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Sample records for quantify anesthetic effects

  1. Inhaled anesthetics have hyperalgesic effects at 0.1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Eger, E I; Dutton, R C; Sonner, J M

    2000-08-01

    We investigated the hyperalgesic (antianalgesic) effect of the inhaled anesthetics isoflurane, halothane, nitrous oxide, and diethyl ether, or the nonimmobilizer 1, 2-dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane at subanesthetic partial pressures (or, for the nonimmobilizer, subanesthetic partial pressures predicted from lipid solubility) in rats. Hyperalgesia was assessed as a decrease in the time to withdrawal of a rat hind paw exposed to heat. All four anesthetics, including nitrous oxide and diethyl ether, produced hyperalgesia at low partial pressures, with a maximal effect at 0.1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) required to prevent response to movement in 50% of animals, and analgesia (an increased time to withdrawal of the hind paw) at 0. 4 to 0.8 MAC. The nonimmobilizer had neither analgesic nor hyperalgesia effects. We propose that inhaled anesthetics with a higher MAC-Awake (the MAC-fraction that suppresses appropriate responsiveness to command), such as nitrous oxide and diethyl ether, can be used as analgesics because patients are conscious at higher anesthetic partial pressures, including those which have analgesic effects, whereas anesthetics with a lower MAC-Awake do not produce analgesic effects at concentrations that permit consciousness. The inhaled anesthetics isoflurane, halothane, nitrous oxide, and diethyl ether produce antianalgesia at subanesthetic concentrations, with a maximal effect at approximately one-tenth the concentration required for anesthesia. This effect may enhance perception of pain when such small concentrations are reached during recovery from anesthesia.

  2. Renal effects of methoxyverapamil in anesthetized rats.

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    Brown, B; Churchill, P

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to determine the renal effects of methoxyverapamil (D-600). Three groups of rats were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital and given 0, 0.85 or 1.69 nmol/min of methoxyverapamil i.v. Increases in urine flow and Na, K and Ca excretory rates occurred, in an apparently dose-dependent manner. Plasma Na and arterial renin concentration decreased at both doses and, at the higher dose, mean arterial blood pressure and effective renal plasma flow decreased while plasma K increased. Plasma Ca, glomerular filtration rate, filtration fraction and total renal plasma flow were not affected. The findings that methoxyverapamil increased urine flow and electrolyte excretion without changing glomerular filtration rate are consistent with the hypothesis that methoxyverapamil acts directly on tubular reabsorptive mechanisms. These effects, and the effect on plasma renin concentration, could contribute to the beneficial effects of this and other Ca entry antagonists in the treatment of hypertension.

  3. The application of a non-linear analysis technique to the monitoring of anesthetic effects in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, P.L.C. van den; Egmond, J. van; Rijn, C.M. van; Dirksen, R.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Booij, L.H.D.J.

    2000-01-01

    To find a new measure from the EEG that quantifies the effects of anesthetics during surgery, the correlation dimension (CD) of the EEG of eight rats was estimated. To get informed about the anesthetic state, the noxious induced withdrawal reflex (NIWR) was measured, i.e. the force elicited by trans

  4. Effects of anesthetic compounds on responses of earthworms to electrostimulation.

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    Podolak-Machowska, Agnieszka; Kostecka, Joanna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Santocki, Michal; Bigaj, Janusz; Plytycz, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Earthworms play an important role in biomedical research, and some surgical procedures require anesthesia. Anesthetic treatments used so far usually induce convulsive body movements connected with extrusion of coelomocyte-containing coelomic fluid that may affect experimental results. Extensive movements connected with the expulsion of coelomic fluid are exploited by immunologists as a method of harvesting immunocompetent coelomocytes from worms subjected to mild electrostimulation (4.5V). The aim of the investigations was to find anesthetic drugs without unintentional coelomocyte depletion. Experiments were performed on adult specimens of Dendrobaena veneta, the coelomocytes of which consist of amoebocytes and riboflavin-storing eleocytes. Earthworm mobility was filmed and extrusion of coelomocytes was quantified by detection of eleocyte-derived riboflavin in immersion fluid. Treatments included earthworms (1) immersed either in physiological saline (controls) or in a solution of one of the tested anesthetic drugs; (2) electrostimulated immediately after anesthesia, and (3) electrostimulated a second time after a 1-hour recovery period. The well-established fish and amphibian anesthetic agent MS-222 induced coelomocyte expulsion. In contrast, solutions of the mammