamin D concentrations in humans. Objective: This study sought to advance the current understanding of placental vitamin D metabolism and its role in modulating maternal circulating vitamin D metabolites during pregnancy. Design: Nested within a feeding study, 24 healthy pregnant women (26-29 wk of gestation) consumed a single amount of vitamin D (511 IU/d from diet and a cholecalciferol supplement) for 10 wk. Concentrations of placental and blood vitamin D metabolites and placental messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance of vitamin D metabolic pathway components were quantified. In addition, cultured human trophoblasts were incubated with 13 C-cholecalciferol to examine the intracellular generation and secretion of vitamin D metabolites along with the regulation of target genes. Results: In placental tissue, 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 [25(OH)D 3 ] was strongly correlated ( r = 0.83, P D 3 Moreover, these placental metabolites were strongly correlated ( r ≤ 0.85, P ≤ 0.04) with their respective metabolites in maternal circulation. Positive associations ( P ≤ 0.045) were also observed between placental mRNA abundance of vitamin D metabolic components and circulating vitamin D metabolites [i.e., LDL-related protein 2 ( LRP2 , also known as megalin) with 25(OH)D 3 and the C3 epimer of 25(OH)D 3 [3-epi-25(OH)D 3 ]; cubilin ( CUBN ) with 25(OH)D 3 ; 25-hydroxylase ( CYP2R1 ) with 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 ; 24-hydroxylase ( CYP24A1 ) with 25(OH)D 3 , 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 , and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 [1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ]; and 1α-hydroxylase [( CYP27B1 ) with 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 and 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ]. Notably, in vitro experiments with trophoblasts showed increased production and secretion of 25(OH)D 3 and higher CYP24A1 gene transcript abundance in response to cholecalciferol treatment. Conclusions: The numerous associations of many of the placental biomarkers of vitamin D metabolism with

  7. Vitamins D3 and K2 may partially counterbalance the detrimental effects of pentosidine in ex vivo human osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguineti, R; Monacelli, F; Parodi, A; Furfaro, A L; Borghi, R; Pacini, D; Pronzato, M A; Odetti, P; Molfetta, L; Traverso, N

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic multifaceted disorder, characterized by insufficient bone strength. It has been recently shown that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play a role in senile osteoporosis, through bone cell impairment and altered biomechanical properties. Pentosidine (PENT), a wellcharacterized AGE, is also considered a biomarker of bone fracture. Adequate responses to various hormones, such as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 , are prerequisites for optimal osteoblasts functioning. Vitamin K 2 is known to enhance in vitro and in vitro vitamin D-induced bone formation. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of Vitamins D 3 and K 2 and PENT on in vitro osteoblast activity, to convey a possible translational clinical message. Ex vivo human osteoblasts cultured, for 3 weeks, with vitamin D 3 and vitamin K 2 were exposed to PENT, a well-known advanced glycoxidation end product for the last 72 hours. Experiments with PENT alone were also carried out. Gene expression of specific markers of bone osteoblast maturation [alkaline phosphatase, ALP; collagen I, COL Iα1; and osteocalcin (bone-Gla-protein) BGP] was measured, together with the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand/osteoproteregin (RANKL/OPG) ratio to assess bone remodeling. Expression of RAGE, a well-characterized receptor of AGEs, was also assessed. PENT+vitamins slightly inhibited ALP secretion while not affecting gene expression, indicating hampered osteoblast functional activity. PENT+vitamins up-regulated collagen gene expression, while protein secretion was unchanged. Intracellular collagen levels were partially decreased, and a significant reduction in BGP gene expression and intracellular protein concentration were both reported after PENT exposure. The RANKL/OPG ratio was increased, favouring bone reabsorption. RAGE gene expression significantly decreased. These results were confirmed by a lower mineralization rate. We provided in vitro evidence that glycoxidation might

  8. Impedance Based Vitamin D Measurement Sensor and Algorithm for Human Wellness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Jin KIM

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available While entering the modern society, medical technology has been able to cure almost all kinds of diseases. However, autoimmune diseases are increasing rapidly due to environment, food, and indoor life. In particular, vitamin D is lacking in about 90 % of Koreans. As a result of this, many middle-aged and older women are taking calcium, but most of them do not know their vitamin D levels. Based on this background, the goal of this paper is to develop a vitamin D measurement technique using a quantum analyzer that is capable of measuring various kinds of vitamins and minerals, and to prepare a plan to easily measure vitamin D by attaching it to a UVB device that is currently used in the hospital. The quantum analyzer was designed based on the impedance principle, and the impedance change according to vitamin D concentration was able to confirm a significant proportional relationship between vitamin D and impedance. In addition, the correlation between vitamin D and impedance was confirmed by in vitro experiment using lab mice, and the measurement error of the impedance meter for vitamin D concentration in the blood was confirmed to be about 12.7 %.

  9. Quantifying human behavior uncertainties in a coupled agent-based model for water resources management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, J. Y.; Yang, Y. C. E.; Tidwell, V. C.; Macknick, J.

    2017-12-01

    Modeling human behaviors and decisions in water resources management is a challenging issue due to its complexity and uncertain characteristics that affected by both internal (such as stakeholder's beliefs on any external information) and external factors (such as future policies and weather/climate forecast). Stakeholders' decision regarding how much water they need is usually not entirely rational in the real-world cases, so it is not quite suitable to model their decisions with a centralized (top-down) approach that assume everyone in a watershed follow the same order or pursue the same objective. Agent-based modeling (ABM) uses a decentralized approach (bottom-up) that allow each stakeholder to make his/her own decision based on his/her own objective and the belief of information acquired. In this study, we develop an ABM which incorporates the psychological human decision process by the theory of risk perception. The theory of risk perception quantifies human behaviors and decisions uncertainties using two sequential methodologies: the Bayesian Inference and the Cost-Loss Problem. The developed ABM is coupled with a regulation-based water system model: Riverware (RW) to evaluate different human decision uncertainties in water resources management. The San Juan River Basin in New Mexico (Figure 1) is chosen as a case study area, while we define 19 major irrigation districts as water use agents and their primary decision is to decide the irrigated area on an annual basis. This decision will be affected by three external factors: 1) upstream precipitation forecast (potential amount of water availability), 2) violation of the downstream minimum flow (required to support ecosystems), and 3) enforcement of a shortage sharing plan (a policy that is currently undertaken in the region for drought years). Three beliefs (as internal factors) that correspond to these three external factors will also be considered in the modeling framework. The objective of this study is

  10. Interobserver Reliability of the Total Body Score System for Quantifying Human Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbs, Gretchen R; Connor, Melissa; Bytheway, Joan A

    2016-03-01

    Several authors have tested the accuracy of the Total Body Score (TBS) method for quantifying decomposition, but none have examined the reliability of the method as a scoring system by testing interobserver error rates. Sixteen participants used the TBS system to score 59 observation packets including photographs and written descriptions of 13 human cadavers in different stages of decomposition (postmortem interval: 2-186 days). Data analysis used a two-way random model intraclass correlation in SPSS (v. 17.0). The TBS method showed "almost perfect" agreement between observers, with average absolute correlation coefficients of 0.990 and average consistency correlation coefficients of 0.991. While the TBS method may have sources of error, scoring reliability is not one of them. Individual component scores were examined, and the influences of education and experience levels were investigated. Overall, the trunk component scores were the least concordant. Suggestions are made to improve the reliability of the TBS method. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Optical coherence tomography in quantifying the permeation of human plasma lipoproteins in vascular tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, M. G.; Mashiatulla, M.; Tuchin, V. V.; Morrisett, J. D.; Larin, K. V.

    2012-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common underlying cause of vascular disease, occurring in multiple arterial beds including the carotid, coronary, and femoral arteries. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process occurring in arterial tissue, involving the subintimal accumulation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Little is known about the rates at which these accumulations occur. Measurements of the permeability rate of LDL, and other lipoproteins such as high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), could help gain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. The permeation of VLDL, LDL, HDL, and glucose was monitored and quantified in normal and diseased human carotid endarterectomy tissues at 20°C and 37°C using optical coherence tomography (OCT). The rates for LDL permeation through normal tissue at 20°C was (3.16 +/- 0.37) × 10-5 cm/sec and at 37°C was (4.77 +/- 0.48) × 10-5 cm/sec, significantly greater (plipoproteins.

  12. Methods for quantifying adipose tissue insulin resistance in overweight/obese humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Horst, K W; van Galen, K A; Gilijamse, P W; Hartstra, A V; de Groot, P F; van der Valk, F M; Ackermans, M T; Nieuwdorp, M; Romijn, J A; Serlie, M J

    2017-08-01

    Insulin resistance of adipose tissue is an important feature of obesity-related metabolic disease. However, assessment of lipolysis in humans requires labor-intensive and expensive methods, and there is limited validation of simplified measurement methods. We aimed to validate simplified methods for the quantification of adipose tissue insulin resistance against the assessment of insulin sensitivity of lipolysis suppression during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies. We assessed the insulin-mediated suppression of lipolysis by tracer-dilution of [1,1,2,3,3- 2 H 5 ]glycerol during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies in 125 overweight or obese adults (85 men, 40 women; age 50±11 years; body mass index 38±7 kg m -2 ). Seven indices of adipose tissue insulin resistance were validated against the reference measurement method. Low-dose insulin infusion resulted in suppression of the glycerol rate of appearance ranging from 4% (most resistant) to 85% (most sensitive), indicating a good range of adipose tissue insulin sensitivity in the study population. The reference method correlated with (1) insulin-mediated suppression of plasma glycerol concentrations (r=0.960, PInsulin Resistance (Adipo-IR) index (fasting plasma insulin-NEFA product; r=-0.526, Pinsulin-glycerol product (r=-0.467, PInsulin Resistance Index (fasting plasma insulin-basal lipolysis product; r=0.460, PInsulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI)-NEFA index (r=0.621, Pinsulin resistance (area under the curve ⩾0.801, Pinsulin sensitivity (that is, the antilipolytic action of insulin) can be reliably quantified in overweight and obese humans by simplified index methods. The sensitivity and specificity of the Adipo-IR index and the fasting plasma insulin-glycerol product, combined with their simplicity and acceptable agreement, suggest that these may be most useful in clinical practice.

  13. Quantifying human exposure to air pollution - moving from static monitoring to spatio-temporally resolved personal exposure assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinle, Susanne; Reis, Stefan; Sabel, Clive E

    2013-01-01

    exposure studies to accurately assess human health risks. ? We discuss potential and shortcomings of methods and tools with a focus on how their development influences study design. ? We propose a novel conceptual model for integrated health impact assessment of human exposure to air pollutants. ? We......Quantifying human exposure to air pollutants is a challenging task. Ambient concentrations of air pollutants at potentially harmful levels are ubiquitous in urban areas and subject to high spatial and temporal variability. At the same time, every individual has unique activity-patterns. Exposure...... results from multifaceted relationships and interactions between environmental and human systems, adding complexity to the assessment process. Traditionally, approaches to quantify human exposure have relied on pollutant concentrations from fixed air quality network sites and static population...

  14. Vitamin D activation of functionally distinct regulatory miRNAs in primary human osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Thomas S; Chun, Rene F; Rieger, Sandra; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2013-06-01

    When bound to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D) is a potent regulator of osteoblast transcription. Less clear is the impact of 1,25D on posttranscriptional events in osteoblasts, such as the generation and action of microRNAs (miRNAs). Microarray analysis using replicate (n = 3) primary cultures of human osteoblasts (HOBs) identified human miRNAs that were differentially regulated by >1.5-fold following treatment with 1,25D (10 nM, 6 hours), which included miRNAs 637 and 1228. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR analyses showed that the host gene for miR-1228, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), was coinduced with miR-1228 in a dose-dependent fashion following treatment with 1,25D (0.1-10 nM, 6 hours). By contrast, the endogenous host gene for miR-637, death-associated protein kinase 3 (DAPK3), was transcriptionally repressed by following treatment with 1,25D. Analysis of two potential targets for miR-637 and miR-1228 in HOB, type IV collagen (COL4A1) and bone morphogenic protein 2 kinase (BMP2K), respectively, showed that 1,25D-mediates suppression of these targets via distinct mechanisms. In the case of miR-637, suppression of COL4A1 appears to occur via decreased levels of COL4A1 mRNA. By contrast, suppression of BMP2K by miR-1228 appears to occur by inhibition of protein translation. In mature HOBs, small interfering RNA (siRNA) inactivation of miR-1228 alone was sufficient to abrogate 1,25D-mediated downregulation of BMP2K protein expression. This was associated with suppression of prodifferentiation responses to 1,25D in HOB, as represented by parallel decrease in osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase expression. These data show for the first time that the effects of 1,25D on human bone cells are not restricted to classical VDR-mediated transcriptional responses but also involve miRNA-directed posttranscriptional mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bone and

  15. Radioprotective effects of selenium and vitamin-E against 6MV X-rays in human blood lymphocytes by micronucleus assay

    OpenAIRE

    Rostami, Aram; Moosavi, Seyed Akbar; Changizi, Vahid; Abbasian Ardakani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Critical macromolecules of cells such as DNA are in exposure to damage of free radicals that induced from the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological systems. Selenium and vitamin-E are natural compounds that have been shown to be a direct free radical scavenger. The aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of selenium and vitamin-E separately and synergistically against genotoxicity induced by 6MV x-rays irradiation in blood lymphocytes. Methods: ...

  16. Metabolic Effects of Inflammation on Vitamin A and Carotenoids in Humans and Animal Models123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lewis P; Ross, A Catharine; Stephensen, Charles B; Bohn, Torsten; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2017-01-01

    The association between inflammation and vitamin A (VA) metabolism and status assessment has been documented in multiple studies with animals and humans. The relation between inflammation and carotenoid status is less clear. Nonetheless, it is well known that carotenoids are associated with certain health benefits. Understanding these relations is key to improving health outcomes and mortality risk in infants and young children. Hyporetinolemia, i.e., low serum retinol concentrations, occurs during inflammation, and this can lead to the misdiagnosis of VA deficiency. On the other hand, inflammation causes impaired VA absorption and urinary losses that can precipitate VA deficiency in at-risk groups of children. Many epidemiologic studies have suggested that high dietary carotenoid intake and elevated plasma concentrations are correlated with a decreased risk of several chronic diseases; however, large-scale carotenoid supplementation trials have been unable to confirm the health benefits and in some cases resulted in controversial results. However, it has been documented that dietary carotenoids and retinoids play important roles in innate and acquired immunity and in the body’s response to inflammation. Although animal models have been useful in investigating retinoid effects on developmental immunity, it is more challenging to tease out the effects of carotenoids because of differences in the absorption, kinetics, and metabolism between humans and animal models. The current understanding of the relations between inflammation and retinoid and carotenoid metabolism and status are the topics of this review. PMID:28298266

  17. Metabolic Effects of Inflammation on Vitamin A and Carotenoids in Humans and Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lewis P; Ross, A Catharine; Stephensen, Charles B; Bohn, Torsten; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2017-03-01

    The association between inflammation and vitamin A (VA) metabolism and status assessment has been documented in multiple studies with animals and humans. The relation between inflammation and carotenoid status is less clear. Nonetheless, it is well known that carotenoids are associated with certain health benefits. Understanding these relations is key to improving health outcomes and mortality risk in infants and young children. Hyporetinolemia, i.e., low serum retinol concentrations, occurs during inflammation, and this can lead to the misdiagnosis of VA deficiency. On the other hand, inflammation causes impaired VA absorption and urinary losses that can precipitate VA deficiency in at-risk groups of children. Many epidemiologic studies have suggested that high dietary carotenoid intake and elevated plasma concentrations are correlated with a decreased risk of several chronic diseases; however, large-scale carotenoid supplementation trials have been unable to confirm the health benefits and in some cases resulted in controversial results. However, it has been documented that dietary carotenoids and retinoids play important roles in innate and acquired immunity and in the body's response to inflammation. Although animal models have been useful in investigating retinoid effects on developmental immunity, it is more challenging to tease out the effects of carotenoids because of differences in the absorption, kinetics, and metabolism between humans and animal models. The current understanding of the relations between inflammation and retinoid and carotenoid metabolism and status are the topics of this review. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Vitamin D up-regulates the vitamin D receptor by protecting it from proteasomal degradation in human CD4+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Martin; von Essen, Marina R; Boding, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D3, 1,25(OH)2D3, has significant immunomodulatory properties and is an important determinant in the differentiation of CD4+ effector T cells. The biological actions of 1,25(OH)2D3 are mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and are believed to correlate with the VDR...... protein expression level in a given cell. The aim of this study was to determine if and how 1,25(OH)2D3 by itself regulates VDR expression in human CD4+ T cells. We found that activated CD4+ T cells have the capacity to convert the inactive 25(OH)D3 to the active 1,25(OH)2D3 that subsequently up......-regulates VDR protein expression approximately 2-fold. 1,25(OH)2D3 does not increase VDR mRNA expression but increases the half-life of the VDR protein in activated CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, 1,25(OH)2D3 induces a significant intracellular redistribution of the VDR. We show that 1,25(OH)2D3 stabilizes the VDR...

  19. Vitamin D receptor protein is associated with interleukin-6 in human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin D is associated with skeletal muscle physiology and function and may play a role in intramuscular inflammation, possibly via the vitamin D receptor (VDR). We conducted two studies to examine (1) whether serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and/or intramuscular VDR protein concentrations are ass...

  20. Vitamin C and E supplementation hampers cellular adaptation to endurance training in humans: a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Gøran; Cumming, Kristoffer T; Holden, Geir; Hallén, Jostein; Rønnestad, Bent Ronny; Sveen, Ole; Skaug, Arne; Paur, Ingvild; Bastani, Nasser E; Østgaard, Hege Nymo; Buer, Charlotte; Midttun, Magnus; Freuchen, Fredrik; Wiig, Havard; Ulseth, Elisabeth Tallaksen; Garthe, Ina; Blomhoff, Rune; Benestad, Haakon B; Raastad, Truls

    2014-04-15

    In this double-blind, randomised, controlled trial, we investigated the effects of vitamin C and E supplementation on endurance training adaptations in humans. Fifty-four young men and women were randomly allocated to receive either 1000 mg of vitamin C and 235 mg of vitamin E or a placebo daily for 11 weeks. During supplementation, the participants completed an endurance training programme consisting of three to four sessions per week (primarily of running), divided into high-intensity interval sessions [4-6 × 4-6 min; >90% of maximal heart rate (HRmax)] and steady state continuous sessions (30-60 min; 70-90% of HRmax). Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max ), submaximal running and a 20 m shuttle run test were assessed and blood samples and muscle biopsies were collected, before and after the intervention. Participants in the vitamin C and E group increased their VO2 max (mean ± s.d.: 8 ± 5%) and performance in the 20 m shuttle test (10 ± 11%) to the same degree as those in the placebo group (mean ± s.d.: 8 ± 5% and 14 ± 17%, respectively). However, the mitochondrial marker cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX4) and cytosolic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1 α (PGC-1α) increased in the m. vastus lateralis in the placebo group by 59 ± 97% and 19 ± 51%, respectively, but not in the vitamin C and E group (COX4: -13 ± 54%; PGC-1α: -13 ± 29%; P ≤ 0.03, between groups). Furthermore, mRNA levels of CDC42 and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) in the trained muscle were lower in the vitamin C and E group than in the placebo group (P ≤ 0.05). Daily vitamin C and E supplementation attenuated increases in markers of mitochondrial biogenesis following endurance training. However, no clear interactions were detected for improvements in VO2 max and running performance. Consequently, vitamin C and E supplementation hampered cellular adaptations in the exercised muscles, and although this did not translate to the performance tests

  1. Quantifying the demographic cost of human-related mortality to a raptor population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, W. Grainger; Wiens, David; Law, Peter R.; Fuller, Mark R.; Hunt, Teresa L.; Driscoll, Daniel E.; Jackman, Ronald E.

    2017-01-01

    Raptors are exposed to a wide variety of human-related mortality agents, and yet population-level effects are rarely quantified. Doing so requires modeling vital rates in the context of species life-history, behavior, and population dynamics theory. In this paper, we explore the details of such an analysis by focusing on the demography of a resident, tree-nesting population of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the vicinity of an extensive (142 km2) windfarm in California. During 1994–2000, we tracked the fates of >250 radio-marked individuals of four life-stages and conducted five annual surveys of territory occupancy and reproduction. Collisions with wind turbines accounted for 41% of 88 uncensored fatalities, most of which were subadults and nonbreeding adults (floaters). A consistent overall male preponderance in the population meant that females were the limiting sex in this territorial, monogamous species. Estimates of potential population growth rate and associated variance indicated a stable breeding population, but one for which any further decrease in vital rates would require immigrant floaters to fill territory vacancies. Occupancy surveys 5 and 13 years later (2005 and 2013) showed that the nesting population remained intact, and no upward trend was apparent in the proportion of subadult eagles as pair members, a condition that would have suggested a deficit of adult replacements. However, the number of golden eagle pairs required to support windfarm mortality was large. We estimated that the entire annual reproductive output of 216–255 breeding pairs would have been necessary to support published estimates of 55–65 turbine blade-strike fatalities per year. Although the vital rates forming the basis for these calculations may have changed since the data were collected, our approach should be useful for gaining a clearer understanding of how anthropogenic mortality affects the health of raptor populations, particularly those species with delayed

  2. Physiologically Based Simulations of Deuterated Glucose for Quantifying Cell Turnover in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Niederalt

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In vivo [6,6-2H2]-glucose labeling is a state-of-the-art technique for quantifying cell proliferation and cell disappearance in humans. However, there are discrepancies between estimates of T cell proliferation reported in short (1-day versus long (7-day 2H2-glucose studies and very-long (9-week 2H2O studies. It has been suggested that these discrepancies arise from underestimation of true glucose exposure from intermittent blood sampling in the 1-day study. Label availability in glucose studies is normally approximated by a “square pulse” (Sq pulse. Since the body glucose pool is small and turns over rapidly, the availability of labeled glucose can be subject to large fluctuations and the Sq pulse approximation may be very inaccurate. Here, we model the pharmacokinetics of exogenous labeled glucose using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model to assess the impact of a more complete description of label availability as a function of time on estimates of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation and disappearance. The model enabled us to predict the exposure to labeled glucose during the fasting and de-labeling phases, to capture the fluctuations of labeled glucose availability caused by the intake of food or high-glucose beverages, and to recalculate the proliferation and death rates of immune cells. The PBPK model was used to reanalyze experimental data from three previously published studies using different labeling protocols. Although using the PBPK enrichment profile decreased the 1-day proliferation estimates by about 4 and 7% for CD4 and CD8+ T cells, respectively, differences with the 7-day and 9-week studies remained significant. We conclude that the approximations underlying the “square pulse” approach—recently suggested as the most plausible hypothesis—only explain a component of the discrepancy in published T cell proliferation rate estimates.

  3. [Comparative effects of vitamin C on the effects of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine, and lidocaine on human chondrocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Intra-articular injections of local anesthetics are commonly used to enhance post-operative analgesia following orthopedic surgery as arthroscopic surgeries. Nevertheless, recent reports of severe complications due to the use of intra-articular local anesthetic have raised concerns. The study aims to assess use of vitamin C in reducing adverse effects of the most commonly employed anesthetics - ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine - on human chondrocytes. The chondrocyte viability following exposure to 0.5% bupivacaine or 0.75% ropivacaine or 1.0% lidocaine and/or vitamin C at doses 125, 250 and 500μM was determined by Live/Dead assay and annexin V staining. Expression levels of caspases 3 and 9 were assessed using antibodies by Western blotting. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze the generation of reactive oxygen species. On exposure to the local anesthetics, chondrotoxicity was found in the order ropivacaineC effectively improved the reduced chondrocyte viability and decreased the raised apoptosis levels following exposure to anesthesia. At higher doses, vitamin C was found efficient in reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species and as well down-regulate the expressions of caspases 3 and 9. Vitamin C was observed to effectively protect chondrocytes against the toxic insult of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative effects of vitamin C on the effects of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine, and lidocaine on human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Intra-articular injections of local anesthetics are commonly used to enhance post-operative analgesia following orthopedic surgery as arthroscopic surgeries. Nevertheless, recent reports of severe complications due to the use of intra-articular local anesthetic have raised concerns. The study aims to assess use of vitamin C in reducing adverse effects of the most commonly employed anesthetics - ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine - on human chondrocytes. The chondrocyte viability following exposure to 0.5% bupivacaine or 0.75% ropivacaine or 1.0% lidocaine and/or vitamin C at doses 125, 250 and 500 μM was determined by LIVE/DEAD assay and annexin V staining. Expression levels of caspases 3 and 9 were assessed using antibodies by Western blotting. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze the generation of reactive oxygen species. On exposure to the local anesthetics, chondrotoxicity was found in the order ropivacaineC effectively improved the reduced chondrocyte viability and decreased the raised apoptosis levels following exposure to anesthesia. At higher doses, vitamin C was found efficient in reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species and as well down-regulate the expressions of caspases 3 and 9. Vitamin C was observed to effectively protect chondrocytes against the toxic insult of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Clastogenic effects in human lymphocytes exposed to low and high dose rate X-ray irradiation and vitamin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopacka, M; Rogolinski, J.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work we investigated the ability of vitamin C to modulate clastogenic effects induced in cultured human lymphocytes by X-irradiation delivered at either high (1 Gy/min) or low dose rate (0.24 Gy/min). Biological effects of the irradiation were estimated by cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay including the analysis of the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and apoptotic cells as well as calculation of nuclear division index (NDI). The numbers of micronucleated binucleate lymphocytes (MN-CBL) were 24.85 ± 2.67% and 32.56 ± 3.17% in cultures exposed to X-rays (2 Gy) delivered at low and high dose rates, respectively. Addition of vitamin C (1-20 μg/ml) to the medium of cultures irradiated with the low dose rate reduced the frequency of micronucleated lymphocytes with multiple MN in a concentration-dependent manner. Lymphocytes exposed to the high dose rate radiation showed a U-shape response: low concentration of vitamin C significantly reduced the number of MN, whereas high concentration influenced the radiation-induced total number of micronucleated cells insignificantly, although it increased the number of cells with multiple MN. Addition of vitamin C significantly reduced the fraction of apoptotic cells, irrespective of the X-ray dose rate. These results indicate that radiation dose rate is an important exposure factor, not only in terms of biological cell response to irradiation, but also with respect to the modulating effects of antioxidants. (authors)

  6. UV dependent vitamin D syntheses. UV exposure time balancing for optimum production of the vitamins D3 status in the human body. Final report; UV-abhaengige Vitamin D Synthese. Bilanzierung der Expositionszeit durch UV zur Produktion des optimalen Vitamin D{sub 3}-Bedarfes im menschlichen Koerper. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuschke, P.; Lehmann, B.; Pueschel, A.; Roensch, H.

    2012-10-15

    UV-dependent vitamin D{sub 3} synthesis - balancing of UV exposure time and the production of an optimal vitamin D{sub 3} status in men The adverse health effects on human skin and eyes by UV radiation have been well known for years. They are known to the public, too. Increased exposures by the UV-B fraction of solar radiation cause e.g. sun burn as an acute skin reaction or an increased risk on skin cancer as a chronic effect. Radiation of the same spectral UV-B range is necessary to induce the essential vitamin D metabolism in men. The UV-induced vitamin D synthesis in the skin supplies the body with more than 90 % while our typical nutrition contributes no more than 10 %. These photobiological effects are diametrically opposed. Therefore, up to now there are contradictory recommendations to the public concerning the health effects of solar UV exposure. The aim of this research project was to evaluate the quantitative and qualitative relations of UV exposure and the vitamin D status in men taking into account different conditions in the population. In result, well-balanced recommendations on optimal UV exposures for the different fractions of the population should be elaborated, realizing health protection aspects against detrimental UV effects. A literature survey (updated in 2011) summarizes the current knowledge on the vitamin D metabolism, on the effects of the hormone vitamin D and on the stage of the current discussion on the optimal vitamin D status. In a number of studies of this project the effects of UV exposure on the vitamin D status (25OH-vitamin D{sub 3} und 1,25OH-vitamin D{sub 3}) were investigated. Exposure parameters were the photobiologically effective UV dose (with respect to the minimal erythema dose MED = individual sun burn dose in each investigated volunteer) and the extent of the exposed skin area: face and hands (like everyday conditions) or whole body respectively. Serial UV exposures were applied by natural solar UV radiation or by

  7. Quantifying uncertainty in Bayesian calibrated animal-to-human PBPK models with informative prior distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding and quantifying the uncertainty of model parameters and predictions has gained more interest in recent years with the increased use of computational models in chemical risk assessment. Fully characterizing the uncertainty in risk metrics derived from linked quantita...

  8. Protection of human cells against the effects of cadmium chloride by pretreatment with vitamins, interferon, and prior low-dose γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusainova, K.A.; Vasil'eva, I.M.; Chekova, V.V.; Akhmatullina, N.B.; Zasukhina, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    Within the increasing environmental pollution there is a need to discover means to protect humans from the mutagenic effects of chemical pollutants. Natural antimutagens such as interferon and vitamins have some protective properties. Interferons simulate a variety of repair pathways in human cells and reduce the numbers of mutations induced by physical and chemical mutagens. This study compares the protective properties of interferon and vitamins with the known protective effects of small doses of ionizing radiation

  9. Quantifying over-activity in bipolar and schizophrenia patients in a human open field Paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, William; Minassian, Arpi; Henry, Brook; Kincaid, Meegin; Young, Jared W.; Geyer, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that a cardinal symptom of mania is over-activity and exaggerated goal-directed behavior. Nevertheless, few attempts have been made to quantify this behavior objectively in a laboratory environment. Having a methodology to assess over-activity reliably might be useful in distinguishing manic bipolar disorder (BD) from schizophrenia (SCZ) during highly activated states. In the current study, quantifiable measures of object-interaction were assessed using a multivariate ...

  10. Warfarin traps human vitamin K epoxide reductase in an intermediate state during electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guomin; Cui, Weidong; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Fengbo; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qian; Yang, Yihu; Li, Shuang; Bowman, Gregory R.; Sadler, J. Evan; Gross, Michael L.; Li, Weikai

    2017-01-01

    Although warfarin is the most widely used anticoagulant worldwide, the mechanism by which warfarin inhibits its target, human vitamin K epoxide reductase (hVKOR), remains unclear. Here we show that warfarin blocks a dynamic electron-transfer process in hVKOR. A major fraction of cellular hVKOR is at an intermediate redox state of this process containing a Cys51-Cys132 disulfide, a characteristic accommodated by a four-transmembrane-helix structure of hVKOR. Warfarin selectively inhibits this major cellular form of hVKOR, whereas disruption of the Cys51-Cys132 disulfide impairs warfarin binding and causes warfarin resistance. Relying on binding interactions identified by cysteine alkylation footprinting and mass spectrometry coupled with mutagenesis analysis, we are able to conduct structure simulations to reveal a closed warfarin-binding pocket stabilized by the Cys51-Cys132 linkage. Understanding the selective warfarin inhibition of a specific redox state of hVKOR should enable the rational design of drugs that exploit the redox chemistry and associated conformational changes in hVKOR. PMID:27918545

  11. Vitamin D analysis in plasma by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with C30 reversed phase column and UV detection - easy and acetonitrile-free

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hymøller, Lone; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Two physiologically important forms of vitamin D exist: vitamin D2 and vitamin D3, which by liver based hydroxylase enzymes are converted to 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, respectively. These hydroxylated metabolites of vitamin D are measured in plasma to assess the vtamin D status...... detection at 265nm for quantifying vitamin D2, vitamin D3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D2, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. The method proved versatile with respect to plasma lipid content, sample amount, and plasma concentration of the vitamin D metabolites as it was tested using plasma from six different species: cattle...... material® 972 “Vitamin D in human serum” from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (Gaithersburg, USA) the results for 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations were within the boundaries provided by NIST, reflected by Z-scores between 0.1 and 0.9....

  12. Factors that contribute to biomarker responses in humans including a study in individuals taking Vitamin C supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D

    2001-09-01

    It is possible in many situations to identify humans exposed to potentially toxic materials in the workplace and in the environment. As in most human studies, there tends to be a high degree of interindividual variability in response to chemical insults. Some non-exposed control individuals exhibit as high a level of damage as some exposed individuals and some of these have levels of damage as low as many of the controls. Thus, it is only the mean values of the groups that can substantiate an exposure-related problem; the data on an individual basis are still of limited use. While human lymphocytes remain the most popular cell type for monitoring purposes, sperm, buccal, nasal, epithelial and placental cells are also used. However, for interpretation of responses, the issue of confounding factors must be addressed. There are endogenous confounding factors, such as age, gender, and genetic make-up and exogenous ones, including lifestyle habits (smoking, drinking, etc.) There are biomarkers of exposure, effect/response and susceptibility and the last may be influenced by the genotype and polymorphism genes existing in a population. From our own studies, confounding effects on cytogenetic damage and ras oncoproteins will be considered in relation to workers exposed to vinyl chloride and petroleum emissions and to volunteers taking Vitamin C supplementation. Smoking history, exposure and duration of employment affected the worker studies. For petroleum emissions, so did gender and season of exposure. For the non-smoking volunteer Vitamin C supplementation study, cholesterol levels, plasma Vitamin C levels, lipid peroxidation products and DNA damage in the Comet assay were also measured. Gender affected differences in Vitamin C levels, antioxidant capacity and the number of chromosome aberrations induced by bleomycin challenge in vitro. The results were the same for both high and low cholesterol subjects. The relationship between biomarkers and the various factors which

  13. Chylomicron remnant-vitamin A metabolism by the human hepatoma cell line HepG2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenich, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The binding and metabolism of [ 3 H] vitamin A-containing chylomicron remnants (CMR) by the human hepatoma cell line Hep G2 was studied. Mesenteric lymph chylomicrons (CM) were collected from [ 3 H] retinol-fed rats and incubated with lipoprotein-lipase to obtain CMR. At 4 0 C, specific CMR binding was inhibited by excess unlabeled CMR. Specific binding predominated at low concentrations and approached saturation while total binding continued to increase over an extensive concentration range (0.45-32 μg triglyceride/ml). CMR uptake at 37 0 C was greater than that of CM and at least 100 times more efficient than the fluid-phase pinocytosis of sucrose. CMR binding increased as the extent of lipolysis obtained by incubation with lipoprotein-lipase increased. Addition of human apolipoprotein E enhanced both CMR and CM binding. After internalization, Hep G2 cells hydrolyzed CMR-[ 3 H]retinyl esters and radiolabeled metabolites accumulated as a function of time and temperature. As a function of the concentration of [ 3 H] VA initially cell-bound, retinol and retinyl esters accumulated as the major cell-associated metabolites. By contrast, retinol was the major metabolite in the medium only at low VA concentrations as other more polar metabolites accumulated at higher concentrations (> 110 pmol VA/mg cell protein). The accumulation of CMR-VA metabolites in the medium was reduced when cells were preincubated in retinol-supplemented media. Also, the specific activity of retinol in the medium closely resembled that in the cell indicating that CMR-VA mixed with the cellular store prior to its secretion

  14. A novel role for a major component of the vitamin D axis: vitamin D binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor induces human breast cancer cell apoptosis through stimulation of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Fiore, Maria Giulia; Magherini, Stefano; Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-07-08

    The role of vitamin D in maintaining health appears greater than originally thought, and the concept of the vitamin D axis underlines the complexity of the biological events controlled by biologically active vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D3), its two binding proteins that are the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). In this study we demonstrate that GcMAF stimulates macrophages, which in turn attack human breast cancer cells, induce their apoptosis and eventually phagocytize them. These results are consistent with the observation that macrophages infiltrated implanted tumors in mice after GcMAF injections. In addition, we hypothesize that the last 23 hydrophobic amino acids of VDR, located at the inner part of the plasma membrane, interact with the first 23 hydrophobic amino acids of the GcMAF located at the external part of the plasma membrane. This allows 1,25(OH)(2)D3 and oleic acid to become sandwiched between the two vitamin D-binding proteins, thus postulating a novel molecular mode of interaction between GcMAF and VDR. Taken together, these results support and reinforce the hypothesis that GcMAF has multiple biological activities that could be responsible for its anti-cancer effects, possibly through molecular interaction with the VDR that in turn is responsible for a multitude of non-genomic as well as genomic effects.

  15. A Novel Role for a Major Component of the Vitamin D Axis: Vitamin D Binding Protein-Derived Macrophage Activating Factor Induces Human Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis through Stimulation of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ruggiero

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of vitamin D in maintaining health appears greater than originally thought, and the concept of the vitamin D axis underlines the complexity of the biological events controlled by biologically active vitamin D (1,25(OH(2D3, its two binding proteins that are the vitamin D receptor (VDR and the vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF. In this study we demonstrate that GcMAF stimulates macrophages, which in turn attack human breast cancer cells, induce their apoptosis and eventually phagocytize them. These results are consistent with the observation that macrophages infiltrated implanted tumors in mice after GcMAF injections. In addition, we hypothesize that the last 23 hydrophobic amino acids of VDR, located at the inner part of the plasma membrane, interact with the first 23 hydrophobic amino acids of the GcMAF located at the external part of the plasma membrane. This al1ows 1,25(OH(2D3 and oleic acid to become sandwiched between the two vitamin D-binding proteins, thus postulating a novel molecular mode of interaction between GcMAF and VDR. Taken together, these results support and reinforce the hypothesis that GcMAF has multiple biological activities that could be responsible for its anti-cancer effects, possibly through molecular interaction with the VDR that in turn is responsible for a multitude of non-genomic as well as genomic effects.

  16. Vitamin C In Neuropsychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Dragan M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamins are necessary factors in human development and normal brain function. Vitamin C is a hydrosoluble compound that humans cannot produce; therefore, we are completely dependent on food intake for vitamin C. Ascorbic acid is an important antioxidative agent and is present in high concentrations in neurons and is also crucial for collagen synthesis throughout the body. Ascorbic acid has a role in modulating many essential neurotransmitters, enables neurogenesis in adult brain and protects cells against infection. While SVCT1 enables the absorption of vitamin C in the intestine, SVCT2 is primarily located in the brain.

  17. Increased production of functional recombinant human clotting factor IX by baby hamster kidney cells engineered to overexpress VKORC1, the vitamin K 2,3-epoxide-reducing enzyme of the vitamin K cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajih, Nadeem; Hutson, Susan M; Owen, John; Wallin, Reidar

    2005-09-09

    Some recombinant vitamin K-dependent blood coagulation factors (factors VII, IX, and protein C) have become valuable pharmaceuticals in the treatment of bleeding complications and sepsis. Because of their vitamin K-dependent post-translational modification, their synthesis by eukaryotic cells is essential. The eukaryotic cell harbors a vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylation system that converts the proteins to gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing proteins. However, the system in eukaryotic cells has limited capacity, and cell lines overexpressing vitamin K-dependent clotting factors produce only a fraction of the recombinant proteins as fully gamma-carboxylated, physiologically competent proteins. In this work we have used recombinant human factor IX (r-hFIX)-producing baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, engineered to stably overexpress various components of the gamma-carboxylation system of the cell, to determine whether increased production of functional r-hFIX can be accomplished. All BHK cell lines secreted r-hFIX into serum-free medium. Overexpression of gamma-carboxylase is shown to inhibit production of functional r-hFIX. On the other hand, cells overexpressing VKORC1, the reduced vitamin K cofactor-producing enzyme of the vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylation system, produced 2.9-fold more functional r-hFIX than control BHK cells. The data are consistent with the notion that VKORC1 is the rate-limiting step in the system and is a key regulatory protein in synthesis of active vitamin K-dependent proteins. The data suggest that overexpression of VKORC1 can be utilized for increased cellular production of recombinant vitamin K-dependent proteins.

  18. Vitamin C and Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemilä, Harri

    2017-03-29

    In the early literature, vitamin C deficiency was associated with pneumonia. After its identification, a number of studies investigated the effects of vitamin C on diverse infections. A total of 148 animal studies indicated that vitamin C may alleviate or prevent infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The most extensively studied human infection is the common cold. Vitamin C administration does not decrease the average incidence of colds in the general population, yet it halved the number of colds in physically active people. Regularly administered vitamin C has shortened the duration of colds, indicating a biological effect. However, the role of vitamin C in common cold treatment is unclear. Two controlled trials found a statistically significant dose-response, for the duration of common cold symptoms, with up to 6-8 g/day of vitamin C. Thus, the negative findings of some therapeutic common cold studies might be explained by the low doses of 3-4 g/day of vitamin C. Three controlled trials found that vitamin C prevented pneumonia. Two controlled trials found a treatment benefit of vitamin C for pneumonia patients. One controlled trial reported treatment benefits for tetanus patients. The effects of vitamin C against infections should be investigated further.

  19. Vitamin C and Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Hemilä

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the early literature, vitamin C deficiency was associated with pneumonia. After its identification, a number of studies investigated the effects of vitamin C on diverse infections. A total of 148 animal studies indicated that vitamin C may alleviate or prevent infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The most extensively studied human infection is the common cold. Vitamin C administration does not decrease the average incidence of colds in the general population, yet it halved the number of colds in physically active people. Regularly administered vitamin C has shortened the duration of colds, indicating a biological effect. However, the role of vitamin C in common cold treatment is unclear. Two controlled trials found a statistically significant dose–response, for the duration of common cold symptoms, with up to 6–8 g/day of vitamin C. Thus, the negative findings of some therapeutic common cold studies might be explained by the low doses of 3–4 g/day of vitamin C. Three controlled trials found that vitamin C prevented pneumonia. Two controlled trials found a treatment benefit of vitamin C for pneumonia patients. One controlled trial reported treatment benefits for tetanus patients. The effects of vitamin C against infections should be investigated further.

  20. Nonclassical Vitamin D Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Zittermann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that vitamin D has a broad range of actions in the human body. Besides its well-known effects on calcium/phosphate homeostasis, vitamin D influences muscle function, cardiovascular homeostasis, nervous function, and the immune response. Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency has been associated with muscle weakness and a high incidence of various chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 and 2 diabetes. Most importantly, low vitamin D status has been found to be an independent predictor of all-cause mortality. Several recent randomized controlled trials support the assumption that vitamin D can improve muscle strength, glucose homeostasis, and cardiovascular risk markers. In addition, vitamin D may reduce cancer incidence and elevated blood pressure. Since the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is high throughout the world, there is a need to improve vitamin D status in the general adult population. However, the currently recommended daily vitamin D intake of 5–15 µg is too low to achieve an adequate vitamin D status in individuals with only modest skin synthesis. Thus, there is a need to recommend a vitamin D intake that is effective for achieving adequate circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (>75 nmol/L.

  1. A Review of the Extraction and Determination Methods of Thirteen Essential Vitamins to the Human Body: An Update from 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Wei-E; Yan, Jia-Qing; Liu, Min; Zhou, Yu; Shen, Xin; Ma, Ying-Lin; Feng, Xue-Song; Yang, Jun; Li, Guo-Hui

    2018-06-19

    Vitamins are a class of essential nutrients in the body; thus, they play important roles in human health. The chemicals are involved in many physiological functions and both their lack and excess can put health at risk. Therefore, the establishment of methods for monitoring vitamin concentrations in different matrices is necessary. In this review, an updated overview of the main pretreatments and determination methods that have been used since 2010 is given. Ultrasonic assisted extraction, liquid⁻liquid extraction, solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid⁻liquid microextraction are the most common pretreatment methods, while the determination methods involve chromatography methods, electrophoretic methods, microbiological assays, immunoassays, biosensors and several other methods. Different pretreatments and determination methods are discussed.

  2. A Review of the Extraction and Determination Methods of Thirteen Essential Vitamins to the Human Body: An Update from 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamins are a class of essential nutrients in the body; thus, they play important roles in human health. The chemicals are involved in many physiological functions and both their lack and excess can put health at risk. Therefore, the establishment of methods for monitoring vitamin concentrations in different matrices is necessary. In this review, an updated overview of the main pretreatments and determination methods that have been used since 2010 is given. Ultrasonic assisted extraction, liquid–liquid extraction, solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction are the most common pretreatment methods, while the determination methods involve chromatography methods, electrophoretic methods, microbiological assays, immunoassays, biosensors and several other methods. Different pretreatments and determination methods are discussed.

  3. Scurvy and Vitamin C

    OpenAIRE

    Mayberry, Jason A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the history of scurvy and vitamin C. The first section of the paper outlines the science of vitamin C. The second discusses outlines the medical progression of vitamin C deficiency and scurvy. The third section gives a brief timeline of scurvy throughout human history. The fourth section discusses the conditions during the age of sail that combined to make scurvy the greatest killer of sailors. The final section follows the scientific drive to find a cure and eventual elim...

  4. Vitamin D and Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    PITTAS, ANASTASSIOS G.; DAWSON-HUGHES, BESS

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of evidence from animal and human studies, vitamin D has emerged as a potential risk modifier for type 1 and type 2 diabetes (type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes). Vitamin D is thought to have both direct (through activation of the vitamin D receptor) and indirect (via regulation of calcium homeostasis) effects on various mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of both types of diabetes, including pancreatic beta cell dysfunction, impaired insulin action and systemic inflammati...

  5. Applying Multiple Data Collection Tools to Quantify Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Communication on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Philip M; Leader, Amy; Yom-Tov, Elad; Budenz, Alexandra; Fisher, Kara; Klassen, Ann C

    2016-12-05

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. There are several vaccines that protect against strains of HPV most associated with cervical and other cancers. Thus, HPV vaccination has become an important component of adolescent preventive health care. As media evolves, more information about HPV vaccination is shifting to social media platforms such as Twitter. Health information consumed on social media may be especially influential for segments of society such as younger populations, as well as ethnic and racial minorities. The objectives of our study were to quantify HPV vaccine communication on Twitter, and to develop a novel methodology to improve the collection and analysis of Twitter data. We collected Twitter data using 10 keywords related to HPV vaccination from August 1, 2014 to July 31, 2015. Prospective data collection used the Twitter Search API and retrospective data collection used Twitter Firehose. Using a codebook to characterize tweet sentiment and content, we coded a subsample of tweets by hand to develop classification models to code the entire sample using machine learning procedures. We also documented the words in the 140-character tweet text most associated with each keyword. We used chi-square tests, analysis of variance, and nonparametric equality of medians to test for significant differences in tweet characteristic by sentiment. A total of 193,379 English-language tweets were collected, classified, and analyzed. Associated words varied with each keyword, with more positive and preventive words associated with "HPV vaccine" and more negative words associated with name-brand vaccines. Positive sentiment was the largest type of sentiment in the sample, with 75,393 positive tweets (38.99% of the sample), followed by negative sentiment with 48,940 tweets (25.31% of the sample). Positive and neutral tweets constituted the largest percentage of tweets mentioning prevention or protection (20

  6. Rapid, high performance method for the determination of vitamin K(1), menaquinone-4 and vitamin K(1) 2,3-epoxide in human serum and plasma using liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Alessandra; Cafolla, Arturo; Gasperi, Tecla; Bellante, Simona; Caretti, Fulvia; Curini, Roberta; Fernández, Virginia Pérez

    2014-04-18

    Unlike the other fat-soluble vitamins, vitamin K circulates in the human bloodstream at very low levels because of a low intake in the diet. Mammals have developed an efficient recycling system, known as vitamin K-epoxide cycle, which involve quinone, hydroquinone and epoxide forms of the vitamin. Phylloquinone (K(1)) is the main homologue, while menaquinone-4 (MK-4) is both a member of the vitamin K(2) family and metabolite of K(1) in extra-hepatic tissues. Notwithstanding the recent advances, many aspects of the complex vitamin K physiology still remain to be investigated. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop more reliable analytical methods for determining the vitamin K and its metabolites in biological fluids and tissues. Nevertheless, relatively low concentrations, unavailability of some authentic standards and occurrence of interfering lipids make this a challenging task. The method proposed in the present paper can directly and accurately estimate K(1), K(1) 2,3-epoxide (K(1)O), and MK-4 in human serum and plasma at concentrations in the ng/L-μg/L range, using labelled internal standards and a quadrupole linear ion trap instrument operated in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. High sensitivity was achieved by removing signal "endogenous suppressors" and making the composition of the non-aqueous mobile phase suitable to support the positive atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the analytes. An excellent selectivity resulted from the combination of some factors: the MRM acquisition, the adoption of an identification point system, an extraction optimized to remove most of the lipids and a tandem-C18 column-system necessary to separate isobaric interferences from analytes. The method was validated according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines and its accuracy was assessed by analysing 9 samples from the Vitamin K External Quality Assessment Scheme (KEQAS). Its feasibility in evaluating vitamin K status in human serum was

  7. Polymorphic Human Sulfotransferase 2A1 Mediates the Formation of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3-3-O-Sulfate, a Major Circulating Vitamin D Metabolite in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Timothy; Wang, Zhican; Chapron, Brian D; Suzuki, Mizuki; Claw, Katrina G; Gao, Chunying; Foti, Robert S; Prasad, Bhagwat; Chapron, Alenka; Calamia, Justina; Chaudhry, Amarjit; Schuetz, Erin G; Horst, Ronald L; Mao, Qingcheng; de Boer, Ian H; Thornton, Timothy A; Thummel, Kenneth E

    2018-04-01

    Metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 (25OHD 3 ) plays a central role in regulating the biologic effects of vitamin D in the body. Although cytochrome P450-dependent hydroxylation of 25OHD 3 has been extensively investigated, limited information is available on the conjugation of 25OHD 3 In this study, we report that 25OHD 3 is selectively conjugated to 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate by human sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1) and that the liver is a primary site of metabolite formation. At a low (50 nM) concentration of 25OHD 3 , 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate was the most abundant metabolite, with an intrinsic clearance approximately 8-fold higher than the next most efficient metabolic route. In addition, 25OHD 3 sulfonation was not inducible by the potent human pregnane X receptor agonist, rifampicin. The 25OHD 3 sulfonation rates in a bank of 258 different human liver cytosols were highly variable but correlated with the rates of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfonation. Further analysis revealed a significant association between a common single nucleotide variant within intron 1 of SULT2A1 (rs296361; minor allele frequency = 15% in whites) and liver cytosolic SULT2A1 content as well as 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate formation rate, suggesting that variation in the SULT2A1 gene contributes importantly to interindividual differences in vitamin D homeostasis. Finally, 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate exhibited high affinity for the vitamin D binding protein and was detectable in human plasma and bile but not in urine samples. Thus, circulating concentrations of 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate appear to be protected from rapid renal elimination, raising the possibility that the sulfate metabolite may serve as a reservoir of 25OHD 3 in vivo, and contribute indirectly to the biologic effects of vitamin D. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  8. Vitamin E--a selective inhibitor of the NADPH oxidoreductase enzyme system in human granulocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterick, C.J.; Baehner, R.L.; Boxer, L.A.; Jersild, R.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The cellular sites of H 2 O 2 formation in phagocytizing granulocytes have been identified with cerium chloride. A precipitate was visible in phagosomes and on plasma membranes from intact normal cells in the presence of either 0.71 mM NADH or NADPH. X-ray microanalysis permitted identification of cerium deposition within the phagosomes even in the absence of reduced pyridine nucleotides. Catalase ablated the formation of the reaction product. Intact granulocytes obtained from subjects receiving 1600 units of vitamin E daily for 2 weeks exhibited reaction product in the presence of NADH but not NADPH. Intact cells from subjects treated with vitamin E demonstrated diminished numbers of phagocytic vesicles containing reaction product. During phagocytosis the granulocytes treated with vitamin E consumed oxygen but exhibited significantly reduced rates of hydrogen-peroxide-dependent glucose-1- 14 C oxidation to 14 CO 2 . Isolated phagocytic vesicles obtained from granulocytes after ingestion of opsonized lipopolysaccharide-paraffin oil droplets contained reaction product when exposed to 0.71 mM NADPH. No reaction product was evident at 0.71 mM NADH but was evident at 2.0 mM NADH. Isolated phagocytic vesicles from the granulocytes of subjects receiving vitamin E exhibited reaction product only in the presence of NADH. These observations suggest that vitamin E interferes with the electron transport chain apparently required for the oxidation of NADPH to form H 2 O 2 in the phagocytizing granulocyte

  9. Maternal supplementation with natural or synthetic vitamin E and its levels in human colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Heleni A; Ramalho, Heryka M M; Lima, Mayara S R; Grilo, Evellyn C; Dimenstein, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Newborns are considered a high-risk group for vitamin E deficiency. Breast milk is a source of alpha-tocopherol (α-TOH), a form of vitamin E that prevents deficiency. The present study aimed to assess whether supplementation with a natural or synthetic form of α-TOH, in addition to maternal sources of vitamin E, would increase the concentration of α-TOH in colostrum. A total of 109 healthy lactating women were recruited from a Brazilian public maternity clinic and randomized into 3 groups: control without supplementation (n = 36), natural α-TOH supplementation (n = 40), and synthetic α-TOH supplementation (n = 33). Blood and colostrum samples were collected before and after supplementation to check the nutritional status of these women by high-performance liquid chromatography. The Kruskal-Wallis test was applied for independent samples, and Tukey test was used for 2-way analysis of the averages of the groups. The baseline nutritional status of vitamin E of all of the lactating women enrolled in the trial was considered adequate. Women who received supplementation had higher concentrations of α-TOH in colostrum than the control group, with 57% and 39% increases in women supplemented with the natural and synthetic forms of α-TOH, respectively. Supplementation with both forms of α-TOH increased vitamin E concentrations in colostrum; however, the natural form was more efficient in increasing the levels.

  10. Vitamin D inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages through the induction of autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant R Campbell

    Full Text Available Low vitamin D levels in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV infected persons are associated with more rapid disease progression and increased risk for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We have previously shown that 1α,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25D3, the active form of vitamin D, inhibits HIV replication in human macrophages through the induction of autophagy. In this study, we report that physiological concentrations of 1,25D3 induce the production of the human cathelicidin microbial peptide (CAMP and autophagic flux in HIV and M. tuberculosis co-infected human macrophages which inhibits mycobacterial growth and the replication of HIV. Using RNA interference for Beclin-1 and the autophagy-related 5 homologue, combined with the chemical inhibitors of autophagic flux, bafilomycin A₁, an inhibitor of autophagosome-lysosome fusion and subsequent acidification, and SID 26681509 an inhibitor of the lysosome hydrolase cathepsin L, we show that the 1,25D3-mediated inhibition of HIV replication and mycobacterial growth during single infection or dual infection is dependent not only upon the induction of autophagy, but also through phagosomal maturation. Moreover, through the use of RNA interference for CAMP, we demonstrate that cathelicidin is essential for the 1,25D3 induced autophagic flux and inhibition of HIV replication and mycobacterial growth. The present findings provide a biological explanation for the benefits and importance of vitamin D sufficiency in HIV and M. tuberculosis-infected persons, and provide new insights into novel approaches to prevent and treat HIV infection and related opportunistic infections.

  11. Quantifying human exposure to air pollution--moving from static monitoring to spatio-temporally resolved personal exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinle, Susanne; Reis, Stefan; Sabel, Clive Eric

    2013-01-15

    Quantifying human exposure to air pollutants is a challenging task. Ambient concentrations of air pollutants at potentially harmful levels are ubiquitous in urban areas and subject to high spatial and temporal variability. At the same time, every individual has unique activity-patterns. Exposure results from multifaceted relationships and interactions between environmental and human systems, adding complexity to the assessment process. Traditionally, approaches to quantify human exposure have relied on pollutant concentrations from fixed air quality network sites and static population distributions. New developments in sensor technology now enable us to monitor personal exposure to air pollutants directly while people are moving through their activity spaces and varying concentration fields. The literature review on which this paper is based on reflects recent developments in the assessment of human exposure to air pollution. This includes the discussion of methodologies and concepts, and the elaboration of approaches and study designs applied in the field. We identify shortcomings of current approaches and discuss future research needs. We close by proposing a novel conceptual model for the integrated assessment of human exposure to air pollutants taking into account latest technological capabilities and contextual information. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Vitamin B6-Dependent Enzymes in the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: A Druggable Target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales Kronenberger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a deadly infectious disease which affects millions of people each year in tropical regions. There is no effective vaccine available and the treatment is based on drugs which are currently facing an emergence of drug resistance and in this sense the search for new drug targets is indispensable. It is well established that vitamin biosynthetic pathways, such as the vitamin B6 de novo synthesis present in Plasmodium, are excellent drug targets. The active form of vitamin B6, pyridoxal 5-phosphate, is, besides its antioxidative properties, a cofactor for a variety of essential enzymes present in the malaria parasite which includes the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, synthesis of polyamines, the aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT, involved in the protein biosynthesis, and the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT, a key enzyme within the folate metabolism.

  13. Curcumin induces human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene expression through a vitamin D receptor-independent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Chunxiao; Rosoha, Elena; Lowry, Malcolm B

    2013-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) mediates the pleiotropic biologic effects of 1α,25 dihydroxy-vitamin D(3). Recent in vitro studies suggested that curcumin and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) also bind to VDR with low affinity. As potential ligands for the VDR, we hypothesized that curcumin...... cancer cell line HT-29 and keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. We demonstrated that PUFAs failed to induce CAMP or CYP24A1 mRNA expression in all three cell lines, but curcumin up-regulated CAMP mRNA and protein levels in U937 cells. Curcumin treatment induced CAMP promoter activity from a luciferase reporter...... construct lacking the VDR binding site and did not increase binding of the VDR to the CAMP promoter as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. These findings indicate that induction of CAMP by curcumin occurs through a vitamin D receptor-independent manner. We conclude that PUFAs and curcumin do...

  14. Vitamin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin K helps your body by making proteins for ... blood clotting. If you don't have enough vitamin K, you may bleed too much. Newborns have ...

  15. Vitamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin A plays a role in your Vision Bone growth Reproduction Cell functions Immune system Vitamin A is an antioxidant. It can come from ...

  16. Vitamin E

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ultraviolet light from the sun. The body also needs vitamin E to boost its immune system so that ... important functions. How much vitamin E do I need? The amount of vitamin E you need each day depends on your ...

  17. Sun exposure and vitamin D supplementation in relation to vitamin D status of breastfeeding mothers and infants in the global exploration of human milk study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawodu, Adekunle; Davidson, Barbara; Woo, Jessica G; Peng, Yong-Mei; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M; de Lourdes Guerrero, Maria; Morrow, Ardythe L

    2015-02-05

    Although vitamin D (vD) deficiency is common in breastfed infants and their mothers during pregnancy and lactation, a standardized global comparison is lacking. We studied the prevalence and risk factors for vD deficiency using a standardized protocol in a cohort of breastfeeding mother-infant pairs, enrolled in the Global Exploration of Human Milk Study, designed to examine longitudinally the effect of environment, diet and culture. Mothers planned to provide breast milk for at least three months post-partum and were enrolled at four weeks postpartum in Shanghai, China (n=112), Cincinnati, Ohio (n=119), and Mexico City, Mexico (n=113). Maternal serum 25(OH)D was measured by radioimmunoassay (obesity (p=0.03), season (p=0.001) and sites (p<0.001) predicted maternal vD status. vD deficiency in order of magnitude was found in 62%, 28%, and 6% of Mexican, Cincinnati and Shanghai infants, respectively (p<0.001). Season (p=0.022), adding formula feeding (p<0.001) and a higher sun index (p=0.085) predicted higher infant vD status. vD deficiency appears to be a global problem in mothers and infants, though the prevalence in diverse populations may depend upon sun exposure behaviors and vD supplementation. Greater attention to maternal and infant vD status starting during pregnancy is warranted worldwide.

  18. B vitamins and n-3 fatty acids for brain development and function: review of human studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, van de O.; Hooijdonk, L.W.A.; Doets, E.L.; Schiepers, O.J.G.; Eilander, J.H.C.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nutrition is one of many factors that affect brain development and functioning, and in recent years the role of certain nutrients has been investigated. B vitamins and n–3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are two of the most promising and widely studied nutritional factors. Methods: In

  19. Human Serum Vitamin A and β-Carotene Contents in Relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of the levels of vitamin A (as retinol) and β-carotene in locally consumed foods in relationship to their occurrence in the serum of individuals grouped according to different social groups and sexes was carried out in Kano metropolis. Both raw and prepared foods (meals/snacks) investigated showed the ...

  20. The effect of Centella asiatica, vitamins, glycolic acid and their mixtures preparations in stimulating collagen and fibronectin synthesis in cultured human skin fibroblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Puziah

    2014-03-01

    Centella asiatica (Linn.) Urban is well known in promoting wound healing and provides significant benefits in skin care and therapeutic products formulation. Glycolic acid and vitamins also play a role in the enhancement of collagen and fibronectin synthesis. Here, we evaluate the specific effect of Centella asiatica (CA), vitamins, glycolic acid and their mixture preparations to stimulate collagen and fibronectin synthesis in cultured human fibroblast cells. The fibroblast cells are incubated with CA, glycolic acid, vitamins and their mixture preparations for 48 h. The cell lysates were analyzed for protein content and collagen synthesis by direct binding enzyme immunoassay. The fibronectin of the cultured supernatant was measured by sandwich enzyme immunoassay. The results showed that CA, glycolic acid, vitamins A, E and C significantly stimulate collagen and fibronectin synthesis in the fibroblast. Addition of glycolic acid and vitamins to CA further increased the levels of collagen and fibronectin synthesis to 8.55 and 23.75 μg/100 μg, respectively. CA, glycolic acid, vitamins A, E, and C, and their mixtures demonstrated stimulatory effect on both extra-cellular matrix synthesis of collagen and fibronectin in in vitro studies on human foreskin fibroblasts, which is beneficial to skin care and therapeutic products formulation.

  1. Quantifying the impact of human immunodeficiency virus-1 escape from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich D Kadolsky

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 escape from the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL response leads to a weakening of viral control and is likely to be detrimental to the patient. To date, the impact of escape on viral load and CD4(+ T cell count has not been quantified, primarily because of sparse longitudinal data and the difficulty of separating cause and effect in cross-sectional studies. We use two independent methods to quantify the impact of HIV-1 escape from CTLs in chronic infection: mathematical modelling of escape and statistical analysis of a cross-sectional cohort. Mathematical modelling revealed a modest increase in log viral load of 0.051 copies ml(-1 per escape event. Analysis of the cross-sectional cohort revealed a significant positive association between viral load and the number of "escape events", after correcting for length of infection and rate of replication. We estimate that a single CTL escape event leads to a viral load increase of 0.11 log copies ml(-1 (95% confidence interval: 0.040-0.18, consistent with the predictions from the mathematical modelling. Overall, the number of escape events could only account for approximately 6% of the viral load variation in the cohort. Our findings indicate that although the loss of the CTL response for a single epitope results in a highly statistically significant increase in viral load, the biological impact is modest. We suggest that this small increase in viral load is explained by the small growth advantage of the variant relative to the wildtype virus. Escape from CTLs had a measurable, but unexpectedly low, impact on viral load in chronic infection.

  2. Quantifying Diet-Induced Metabolic Changes of the Human Gut Microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shoaie, Saeed; Ghaffari, Pouyan; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia

    2015-01-01

    The human gut microbiome is known to be associated with various human disorders, but a major challenge is to go beyond association studies and elucidate causalities. Mathematical modeling of the human gut microbiome at a genome scale is a useful tool to decipher microbe-microbe, diet...... of single bacteria and whole communities in vitro. Focusing on metabolic interactions between the diet, gut microbiota, and host metabolism, we demonstrated the predictive power of the toolbox in a diet-intervention study of 45 obese and overweight individuals and validated our predictions by fecal...... and blood metabolomics data. Thus, modeling could quantitatively describe altered fecal and serum amino acid levels in response to diet intervention....

  3. Human Vitamin B12 Absorption and Metabolism are Measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Using Specifically Labeled 14C-Cobalamin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carkeet, C; Dueker, S R; Lango, J; Buchholz, B A; Miller, J W; Green, R; Hammock, B D; Roth, J R; Anderson, P J

    2006-01-01

    There is need for an improved test of human ability to assimilate dietary vitamin B 12 . Assaying and understanding absorption and uptake of B 12 is important because defects can lead to hematological and neurological complications. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is uniquely suited for assessing absorption and kinetics of 14 C-labeled substances after oral ingestion because it is more sensitive than decay counting and can measure levels of carbon-14 ( 14 C) in microliter volumes of biological samples, with negligible exposure of subjects to radioactivity. The test we describe employs amounts of B 12 in the range of normal dietary intake. The B 12 used was quantitatively labeled with 14 C at one particular atom of the DMB moiety by exploiting idiosyncrasies of Salmonellametabolism. In order to grow aerobically on ethanolamine, S. entericamust be provided with either pre-formed B 12 or two of its precursors: cobinamide and dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). When provided with 14 C-DMB specifically labeled in the C2 position, cells produced 14 C-B 12 of high specific activity (2.1 GBq/mmol, 58 mCi/mmol) and no detectable dilution of label from endogenous DMB synthesis. In a human kinetic study, a physiological dose (1.5 mg, 2.2 KBq/59 nCi) of purified 14 C-B 12 was administered and showed plasma appearance and clearance curves consistent with the predicted behavior of the pure vitamin. This method opens new avenues for study of B 12 assimilation

  4. Quantifying human and organizational factors in accident management using decision trees: the HORAAM method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumont, G.; Menage, F.; Schneiter, J.R.; Spurgin, A.; Vogel, A.

    2000-01-01

    In the framework of the level 2 Probabilistic Safety Study (PSA 2) project, the Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection (IPSN) has developed a method for taking into account Human and Organizational Reliability Aspects during accident management. Actions are taken during very degraded installation operations by teams of experts in the French framework of Crisis Organization (ONC). After describing the background of the framework of the Level 2 PSA, the French specific Crisis Organization and the characteristics of human actions in the Accident Progression Event Tree, this paper describes the method developed to introduce in PSA the Human and Organizational Reliability Analysis in Accident Management (HORAAM). This method is based on the Decision Tree method and has gone through a number of steps in its development. The first one was the observation of crisis center exercises, in order to identify the main influence factors (IFs) which affect human and organizational reliability. These IFs were used as headings in the Decision Tree method. Expert judgment was used in order to verify the IFs, to rank them, and to estimate the value of the aggregated factors to simplify the quantification of the tree. A tool based on Mathematica was developed to increase the flexibility and the efficiency of the study

  5. Quantifying the Role of Homophily in Human Cooperation Using Multiplex Evolutionary Game Theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Di Stefano

    Full Text Available Nature shows as human beings live and grow inside social structures. This assumption allows us to explain and explore how it may shape most of our behaviours and choices, and why we are not just blindly driven by instincts: our decisions are based on more complex cognitive reasons, based on our connectedness on different spaces. Thus, human cooperation emerges from this complex nature of social network. Our paper, focusing on the evolutionary dynamics, is intended to explore how and why it happens, and what kind of impact is caused by homophily among people. We investigate the evolution of human cooperation using evolutionary game theory on multiplex. Multiplexity, as an extra dimension of analysis, allows us to unveil the hidden dynamics and observe non-trivial patterns within a population across network layers. More importantly, we find a striking role of homophily, as the higher the homophily between individuals, the quicker is the convergence towards cooperation in the social dilemma. The simulation results, conducted both macroscopically and microscopically across the network layers in the multiplex, show quantitatively the role of homophily in human cooperation.

  6. Maternal Vitamin D Deficiency and Fetal Programming - Lessons Learned from Humans and Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Reichetzeder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cardiovascular disease partially originates from poor environmental and nutritional conditions in early life. Lack of micronutrients like 25 hydroxy vitamin D3 (25OHD during pregnancy may be an important treatable causal factor. The present study explored the effect of maternal 25OHD deficiency on the offspring. Methods: We performed a prospective observational study analyzing the association of maternal 25OHD deficiency during pregnancy with birth outcomes considering confounding. To show that vitamin D deficiency may be causally involved in the observed associations, mice were set on either 25OHD sufficient or insufficient diets before and during pregnancy. Growth, glucose tolerance and mortality was analyzed in the F1 generation. Results: The clinical study showed that severe 25OHD deficiency was associated with low birth weight and low gestational age. ANCOVA models indicated that established confounding factors such as offspring sex, smoking during pregnancy and maternal BMI did not influence the impact of 25OHD on birth weight. However, there was a significant interaction between 25OHD and gestational age. Maternal 25OHD deficiency was also independently associated with low APGAR scores 5 minutes postpartum. The offspring of 25OHD deficient mice grew slower after birth, had an impaired glucose tolerance shortly after birth and an increased mortality during follow-up. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates an association between maternal 25OHD and offspring birth weight. The effect of 25OHD on birth weight seems to be mediated by vitamin D controlling gestational age. Results from an animal experiment suggest that gestational 25OHD insufficiency is causally linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Since birth weight and prematurity are associated with an adverse cardiovascular outcome in later life, this study emphasizes the need for novel monitoring and treatment guidelines of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy.

  7. The role of vitamins in the diet of the elderly II. Water-soluble vitamins

    OpenAIRE

    Csapó J.; Albert Cs.; Prokisch J.

    2017-01-01

    Following a presentation of humans’ water-soluble vitamin requirements, the authors will discuss in detail the role these vitamins play in human organism and outline those major biochemical processes that are negatively affected in the body in case of vitamin deficiency. They point out that in the elderly population of developed countries cases of water-soluble vitamin deficiency are extremely rare and they are due to the lack of dietary vitamin, but mostly to the vitamin being released from ...

  8. Facts about Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national ... content in food (US Department of Health and Human Services & US Department of Agriculture, 2015). Food Vitamin ...

  9. Quantifying Human Response: Linking metrological and psychometric characterisations of Man as a Measurement Instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendrill, L R; Fisher, William P Jr

    2013-01-01

    A better understanding of how to characterise human response is essential to improved person-centred care and other situations where human factors are crucial. Challenges to introducing classical metrological concepts such as measurement uncertainty and traceability when characterising Man as a Measurement Instrument include the failure of many statistical tools when applied to ordinal measurement scales and a lack of metrological references in, for instance, healthcare. The present work attempts to link metrological and psychometric (Rasch) characterisation of Man as a Measurement Instrument in a study of elementary tasks, such as counting dots, where one knows independently the expected value because the measurement object (collection of dots) is prepared in advance. The analysis is compared and contrasted with recent approaches to this problem by others, for instance using signal error fidelity

  10. Classifying and quantifying human error in routine tasks in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, O.M.; Rasmussen, J.; Carnino, A.; Gagnolet, P.; Griffon, M.; Mancini, G.

    1982-01-01

    This paper results from the work of the OECD/NEA-CSNI Group of Experts on Human Error Data and Assessment. It proposes a classification system (or taxonomy) for use in reporting events involving human malfunction, especially those occurring during the execution of routine tasks. A set of data collection sheets based on this taxonomy has been designed. They include the information needed in order to ensure adequate quality and coherence of the raw data. The sources from which the various data should be obtainable are identified, as are the persons who should analyze them. Improving data collection systems is an iterative process. Therefore Group members are currently making trial applications of the taxonomy to previously analysed real incidents. Results from the initial round of trials are presented and discussed

  11. Flow induced dispersion analysis rapidly quantifies proteins in human plasma samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nicklas N; Andersen, Nina Z; Østergaard, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive quantification of protein based biomarkers and drugs is a substantial challenge in diagnostics and biopharmaceutical drug development. Current technologies, such as ELISA, are characterized by being slow (hours), requiring relatively large amounts of sample and being subject...... to cumbersome and expensive assay development. In this work a new approach for quantification based on changes in diffusivity is presented. The apparent diffusivity of an indicator molecule interacting with the protein of interest is determined by Taylor Dispersion Analysis (TDA) in a hydrodynamic flow system...... in a blood plasma matrix), fully automated, and being subject to a simple assay development. FIDA is demonstrated for quantification of the protein Human Serum Albumin (HSA) in human plasma as well as for quantification of an antibody against HSA. The sensitivity of the FIDA assay depends on the indicator...

  12. Vitamin D and bone health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holick, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    Vitamin D plays an essential role in maintaining a healthy mineralized skeleton for most land vertebrates including humans. Sunlight causes the photoproduction of vitamin D3 in the skin. Once formed, vitamin D3 is metabolized sequentially in the liver and kidney to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. The major biological function of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D is to keep the serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations within the normal range to maintain essential cellular functions and to promote mineralization of the skeleton. Most foods do not contain any vitamin D. Foods fortified with vitamin D have a variable amount present and cannot be depended on as a sole source of vitamin D nutrition. Exposure to sunlight provides most humans with their vitamin D requirement. Aging, sunscreen use and the change in the zenith angle of the sun can dramatically affect the cutaneous production of vitamin D3. Vitamin D insufficiency and vitamin D deficiency is now being recognized as a major cause of metabolic bone disease in the elderly. Vitamin D deficiency not only causes osteomalacia but can exacerbate osteoporosis. It is generally accepted that an increase in calcium intake to 1000-1500 mg/d along with an adequate source of vitamin D of at least 400 IU/d is important for maintaining good bone health

  13. Multiple vitamin K forms exist in dairy foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The plant-based form of vitamin K (phylloquinone, vitamin K-1) has been well quantified in the US diet. Menaquinones (vitamin K-2) are another class of vitamin K compounds that differ from phylloquinone in the length and saturation of their side chain, but they have not been well charact...

  14. A virtual infection model quantifies innate effector mechanisms and Candida albicans immune escape in human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Hünniger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans bloodstream infection is increasingly frequent and can result in disseminated candidiasis associated with high mortality rates. To analyze the innate immune response against C. albicans, fungal cells were added to human whole-blood samples. After inoculation, C. albicans started to filament and predominantly associate with neutrophils, whereas only a minority of fungal cells became attached to monocytes. While many parameters of host-pathogen interaction were accessible to direct experimental quantification in the whole-blood infection assay, others were not. To overcome these limitations, we generated a virtual infection model that allowed detailed and quantitative predictions on the dynamics of host-pathogen interaction. Experimental time-resolved data were simulated using a state-based modeling approach combined with the Monte Carlo method of simulated annealing to obtain quantitative predictions on a priori unknown transition rates and to identify the main axis of antifungal immunity. Results clearly demonstrated a predominant role of neutrophils, mediated by phagocytosis and intracellular killing as well as the release of antifungal effector molecules upon activation, resulting in extracellular fungicidal activity. Both mechanisms together account for almost [Formula: see text] of C. albicans killing, clearly proving that beside being present in larger numbers than other leukocytes, neutrophils functionally dominate the immune response against C. albicans in human blood. A fraction of C. albicans cells escaped phagocytosis and remained extracellular and viable for up to four hours. This immune escape was independent of filamentation and fungal activity and not linked to exhaustion or inactivation of innate immune cells. The occurrence of C. albicans cells being resistant against phagocytosis may account for the high proportion of dissemination in C. albicans bloodstream infection. Taken together, iterative experiment

  15. Quantifying Human Movement Using the Movn Smartphone App: Validation and Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Ralph; Gemming, Luke; Monedero, Javier; Bolger, Linda; Belton, Sarahjane; Issartel, Johann; Marsh, Samantha; Direito, Artur; Solenhill, Madeleine; Zhao, Jinfeng; Exeter, Daniel John; Vathsangam, Harshvardhan; Rawstorn, Jonathan Charles

    2017-08-17

    The use of embedded smartphone sensors offers opportunities to measure physical activity (PA) and human movement. Big data-which includes billions of digital traces-offers scientists a new lens to examine PA in fine-grained detail and allows us to track people's geocoded movement patterns to determine their interaction with the environment. The objective of this study was to examine the validity of the Movn smartphone app (Moving Analytics) for collecting PA and human movement data. The criterion and convergent validity of the Movn smartphone app for estimating energy expenditure (EE) were assessed in both laboratory and free-living settings, compared with indirect calorimetry (criterion reference) and a stand-alone accelerometer that is commonly used in PA research (GT1m, ActiGraph Corp, convergent reference). A supporting cross-validation study assessed the consistency of activity data when collected across different smartphone devices. Global positioning system (GPS) and accelerometer data were integrated with geographical information software to demonstrate the feasibility of geospatial analysis of human movement. A total of 21 participants contributed to linear regression analysis to estimate EE from Movn activity counts (standard error of estimation [SEE]=1.94 kcal/min). The equation was cross-validated in an independent sample (N=42, SEE=1.10 kcal/min). During laboratory-based treadmill exercise, EE from Movn was comparable to calorimetry (bias=0.36 [-0.07 to 0.78] kcal/min, t 82 =1.66, P=.10) but overestimated as compared with the ActiGraph accelerometer (bias=0.93 [0.58-1.29] kcal/min, t 89 =5.27, PDireito, Madeleine Solenhill, Jinfeng Zhao, Daniel John Exeter, Harshvardhan Vathsangam, Jonathan Charles Rawstorn. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 17.08.2017.

  16. Quantifying the Number of Independent Organelle DNA Insertions in Genome Evolution and Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Martin, William F

    2017-05-01

    Fragments of organelle genomes are often found as insertions in nuclear DNA. These fragments of mitochondrial DNA (numts) and plastid DNA (nupts) are ubiquitous components of eukaryotic genomes. They are, however, often edited out during the genome assembly process, leading to systematic underestimation of their frequency. Numts and nupts, once inserted, can become further fragmented through subsequent insertion of mobile elements or other recombinational events that disrupt the continuity of the inserted sequence relative to the genuine organelle DNA copy. Because numts and nupts are typically identified through sequence comparison tools such as BLAST, disruption of insertions into smaller fragments can lead to systematic overestimation of numt and nupt frequencies. Accurate identification of numts and nupts is important, however, both for better understanding of their role during evolution, and for monitoring their increasingly evident role in human disease. Human populations are polymorphic for 141 numt loci, five numts are causal to genetic disease, and cancer genomic studies are revealing an abundance of numts associated with tumor progression. Here, we report investigation of salient parameters involved in obtaining accurate estimates of numt and nupt numbers in genome sequence data. Numts and nupts from 44 sequenced eukaryotic genomes reveal lineage-specific differences in the number, relative age and frequency of insertional events as well as lineage-specific dynamics of their postinsertional fragmentation. Our findings outline the main technical parameters influencing accurate identification and frequency estimation of numts in genomic studies pertinent to both evolution and human health. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  17. [Concentration of glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and substances reacting with thiobarbituric acid (TBA-rs) in single human brain metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Henryk; Farbiszewski, Ryszard; Rydzewska, Maria; Michno, Tadeusz; Kozłowski, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the concentration of glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA-rs) in single human brain metastases and histologically unchanged nerve tissue. The research was conducted on fragments of neoplasmatic tissue collected from 45 patients undergoing surgery in the Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of Białystok in years 1996-2002. Concentration of GSH was evaluated using the GSH-400 method, vitamin C using the method of Kyaw and TBA-rs using the method of Salaris and Babs. It has been found that there is a decrease of concentration of GSH and vitamin C and a considerable increase (p TBA-rs in investigated single brain human metastasis in correlation to the concentration of the mentioned above substances in unchanged nerve tissue.

  18. Ptychographic X-ray nanotomography quantifies mineral distributions in human dentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanette, I.; Enders, B.; Dierolf, M.; Thibault, P.; Gradl, R.; Diaz, A.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Menzel, A.; Pfeiffer, F.; Zaslansky, P.

    2015-03-01

    Bones are bio-composites with biologically tunable mechanical properties, where a polymer matrix of nanofibrillar collagen is reinforced by apatite mineral crystals. Some bones, such as antler, form and change rapidly, while other bone tissues, such as human tooth dentine, develop slowly and maintain constant composition and architecture for entire lifetimes. When studying apatite mineral microarchitecture, mineral distributions or mineralization activity of bone-forming cells, representative samples of tissue are best studied at submicrometre resolution while minimizing sample-preparation damage. Here, we demonstrate the power of ptychographic X-ray tomography to map variations in the mineral content distribution in three dimensions and at the nanometre scale. Using this non-destructive method, we observe nanostructures surrounding hollow tracts that exist in human dentine forming dentinal tubules. We reveal unprecedented quantitative details of the ultrastructure clearly revealing the spatially varying mineralization density. Such information is essential for understanding a variety of natural and therapeutic effects for example in bone tissue healing and ageing.

  19. Concentração de vitamina A no leite humano maduro Vitamin A concentration in mature human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Souza

    2012-12-01

    ência devem ser estendidas a todas as gestantes e puérperas, independentemente das condições sociodemográficas e do grau de conhecimento de nutrição, visando melhorar a saúde do binômio mãe/filho.OBJECTIVE: To quantify vitamin A levels in mature milk of 196 nursing women who were treated at the Maternity School of Rio de Janeiro and to evaluate its correlation with sociodemographic variables and degree of nutrition knowledge. METHODS: To quantify retinol concentrations, 10 mL of mature milk were collected by manual expression of one breast, 2 hours after the last feed, in the morning period. Values below 1.05 µmol/L and 2.3 µmol/L were considered inadequate to meet satisfactory intake and to constitute vitamin A liver reserve, respectively. The following variables were also assessed: sex, age, familiar income, maternal education, basic sanitation conditions, number of people in the household, maternal age, prenatal care, and degree of nutrition knowledge. RESULTS: Among the 196 lactating mothers analyzed, the average vitamin A concentration observed in mature milk was 1.76±0.85 µmol/L and prevalence of vitamin A deficiency was observed in 20.5% mothers. There was no significant difference between vitamin A levels in maternal milk and the variables socioeconomic status and nutrition knowledge. Only 38.9% of lactating women presented enough vitamin A concentrations in milk for the infants' liver reserves (2.3 µmol/L. CONCLUSIONS: These findings reveal high prevalence of inadequate vitamin A nutritional status of mothers and infants, consistent with the national prevalence reported in women of childbearing age and Brazilian children, and that the intervention measures to fight this shortage should be extended to all pregnant and postpartum women, regardless of sociodemographic conditions and degree of nutrition knowledge, in order to improve the health of mother and child.

  20. Calciotrophic hormones and hyperglycemia modulate vitamin D receptor and 25 hydroxyy vitamin D 1-α hydroxylase mRNA expression in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somjen, D; Knoll, E; Sharon, O; Many, A; Stern, N

    2015-04-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ), the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and 25 hydroxyy vitamin D 1-α hydroxylase (1OHase) mRNA are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In these cells estrogenic hormones modulate cell proliferation as measured by DNA synthesis (DNA). In the present study we determined whether or not the calciotrophic hormones PTH 1-34 (PTH) and less- calcemic vitamin D analog QW as well as hyperglycemia can regulate DNA synthesis and CK. E2 had a bimodal effect on VSMC DNA synthesis, such that proliferation was inhibited at 30nM but stimulated at 0.3nM. PTH at 50nM increased, whereas QW at 10nM inhibited DNA synthesis. Hyperglycemia inhibited the effects on high E2, QW and PTH on DNA only. Both QW and PTH increased ERα mRNA expression, but only PTH increased ERβ expression. Likewise, both PTH and QW stimulated VDR and 1OHase expression and activity. ERβ, VDR and 1OHase expression and activity were inhibited by hyperglycemia, but ERα expression was unaffected by hyperglycemia. In conclusion, calcitrophic hormones modify VSMC growth and concomitantly affect ER expression in these cells as well as the endogenous VSMC vitamin D system elements, including VDR and 1OHase. Some of the later changes may likely participate in growth effects. Of importance in the observation is that several regulatory effects are deranged in the presence of hyperglycemia, particularly the PTH- and vitamin D-dependent up regulation of VDR and 1OHase in these cells. The implications of these effects require further studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Peranan Vitamin D Pada Pencegahan Penyakit Degeneratif: Persfektif Baru

    OpenAIRE

    Siagian, Albiner

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D is one of the fat soluble vitamins. This vitamin is usually known as vitamin that takes apart in bone health thorough its role in increasing efficiency of calcium absorption in small intestine. Without vitamin D, human small intestine can only absorb calcium up to 15%. Vitamin D can increase efficiency of dietary calcium absorption up to 30%. Until 1980s, vitamin D was primarily known by its role in bone and tooth formation However, recent epidemiologic studies have revealed...

  2. Imaging and quantifying ganglion cells and other transparent neurons in the living human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Furu; Lee, John J; Miller, Donald T

    2017-11-28

    Ganglion cells (GCs) are fundamental to retinal neural circuitry, processing photoreceptor signals for transmission to the brain via their axons. However, much remains unknown about their role in vision and their vulnerability to disease leading to blindness. A major bottleneck has been our inability to observe GCs and their degeneration in the living human eye. Despite two decades of development of optical technologies to image cells in the living human retina, GCs remain elusive due to their high optical translucency. Failure of conventional imaging-using predominately singly scattered light-to reveal GCs has led to a focus on multiply-scattered, fluorescence, two-photon, and phase imaging techniques to enhance GC contrast. Here, we show that singly scattered light actually carries substantial information that reveals GC somas, axons, and other retinal neurons and permits their quantitative analysis. We perform morphometry on GC layer somas, including projection of GCs onto photoreceptors and identification of the primary GC subtypes, even beneath nerve fibers. We obtained singly scattered images by: ( i ) marrying adaptive optics to optical coherence tomography to avoid optical blurring of the eye; ( ii ) performing 3D subcellular image registration to avoid motion blur; and ( iii ) using organelle motility inside somas as an intrinsic contrast agent. Moreover, through-focus imaging offers the potential to spatially map individual GCs to underlying amacrine, bipolar, horizontal, photoreceptor, and retinal pigment epithelium cells, thus exposing the anatomical substrate for neural processing of visual information. This imaging modality is also a tool for improving clinical diagnosis and assessing treatment of retinal disease. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  3. Quantifying human vulnerability in rural areas: case study of Tutova Hills (Eastern Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stângă, I. C.; Grozavu, A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper aims to assess the vulnerability at regional level, the model and the proposed indicators being explicitly intended for an essentially rural region, in this case-Tutova Hills (Eastern Romania). Five categories of variables were taken into account to define the vulnerability components: rural habitat, demographic features, agriculture, environmental quality and emergency situations. For each one, five variables were analyzed and ranked based on the level of determination or subordination. In order to ensure the flexibility of the model and to avoid the criteria duplication in assessing vulnerability, only a single indicator of each category was retained and included in analysis: total number of inhabitants, dependency ratio, weight of arable land on slope categories, weight of land under forestry and road accessibility of villages. The selected indicators were mathematically processed in order to maximize their relevance and to unitary express the results in the spread 0-1. Also, values of each indicator were grouped into four classes, corresponding to the level of vulnerability: low, medium, high and very high. A general index was obtained through the integration of vulnerability factors in an equation based on the geometric mean. Spatial analysis was based on features of the MicroImages TNTmips 7.3. software, which allow the vulnerability mapping. This approach argues and states that vulnerability assessment through indicator-based methods can be made only according to the level and scale of analysis and related to natural or human conditions of a region.

  4. Quantifying Killing of Orangutans and Human-Orangutan Conflict in Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijaard, Erik; Buchori, Damayanti; Hadiprakarsa, Yokyok; Utami-Atmoko, Sri Suci; Nurcahyo, Anton; Tjiu, Albertus; Prasetyo, Didik; Nardiyono; Christie, Lenny; Ancrenaz, Marc; Abadi, Firman; Antoni, I Nyoman Gede; Armayadi, Dedy; Dinato, Adi; Ella; Gumelar, Pajar; Indrawan, Tito P.; Kussaritano; Munajat, Cecep; Priyono, C. Wawan Puji; Purwanto, Yadi; Puspitasari, Dewi; Putra, M. Syukur Wahyu; Rahmat, Abdi; Ramadani, Harri; Sammy, Jim; Siswanto, Dedi; Syamsuri, Muhammad; Andayani, Noviar; Wu, Huanhuan; Wells, Jessie Anne; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2011-01-01

    Human-orangutan conflict and hunting are thought to pose a serious threat to orangutan existence in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo. No data existed prior to the present study to substantiate these threats. We investigated the rates, spatial distribution and causes of conflict and hunting through an interview-based survey in the orangutan's range in Kalimantan, Indonesia. Between April 2008 and September 2009, we interviewed 6983 respondents in 687 villages to obtain socio-economic information, assess knowledge of local wildlife in general and orangutan encounters specifically, and to query respondents about their knowledge on orangutan conflicts and killing, and relevant laws. This survey revealed estimated killing rates of between 750 and 1800 animals killed in the last year, and between 1950 and 3100 animals killed per year on average within the lifetime of the survey respondents. These killing rates are higher than previously thought and are high enough to pose a serious threat to the continued existence of orangutans in Kalimantan. Importantly, the study contributes to our understanding of the spatial variation in threats, and the underlying causes of those threats, which can be used to facilitate the development of targeted conservation management. PMID:22096582

  5. Quantifying the human-robot interaction forces between a lower limb exoskeleton and healthy users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Ashish; Wilcox, Matthew; Ramirez, Dafne Zuleima Morgado; Loureiro, Rui; Carlson, Tom

    2016-08-01

    To counter the many disadvantages of prolonged wheelchair use, patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI) are beginning to turn towards robotic exoskeletons. However, we are currently unaware of the magnitude and distribution of forces acting between the user and the exoskeleton. This is a critical issue, as SCI patients have an increased susceptibility to skin lesions and pressure ulcer development. Therefore, we developed a real-time force measuring apparatus, which was placed at the physical human-robot interface (pHRI) of a lower limb robotic exoskeleton. Experiments captured the dynamics of these interaction forces whilst the participants performed a range of typical stepping actions. Our results indicate that peak forces occurred at the anterior aspect of both the left and right legs, areas that are particularly prone to pressure ulcer development. A significant difference was also found between the average force experienced at the anterior and posterior sensors of the right thigh during the swing phase for different movement primitives. These results call for the integration of instrumented straps as standard in lower limb exoskeletons. They also highlight the potential of such straps to be used as an alternative/complementary interface for the high-level control of lower limb exoskeletons in some patient groups.

  6. Quantifying killing of orangutans and human-orangutan conflict in Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Meijaard

    Full Text Available Human-orangutan conflict and hunting are thought to pose a serious threat to orangutan existence in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo. No data existed prior to the present study to substantiate these threats. We investigated the rates, spatial distribution and causes of conflict and hunting through an interview-based survey in the orangutan's range in Kalimantan, Indonesia. Between April 2008 and September 2009, we interviewed 6983 respondents in 687 villages to obtain socio-economic information, assess knowledge of local wildlife in general and orangutan encounters specifically, and to query respondents about their knowledge on orangutan conflicts and killing, and relevant laws. This survey revealed estimated killing rates of between 750 and 1800 animals killed in the last year, and between 1950 and 3100 animals killed per year on average within the lifetime of the survey respondents. These killing rates are higher than previously thought and are high enough to pose a serious threat to the continued existence of orangutans in Kalimantan. Importantly, the study contributes to our understanding of the spatial variation in threats, and the underlying causes of those threats, which can be used to facilitate the development of targeted conservation management.

  7. Quantifying the impact of µCT-scanning of human fossil teeth on ESR age results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Mathieu; Martín-Francés, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Fossil human teeth are nowadays systematically CT-scanned by palaeoanthropologists prior to any further analysis. It has been recently demonstrated that this noninvasive technique has, in most cases, virtually no influence on ancient DNA preservation. However, it may have nevertheless an impact on other techniques, like Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) dating, by artificially ageing the apparent age of the sample. To evaluate this impact, we µCT-scanned several modern enamel fragments following the standard analytical procedures employed by the Dental Anthropology Group at CENIEH, Spain, and then performed ESR dose reconstruction for each of them. The results of our experiment demonstrate that the systematic high-resolution µCT-scanning of fossil hominin remains introduces a nonnegligible X-ray dose into the tooth enamel, equivalent to 15-30 Gy depending on the parameters used. This dose may be multiplied by a factor of ∼8 if no metallic filter is used. However, this dose estimate cannot be universally extrapolated to any µCT-scan experiment but has instead to be specifically assessed for each device and set of parameters employed. The impact on the ESR age results is directly dependent on the magnitude of the geological dose measured in fossil enamel but could potentially lead to an age overestimation up to 40% in case of Late Pleistocene samples, if not taken into consideration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Quantifying human decomposition in an indoor setting and implications for postmortem interval estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceciliason, Ann-Sofie; Andersson, M Gunnar; Lindström, Anders; Sandler, Håkan

    2018-02-01

    This study's objective is to obtain accuracy and precision in estimating the postmortem interval (PMI) for decomposing human remains discovered in indoor settings. Data were collected prospectively from 140 forensic cases with a known date of death, scored according to the Total Body Score (TBS) scale at the post-mortem examination. In our model setting, it is estimated that, in cases with or without the presence of blowfly larvae, approximately 45% or 66% respectively, of the variance in TBS can be derived from Accumulated Degree-Days (ADD). The precision in estimating ADD/PMI from TBS is, in our setting, moderate to low. However, dividing the cases into defined subgroups suggests the possibility to increase the precision of the model. Our findings also suggest a significant seasonal difference with concomitant influence on TBS in the complete data set, possibly initiated by the presence of insect activity mainly during summer. PMI may be underestimated in cases with presence of desiccation. Likewise, there is a need for evaluating the effect of insect activity, to avoid overestimating the PMI. Our data sample indicates that the scoring method might need to be slightly modified to better reflect indoor decomposition, especially in cases with insect infestations or/and extensive desiccation. When applying TBS in an indoor setting, the model requires distinct inclusion criteria and a defined population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Immunomodulation by vitamin D: implications for TB

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Rene F; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2011-01-01

    TB remains a major cause of mortality throughout the world. Low vitamin D status has been linked to increased risk of TB and other immune disorders. These observations suggest a role for vitamin D as a modulator of normal human immune function. This article will detail the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which vitamin D regulates the immune system and how vitamin D insufficiency may lead to immune dysregulation. The importance of vitamin D bioavailability as a mechanism for defining the ...

  10. Stability of Folate and Vitamin B 12 in Human Serum after Long-Term Storage: A Follow-Up after 13 Years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Eugène H. J. M.; Beekhof, Piet K.; Centre for Health Protection, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, Netherlands; Centre for Health Protection, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, Netherlands

    2018-01-01

    In epidemiological and nutrition research, it is very important to evaluate the stability of biomarkers as function of both storage time and temperature. In this study, the stability of folate and vitamin B 12 in human serum samples has been tested after long-term

  11. Expression of the vitamin D receptor, 25-hydroxylases, 1alpha-hydroxylase and 24-hydroxylase in the human kidney and renal clear cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Andersen, Claus B.; Nielsen, John E

    2010-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR), CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 are expressed in the human kidney, but the segmental expression of the 25-hydroxylases is unknown. A comprehensive analysis of CYP2R1, CYP27A1, CYP27B1, VDR and CYP24A1 expression in normal kidney and renal clear cell cancer (CCc) would reveal...

  12. Quantifying Human Appropriated Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) in a Ghanaian Cocoa System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, A.; Adu-Bredu, S.; Adu Sasu, M.; Ashley Asare, R.; Boyd, E.; Hirons, M. A.; Malhi, Y.; Mason, J.; Norris, K.; Robinson, E. J. Z.; McDermott, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Ghana is the second largest producer of cocoa (Theobroma cacoa), exporting approximately 18 percent of global volumes. These cocoa farms are predominantly small-scale, ranging in size from 2-4 hectares (ha). Traditionally, the model of cocoa expansion in Ghana relied on clearing new areas of forest and establishing a farm under remnant forest trees. This is increasingly less practical due to few unprotected forest areas remaining and management practices favoring close to full sun cocoa to maximize short-term yields. This study is part of a larger project, ECOLMITS, which is an interdisciplinary, ESPA-funded[1] initiative exploring the ecological limits of ecosystem system services (ESS) for alleviating poverty in small-scale agroforestry systems. The ecological study plots are situated within and around the Kakum National Forest, a well-protected, moist-evergreen forest of the Lower Guinea Forest region. Net primary productivity (NPP) is a measure of the rate at which carbon dioxide (CO2) is incorporated into plant tissues (e.g. canopy, stem and root). For this study, NPP was monitored in situ using methods developed by the Global Environmental Monitoring Network (GEM, http://gem.tropicalforests.ox.ac.uk/). By comparing NPP measured in intact forest and farms, the human appropriated NPP (HANPP) of this system can be estimated. The forest measures provide the "potential" NPP of the region, and then the reduction in NPP for farm plots is calculated for both land-cover change (HANPPLUC) and cocoa harvesting (HANPPHARV). The results presented are of the first year of NPP measurements across the cocoa landscape, including measurements from intact forest, logged forest and cocoa farms across a shade gradient and located at varying distances from the forest edge (e.g. 100 m, 500 m, 1 km and 5 km). These measures will have implications for carbon sequestration potential over the region and long-term sustainability of the Ghanaian cocoa sector. [1] Ecosystem Services for

  13. Quantifying the Risk of Human Toxoplasma gondii Infection Due to Consumption of Domestically Produced Lamb in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Miao; Mishra, Abhinav; Buchanan, Robert L; Dubey, Jitender P; Hill, Dolores E; Gamble, H Ray; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a prevalent protozoan parasite worldwide. Human toxoplasmosis is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in the United States, and meat products have been identified as an important source of T. gondii infections in humans. The goal of this study was to develop a farm-to-table quantitative microbial risk assessment model to predict the public health burden in the United States associated with consumption of U.S. domestically produced lamb. T. gondii prevalence in market lambs was pooled from the 2011 National Animal Health Monitoring System survey, and the concentration of the infectious life stage (bradyzoites) was calculated in the developed model. A log-linear regression and an exponential doseresponse model were used to model the reduction of T. gondii during home cooking and to predict the probability of infection, respectively. The mean probability of infection per serving of lamb was estimated to be 1.5 cases per 100,000 servings, corresponding to ∼6,300 new infections per year in the U.S. Based on the sensitivity analysis, we identified cooking as the most effective method to influence human health risk. This study provided a quantitative microbial risk assessment framework for T. gondii infection through consumption of lamb and quantified the infection risk and public health burden associated with lamb consumption.

  14. Quantifying the exposure of humans and the environment to oil pollution in the Niger Delta using advanced geostatistical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obida, Christopher B; Alan Blackburn, G; Duncan Whyatt, J; Semple, Kirk T

    2018-02-01

    The Niger Delta is one of the largest oil producing regions of the world. Large numbers and volumes of oil spills have been reported in this region. What has not been quantified is the putative exposure of humans and/or the environment to this hydrocarbon pollution. In this novel study, advanced geostatistical techniques were applied to an extensive database of oil spill incidents from 2007 to 2015. The aims were to (i) identify and analyse spill hotspots along the oil pipeline network and (ii) estimate the exposure of the hydrocarbon pollution to the human population and the environment within the Niger Delta. Over the study period almost 90millionlitres of oil were released. Approximately 29% of the human population living in proximity to the pipeline network has been potentially exposed to oil contamination, of which 565,000 people live within high or very high spill intensity sectors. Over 1000km 2 of land has been contaminated by oil pollution, with broadleaved forest, mangroves and agricultural land the most heavily impacted land cover types. Proximity to the coast, roads and cities are the strongest spatial factors contributing to spill occurrence, which largely determine the accessibility of sites for pipeline sabotage and oil theft. Overall, the findings demonstrate the high levels of environmental and human exposure to hydrocarbon pollutants in the Niger Delta. These results provide evidence with which to spatially target interventions to reduce future spill incidents and mitigate the impacts of previous spills on human communities and ecosystem health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Separation and determination of reduced vitamin C in polymerized hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers of the human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Mo, Ling; Li, Shen; Zhou, Wentao; Wang, Hong; Liu, Jiaxin; Yang, Chengmin

    2015-06-01

    The molybdenum blue method was used to determine the content of reduced vitamin C (Vc) in a solution of polymerized hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) of the human placenta. The conditions of absorption wavelength, HCl addition, and reaction time, were investigated. The results of validation experiments showed that under the optimized conditions, a standard curve was confirmed with good linearity of 0.9985, for the Vc amount ranging from 0-200 μg. The values for relative standard deviation (RSD) of the precision and repeatability were both below 5%. Vc recovery was in the range of 97-102%. The conclusion could be made that a reduction in Vc content could be tested effectively by the molybdenum blue method.

  16. Ascorbic acid transported by sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 stimulates steroidogenesis in human choriocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ximei; Iguchi, Takuma; Itoh, Norio; Okamoto, Kousuke; Takagi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Keiichi; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Reduced vitamin C [ascorbic acid (AA)], which is taken up into cells by sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter (SVCT) 1 and 2, is believed to be important for hormone synthesis, but its role in generating placental steroids needed to maintain pregnancy and fetal development is not clear. To determine the steroidogenic effect of AA and the role of SVCT2 in AA-induced steroidogenesis, we tested the effects of AA treatment and SVCT2 knockdown on steroidogenesis in human choriocarcinoma cell lines. AA treatment of JEG-3, BeWo, and JAR cells for 48-h dose dependently increased progesterone and estradiol levels. In JEG-3 cells, AA increased the mRNA expression of P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, and aromatase, key enzymes for steroidogenesis. Stable knockdown of SVCT2 in JEG-3 cells by retrovirally mediated RNA interference decreased the maximal velocity of AA uptake by approximately 50%, but apparent affinity values were not affected. SVCT2 knockdown in JEG-3 cells significantly suppressed the AA-induced mRNA expression of placental P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, and aromatase. This suppression of the AA-induced mRNA expression of steroidogenic enzymes subsequently decreased progesterone and estradiol production. In addition, inhibition of MAPK kinase-ERK signaling, which is a major pathway for AA-regulated gene expression, failed to affect AA-induced steroidogenesis. Our observations indicate that SVCT2-mediated AA uptake into cells is necessary for AA-induced steroidogenesis in human choriocarcinoma cell, but MAPK kinase-ERK signaling is not involved in AA-induced steroidogenesis.

  17. Vitamin E

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin E is an antioxidant. It plays a role in ... immune system and metabolic processes. Good sources of vitamin E include Vegetable oils Margarine Nuts and seeds Leafy ...

  18. Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thin, and brittle bones, a condition known as rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Vitamin D ... the body. In children, vitamin D deficiency causes rickets, a condition in which the bones become soft ...

  19. Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium. Calcium is one ... building blocks of bone. A lack of vitamin D can lead to bone diseases such as osteoporosis ...

  20. Vitamin C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin C is an antioxidant. It is important for your ... healing and helps the body absorb iron. Vitamin C comes from fruits and vegetables. Good sources include ...

  1. High throughput LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous analysis of multiple vitamin D analytes in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Carl; Taylor, Angela E; Hassan-Smith, Zaki K; Adams, John S; Stewart, Paul M; Hewison, Martin; Keevil, Brian G

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that vitamin D-deficiency is linked to increased risk of common human health problems. To define vitamin D 'status' most routine analytical methods quantify one particular vitamin D metabolite, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD3). However, vitamin D is characterized by complex metabolic pathways, and simultaneous measurement of multiple vitamin D metabolites may provide a more accurate interpretation of vitamin D status. To address this we developed a high-throughput liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to analyse multiple vitamin D analytes, with particular emphasis on the separation of epimer metabolites. A supportive liquid-liquid extraction (SLE) and LC-MS/MS method was developed to quantify 10 vitamin D metabolites as well as separation of an interfering 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (7αC4) isobar (precursor of bile acid), and validated by analysis of human serum samples. In a cohort of 116 healthy subjects, circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD3), 3-epi-25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (3-epi-25OHD3), 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (24R,25(OH)2D3), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 (25OHD2) were quantifiable using 220μL of serum, with 25OHD3 and 24R,25(OH)2D3 showing significant seasonal variations. This high-throughput LC-MS/MS method provides a novel strategy for assessing the impact of vitamin D on human health and disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of a non-invasive method to study the moisturizing effect of formulations containing vitamins A or E or ceramide on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Gislaine Ricci; Gaspar, Lorena Rigo; Maia Campos, Patrícia M B G

    2002-01-01

    Moisturizers containing vitamins A and E as well as ceramides are believed to improve the skin condition by increasing the water content of the stratum corneum. The aim of this research was to evaluate, through the capacitance method (a non-invasive method), the moisturizing effect of an O/W emulsion (non-ionic self-emulsifying base) containing vitamin A palmitate, vitamin E acetate, and ceramide III on human skin. The studies were carried out on a group of 40 healthy Caucasian female test subjects between 30 and 45 years of age, using the Corneometer CM 825 PC. Skin measurements were taken from the volunteers at 7 and 30 days after daily use (twice a day) of the tested products. The presence of vitamins A and E or ceramide III did not cause an improvement in the hydration of the stratum corneum, which means that none of those compounds strengthens the hydration effectiveness of the base formulations used, at least at the doses tested. The interpretation of electrical measurement regarding skin moisture should be made with caution; thus the results observed in this study show the importance of using different approaches (or methodologies) to verify the performance of the formulas tested. We conclude that, at the low doses typically used in cosmetic formulations, vitamins A and E and ceramide III are not likely to contribute to the hydrating effects of the base moisturizing formulation when assessed by capacitance.

  3. Vitamin C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... values to calculate your total daily recommended amount. What foods provide vitamin C? Fruits and vegetables are the ... lessen cooking losses. Fortunately, many of the best food sources of vitamin C, ... raw. What kinds of vitamin C dietary supplements are available? ...

  4. A Nampt inhibitor FK866 mimics vitamin B3 deficiency by causing senescence of human fibroblastic Hs68 cells via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tuzz-Ying; Yeh, Shu-Lan; Hu, Miao-Lin; Chen, Mei-Yau; Yang, Nae-Cherng

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B3 (niacin) deficiency can cause pellagra with symptoms of dermatitis, diarrhea and dementia. However, it is unclear whether the vitamin B3 deficiency causes human aging. FK866 (a Nampt inhibitor) can reduce intracellular NAD(+) level and induce senescence of human Hs68 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells are unclear. In this study, we used FK866 to mimic the effects of vitamin B3 deficiency to reduce the NAD(+) level and investigated the mechanisms of FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells. We hypothesized that FK866 induced the senescence of Hs68 cells via an attenuation of NAD(+)-silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) signaling. We found that FK866 induced cell senescence and diminished cellular NAD(+) levels and SIRT1 activity (detected by acetylation of p53), and these effects were dramatically antagonized by co-treatment with nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, or NAD(+). In contrast, the protein expression of SIRT1, AMP-activated protein kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) was not affected by FK866. In addition, the role of GSH in the FK866-induced cells senescence may be limited, as N-acetylcysteine did not antagonize FK866-induced cell senescence. These results suggest that FK866 induces cell senescence via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling. The effects of vitamin B3 deficiency on human aging warrant further investigation.

  5. Synthesis of B6 vitamin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučijak Nevena Ž.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of vitamin B6 has been known since its discovery in the 1940's. Chemical tests, elestrometric titration determinations, and absorption spectrum studies showed that this vitamin exists in three major chemical forms: pyridoxine (an alcohol, pyridoxal (an aldehyde, and pyridoxamine (a primary amine. Vitamin B6 is needed for more than 100 enzymes involved in protein metabolism, and it is assumed that this vitamin is cofactor of metabolic processes more important than any other substance. A deficiency of vitamin B6 in the human diet leads to severe disorders. Vitamin B6 is necessary for the proper function of the immune and nervous system, and helps the body convert protein to energy. This paper describes the history, properties and applications of vitamin B6, elucidation of chemical structure, and different procedures for synthesis of pyridoxine and pyridoxamine.

  6. A high frequency MspI RFLP at the human vitamin D binding protein (hDBP) locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, K; Cooke, N E [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA)

    1988-07-25

    A nearly full-length cDNA encoding the human vitamin D binding protein (hDBP), also known as Gc-globulin, was isolated from a human liver cDNA expression library. This 1.73 kb cDNA was digested with EcoRI and the 5{prime}, 140 bp fragment of the cDNA, subcloned into plasmid SP65 (phDBP140), was used as probe. MspI identifies a two allele polymorphism with either a band at 12 kb or a band at 5 kb. The frequency was estimated from a study of 24 unrelated North American Caucasians. The hDBP gene has been localized to chromosome 4 using a cDNA probe and a panel of rodent X human somatic cell hybrids. It was sublocalized to 4q11-q13 by in situ hybridization. Co-dominant autosomal segregation of the polymorphic alleles has been observed in two informative families (20 individuals). With overexposure of the autoradiograph two faint variant bands are seen at 17 kb and 13.5 kb which appear to cosegregate with the 12 kb band and the 5 kb band respectively.

  7. Effects of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor on human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Punzi, Tiziana; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Searching for additional therapeutic tools to fight breast cancer, we investigated the effects of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF, also known as GcMAF) on a human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7). The effects of DBP-MAF on proliferation, morphology, vimentin expression and angiogenesis were studied by cell proliferation assay, phase-contrast microscopy, immunohistochemistry and western blotting, and chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. DBP-MAF inhibited human breast cancer cell proliferation and cancer cell-stimulated angiogenesis. MCF-7 cells treated with DBP-MAF predominantly grew in monolayer and appeared to be well adherent to each other and to the well surface. Exposure to DBP-MAF significantly reduced vimentin expression, indicating a reversal of the epithelial/mesenchymal transition, a hallmark of human breast cancer progression. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the known anticancer efficacy of DBP-MAF can be ascribed to different biological properties of the molecule that include inhibition of tumour-induced angiogenesis and direct inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, migration and metastatic potential.

  8. Quantifying Human Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    have knowledge of host populations: social structure (ethnic groups, tribes, elite networks, institutions, organizations and the relationships...from asking a question on religious affiliation on a mandatory basis. 4 United Jewish Appeal--Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York, The...to complications. At a scale of 5 United Jewish Appeal--Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New

  9. Nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for human factor VII, a vitamin K-dependent protein participating in blood coagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, P.J.; Grant, F.J.; Haldeman, B.A.; Gray, C.L.; Insley, M.Y.; Hagen, F.S.; Murray, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Activated factor VII (factor VIIa) is a vitamin K-dependent plasma serine protease that participates in a cascade of reactions leading to the coagulation of blood. Two overlapping genomic clones containing sequences encoding human factor VII were isolated and characterized. The complete sequence of the gene was determined and found to span about 12.8 kilobases. The mRNA for factor VII as demonstrated by cDNA cloning is polyadenylylated at multiple sites but contains only one AAUAAA poly(A) signal sequence. The mRNA can undergo alternative splicing, forming one transcript containing eight segments as exons and another with an additional exon that encodes a larger prepro leader sequence. The latter transcript has no known counterpart in the other vitamin K-dependent proteins. The positions of the introns with respect to the amino acid sequence encoded by the eight essential exons of factor VII are the same as those present in factor IX, factor X, protein C, and the first three exons of prothrombin. These exons code for domains generally conserved among members of this gene family. The comparable introns in these genes, however, are dissimilar with respect to size and sequence, with the exception of intron C in factor VII and protein C. The gene for factor VII also contains five regions made up of tandem repeats of oligonucleotide monomer elements. More than a quarter of the intron sequences and more than a third of the 3' untranslated portion of the mRNA transcript consist of these minisatellite tandem repeats

  10. UVA-induced immune suppression in human skin: protective effect of vitamin E in human epidermal cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement-Lacroix, P.; Michel, L.; Moysan, A.; Morliere, P.; Dubertret, L.

    1996-01-01

    UVA (320-400 nm) radiation damage to membranes, proteins, DNA and other cellular targets is predominantly related to oxidative processes. In the present study, we demonstrated that cutaneous UVA-induced immunosuppression can be related, at least in part, to the appearance of these oxidative processes. The UVA-induced oxidative processes in freshly isolated epidermal cells were monitored by measuring the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) as an index of peroxidation. The in vitro immunosuppressive effects of UVA were demonstrated by measuring the allogenic lymphocyte proliferation induced by epidermal cells or purified Langerhans cells in the mixed epidermal cell-lymphocyte reaction (MECLR). In addition, the effects of a potent antioxidant (vitamin E) on these two UVA-induced processes were analysed. (author)

  11. Quantifying Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying Matter explains how scientists learned to measure matter and quantify some of its most fascinating and useful properties. It presents many of the most important intellectual achievements and technical developments that led to the scientific interpretation of substance. Complete with full-color photographs, this exciting new volume describes the basic characteristics and properties of matter. Chapters include:. -Exploring the Nature of Matter. -The Origin of Matter. -The Search for Substance. -Quantifying Matter During the Scientific Revolution. -Understanding Matter's Electromagnet

  12. Noninvasive quantification of human brain antioxidant concentrations after an intravenous bolus of vitamin C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Until now, antioxidant based initiatives for preventing dementia have lacked a means to detect deficiency or measure pharmacologic effect in the human brain in situ. Objective: Our objective was to apply a novel method to measure key human brain antioxidant concentrations throughout the ...

  13. Quantification of vitamin B6 vitamers in human cerebrospinal fluid by ultra performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, M. van der; Albersen, M.; Koning, T.J. de; Visser, G.; Middendorp, A.; Bosma, M.; Verhoeven-Duif, N.M.; Sain-van der Velden, M.G.M. de

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We present a sensitive UPLC–MS/MS method for quantification of B6 vitamers in human CSF. ► Our method is very accurate since stable isotope labeled internal standards are used. ► We present data on light sensitivity, temperature dependence and rostrocaudal gradient. ► With PN supplementation, concentrations of PL, PM, PN and PA in CSF are increased. ► Our fully validated method is suitable for implementation in a diagnostic setting. - Abstract: Since vitamin B6 is essential for normal functioning of the central nervous system, there is growing need for sensitive analysis of B6 vitamers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This manuscript describes the development and validation of a rapid, sensitive and accurate method for quantification of the vitamin B6 vitamers pyridoxal (PL), pyridoxamine (PM), pyridoxine (PN), pyridoxic acid (PA), pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP), pyridoxamine 5′-phosphate (PMP) and pyridoxine 5′-phosphate (PNP) in human CSF. The method is based on ultra performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC–MS/MS) with a simple sample preparation procedure of protein precipitation using 50 g L −1 trichloroacetic acid containing stable isotope labeled internal standards: PL-D 3 for PL and PM, PN- 13 C 4 for PN, PA-D 2 for PA and PLP-D 3 for the phosphorylated vitamers. B6 vitamers were separated (Acquity HSS-T3 UPLC column) with a buffer containing acetic acid, heptafluorobutyric acid and acetonitrile. Positive electrospray ionization was used to monitor transitions m/z 168.1 → 150.1 (PL), 169.1 → 134.1 (PM), 170.1 → 134.1 (PN), 184.1 → 148.1 (PA), 248.1 → 150.1 (PLP), 249.1 → 232.1 (PMP) and 250.1 → 134.1 (PNP). The method was validated at three concentration levels for each B6 vitamer in CSF. Recoveries of the internal standards were between 93% and 96%. Intra- and inter-assay variations were below 20%. Accuracy tests showed deviations from 3% (PN) to 39% (PMP). Limits of quantification were

  14. Quantification of vitamin B6 vitamers in human cerebrospinal fluid by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, M. van der, E-mail: M.vanderHam-3@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Albersen, M., E-mail: M.Albersen@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Koning, T.J. de, E-mail: T.deKoning@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Pediatric Metabolic Diseases, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC03.063.0, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Visser, G., E-mail: G.Visser-4@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Pediatric Metabolic Diseases, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC03.063.0, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Middendorp, A., E-mail: Alfred_Middendorp@waters.com [Waters Chromatography B.V., Florijnstraat 19, Postbus 379, 4870 AJ Etten-Leur (Netherlands); Bosma, M., E-mail: M.Bosma@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Verhoeven-Duif, N.M., E-mail: N.Verhoeven@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Sain-van der Velden, M.G.M. de, E-mail: M.G.deSain@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Metabolic Diseases and Netherlands Metabolomics Center, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, Huispost KC02.069.1, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a sensitive UPLC-MS/MS method for quantification of B6 vitamers in human CSF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our method is very accurate since stable isotope labeled internal standards are used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present data on light sensitivity, temperature dependence and rostrocaudal gradient. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With PN supplementation, concentrations of PL, PM, PN and PA in CSF are increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our fully validated method is suitable for implementation in a diagnostic setting. - Abstract: Since vitamin B6 is essential for normal functioning of the central nervous system, there is growing need for sensitive analysis of B6 vitamers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This manuscript describes the development and validation of a rapid, sensitive and accurate method for quantification of the vitamin B6 vitamers pyridoxal (PL), pyridoxamine (PM), pyridoxine (PN), pyridoxic acid (PA), pyridoxal 5 Prime -phosphate (PLP), pyridoxamine 5 Prime -phosphate (PMP) and pyridoxine 5 Prime -phosphate (PNP) in human CSF. The method is based on ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) with a simple sample preparation procedure of protein precipitation using 50 g L{sup -1} trichloroacetic acid containing stable isotope labeled internal standards: PL-D{sub 3} for PL and PM, PN-{sup 13}C{sub 4} for PN, PA-D{sub 2} for PA and PLP-D{sub 3} for the phosphorylated vitamers. B6 vitamers were separated (Acquity HSS-T3 UPLC column) with a buffer containing acetic acid, heptafluorobutyric acid and acetonitrile. Positive electrospray ionization was used to monitor transitions m/z 168.1 {yields} 150.1 (PL), 169.1 {yields} 134.1 (PM), 170.1 {yields} 134.1 (PN), 184.1 {yields} 148.1 (PA), 248.1 {yields} 150.1 (PLP), 249.1 {yields} 232.1 (PMP) and 250.1 {yields} 134.1 (PNP). The method was validated at three concentration levels for each B6 vitamer in CSF

  15. Vitamin D deficiency in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashman, Kevin D.; Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    25(OH)D values from national health/nutrition surveys. OBJECTIVE: This study applied VDSP protocols to serum 25(OH)D data from representative childhood/teenage and adult/older adult European populations, representing a sizable geographical footprint, to better quantify the prevalence of vitamin D...... is evident throughout the European population at prevalence rates that are concerning and that require action from a public health perspective. What direction these strategies take will depend on European policy but should aim to ensure vitamin D intakes that are protective against vitamin D deficiency...

  16. Calcium supplements as source of trace elements: Adequacy and safety of supplements with vitamin C, vitamin D and phosphate formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, S.; Rahman, S.; Siddique, N.

    2014-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry were used to quantify trace elements in different national and multinational Ca supplements categorized on the basis of Ca with vitamin D, vitamin C and phosphate formulations. The supplements were found to contain low levels of Co, Cr and Cu with elevated amounts of Fe, K and Na. Toxic elements (As, Cd and Sb) were detected in very few samples at very low concentrations. The essential elements contribute to >3% of their respective Dietary Reference Intakes. - Highlights: • INAA and AAS were used to quantify trace elements in different national and multinational Ca supplements. • The essential elements contribute to >3% of their respective DRIs. • Toxic elements (As, Cd and Sb) were detected in very few samples at very low concentrations. • All supplements can be considered safe for human intake with respect to trace nutrients

  17. Efficacy of the dietary histone deacetylase inhibitor butyrate alone or in combination with vitamin A against proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, F.O.; Nagamine, M.K.; De Conti, A.; Chaible, L.M.; Fontelles, C.C.; Jordão Junior, A.A.; Vannucchi, H.; Dagli, M.L.Z.; Bassoli, B.K.; Moreno, F.S.; Ong, T.P.

    2012-01-01

    The combined treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and retinoids has been suggested as a potential epigenetic strategy for the control of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treatment with butyrate, a dietary HDACi, combined with vitamin A on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation was evaluated by the crystal violet staining method. MCF-7 cells were plated at 5 x 10 4 cells/mL and treated with butyrate (1 mM) alone or combined with vitamin A (10 µM) for 24 to 120 h. Cell proliferation inhibition was 34, 10 and 46% following treatment with butyrate, vitamin A and their combination, respectively, suggesting that vitamin A potentiated the inhibitory activities of butyrate. Furthermore, exposure to this short-chain fatty acid increased the level of histone H3K9 acetylation by 9.5-fold (Western blot), but not of H4K16, and increased the expression levels of p21 WAF1 by 2.7-fold (Western blot) and of RARβ by 2.0-fold (quantitative real-time PCR). Our data show that RARβ may represent a molecular target for butyrate in breast cancer cells. Due to its effectiveness as a dietary HDACi, butyrate should be considered for use in combinatorial strategies with more active retinoids, especially in breast cancers in which RARβ is epigenetically altered

  18. Efficacy of the dietary histone deacetylase inhibitor butyrate alone or in combination with vitamin A against proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, F.O. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nagamine, M.K. [Laboratório de Oncologia Experimental, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); De Conti, A. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Chaible, L.M. [Laboratório de Oncologia Experimental, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fontelles, C.C. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Jordão Junior, A.A.; Vannucchi, H. [Divisão de Nutrição, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Dagli, M.L.Z. [Laboratório de Oncologia Experimental, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bassoli, B.K.; Moreno, F.S.; Ong, T.P. [Laboratório de Dieta, Nutrição e Câncer, Departamento de Alimentos e Nutrição Experimental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-06-22

    The combined treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and retinoids has been suggested as a potential epigenetic strategy for the control of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treatment with butyrate, a dietary HDACi, combined with vitamin A on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation was evaluated by the crystal violet staining method. MCF-7 cells were plated at 5 x 10{sup 4} cells/mL and treated with butyrate (1 mM) alone or combined with vitamin A (10 µM) for 24 to 120 h. Cell proliferation inhibition was 34, 10 and 46% following treatment with butyrate, vitamin A and their combination, respectively, suggesting that vitamin A potentiated the inhibitory activities of butyrate. Furthermore, exposure to this short-chain fatty acid increased the level of histone H3K9 acetylation by 9.5-fold (Western blot), but not of H4K16, and increased the expression levels of p21{sup WAF1} by 2.7-fold (Western blot) and of RARβ by 2.0-fold (quantitative real-time PCR). Our data show that RARβ may represent a molecular target for butyrate in breast cancer cells. Due to its effectiveness as a dietary HDACi, butyrate should be considered for use in combinatorial strategies with more active retinoids, especially in breast cancers in which RARβ is epigenetically altered.

  19. Development and validation of a liquid chromatography method for the simultaneous determination of eight water-soluble vitamins in multivitamin formulations and human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Suyog S; Srivastava, Ashwini K

    2013-01-01

    A simple, precise, and rapid RPLC method has been developed without incorporation of any ion-pair reagent for the simultaneous determination of vitamin C (C) and seven B-complex vitamins, viz, thiamine hydrochloride (B1), pyridoxine hydrochloride (B6), nicotinamide (B3), cyanocobalamine (B12), folic acid, riboflavin (B2), and 4-aminobenzoic acid (Bx). Separations were achieved within 12.0 min at 30 degrees C by gradient elution on an RP C18 column using a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of 15 mM ammonium formate buffer and 0.1% triethylamine adjusted to pH 4.0 with formic acid and acetonitrile. Simultaneous UV detection was performed at 275 and 360 nm. The method was validated for system suitability, LOD, LOQ, linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity, and robustness in accordance with International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. The developed method was implemented successfully for determination of the aforementioned vitamins in pharmaceutical formulations containing an individual vitamin, in their multivitamin combinations, and in human urine samples. The calibration curves for all analytes showed good linearity, with coefficients of correlation higher than 0.9998. Accuracy, intraday repeatability (n = 6), and interday repeatability (n = 7) were found to be satisfactory.

  20. In vivo production of novel vitamin D2 hydroxy-derivatives by human placentas, epidermal keratinocytes, Caco-2 colon cells and the adrenal gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Andrzej T.; Kim, Tae-Kang; Shehabi, Haleem Z.; Tang, Edith; Benson, Heather A. E.; Semak, Igor; Lin, Zongtao; Yates, Charles R.; Wang, Jin; Li, Wei; Tuckey, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the metabolism of vitamin D2 to hydroxyvitamin D2 metabolites ((OH)D2) by human placentas ex-utero, adrenal glands ex-vivo and cultured human epidermal keratinocytes and colonic Caco-2 cells, and identified 20(OH)D2, 17,20(OH)2D2, 1,20(OH)2D2, 25(OH)D2 and 1,25(OH)2D2 as products. Inhibition of product formation by 22R-hydroxycholesterol indicated involvement of CYP11A1 in 20- and 17-hydroxylation of vitamin D2, while use of ketoconazole indicated involvement of CYP27B1 in 1α-hydroxylation of products. Studies with purified human CYP11A1 confirmed the ability of this enzyme to convert vitamin D2 to 20(OH)D2 and 17,20(OH)2D2. In placentas and Caco-2 cells, production of 20(OH)D2 was higher than 25(OH)D2 while in human keratinocytes the production of 20(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D2 were comparable. HaCaT keratinocytes showed high accumulation of 1,20(OH)2D2 relative to 20(OH)D2 indicating substantial CYP27B1 activity. This is the first in vivo evidence for a novel pathway of vitamin D2 metabolism initiated by CYP11A1 and modified by CYP27B1, with the product profile showing tissue- and cell-type specificity. PMID:24382416

  1. 21 CFR 582.5930 - Vitamin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin A. 582.5930 Section 582.5930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5930 Vitamin A. (a) Product. Vitamin A. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  2. Vitamin D, Sunlight and Prostate Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Vanaja Donkena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second common cancer in men worldwide. The prevention of prostate cancer remains a challenge to researchers and clinicians. Here, we review the relationship of vitamin D and sunlight to prostate cancer risk. Ultraviolet radiation of the sunlight is the main stimulator for vitamin D production in humans. Vitamin D's antiprostate cancer activities may be involved in the actions through the pathways mediated by vitamin D metabolites, vitamin D metabolizing enzymes, vitamin D receptor (VDR, and VDR-regulated genes. Although laboratory studies including the use of animal models have shown that vitamin D has antiprostate cancer properties, whether it can effectively prevent the development and/or progression of prostate cancer in humans remains to be inconclusive and an intensively studied subject. This review will provide up-to-date information regarding the recent outcomes of laboratory and epidemiology studies on the effects of vitamin D on prostate cancer prevention.

  3. Validation of ALFIA: a platform for quantifying near-infrared fluorescent images of lymphatic propulsion in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, John C.; Bautista, Merrick; Tan, I.-Chih; Adams, Kristen E.; Aldrich, Melissa; Marshall, Milton V.; Fife, Caroline E.; Maus, Erik A.; Smith, Latisha A.; Zhang, Jingdan; Xiang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Shaohua Kevin; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-02-01

    Recently, we demonstrated near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging for quantifying real-time lymphatic propulsion in humans following intradermal injections of microdose amounts of indocyanine green. However computational methods for image analysis are underdeveloped, hindering the translation and clinical adaptation of NIR fluorescent lymphatic imaging. In our initial work we used ImageJ and custom MatLab programs to manually identify lymphatic vessels and individual propulsion events using the temporal transit of the fluorescent dye. In addition, we extracted the apparent velocities of contractile propagation and time periods between propulsion events. Extensive time and effort were required to analyze the 6-8 gigabytes of NIR fluorescent images obtained for each subject. To alleviate this bottleneck, we commenced development of ALFIA, an integrated software platform which will permit automated, near real-time analysis of lymphatic function using NIR fluorescent imaging. However, prior to automation, the base algorithms calculating the apparent velocity and period must be validated to verify that they produce results consistent with the proof-of-concept programs. To do this, both methods were used to analyze NIR fluorescent images of two subjects and the number of propulsive events identified, the average apparent velocities, and the average periods for each subject were compared. Paired Student's t-tests indicate that the differences between their average results are not significant. With the base algorithms validated, further development and automation of ALFIA can be realized, significantly reducing the amount of user interaction required, and potentially enabling the near real-time, clinical evaluation of NIR fluorescent lymphatic imaging.

  4. NutriPhone: a mobile platform for low-cost point-of-care quantification of vitamin B12 concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seoho; O'Dell, Dakota; Hohenstein, Jess; Colt, Susannah; Mehta, Saurabh; Erickson, David

    2016-06-15

    Vitamin B12 is necessary for formation of red blood cells, DNA synthesis, neural myelination, brain development, and growth. Vitamin B12 deficiency is often asymptomatic early in its course; however, once it manifests, particularly with neurological symptoms, reversal by dietary changes or supplementation becomes less effective. Access to easy, low cost, and personalized nutritional diagnostics could enable individuals to better understand their own deficiencies as well as track the effects of dietary changes. In this work, we present the NutriPhone, a mobile platform for the analysis of blood vitamin B12 levels in 15 minutes. The NutriPhone technology comprises of a smartphone accessory, an app, and a competitive-type lateral flow test strip that quantifies vitamin B12 levels. To achieve the detection of sub-nmol/L physiological levels of vitamin B12, our assay incorporates an innovative "spacer pad" for increasing the duration of the key competitive binding reaction and uses silver amplification of the initial signal. We demonstrate the efficacy of our NutriPhone system by quantifying physiologically relevant levels of vitamin B12 and performing human trials where it was used to accurately evaluate blood vitamin B12 status of 12 participants from just a drop (~40 μl) of finger prick blood.

  5. Quantification of vitamin B6 vitamers in human cerebrospinal fluid by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ham, M; Albersen, M; de Koning, T J; Visser, G; Middendorp, A; Bosma, M; Verhoeven-Duif, N M; de Sain-van der Velden, M G M

    2012-01-27

    Since vitamin B6 is essential for normal functioning of the central nervous system, there is growing need for sensitive analysis of B6 vitamers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This manuscript describes the development and validation of a rapid, sensitive and accurate method for quantification of the vitamin B6 vitamers pyridoxal (PL), pyridoxamine (PM), pyridoxine (PN), pyridoxic acid (PA), pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP) and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate (PNP) in human CSF. The method is based on ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) with a simple sample preparation procedure of protein precipitation using 50 g L(-1) trichloroacetic acid containing stable isotope labeled internal standards: PL-D(3) for PL and PM, PN-(13)C(4) for PN, PA-D(2) for PA and PLP-D(3) for the phosphorylated vitamers. B6 vitamers were separated (Acquity HSS-T3 UPLC column) with a buffer containing acetic acid, heptafluorobutyric acid and acetonitrile. Positive electrospray ionization was used to monitor transitions m/z 168.1→150.1 (PL), 169.1→134.1 (PM), 170.1→134.1 (PN), 184.1→148.1 (PA), 248.1→150.1 (PLP), 249.1→232.1 (PMP) and 250.1→134.1 (PNP). The method was validated at three concentration levels for each B6 vitamer in CSF. Recoveries of the internal standards were between 93% and 96%. Intra- and inter-assay variations were below 20%. Accuracy tests showed deviations from 3% (PN) to 39% (PMP). Limits of quantification were in the range of 0.03-5.37 nM. Poor results were obtained for quantification of PNP. The method was applied to CSF samples of 20 subjects and two patients on pyridoxine supplementation. Using minimal CSF volumes this method is suitable for implementation in a routine diagnostic setting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transporters for the Intestinal Absorption of Cholesterol, Vitamin E, and Vitamin K

    OpenAIRE

    Yamanashi, Yoshihide; Takada, Tappei; Kurauchi, Ryoya; Tanaka, Yusuke; Komine, Toko; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Humans cannot synthesize fat-soluble vitamins such as vitamin E and vitamin K. For this reason, they must be obtained from the diet via intestinal absorption. As the deficiency or excess of these vitamins has been reported to cause several types of diseases and disorders in humans, the intestinal absorption of these nutrients must be properly regulated to ensure good health. However, the mechanism of their intestinal absorption remains poorly understood. Recent studies on cholesterol using ge...

  7. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of human nails to find correlation between nutrients and vitamin D deficiency using LIBS and ICP-AES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almessiere, M A; Altuwiriqi, R; Gondal, M A; AlDakheel, R K; Alotaibi, H F

    2018-08-01

    In this work, we analysed human fingernails of people who suffer from vitamin D deficiency using the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy(LIBS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES)techniques. The measurements have been conducted on 71 nail samples collected randomly from volunteers of different genders and ages ranged between 20 and 50 years. The main aim of this study is to find the correlation between vitamin D deficiency and the intensity of some dominated lines in the LIBS spectra. A LIBS spectrum consists of dominant lines of fifteen elements including calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, titanium, iron, chloride, sulphur, copper, chromium, zinc, nitrogen, phosphor, and oxygen. By recording the spectrum in specific ranges and focusing on calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium, we found a correlation between the intensity of the potassium (K) lines at (766.5 and 769.9 nm)and vitamin D level in both age groups (20 and 25 years old), with weak correlation for the calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and sodium (Na) lines. To verify the validity of the LIBS results, we analysed the nail samples with ICP, a standard analytical technique. The elements detected with our LIBS technique are in a good agreement with those identified by ICP-AES. From the health and physiological perspectives, the LIBS system, which is used for spectral analysis in this work, is appropriate for diagnostic purposes such as to find the correlation between vitamin D deficiency and potassium content, especially for hypertensive patients who simultaneously take potassium-based medication and vitamin D supplement. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Vitamin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seem to benefit older women who still have strong bones. Taking vitamin K1 seems to increase bone strength and might prevent fractures in older women. But it might not work as well in older men. Vitamin K1 doesn't seem to improve bone ...

  9. B Vitamins

    Science.gov (United States)

    The B vitamins are B1 (thiamine) B2 (riboflavin) B3 (niacin) B5 (pantothenic acid) B6 B7 (biotin) B12 Folic acid These ... help form red blood cells. You can get B vitamins from proteins such as fish, poultry, meat, eggs, ...

  10. Conserved epitope on several human vitamin K-dependent proteins: location of the antigenic site and influence of metal ions on antibody binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, W.R.; Messier, T.; Howard, P.R.; Amiral, J.; Meyer, D.; Mann, K.G.

    1988-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (designated H-11) produced by injecting mice with purified human protein C was found to bind several human vitamin K-dependent proteins. Using a solid-phase competitive radioimmunoassay with antibody immobilized onto microtiter plates, binding of 125 I-labeled protein C to the antibody was inhibited by increasing amounts of protein C, prothrombin, and Factors X and VII over a concentration range of 1 x 10 -8 to 1 x 10 -6 M. Chemical treatment of prothrombin with a variety of agents did not destroy the antigenic site recognized by the antibody as measured by immunoblotting of prothrombin or prothrombin derivative immobilized onto nitrocellulose. Immunoblotting of purified vitamin K-dependent polypeptides with the monoclonal antibody following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and electrophoretic transfer to nitrocellulose indicated that the antigenic site was found on the light chains of protein C and Factor X. The exact location of the antigenic determinant for antibody H-11 was established using synthetic peptides. Comparison of protein sequences of bovine and human vitamin K-dependent proteins suggests that the sequence Phe-Leu-Glu-Glu-Xaa-Arg/Lys is required for antibody binding. Increasing concentrations of Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , or Mn 2+ partially inhibited binding of 125 I-protein C to the antibody in a solid-phase assay system with half-maximal binding observed at divalent metal ion concentrations of 2, 4, and 0.6 mM, respectively. The antigenic site thus recognized by monoclonal antibody H-11 is located at the amino-terminal region in the highly conserved γ-carboxyglutamic acid-containing domains of several, but not all, vitamin K-dependent proteins

  11. Dietary B Vitamins and Depression in Persons with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: The Positive Living with HIV (POLH) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel-Tandukar, Kalpana

    2016-01-01

    B vitamins have beneficial roles in mental health functional impairments; however, research on the role of B vitamins in depression among HIV-infected persons is limited. This study assessed the association between dietary B vitamin intake and depressive symptoms in a cohort of HIV-infected persons. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 314 HIV-infected persons (180 men and 134 women) aged 18 to 60 y residing in the Kathmandu, Nepal. The Beck Depression Inventory-I was used to measure depression, with a cutoff score of 20 or higher. Dietary intake was assessed using two nonconsecutive 24-h dietary recalls. The relationships between B vitamins and depressive symptoms were assessed using multiple logistic regression analysis. Twenty-six percent participants (men: 23%; women: 29%) were depressed. More than two thirds of participants' B vitamins intake were below the estimated average requirements (EAR) level. Low intake of riboflavin was associated with an increased risk of depression in women but not in men. Multivariate OR (95% CI) for depression in the first, second, and third tertiles of riboflavin in total participants were 1 (reference), 0.87 (0.46-1.64), and 0.49 (0.24-0.98), respectively (p for trend=0.048) and in women were 1 (reference), 0.94 (0.36-2.40), and 0.23 (0.07-0.77), respectively (p for trend=0.020). No clear associations were seen between other B vitamins and depressive symptoms in either sex. Low intake of riboflavin was independently associated with an increased risk of depressive symptoms in all participants and in HIV-infected women. Further prospective studies are warranted to confirm the role of vitamin B vitamins in depressive symptoms among HIV-infected persons.

  12. Vitamin D fails to prevent serum starvation- or staurosporine-induced apoptosis in human and rat osteosarcoma-derived cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witasp, Erika; Gustafsson, Ann-Catrin; Cotgreave, Ian; Lind, Monica; Fadeel, Bengt

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 , the active form of vitamin D 3 , may increase the survival of bone-forming osteoblasts through an inhibition of apoptosis. On the other hand, vitamin D 3 has also been shown to trigger apoptosis in human cancer cells, including osteosarcoma-derived cell lines. In the present study, we show that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 induces a time- and dose-dependent loss of cell viability in the rat osteosarcoma cell line, UMR-106, and the human osteosarcoma cell line, TE-85. We were unable, however, to detect nuclear condensation, phosphatidylserine externalization, or other typical signs of apoptosis in this model. Moreover, 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 failed to protect against apoptosis induced by serum starvation or incubation with the protein kinase inhibitor, staurosporine. These in vitro findings are thus at variance with several previous reports in the literature and suggest that induction of or protection against apoptosis of bone-derived cells may not be a primary function of vitamin D 3

  13. Epigenetic Regulation of Vitamin D 24-Hydroxylase/CYP24A1 in Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Karpf, Adam R.; Deeb, Kristin K.; Muindi, Josephia R.; Morrison, Carl D.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    Calcitriol, a regulator of calcium homeostasis with antitumor properties, is degraded by the product of the CYP24A1 gene which is downregulated in human prostate cancer by unknown mechanisms. We found that CYP24A1 expression is inversely correlated with promoter DNA methylation in prostate cancer cell lines. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC) activates CYP24A1 expression in prostate cancer cells. In vitro methylation of the CYP24A1 promoter represses its promoter activity. Furthermore, inhibition of histone deacetylases by trichostatin A (TSA) enhances the expression of CYP24A1 in prostate cancer cells. ChIP-qPCR reveals that specific histone modifications are associated with the CYP24A1 promoter region. Treatment with TSA increases H3K9ac and H3K4me2 and simultaneously decreases H3K9me2 at the CYP24A1 promoter. ChIP-qPCR assay reveals that treatment with DAC and TSA increases the recruitment of VDR to the CYP24A1 promoter. RT-PCR analysis of paired human prostate samples reveals that CYP24A1 expression is down-regulated in prostate malignant lesions compared to adjacent histologically benign lesions. Bisulfite pyrosequencing shows that CYP24A1 gene is hypermethylated in malignant lesions compared to matched benign lesions. Our findings indicate that repression of CYP24A1 gene expression in human prostate cancer cells is mediated in part by promoter DNA methylation and repressive histone modifications. PMID:20587525

  14. FATSOLUBLE VITAMINS AND SPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Novica Bojanić; Jelena Radović; Nina Jančić; Nataša Đinđić

    2013-01-01

    Vitamins are the cell biocatalysts, indispensable factors in performing the basic body functions. Fat-soluble vitamins are not involved in processes related to musscle contractions and energy expenditure, but they can affect physical performance indirectly because they are important for immune function (vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E), antioxidant function (vitamin A, vitamin E) or bone methabolism (vitamin D, vitamin K). Currently there are no clear recommendations for increase of fat-solub...

  15. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body uses vitamins for a variety of biological processes, including growth, digestion, and nerve function. There are ... published by the Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), provide ...

  16. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will achieve adequate vitamin intakes. The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans advises that nutrient needs be met ... with supplementation suggested for certain sensitive populations. These guidelines, published by the Department of Health and Human ...

  17. [Vitamin D and endocrine diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Natielen Jacques; Garcia, Vivian Cristina; Martini, Ligia Araújo

    2009-07-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency has been worldwide reported in all age groups in recent years. It has been considered a Public Health matter since decreased levels of vitamin D has been related to several chronic diseases, as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity and hypertension. Glucose intolerance and insulin secretion has been observed during vitamin D deficiency, both in animals and humans resulting in T2DM. The supposed mechanism underlying these findings is presence of vitamin D receptor in several tissues and cells, including pancreatic beta-cells, adipocyte and muscle cells. In obese individuals, the impaired vitamin D endocrine system, characterized by high levels of PTH and 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) could induce a negative feedback for the hepatic synthesis of 25(OH)D and also contribute to a higher intracellular calcium, which in turn secrete less insulin and deteriorate insulin sensitivity. In hypertension, vitamin D could act on renin-angiotensin system and also in vascular function. Administration of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) could decreases renin gene expression and inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. However, prospective and intervention human studies that clearly demonstrates the benefits of vitamin D status adequacy in the prevention and treatment of endocrine metabolic diseases are lacking. Further research still necessary to assure the maximum benefit of vitamin D in such situations.

  18. DNA polymerase gamma inhibition by vitamin K3 induces mitochondria-mediated cytotoxicity in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Ryohei; Suzuki, Yoko; Yonezawa, Yuko; Ota, Yosuke; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Demizu, Yusuke; Huang, Peng; Yoshida, Hiromi; Sugimura, Kazuro; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2008-05-01

    Among the vitamin K (VK) compounds, VK3 exhibits distinct cytotoxic activity in cancer cells and is thought to affect redox cycling; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that VK3 selectively inhibits DNA polymerase (pol) gamma, the key enzyme responsible for mitochondrial DNA replication and repair. VK3 at 30 microM inhibited pol gamma by more than 80%, caused impairment of mitochondrial DNA replication and repair, and induced a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to apoptosis. At a lower concentration (3 microM), VK3 did not cause a significant increase in ROS, but was able to effectively inhibit cell proliferation, which could be reversed by supplementing glycolytic substrates. The cytotoxic action of VK3 was independent of p53 tumor suppressor gene status. Interestingly, VK3 only inhibited pol gamma but did not affect other pol including human pol alpha, pol beta, pol delta, and pol epsilon. VK1 and VK2 exhibited no inhibitory effect on any of the pol tested. These data together suggest that the inhibition of pol gamma by VK3 is relatively specific, and that this compound seems to exert its anticancer activity by two possible mechanisms in a concentration-dependent manner: (1) induction of ROS-mediated cell death at high concentrations; and (2) inhibition of cell proliferation at lower concentrations likely through the suppression of mitochondrial respiratory function. These findings may explain various cytotoxic actions induced by VK3, and may pave the way for the further use of VK3.

  19. Use of smartphones and portable media devices for quantifying human movement characteristics of gait, tendon reflex response, and Parkinson's disease hand tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Smartphones and portable media devices are both equipped with sensor components, such as accelerometers. A software application enables these devices to function as a robust wireless accelerometer platform. The recorded accelerometer waveform can be transmitted wireless as an e-mail attachment through connectivity to the Internet. The implication of such devices as a wireless accelerometer platform is the experimental and post-processing locations can be placed anywhere in the world. Gait was quantified by mounting a smartphone or portable media device proximal to the lateral malleolus of the ankle joint. Attributes of the gait cycle were quantified with a considerable accuracy and reliability. The patellar tendon reflex response was quantified by using the device in tandem with a potential energy impact pendulum to evoke the patellar tendon reflex. The acceleration waveform maximum acceleration feature of the reflex response displayed considerable accuracy and reliability. By mounting the smartphone or portable media device to the dorsum of the hand through a glove, Parkinson's disease hand tremor was quantified and contrasted with significance to a non-Parkinson's disease steady hand control. With the methods advocated in this chapter, any aspect of human movement may be quantified through smartphones or portable media devices and post-processed anywhere in the world. These wearable devices are anticipated to substantially impact the biomedical and healthcare industry.

  20. Vitamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carrots, and squash. Fruits, including cantaloupe, apricots, and mangos. Dairy products, which are among the major sources ... medicines might interfere with how your body absorbs, uses, or breaks down nutrients . Vitamin A and healthful ...

  1. Vitamin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... known as the clotting vitamin, because without it blood would not clot. Some studies suggest that it helps maintain strong bones in the older adults. Food Sources The best way to get the daily ...

  2. Quantifying Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolhouse, Mark

    2017-07-01

    Transmissibility is the defining characteristic of infectious diseases. Quantifying transmission matters for understanding infectious disease epidemiology and designing evidence-based disease control programs. Tracing individual transmission events can be achieved by epidemiological investigation coupled with pathogen typing or genome sequencing. Individual infectiousness can be estimated by measuring pathogen loads, but few studies have directly estimated the ability of infected hosts to transmit to uninfected hosts. Individuals' opportunities to transmit infection are dependent on behavioral and other risk factors relevant given the transmission route of the pathogen concerned. Transmission at the population level can be quantified through knowledge of risk factors in the population or phylogeographic analysis of pathogen sequence data. Mathematical model-based approaches require estimation of the per capita transmission rate and basic reproduction number, obtained by fitting models to case data and/or analysis of pathogen sequence data. Heterogeneities in infectiousness, contact behavior, and susceptibility can have substantial effects on the epidemiology of an infectious disease, so estimates of only mean values may be insufficient. For some pathogens, super-shedders (infected individuals who are highly infectious) and super-spreaders (individuals with more opportunities to transmit infection) may be important. Future work on quantifying transmission should involve integrated analyses of multiple data sources.

  3. Influence of phytosterol and phytostanol food supplementation on plasma liposoluble vitamins and provitamin A carotenoid levels in humans: An updated review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardet, Anthony; Morise, Anne; Kalonji, Esther; Margaritis, Irène; Mariotti, François

    2017-06-13

    Phytosterols and phytostanols (PAP) compete with cholesterol absorption in the intestine, resulting in a 5-15%-reduction in plasma total and LDL cholesterol. An important issue is the PAP potential to reduce the plasma concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins and provitamin A carotenoids. Here, an update of the scientific evidence is reviewed to evaluate plant PAP-enriched foods impact on plasma fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoid levels, and to discuss potential implications in terms of cardiovascular risk. Based on 49 human interventional and 3 bioavailability studies, results showed that regular consumption, particularly over the long term, of foods fortified with PAP as recommended in labeling does not significantly impact plasma vitamins A, D, and K concentration. A 10% significant median reduction was observed for α-tocopherol. Concerning carotenoids, while 13 studies did not demonstrate statistically significant plasma β-carotene reduction, 20 studies showed significant reductions, with median effect size of -24%. This decline can be mitigated or offset by increased fruits and vegetables consumption. Furthermore, higher cardiovascular risk was observed for differences in plasma β-carotene concentration of the same magnitude as the estimated average decrease by PAP consumption. These results are supported by the only study of β-carotene bioavailability showing decrease in absorption by phytosterols daily intake.

  4. The role of vitamin D in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Khanh vinh quoc; Nguyen, Lan Thi Hoàng

    2012-04-01

    Vitamin D metabolites are important immune-modulatory hormones and are able to suppress Th2-mediated allergic airway disease. Some genetic factors that may contribute to asthma are regulated by vitamin D, such as vitamin D receptor (VDR), human leukocyte antigen genes (HLA), human Toll-like receptors (TLR), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a disintegrin and metalloprotein-33 (ADAM-33), and poly(ADP-ribosyl) polymerase- 1 (PARP-1). Vitamin D has also been implicated in asthma through its effects on the obesity, bacillus Calmettee Guérin (BCG) vaccination and high vitamin D level, vitamin D supplement, checkpoint protein kinase 1 (Chk1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and gamma delta T cells (gdT). Vitamin D plays a role in asthma and exerts its action through either genomic and/or non-genomic ways.

  5. Vitamins and bone health: beyond calcium and vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadieh, Hala; Arabi, Asma

    2011-10-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health disorder associated with an increased risk of fracture. Nutrition is among the modifiable factors that influence the risk of osteoporosis and fracture. Calcium and vitamin D play important roles in improving bone mineral density and reducing the risk of fracture. Other vitamins appear to play a role in bone health as well. In this review, the findings of studies that related the intake and/or the status of vitamins other than vitamin D to bone health in animals and humans are summarized. Studies of vitamin A showed inconsistent results. Excessive, as well as insufficient, levels of retinol intake may be associated with compromised bone health. Deficiencies in vitamin B, along with the consequent elevated homocysteine level, are associated with bone loss, decreased bone strength, and increased risk of fracture. Deficiencies in vitamins C, E, and K are also associated with compromised bone health; this effect may be modified by smoking, estrogen use or hormonal therapy after menopause, calcium intake, and vitamin D. These findings highlight the importance of adequate nutrition in preserving bone mass and reducing the risk of osteoporosis and fractures. © 2011 International Life Sciences Institute.

  6. Vitamin D Receptor Expression in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, A.G.; Milne, E.; Drummond, D.; Smith, S.; Handel, I.; Mellanby, R.J.

    2018-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence linking low blood vitamin D concentration to numerous diseases in people and in dogs. Vitamin D influences cellular function by signaling through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Little is known about which non‐skeletal tissues express the VDR or how inflammation influences its expression in the dog. Objectives To define which non‐skeletal canine tissues express the VDR and to investigate expression in inflamed small intestine. Animals Thirteen non‐skeletal tissues were collected prospectively from 6 control dogs. Thirty‐five dogs diagnosed with a chronic enteropathy (CE) and 24 control dogs were prospectively enrolled and duodenal biopsies were evaluated for VDR expression. Methods Prospective; blinded assessment of canine intestinal VDR. Dogs with CE were included once other identifiable causes of intestinal disease were excluded. Age matched controls were included with no intestinal clinical signs. VDR expression was assessed immunohistochemically in all samples, using a Rat IgG VDR monoclonal antibody. Quantitative real‐time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was also used for duodenal biopsies. Results VDR expression as assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) was highest in the kidney, duodenum, skin, ileum and spleen, and weak in the colon, heart, lymph node, liver, lung, and ovary. Gastric and testicular tissue did not express the VDR. There was no statistical difference in duodenal VDR expression between the 24 healthy dogs and 34 dogs with CE when quantified by either qPCR (P = 0.87) or IHC (P = 0.099). Conclusions and Clinical Importance The lack of down regulation of VDR expression in inflamed intestine contrasts with previous studies in humans. Our findings support future studies to investigate whether vitamin D and its analogues can be used to modulate intestinal inflammation in the dog. PMID:29469965

  7. VITAMIN INTAKE: REAL NECESSARY OR DANGEROUS EXCESS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Torshkhoeva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamins are biologically active substances, which regulate many biochemical processes within the human body. in modern conditions, peculiarities of the household and children's nourishment do not allow for complete satisfaction of the need in all the vitamins only thanks to the food. In relation to this, it's quite desirable to provide the additional inflow of the vitamins into the child's body, which may be performed through the individual intake of the children's multivitamin medications.Key words: vitamins, children, hypovitaminosis, vitamin and mineral complex.

  8. [Osteomalacia and vitamin D deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, C P; Corsten, N; Rolf, O

    2015-09-01

    Vitamin D and calcium deficiency has a higher incidence in the orthopedic-trauma surgery patient population than generally supposed. In the long term this can result in osteomalacia, a form of altered bone mineralization in adults, in which the cartilaginous, non-calcified osteoid does not mature to hard bone. The current value of vitamin D and its importance for bones and other body cells are demonstrated. The causes of vitamin D deficiency are insufficient sunlight exposure, a lack of vitamin D3 and calcium, malabsorption, and rare alterations of VDR signaling and phosphate metabolism. The main symptoms are bone pain, fatigue fractures, muscular cramps, muscle pain, and gait disorders, with an increased incidence of falls in the elderly. Osteopathies induced by pharmaceuticals, tumors, rheumatism or osteoporosis have to be considered as the main differential diagnoses. In addition to the recording of symptoms and medical imaging, the diagnosis of osteomalacia should be ensured by laboratory parameters. Adequate treatment consists of the high-dose intake of vitamin D3 and the replacement of phosphate if deficient. Vitamin D is one of the important hormone-like vitamins and is required in all human cells. Deficiency of vitamin D has far-reaching consequences not only for bone, but also for other organ systems.

  9. Vitamin D and Human Health: from the Gamete to the Grave”: Report on a meeting held at Queen Mary University of London, 23rd–25th April 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Martineau

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The inaugural Vitamin D and Human Health conference was held on the London Whitechapel campus of Queen Mary University’s Barts and The London Medical School, from the 23rd to 25th of April, 2014. This three-day meeting set out to achieve two main aims: to create a forum for researchers to meet and forge new collaborations, and to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the latest findings from clinical research in the field of vitamin D. Over 300 clinical researchers, students and commercial representatives attended. Thirty international experts in the field of clinical vitamin D research presented talks organised into a programme spanning the human life course. Commencing with a session of talks providing overviews of randomised trials of supplementation and global vitamin D status, the meeting proceeded with a session on pre-birth related vitamin D research—evolution, genetics & fertility—which led into several talks in the area of child health. Sessions on respiratory health, immune function, cancer biology, and neurodegenerative diseases preceded an overview of research in the area of ageing-related health outcomes, including musculoskeletal health and metabolic diseases. Finally sessions on the economy of vitamin D and public health, along with future directions for research were held. Several themes emerged during the course of the meeting. The anticipation of results from very large (n > 5000 randomised controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation (“mega-trials” and Individual Patient Data (IPD meta-analyses were hot topics of discussion. Mega-trials have the potential to detect small effect sizes of vitamin D supplementation on end-points such as incidence and mortality from cardiovascular disease and cancer. IPD meta-analyses have the potential to investigate the causes of heterogeneity often seen in the results of individual primary trials by allowing clinically important subgroup effects of vitamin D supplementation to be

  10. 77 FR 52228 - Food Additives Permitted for Direct Addition to Food for Human Consumption; Vitamin D2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... D2 Bakers Yeast AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and..., 379e. 0 2. Section 172.381 is added to subpart D to read as follows: Sec. 172.381 Vitamin D2 bakers...

  11. Development of an Advanced HPLC–MS/MS Method for the Determination of Carotenoids and Fat-Soluble Vitamins in Human Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Hrvolová

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of carotenoids and fat-soluble vitamins in human plasma may play a significant role in numerous chronic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and some types of cancer. Although these compounds are of utmost interest for human health, methods for their simultaneous determination are scarce. A new high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS method for the quantification of selected carotenoids and fat-soluble vitamins in human plasma was developed, validated, and then applied in a pilot dietary intervention study with healthy volunteers. In 50 min, 16 analytes were separated with an excellent resolution and suitable MS signal intensity. The proposed HPLC–MS/MS method led to improvements in the limits of detection (LOD and quantification (LOQ for all analyzed compounds compared to the most often used HPLC–DAD methods, in some cases being more than 100-fold lower. LOD values were between 0.001 and 0.422 µg/mL and LOQ values ranged from 0.003 to 1.406 µg/mL, according to the analyte. The accuracy, precision, and stability met with the acceptance criteria of the AOAC (Association of Official Analytical Chemists International. According to these results, the described HPLC-MS/MS method is adequately sensitive, repeatable and suitable for the large-scale analysis of compounds in biological fluids.

  12. Development of an Advanced HPLC–MS/MS Method for the Determination of Carotenoids and Fat-Soluble Vitamins in Human Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrvolová, Barbora; Martínez-Huélamo, Miriam; Colmán-Martínez, Mariel; Hurtado-Barroso, Sara; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria; Kalina, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of carotenoids and fat-soluble vitamins in human plasma may play a significant role in numerous chronic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and some types of cancer. Although these compounds are of utmost interest for human health, methods for their simultaneous determination are scarce. A new high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method for the quantification of selected carotenoids and fat-soluble vitamins in human plasma was developed, validated, and then applied in a pilot dietary intervention study with healthy volunteers. In 50 min, 16 analytes were separated with an excellent resolution and suitable MS signal intensity. The proposed HPLC–MS/MS method led to improvements in the limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) for all analyzed compounds compared to the most often used HPLC–DAD methods, in some cases being more than 100-fold lower. LOD values were between 0.001 and 0.422 µg/mL and LOQ values ranged from 0.003 to 1.406 µg/mL, according to the analyte. The accuracy, precision, and stability met with the acceptance criteria of the AOAC (Association of Official Analytical Chemists) International. According to these results, the described HPLC-MS/MS method is adequately sensitive, repeatable and suitable for the large-scale analysis of compounds in biological fluids. PMID:27754400

  13. Method for simultaneous analysis of eight analogues of vitamin D using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Iltaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite considerable global investigation over several decades, the roles of vitamin D in health and disease development remains convoluted. One recognised issue is the difficulty of accurately measuring the active forms of vitamin D. Advances made include some new methods addressing the potential interference by excluding epimers and isobars. However, there is no evidence that epimers are without function. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and validate, for the first time, a new assay to simultaneously measure levels of six forms of vitamin D along with two epimers. The assay was applied to multilevel certified reference material (CRM and 25 pooled human sera samples, obtained from the Vitamin D External Quality Assessment Scheme (DEQAS, to demonstrate its efficiency. Results The assay is capable of simultaneously measuring eight vitamin D analogues over the calibration ranges and LODs (in nmol/L of: 1α25(OH2D2 [0.015-1; 0.01], 1α25(OH2D3 [0.1-100; 0.01], 25OHD3 [0.5-100, 0.025], 3-epi-25OHD3 [0.1-100, 0.05], 25OHD2 [0.5-100, 0.025], 3-epi-25OHD2 [0.1-100, 0.05], vitamin D3 [0.5-100, 0.05] and vitamin D2 [0.5-100, 0.05], using stanozolol-d3 as internal standard. Certified reference material and external quality control samples (DEQAS were analysed to meet the standards outlined by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST. Validation steps included recovery and both precision and accuracy under inter- and intra-day variation limit of detection, and analysis of each analyte over a linear range. All validation parameters were in line with acceptable Food and Drug Administration (FDA guidelines. All eight analogues were quantified with the 25OHD levels being commensurate with DEQAS data. Conclusions This report details the application of a new LC-MS/MS based assay for the efficient analysis of eight analogues of vitamin D over a range of samples, which is a significant advance over the existing

  14. Kinetic analysis of human CYP24A1 metabolism of vitamin D via the C24-oxidation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieu, Elaine W; Tang, Edith K Y; Tuckey, Robert C

    2014-07-01

    CYP24A1 is the multicatalytic cytochrome P450 responsible for the catabolism of vitamin D via the C23- and C24-oxidation pathways. We successfully expressed the labile human enzyme in Escherichia coli and partially purified it in an active state that permitted detailed characterization of its metabolism of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2 D3] and the intermediates of the C24-oxidation pathway in a phospholipid-vesicle reconstituted system. The C24-oxidation pathway intermediates, 1,24,25-trihydroxyvitamin D3, 24-oxo-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, 24-oxo-1,23,25-trihydroxyvitamin D3 and tetranor-1,23-dihydroxyvitamin D3, were enzymatically produced from 1,25(OH)2 D3 using rat CYP24A1. Both 1,25(OH)2 D3 and 1,23-dihydroxy-24,25,26,27-tetranorvitamin D3 were found to partition strongly into the phospholipid bilayer when in aqueous medium. Changes to the phospholipid concentration did not affect the kinetic parameters for the metabolism of 1,25(OH)2 D3 by CYP24A1, indicating that it is the concentration of substrates in the membrane phase (mol substrate·mol phospholipid(-1) ) that determines their rate of metabolism. CYP24A1 exhibited Km values for the different C24-intermediates ranging from 0.34 to 15 mmol·mol phospholipid(-1) , with 24-oxo-1,23,25-trihydroxyvitamin D3 [24-oxo-1,23,25(OH)3 D3] displaying the lowest and 1,24,25-trihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,24,25(OH)3 D3] displaying the highest. The kcat values varied by up to 3.8-fold, with 1,24,25(OH)3 D3 displaying the highest kcat (34 min(-1) ) and 24-oxo-1,23,25(OH)3 D3 the lowest. The data show that the cleavage of the side chain of 24-oxo-1,23,25(OH)3 D3 occurs with the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) and produces 1-hydroxy-23-oxo-24,25,26,27-tetranorvitamin D3 and not 1,23-dihydroxy-24,25,26,27-tetranorvitamin D3, as the primary product. These kinetic analyses also show that intermediates of the C24-oxidation pathway effectively compete with precursor substrates for binding to the active site of the

  15. Reproductive endocrinology of vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Mette; Boisen, Ida Marie; Mortensen, Li Juel; Lanske, Beate; Juul, Anders; Blomberg Jensen, Martin

    2017-09-15

    Vitamin D is a versatile hormone with several functions beyond its well-established role in maintenance of skeletal health and calcium homeostasis. The effects of vitamin D are mediated by the vitamin D receptor, which is expressed together with the vitamin D metabolizing enzymes in the reproductive tissues. The reproductive organs are therefore responsive to and able to metabolize vitamin D locally. The exact role remains to be clarified but several studies have suggested a link between vitamin D and production/release of reproductive hormones into circulation, which will be the main focus of this review. Current evidence is primarily based on small human association studies and rodent models. This highlights the need for randomized clinical trials, but also functional animal and human in vitro studies, and larger, prospective cohort studies are warranted. Given the high number of men and women suffering from reproductive problems and abnormal endocrinology research addressing the role of vitamin D in reproductive endocrinology may be of clinical importance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Urinary water-soluble vitamins and their metabolite contents as nutritional markers for evaluating vitamin intakes in young Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2008-06-01

    Little information is available to estimate water-soluble vitamin intakes from urinary vitamins and their metabolite contents as possible nutritional markers. Determination of the relationships between the oral dose and urinary excretion of water-soluble vitamins in human subjects contributes to finding valid nutrition markers of water-soluble vitamin intakes. Six female Japanese college students were given a standard Japanese diet in the first week, the same diet with a synthesized water-soluble vitamin mixture as a diet with approximately onefold vitamin mixture based on Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) for Japanese in the second week, with a threefold vitamin mixture in the third week, and a sixfold mixture in the fourth week. Water-soluble vitamins and their metabolites were measured in the 24-h urine collected each week. All urinary vitamins and their metabolite levels except vitamin B(12) increased linearly in a dose-dependent manner, and highly correlated with vitamin intake (r=0.959 for vitamin B(1), r=0.927 for vitamin B(2), r=0.965 for vitamin B(6), r=0.957 for niacin, r=0.934 for pantothenic acid, r=0.907 for folic acid, r=0.962 for biotin, and r=0.952 for vitamin C). These results suggest that measuring urinary water-soluble vitamins and their metabolite levels can be used as good nutritional markers for assessing vitamin intakes.

  17. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12 and folate). AAFP cites two categories of vitamins. ... vitamin E (for children and adolescents) vitamin B-12, iron, folic acid, and vitamins E and D ( ...

  18. The effect of calcium and vitamin D3 supplementation on the healing of the proximal humerus fracture: a randomized placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, A M; Faber, J; Lynnerup, N

    2004-01-01

    scan, WHO criteria), and not taking any drugs related to bone formation, including calcium or vitamin D supplementation, were randomly assigned to either oral 800 IU vitamin D3 plus 1 g calcium or placebo, in a double-blind prospective study. We measured biochemical, radiographic, and bone mineral......The purpose of this study was to (1) quantify the healing process of the human osteoporotic proximal humerus fracture (PHF) expressed in terms of callus formation over the fracture region using BMD scanning, and (2) quantify the impact of medical intervention with vitamin D3 and calcium...... on the healing process of the human osteoporotic fracture. The conservatively treated PHF was chosen in order to follow the genuine fracture healing without influence of osteosynthetic materials or casts. Thirty women (mean age = 78 years; range = 58-88) with a PHF, osteoporosis or osteopenia (based on a hip...

  19. Feasibility study of novel endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging system in detecting and quantifying gastrointestinal disease: first human results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hao; Li, Shujun; Yao, Liping; Liang, Jie; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Cao, Xin; Lin, Yenan; Liu, Muhan; Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli; Kang, Fei; Wang, Jing; Wang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides potential to use clinical radiotracers for optical imaging. The goal of this study was to present a newly developed endoscopic CLI (ECLI) system and illustrate its feasibility and potential in distinguishing and quantifying cancerous lesions of the GI tract. The ECLI system was established by integrating an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera with a flexible fibre endoscope. Phantom experiments and animal studies were conducted to test and illustrate the system in detecting and quantifying the presence of radionuclide in vitro and in vivo. A pilot clinical study was performed to evaluate our system in clinical settings. Phantom and mice experiments demonstrated its ability to acquire both the luminescent and photographic images with high accuracy. Linear quantitative relationships were also obtained when comparing the ECLI radiance with the radiotracer activity (r 2 = 0.9779) and traditional CLI values (r 2 = 0.9025). Imaging of patients revealed the potential of ECLI in the identification and quantification of cancerous tissue from normal, which showed good consistence with the clinical PET examination. The new ECLI system shows good consistence with the clinical PET examination and has great potential for clinical translation and in aiding detection of the GI tract disease. (orig.)

  20. Feasibility study of novel endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging system in detecting and quantifying gastrointestinal disease: first human results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hao; Li, Shujun; Yao, Liping; Liang, Jie; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun [Fourth Military Medical University, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); Cao, Xin; Lin, Yenan; Liu, Muhan; Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli [Xidian University, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an (China); Kang, Fei; Wang, Jing [Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); Wang, Min [Xi' an Children' s Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Xi' an (China)

    2015-06-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides potential to use clinical radiotracers for optical imaging. The goal of this study was to present a newly developed endoscopic CLI (ECLI) system and illustrate its feasibility and potential in distinguishing and quantifying cancerous lesions of the GI tract. The ECLI system was established by integrating an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera with a flexible fibre endoscope. Phantom experiments and animal studies were conducted to test and illustrate the system in detecting and quantifying the presence of radionuclide in vitro and in vivo. A pilot clinical study was performed to evaluate our system in clinical settings. Phantom and mice experiments demonstrated its ability to acquire both the luminescent and photographic images with high accuracy. Linear quantitative relationships were also obtained when comparing the ECLI radiance with the radiotracer activity (r{sup 2} = 0.9779) and traditional CLI values (r{sup 2} = 0.9025). Imaging of patients revealed the potential of ECLI in the identification and quantification of cancerous tissue from normal, which showed good consistence with the clinical PET examination. The new ECLI system shows good consistence with the clinical PET examination and has great potential for clinical translation and in aiding detection of the GI tract disease. (orig.)

  1. Vitamin C and Immune Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitra C. Carr

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin C is an essential micronutrient for humans, with pleiotropic functions related to its ability to donate electrons. It is a potent antioxidant and a cofactor for a family of biosynthetic and gene regulatory enzymes. Vitamin C contributes to immune defense by supporting various cellular functions of both the innate and adaptive immune system. Vitamin C supports epithelial barrier function against pathogens and promotes the oxidant scavenging activity of the skin, thereby potentially protecting against environmental oxidative stress. Vitamin C accumulates in phagocytic cells, such as neutrophils, and can enhance chemotaxis, phagocytosis, generation of reactive oxygen species, and ultimately microbial killing. It is also needed for apoptosis and clearance of the spent neutrophils from sites of infection by macrophages, thereby decreasing necrosis/NETosis and potential tissue damage. The role of vitamin C in lymphocytes is less clear, but it has been shown to enhance differentiation and proliferation of B- and T-cells, likely due to its gene regulating effects. Vitamin C deficiency results in impaired immunity and higher susceptibility to infections. In turn, infections significantly impact on vitamin C levels due to enhanced inflammation and metabolic requirements. Furthermore, supplementation with vitamin C appears to be able to both prevent and treat respiratory and systemic infections. Prophylactic prevention of infection requires dietary vitamin C intakes that provide at least adequate, if not saturating plasma levels (i.e., 100–200 mg/day, which optimize cell and tissue levels. In contrast, treatment of established infections requires significantly higher (gram doses of the vitamin to compensate for the increased inflammatory response and metabolic demand.

  2. Vitamin D and the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzosek, Małgorzata; Łukaszkiewicz, Jacek; Wrzosek, Michał; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Matsumoto, Halina; Piątkiewicz, Paweł; Radziwoń-Zaleska, Maria; Wojnar, Marcin; Nowicka, Grażyna

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D is formed in human epithelial cells via photochemical synthesis and is also acquired from dietary sources. The so-called classical effect of this vitamin involves the regulation of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. Apart from this, non-classical effects of vitamin D have recently gained renewed attention. One important yet little known of the numerous functions of vitamin D is the regulation of nervous system development and function. The neuroprotective effect of vitamin D is associated with its influence on neurotrophin production and release, neuromediator synthesis, intracellular calcium homeostasis, and prevention of oxidative damage to nervous tissue. Clinical studies suggest that vitamin D deficiency may lead to an increased risk of disease of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis. Adequate intake of vitamin D during pregnancy and the neonatal period seems to be crucial in terms of prevention of these diseases.

  3. Vitamin D: Is There a New Era?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Amani

    2017-08-01

    Background: In recent decades, much interest has been focused on investigating new roles of vitamin D in human body beyond the mineral-ion homeostasis. Methods: By searching medical databases such as PubMed, over 16000 articles were found which have been published since 2000 on novel aspects of vitamin D in health and diseases. Results: Of great interest was the effects of vitamin D on decreasing the risk of several chronic illnesses, including common cancers, autoimmune, infectious, and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, the new roles of vitamin D that have recently been investigated were addressed. Conclusions: Due to the vast prevalence of vitamin D deficiency worldwide, it seems that time has come to conduct well-designed clinical trials and meta-analysis to explore the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation in treatment of common diseases. Finally, the progression in cellular and molecular methods and technology will shed new lights on vitamin D roles in health and disease.

  4. Vitamin D Status in Danish Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rikke Agnete

    A principal function of vitamin D is facilitation of intestinal calcium absorption and maintenance of calcium homeostasis. This is essential to several functions in the body, and vitamin D is believed to be particularly crucial during childhood growth as the requirement for calcium increases....... In addition to skeletal health, vitamin D has also been associated with several extra-skeletal conditions including cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes. Evaluation of Vitamin D status is complex because it is modified by several factors and because the level of optimal vitamin D concentration...... is uncertain. The primary source of vitamin D in humans is believed to be the synthesis that occurs in the skin upon sun exposure while intake from diet, supplements, and potential fortified foods are secondary sources. Yet, synthesis of vitamin D from sun exposure is negligible during winter at northern...

  5. Quantifying and Maximizing Performance of a Human-Centric Robot under Precision, Safety, and Robot Specification Constraints

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The research project is an effort towards achieving 99.99% safety of mobile robots working alongside humans while matching the precision performance of industrial...

  6. Electrical signature analysis to quantify human and animal performance on fitness and therapy equipment such as a treadmill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daryl F.; Hochanadel, Charles D.; Haynes, Howard D.

    2010-05-18

    The invention is a human and animal performance data acquisition, analysis, and diagnostic system for fitness and therapy devices having an interface box removably disposed on incoming power wiring to a fitness and therapy device, at least one current transducer removably disposed on said interface box for sensing current signals to said fitness and therapy device, and a means for analyzing, displaying, and reporting said current signals to determine human and animal performance on said device using measurable parameters.

  7. In Vivo Determination of Vitamin D Function Using Transgenic Mice Carrying a Human Osteocalcin Luciferase Reporter Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Nakanishi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is an essential factor for ossification, and its deficiency causes rickets. Osteocalcin, which is a noncollagenous protein found in bone matrix and involved in mineralization and calcium ion homeostasis, is one of the major bone morphogenetic markers and is used in the evaluation of osteoblast maturation and osteogenic activation. We established transgenic mouse line expressing luciferase under the control of a 10-kb osteocalcin enhancer/promoter sequence. Using these transgenic mice, we evaluated the active forms of vitamins D2 and D3 for their bone morphogenetic function by in vivo bioluminescence. As the result, strong activity for ossification was observed with 1α,25-hydroxyvitamin D3. Our mouse system can offer a feasible detection method for assessment of osteogenic activity in the development of functional foods and medicines by noninvasive screening.

  8. Supplementation with vitamins C and E inhibits the release of interleukin-6 from contracting human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Christian P; Hiscock, Natalie J; Penkowa, Milena

    2004-01-01

    (6 h). Leg blood flow was measured using Doppler ultrasonography. Plasma IL-6 concentration was measured in blood sampled from the femoral artery and vein. The net release of IL-6 was calculated using Fick's principle. Plasma vitamin C and E concentrations were elevated in Treatment compared...... in Control, but not in Treatment. In conclusion, our results show that supplementation with vitamins C and E attenuated the systemic IL-6 response to exercise primarily via inhibition of the IL-6 protein release from the contracting skeletal muscle per se....... (Treatment versus Control: 7.9 pg ml(-1), 95% confidence interval (CI) 6.0-10.7 pg ml(-1), versus 19.7 pg ml(-1), CI 13.8-29.4 pg ml(-1), at 3.5 h, P C-reactive protein and cortisol levels all increased after the exercise...

  9. Transrepression of the estrogen receptor promoter by calcitriol in human breast cancer cells via two negative vitamin D response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Srilatha; Krishnan, Aruna V; Peng, Lihong; Lundqvist, Johan; Feldman, David

    2013-08-01

    Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3), the hormonally active metabolite of vitamin D, exerts its anti-proliferative activity in breast cancer (BCa) cells by multiple mechanisms including the downregulation of the expression of estrogen receptor α (ER). We analyzed an ∼3.5 kb ER promoter sequence and demonstrated the presence of two potential negative vitamin D response elements (nVDREs), a newly identified putative nVDRE upstream at -2488 to -2473 bp (distal nVDRE) and a previously published sequence (proximal nVDRE) at -94 to -70 bp proximal to the P1 start site. Transactivation analysis using ER promoter deletion constructs and heterologous promoter-reporter constructs revealed that both nVDREs functioned to mediate calcitriol transrepression. In the electrophoretic mobility shift assay, the vitamin D receptor (VDR) showed strong binding to both nVDREs in the presence of calcitriol, and the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated the recruitment of the VDR to the distal nVDRE site. Mutations in the 5' hexameric DNA sequence of the distal nVDRE resulted in the loss of calcitriol-mediated transrepression and the inhibition of protein-DNA complex formation, demonstrating the importance of these nucleotides in VDR DNA binding and transrepression. A putative nuclear factor-Y (NFY) binding site, identified within the distal nVDRE, led to the findings that NFY bound to the distal nVDRE site interfered with the binding of the VDR at the site and reduced calcitriol-mediated transrepression. In conclusion, the ER promoter region contains two negative VDREs that act in concert to bind to the VDR and both nVDREs are required for the maximal inhibition of ER expression by calcitriol. The suppression of ER expression and estrogen-mediated signaling by calcitriol in BCa cells suggests that vitamin D may be useful in the treatment of ER+ BCa.

  10. Gene expression profiles in human and mouse primary cells provide new insights into the differential actions of vitamin D3 metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pentti Tuohimaa

    Full Text Available 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH2D3 had earlier been regarded as the only active hormone. The newly identified actions of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OHD3 and 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (24R,25(OH2D3 broadened the vitamin D3 endocrine system, however, the current data are fragmented and a systematic understanding is lacking. Here we performed the first systematic study of global gene expression to clarify their similarities and differences. Three metabolites at physiologically comparable levels were utilized to treat human and mouse fibroblasts prior to DNA microarray analyses. Human primary prostate stromal P29SN cells (hP29SN, which convert 25(OHD3 into 1α,25(OH2D3 by 1α-hydroxylase (encoded by the gene CYP27B1, displayed regulation of 164, 171, and 175 genes by treatment with 1α,25(OH2D3, 25(OHD3, and 24R,25(OH2D3, respectively. Mouse primary Cyp27b1 knockout fibroblasts (mCyp27b1 (-/-, which lack 1α-hydroxylation, displayed regulation of 619, 469, and 66 genes using the same respective treatments. The number of shared genes regulated by two metabolites is much lower in hP29SN than in mCyp27b1 (-/-. By using DAVID Functional Annotation Bioinformatics Microarray Analysis tools and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, we identified the agonistic regulation of calcium homeostasis and bone remodeling between 1α,25(OH2D3 and 25(OHD3 and unique non-classical actions of each metabolite in physiological and pathological processes, including cell cycle, keratinocyte differentiation, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis signaling, gene transcription, immunomodulation, epigenetics, cell differentiation, and membrane protein expression. In conclusion, there are three distinct vitamin D3 hormones with clearly different biological activities. This study presents a new conceptual insight into the vitamin D3 endocrine system, which may guide the strategic use of vitamin D3 in disease prevention and treatment.

  11. Formulation of vitamin D encapsulated cinnamon oil nanoemulsion: Its potential anti-cancerous activity in human alveolar carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghani, Nikita; Patel, Pal; Kansara, Krupa; Ranjan, Shivendu; Dasgupta, Nandita; Ramalingam, Chidambaram; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2018-06-01

    Cinnamon oil is used for medicinal purpose since ancient time because of its antioxidant activity. Oil-in-water nanoemulsion (NE) of cinnamon oil was formulated using cinnamon oil, nonionic surfactant Tween 80 and water by ultrasonication technique. Phase diagram was constructed to investigate the influence of oil, water and surfactant concentration. Vitamin D encapsulated cinnamon oil NE was fabricated by wash out method followed by ultrasonication in similar fashion. The hydrodynamic size of cinnamon oil NE and vitamin D encapsulated cinnamon oil NE was observed as 40.52 and 48.96 nm in complete DMEM F12 media respectively. We focused on the cytotoxic and genotoxic responses of NEs in A549 cells in concentration dependent manner. We observed that both NEs induce DNA damage along with corresponding increase in micronucleus frequency that is evident from the comet and CBMN assay. Both the NEs arrested the cell cycle progression in G0/G1 phase, showed increased expression of Bax, capase-3 and caspase-9 and decrease expression of BcL2 proteins along with significant (p oil as carrier for lipophilic nutraceutical like vitamin D. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of vitamin C and E supplementation on total antioxidant content of human breastmilk and infant urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarban, Asghar; Toroghi, Mahsa Mostafavi; Asli, Marziye; Jafari, Masumeh; Vejdan, Morteza; Sharifzadeh, Gholamreza

    2015-05-01

    After delivery and birth, mothers and neonates are exposed to oxidative stress. The present study examined the effect of supplementation of the diet of breastfeeding mothers with vitamin C and E to improve the antioxidant content of breastmilk and evidence of antioxidant activity in infant urine. The subjects were 60 healthy lactating breastfeeding mothers and their infants 1-6 months of age. They were randomly allocated to a control group (n=30) consuming a free diet or an experimental group (n=30) consuming a free diet supplemented each day with effervescent tablets of vitamin C (500 mg) and chewable tablets of vitamin E (100 IU). After 30 days, the total antioxidant content of the mothers' breastmilk and evidence of antioxidant activity in the infants' urine were measured by the ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay. The free radical scavenging activity of the urine samples was measured by the α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl method. Differences pre- and postintervention were compared within and between the groups. Significantly higher levels of antioxidants in the breastmilk (610±295.5 to 716±237.5 μmol/L) and infant urine (43.2±21.8 to 75.0±49.2 μmol/mg creatinine) were observed in the experimental group over the control group (pvitamin C and E supplements appears to have a positive effect on total antioxidant content of breastmilk and evidence of antioxidant activity in infant urine.

  13. Sub-apoptotic dosages of pro-oxidant vitamin cocktails sensitize human melanoma cells to NK cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremante, Elisa; Santarelli, Lory; Lo Monaco, Elisa; Sampaoli, Camilla; Ingegnere, Tiziano; Guerrieri, Roberto; Tomasetti, Marco; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2015-10-13

    Alpha-tocopheryl succinate (αTOS), vitamin K3 (VK3) and vitamin C (ascorbic acid, AA) were previously shown to synergistically promote different death pathways in carcinoma cells, depending on their concentrations and combinations. Similar effects were observed herein in melanoma cells, although αTOS behaved as an antagonist. Interestingly, suboptimal cell death-inducing concentrations (1.5 μM αTOS/20 μM AA/0.2 μM VK3) effectively up-regulated activating Natural Killer (NK) cell ligands, including MICA (the stress-signaling ligand of the NKG2D receptor), and/or the ligands of at least one of the natural cytotoxicity receptors (NKp30, NKp44 and NKp46) in 5/6 melanoma cell lines. Only an isolated MICA down-regulation was seen. HLA class I, HLA class II, ULBP1, ULBP2, ULBP3, Nectin-2, and PVR displayed little, if any, change in expression. Ligand up-regulation resulted in improved lysis by polyclonal NK cells armed with the corresponding activating receptors. These results provide the first evidence for concerted induction of cell death by cell-autonomous and extrinsic (immune) mechanisms. Alarming the immune system much below the cell damage threshold may have evolved as a sensitive readout of neoplastic transformation and oxidative stress. Cocktails of vitamin analogues at slightly supra-physiological dosages may find application as mild complements of melanoma treatment, and in chemoprevention.

  14. Kinetics, bioavailability, and metabolism of RRR-alpha-tocopherol in humans supports lower requirement for vitamin E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinetic models enable nutrient needs and kinetic behaviors to be quantified and provide mechanistic insights into metabolism. Therefore, we modeled and quantified the kinetics, bioavailability and metabolism of RRR-alpha-tocopherol in 12 healthy adults. Six men and six women, aged 27 ± 6 y, each i...

  15. Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body that produces vitamin D. As many of us spend more and more time on computers and game consoles, we're not outdoors as much as we once were. And, when we do spend time in the sun, more of us are making the wise decision to use sunscreen ...

  16. Threatened species richness along a Himalayan elevational gradient: quantifying the influences of human population density, range size, and geometric constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Prakash Kumar; Sipos, Jan; Brodie, Jedediah F

    2018-02-07

    A crucial step in conserving biodiversity is to identify the distributions of threatened species and the factors associated with species threat status. In the biodiversity hotspot of the Himalaya, very little is known about which locations harbour the highest diversity of threatened species and whether diversity of such species is related to area, mid-domain effects (MDE), range size, or human density. In this study, we assessed the drivers of variation in richness of threatened birds, mammals, reptiles, actinopterygii, and amphibians along an elevational gradient in Nepal Himalaya. Although geometric constraints (MDE), species range size, and human population density were significantly related to threatened species richness, the interaction between range size and human population density was of greater importance. Threatened species richness was positively associated with human population density and negatively associated with range size. In areas with high richness of threatened species, species ranges tend to be small. The preponderance of species at risk of extinction at low elevations in the subtropical biodiversity hotspot could be due to the double impact of smaller range sizes and higher human density.

  17. Determination of water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins in tears and blood serum of infants and parents by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaksari, Maryam; Mazzoleni, Lynn R; Ruan, Chunhai; Kennedy, Robert T; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2017-02-01

    Tears serve as a viable diagnostic fluid with advantages including less invasive sample to collect and less complex to prepare for analysis. Several water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins were detected and quantified in human tears and compared with blood serum levels. Samples from 15 family pairs, each pair consisting of a four-month-old infant and one parent were analyzed; vitamin concentrations were compared between tears and blood serum for individual subjects, between infants and parents, and against self-reported dietary intakes. Water-soluble vitamins B 1 , B 2 , B 3 (nicotinamide), B 5 , B 9 and fat-soluble vitamin E (α-tocopherol) were routinely detected in tears and blood serum while fat-soluble vitamin A (retinol) was detected only in blood serum. Water-soluble vitamin concentrations measured in tears and blood serum of single subjects were comparable, while higher concentrations were measured in infants compared to their parents. Fat-soluble vitamin E concentrations were lower in tears than blood serum with no significant difference between infants and parents. Serum vitamin A concentrations were higher in parents than infants. Population trends were compiled and quantified using a cross correlation factor. Strong positive correlations were found between tear and blood serum concentrations of vitamin E from infants and parents and vitamin B 3 concentrations from parents, while slight positive correlations were detected for infants B 3 and parents B 1 and B 2 concentrations. Correlations between infants and parents were found for the concentrations of B 1 , B 2 , B 3 , and E in tears, and the concentrations of B 2, A, and E in blood serum. Stronger vitamin concentration correlations were found between infants and parents for the breast-fed infants, while no significant difference was observed between breast-fed and bottle-fed infants. This work is the first to demonstrate simultaneous vitamin A, B, and E detection and to quantify correlations between

  18. Photoprotection and vitamin D status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springbett, Peter; Buglass, Surhi; Young, Antony R

    2010-11-03

    The adverse effects of solar ultraviolet radiation on the skin are well documented, especially in fair-skinned people. These can be ameliorated by photoprotection strategies advocated by many public health bodies and typically include sun avoidance, sunscreen use and clothing. The UVB waveband which is the main cause of all adverse effects investigated in the laboratory to date is also the waveband for vitamin D photosynthesis which is the only established benefit of solar exposure. This is especially important because solar UVB is the main source of vitamin D for most people. There is increasing evidence that vitamin D plays a much greater role in human health than was previously thought. This has given rise to concerns that photoprotection, especially sunscreen use, could adversely affect vitamin D status and human health. Furthermore, it is stated that people with heavily pigmented skins often have poor vitamin D status because of photoprotection by melanin. In this paper we review the effect of photoprotection strategies and pigmentation on vitamin D status. Clothing can clearly be very effective at inhibiting vitamin D synthesis. Sunscreens are effective in theory and some limited human studies support this. However, most studies show little or no effect and the most likely reason for this is that sunscreens have not been applied in the manner that was used to determine their labelled index of protection against sunburn. This could change in the future if public health campaigns and the sunscreen industry are successful in encouraging the public to apply sunscreens more liberally and/or use much higher levels of labelled protection. The role of melanin on vitamin D status is not clear and requires further investigation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. A novel video-tracking system to quantify the behaviour of nocturnal mosquitoes attacking human hosts in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angarita-Jaimes, N C; Parker, J E A; Abe, M; Mashauri, F; Martine, J; Towers, C E; McCall, P J; Towers, D P

    2016-04-01

    Many vectors of malaria and other infections spend most of their adult life within human homes, the environment where they bloodfeed and rest, and where control has been most successful. Yet, knowledge of peri-domestic mosquito behaviour is limited, particularly how mosquitoes find and attack human hosts or how insecticides impact on behaviour. This is partly because technology for tracking mosquitoes in their natural habitats, traditional dwellings in disease-endemic countries, has never been available. We describe a sensing device that enables observation and recording of nocturnal mosquitoes attacking humans with or without a bed net, in the laboratory and in rural Africa. The device addresses requirements for sub-millimetre resolution over a 2.0 × 1.2 × 2.0 m volume while using minimum irradiance. Data processing strategies to extract individual mosquito trajectories and algorithms to describe behaviour during host/net interactions are introduced. Results from UK laboratory and Tanzanian field tests showed that Culex quinquefasciatus activity was higher and focused on the bed net roof when a human host was present, in colonized and wild populations. Both C. quinquefasciatus and Anopheles gambiae exhibited similar behavioural modes, with average flight velocities varying by less than 10%. The system offers considerable potential for investigations in vector biology and many other fields. © 2016 The Authors.

  20. ELISA MEASUREMENT OF STACHYLYSIN (TM) IN SERUM TO QUANTIFY HUMAN EXPOSURES TO THE INDOOR MOLD STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibodies were produced against the hemolytic agent stachylysin obtained from the mold Stachybotryis chartarum. These antibodies were used to develop two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods for the analysis of stachylysin in human and rat sera and environmental sa...

  1. Vitamins and cancer prevention: issues and dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, V R; Newberne, P M

    1981-03-01

    Vitamins are a class of organic compounds that are components of an adequate diet. They or their derivatives function as coenzymes, cellular antioxidants, and/or regulators of gene expression. Fourteen vitamins are recognized in human nutrition (Vitamins A, D, E, K, B1, B2, B6, B12, C, niacin, folacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, choline), with deficiencies or excesses in intake leading to changes in protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrates, fat and/or mineral metabolism. Thus, the integrity of physiological systems, including those associated with detoxification, cellular repair, immune processes, and neural and endocrine function, depends upon the nutritional and vitamin status of the host. For these reasons, it may be anticipated that the adequacy of the vitamin supply to cells and tissues would affect the development, progress, and outcome of cancers. In this review, the definition and functions of and requirements and recommended allowance for vitamins are discussed briefly before exploring the evidence, largely from studies in experimental animals, that indicates the nature of the link between vitamins and cancer. Although evidence based on studies in animal systems reveals that vitamin intake and status can modulate the outcome of experimental carcinogenesis, the findings are often conflicting and difficult to interpret. Furthermore, it is not yet possible to develop a suitable prediction of the role of the individual vitamins in tumor development. The significance of these observations for human nutrition and cancer prevention, particularly in reference to ascorbic acid (vitamin C), vitamin E, and B-complex vitamins is considered. Vitamin A and retinoid compounds are discussed elsewhere in the symposium. The many popular misconceptions and unsound advice concerning vitamins and health, including "fake" vitamins-pangamic acid ("vitamin B15") and laetrile ("vitamin B17")-are also discussed. On the basis of current evidence, it would be inappropriate to recommend

  2. Effect of the vitamin B12-binding protein haptocorrin present in human milk on a panel of commensal and pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nexø Ebba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haptocorrin is a vitamin B12-binding protein present in high amounts in different body fluids including human milk. Haptocorrin has previously been shown to inhibit the growth of specific E. coli strains, and the aim of the present study was to elucidate whether the antibacterial properties of this protein may exert a general defense against pathogens and/or affect the composition of the developing microbiota in the gastrointestinal tracts of breastfed infants. Findings The present work was the first systematic study of the effect of haptocorrin on bacterial growth, and included 34 commensal and pathogenic bacteria to which infants are likely to be exposed. Well-diffusion assays addressing antibacterial effects were performed with human milk, haptocorrin-free human milk, porcine holo-haptocorrin (saturated with B-12 and human apo-haptocorrin (unsaturated. Human milk inhibited the growth of S. thermophilus and the pathogenic strains L. monocytogenes LO28, L. monocytogenes 4446 and L. monocytogenes 7291, but the inhibition could not be ascribed to haptocorrin. Human apo-haptocorrin inhibited the growth of only a single bacterial strain (Bifidobacterium breve, while porcine holo-haptocorrin did not show any inhibitory effect. Conclusions Our results suggest that haptocorrin does not have a general antibacterial activity, and thereby contradict the existing hypothesis implicating such an effect. The study contributes to the knowledge on the potential impact of breastfeeding on the establishment of a healthy microbiota in infants.

  3. Quantified Faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette-Marie Zacher

    2016-01-01

    artist Marnix de Nijs' Physiognomic Scrutinizer is an interactive installation whereby the viewer's face is scanned and identified with historical figures. The American artist Zach Blas' project Fag Face Mask consists of three-dimensional portraits that blend biometric facial data from 30 gay men's faces...... and critically examine bias in surveillance technologies, as well as scientific investigations, regarding the stereotyping mode of the human gaze. The American artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg creates three-dimensional portraits of persons she has “identified” from their garbage. Her project from 2013 entitled...

  4. Using Neural Pattern Classifiers to Quantify the Modularity of Conflict–Control Mechanisms in the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiefeng; Egner, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Resolving conflicting sensory and motor representations is a core function of cognitive control, but it remains uncertain to what degree control over different sources of conflict is implemented by shared (domain general) or distinct (domain specific) neural resources. Behavioral data suggest conflict–control to be domain specific, but results from neuroimaging studies have been ambivalent. Here, we employed multivoxel pattern analyses that can decode a brain region's informational content, allowing us to distinguish incidental activation overlap from actual shared information processing. We trained independent sets of “searchlight” classifiers on functional magnetic resonance imaging data to decode control processes associated with stimulus-conflict (Stroop task) and ideomotor-conflict (Simon task). Quantifying the proportion of domain-specific searchlights (capable of decoding only one type of conflict) and domain-general searchlights (capable of decoding both conflict types) in each subject, we found both domain-specific and domain-general searchlights, though the former were more common. When mapping anatomical loci of these searchlights across subjects, neural substrates of stimulus- and ideomotor-specific conflict–control were found to be anatomically consistent across subjects, whereas the substrates of domain-general conflict–control were not. Overall, these findings suggest a hybrid neural architecture of conflict–control that entails both modular (domain specific) and global (domain general) components. PMID:23402762

  5. Using neural pattern classifiers to quantify the modularity of conflict-control mechanisms in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiefeng; Egner, Tobias

    2014-07-01

    Resolving conflicting sensory and motor representations is a core function of cognitive control, but it remains uncertain to what degree control over different sources of conflict is implemented by shared (domain general) or distinct (domain specific) neural resources. Behavioral data suggest conflict-control to be domain specific, but results from neuroimaging studies have been ambivalent. Here, we employed multivoxel pattern analyses that can decode a brain region's informational content, allowing us to distinguish incidental activation overlap from actual shared information processing. We trained independent sets of "searchlight" classifiers on functional magnetic resonance imaging data to decode control processes associated with stimulus-conflict (Stroop task) and ideomotor-conflict (Simon task). Quantifying the proportion of domain-specific searchlights (capable of decoding only one type of conflict) and domain-general searchlights (capable of decoding both conflict types) in each subject, we found both domain-specific and domain-general searchlights, though the former were more common. When mapping anatomical loci of these searchlights across subjects, neural substrates of stimulus- and ideomotor-specific conflict-control were found to be anatomically consistent across subjects, whereas the substrates of domain-general conflict-control were not. Overall, these findings suggest a hybrid neural architecture of conflict-control that entails both modular (domain specific) and global (domain general) components. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Human O-sulfated metabolites of (-)-epicatechin and methyl-(-)-epicatechin are poor substrates for commercial aryl-sulfatases: implications for studies concerned with quantifying epicatechin bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S; Hollands, W; Needs, P W; Ostertag, L M; de Roos, B; Duthie, G G; Kroon, P A

    2012-06-01

    Epicatechin is a widely consumed dietary flavonoid and there is substantial evidence that it contributes to the health benefits reported for flavanol-rich cocoa products including dark chocolate. Numerous reports have described the appearance of epicatechin and epicatechin phase-2 conjugates (sulfates and glucuronides of epicatechin and methylepicatechin) in blood and urine samples of subjects following ingestion of epicatechin. The most widely reported method of quantifying total epicatechin in plasma and urine samples involves hydrolysis with a mixture of β-glucuronidase and sulfatase to convert the conjugates to epicatechin aglycone which is subsequently quantified. We observed a lack of hydrolysis of epicatechin sulfates and methylepicatechin sulfates using commercial sulfatases and investigated this further. Samples of urine or plasma from subjects who had consumed epicatechin were subjected to enzyme hydrolysis and then analysed using LC-MS/MS, or analysed without enzyme hydrolysis. Attempts to increase the extent of hydrolysis of epicatechin conjugates were made by increasing the amount of enzyme, hydrolysis pH and length of incubations, and using alternative sources of enzyme. The standard hydrolysis conditions failed to hydrolyse the majority of epicatechin sulfates and methylepicatechin sulfates. Even when the quantity of enzyme and incubation period was increased, the pH optimised, or alternative sources of sulfatases were used, epicatechin monosulfates and methylepicatechin monosulfates remained as major peaks in the chromatograms of the samples. An assessment of literature data strongly suggested that the majority of reports where enzyme hydrolysis was used had significantly underestimated epicatechin bioavailability in humans. Methods for quantifying epicatechin concentrations in blood and urine need to take account of the lack of hydrolysis of (methyl)epicatechin-sulfates, for example by quantifying these directly using LC-MS/MS. Copyright © 2012

  7. VITAMIN INTAKE: REAL NECESSARY OR DANGEROUS EXCESS?

    OpenAIRE

    R.M. Torshkhoeva; L.S. Namazova; I.A. Gromov; E.A. Vishneva; V.A. Barannik; A.A. Alekseeva

    2007-01-01

    Vitamins are biologically active substances, which regulate many biochemical processes within the human body. in modern conditions, peculiarities of the household and children's nourishment do not allow for complete satisfaction of the need in all the vitamins only thanks to the food. In relation to this, it's quite desirable to provide the additional inflow of the vitamins into the child's body, which may be performed through the individual intake of the children's multivitamin medications.K...

  8. UVR: sun, lamps, pigmentation and vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, C M; Philipsen, P A; Wulf, H C

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has important and significant consequences on human health. Recently, there has been renewed interest in the beneficial effects of UVR. This perspective gives an introduction to the solar spectrum, UV lamps, UV dosimetry, skin pigment and vitamin D....... The health benefits of UVR exposure through vitamin D production or non-vitamin D pathways will be discussed in this themed issue in the following articles....

  9. Use of performance shaping factors and quantified expert judgment in the evaluation of human reliability: an initial appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrey, D.E.

    1983-05-01

    The first part of the report considers the nature of human reliability assessment, and the techniques currently employed. It is concluded that most approaches are limited by the availability of data. Approaches to the subjective assessment of error are surveyed. A particular technique which has been developed, the Success Likelihood Index Methodology (SLIM), is described in detail, together with the practical steps for its implementation. The results from a trial application of a questionnaire designed to elicit judges' perceptions of the relative importance of performance shaping factors in determining human reliability are analyzed. A revised form of the questionnaire is presented for future use. A pilot experiment to investigate the relationship between subjectively derived indices of success for six tasks and their objective probability of success is described. The results indicate that the SLIM has potential value as a predictive technique. Some requirements for a program of research to produce a generally applicable methodology are set out

  10. Single-cell force spectroscopy as a technique to quantify human red blood cell adhesion to subendothelial laminin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciaszek, Jamie L; Partola, Kostyantyn; Zhang, Jing; Andemariam, Biree; Lykotrafitis, George

    2014-12-18

    Single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based assay, enables quantitative study of cell adhesion while maintaining the native state of surface receptors in physiological conditions. Human healthy and pathological red blood cells (RBCs) express a large number of surface proteins which mediate cell-cell interactions, or cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In particular, RBCs adhere with high affinity to subendothelial matrix laminin via the basal cell adhesion molecule and Lutheran protein (BCAM/Lu). Here, we established SCFS as an in vitro technique to study human RBC adhesion at baseline and following biochemical treatment. Using blood obtained from healthy human subjects, we recorded adhesion forces from single RBCs attached to AFM cantilevers as the cell was pulled-off of substrates coated with laminin protein. We found that an increase in the overall cell adhesion measured via SCFS is correlated with an increase in the resultant total force measured on 1 µm(2) areas of the RBC membrane. Further, we showed that SCFS can detect significant changes in the adhesive response of RBCs to modulation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Lastly, we identified variability in the RBC adhesion force to laminin amongst the human subjects, suggesting that RBCs maintain diverse levels of active BCAM/Lu adhesion receptors. By using single-cell measurements, we established a powerful new method for the quantitative measurement of single RBC adhesion with specific receptor-mediated binding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Vitamins, Minerals, and Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Crawford, Susan G.; Field, Catherine J.; Simpson, J. Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the breadth and depth of published research linking dietary vitamins and minerals (micronutrients) to mood. Since the 1920s, there have been many studies on individual vitamins (especially B vitamins and Vitamins C, D, and E), minerals (calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium), and vitamin-like…

  12. The role of vitamins in the diet of the elderly II. Water-soluble vitamins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csapó J.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Following a presentation of humans’ water-soluble vitamin requirements, the authors will discuss in detail the role these vitamins play in human organism and outline those major biochemical processes that are negatively affected in the body in case of vitamin deficiency. They point out that in the elderly population of developed countries cases of water-soluble vitamin deficiency are extremely rare and they are due to the lack of dietary vitamin, but mostly to the vitamin being released from its bindings, the difficulty of free vitamin absorption, gastrointestinal problems, medication, and often alcoholism. Among water-soluble vitamins, B12 is the only one with a sufficient storage level in the body, capable of preventing deficiency symptoms for a long period of time in cases of vitamin-deficient nutrition. Each type of vitamin is dealt with separately in discussing the beneficial outcomes of their overconsumption regarding health, while the authors of the article also present cases with contradictory results. Daily requirements are set forth for every water-soluble vitamin and information is provided on the types of nutrients that help us to the water-soluble vitamins essential for the organism.

  13. Quantifying the environmental impact of an integrated human/industrial-natural system using life cycle assessment; a case study on a forest and wood processing chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaubroeck, Thomas; Alvarenga, Rodrigo A F; Verheyen, Kris; Muys, Bart; Dewulf, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a tool to assess the environmental sustainability of a product; it quantifies the environmental impact of a product's life cycle. In conventional LCAs, the boundaries of a product's life cycle are limited to the human/industrial system, the technosphere. Ecosystems, which provide resources to and take up emissions from the technosphere, are not included in those boundaries. However, similar to the technosphere, ecosystems also have an impact on their (surrounding) environment through their resource usage (e.g., nutrients) and emissions (e.g., CH4). We therefore propose a LCA framework to assess the impact of integrated Techno-Ecological Systems (TES), comprising relevant ecosystems and the technosphere. In our framework, ecosystems are accounted for in the same manner as technosphere compartments. Also, the remediating effect of uptake of pollutants, an ecosystem service, is considered. A case study was performed on a TES of sawn timber production encompassing wood growth in an intensively managed forest ecosystem and further industrial processing. Results show that the managed forest accounted for almost all resource usage and biodiversity loss through land occupation but also for a remediating effect on human health, mostly via capture of airborne fine particles. These findings illustrate the potential relevance of including ecosystems in the product's life cycle of a LCA, though further research is needed to better quantify the environmental impact of TES.

  14. Quantifying human impacts on hydrological drought using a combined modelling approach in a tropical river basin in central Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. M. Firoz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological droughts are one of the most damaging disasters in terms of economic loss in central Vietnam and other regions of South-east Asia, severely affecting agricultural production and drinking water supply. Their increasing frequency and severity can be attributed to extended dry spells and increasing water abstractions for e.g. irrigation and hydropower development to meet the demand of dynamic socioeconomic development. Based on hydro-climatic data for the period from 1980 to 2013 and reservoir operation data, the impacts of recent hydropower development and other alterations of the hydrological network on downstream streamflow and drought risk were assessed for a mesoscale basin of steep topography in central Vietnam, the Vu Gia Thu Bon (VGTB River basin. The Just Another Modelling System (JAMS/J2000 was calibrated for the VGTB River basin to simulate reservoir inflow and the naturalized discharge time series for the downstream gauging stations. The HEC-ResSim reservoir operation model simulated reservoir outflow from eight major hydropower stations as well as the reconstructed streamflow for the main river branches Vu Gia and Thu Bon. Drought duration, severity, and frequency were analysed for different timescales for the naturalized and reconstructed streamflow by applying the daily varying threshold method. Efficiency statistics for both models show good results. A strong impact of reservoir operation on downstream discharge at the daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual scales was detected for four discharge stations relevant for downstream water allocation. We found a stronger hydrological drought risk for the Vu Gia river supplying water to the city of Da Nang and large irrigation systems especially in the dry season. We conclude that the calibrated model set-up provides a valuable tool to quantify the different origins of drought to support cross-sectorial water management and planning in a suitable way to be transferred to similar

  15. Quantifying human impacts on hydrological drought using a combined modelling approach in a tropical river basin in central Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoz, A. B. M.; Nauditt, Alexandra; Fink, Manfred; Ribbe, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Hydrological droughts are one of the most damaging disasters in terms of economic loss in central Vietnam and other regions of South-east Asia, severely affecting agricultural production and drinking water supply. Their increasing frequency and severity can be attributed to extended dry spells and increasing water abstractions for e.g. irrigation and hydropower development to meet the demand of dynamic socioeconomic development. Based on hydro-climatic data for the period from 1980 to 2013 and reservoir operation data, the impacts of recent hydropower development and other alterations of the hydrological network on downstream streamflow and drought risk were assessed for a mesoscale basin of steep topography in central Vietnam, the Vu Gia Thu Bon (VGTB) River basin. The Just Another Modelling System (JAMS)/J2000 was calibrated for the VGTB River basin to simulate reservoir inflow and the naturalized discharge time series for the downstream gauging stations. The HEC-ResSim reservoir operation model simulated reservoir outflow from eight major hydropower stations as well as the reconstructed streamflow for the main river branches Vu Gia and Thu Bon. Drought duration, severity, and frequency were analysed for different timescales for the naturalized and reconstructed streamflow by applying the daily varying threshold method. Efficiency statistics for both models show good results. A strong impact of reservoir operation on downstream discharge at the daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual scales was detected for four discharge stations relevant for downstream water allocation. We found a stronger hydrological drought risk for the Vu Gia river supplying water to the city of Da Nang and large irrigation systems especially in the dry season. We conclude that the calibrated model set-up provides a valuable tool to quantify the different origins of drought to support cross-sectorial water management and planning in a suitable way to be transferred to similar river basins.

  16. Rapid solid-phase extraction method to quantify [11C]-verapamil, and its [11C]-metabolites, in human and macaque plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unadkat, Jashvant D.; Chung, Francisco; Sasongko, Lucy; Whittington, Dale; Eyal, Sara; Mankoff, David; Collier, Ann C.; Muzi, Mark; Link, Jeanne

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux transporter, is a significant barrier to drug entry into the brain and the fetus. The positron emission tomography (PET) ligand, [ 11 C]-verapamil, has been used to measure in vivo P-gp activity at various tissue-blood barriers of humans and animals. Since verapamil is extensively metabolized in vivo, it is important to quantify the extent of verapamil metabolism in order to interpret such P-gp activity. Therefore, we developed a rapid solid-phase extraction (SPE) method to separate, and then quantify, verapamil and its radiolabeled metabolites in plasma. Methods: Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), we established that the major identifiable circulating radioactive metabolite of [ 11 C]-verapamil in plasma of humans and the nonhuman primate, Macaca nemestrina, was [ 11 C]-D-617/717. Using sequential and differential pH elution on C 8 SPE cartridges, we developed a rapid method to separate [ 11 C]-verapamil and [ 11 C]-D-617/717. Recovery was measured by spiking the samples with the corresponding nonradioactive compounds and assaying these compounds by HPLC. Results: Verapamil and D-617/717 recovery with the SPE method was >85%. When the method was applied to PET studies in humans and nonhuman primates, significant plasma concentration of D-617/717 and unknown polar metabolite(s) were observed. The SPE and the HPLC methods were not significantly different in the quantification of verapamil and D-617/717. Conclusions: The SPE method simultaneously processes multiple samples in less than 5 min. Given the short half-life of [ 11 C], this method provides a valuable tool to rapidly determine the concentration of [ 11 C]-verapamil and its [ 11 C]-metabolites in human and nonhuman primate plasma

  17. Rapid solid-phase extraction method to quantify [{sup 11}C]-verapamil, and its [{sup 11}C]-metabolites, in human and macaque plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unadkat, Jashvant D. [Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington, Box 357610, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)], E-mail: jash@u.washington.edu; Chung, Francisco; Sasongko, Lucy; Whittington, Dale; Eyal, Sara [Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington, Box 357610, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Mankoff, David [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Collier, Ann C. [Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Box 359929, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Muzi, Mark; Link, Jeanne [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Introduction: P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux transporter, is a significant barrier to drug entry into the brain and the fetus. The positron emission tomography (PET) ligand, [{sup 11}C]-verapamil, has been used to measure in vivo P-gp activity at various tissue-blood barriers of humans and animals. Since verapamil is extensively metabolized in vivo, it is important to quantify the extent of verapamil metabolism in order to interpret such P-gp activity. Therefore, we developed a rapid solid-phase extraction (SPE) method to separate, and then quantify, verapamil and its radiolabeled metabolites in plasma. Methods: Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), we established that the major identifiable circulating radioactive metabolite of [{sup 11}C]-verapamil in plasma of humans and the nonhuman primate, Macaca nemestrina, was [{sup 11}C]-D-617/717. Using sequential and differential pH elution on C{sub 8} SPE cartridges, we developed a rapid method to separate [{sup 11}C]-verapamil and [{sup 11}C]-D-617/717. Recovery was measured by spiking the samples with the corresponding nonradioactive compounds and assaying these compounds by HPLC. Results: Verapamil and D-617/717 recovery with the SPE method was >85%. When the method was applied to PET studies in humans and nonhuman primates, significant plasma concentration of D-617/717 and unknown polar metabolite(s) were observed. The SPE and the HPLC methods were not significantly different in the quantification of verapamil and D-617/717. Conclusions: The SPE method simultaneously processes multiple samples in less than 5 min. Given the short half-life of [{sup 11}C], this method provides a valuable tool to rapidly determine the concentration of [{sup 11}C]-verapamil and its [{sup 11}C]-metabolites in human and nonhuman primate plasma.

  18. The efficacy of topical human amniotic membrane-mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium (hAMMSC-CM) and a mixture of topical hAMMSC-CM + vitamin C and hAMMSC-CM + vitamin E on chronic plantar ulcers in leprosy:a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakoeswa, C R S; Natallya, F R; Harnindya, D; Thohiroh, A; Oktaviyanti, R N; Pratiwi, K D; Rubianti, M A; Yogatri, B; Primasari, P I; Herwanto, N; Alinda, M D; Kusumaputra, B H; Astari, L; Listiawan, M Y; Agusni, I; Rantam, F A

    2018-05-10

    Healing of chronic plantar ulcers in leprosy (CPUL) typically takes a long time due to impaired neurological function, thereby reducing the levels of growth factors and cytokines. Cytokines can be found in metabolite products from amniotic membrane stem cells. Chronic ulcers are frequently characterized by high levels of reactive oxygen species. Vitamin E (α-tocopherol) is widely used in skin lesions, owing to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Vitamin C also has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and collagen synthesis properties which are useful in wound healing. Herein, we compared the effects of topical human amniotic membrane-mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium (hAMMSC-CM) alone and with vitamins C and E on healing of CPUL. In this randomized controlled trial, topical agents were applied every 3 days for up to 8 weeks. Ulcer size, side-effects, and possible complications were monitored weekly. Healing percentage increased each week in all groups. Mean difference in ulcer size was highest in the hAMMSC-CM + vitamin E group, implying better progress of wound healing. There were no side-effects or complications. hAMMSC-CM + vitamin E is best for healing of CPUL.

  19. Manipulation of the membrane binding site of vitamin K-dependent proteins: Enhanced biological function of human factor VII

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Amit M.; Kisiel, Walter; Foster, Donald C.; Nelsestuen, Gary L.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that modification of the membrane contact site of vitamin K-dependent proteins may enhance the membrane affinity and function of members of this protein family. The properties of a factor VII mutant, factor VII-Q10E32, relative to wild-type factor VII (VII, containing P10K32), have been compared. Membrane affinity of VII-Q10E32 was about 20-fold higher than that of wild-type factor VII. The rate of autoactivation VII-Q10E32 with soluble tissue factor was 100-fold fast...

  20. How to Quantify Human-environment Interactions in the Past: A Global Historical Land Use Data Set for the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein Goldewijk, K.

    2015-12-01

    Land use plays an important role in the climate system. Many ecosystem processes are directly or indirectly climate driven, and together with human driven land use changes, they determine how the land surface will evolve through time. To assess the effects of land cover changes on the climate system, models are required which are capable of simulating interactions between the involved components of the Earth system. Since driving forces for global environmental change differ among regions, a geographically (spatially) explicit modeling approach is called for, so that it can be incorporated in global and regional (climate and/or biophysical) change models in order to enhance our understanding of the underlying processes and thus improving future projections.Some researchers suggest that mankind has shifted from living in the Holocene (~emergence of agriculture) into the Anthropocene (~humans capable of changing the Earth' atmosphere) since the start of the Industrial Revolution. But in the light of the sheer size and magnitude of some historical land use changes (e.g. the Black Plague in the 14th century and the aftermath of the Colombian Exchange in the 16th century), some believe that this point might have occurred earlier in time. There are still many uncertainties and gaps in our knowledge about the importance of land use (change) in the global biogeochemical cycle, and it is crucial that researchers from other disciplines are involved in decreasing the uncertainties.Thus, integrated records of the co-evolving human-environment system over millennia are needed to provide a basis for a deeper understanding of the present and for forecasting the future. This requires the major task of assembling and integrating regional and global historical, archaeological, and paleo-environmental records. Humans cannot predict the future. Here I present a tool for such long term global change studies; it is the latest update (v 3.2) of the History Database of the Global

  1. Quantifying resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Craig R.; Angeler, David G.

    2016-01-01

    The biosphere is under unprecedented pressure, reflected in rapid changes in our global ecological, social, technological and economic systems. In many cases, ecological and social systems can adapt to these changes over time, but when a critical threshold is surpassed, a system under stress can undergo catastrophic change and reorganize into a different state. The concept of resilience, introduced more than 40 years ago in the ecological sciences, captures the behaviour of systems that can occur in alternative states. The original definition of resilience forwarded by Holling (1973) is still the most useful. It defines resilience as the amount of disturbance that a system can withstand before it shifts into an alternative stable state. The idea of alternative stable states has clear and profound implications for ecological management. Coral reefs, for example, are high-diversity systems that provide key ecosystem services such as fisheries and coastal protection. Human impacts are causing significant, ongoing reef degradation, and many reefs have shifted from coral- to algal-dominated states in response to anthropogenic pressures such as elevated water temperatures and overfishing. Understanding and differentiating between the factors that help maintain reefs in coral-dominated states vs. those that facilitate a shift to an undesired algal-dominated state is a critical step towards sound management and conservation of these, and other, important social–ecological systems.

  2. Winter to summer change in vitamin D status reduces systemic inflammation and bioenergetic activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K. Calton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D status [25(OHD] has recently been reported to be associated with altered cellular bioenergetic profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. No study has tracked the seasonal variation of 25(OHD and its putative influence on whole body energy metabolism, cellular bioenergetic profiles, inflammatory markers and clinical chemistry. Material and methods: Whole body energy metabolism and substrate utilisation were measured by indirect calorimetry. PBMCs obtained from the same subjects were isolated from whole blood, counted and freshly seeded. Bioenergetic analysis (mitochondrial stress test and glycolysis stress test was performed using the Seahorse XFe96 flux analyser. 25(OHD was assessed using the Architect immunoassay method. Results: 25(OHD increased by a median (IQR of 14.40 (20.13 nmol/L (p75 nmol/L. The absolute change in 25(OHD was not associated with altered bioenergetics. Conclusion: Seasonal improvements in 25(OHD was associated with reduced systemic inflammation, PBMC bioenergetic profiles and whole body energy metabolism. These observational changes in PBMC bioenergetics were most pronounced in those who had insufficient 25(OHD in winter. The data warrants confirmation through cause and effect study designs. Keywords: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Bioenergetics, Vitamin D, Season, Inflammation, Insulin sensitivity

  3. CORRECTION OF VITAMIN-DEFICIENT CONDITIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Vishneva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important biochemical processes in human organism are carried out with vitamins and microelements involved. Acting as biological catalysts, vitamins have an impact on metabolism and provide protection against unfavourable environmental factors. The key source of vitamins and microelements for a person is food. The content of vitamins in a diet varies and depends on a range of various reasons. However, now the diet may not fully meet vitamin and microelement requirements. The result of this is widespread prevalence of sub-clinical deficiency of vitamins and microelements. Patients from one of the risk groups, children with atopy, are especially susceptible to this condition. Hypoallergenic diet prescribed as part of the therapeutic measures, is often the cause of imbalanced and irrational nutrition. Modern vitamin complexes may solve the issue of subnormal supply of vitamins and apparent hypovitaminosis in children with allergic diseases.Key words: polyvitamin complexes, atopy, allergic diseases, subnormal supply of vitamins, children.

  4. The RHNumtS compilation: Features and bioinformatics approaches to locate and quantify Human NumtS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saccone Cecilia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To a greater or lesser extent, eukaryotic nuclear genomes contain fragments of their mitochondrial genome counterpart, deriving from the random insertion of damaged mtDNA fragments. NumtS (Nuclear mt Sequences are not equally abundant in all species, and are redundant and polymorphic in terms of copy number. In population and clinical genetics, it is important to have a complete overview of NumtS quantity and location. Searching PubMed for NumtS or Mitochondrial pseudo-genes yields hundreds of papers reporting Human NumtS compilations produced by in silico or wet-lab approaches. A comparison of published compilations clearly shows significant discrepancies among data, due both to unwise application of Bioinformatics methods and to a not yet correctly assembled nuclear genome. To optimize quantification and location of NumtS, we produced a consensus compilation of Human NumtS by applying various bioinformatics approaches. Results Location and quantification of NumtS may be achieved by applying database similarity searching methods: we have applied various methods such as Blastn, MegaBlast and BLAT, changing both parameters and database; the results were compared, further analysed and checked against the already published compilations, thus producing the Reference Human Numt Sequences (RHNumtS compilation. The resulting NumtS total 190. Conclusion The RHNumtS compilation represents a highly reliable reference basis, which may allow designing a lab protocol to test the actual existence of each NumtS. Here we report preliminary results based on PCR amplification and sequencing on 41 NumtS selected from RHNumtS among those with lower score. In parallel, we are currently designing the RHNumtS database structure for implementation in the HmtDB resource. In the future, the same database will host NumtS compilations from other organisms, but these will be generated only when the nuclear genome of a specific organism has reached a high

  5. Facts about Vitamin C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... milligrams of vitamin C every day. Three large strawberries provide 33 milligrams of vitamin C. Figure 1. ... and citrus fruit juices, sweet peppers, papayas, and strawberries. Table 2. Food sources of vitamin C. Food ...

  6. Vitamin D and adolescent health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino R Pérez-López

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Faustino R Pérez-López, Gonzalo Pérez-Roncero, María T López-BaenaGrupo de Investigación sobre Salud de la Mujer en Aragón (GRISAMAR, Universidad de Zaragoza, Hospital Clínico Zaragoza, SpainAbstract: Vitamin D is a hormone sequentially produced at different body sites, and which plays a significant role in human health, particularly bone health. However, other roles are emerging. When the serum concentration of vitamin D is very low, the risk of rickets, osteomalacia and osteoporosis is increased. In children and adolescents there is a high prevalence of low vitamin D status, especially in females and during the winter–the prevalence being lower than during the summer. Although there is no unanimous agreement over the minimum values necessary for good health, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] levels below 20 ng/mL may be regarded as a vitamin D-deficient condition, and levels between 20–30 ng/mL may be the range of vitamin D insufficiency. Mild low levels have been associated with bone mass accrual alterations in children and adolescents, diminished muscle strength, negative cardiovascular outcomes, insulin resistance and obesity, and neurological disorders. Effective preventive strategies are needed to guarantee adequate vitamin D levels throughout childhood and adolescence, taking into account the geographical setting, season of the year, the level of environmental pollution, skin characteristics, eating habits and body weight, with a view to securing optimum health during these phases, and the prevention of complications in adulthood. There needs to be a renewed appreciation of the beneficial effect of moderate sunlight for providing all humans with the vitamin D needed for ensuring good health. Prolonged sun exposure is not advised, however, due to the risk of skin cancer. In addition, a balanced diet is indicated, since vitamin D-rich foods are better assimilated than supplements. When such conditions cannot be met, then the

  7. 25-hydroxyvitamin D circulates in different fractions of calf plasma if the parent compound is vitamin D2 or vitamin D3 respectively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hymøller, Lone; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D has become one of the most discussed nutrients in human nutrition, which has led to an increased interest in milk as a vitamin D source. Problems related to fortifying milk with synthetic vitamin D can be avoided by securing a high content of natural vitamin D in the milk by supplying...

  8. Expression of the vitamin D metabolizing enzyme CYP24A1 at the annulus of human spermatozoa may serve as a novel marker of semen quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Blomberg; Jørgensen, A; Nielsen, J E

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D (VD) is important for male reproduction in mammals and the VD receptor (VDR) and VD-metabolizing enzymes are expressed in human spermatozoa. The VD-inactivating enzyme CYP24A1 titrates the cellular responsiveness to VD, is transcriptionally regulated by VD, and has a distinct expression...... at the sperm annulus. Here, we investigated if CYP24A1 expression serves as a marker for VD metabolism in spermatozoa, and whether CYP24A1 expression was associated with semen quality. We included 130 men (53 healthy young volunteers and 77 subfertile men) for semen analysis and immunocytochemical (ICC.......3%. Functional studies revealed that 1,25(OH)(2) D(3) increased [Ca(2+) ](i) and sperm motility in young healthy men, while 1,25(OH)(2) D(3) was unable to increase motility in subfertile patients. In conclusion, we suggest that CYP24A1 expression at the annulus may serve as a novel marker of semen quality...

  9. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vitamins for a variety of biological processes, including growth, digestion, and nerve function. There are 13 vitamins ... fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E (for children and adolescents) vitamin B-12, iron, folic acid, and vitamins ...

  10. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vitamins that the body absolutely needs: vitamins A, C, D, E, K, and the B vitamins (thiamine, ... excessive amounts of water-soluble vitamins, like vitamins C and B, are not used by the body ...

  11. Genetic Variation in Vitamin B-12 Content of Bovine Milk and Its Association with SNP along the Bovine Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.M.; Bouwman, A.C.; Sprong, R.C.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Visker, M.H.P.W.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B-12 (also called cobalamin) is essential for human health and current intake levels of vitamin B-12 are considered to be too low. Natural enrichment of the vitamin B-12 content in milk, an important dietary source of vitamin B-12, may help to increase vitamin B-12 intake. Natural enrichment

  12. Instrumental evaluation of anti-aging effects of cosmetic formulations containing palmitoyl peptides, Silybum marianum seed oil, vitamin E and other functional ingredients on aged human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Jung, Ho Jung; Schrammek-Drusios, Med Christine; Lee, Sung Nae; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Kwon, Seung Bin; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2016-08-01

    Anti-aging cosmetics are widely used for improving signs of aged skin such as skin wrinkles, decreased elasticity, low dermal density and yellow skin tone. The present study evaluated the effects of cosmetic formulations, eye cream and facial cream, containing palmitoyl peptides, Silybum marianum ( S. marianum ) seed oil, vitamin E and other functional ingredients on the improvement of facial wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone after 4 weeks period of application on aged human skin. Healthy volunteers (n=20) with aged skin were recruited to apply the test materials facially twice per day for 4 weeks. Skin wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone were measured instrumentally for assessing the improvement of skin aging. All the measurements were conducted prior to the application of test materials and at 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. Crow's feet wrinkles were decreased 5.97% after 2 weeks of test material application and 14.07% after 4 weeks of application in comparison of pre-application. Skin elasticity was increased 6.81% after 2 weeks and 8.79% after 4 weeks. Dermal density was increased 16.74% after 2 weeks and 27.63% after 4 weeks. With the L* value indicating skin brightness and the a* value indicating erythema (redness), the results showed that brightness was increased 1.70% after 2 weeks and 2.14% after 4 weeks, and erythema was decreased 10.45% after 2 weeks and 22.39% after 4 weeks. Hence, the test materials appear to exert some degree of anti-aging effects on aged human skin. There were no abnormal skin responses from the participants during the trial period. We conclude that the facial and eye cream containing palmitoyl peptides and S. marianum seed oil, vitamin E and other ingredients have effects on the improvement of facial wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone.

  13. Quantifying behavioural interactions between humans and mosquitoes: Evaluating the protective efficacy of insecticidal nets against malaria transmission in rural Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathenge Evan

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African malaria vectors bite predominantly indoors at night so sleeping under an Insecticide-Treated Net (ITN can greatly reduce malaria risk. Behavioural adaptation by mosquitoes to increasing ITN coverage could allow vector mosquitoes to bite outside of peak sleeping hours and undermine efficacy of this key malaria prevention measure. Methods High coverage with largely untreated nets has been achieved in the Kilombero Valley, southern Tanzania through social marketing programmes. Direct surveys of nightly biting activity by An. gambiae Giles were conducted in the area before (1997 and after (2004 implementation of ITN promotion. A novel analytical model was applied to estimate the effective protection provided by an ITN, based on published experimental hut trials combined with questionnaire surveys of human sleeping behaviour and recorded mosquito biting patterns. Results An. gambiae was predominantly endophagic and nocturnal in both surveys: Approximately 90% and 80% of exposure occurred indoors and during peak sleeping hours, respectively. ITNs consistently conferred >70% protection against exposure to malaria transmission for users relative to non-users. Conclusion As ITN coverage increases, behavioural adaptation by mosquitoes remains a future possibility. The approach described allows comparison of mosquito biting patterns and ITN efficacy at multiple study sites and times. Initial results indicate ITNs remain highly effective and should remain a top-priority intervention. Combined with recently developed transmission models, this approach allows rapid, informative and cost-effective preliminary comparison of diverse control strategies in terms of protection against exposure before more costly and intensive clinical trials.

  14. Quantifying glucose permeability and enhanced light penetration in ex vivo human normal and cancerous esophagus tissues with optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Q L; Guo, Z Y; Wei, H J; Guo, X; Zhong, H Q; Li, L Q; Si, J L; Yang, H Q; Xie, S S; Wu, G Y; Li, X Y

    2011-01-01

    We report our pilot results on quantification of glucose (G) diffusion permeability in human normal esophagus and ESCC tissues in vitro by using OCT technique. The permeability coefficient of 40% aqueous solution of G was found to be (1.74±0.04)×10 -5 cm/s in normal esophagus and (2.45±0.06)×10 -5 cm/s in ESCC tissues. The results from this study indicate that ESCC tissues had a higher permeability coefficient compared to normal esophageal tissues, and the light penetration depths gradually increase with the increase of applied topically with G time for the normal esophageal and ESCC tissues. The results indicate that the permeability coefficient of G in cancer tissues was 1.41-fold than that in normal tissues, and the light penetration depth for the ESCC tissues is significantly smaller than that of normal esophagus tissues in the same time range. These results demonstrate that the optical clearing of normal and cancer esophagus tissues are improved after application of G

  15. Quantifying glucose permeability and enhanced light penetration in ex vivo human normal and cancerous esophagus tissues with optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q. L.; Si, J. L.; Guo, Z. Y.; Wei, H. J.; Yang, H. Q.; Wu, G. Y.; Xie, S. S.; Li, X. Y.; Guo, X.; Zhong, H. Q.; Li, L. Q.

    2011-01-01

    We report our pilot results on quantification of glucose (G) diffusion permeability in human normal esophagus and ESCC tissues in vitro by using OCT technique. The permeability coefficient of 40% aqueous solution of G was found to be (1.74±0.04)×10-5 cm/s in normal esophagus and (2.45±0.06)×10-5 cm/s in ESCC tissues. The results from this study indicate that ESCC tissues had a higher permeability coefficient compared to normal esophageal tissues, and the light penetration depths gradually increase with the increase of applied topically with G time for the normal esophageal and ESCC tissues. The results indicate that the permeability coefficient of G in cancer tissues was 1.41-fold than that in normal tissues, and the light penetration depth for the ESCC tissues is significantly smaller than that of normal esophagus tissues in the same time range. These results demonstrate that the optical clearing of normal and cancer esophagus tissues are improved after application of G.

  16. Neglect in human communication: quantifying the cost of cell-phone interruptions in face to face dialogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rosenfeld, Matías; Calero, Cecilia I; Fernandez Slezak, Diego; Garbulsky, Gerry; Bergman, Mariano; Trevisan, Marcos; Sigman, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    There is a prevailing belief that interruptions using cellular phones during face to face interactions may affect severely how people relate and perceive each other. We set out to determine this cost quantitatively through an experiment performed in dyads, in a large audience in a TEDx event. One of the two participants (the speaker) narrates a story vividly. The listener is asked to deliberately ignore the speaker during part of the story (for instance, attending to their cell-phone). The speaker is not aware of this treatment. We show that total amount of attention is the major factor driving subjective beliefs about the story and the conversational partner. The effects are mostly independent on how attention is distributed in time. All social parameters of human communication are affected by attention time with a sole exception: the perceived emotion of the story. Interruptions during day-to-day communication between peers are extremely frequent. Our data should provide a note of caution, by indicating that they have a major effect on the perception people have about what they say (whether it is interesting or not . . .) and about the virtues of the people around them.

  17. Neglect in human communication: quantifying the cost of cell-phone interruptions in face to face dialogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Lopez-Rosenfeld

    Full Text Available There is a prevailing belief that interruptions using cellular phones during face to face interactions may affect severely how people relate and perceive each other. We set out to determine this cost quantitatively through an experiment performed in dyads, in a large audience in a TEDx event. One of the two participants (the speaker narrates a story vividly. The listener is asked to deliberately ignore the speaker during part of the story (for instance, attending to their cell-phone. The speaker is not aware of this treatment. We show that total amount of attention is the major factor driving subjective beliefs about the story and the conversational partner. The effects are mostly independent on how attention is distributed in time. All social parameters of human communication are affected by attention time with a sole exception: the perceived emotion of the story. Interruptions during day-to-day communication between peers are extremely frequent. Our data should provide a note of caution, by indicating that they have a major effect on the perception people have about what they say (whether it is interesting or not . . . and about the virtues of the people around them.

  18. Measuring center of pressure signals to quantify human balance using multivariate multiscale entropy by designing a force platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Wei; Sue, Pei-Der; Abbod, Maysam F; Jiang, Bernard C; Shieh, Jiann-Shing

    2013-08-08

    To assess the improvement of human body balance, a low cost and portable measuring device of center of pressure (COP), known as center of pressure and complexity monitoring system (CPCMS), has been developed for data logging and analysis. In order to prove that the system can estimate the different magnitude of different sways in comparison with the commercial Advanced Mechanical Technology Incorporation (AMTI) system, four sway tests have been developed (i.e., eyes open, eyes closed, eyes open with water pad, and eyes closed with water pad) to produce different sway displacements. Firstly, static and dynamic tests were conducted to investigate the feasibility of the system. Then, correlation tests of the CPCMS and AMTI systems have been compared with four sway tests. The results are within the acceptable range. Furthermore, multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD) and enhanced multivariate multiscale entropy (MMSE) analysis methods have been used to analyze COP data reported by the CPCMS and compare it with the AMTI system. The improvements of the CPCMS are 35% to 70% (open eyes test) and 60% to 70% (eyes closed test) with and without water pad. The AMTI system has shown an improvement of 40% to 80% (open eyes test) and 65% to 75% (closed eyes test). The results indicate that the CPCMS system can achieve similar results to the commercial product so it can determine the balance.

  19. Measuring Center of Pressure Signals to Quantify Human Balance Using Multivariate Multiscale Entropy by Designing a Force Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Huang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To assess the improvement of human body balance, a low cost and portable measuring device of center of pressure (COP, known as center of pressure and complexity monitoring system (CPCMS, has been developed for data logging and analysis. In order to prove that the system can estimate the different magnitude of different sways in comparison with the commercial Advanced Mechanical Technology Incorporation (AMTI system, four sway tests have been developed (i.e., eyes open, eyes closed, eyes open with water pad, and eyes closed with water pad to produce different sway displacements. Firstly, static and dynamic tests were conducted to investigate the feasibility of the system. Then, correlation tests of the CPCMS and AMTI systems have been compared with four sway tests. The results are within the acceptable range. Furthermore, multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD and enhanced multivariate multiscale entropy (MMSE analysis methods have been used to analyze COP data reported by the CPCMS and compare it with the AMTI system. The improvements of the CPCMS are 35% to 70% (open eyes test and 60% to 70% (eyes closed test with and without water pad. The AMTI system has shown an improvement of 40% to 80% (open eyes test and 65% to 75% (closed eyes test. The results indicate that the CPCMS system can achieve similar results to the commercial product so it can determine the balance.

  20. Vitamins--conventional uses and new insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Alison; Lansdowne, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    There are 13 nutrients classified as vitamins: 4 'fat-soluble' and 9 'water-soluble'. All are essential to maintain healthy homeostasis and metabolic function. Preterm infants are born with low levels and reduced stores of fat-soluble vitamins. Active placental transfer of water-soluble vitamins ensures high levels at birth, but as they are not stored, levels fall rapidly. All VLBW and ELBW infants require vitamins to be provided soon after birth. Quantifying exact requirements of each vitamin which will meet the needs for all infants is difficult due to a limited evidence base. However, timely prescription of vitamin supplements and awareness of situations where delivery or uptake might be compromised will help to ensure that these vulnerable patients do not suffer from vitamin deficiencies. Multivitamin preparations are available for parenteral and enteral use. Vitamins A, C and E have important functions as antioxidants. Further research is required to understand optimal doses and routes of administration for initial and ongoing nutritional support. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. 21 CFR 582.5953 - Vitamin D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin D3. 582.5953 Section 582.5953 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5953 Vitamin D3. (a) Product. Vitamin D3. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5945 - Vitamin B12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin B12. 582.5945 Section 582.5945 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5945 Vitamin B12. (a) Product. Vitamin B12. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5950 - Vitamin D2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vitamin D2. 582.5950 Section 582.5950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5950 Vitamin D2. (a) Product. Vitamin D2. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  4. Vitamin C for DNA damage prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sram, Radim J.; Binkova, Blanka; Rossner, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    The ability of vitamin C to affect genetic damage was reviewed in human studies that used molecular epidemiology methods, including analysis of DNA adducts, DNA strand breakage (using the Comet assay), oxidative damage measured as levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei, and the induction of DNA repair proteins. The protective effect of vitamin C was observed at plasma levels > 50 μmol/l. Vitamin C supplementation decreased the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in groups with insufficient dietary intake who were occupationally exposed to mutagens, and also decreased the sensitivity to mutagens as assessed using the bleomycin assay. High vitamin C levels in plasma decreased the frequency of genomic translocations in groups exposed to ionizing radiation or c-PAHs in polluted air. The frequency of micronuclei was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in smokers challenged with γ-irradiation, and higher vitamin C levels in plasma counteracted the damage induced by air pollution. The prevalence of DNA adducts inversely correlated with vitamin C levels in groups environmentally exposed to high concentrations of c-PAHs. Increased vitamin C levels decreased DNA strand breakage induced by air pollution. Oxidative damage (8-oxodG levels) was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in groups with plasma levels > 50 μmol/l exposed to PM2.5 and c-PAHs. Modulation of DNA repair by vitamin C supplementation was observed both in poorly nourished subjects and in groups with vitamin C plasma levels > 50 μmol/l exposed to higher concentrations of c-PAHs. It is possible that the impact of vitamin C on DNA damage depends both on background values of vitamin C in the individual as well as on the level of exposure to xenobiotics or oxidative stress.

  5. Vitamin C for DNA damage prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sram, Radim J., E-mail: sram@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 14220 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Binkova, Blanka; Rossner, Pavel [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 14220 Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2012-05-01

    The ability of vitamin C to affect genetic damage was reviewed in human studies that used molecular epidemiology methods, including analysis of DNA adducts, DNA strand breakage (using the Comet assay), oxidative damage measured as levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroxy-2 Prime -deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei, and the induction of DNA repair proteins. The protective effect of vitamin C was observed at plasma levels > 50 {mu}mol/l. Vitamin C supplementation decreased the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in groups with insufficient dietary intake who were occupationally exposed to mutagens, and also decreased the sensitivity to mutagens as assessed using the bleomycin assay. High vitamin C levels in plasma decreased the frequency of genomic translocations in groups exposed to ionizing radiation or c-PAHs in polluted air. The frequency of micronuclei was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in smokers challenged with {gamma}-irradiation, and higher vitamin C levels in plasma counteracted the damage induced by air pollution. The prevalence of DNA adducts inversely correlated with vitamin C levels in groups environmentally exposed to high concentrations of c-PAHs. Increased vitamin C levels decreased DNA strand breakage induced by air pollution. Oxidative damage (8-oxodG levels) was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in groups with plasma levels > 50 {mu}mol/l exposed to PM2.5 and c-PAHs. Modulation of DNA repair by vitamin C supplementation was observed both in poorly nourished subjects and in groups with vitamin C plasma levels > 50 {mu}mol/l exposed to higher concentrations of c-PAHs. It is possible that the impact of vitamin C on DNA damage depends both on background values of vitamin C in the individual as well as on the level of exposure to xenobiotics or oxidative stress.

  6. Quantifying dynamic mechanical properties of human placenta tissue using optimization techniques with specimen-specific finite-element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingwen; Klinich, Kathleen D; Miller, Carl S; Nazmi, Giseli; Pearlman, Mark D; Schneider, Lawrence W; Rupp, Jonathan D

    2009-11-13

    Motor-vehicle crashes are the leading cause of fetal deaths resulting from maternal trauma in the United States, and placental abruption is the most common cause of these deaths. To minimize this injury, new assessment tools, such as crash-test dummies and computational models of pregnant women, are needed to evaluate vehicle restraint systems with respect to reducing the risk of placental abruption. Developing these models requires accurate material properties for tissues in the pregnant abdomen under dynamic loading conditions that can occur in crashes. A method has been developed for determining dynamic material properties of human soft tissues that combines results from uniaxial tensile tests, specimen-specific finite-element models based on laser scans that accurately capture non-uniform tissue-specimen geometry, and optimization techniques. The current study applies this method to characterizing material properties of placental tissue. For 21 placenta specimens tested at a strain rate of 12/s, the mean failure strain is 0.472+/-0.097 and the mean failure stress is 34.80+/-12.62 kPa. A first-order Ogden material model with ground-state shear modulus (mu) of 23.97+/-5.52 kPa and exponent (alpha(1)) of 3.66+/-1.90 best fits the test results. The new method provides a nearly 40% error reduction (p<0.001) compared to traditional curve-fitting methods by considering detailed specimen geometry, loading conditions, and dynamic effects from high-speed loading. The proposed method can be applied to determine mechanical properties of other soft biological tissues.

  7. Connected Car: Quantified Self becomes Quantified Car

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Swan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The automotive industry could be facing a situation of profound change and opportunity in the coming decades. There are a number of influencing factors such as increasing urban and aging populations, self-driving cars, 3D parts printing, energy innovation, and new models of transportation service delivery (Zipcar, Uber. The connected car means that vehicles are now part of the connected world, continuously Internet-connected, generating and transmitting data, which on the one hand can be helpfully integrated into applications, like real-time traffic alerts broadcast to smartwatches, but also raises security and privacy concerns. This paper explores the automotive connected world, and describes five killer QS (Quantified Self-auto sensor applications that link quantified-self sensors (sensors that measure the personal biometrics of individuals like heart rate and automotive sensors (sensors that measure driver and passenger biometrics or quantitative automotive performance metrics like speed and braking activity. The applications are fatigue detection, real-time assistance for parking and accidents, anger management and stress reduction, keyless authentication and digital identity verification, and DIY diagnostics. These kinds of applications help to demonstrate the benefit of connected world data streams in the automotive industry and beyond where, more fundamentally for human progress, the automation of both physical and now cognitive tasks is underway.

  8. Comparison of vitamins K1, K2 and K3 effects on growth of rat glioma and human glioblastoma multiforme cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztopçu, Pinar; Kabadere, Selda; Mercangoz, Ayşe; Uyar, Ruhi

    2004-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is characterized as highly invasive and rapidly growing astrocytomas, and scientists have sought for efficient treatment against malignant gliomas for a long time. Therefore, we compared the respond of rat glioma (C6) and glioblastoma multiforme cells derived from two patients to vitamins K1, K2 and K3. The cells were exposed to 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 microM of vitamins K1 and K2, and 1, 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 microM of vitamin K3 for 24 hours in an incubator atmosphere of 5% CO2, 37 degrees C and 100% humidity. Cell viability was estimated by MTT assay. Vitamin K1 showed no growth effect on all the glioma cells examined. Vitamin K2 did not cause any change in number of C6, however induced growth inhibition in a dose-dependent manner on glioblastoma multiforme. The IC50 values of vitamin K2 were 960 microM and 970 microM for glioblastoma multiforme, respectively. Vitamin K3 had also growth inhibitory effect in a dose-dependent manner on both C6 and glioblastoma multiforme. The IC50 values were 41 microM, 24 microM and 23 microM for vitamin K3, respectively. We concluded that vitamin K3 is more effective than vitamin K2 for inhibition of cancer cell growth, and might have an alternative value as an anticancer drug against glioblastoma multiforme.

  9. Human arachnoid granulations Part I: a technique for quantifying area and distribution on the superior surface of the cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holman David W

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arachnoid granulations (AGs are herniations of the arachnoid membrane into the dural venous sinuses on the surface of the brain. Previous morphological studies of AGs have been limited in scope and only one has mentioned surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to investigate the topographic distribution of AGs on the superior surface of the cerebral cortex. Methods En face images were taken of the superior surface of 35 formalin-fixed human brains. AGs were manually identified using Adobe Photoshop, with a pixel location containing an AG defined as 'positive'. A set of 25 standard fiducial points was marked on each hemisphere for a total of 50 points on each image. The points were connected on each hemisphere to create a segmented image. A standard template was created for each hemisphere by calculating the average position of the 25 fiducial points from all brains. Each segmented image was mapped to the standard template using a linear transformation. A topographic distribution map was produced by calculating the proportion of AG positive images at each pixel in the standard template. The AG surface area was calculated for each hemisphere and for the total brain superior surface. To adjust for different brain sizes, the proportional involvement of AGs was calculated by dividing the AG area by the total area. Results The total brain average surface area of AGs was 78.53 ± 13.13 mm2 (n = 35 and average AG proportional involvement was 57.71 × 10-4 ± 7.65 × 10-4. Regression analysis confirmed the reproducibility of AG identification between independent researchers with r2 = 0.97. The surface AGs were localized in the parasagittal planes that coincide with the region of the lateral lacunae. Conclusion The data obtained on the spatial distribution and en face surface area of AGs will be used in an in vitro model of CSF outflow. With an increase in the number of samples, this analysis technique can be used

  10. Development of a PBPK model of thiocyanate in rats with an extrapolation to humans: A computational study to quantify the mechanism of action of thiocyanate kinetics in thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemin, Marie-Emilie; Lumen, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid homeostasis can be disturbed due to thiocyanate exposure from the diet or tobacco smoke. Thiocyanate inhibits both thyroidal uptake of iodide, via the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS), and thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis in the thyroid, via thyroid peroxidase (TPO), but the mode of action of thiocyanate is poorly quantified in the literature. The characterization of the link between intra-thyroidal thiocyanate concentrations and dose of exposure is crucial for assessing the risk of thyroid perturbations due to thiocyanate exposure. We developed a PBPK model for thiocyanate that describes its kinetics in the whole-body up to daily doses of 0.15 mmol/kg, with a mechanistic description of the thyroidal kinetics including NIS, passive diffusion, and TPO. The model was calibrated in a Bayesian framework using published studies in rats. Goodness-of-fit was satisfactory, especially for intra-thyroidal thiocyanate concentrations. Thiocyanate kinetic processes were quantified in vivo, including the metabolic clearance by TPO. The passive diffusion rate was found to be greater than NIS-mediated uptake rate. The model captured the dose-dependent kinetics of thiocyanate after acute and chronic exposures. Model behavior was evaluated using a Morris screening test. The distribution of thiocyanate into the thyroid was found to be determined primarily by the partition coefficient, followed by NIS and passive diffusion; the impact of the latter two mechanisms appears to increase at very low doses. Extrapolation to humans resulted in good predictions of thiocyanate kinetics during chronic exposure. The developed PBPK model can be used in risk assessment to quantify dose-response effects of thiocyanate on TH. - Highlights: • A PBPK model of thiocyanate (SCN − ) was calibrated in rats in a Bayesian framework. • The intra-thyroidal kinetics of thiocyanate including NIS and TPO was modeled. • Passive diffusion rate for SCN − seemed to be greater than the NIS

  11. Development of a PBPK model of thiocyanate in rats with an extrapolation to humans: A computational study to quantify the mechanism of action of thiocyanate kinetics in thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemin, Marie-Emilie; Lumen, Annie, E-mail: Annie.Lumen@fda.hhs.gov

    2016-09-15

    Thyroid homeostasis can be disturbed due to thiocyanate exposure from the diet or tobacco smoke. Thiocyanate inhibits both thyroidal uptake of iodide, via the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS), and thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis in the thyroid, via thyroid peroxidase (TPO), but the mode of action of thiocyanate is poorly quantified in the literature. The characterization of the link between intra-thyroidal thiocyanate concentrations and dose of exposure is crucial for assessing the risk of thyroid perturbations due to thiocyanate exposure. We developed a PBPK model for thiocyanate that describes its kinetics in the whole-body up to daily doses of 0.15 mmol/kg, with a mechanistic description of the thyroidal kinetics including NIS, passive diffusion, and TPO. The model was calibrated in a Bayesian framework using published studies in rats. Goodness-of-fit was satisfactory, especially for intra-thyroidal thiocyanate concentrations. Thiocyanate kinetic processes were quantified in vivo, including the metabolic clearance by TPO. The passive diffusion rate was found to be greater than NIS-mediated uptake rate. The model captured the dose-dependent kinetics of thiocyanate after acute and chronic exposures. Model behavior was evaluated using a Morris screening test. The distribution of thiocyanate into the thyroid was found to be determined primarily by the partition coefficient, followed by NIS and passive diffusion; the impact of the latter two mechanisms appears to increase at very low doses. Extrapolation to humans resulted in good predictions of thiocyanate kinetics during chronic exposure. The developed PBPK model can be used in risk assessment to quantify dose-response effects of thiocyanate on TH. - Highlights: • A PBPK model of thiocyanate (SCN{sup −}) was calibrated in rats in a Bayesian framework. • The intra-thyroidal kinetics of thiocyanate including NIS and TPO was modeled. • Passive diffusion rate for SCN{sup −} seemed to be greater than the NIS

  12. The association between personal sun exposure, serum vitamin D and global methylation in human lymphocytes in a population of healthy adults in South Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair-Shalliker, Visalini, E-mail: visalinin@nswcc.org.au [Cancer Research Division, Cancer Council New South Wales (Australia); Dhillon, Varinderpal [CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences (Australia); Clements, Mark [Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Armstrong, Bruce K. [Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney (Australia); Fenech, Michael [CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences (Australia)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Solar UV exposure is positively correlated with LINE 1 hypomethylation. • This was observed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. • There was no evident effect modification by serum vitamin D (25OHD) levels. • This was observed in a population of healthy adults from South Australia. - Abstract: Background: There is a positive association between solar UV exposure and micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and this association may be stronger when serum vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels are insufficient (<50 nmol/L). Micronucleus formation can result from global hypomethylation of DNA repeat sequences. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the relationship between solar UV exposure and methylation pattern in LINE-1 repetitive elements in PBL DNA and to see if serum 25(OH)D levels modify it. Method: Personal solar UV exposure was estimated from hours of outdoor exposure over 6 weeks recalled at the time of blood collection in 208 male and female participants living in South Australia. Methylation in LINE-1 repetitive elements was assessed in PBL using pyrosequencing. Results: Methylation in LINE-1 decreased with increasing solar UV exposure (% decrease = 0.5% per doubling of sUV; 95%CI: −0.7 to −0.2 p{sub value} = 0.00003). Although there was no correlation between LINE-1 methylation and micronucleus frequency, there was a 4.3% increase (95%CI: 0.6–8.1 p-value = 0.02) in nucleoplasmic bridges and a 4.3% increase in necrosis (CI: 1.9–6.8 p-value = 0.0005) for every 1% increase in LINE-1 methylation. Serum 25(OH)D was not associated with DNA methylation; or did it modify the association of solar UV with DNA methylation. Conclusion: Exposure to solar UV radiation may reduce DNA methylation in circulating lymphocytes. This association does not appear to be influenced or mediated by vitamin D status.

  13. Vitamin concentrations in human milk vary with time within feed, circadian rhythm, and single-dose supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Importance: Human milk is the subject of many nutrition studies but methods for representative sample collection are not established. Our recently improved, validated methods for analyzing micronutrients in human milk now enable systematic study of factors affecting their concentration. Objective...

  14. H32, a non-quinone sulfone analog of vitamin K3, inhibits human hepatoma cell growth by inhibiting Cdc25 and activating ERK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Siddhartha; Wang, Meifang; Ham, Seung Wook; Carr, Brian I

    2006-10-01

    We previously synthesized a K-vitamin derivative, Cpd 5, which was a potent growth inhibitor of human tumor cells, including Hep3B hepatoma cells. However, being a quinone compound, Cpd 5 has the potential for generating toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). We therefore synthesized a nonquinone sulfone derivative, H32, which has a sufone group substituting the quinone. The IC50 of H32 for Hep3B cells was found to be 2.5 microM, which was 2.5 and 3.2 times more potent than Cpd 5 and vitamin K3 respectively. It induced apoptosis in Hep3B cells but did not generate ROS when compared to Cpd 5. Interestingly, under similar culture conditions, normal rat hepatocytes were 14-fold more and 7-fold more resistant to the growth inhibitory effects of H32 than Hep3B and PLC/PRF5 cells respectively. H32 preferentially inhibited the activities of the cell cycle controlling Cdc25A phosphatase likely by binding to its catalytic cysteine. As a consequence, it induced inhibitory tyrosine phosphorylation of the Cdc25 substrate kinases Cdk2 and Cdk4 in Hep3B cells and the cells undergo an arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. H32 also induced persistent phosphorylation of the MAPK protein ERK1/2, but marginal JNK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation. The ERK inhibitor U0126, added at least 30 min prior to H32, antagonized the growth inhibition induced by H32. However, the JNK and p38 inhibitors, JNKI-II and SB203580, were not able to antagonize H32 induced growth inhibition. Thus, H32 differentially inhibited growth of normal and liver tumor cells by preferentially inhibiting the actions of Cdc25 phosphatases and inducing persistent ERK phosphorylation.

  15. Vitamin K2 Induces Mitochondria-Related Apoptosis in Human Bladder Cancer Cells via ROS and JNK/p38 MAPK Signal Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Fengsen; Yu, Yuejin; Guan, Rijian; Xu, Zhiliang; Liang, Huageng; Hong, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The effects of vitamin K2 on apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells have been well established in previous studies. However, the apoptotic effect of vitamin K2 on bladder cancer cells has not been evaluated. The aim of this study is to examine the apoptotic activity of Vitamin K2 in bladder cancer cells and investigate the underlying mechanism. In this study, Vitamin K2 induced apoptosis in bladder cancer cells through mitochondria pathway including loss of mitochondria membrane potential, cytochrome C release and caspase-3 cascade. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK was detected in Vitamin K2-treated cells and both SP600125 (an inhibitor of JNK) and SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 MAPK) completely abolished the Vitamin K2-induced apoptosis and loss of mitochondria membrane potential. Moreover, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected in bladder cancer cells, upon treatment of vitamin K2 and the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) almost blocked the Vitamin K2-triggered apoptosis, loss of mitochondria membrane potential and activation of JNK and p38 MAPK. Taken together, these findings revealed that Vitamin K2 induces apoptosis in bladder cancer cells via ROS-mediated JNK/p38 MAPK and Mitochondrial pathways.

  16. Facts about Vitamin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facts about Vitamin K 1 R. Elaine Turner and Wendy J. Dahl 2 FCS8666 Figure 1. Vitamin K is mostly found in vegetables, especially green ... ColognePhotos/iStock/Thinkstock, © ColognePhotos Why do we need vitamin K? Vitamin K is one of the fat- ...

  17. Vitamin B6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Datos en español Health Professional Other Resources Vitamin B6 Fact Sheet for Consumers Have a question? ... out more about vitamin B6? Disclaimer What is vitamin B6 and what does it do? Vitamin B6 ...

  18. Vitamin B12

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Datos en español Health Professional Other Resources Vitamin B12 Fact Sheet for Consumers Have a question? ... out more about vitamin B12? Disclaimer What is vitamin B12 and what does it do? Vitamin B12 ...

  19. FATSOLUBLE VITAMINS AND SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novica Bojanić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamins are the cell biocatalysts, indispensable factors in performing the basic body functions. Fat-soluble vitamins are not involved in processes related to musscle contractions and energy expenditure, but they can affect physical performance indirectly because they are important for immune function (vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, antioxidant function (vitamin A, vitamin E or bone methabolism (vitamin D, vitamin K. Currently there are no clear recommendations for increase of fat-solubile vitamins intake in athletes, as well as evidence that athletic performance may be improved due to fat-solubile vitamins supplementation. In a small number of studies, it was shown that an antioxidant effect of beta carotene and vitamin E can prevent muscle damage and facilitate recovery after exercise. Also, athletes who perform the exercises in the halls should be informed about the necessity of sun exposure, as vitamin D is synthesised in the skin. Most athletes are not familiar with their needs for vitamins and trace elements, and take these compounds as supplements without consulting a nutritionist. It is important to emphasize that liposulubile vitamins are deposited in the body and can cause hypervitaminosis and toxic effects if taken in excess. It is indisputable that the lack of any fat-soluble vitamin cause problems in normal physiological processes, but supplementation is generally not required in athlets who have a well-balanced diet.

  20. Vitamin D in ocular and systemic health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solani D. Mathebula

    2015-06-01

    Vitamin D is produced in skin exposed to sunlight UVB radiation and is then metabolised by the kidney into calciferol, which is an active form. The main function of vitamin D is to promote calcium and phosphorus absorption, and studies have shown that a lack of itplays an important role in ocular conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Recent studies have suggested that vitamin D may protect the diabetic retina; however, other vitamin D-associated conditions (diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases may result in secondary ocular manifestations and the potential forsight-threatening complications. The purpose of this review is to describe the current literature on the role of vitamin D in ocular and systemic wellness. However, more research is needed to determine if increasing levels of this vitamin can assist in preventing age-related macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy. Since vitamin D is a circulating steroid hormone, its receptors are found in almost every cell in the human body, and this suggests that vitamin D might have a very broad role for overall health. However, there is still demand for further research to clarify the clinical use of vitamin D in the prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases.

  1. 78 FR 63999 - Notice of Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) Symposium: Tools To Improve Laboratory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice of Vitamin D... Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) to those with an interest in the effort to standardize vitamin D... laboratory personnel; vitamin D researchers; and members of professional societies with clinical and public...

  2. Development and Use of a Real-Time Quantitative PCR Method for Detecting and Quantifying Equol-Producing Bacteria in Human Faecal Samples and Slurry Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Vázquez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work introduces a novel real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR protocol for detecting and quantifying equol-producing bacteria. To this end, two sets of primers targeting the dihydrodaidzein reductase (ddr and tetrahydrodaidzein reductase (tdr genes, which are involved in the synthesis of equol, were designed. The primers showed high specificity and sensitivity when used to examine DNA from control bacteria, such as Slackia isoflavoniconvertens, Slackia equolifaciens, Asaccharobacter celatus, Adlercreutzia equolifaciens, and Enterorhabdus mucosicola. To demonstrate the validity and reliability of the protocol, it was used to detect and quantify equol-producing bacteria in human faecal samples and their derived slurry cultures. These samples were provided by 18 menopausal women under treatment of menopause symptoms with a soy isoflavone concentrate, among whom three were known to be equol-producers given the prior detection of the molecule in their urine. The tdr gene was detected in the faeces of all these equol-producing women at about 4–5 log10 copies per gram of faeces. In contrast, the ddr gene was only amplified in the faecal samples of two of these three women, suggesting the presence in the non-amplified sample of reductase genes unrelated to those known to be involved in equol formation and used for primer design in this study. When tdr and ddr were present in the same sample, similar copy numbers of the two genes were recorded. However, no significant increase in the copy number of equol-related genes along isoflavone treatment was observed. Surprisingly, positive amplification for both tdr and ddr genes was obtained in faecal samples and derived slurry cultures from two non-equol producing women, suggesting the genes could be non-functional or the daidzein metabolized to other compounds in samples from these two women. This novel qPCR tool provides a technique for monitoring gut microbes that produce equol in humans. Monitoring equol

  3. The relationship between peak warming and cumulative CO2 emissions, and its use to quantify vulnerabilities in the carbon-climate-human system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raupach, Michael; Canadell, Josep G.; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Rayner, Peter J.; Trudinger, Catherine M.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between the carbon cycle, climate and human societies are subject to several major vulnerabilities, broadly defined as factors contributing to the risk of harm from human-induced climate change. We assess five vulnerabilities: (1) effects of increasing CO 2 on the partition of anthropogenic carbon between atmospheric, land and ocean reservoirs; (2) effects of climate change (quantified by temperature) on CO 2 fluxes; (3) uncertainty in climate sensitivity; (4) non-CO 2 radiative forcing and (5) anthropogenic CO 2 emissions. Our analysis uses a physically based expression for Tp(Qp), the peak warming Tp associated with a cumulative anthropogenic CO 2 emission Qp to the time of peak warming. The approximations in this expression are evaluated using a non-linear box model of the carbon-climate system, forced with capped emissions trajectories described by an analytic form satisfying integral and smoothness constraints. The first four vulnerabilities appear as parameters that influence Tp(Qp), whereas the last appears through the independent variable. In terms of likely implications for Tp(Qp), the decreasing order of the first four vulnerabilities is: uncertainties in climate sensitivity, effects of non-CO 2 radiative forcing, effects of climate change on CO 2 fluxes and effects of increasing CO 2 on the partition of anthropogenic carbon. (authors)

  4. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... Linkedin Pin it Email Print Subscribe: FDA Consumer Health Information Vitamins are essential nutrients that contribute to ...

  5. Vitamin D and Anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Biricik, Ebru; Güneş, Yasemin

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D is a vitamin not only associated with calcium-phosphorus metabolism but also affects many organ systems. Because of its effect on the immune system in recent years, it has attracted much attention. Vitamin D deficiency is a clinical condition that can be widely observed in the society. Thus, patients with vitamin D deficiency are often seen in anaesthesia practice. In the absence of vitamin D, prolongation of intensive care unit stay, increase in mortality and morbidity and also ass...

  6. Immune Function of Vitamin D in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Li

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a well-known fat-soluble vitamin which is essential in the homeostasis of calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D deficiency causes skeletal disorders, including rickets, osteomalacia, and osteoporosis. However, recent studies revealing the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D have opened up a new understanding and possibility in this field. It has been proved that vitamin D is related to a variety of autoimmune diseases. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, being generally accepted as autoimmune mediated, is also proposed to be associated with the vitamin D status of the human body. Here, we reviewed briefly the epidemiological correlation between the vitamin D status and prevalence of T1DM, the possible mechanisms underlying this correlation, and clinical trials focusing on the therapeutic prospects of vitamin D in the treatment of T1DM.

  7. Vitamin D Every Day to Keep the Infection Away?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Castro Kroner

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the last decade, vitamin D has emerged as a central regulator of host defense against infections. In this regard, vitamin D triggers effective antimicrobial pathways against bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens in cells of the human innate immune system. However, vitamin D also mediates potent tolerogenic effects: it is generally believed that vitamin D attenuates inflammation and acquired immunity, and thus potentially limits collateral tissue damage. Nevertheless, several studies indicate that vitamin D promotes aspects of acquired host defense. Clinically, vitamin D deficiency has been associated with an increased risk for various infectious diseases in epidemiological studies; yet, robust data from controlled trials investigating the use of vitamin D as a preventive or therapeutic agent are missing. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the effect of vitamin D on innate and acquired host defense, and speculate on the difficulties to translate the available molecular medicine data into practical therapeutic or preventive recommendations.

  8. Plasma and skin vitamin E concentrations in canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plevnik Kapun, Alja; Salobir, Janez; Levart, Alenka; Tavčar Kalcher, Gabrijela; Nemec Svete, Alenka; Kotnik, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Altered homeostasis of vitamin E has been demonstrated in human atopic dermatitis. Data on plasma and skin vitamin E concentrations in canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) are not available. To determine vitamin E concentrations in plasma and skin of atopic dogs. Vitamin E concentrations in plasma and full-thickness skin biopsies of 15 atopic dogs were related to CAD extent and severity index (CADESI-03) scores and compared to the equivalent concentrations in 17 healthy dogs. Statistically significant differences of measured parameters between the two groups were determined by the nonparametric Mann Whitney U test and correlations between CADESI-03 scores and vitamin E concentrations were evaluated by the Spearman rank test. A value of P vitamin E were significantly lower in atopic dogs than in healthy dogs, with median values of 29.8 and 52.9 μmol/L, respectively. Skin vitamin E values did not differ significantly between patients and healthy controls. The median concentration of skin vitamin E in atopic dogs was higher than that in healthy dogs. No significant correlations were found between CADESI-03 score and plasma vitamin E or skin vitamin E concentrations. Significantly lower plasma vitamin E concentrations in atopic dogs than in healthy controls indicate altered homeostasis of vitamin E in CAD. Further investigation into vitamin E supplementation in CAD is warranted.

  9. Uptake of intact TPGS (d-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate) a water-miscible form of vitamin E by human cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traber, M.G.; Thellman, C.A.; Rindler, M.J.; Kayden, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which TPGS (alpha-tocopheryl succinate esterified to polyethylene glycol 1000 [PEG 1000]) delivers tocopherol (vitamin E) was studied in human fibroblasts and erythrocytes and a human intestinal cell line, Caco-2. The total cellular tocopherol content of saponified samples of fibroblasts or Caco-2 incubated for 4 h with TPGS (4 mumol/L) increased 10-fold without an increase in the free tocopherol content of nonsaponified samples. A 24-h incubation resulted in a free tocopherol content of approximately 20%, suggesting that intracellular hydrolysis of ester bonds had occurred. The increase in total tocopherol content after a 4-h incubation with TPGS was temperature dependent; no change was measurable at 4 degrees C. Addition of metabolic inhibitors during incubation with TPGS at 37 degrees C did not prevent the increase. [ 14 C]TPGS (synthesized from [ 14 C]PEG 1000) was taken up by Caco-2 cells but [ 14 C]PEG 1000 was not. The intracellular total tocopherol (pmol) equaled the [ 14 C]TPGS (pmol), unequivocally demonstrating uptake of the intact TPGS molecule

  10. 21 CFR 172.380 - Vitamin D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.380 Vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 may be used safely in foods as a...

  11. Quantifying the ocean, freshwater and human effects on year-to-year variability of one-sea-winter Atlantic salmon angled in multiple Norwegian rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Jaime; Jensen, Arne J; L'Abée-Lund, Jan Henning; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Storvik, Geir O; Vøllestad, Leif Asbjørn

    2011-01-01

    Many Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, populations are decreasing throughout the species' distributional range probably due to several factors acting in concert. A number of studies have documented the influence of freshwater and ocean conditions, climate variability and human impacts resulting from impoundment and aquaculture. However, most previous research has focused on analyzing single or only a few populations, and quantified isolated effects rather than handling multiple factors in conjunction. By using a multi-river mixed-effects model we estimated the effects of oceanic and river conditions, as well as human impacts, on year-to-year and between-river variability across 60 time series of recreational catch of one-sea-winter salmon (grilse) from Norwegian rivers over 29 years (1979-2007). Warm coastal temperatures at the time of smolt entrance into the sea and increased water discharge during upstream migration of mature fish were associated with higher rod catches of grilse. When hydropower stations were present in the course of the river systems the strength of the relationship with runoff was reduced. Catches of grilse in the river increased significantly following the reduction of the harvesting of this life-stage at sea. However, an average decreasing temporal trend was still detected and appeared to be stronger in the presence of salmon farms on the migration route of smolts in coastal/fjord areas. These results suggest that both ocean and freshwater conditions in conjunction with various human impacts contribute to shape interannual fluctuations and between-river variability of wild Atlantic salmon in Norwegian rivers. Current global change altering coastal temperature and water flow patterns might have implications for future grilse catches, moreover, positioning of aquaculture facilities as well as the implementation of hydropower schemes or other encroachments should be made with care when implementing management actions and searching for solutions to

  12. Quantifying the ocean, freshwater and human effects on year-to-year variability of one-sea-winter Atlantic salmon angled in multiple Norwegian rivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Otero

    Full Text Available Many Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, populations are decreasing throughout the species' distributional range probably due to several factors acting in concert. A number of studies have documented the influence of freshwater and ocean conditions, climate variability and human impacts resulting from impoundment and aquaculture. However, most previous research has focused on analyzing single or only a few populations, and quantified isolated effects rather than handling multiple factors in conjunction. By using a multi-river mixed-effects model we estimated the effects of oceanic and river conditions, as well as human impacts, on year-to-year and between-river variability across 60 time series of recreational catch of one-sea-winter salmon (grilse from Norwegian rivers over 29 years (1979-2007. Warm coastal temperatures at the time of smolt entrance into the sea and increased water discharge during upstream migration of mature fish were associated with higher rod catches of grilse. When hydropower stations were present in the course of the river systems the strength of the relationship with runoff was reduced. Catches of grilse in the river increased significantly following the reduction of the harvesting of this life-stage at sea. However, an average decreasing temporal trend was still detected and appeared to be stronger in the presence of salmon farms on the migration route of smolts in coastal/fjord areas. These results suggest that both ocean and freshwater conditions in conjunction with various human impacts contribute to shape interannual fluctuations and between-river variability of wild Atlantic salmon in Norwegian rivers. Current global change altering coastal temperature and water flow patterns might have implications for future grilse catches, moreover, positioning of aquaculture facilities as well as the implementation of hydropower schemes or other encroachments should be made with care when implementing management actions and searching

  13. Plant amino acid-derived vitamins: biosynthesis and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret, Javier A; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-04-01

    Vitamins are essential organic compounds for humans, having lost the ability to de novo synthesize them. Hence, they represent dietary requirements, which are covered by plants as the main dietary source of most vitamins (through food or livestock's feed). Most vitamins synthesized by plants present amino acids as precursors (B1, B2, B3, B5, B7, B9 and E) and are therefore linked to plant nitrogen metabolism. Amino acids play different roles in their biosynthesis and metabolism, either incorporated into the backbone of the vitamin or as amino, sulfur or one-carbon group donors. There is a high natural variation in vitamin contents in crops and its exploitation through breeding, metabolic engineering and agronomic practices can enhance their nutritional quality. While the underlying biochemical roles of vitamins as cosubstrates or cofactors are usually common for most eukaryotes, the impact of vitamins B and E in metabolism and physiology can be quite different on plants and animals. Here, we first aim at giving an overview of the biosynthesis of amino acid-derived vitamins in plants, with a particular focus on how this knowledge can be exploited to increase vitamin contents in crops. Second, we will focus on the functions of these vitamins in both plants and animals (and humans in particular), to unravel common and specific roles for vitamins in evolutionary distant organisms, in which these amino acid-derived vitamins play, however, an essential role.

  14. Vitamin D Deficiency Among Professional Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Matthew P; Lombardo, Stephen J; Kharrazi, F Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in several systems of the human body. Various studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to stress and insufficiency fractures, muscle recovery and function, and athletic performance. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the elite athletic population has not been extensively studied, and very few reports exist among professional athletes. There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency among players attending the National Basketball Association (NBA) Combine. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. This is a retrospective review of data previously collected as part of the routine medical evaluation of players in the NBA Combines from 2009 through 2013. Player parameters evaluated were height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and vitamin D level. Statistical analysis using t tests and analysis of variance was used to detect any correlation between the player parameters and vitamin D level. Vitamin D levels were categorized as deficient (32 ng/mL). After institutional review board approval was submitted to the NBA, the NBA released deidentified data on 279 players who participated in the combines from 2009 through 2013. There were 90 players (32.3%) who were deficient, 131 players (47.0%) who were insufficient, and 58 players (20.8%) who were sufficient. A total of 221 players (79.3%) were either vitamin D deficient or insufficient. Among all players included, the average vitamin D level was 25.6 ± 10.2 ng/mL. Among the players who were deficient, insufficient, and sufficient, the average vitamin D levels were 16.1 ± 2.1 ng/mL, 25.0 ± 3.4 ng/mL, and 41.6 ± 8.6 ng/mL, respectively. Player height and weight were significantly increased in vitamin D-sufficient players compared with players who were not sufficient (P = .0008 and .009, respectively). Player age and BMI did not significantly differ depending on vitamin D status (P = .15 and .77, respectively). There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency

  15. Quantifying Intrinsic and Extrinsic Contributions to Human Longevity: Application of a Two-Process Vitality Model to the Human Mortality Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrow, David J; Anderson, James J

    2016-12-01

    The rise in human life expectancy has involved declines in intrinsic and extrinsic mortality processes associated, respectively, with senescence and environmental challenges. To better understand the factors driving this rise, we apply a two-process vitality model to data from the Human Mortality Database. Model parameters yield intrinsic and extrinsic cumulative survival curves from which we derive intrinsic and extrinsic expected life spans (ELS). Intrinsic ELS, a measure of longevity acted on by intrinsic, physiological factors, changed slowly over two centuries and then entered a second phase of increasing longevity ostensibly brought on by improvements in old-age death reduction technologies and cumulative health behaviors throughout life. The model partitions the majority of the increase in life expectancy before 1950 to increasing extrinsic ELS driven by reductions in environmental, event-based health challenges in both childhood and adulthood. In the post-1950 era, the extrinsic ELS of females appears to be converging to the intrinsic ELS, whereas the extrinsic ELS of males is approximately 20 years lower than the intrinsic ELS.

  16. Transporters for the Intestinal Absorption of Cholesterol, Vitamin E, and Vitamin K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Yoshihide; Takada, Tappei; Kurauchi, Ryoya; Tanaka, Yusuke; Komine, Toko; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2017-04-03

    Humans cannot synthesize fat-soluble vitamins such as vitamin E and vitamin K. For this reason, they must be obtained from the diet via intestinal absorption. As the deficiency or excess of these vitamins has been reported to cause several types of diseases and disorders in humans, the intestinal absorption of these nutrients must be properly regulated to ensure good health. However, the mechanism of their intestinal absorption remains poorly understood. Recent studies on cholesterol using genome-edited mice, genome-wide association approaches, gene mutation analyses, and the development of cholesterol absorption inhibitors have revealed that several membrane proteins play crucial roles in the intestinal absorption of cholesterol. Surprisingly, detailed analyses of these cholesterol transporters have revealed that they can also transport vitamin E and vitamin K, providing clues to uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying the intestinal absorption of these fat-soluble vitamins. In this review, we focus on the membrane proteins (Niemann-Pick C1 like 1, scavenger receptor class B type I, cluster of differentiation 36, and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) that are (potentially) involved in the intestinal absorption of cholesterol, vitamin E, and vitamin K and discuss their physiological and pharmacological importance. We also discuss the related uncertainties that need to be explored in future studies.

  17. The role of vitamin D in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dębińska, Anna; Sikorska-Szaflik, Hanna; Urbanik, Magdalena; Boznański, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D has been suggested to have an important impact on a much wider aspects on human health than calcium homeostasis and mineral metabolism, specifically in the field of human immunology. It has been reported that vitamin D influences the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems, which makes the association between vitamin D and allergic diseases a field of interest. Although many studies have sought to determine whether vitamin D has an influence on progression of allergic disease, the impact of vitamin D on atopic dermatitis development and severity remains unclear. In this review, we summarize recent studies relating vitamin D to atopic dermatitis and discuss its possible role in the pathogenesis of allergic skin diseases, emphasizing the need for well-designed, prospective trials on vitamin D supplementation in the context of prevention and treatment for allergic conditions.

  18. The role of vitamin D in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lương, Khanh Vinh Quốc; Nguyễn, Lan Thi Hoàng

    2015-01-15

    An abnormal calcium-parathyroid hormone (PTH)-vitamin D axis has been reported in patients with malaria infection. A role for vitamin D in malaria has been suggested by many studies. Genetic studies have identified numerous factors that link vitamin D to malaria, including human leukocyte antigen genes, toll-like receptors, heme oxygenase-1, angiopoietin-2, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors, and Bcl-2. Vitamin D has also been implicated in malaria via its effects on the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine, matrix metalloproteinases, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, prostaglandins, reactive oxidative species, and nitric oxide synthase. Vitamin D may be important in malaria; therefore, additional research on its role in malaria is needed.

  19. Population‐based survey methods to quantify associations between human rights violations and health outcomes among internally displaced persons in eastern Burma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullany, Luke C; Richards, Adam K; Lee, Catherine I; Suwanvanichkij, Voravit; Maung, Cynthia; Mahn; Beyrer, Chris; Lee, Thomas J

    2007-01-01

    Background Case reports of human rights violations have focused on individuals' experiences. Population‐based quantification of associations between rights indicators and health outcomes is rare and has not been documented in eastern Burma. Objective We describe the association between mortality and morbidity and the household‐level experience of human rights violations among internally displaced persons in eastern Burma. Methods Mobile health workers in conflict zones of eastern Burma conducted 1834 retrospective household surveys in 2004. Workers recorded data on vital events, mid‐upper arm circumference of young children, malaria parasitaemia status of respondents and household experience of various human rights violations during the previous 12 months. Results Under‐5 mortality was 218 (95% confidence interval 135 to 301) per 1000 live births. Almost one‐third of households reported forced labour (32.6%). Forced displacement (8.9% of households) was associated with increased child mortality (odds ratio = 2.80), child malnutrition (odds ratio = 3.22) and landmine injury (odds ratio = 3.89). Theft or destruction of the food supply (reported by 25.2% of households) was associated with increased crude mortality (odds ratio = 1.58), malaria parasitaemia (odds ratio = 1.82), child malnutrition (odds ratio = 1.94) and landmine injury (odds ratio = 4.55). Multiple rights violations (14.4% of households) increased the risk of child (incidence rate ratio = 2.18) and crude (incidence rate ratio = 1.75) mortality and the odds of landmine injury (odds ratio = 19.8). Child mortality risk was increased more than fivefold (incidence rate ratio = 5.23) among families reporting three or more rights violations. Conclusions Widespread human rights violations in conflict zones in eastern Burma are associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality. Population‐level associations can be quantified using standard

  20. Quantifying human disturbance in watersheds: Variable selection and performance of a GIS-based disturbance index for predicting the biological condition of perennial streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, James A.; Carlisle, Daren M.; Weber, Lisa C.

    2010-01-01

    Characterizing the relative severity of human disturbance in watersheds is often part of stream assessments and is frequently done with the aid of Geographic Information System (GIS)-derived data. However, the choice of variables and how they are used to quantify disturbance are often subjective. In this study, we developed a number of disturbance indices by testing sets of variables, scoring methods, and weightings of 33 potential disturbance factors derived from readily available GIS data. The indices were calibrated using 770 watersheds located in the western United States for which the severity of disturbance had previously been classified from detailed local data by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). The indices were calibrated by determining which variable or variable combinations and aggregation method best differentiated between least- and most-disturbed sites. Indices composed of several variables performed better than any individual variable, and best results came from a threshold method of scoring using six uncorrelated variables: housing unit density, road density, pesticide application, dam storage, land cover along a mainstem buffer, and distance to nearest canal/pipeline. The final index was validated with 192 withheld watersheds and correctly classified about two-thirds (68%) of least- and most-disturbed sites. These results provide information about the potential for using a disturbance index as a screening tool for a priori ranking of watersheds at a regional/national scale, and which landscape variables and methods of combination may be most helpful in doing so.

  1. A high-throughput cellular assay to quantify the p53-degradation activity of E6 from different human papillomavirus types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, David; Archambault, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    A subset of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), known as the high-risk types, are the causative agents of cervical cancer and other malignancies of the anogenital region and oral mucosa. The capacity of these viruses to induce cancer and to immortalize cells in culture relies in part on a critical function of their E6 oncoprotein, that of promoting the poly-ubiquitination of the cellular tumor suppressor protein p53 and its subsequent degradation by the proteasome. Here, we describe a cellular assay to measure the p53-degradation activity of E6 from different HPV types. This assay is based on a translational fusion of p53 to Renilla luciferase (Rluc-p53) that remains sensitive to degradation by high-risk E6 and whose steady-state levels can be accurately measured in standard luciferase assays. The p53-degradation activity of any E6 protein can be tested and quantified in transiently transfected cells by determining the amount of E6-expression vector required to reduce by half the levels of RLuc-p53 luciferase activity (50 % effective concentration [EC50]). The high-throughput and quantitative nature of this assay makes it particularly useful to compare the p53-degradation activities of E6 from several HPV types in parallel.

  2. Validation of a method to quantify chromium, cadmium, manganese, nickel and lead in human whole blood, urine, saliva and hair samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmedo, P.; Pla, A.; Hernandez, A.F.; Lopez-Guarnido, O.; Rodrigo, L.; Gil, F.

    2010-01-01

    For biological monitoring of heavy metal exposure in occupational toxicology, usually whole blood and urine samples are the most widely used and accepted matrix to assess internal xenobiotic exposure. Hair samples and saliva are also of interest in occupational and environmental health surveys but procedures for the determination of metals in saliva and hair are very scarce and to our knowledge there is no validation of a method to quantify Cr, Cd, Mn, Ni and Pb in four different human biological materials (whole blood, urine, saliva and axilary hair) by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). In the present study, quantification methods for the determination of Cr, Cd, Mn, Ni and Pb in whole blood, urine, saliva and axilary hair were validated according to the EU common standards. Pyrolisis and atomization temperatures have been determined. The main parameters evaluated were: detection and quantification limits, linearity range, repeatability, reproducibility, recovery and uncertainty. Accuracy of the methods was tested with the whole blood, urine and hair certified reference materials and recoveries of the spiked samples were acceptable ranged from 96.3 to 107.8%.

  3. Validation of a method to quantify chromium, cadmium, manganese, nickel and lead in human whole blood, urine, saliva and hair samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmedo, P.; Pla, A.; Hernandez, A.F.; Lopez-Guarnido, O.; Rodrigo, L. [Department of Legal Medicine and Toxicology, University of Granada, School of Medicine (Spain); Gil, F., E-mail: fgil@ugr.es [Department of Legal Medicine and Toxicology, University of Granada, School of Medicine (Spain)

    2010-02-05

    For biological monitoring of heavy metal exposure in occupational toxicology, usually whole blood and urine samples are the most widely used and accepted matrix to assess internal xenobiotic exposure. Hair samples and saliva are also of interest in occupational and environmental health surveys but procedures for the determination of metals in saliva and hair are very scarce and to our knowledge there is no validation of a method to quantify Cr, Cd, Mn, Ni and Pb in four different human biological materials (whole blood, urine, saliva and axilary hair) by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). In the present study, quantification methods for the determination of Cr, Cd, Mn, Ni and Pb in whole blood, urine, saliva and axilary hair were validated according to the EU common standards. Pyrolisis and atomization temperatures have been determined. The main parameters evaluated were: detection and quantification limits, linearity range, repeatability, reproducibility, recovery and uncertainty. Accuracy of the methods was tested with the whole blood, urine and hair certified reference materials and recoveries of the spiked samples were acceptable ranged from 96.3 to 107.8%.

  4. Calculating radiation exposures during use of (14)C-labeled nutrients, food components, and biopharmaceuticals to quantify metabolic behavior in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kelly, Peter B; Clifford, Andrew J

    2010-04-28

    (14)C has long been used as a tracer for quantifying the in vivo human metabolism of food components, biopharmaceuticals, and nutrients. Minute amounts (food components, biopharmaceuticals, or nutrients to be organized into models suitable for quantitative hypothesis testing and determination of metabolic parameters. In vivo models are important for specification of intake levels for food components, biopharmaceuticals, and nutrients. Accurate estimation of the radiation exposure from ingested (14)C is an essential component of the experimental design. Therefore, this paper illustrates the calculation involved in determining the radiation exposure from a minute dose of orally administered (14)C-beta-carotene, (14)C-alpha-tocopherol, (14)C-lutein, and (14)C-folic acid from four prior experiments. The administered doses ranged from 36 to 100 nCi, and radiation exposure ranged from 0.12 to 5.2 microSv to whole body and from 0.2 to 3.4 microSv to liver with consideration of tissue weighting factor and fractional nutrient. In comparison, radiation exposure experienced during a 4 h airline flight across the United States at 37000 ft was 20 microSv.

  5. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... regimen. Why Buy Vitamins? There are many good reasons to consider taking vitamin supplements, such as over- ... including growth, digestion, and nerve function. There are 13 vitamins that the body absolutely needs: vitamins A, ...

  6. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the vitamins they need from the foods they eat, millions of people worldwide take supplemental vitamins as part of their health regimen. Why Buy Vitamins? There are many good reasons to consider taking vitamin supplements, such ...

  7. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body absolutely needs: vitamins A, C, D, E, K, and the B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, ... magnesium, and vitamins A (as carotenoids), C, and E (for adults) calcium, potassium, fiber, magnesium, and vitamin ...

  8. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have dark skin, or are exposed to insufficient ultraviolet band radiation (such as sunlight), consume extra vitamin D from vitamin D-fortified foods and/or supplements. How Vitamins are Regulated Vitamin ...

  9. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant or breastfeeding Vitamin Facts Your body uses vitamins for a variety of biological processes, ... nerve function. There are 13 vitamins that the body absolutely needs: vitamins A, C, D, E, K, ...

  10. Winter to summer change in vitamin D status reduces systemic inflammation and bioenergetic activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calton, Emily K; Keane, Kevin N; Raizel, Raquel; Rowlands, Jordan; Soares, Mario J; Newsholme, Philip

    2017-08-01

    Vitamin D status [25(OH)D] has recently been reported to be associated with altered cellular bioenergetic profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). No study has tracked the seasonal variation of 25(OH)D and its putative influence on whole body energy metabolism, cellular bioenergetic profiles, inflammatory markers and clinical chemistry. Whole body energy metabolism and substrate utilisation were measured by indirect calorimetry. PBMCs obtained from the same subjects were isolated from whole blood, counted and freshly seeded. Bioenergetic analysis (mitochondrial stress test and glycolysis stress test) was performed using the Seahorse XF e 96 flux analyser. 25(OH)D was assessed using the Architect immunoassay method. 25(OH)D increased by a median (IQR) of 14.40 (20.13)nmol/L (pwinter to summer and was accompanied by significant improvements in indices of insulin sensitivity, McAuley's index (p=0.019) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (p=0.028). PBMC mitochondrial parameters basal respiration, non-mitochondrial respiration, ATP production, proton leak, and maximal respiration decreased in summer compared to winter. Similarly, PBMC glycolytic parameters glycolytic activity, glucose response, and glycolytic capacity were all reduced in summer compared to winter. There was also a trend for absolute resting metabolic rate (RMR) to decrease (p=0.066). Markers of systemic inflammation MCP-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and IL-12p70 decreased significantly in summer compared to winter. Participants who entered winter with a low 25(OH)D (winter 25(OH)D concentrations of 50-75nmol/L or >75nmol/L. The absolute change in 25(OH)D was not associated with altered bioenergetics. Seasonal improvements in 25(OH)D was associated with reduced systemic inflammation, PBMC bioenergetic profiles and whole body energy metabolism. These observational changes in PBMC bioenergetics were most pronounced in those who had insufficient 25(OH)D in winter. The data warrants

  11. Vitamins, Are They Safe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Hamishehkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of a daily multivitamin among people all over the world is dramatically increasing in recent years. Most of the people believe that if vitamins are not effective, at least they are safe. However, the long term health consequences of vitamins consumption are unknown. This study aimed to assess the side effects and possible harmful and detrimental properties of vitamins and to discuss whether vitamins can be used as safe health products or dietary supplements. We performed a MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus and Google Scholar search and assessed reference lists of the included studies which were published from 1993 through 2015. The studies, with an emphasis on RCTs (randomized controlled clinical trials, were reviewed. As some vitamins such as fat-soluble vitamins (vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, and also some of the water-soluble vitamins like folic acid may cause adverse events and some like vitamin C is widely taken assuming that it has so many benefits and no harm, we included relevant studies with negative or undesired results regarding the effect of these vitamins on health. Our recommendation is that taking high-dose supplements of vitamins A, E, D, C, and folic acid is not always effective for prevention of disease, and it can even be harmful to the health.

  12. Thiamin and Riboflavin in Human Milk: Effects of Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplementation and Stage of Lactation on Vitamer Secretion and Contributions to Total Vitamin Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Daniela; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Adair, Linda S; Bentley, Margaret E; Flax, Valerie L; Jamieson, Denise J; Ellington, Sascha R; Tegha, Gerald; Chasela, Charles S; Kamwendo, Debbie; Allen, Lindsay H

    2016-01-01

    While thiamin and riboflavin in breast milk have been analyzed for over 50 years, less attention has been given to the different forms of each vitamin. Thiamin-monophosphate (TMP) and free thiamin contribute to total thiamin content; flavin adenine-dinucleotide (FAD) and free riboflavin are the main contributors to total riboflavin. We analyzed milk collected at 2 (n = 258) or 6 (n = 104), and 24 weeks (n = 362) from HIV-infected Malawian mothers within the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals and Nutrition (BAN) study, randomly assigned at delivery to lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) or a control group, to investigate each vitamer's contribution to total milk vitamin content and the effects of supplementation on the different thiamin and riboflavin vitamers at early and later stages of lactation, and obtain insight into the transport and distribution of these vitamers in human milk. Thiamin vitamers were derivatized into thiochrome-esters and analyzed by high-performance liquid-chromatography-fluorescence-detection (HPLC-FLD). Riboflavin and FAD were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass-spectrometry (ULPC-MS/MS). Thiamin-pyrophosphate (TPP), identified here for the first time in breast milk, contributed 1.9-4.5% to total thiamin. Free thiamin increased significantly from 2/6 to 24 weeks regardless of treatment indicating an active transport of this vitamer in milk. LNS significantly increased TMP and free thiamin only at 2 weeks compared to the control: median 170 versus 151 μg/L (TMP), 13.3 versus 10.5 μg/L (free thiamin, priboflavin was consistently and significantly increased with LNS (range: 14.8-19.6 μg/L (LNS) versus 5.0-7.4 μg/L (control), priboflavin relative amounts from 92-94:6-8% to 85:15%, indicating a preferred secretion of the free form into breast milk. The continuous presence of FAD in breast milk suggests an active transport and secretion system for this vitamer or possibly formation of this co-enymatic form in the

  13. Quantify environmental effects in shaping the genetic diversification pattern of Oncomelania hupensis and its implications in surveillance of human susceptibility to Schistosomiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L.; Liao, J. S.; Gong, P.

    2012-12-01

    The transmission and distribution of schistomiasis, one of the most serious infectious diseases in East and Southeast Asia, tied closely to its unique intermediate snail host Oncomelania hupensis. The coevolved relationships of O. hupensis populations with its parasite Schistosoma japonisum are important in understanding the mechanism of disease spread. The genetic diversification pattern within population is supposed to influence the amount of parasite loads, and the susceptibility of snails determined the chance for human or mammals to get infected. Meanwhile, intervening environmental features had been long suggested to affect snail population dynamics and evolutionary trajectories of species. However, no comprehensive study referring to the above topics has been carried out on O.hupensis populations before. In this study, we reanalyzed published data in mainland China to evaluate whether human infection rate and genetic diversification patterns are related under natural environment. Besides that, we used an array of remotely sensed image derived environmental variables to quantify the amount of variation in population genetic structure that could be explained by those factors by landscape genetic analysis. We found that human schistosomiasis infection rate is positively correlated with intra-population genetic diversification and inter-population genetic exchange, which is contradictory with the Red Queen hypothesis. The patterns of genetic diversification are better revealed when non-Euclidean, environmentally determined distance measures or features are used in large heterogeneous landscape. The impact of stream connectivity on the snail inter-population genetic distances does not so evident unless taking wetlands into calculation, and thus control activities planned solely along river systems may be suboptimal. Climate features have a stronger impact on genetic structure of snails than topology, and precipitation seasonality dominates the highest proportion

  14. Quantifiers and working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szymanik, J.; Zajenkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a study examining the role of working memory in quantifier verification. We created situations similar to the span task to compare numerical quantifiers of low and high rank, parity quantifiers and proportional quantifiers. The results enrich and support the data obtained

  15. Quantifiers and working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szymanik, J.; Zajenkowski, M.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a study examining the role of working memory in quantifier verification. We created situations similar to the span task to compare numerical quantifiers of low and high rank, parity quantifiers and proportional quantifiers. The results enrich and support the data obtained

  16. FORMULATION OF VITAMIN COMPLEXES, SUPPLYING PHYSIOLOGICAL NEEDS IN VITAMINS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Gromova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological progress saved human from hard physical work and big expenditures of energy. It was resulted in need to decrease the volume of consumed food. But need in vitamins remained on the former level. Maximal volume of vitamins, which organism use, is conditioned on the level of genes. The reasons, allowing a development of state of hypovitaminosis especially in schoolchildren, remain. Increased metabolism, induced by the growth of organism, frequently inevitable stress, sometimes unbalanced nutrition, hard intellectual loads, etc., can lead to the development of the states, which need increased doses of vitamins. Observations during last 20 years showed that there is no almost any child, whose provision with vitamins con be estimated as optimal. In most children (up to 70% the combined deficiency of three and more vitamins is detected, independently of their age, time of year and place of living. Pediatricians use vitamins not only for the maintenance of homeostasis itself, but for the initiation of all program of child’s development. Schoolchild’s organism needs additional volume of vitamins all the time, and they should be administrated during prolonged periods of time, independently of time of the year and adequacy of diet. Timely administration of vitamins and minerals complexes provides significant prophylactic of hypovitaminosis.Key words: children, vitamins, nutrition, prophylaxis.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(6:77-84

  17. Vitamin B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prize Alfred Nobel's Life and Work Teachers' Questionnaire Vitamin B1 - About The Chicken Farm educational game and ... the game window. Reading: "Christian Eijkman, Beriberi and Vitamin B1" - Who was Eijkman and why did he ...

  18. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  19. Facts about Vitamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yolks. Table 2. Food sources of vitamin A Food Vitamin A (RAE*) Sweet potato, cooked, 1 medium 1,400 Spinach, frozen, boiled, ½ cup 580 Carrot, raw, ½ cup 460 Pumpkin, cooked, ½ cup 305 Cantaloupe, cubed, 1 cup ...

  20. Vitamin B12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. National Academies Press. Washington, DC, 1998. PMID: 23193625 ...

  1. Vitamin D Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. If your results show you have an excess of (too much) vitamin D, it is most likely due to taking ... 2 screens]. Available from: ... Merck & Co. Inc.; c2017. Vitamin D [cited 2017 Apr 10]; [about 2 screens]. ...

  2. Vitamin A blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A higher than normal value means you have excess vitamin A in your blood (toxic levels). This may ... Saunders; 2013:1175-1177. Ross AC, Tan L. Vitamin A deficiencies and excess. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  3. B Vitamins Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the body through the urine. Because B vitamins are water-soluble, only small amounts are stored by the body and they must be obtained from foods rich in B vitamins or from supplements on a regular basis. Severe ...

  4. Vitamin D derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deluca, H.F.; Schnoes, H.K.; Napoli, J.L.; Fivizzani, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    The preparation is described of specified vitamin D 3 esters containing alkyl and hydroxy groups. They can be used, in particular, for preparing radiolabeled vitamin D 3 compounds of high specific activity. (U.K.)

  5. Vitamin D derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deluca, H.F.; Schnoes, H.K.; Napoli, J.L.; Fivizzani, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to cyclo-vitamin intermediates of specified formula. They can be used, in particular, for preparing 26,27-isotopically labeled vitamin D 3 compounds of high specific activity. (author)

  6. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  7. Effects of vitamin K3 and K5 on proliferation, cytokine production, and regulatory T cell-frequency in human peripheral-blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Hiroshige; Ishizawa, Hitomi; Nakamura, Yurie; Tadokoro, Hiroko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2014-03-18

    The effects of vitamin K (VK) derivatives VK3 and VK5 on human immune cells have not been extensively investigated. We examined the effects of VK3 and VK5 on proliferation, apoptosis, cytokine production, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cell-frequency in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) activated by T cell mitogen in vitro. Anti-proliferative effects of VK3 and VK5 on T-cell mitogen activated PBMCs were assessed by WST assay procedures. Apoptotic cells were determined as Annexin V positive/propidium iodide (PI) negative cells. Cytokine concentrations in the supernatant of the culture medium were measured with bead-array procedures followed by analysis with flow cytometry. The CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells in mitogen-activated PBMCs were stained with fluorescence-labeled specific antibodies followed by flow cytometry. VK3 and VK5 suppressed the mitogen-activated proliferation of PBMCs significantly at 10-100μM (p<0.05). The data also suggest that VK3 and VK5 promote apoptosis in the mitogen-activated T cells. VK3 and VK5 significantly inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, interleukin (IL)-4, -6, and -10 from the activated PBMCs at 10-100μM (p<0.05). In contrast, VK3 and VK5 significantly increased Treg cell-frequency in the activated PBMCs at concentrations more than 10μM (p<0.001). Our data suggest that VK3 and VK5 attenuate T cell mediated immunity by inhibiting the proliferative response and inducing apoptosis in activated T cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Vitamin D – The Vitamin Hormone

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a lot has changed, and vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency is now a global public-health ... Open Access article distributed under the terms of the. Creative Commons ..... as excess vitamin D3 is destroyed by sunlight. Conclusion. It appears ...

  9. Vitamins and Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and can be stored in your body. The water-soluble vitamins — C and the B-complex vitamins (such as vitamins B6, B12, niacin, riboflavin, and folate) — need to dissolve in water before your body can absorb them. Because of ...

  10. Vitamin D derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deluca, H.F.; Schnoes, H.K.; Napoli, J.L.; Fivizzani, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The chemical preparation of 26,27-isotopically labelled vitamin D 3 derivatives of high specific activity is described. These labelled vitamin D derivatives are useful in the determination of vitamin D metabolite levels in the blood and tissues of man and animals. (U.K.)

  11. Vitamin B6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pork Nuts Poultry Whole grains and fortified cereals Canned chickpeas Fortified breads and cereals may also contain vitamin B6. Fortified means that a vitamin or mineral has been added to the food. Side Effects Large doses of vitamin B6 can cause: Difficulty ...

  12. Intracellular transport of fat-soluble vitamins A and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Nozomu; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Vitamins are compounds that are essential for the normal growth, reproduction and functioning of the human body. Of the 13 known vitamins, vitamins A, D, E and K are lipophilic compounds and are therefore called fat-soluble vitamins. Because of their lipophilicity, fat-soluble vitamins are solubilized and transported by intracellular carrier proteins to exert their actions and to be metabolized properly. Vitamin A and its derivatives, collectively called retinoids, are solubilized by intracellular retinoid-binding proteins such as cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP), cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP) and cellular retinal-binding protein (CRALBP). These proteins act as chaperones that regulate the metabolism, signaling and transport of retinoids. CRALBP-mediated intracellular retinoid transport is essential for vision in human. α-Tocopherol, the main form of vitamin E found in the body, is transported by α-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP) in hepatic cells. Defects of α-TTP cause vitamin E deficiency and neurological disorders in humans. Recently, it has been shown that the interaction of α-TTP with phosphoinositides plays a critical role in the intracellular transport of α-tocopherol and is associated with familial vitamin E deficiency. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms and biological significance of the intracellular transport of vitamins A and E. © 2014 The Authors. Traffic published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Quantifying the importance of MSP1-19 as a target of growth-inhibitory and protective antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny W Wilson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies targeting blood stage antigens are important in protection against malaria, but the key targets and mechanisms of immunity are not well understood. Merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1 is an abundant and essential protein. The C-terminal 19 kDa region (MSP1-19 is regarded as a promising vaccine candidate and may also be an important target of immunity. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Growth inhibitory antibodies against asexual-stage parasites and IgG to recombinant MSP1-19 were measured in plasma samples from a longitudinal cohort of 206 children in Papua New Guinea. Differential inhibition by samples of mutant P. falciparum lines that expressed either the P. falciparum or P. chabaudi form of MSP1-19 were used to quantify MSP1-19 specific growth-inhibitory antibodies. The great majority of children had detectable IgG to MSP1-19, and high levels of IgG were significantly associated with a reduced risk of symptomatic P. falciparum malaria during the 6-month follow-up period. However, there was little evidence of PfMSP1-19 specific growth inhibition by plasma samples from children. Similar results were found when testing non-dialysed or dialysed plasma, or purified antibodies, or when measuring growth inhibition in flow cytometry or microscopy-based assays. Rabbit antisera generated by immunization with recombinant MSP1-19 demonstrated strong MSP1-19 specific growth-inhibitory activity, which appeared to be due to much higher antibody levels than human samples; antibody avidity was similar between rabbit antisera and human plasma. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that MSP1-19 is not a major target of growth inhibitory antibodies and that the protective effects of antibodies to MSP1-19 are not due to growth inhibitory activity, but may instead be mediated by other mechanisms. Alternatively, antibodies to MSP1-19 may act as a marker of protective immunity.

  14. Vitamin D vitamers affect vitamin D status differently in young healthy males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jette; Wreford Andersen, Elisabeth Anne; Christensen, Tue

    2018-01-01

    Dietary intake of vitamin D includes vitamin D3 (vitD3), 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OH-D3), and vitamin D2 (vitD2). However, the bioactivity of the different species has not been scientifically established. The hypothesis in this study was that vitD3, 25OH-D3, and vitD2 have an equal effect on 25......-hydroxyvitamin D in serum (vitamin D status). To test our hypothesis, we performed a randomized, crossover study. Twelve young males consumed 10 µg/day vitD3 during a four-week run-in period, followed by 3 × 6 weeks of 10 µg/day vitD3, 10 µg/day 25OH-D3, and 10 µg/day vitD2. The content of vitD3, vitD2, 25OH-D3......, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 (25OH-D2) in serum was quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The hypothesis that the three sources of vitamin D affect vitamin D status equally was rejected. Based on the assumption that 1 µg vitD3/day will show an increase in vitamin D status...

  15. The experimental scavenging capacity and the degradation potential of the mixture of carotenoid and vitamin E, vitamin C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyet, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Khoa, Tran Anh; Quan, Vu Thi Hong; Chinh, Vuong Ngoc; Phung, Le Thi Kim

    2017-09-01

    The antioxidant capacity of Gac oil can be enhanced by the presence of these other active antioxidants such as vitamin E, vitamin C. Since many of these natural antioxidants are consumed together in foods, the potential for scavenging capacity is high in the human diet. The aim of this study was to determine what concentrations and combinations of antioxidants among Gac oil, vitamin E, vitamin C are capable of producing high scavenging capacity. The fact has resulted in detailed studies of antioxidation capacity of carotenoid of and vitamin. In addition, the antioxidant capacity and degradation potential of the combined mixture of carotenoid and vitamin E, vitamin C were discussed in view of their antioxidant properties as beneficial species in preventing various diseases.

  16. Effects of Vitamin E in Neonates and Young Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria Pacifici

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol is a potent and natural antioxidant. Vitamin E is concentrated from soybean oil. The Committee on Fetus and Newborn of the Academy of the American of Pediatrics endorsed 1 to 2 mg/dl as the normal range of serum tocopherol level. Human infants are born with low stores of vitamin E, thus they require an adequate intake of vitamin E soon after birth. The optimum intravenous dose of vitamin E is 2.8 mg/kg per day (maximum 7 mg/kg per day. Treating very-low-birth-weight infants with 100 mg/kg vitamin E for >1 week results in levels >3.5 mg/dl and significantly reduces the risks of severe retinopathy, intracranial hemorrhage, hemolytic anemia, chronic lung disease, retrolental fibroplasia and incidence and severity of intraventricular hemorrhage, but increases the risks of sepsis, necrotizing enterocolitis and can cause retinal hemorrhage in very-low-birth-weight infants. Vitamin E supplementation prevents the isolated vitamin E deficiency that causes spinocerebellar symptoms. The major benefits arising from elevated dosages of vitamin E have been the relief of symptoms of vitamin E deficiency in infants with abetalipoproteinamia and chronic cholestasis. Excessive doses of vitamin E may result in side effects and careful monitoring of vitamin E is thus essential. Neonates born to mothers treated with high doses of vitamin E have significantly lower birth weight compared to neonates born to untreated mothers. Vitamin E is not teratogenic. The aim of this study was to review the effects of vitamin E in neonates and young infants.

  17. A review on potential roles of vitamins in incidence, progression, and improvement of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matin Khosravi-Largani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease, with unknown etiology. Vitamins, as important micronutrients playing different roles in body, seem to be important in MS pathogenesis. In vitro, in vivo and human studies, supports the protective role of some vitamins in MS occurrence or progression. Current study reviews recent insights and reports about the importance of vitamins in MS incidence or progression. In accordance, the importance of all water and fat-soluble vitamins in MS pathogenesis based on observational studies in human population and their role in the function of immune system as well as possible therapeutic opportunities are discussed in depth throughout this review. Keywords: Multiple sclerosis, Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, Vitamin A, Vitamin E, Vitamin D, Folic acid, Vitamin B 12, Vitamins

  18. [Vitamins and oxidative stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodentsova, V M; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Mazo, V K

    2013-01-01

    The central and local stress limiting systems, including the antioxidant defense system involved in defending the organism at the cellular and systemic levels from excess activation response to stress influence, leading to damaging effects. The development of stress, regardless of its nature [cold, increased physical activity, aging, the development of many pathologies (cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases, diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, ischemia, the effects of burns), immobilization, hypobaric hypoxia, hyperoxia, radiation effects etc.] leads to a deterioration of the vitamin status (vitamins E, A, C). Damaging effect on the antioxidant defense system is more pronounced compared to the stress response in animals with an isolated deficiency of vitamins C, A, E, B1 or B6 and the combined vitamins deficiency in the diet. Addition missing vitamin or vitamins restores the performance of antioxidant system. Thus, the role of vitamins in adaptation to stressors is evident. However, vitamins C, E and beta-carotene in high doses, significantly higher than the physiological needs of the organism, may be not only antioxidants, but may have also prooxidant properties. Perhaps this explains the lack of positive effects of antioxidant vitamins used in extreme doses for a long time described in some publications. There is no doubt that to justify the current optimal doses of antioxidant vitamins and other dietary antioxidants specially-designed studies, including biochemical testing of initial vitamin and antioxidant status of the organism, as well as monitoring their change over time are required.

  19. [Vitamins in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneller, K

    2012-09-01

    Vitamins are organic substances essential to the maintenance of many physiological functions, and necessary for growth. They are subdivided into two groups: the fat soluble vitamins which include vitamins A, D, E and K and the water-soluble vitamins which include Group B vitamins and vitamin C. The recommendations for vitamins intake must be evaluated at regular intervals, and vary according to the different methods used and the different environments assessed. The shortcomings, but equally the measures of prevention must be taken into account. In industrialized countries, provided that the diet is balanced and in the absence of chronic disease, the majority of needs are covered. Vitamin requirements vary depending on age, sex, state of pregnancy, chronic disease or a specific diet. In industrialized countries, chronic alcoholics and malabsorption cases represent groups at risk of vitamin deficiency. Dietary anamnesis remains the best tool to assess needs and nutritional deficiencies. In infants fed exclusively on milk, the required intake is easy to deduce; on the other hand, the needs assessment becomes more difficult with dietary diversification. In industrialized countries, vitamin D should be administered throughout one's life, and vitamin K during the first three months of life for breast-fed new-borns. In developing countries, nutritional status is precarious and supplementation needs to be adapted accordingly.

  20. Crucial Role of Vitamin D in the Musculoskeletal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Wintermeyer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is well known to exert multiple functions in bone biology, autoimmune diseases, cell growth, inflammation or neuromuscular and other immune functions. It is a fat-soluble vitamin present in many foods. It can be endogenously produced by ultraviolet rays from sunlight when the skin is exposed to initiate vitamin D synthesis. However, since vitamin D is biologically inert when obtained from sun exposure or diet, it must first be activated in human beings before functioning. The kidney and the liver play here a crucial role by hydroxylation of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the liver and to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidney. In the past decades, it has been proven that vitamin D deficiency is involved in many diseases. Due to vitamin D’s central role in the musculoskeletal system and consequently the strong negative impact on bone health in cases of vitamin D deficiency, our aim was to underline its importance in bone physiology by summarizing recent findings on the correlation of vitamin D status and rickets, osteomalacia, osteopenia, primary and secondary osteoporosis as well as sarcopenia and musculoskeletal pain. While these diseases all positively correlate with a vitamin D deficiency, there is a great controversy regarding the appropriate vitamin D supplementation as both positive and negative effects on bone mineral density, musculoskeletal pain and incidence of falls are reported.

  1. Vitamin D, PCOS and androgens in men: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Trummer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accumulating evidence from animal and human studies suggests that vitamin D is involved in many functions of the reproductive system in both genders. Aim: The aim of this review was to provide an overview on the effects of vitamin D on polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS in women and androgen metabolism in men. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed for relevant English language publications published from January 2012 until September 2017. Results and discussion: The vitamin D receptor and vitamin D-metabolizing enzymes are found in reproductive tissues of women and men. In women, vitamin D status has been associated with several features of PCOS. In detail, cross-sectional data suggest a regulatory role of vitamin D in PCOS-related aspects such as ovulatory dysfunction, insulin resistance as well as hyperandrogenism. Moreover, results from randomized controlled trials (RCTs suggest that vitamin D supplementation may be beneficial for metabolic, endocrine and fertility aspects in PCOS. In men, vitamin D status has been associated with androgen levels and hypogonadism. Further, there is some evidence for a favorable effect of vitamin D supplementation on testosterone concentrations, although others failed to show a significant effect on testosterone levels. Conclusion: In summary, vitamin D deficiency is associated with adverse fertility outcomes including PCOS and hypogonadism, but the evidence is insufficient to establish causality. High-quality RCTs are needed to further evaluate the effects of vitamin D supplementation in PCOS women as well as on androgen levels in men.

  2. The induction of apoptosis and autophagy in human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells by combined treatment with vitamin C and polysaccharides extracted from Grifola frondosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fei; Zhao, Jin; Song, Lei; Zhang, Ya-Qing; Guo, Zhong; Yang, Ke-Hu

    2017-11-01

    Polysaccharides extracted from the mushroom Grifola frondosa (GFP) are a potential anticancer agent. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of GFP and vitamin C (VC) alone and in combination on the viability of human hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 and HepG2 cells. Studies designed to detect cell apoptosis and autophagy were also conducted to investigate the mechanism. Results from the cell viability assay indicated that a combination of GFP (0.2 or 0.25 mg/mL) and VC (0.3 mmol/L) (GFP/VC) led to 52.73 and 53.93% reduction in cell viability of SMMC-7721 and HepG2 cells separately after 24 h. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that GFP/VC treatment induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, and apoptosis occurred in approximately 43.62 and 42.46% of the SMMC-7721 and HepG2 cells separately. Moreover, results of Hoechst33258 and monodansylcadaverine staining, and transmission electron microscopy, showed that GFP/VC induced apoptosis and autophagy in SMMC-7721 and HepG2 cells. Western blot analysis showed changes in the expression of apoptosis-related proteins [upregulation of BAX and caspase-3, downregulation of Bcl-2, and activation of poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase] and autophagy protein markers (upregulation of beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B light chain-3). We also demonstrated that the expression of both Akt and p-Akt was enhanced, suggesting the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway might not be involved in this process. Our study shows that the combined application of GFP and VC induced cell apoptosis and autophagy in vitro, and might have antitumor activity in vivo.

  3. [Vitamin D and cognition in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constans, Thierry; Mondon, Karl; Annweiler, Cédric; Hommet, Caroline

    2010-12-01

    The understanding of the role of vitamin D in maintaining good health has considerably increased in the recent years. There is a growing evidence that vitamin D has not only a beneficial effect to prevent osteoporosis and the risk of falls in the elderly, but also may reduce incidence of cancers, infections, autoimmune, cardiovascular and neurologic diseases, and psychiatric disorders. Laboratory studies yield a biological plausibility for a positive contribution of vitamin D to brain functions: vitamin D receptor and 1,α-hydroxylase, the terminal calcitriol-activating enzyme, are widely distributed in both the fetal and adult brain. Vitamin D may be involved in neuroprotection, control of proinflammatory cytokine induced cognitive dysfunction and synthesis of calcium-binding proteins and neurotransmitter acetylcholine. However, the observational studies conducted in humans are still inconclusive, given the various tests of the cognitive functions that have been used, the performance of the studies either in patients or in healthy subjects, and different designs and/or confounding factors. The role of the vitamin D receptor in the pathophysiology of cognitive decline, incidence of Alzheimer's disease or vascular dementia and/or cognitive decline with respect to previous plasma 25OHD concentration, and the effect on cognition of vitamin D supplementation should be explored in further studies.

  4. Vitamin A and the nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Dragan M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A is essential for the early development and normal functioning of the brain throughout life. A deficiency of vitamin A is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries, and subclinical deficiency is probably present worldwide. The main active molecule in vitamin A is retinoic acid, which is involved in vision, the immune system, skin health, olfaction and cognition (learning, memory, spatial functions, olfaction, etc. through processes of neuroplasticity and neurogenesis. Vitamin A is involved in the regulation of about one-sixth of the human genome. It has non-genomic actions in protein translation and paracrine actions. Retinal vitamin A aldehyde is crucial for day and night vision. The best-known manifestation of hypovitaminosis A is night blindness but in more severe cases, it causes blindness. In the hypothalamus, vitamin A, with information from the retina, acts in circadian and seasonal regulation. Increased retinoic acid levels in the blood are associated with increased risk of depression, and lower levels have been connected with Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, cerebral ischemia, autistic spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. Higher doses and longer periods of treatment pose the threat of hypervitaminosis A. Vitamin A and its analogs are a promising new class of therapeutic agents in a wide spectrum of disorders, albeit with a narrow therapeutic window. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175033 i br. 175022

  5. Quantifying Anthropogenic Dust Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Pierre, Caroline

    2018-02-01

    Anthropogenic land use and land cover change, including local environmental disturbances, moderate rates of wind-driven soil erosion and dust emission. These human-dust cycle interactions impact ecosystems and agricultural production, air quality, human health, biogeochemical cycles, and climate. While the impacts of land use activities and land management on aeolian processes can be profound, the interactions are often complex and assessments of anthropogenic dust loads at all scales remain highly uncertain. Here, we critically review the drivers of anthropogenic dust emission and current evaluation approaches. We then identify and describe opportunities to: (1) develop new conceptual frameworks and interdisciplinary approaches that draw on ecological state-and-transition models to improve the accuracy and relevance of assessments of anthropogenic dust emissions; (2) improve model fidelity and capacity for change detection to quantify anthropogenic impacts on aeolian processes; and (3) enhance field research and monitoring networks to support dust model applications to evaluate the impacts of disturbance processes on local to global-scale wind erosion and dust emissions.

  6. Hepatobiliary transport kinetics of the conjugated bile acid tracer 11C-CSar quantified in healthy humans and patients by positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørntoft, Nikolaj Worm; Munk, Ole Lajord; Frisch, Kim; Ott, Peter; Keiding, Susanne; Sørensen, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Hepatobiliary secretion of bile acids is an important liver function. Here, we quantified the hepatic transport kinetics of conjugated bile acids using the bile acid tracer [N-methyl- 11 C]cholylsarcosine ( 11 C-CSar) and positron emission tomography (PET). Nine healthy participants and eight patients with varying degrees of cholestasis were examined with 11 C-CSar PET and measurement of arterial and hepatic venous blood concentrations of 11 C-CSar. Results are presented as median (range). The hepatic intrinsic clearance was 1.50 (1.20-1.76) ml blood/min/ml liver tissue in healthy participants and 0.46 (0.13-0.91) in patients. In healthy participants, the rate constant for secretion of 11 C-CSar from hepatocytes to bile was 0.36 (0.30-0.62)min -1 , 20 times higher than the rate constant for backflux from hepatocytes to blood (0.02, 0.005-0.07min -1 ). In the patients, rate constant for transport from hepatocyte to bile was reduced to 0.12 (0.006-0.27)min -1 , 2.3times higher than the rate constant for backflux to blood (0.05, 0.04-0.09). The increased backflux did not fully normalize exposure of the hepatocyte to bile acids as mean hepatocyte residence time of 11 C-CSar was 2.5 (1.6-3.1)min in healthy participants and 6.4 (3.1-23.7)min in patients. The rate constant for transport of 11 C-CSar from intrahepatic to extrahepatic bile was 0.057 (0.023-0.11)min -1 in healthy participants and only slightly reduced in patients 0.039 (0.017-0.066). This first in vivo quantification of individual steps involved in the hepatobiliary secretion of a conjugated bile acid in humans provided new insight into cholestatic disease. Positron emission tomography (PET) using the radiolabelled bile acid ( 11 C-CSar) enabled quantification of the individual steps of the hepatic transport of bile acids from blood to bile in man. Cholestasis reduced uptake and secretion and increased backflux to blood. These findings improve our understanding of cholestatic liver diseases and may support

  7. Vitamins and endurance training. Food for running or faddish claims?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Beek, E J

    1985-01-01

    The inter-relationship of food and physical performance, food is considered as a conglomerate of nutrients and man is depicted as a kind of organic pudding. This 'machine' concept of human performance in combination with the mysticism surrounding vitamins, has led to the faddish belief that additional vitamins are necessary to improve physical performance by means of supercharging the metabolic processes in the body. Various vitamins and their dietary recommendations as well as the indicators for vitamin status are discussed. It is concluded that a marginal or subclinical deficiency state can be defined as an intermediate between optimal vitamin status and frank clinical deficiency. Marginal deficiency is characterised by biochemical values deviating from statistically derived reference limits as well as the absence of clinical signs and symptoms of vitamin deficiency. Besides the static, mostly biochemical, indicators of vitamin status, more functional indicators are considered, among them work capacity. An extensive historical review on depletion studies, epidemiological surveys and supplementation studies is presented. It is concluded that a restricted intake of some B-complex vitamins-individually and in combination-of approximately less than 35 to 45% of the recommended dietary allowance may lead to decreased endurance capacity within a few weeks. Studies on ascorbic acid (vitamin C) depletion and fat-soluble vitamin A deficiency have noted no decrease of endurance capacity. However, in a few recent epidemiological surveys, biochemical vitamin C deficiency was actually shown to decrease aerobic power. Although the general conclusion is that a reduced water-soluble vitamin intake decreases endurance capacity, it is believed that further controlled experimentation is needed with B-complex vitamins and vitamin C individually. Furthermore, usually employed reference limits for vitamins need reappraisal translating them into impairment limits. With respect to the

  8. Indian women with higher serum concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 are significantly less likely to be infected with carcinogenic or high-risk (HR types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika J Piyathilake

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chandrika J Piyathilake1, Suguna Badiga1, Proma Paul2, Vijayaraghavan K3, Haripriya Vedantham3, Mrudula Sudula3, Pavani Sowjanya3, Gayatri Ramakrishna4, Keerti V Shah5, Edward E Partridge6, Patti E Gravitt21Department of Nutrition Sciences, The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3SHARE INDIA, Mediciti Institute of Medical Sciences, Ghanpur, India; 4Center for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, India; 5Department of Molecular biology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD USA; 6UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Alabama Birmingham (UAB, Birmingham, AL, USABackground: Studies conducted in the USA have demonstrated that micronutrients such as folate and vitamin B12 play a significant role in modifying the natural history of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs, the causative agent for developing invasive cervical cancer (CC and its precursor lesions.Objective: The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether these micronutrients have similar effects on HR-HPV infections in Indian women.Methods: The associations between serum concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 and HR-HPV infections were evaluated in 724 women who participated in a CC screening study in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh, India. Serum folate and vitamin B12 concentrations were measured by using a competitive radio-binding assay. Digene hybrid capture 2 (HC2 assay results were used to categorize women into two groups, positive or negative for HR-HPVs. Unconditional logistic regression models specified a binary indicator of HC2 (positive/negative as the dependent variable and serum folate concentrations combined with serum vitamin B12 concentrations as the independent predictor of primary interest. Models were fitted, adjusting for age, education, marital status, parity

  9. Molecular insights into human monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition by 1,4-naphthoquinone: evidences for menadione (vitamin K3) acting as a competitive and reversible inhibitor of MAO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho Cerqueira, Eduardo; Netz, Paulo Augusto; Diniz, Cristiane; Petry do Canto, Vanessa; Follmer, Cristian

    2011-12-15

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of biogenic and exogenous amines and its inhibitors have therapeutic value for several conditions including affective disorders, stroke, neurodegenerative diseases and aging. The discovery of 2,3,6-trimethyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (TMN) as a nonselective and reversible inhibitor of MAO, has suggested 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ) as a potential scaffold for designing new MAO inhibitors. Combining molecular modeling tools and biochemical assays we evaluate the kinetic and molecular details of the inhibition of human MAO by 1,4-NQ, comparing it with TMN and menadione. Menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a multitarget drug that acts as a precursor of vitamin K and an inducer of mitochondrial permeability transition. Herein we show that MAO-B was inhibited competitively by 1,4-NQ (K(i)=1.4 μM) whereas MAO-A was inhibited by non-competitive mechanism (K(i)=7.7 μM). Contrasting with TMN and 1,4-NQ, menadione exhibited a 60-fold selectivity for MAO-B (K(i)=0.4 μM) in comparison with MAO-A (K(i)=26 μM), which makes it as selective as rasagiline. Fluorescence and molecular modeling data indicated that these inhibitors interact with the flavin moiety at the active site of the enzyme. Additionally, docking studies suggest the phenyl side groups of Tyr407 and Tyr444 (for MAO-A) or Tyr398 and Tyr435 (for MAO-B) play an important role in the interaction of the enzyme with 1,4-NQ scaffold through forces of dispersion as verified for menadione, TMN and 1,4-NQ. Taken together, our findings reveal the molecular details of MAO inhibition by 1,4-NQ scaffold and show for the first time that menadione acts as a competitive and reversible inhibitor of human MAO. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Definitions of Health Terms: Vitamins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements Water-Soluble Vitamins Water-soluble vitamins include all the B vitamins and vitamin C. The body does not easily store water-soluble vitamins and flushes out the extra in the urine. ...

  11. Lemon (Citrus limon, Burm.f.) essential oil enhances the trans-epidermal release of lipid-(A, E) and water-(B6, C) soluble vitamins from topical emulsions in reconstructed human epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valgimigli, L; Gabbanini, S; Berlini, E; Lucchi, E; Beltramini, C; Bertarelli, Y L

    2012-08-01

    Topical bioavailability of lipid- and water-soluble vitamins is a critical issue for protecting or anti-ageing formulations. Using 17-day-old SkinEthic(®) reconstructed human epidermis, we investigated (at 34°C) the role of lemon EO in enhancing the penetration of α-tocopherol (E) and retinyl acetate (A), pyridoxine (B(6)) and ascorbic acid (C), released from O/W or W/O emulsions. D-limonene, α-pinene and p-cymene (65.9, 2.2 and 0.5%w/w of the oil) had skin permeability coefficients Ps (10(-3) cm h(-1)) of 0.56 ± 0.03 (or 0.73 ± 0.02), 0.72 ± 0.05 (or 0.98 ± 0.05) and 0.84 ± 0.04 (or 1.14 ± 0.04), respectively, when incorporated in a W/O (or O/W) emulsion. Vitamins B6, C and A had Ps values of (3.0 ± 0.4) × 10(-3), (7.9 ± 0.6) × 10(-3) and (0.37 ± 0.02) × 10(-5) cm h(-1), respectively, and their flux through the skin was enhanced by a factor of 4.1, 3.4 and 5.8, respectively, in the presence of lemon EO. The penetration of vitamin E was nine-fold enhanced. Lemon EO produced only reversible modification of TEWL, and it is a safe and effective penetration enhancer for topical administration of lipid- and water-soluble vitamins. © 2012 The Authors. ICS © 2012 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  12. The role of vitamin D in melanogenesis with an emphasis on vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid AlGhamdi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder caused by the destruction of functional melanocytes. Vitamin D is an essential hormone synthesized in the skin and is responsible for skin pigmentation. Low levels of vitamin D have been observed in vitiligo patients and in patients with other autoimmune diseases. Therefore, the relationship between vitamin D and vitiligo needs to be investigated more thoroughly. We reviewed the literature to date regarding the role of vitamin D in skin pigmentation. Our review revealed that vitamin D deficiency has been identified in many conditions, including premature and dysmature birth, pigmented skin, obesity, advanced age, and malabsorption. Vitamin D increases melanogenesis and the tyrosinase content of cultured human melanocytes by its antiapoptotic effect. However, a few growth-inhibitory effects on melanocytes were also reported. Vitamin D regulates calcium and bone metabolism, controls cell proliferation and differentiation, and exerts immunoregulatory activities. Vitamin D exerts its effect via a nuclear hormone receptor for vitamin D. The topical application of vitamin D increased the number of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine-positive melanocytes. The topical application of vitamin D yields significant results when used in combination with phototherapy and ultraviolet exposure to treat vitiligo in humans. Vitamin D decreases the expression of various cytokines that cause vitiligo. In conclusion, application of vitamin D might help in preventing destruction of melanocytes thus causing vitiligo and other autoimmune disorders. The association between low vitamin D levels and the occurrence of vitiligo and other forms of autoimmunity is to be further evaluated.

  13. The science behind vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The use of topically applied vitamins has become a ubiquitous part of clinical skin care. While a part of the skin's antioxidant system that assists in protecting it from oxidative damage, vitamins A, C, and E have also proven their ability to treat photoaging, acne, cutaneous inflammation, and hyperpigmentation ((Burgess, 2008). Understanding these vitamins' unique mechanisms of action and how they work in concert helps the clinician select the appropriate topicals for their patients.

  14. Vitamine K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal dit Sollier Claire

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Subclasses of vitamin K, their origins, their differential characteristics of absorption and metabolism, their relative effects on gammacarboxylation of various proteins implicated in hemostasis andcoagulation, in bone calcification are not well known even by experts in these fields. These misunderstandings explain errors in recommendations for public and for patients. This review will not expose again the fundamentals on vitamins K as presented in the paper by Marc Guillaumont published in 2000 in this same journal. This 2011 review will try to update our actual knowledge and most of all will insist on their practical implications especially on the management of oral anticoagulant treatments since until recently vitamin K antagonist was the only available type of such a treatment. Several examples illustrate the need for a better understanding of this subject. The fear that diet vitamin K could deregulate the equilibrium of oral vitamin K antagonist treatment leads to recommend a quite total suppression of vitamin K containing components in the diet of anticoagulated patients. This leads to an opposite effect: a high sensitivity to vitamin K and to disequilibrium of the anticoagulant treatment while a comprehensivemoderate and regular diet intake of vitamin K first facilitates the food choice of the patients but also helps to stabilise the treatment of chronically anticoagulated patients. Vitamin K plays a role in bone calcification and in osteoporosis prevention. Until recently the food supplementation with vitamin K in view of preventing osteoporosis in general population was strongly limited due to fear to affect the treatment equilibrium in anticoagulated patients. While an understanding that the effects of moderate supplementation in vitamin K has no or limited effect on anticoagulation and on the long run could at the opposite help to stabilize the daily level of anticoagulation in patients chronically treated with vitamin K.

  15. Study the effect of heat processing on the vitamin C of some fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema .

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ascorbic Acid also known as Vitamin C. Vitamin C is very essential for growth and maintenance of the human body. It is necessary for the normal formation of the protein collagen, which is an important constituent of skin and connective tissue. The deficiency of vitamin C causes will be known as disease “Scurvy”. Vitamin C is present in all citrus fruits, gooseberry (Aonala, tomato, apple, pine, pineapple, grapes and other foods. The vitamin C is very sensitive to heat light air and strong alkali. In this paper, we study the effect of heat processing on the vitamin C of Citrus Limon, Ananas Cosmosus, Psidium Guajana, Vitis Vinifera.

  16. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body and are eliminated in the urine." Develop a Vitamin Strategy It is important for consumers ... calcium, potassium, fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E (for children and adolescents) vitamin B-12, iron, folic acid, ...

  17. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E (for adults) calcium, potassium, fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E (for children and adolescents) vitamin B-12, iron, folic acid, and vitamins E and D (for specific population groups). Regarding the ...

  18. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E (for children and adolescents) vitamin B-12, iron, folic acid, and vitamins ... toc Also, the AAFP lists the following side effects that are sometimes associated with taking too much ...

  19. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... thinners, talk to your doctor before taking vitamin E or vitamin K pills. Water-soluble Vitamins B-3 (niacin): flushing, redness of the skin, upset stomach. B-6 (pyridoxine, pyridoxal, and pyridoxamine): ...

  20. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... before taking vitamin E or vitamin K pills. Water-soluble Vitamins B-3 (niacin): flushing, redness of ... Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials ...

  1. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... D, E, K, and the B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin B-6, vitamin ... providers before combining or substituting them with other foods or medicines." Frankos adds, "Do not self-diagnose ...

  2. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of concern. These nutrients are: calcium, potassium, fiber, magnesium, and vitamins A (as carotenoids), C, and E (for adults) calcium, potassium, fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E (for children and adolescents) vitamin ...

  3. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eat, millions of people worldwide take supplemental vitamins as part of their health regimen. Why Buy Vitamins? ... good reasons to consider taking vitamin supplements, such as over-the-counter multivitamins. According to the American ...

  4. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... before taking vitamin E or vitamin K pills. Water-soluble Vitamins B-3 (niacin): flushing, redness of ... Subscribe to FDA RSS feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on ...

  5. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Theresa; Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action, the current evidence on the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, and the optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention are summarized.

  6. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and the B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12 and ... into the body with the use of bile acids, which are fluids used to absorb fat. The ...

  7. Thiamin and riboflavin vitamers in human milk: effects of lipid-based nutrient supplementation and stage of lactation on vitamer secretion and contributions to total vitamin content

    Science.gov (United States)

    While thiamin and riboflavin in breast milk have been analyzed for over 50 years, less attention has been given to the different forms of each vitamin. Thiamin-monophosphate (TMP) and free thiamin contribute to total thiamin content; flavin adenine-dinucleotide (FAD) and free riboflavin are the main...

  8. Mechanism of Action of a Novel Analog of Vitamin D3, 1alpha-hydroxy-24-ethyl Cholecalciferol (D5), in Normal and Transformed Human Breast Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    retinoids, deltanoids (vitamin D derivatives), phytoestrogens, flavonoids , and aromatase inhibitors among others (Kelloffet al, 1996). On a global basis...Dietetics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago. Responsibilities included development and validation of MDA-TBA assay by HPLC with fluorometric

  9. Pregnancy and Vitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Ingole

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D insufficiency is common in women across different races of childbearing age. It is being increasingly discovered that vitamin D has many important bodily functions apart from skeletal actions pertaining to Calcium homeostasis. Evidence suggests that the maternal risks due to vitamin D deficiency includes eclampsia, increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, glucose intolerance; and fetal risks include risk of rickets, osteoporotic fracture in late adulthood. It may be prudent to include screening of all pregnant women for vitamin D level as a part of routine antenatal care and supplementation be given if found deficient.

  10. Vitamin E in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abid Keen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E is an important fat-soluble antioxidant and has been in use for more than 50 years in dermatology. It is an important ingredient in many cosmetic products. It protects the skin from various deleterious effects due to solar radiation by acting as a free-radical scavenger. Experimental studies suggest that vitamin E has antitumorigenic and photoprotective properties. There is a paucity of controlled clinical studies providing a rationale for well-defined dosages and clinical indications of vitamin E usage in dermatological practice. The aim of this article is to review the cosmetic as well as clinical implications of vitamin E in dermatology.

  11. Vitamin D-mangel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey, Henrik; Schmedes, Anne; Horn, Peer

    2009-01-01

    The importance of vitamin D for osteoporosis and fractures has been known for more than 40 years. Vitamin D deficiency is diagnosed by measuring 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), which should be > 50 nmol/l year round. Recent research suggests that a number of severe diseases could be prevented...... by increasing 25-OHD to 80 nmol/l. Despite a strong focus on such increase, recommendations for intake of Vitamin D have not been changed and the present recommendations are too low even to ensure > 50 nmol/l. To achieve optimal concentrations > 80 nmol/l, we estimate that 50-70 microgram of vitamin D per day...

  12. Vitamin D-mangel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Leif; Nielsen, Lars Rejnmark; Larsen, Erik Roj

    2005-01-01

    During the last two decades, biochemical assays for 25-hydroxyvitamin D have been available, and based on plasma measurements various definitions of vitamin D deficiency have been suggested. Whereas severe vitamin D deficiency is usually recognised relatively easy, it has been more difficult to d......% and 47%, respectively. Thus, a suboptimal vitamin D status is common among Danes. It is therefore important to consider how their vitamin D status can be improved.......During the last two decades, biochemical assays for 25-hydroxyvitamin D have been available, and based on plasma measurements various definitions of vitamin D deficiency have been suggested. Whereas severe vitamin D deficiency is usually recognised relatively easy, it has been more difficult...... to delimit the more subtle forms of vitamin D insufficiency. Today, a suboptimal vitamin D status is considered to be when the plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D level is below 50 nmol/L. Vitamin D insufficiency is defined as a plasma concentration between 25 and 50 nmol/L, whereas the term deficiency is used...

  13. Protective Macroautophagy Is Involved in Vitamin E Succinate Effects on Human Gastric Carcinoma Cell Line SGC-7901 by Inhibiting mTOR Axis Phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Hou

    Full Text Available Vitamin E succinate (VES, a potential cancer therapeutic agent, potently induces apoptosis and inhibits the growth of various cancer cells. Autophagy has been supposed to promote cancer cell survival or trigger cell death, depending on particular cancer types and tumor microenvironments. The role of autophagy in the growth suppressive effect of VES on gastric cancer cell is basically unknown. We aimed to determine whether and how autophagy affected the VES-induced inhibition of SGC-7901 human gastric carcinoma cell growth. SGC-7901 cells were treated with VES or pre-treated with autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ and 3-methyladenine (3-MA. Electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and Western blot were used to study whether VES induced autophagy reaction in SGC-7901 cells. Western blot evaluated the activities of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR axis. Then we used 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT and flow cytometry to detect the level of cell viability and apoptosis. Collectively, our data indeed strongly support our hypothesis that VES treatment produced cytological variations that depict autophagy, increased the amount of intracellular green fluorescent protein-microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3 punctate fluorescence and the number of autophagic vacuoles. It altered the expression of endogenous autophagy marker LC3. VES activated the suppression of mTOR through inhibiting upstream regulators p38 MAPK and Akt. mTOR suppression consequently inhibited the activation of mTOR downstream targets p70S6K and 4E-BP-1. The activation of the upstream mTOR inhibitor AMPK had been up-regulated by VES. The results showed that pre-treatment SGC-7901 with autophagy inhibitors before VES treatment could increase the capacity of VES to reduce cell viability and to provoke apoptosis. In conclusion, VES-induced autophagy participates in SGC-7901 cell protection by inhibiting mTOR axis

  14. Vitamin E analogue, D-alpha tocopherol succinate, enhances x-ray induced growth delay of human adenocarcinoma cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworska, A.; Ottesen, T.E.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of d-alpha Tocopherol succinate (alpha-TS) in modifying radiation-induced viability reduction and apoptosis occurrence in the model for normal and cancer cells. Our hypothesis was that alpha-TS enhances the growth-inhibitory effect of x-irradiation in cancer cells and that the effect is more pronounced in these cells than in normal cells. Murine NIH 3T3 Swiss albino embryonic cells and HT29 human Caucasian colon adenocarcinoma cells were used in the experiments. Alpha-TS was added to the cultures 1 h prior to irradiation with doses of 2 or 5Gy of x-ray. After irradiation cells were incubated for 73 h. Trypan blue exclusion viability test and estimation of apoptosis and necrosis were made. Apoptotic and necrotic cells were counted in fluorescence microscope using fluorescence dyes: propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342. For experiments with the dose of 5 Gy at least five series of experiments were performed. At lower doses (up to approximately 25μM/ml) treatment with alpha-TS alone enhanced growth of both cell lines. At higher doses treatment with alpha-TS alone delayed the growth of the cell cultures, accompanied by 20-25% necrosis. At the concentrations higher than 25μM/mL alpha-TS alone caused growth delay of both cell cultures, being much more pronounced for the cancer cell line HT29. At the concentrations of 50 μM/mL, responsible for about 30-60% of growth delay, there was observed a synergy effect for x-rays and alpha-TS for both cell lines. The effect was more pronounced for HT29 cells (DMF=0.48 for HT29 versus DMF=0.73 for NIH 3T3). These results may confirm the views of the literature reports suggesting that use of vitamin E together with radiation could be favorable for colon cancer treatment; however, more experiments using more advanced techniques are needed

  15. Possible influence of vitamin D on male reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Ida Marie; Hansen, Lasse Bøllehuus; Mortensen, Li Juel

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D is a versatile signaling molecule with an established role in the regulation of calcium homeostasis and bone health. In recent years the spectrum of vitamin D target organs has expanded and a reproductive role is supported by the presence of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D...... studies have supported the notion of a positive association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) level and semen quality in both fertile and infertile men. However, it remains to be determined whether this association reflects a causal effect. The VDR is ubiquitously expressed and activated vitamin...... steroid production in infertile men. In this review known and possible future implications of vitamin D in human male reproduction function will be discussed....

  16. Vitamin E - its status and role in leukemia and lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, J.; Das, S.; Sanyal, U.

    1993-01-01

    A comparative study has been performed on the relationship between vitamin E and immuno-function in normal and malignant condition in human and murine systems. Further, the effects of supplemental vitamin E on tumor take, host survival and tumor growth has been studied in a transplantable lymphoma in mice. Vitamin E was assayed in serum samples from normal subjects and from patient with leukemia and lymphoma by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) The murine group included Dalton's ascite lymphoma (DL), Schwartz lymphoblastic leukemia (SVL) and Moloney lymphoblastic leukemia (MVL). Serum vitamin E was found to be lower than that of the normal controls in all cases of leukemia and lymphoma both in human and lymphoma. Supplementary vitamin E administered at the initial phase of development of murine lymphomas reduced the rate of tumor growth, improved host survival and elevated serum vitamin E level. Vitamin E supplementation also activated specific induced blastogenesis of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and elevated serum IgG level. IgM remained unaltered and and macrophage activity did not seem to be affected. The present findings indicated a low status of vitamin E in tumor bearing host and beneficial effect of supplemental vitamin E on the host which was mediated by the host immune system. (author)

  17. Vitamin D and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnant or Breastfeeding? Nutrients You Need Eating During Pregnancy Sun Safety Figuring Out Food Labels Nutrition Guide for Toddlers Osteoporosis Minerals Your Bones Vitamin D Vitamins and Minerals ...

  18. A Review of the Role of Vitamin C in Health | Oguntibeju | Mary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several biochemical and physiological roles have been postulated for vitamin C, although few have been established. Besides, Vitamin C is an essential vitamin that is derived only from exogenous sources and this makes its role in human health to become pertinent. This is in view of the current depression in global ...

  19. Sunlight and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Matthias; Holick, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D is the sunshine vitamin that has been produced on this earth for more than 500 million years. During exposure to sunlight 7-dehydrocholesterol in the skin absorbs UV B radiation and is converted to previtamin D3 which in turn isomerizes into vitamin D3. Previtamin D3 and vitamin D3 also absorb UV B radiation and are converted into a variety of photoproducts some of which have unique biologic properties. Sun induced vitamin D synthesis is greatly influenced by season, time of day, latitude, altitude, air pollution, skin pigmentation, sunscreen use, passing through glass and plastic, and aging. Vitamin D is metabolized sequentially in the liver and kidneys into 25-hydroxyvitamin D which is a major circulating form and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D which is the biologically active form respectively. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D plays an important role in regulating calcium and phosphate metabolism for maintenance of metabolic functions and for skeletal health. Most cells and organs in the body have a vitamin D receptor and many cells and organs are able to produce 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. As a result 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D influences a large number of biologic pathways which may help explain association studies relating vitamin D deficiency and living at higher latitudes with increased risk for many chronic diseases including autoimmune diseases, some cancers, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, schizophrenia and type 2 diabetes. A three-part strategy of increasing food fortification programs with vitamin D, sensible sun exposure recommendations and encouraging ingestion of a vitamin D supplement when needed should be implemented to prevent global vitamin D deficiency and its negative health consequences. PMID:24494042

  20. Vitamin E Nicotinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimbell R. Duncan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E refers to a family of compounds that function as lipid-soluble antioxidants capable of preventing lipid peroxidation. Naturally occurring forms of vitamin E include tocopherols and tocotrienols. Vitamin E in dietary supplements and fortified foods is often an esterified form of α-tocopherol, the most common esters being acetate and succinate. The vitamin E esters are hydrolyzed and converted into free α-tocopherol prior to absorption in the intestinal tract. Because its functions are relevant to many chronic diseases, vitamin E has been extensively studied in respect to a variety of diseases as well as cosmetic applications. The forms of vitamin E most studied are natural α-tocopherol and the esters α-tocopheryl acetate and α-tocopheryl succinate. A small number of studies include or focus on another ester form, α-tocopheryl nicotinate, an ester of vitamin E and niacin. Some of these studies raise the possibility of differences in metabolism and in efficacy between vitamin E nicotinate and other forms of vitamin E. Recently, through metabolomics studies, we identified that α-tocopheryl nicotinate occurs endogenously in the heart and that its level is dramatically decreased in heart failure, indicating the possible biological importance of this vitamin E ester. Since knowledge about vitamin E nicotinate is not readily available in the literature, the purpose of this review is to summarize and evaluate published reports, specifically with respect to α-tocopheryl nicotinate with an emphasis on the differences from natural α-tocopherol or α-tocopheryl acetate.

  1. Crosstalk between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human breast cancer cells: PPARγ binds to VDR and inhibits 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 mediated transactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimirah, Fatouma; Peng, Xinjian; Yuan, Liang; Mehta, Rajeshwari R.; Knethen, Andreas von; Choubey, Divaker; Mehta, Rajendra G.

    2012-01-01

    Heterodimerization and cross-talk between nuclear hormone receptors often occurs. For example, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) physically binds to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and inhibits its transcriptional activity. The interaction between PPARγ and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) however, is unknown. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms linking PPARγ and VDR signaling, and for the first time we show that PPARγ physically associates with VDR in human breast cancer cells. We found that overexpression of PPARγ decreased 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25D 3 ) mediated transcriptional activity of the vitamin D target gene, CYP24A1, by 49% and the activity of VDRE-luc, a vitamin D responsive reporter, by 75% in T47D human breast cancer cells. Deletion mutation experiments illustrated that helices 1 and 4 of PPARγ's hinge and ligand binding domains, respectively, governed this suppressive function. Additionally, abrogation of PPARγ's AF2 domain attenuated its repressive action on 1,25D 3 transactivation, indicating that this domain is integral in inhibiting VDR signaling. PPARγ was also found to compete with VDR for their binding partner retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα). Overexpression of RXRα blocked PPARγ's suppressive effect on 1,25D 3 action, enhancing VDR signaling. In conclusion, these observations uncover molecular mechanisms connecting the PPARγ and VDR pathways. -- Highlights: PPARγ's role on 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 transcriptional activity is examined. ► PPARγ physically binds to VDR and inhibits 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 action. ► PPARγ's hinge and ligand binding domains are important for this inhibitory effect. ► PPARγ competes with VDR for the availability of their binding partner, RXRα.

  2. Quantifiers for quantum logic

    OpenAIRE

    Heunen, Chris

    2008-01-01

    We consider categorical logic on the category of Hilbert spaces. More generally, in fact, any pre-Hilbert category suffices. We characterise closed subobjects, and prove that they form orthomodular lattices. This shows that quantum logic is just an incarnation of categorical logic, enabling us to establish an existential quantifier for quantum logic, and conclude that there cannot be a universal quantifier.

  3. Vitamin B-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B-12 is a cofactor for 2 enzymes. In the cytoplasm, methionine synthase requires vitamin B-12 in the form of methylcobalamin and catalyzes the conversion of homocysteine to methionine by transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate.This enzyme links the methylation pathway through ...

  4. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and adults need it to keep their bones strong and healthy. If you don’t get enough vitamin D, and you’re more likely to break bones as you age. How Much Vitamin D Do You Need? Women and Men Under age 50 400-800 international units (IU) ...

  5. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  6. Rediscovering vitamin D

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-11-08

    Nov 8, 2010 ... closely linked to that of the childhood bone disease rickets. Although the .... milk with vitamin D3, which resulted in a dramatic decline in the incidence of ... The overall effect of calcitriol on the adaptive immune system is ..... non-melanoma skin cancers, protect from solid cancers: vitamin. D as a possible ...

  7. Vitamin A Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... was last reviewed on October 21, 2015. This article was last modified on June 29, 2018. At a Glance Why Get Tested? To detect vitamin A deficiency or toxicity When To Get Tested? When you have symptoms suggesting a vitamin A deficiency or excess, or are at risk for a deficiency Sample ...

  8. Riboflavin : A multifunctional vitamin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Souza, ACS; Ferreira, CV; Juca, MB; Aoyama, H; Cavagis, ADM; Peppelenbosch, MP

    2005-01-01

    Riboflavin, a component of the B-2 vitaminic complex, plays important roles in biochemistry, especially in redox reactions, due to the ability to participate in both one- and two-electron transfers as well as acting as a photosensitizer. Accordingly, low intakes of this vitamin have been associated

  9. Vitamin D and Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    industrial absenteeism caused by colds and respiratory illness; days of missed work was reduced by 30%. (n=3031) Homes AD, et al. Industrial...greater than ~87nmol/L. Vitamin D from sunlight affects TB The 1903 Nobel prize was awarded for the discovery that vitamin D from sunlight could cure cutaneous TB….

  10. Predicted vitamin D status in mid-pregnancy and child allergic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maslova, Ekaterina; Hansen, Susanne; Thorne-Lyman, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    and national registry extracts. We used multivariable log-binomial models to quantify risk ratios (RR) and 95% CI. Plasma 25(OH)D was examined in a stability analysis. RESULTS: Median (IQR) vitamin D prediction score was 58.7 (49.2-69.0) nmol/l. In main analysis, there was no association between vitamin D...

  11. Vitamin D in asthma and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang H

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Haidong Huang,1 Konstantinos Porpodis,2 Paul Zarogoulidis,2,3 Kalliopi Domvri,2 Paschalina Giouleka,2 Antonis Papaiwannou,2 Stella Primikyri,2 Efi Mylonaki,2 Dionysis Spyratos,2 Wolfgang Hohenforst-Schmidt,4 Ioannis Kioumis,2 Konstantinos Zarogoulidis2 1Department of Respiratory Diseases, Changhai Hospital/First Affiliated Hospital of the Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Pulmonary Department, “G Papanikolaou” General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 3Department of Interventional Pneumology, Ruhrlandklinik, West German Lung Center, University Hospital, University Duisburg–Essen, Essen, Germany; 4II Medical Clinic, “Coburg” Hospital, University of Würzburg, Coburg, Germany Abstract: Humans have the ability to synthesize vitamin D during the action of ultraviolet (UV radiation upon the skin. Apart from the regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism, another critical role for vitamin D in immunity and respiratory health has been revealed, since vitamin D receptors have also been found in other body cells. The term “vitamin D insufficiency” has been used to describe low levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D that may be associated with a wide range of pulmonary diseases, including viral and bacterial respiratory infection, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancer. This review focuses on the controversial relationship between vitamin D and asthma. Also, it has been found that different gene polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor have variable associations with asthma. Other studies investigated the vitamin D receptor signaling pathway in vitro or in experimental animal models and showed either a beneficial or a negative effect of vitamin D in asthma. Furthermore, a range of epidemiological studies has also suggested that vitamin D insufficiency is associated with low lung function. In the future, clinical trials in different asthmatic

  12. Vitamin D and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolden-Kirk, Heidi; Overbergh, Lut; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2011-01-01

    directly thereby rendering them more resistant to the types of cellular stress encountered during T1D and T2D. This review evaluates the role of vitamin D signaling in the pathogenesis of T1D and T2D with a special emphasis on the direct effects of vitamin D on pancreatic beta cells.......Experimental evidence indicates that vitamin D may play a role in the defense against type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Epidemiological data have established a link between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of both T1D and T2D, whereas early and long-term vitamin...

  13. Vitamin D – The vitamin hormone | Muntingh | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vitamin D supplements and specific foods can aid in maintaining sufficient levels of vitamin D, particularly in people at risk of deficiency. However, there is still a lot of uncertainty around what are “optimal” or “sufficient” levels, how much sunlight different people need to achieve a given level of vitamin D, and whether vitamin ...

  14. Relationship between vitamin D during perinatal development and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaludjerovic, Jovana; Vieth, Reinhold

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a highly prevalent condition that is present in 40% to 80% of pregnant women. There is emerging evidence that vitamin D deficiency may be a risk modifying factor for many chronic diseases, including osteomalacia, rickets, multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia, heart disease, type 1 diabetes, and cancer. Heightened susceptibility to these diseases may originate in early life during the development of tissue structure and function. It is suspected that biologic mechanisms can "memorize" the metabolic effects of early nutritional environment through fetal and neonatal imprinting. Inadequate vitamin D nutrition during perinatal life may establish a poor foundation that may produce long-term threats to human health. This review summarizes the risks of vitamin D deficiency for human health and provides the current vitamin D recommendations for mothers and their newborns. Copyright © 2010 American College of Nurse-Midwives. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhanced Accumulation of Vitamins, Nutraceuticals and Minerals in Lettuces Associated with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF: A Question of Interest for Both Vegetables and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marouane Baslam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. is extensively grown and is the most widely used food crop for the called “Fourth Range” of vegetables. Lettuce exhibits healthy properties mainly due to the presence of antioxidant compounds (vitamins C and E, carotenoids, polyphenols alongside significant fibre content and useful amounts of certain minerals. Lettuce can establish a mutualistic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. The establishment of the symbiosis involves a continuous cellular and molecular dialogue between both symbionts, which includes the activation of antioxidant, phenylpropanoid or carotenoid metabolic pathways. The presence of AMF colonizing roots of greenhouse-grown lettuces can induce an accumulation of secondary metabolites, vitamins and minerals in leaves that overcome the dilution effect due to the increased size of mycorrhizal plants. Therefore, AMF would allow the intake of minerals and compounds with antioxidant properties to be enhanced without increasing the consumption of lettuce in the diet. In addition, increased quantities of secondary metabolites may help lettuce plants to withstand biotic and abiotic stresses. Our review discusses the influence exerted by several environmental factors and agronomic practices on the ability of AMF for enhancing the levels of vitamins, nutraceuticals and minerals in leaves of green and red-leaf types of lettuces.

  16. Effects of vitamin C, vitamin E, and molecular hydrogen on the placental function in trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhong; Li, Huai-Fang; Guo, Li-Li; Yang, Xiang

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of three different antioxidants, namely vitamin C, vitamin E, and molecular hydrogen, on cytotrophoblasts in vitro. Two trophoblast cell lines, JAR and JEG-3, were exposed to different concentrations of vitamin C (0, 25, 50, 100, 500, 1,000, 5,000 μmol/L), vitamin E (0, 25, 50, 100, 500, 1,000, 5,000 μmol/L), and molecular hydrogen (0, 25, 50, 100, 500 μmol/L) for 48 h. The cell viability was detected using the MTS assay. The secretion of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were assessed and the expression of TNF-α mRNA was observed by real-time RT-PCR. Cell viability was significantly suppressed by 500 μmol/L vitamins C and E (P 0.05). The expression of TNF-α was increased by 100 μmol/L vitamin C and 50 μmol/L vitamins E, separately or combined (P vitamin C and E, separately or combined. High levels of antioxidant vitamins C and E may have significant detrimental effects on placental function, as reflected by decreased cell viability and secretion of hCG; and placental immunity, as reflected by increased production of TNF-a. Meanwhile hydrogen showed no such effects on cell proliferation and TNF-α expression, but it could affect the level of hCG, indicating hydrogen as a potential candidate of antioxidant in the management of preeclampsia (PE) should be further studied.

  17. Vitamin C nutrition in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T

    2012-05-01

    Domestic animals, including ruminants, can synthesize vitamin C (VC) in their liver; as such, the dietary requirement for VC has not been confirmed in these animals. The adequacy of VC has been evaluated by quantifying VC levels in plasma, but the reported values in bovine plasma have been widely variable. Plasma VC concentration is decreased by heat stress, hepatic lesions, fattening, and infectious diseases such as mastitis in cattle. Therefore, VC supplementation is potentially beneficial for cattle with low plasma VC concentration. This review discusses the methods for determination of plasma VC concentration in cattle, VC nutrition, and the efficacy of VC supplementation in calves, dairy cattle, and beef cattle. Additionally I propose a reference range for plasma VC concentration in Japanese Black cattle.

  18. Vitamin C Nutrition in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Matsui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Domestic animals, including ruminants, can synthesize vitamin C (VC in their liver; as such, the dietary requirement for VC has not been confirmed in these animals. The adequacy of VC has been evaluated by quantifying VC levels in plasma, but the reported values in bovine plasma have been widely variable. Plasma VC concentration is decreased by heat stress, hepatic lesions, fattening, and infectious diseases such as mastitis in cattle. Therefore, VC supplementation is potentially beneficial for cattle with low plasma VC concentration. This review discusses the methods for determination of plasma VC concentration in cattle, VC nutrition, and the efficacy of VC supplementation in calves, dairy cattle, and beef cattle. Additionally I propose a reference range for plasma VC concentration in Japanese Black cattle.

  19. Implications of an HRA framework for quantifying human acts of commission and dependency: Development of a methodology for conducting an integrated HRA/PRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriere, M.T.; Luckas, W.J.; Brown, W.S.; Cooper, S.E.; Wreathall, J.; Bley, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    To support the development of a refined human reliability analysis (HRA) framework, to address identified HRA user needs and improve HRA modeling, unique aspects of human performance have been identified from an analysis of actual plant-specific events. Through the use of the refined framework, relationships between the following HRA, human factors and probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) elements were described: the PRA model, plant states, plant conditions, PRA basic events, unsafe human actions, error mechanisms, and performance shaping factors (PSFs). The event analyses performed in the context of the refined HRA framework, identified the need for new HRA methods that are capable of: evaluating a range of different error mechanisms (e.g., slips as well as mistakes); addressing errors of commission (EOCs) and dependencies between human actions; and incorporating the influence of plant conditions and multiple PSFs on human actions. This report discusses the results of the assessment of user needs, the refinement of the existing HRA framework, as well as, the current status on EOCs, and human dependencies

  20. Implications of an HRA framework for quantifying human acts of commission and dependency: Development of a methodology for conducting an integrated HRA/PRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriere, M.T.; Luckas, W.J.; Brown, W.S.; Cooper, S.E.; Wreathall, J.; Bley, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    To support the development of a refined human reliability analysis (HRA) framework, to address identified HRA user needs and improve HRA modeling, unique aspects of human performance have been identified from an analysis of actual plant-specific events. Through the use of the refined framework, relationships between the following HRA, human factors and probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) elements were described: the PRA model, plant states, plant conditions, PRA basic events, unsafe human actions, error mechanisms, and performance shaping factors (PSFs). The event analyses performed in the context of the refined HRA framework, identified the need for new HRA methods that are capable of: evaluating a range of different error mechanisms (e.g., slips as well as mistakes); addressing errors of commission (EOCs) and dependencies between human actions; and incorporating the influence of plant conditions and multiple PSFs on human actions. This report discusses the results of the assessment of user needs, the refinement of the existing HRA framework, as well as, the current status on EOCs, and human dependencies

  1. Quantifying the effects of climate variability and human activities on runoff for Kaidu River Basin in arid region of northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongsheng; Chen, Yaning; Li, Baofu

    2013-02-01

    Much attention has recently been focused on the effects that climate variability and human activities have had on runoff. In this study, data from the Kaidu River Basin in the arid region of northwest China were analyzed to investigate changes in annual runoff during the period of 1960-2009. The nonparametric Mann-Kendall test and the Mann-Kendall-Sneyers test were used to identify trend and step change point in the annual runoff. It was found that the basin had a significant increasing trend in annual runoff. Step change point in annual runoff was identified in the basin, which occurred in the year around 1993 dividing the long-term runoff series into a natural period (1960-1993) and a human-induced period (1994-2009). Then, the hydrologic sensitivity analysis method was employed to evaluate the effects of climate variability and human activities on mean annual runoff for the human-induced period based on precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. In 1994-2009, climate variability was the main factor that increased runoff with contribution of 90.5 %, while the increasing percentage due to human activities only accounted for 9.5 %, showing that runoff in the Kaidu River Basin is more sensitive to climate variability than human activities. This study quantitatively distinguishes the effects between climate variability and human activities on runoff, which can do duty for a reference for regional water resources assessment and management.

  2. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... low dietary intake may be a cause of concern. These nutrients are: calcium, potassium, fiber, magnesium, and vitamins A (as carotenoids), C, and E (for adults) calcium, potassium, fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E (for children and adolescents) vitamin B-12, iron, folic acid, and vitamins ...

  3. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... If you are an older adult, have dark skin, or are exposed to insufficient ultraviolet band radiation (such as sunlight), consume extra vitamin D from vitamin D-fortified foods and/or supplements. How Vitamins are Regulated Vitamin products are regulated by FDA as "Dietary Supplements." The ...

  4. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... consume extra vitamin D from vitamin D-fortified foods and/or supplements. How Vitamins are Regulated Vitamin products are regulated by FDA as "Dietary Supplements." The law defines dietary supplements, in part, as products taken by ...

  5. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultraviolet band radiation (such as sunlight), consume extra vitamin D from vitamin D-fortified foods and/or supplements. How Vitamins are ... Related Consumer Updates Infant Overdose Risk With Liquid Vitamin D 4 Medication Safety Tips for Older Adults More ...

  6. Vitamin C revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudemans-van Straaten, Heleen M; Spoelstra-de Man, Angelique Me; de Waard, Monique C

    2014-08-06

    This narrative review summarizes the role of vitamin C in mitigating oxidative injury-induced microcirculatory impairment and associated organ failure in ischemia/reperfusion or sepsis. Preclinical studies show that high-dose vitamin C can prevent or restore microcirculatory flow impairment by inhibiting activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, augmenting tetrahydrobiopterin, preventing uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, and decreasing the formation of superoxide and peroxynitrite, and by directly scavenging superoxide. Vitamin C can additionally restore vascular responsiveness to vasoconstrictors, preserve endothelial barrier by maintaining cyclic guanylate phosphatase and occludin phosphorylation and preventing apoptosis. Finally, high-dose vitamin C can augment antibacterial defense. These protective effects against overwhelming oxidative stress due to ischemia/reperfusion, sepsis or burn seems to mitigate organ injury and dysfunction, and promote recovery after cardiac revascularization and in critically ill patients, in the latter partially in combination with other antioxidants. Of note, several questions remain to be solved, including optimal dose, timing and combination of vitamin C with other antioxidants. The combination obviously offers a synergistic effect and seems reasonable during sustained critical illness. High-dose vitamin C, however, provides a cheap, strong and multifaceted antioxidant, especially robust for resuscitation of the circulation. Vitamin C given as early as possible after the injurious event, or before if feasible, seems most effective. The latter could be considered at the start of cardiac surgery, organ transplant or major gastrointestinal surgery. Preoperative supplementation should consider the inhibiting effect of vitamin C on ischemic preconditioning. In critically ill patients, future research should focus on the use of short-term high-dose intravenous vitamin

  7. Maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy and offspring bone development: the unmet needs of vitamin D era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, S N; Anagnostis, P; Bili, E; Naughton, D; Petroczi, A; Papadopoulou, F; Goulis, D G

    2014-03-01

    Data from animal and human studies implicate maternal vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy as a significant risk factor for several adverse outcomes affecting maternal, fetal, and child health. The possible associations of maternal vitamin D status and offspring bone development comprise a significant public health issue. Evidence from randomized trials regarding maternal vitamin D supplementation for optimization of offspring bone mass is lacking. In the same field, data from observational studies suggest that vitamin D supplementation is not indicated. Conversely, supplementation studies provided evidence that vitamin D has beneficial effects on neonatal calcium homeostasis. Nevertheless, a series of issues, such as technical difficulties of current vitamin D assays and functional interplay among vitamin D analytes, prohibit arrival at safe conclusions. Future studies would benefit from adoption of a gold standard assay, which would unravel the functions of vitamin D analytes. This narrative review summarizes and discusses data from both observational and supplementation studies regarding maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy and offspring bone development.

  8. Dietary vitamin A intakes of Filipino elders with adequate or low liver vitamin A concentrations as assessed by the deuterated-retinol-dilution method: implications for dietary requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaya-Mercado, Judy D; Solon, Florentino S; Fermin, Liza S; Perfecto, Christine S; Solon, Juan Antonio A; Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Russell, Robert M

    2004-04-01

    The vitamin A requirements of elderly humans have not been studied. In a cross-sectional study of 60-88-y-old men (n = 31) and women (n = 31) in rural Philippines, we assessed the dietary intakes of elders with adequate (> or = 0.07 micromol/g) or low (value for elders. The mean (+/- SD) vitamin A intakes of the men and women with adequate vitamin A in liver were 135 +/- 86 and 134 +/- 104 microg retinol activity equivalents (RAE)/d, respectively; intakes of the men and women with low vitamin A in liver were 75 +/- 53 and 60 +/- 27 microg RAE/d, respectively. Total-body vitamin A or liver vitamin A but not serum retinol correlated with dietary RAE, preformed vitamin A, beta-carotene, fat, and protein. An estimated acceptable or sufficient dietary vitamin A intake associated with adequate liver vitamin A concentrations in elders is 6.45 microg RAE/kg body wt; for a reference 76-kg man and a 61-kg woman, these values are approximately 500 and 400 microg RAE/d, respectively. The dietary vitamin A intakes of elders with adequate or low liver vitamin A concentrations as estimated by use of the deuterated-retinol-dilution technique are useful for assessing vitamin A requirements.

  9. Does vitamin C matter? A quest for in vivo effects of vitamin C deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin C has long been recognized as an important dietary micronutrient based on its ability to prevent scurvy in humans. Moreover, over the past decades, ascorbate has been identified as a powerful redox modulator and named ‘‘the most important antioxidant in plasma''. Several investigators have...... shown ascorbate to be an excellent biomarker of ‘‘oxidative stress'' in a variety of biological settings from isolated cells to humans. However, in spite of the amazing redox powers of ascorbate, little evidence has been presented until now demonstrating that vitamin C deficiency results in any clinical...... problem has prompted discussions on the possible beneficial effect of supplementation to humans as a preventive measure but so far large clinical trials have shown no clinical relevance of antioxidant supplementation in general. Two possible pathological consequences of marginal vitamin C deficiency...

  10. Reproductive endocrinology of vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Mette; Boisen, Ida Marie; Mortensen, Li Juel

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D is a versatile hormone with several functions beyond its well-established role in maintenance of skeletal health and calcium homeostasis. The effects of vitamin D are mediated by the vitamin D receptor, which is expressed together with the vitamin D metabolizing enzymes in the reproduct...... suffering from reproductive problems and abnormal endocrinology research addressing the role of vitamin D in reproductive endocrinology may be of clinical importance....

  11. An update on the association of vitamin D deficiency with common infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Richard R; Lemonovich, Tracy L; Salata, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in modulating the immune response to infections. Deficiency of vitamin D is a common condition, affecting both the general population and patients in health care facilities. Over the last decade, an increasing body of evidence has shown an association between vitamin D deficiency and an increased risk for acquiring several infectious diseases, as well as poorer outcomes in vitamin D deficient patients with infections. This review details recent developments in understanding the role of vitamin D in immunity, the antibacterial actions of vitamin D, the association between vitamin D deficiency and common infections (like sepsis, pneumonia, influenza, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV)), potential therapeutic implications for vitamin D replacement, and future research directions.

  12. Vitamin D in Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria and Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Shannon K; Rainwater, Ellecia; Shure, Anna K; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vitamin D influences allergen-induced pathways in the innate and adaptive immune system, and its potential immunomodulatory role in allergic skin disorders has been explored. This comprehensive review article provides an overview of the role of vitamin D in three common dermatologic conditions: atopic dermatitis (AD), chronic urticaria, and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Whereas the literature regarding vitamin D and AD has resulted in mixed findings, several studies have described an inverse relationship between vitamin D levels and AD severity, and improvement in AD with vitamin D supplementation. Similarly, several studies report an inverse relationship between vitamin D levels and severity of chronic urticaria. Although current research in humans remains limited, an increased likelihood of ACD has been demonstrated in vitamin D-deficient mice. Additional well-designed clinical trials will be necessary to determine whether vitamin D supplementation should be recommended for prevention or adjuvant treatment of these common dermatologic conditions. PMID:27014952

  13. Vitamin D3 in Pigs: Distribution, Storage and Turnover under Various Input Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burild, Anders

    Vitamin D3 is important for the mineralization of the skeleton to prevent the deficiency diseases rickets and osteoporosis, and to maintain a healthy skeleton throughout life. Vitamin D3 is synthesized in the skin after exposure to the sun. Due to the low angle of the sun during wintertime at high...... latitudes, no or only a negligible amount of vitamin D3 is synthesized and the body needs to rely on its storages of vitamin D3, or dietary vitamin D3 in the form of vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. The information of the size of the storages of vitamin D3 in humans is sparse, but very low levels...... of vitamin D3 is found in tissues from animals fed physiologically relevant doses of vitamin D3. The natural synthesis of vitamin D3 might, however, influence on the storages of vitamin D3. The different inherent properties of the two forms of vitamin D3 might also affect the tissue distribution of vitamin D...

  14. Photostability and efficacy studies of topical formulations containing UV-filters combination and vitamins A, C and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, L R; Campos, P M B G Maia

    2007-10-01

    It is already known that the photostability of a sunscreen is important for its performance on human skin. On the other hand, there are many formulations besides sunscreens containing combinations of UV-filters and daily use active substances with other claims like hydration and anti-aging effects. Vitamins A, C and E are frequently added in these kinds of products and it is not known if the UV-filters have some influence on the hydration and anti-aging effects of these vitamins on the skin as well as on their stability mainly when photounstable UV-filters like avobenzone and octyl methoxycinnamate are present in the formulation. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of two different UV-filters combinations, a photostable and a photounstable one, on the photostability as well as on the efficacy of a formulation containing vitamin A, C and E derivatives. The formulations that were investigated contained or not (vehicle: formulation 1) a combination of 0.6 % (w/w) vitamin A palmitate (1,700,000 UI/g), 2 % (w/w) vitamin E acetate and 2% (w/w) ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate (formulation 2) supplemented with a photounstable UV filter combination octyl methoxycinnamate (OMC), avobenzone (AVB) and 4-methylbenzilidene camphor (MBC) (formulation 3) or with a photostable UV filter combination OMC, benzophenone-3 (BP-3) and octocrylene (OC) (formulation 4). In the photostability studies, all formulations were spread onto a glass plate and exposed to UVA/UVB irradiation. The filter components and vitamins were quantified by HPLC analysis with detection at 325 and 235 nm and by spectrophotometry. To simulate the effects of these formulations daily use, all of them (formulations 1-4) were applied on the dorsum of hairless mice, which were submitted to a controlled light-dark cycle (and were not irradiated), once a day for 5 days. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), water content of the stratum corneum and viscoelastic properties of the skin were analyzed by using

  15. Compound list: vitamin A [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available vitamin A VA 00059 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/vitam...in_A.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/vitam...in_A.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/vitam...pen-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/vitamin_A.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  16. Novel Gemini vitamin D3 analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okamoto, Ryoko; Gery, Sigal; Kuwayama, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    anticancer potency, but similar toxicity causing hypercalcemia. We focused on the effect of these compounds on the stimulation of expression of human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) whose gene has a vitamin D response element in its promoter. Expression of CAMP mRNA and protein increased in a dose......-response fashion after exposure of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells to the Gemini analog, BXL-01-126, in vitro. A xenograft model of AML was developed using U937 AML cells injected into NSG-immunodeficient mice. Administration of vitamin D3 compounds to these mice resulted in substantial levels of CAMP...

  17. Simultaneous quantification of vitamin D3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in human serum by LC-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burild, Anders; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Jakobsen, Jette

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D is the established biomarker of vitamin D status although serum concentrations of vitamin D and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D may also be of interest to understand the in vivo kinetics of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Method. An LC-MS/MS method was developed...

  18. Assessment of the effect of esterified propoxylated glycerol (EPG) on the status of fat-soluble vitamins and select water-soluble nutrients following dietary administration to humans for 8 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Michael H; Bechtel, David H

    2014-12-01

    This double-blind, randomized, controlled study assessed the effect of esterified propoxylated glycerol (EPG) on fat-soluble vitamins and select nutrients in human subjects. For 8 weeks, 139 healthy volunteers consumed a core diet providing adequate caloric and nutrient intakes. The diet included items (spread, muffins, cookies, and biscuits) providing EPG (10, 25, and 40 g/day) vs. margarine alone (control). EPG did not significantly affect circulating retinol, α-tocopherol, or 25-OH D2, but circulating β-carotene and phylloquinone were lower in the EPG groups, and PIVKA-II levels were higher; 25-OH D3 increased but to a lesser extent than the control. The effect might be related to EPG acting as a lipid "sink" during gastrointestinal transit. No effects were seen in secondary endpoint measures (physical exam, clinical pathology, serum folate, RBC folate, vitamin B12, zinc, iron, calcium, phosphorus, osteocalcin, RBP, intact PTH, PT, PTT, cholesterol, HDL-C, LDL-C, triglycerides). Gastrointestinal adverse events (gas with discharge; diarrhea; oily spotting; oily evacuation; oily stool; liquid stool; soft stool) were reported more frequently by subjects receiving 25 or 40 g/day of EPG. In general, the incidence and duration of these symptoms correlated directly with EPG dietary concentration. The results suggest 10 g/day of EPG was reasonably well tolerated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Plant Oils as Potential Sources of Vitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele I Stangl

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To combat vitamin D insufficiency in a population, reliable diet sources of vitamin D are required. The recommendations to consume more oily fish and the use of UVB treated yeast are already applied strategies to address vitamin D insufficiency. This study aimed to elucidate the suitability of plant oils as an alternative vitamin D source. Therefore, plant oils that are commonly used in human nutrition were firstly analyzed for their content of vitamin D precursors and metabolites. Secondly, selected oils were exposed to a short-term UVB irradiation to stimulate the synthesis of vitamin D. Finally, to elucidate the efficacy of plant-derived vitamin D to improve the vitamin D status, we fed UVB-exposed wheat germ oil for 4 weeks to mice and compared them with mice that received non-exposed or vitamin D3 supplemented wheat germ oil. Sterol analysis revealed that the selected plant oils contained high amounts of ergosterol, but also 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC, with the highest concentrations found in wheat germ oil. Exposure to UVB irradiation resulted in a partial conversion of ergosterol and 7-DHC to vitamin D2 and D3 in these oils. Mice fed the UVB-exposed wheat germ oil were able to improve their vitamin D status as shown by the rise in the plasma concentration of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD and the liver content of vitamin D compared to mice fed the non-exposed oil. However, the plasma concentration of 25(OHD of mice fed the UVB-treated oil did not reach the values observed in the group fed the D3 supplemented oil. It was striking that the intake of the UVB-exposed oil resulted in distinct accumulation of vitamin D2 in the livers of these mice. In conclusion, plant oils, in particular wheat germ oil, contain considerable amounts of vitamin D precursors which can be converted to vitamin D via UVB exposure. However, the UVB-exposed wheat germ oil was less effective to improve the 25(OHD plasma concentration than a supplementation with vitamin D

  20. Vitamin K3-2,3-epoxide induction of apoptosis with activation of ROS-dependent ERK and JNK protein phosphorylation in human glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jender; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Yang, Liang-Yo; Huang, Guan-Cheng; Cheng, Min-Chi; Lin, Che-Tong; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Chen, Yen-Chou

    2011-08-15

    2-Methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (menadione or vitamin K3; EPO) and K3-2,3-epoxide (EPO1), but not vitamin K3-3-OH (EPO2), exhibited cytotoxicity that caused DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation in U87 and C6 cells. EPO1 showed more-potent cytotoxicity than EPO, and the IC(50) values of EPO and EPO1 in U87 cells were 37.5 and 15.7μM, respectively. Activation of caspase 3 enzyme activity with cleavage of caspase 3 protein was detected in EPO1-treated U87 and C6 cells, and the addition of the caspase 3 peptidyl inhibitor, DEVD-FMK, reduced the cytotoxic effect of EPO1. An increase in the intracellular ROS level by EPO1 was observed in the DCHF-DA analysis, and EPO1-induced apoptosis and caspase 3 protein cleavage were prevented by adding the antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), with decreased ROS production elicited by EPO1. Activation of ERK and JNK, but not p38, via phosphorylation induction was identified in EPO1- but not EPO- or EPO2-treated U87 and C6 cells, and this was blocked by adding NAC. However, the ERK inhibitor, PD98059, and the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, showed no effect on EPO1-induced cytotoxicity in either cell type. Our findings demonstrate that 2,3-epoxide substitution significantly potentiates the apoptotic effect of vitamin K3 via stimulating ROS production, which may be useful in the chemotherapy of glioblastoma cells. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.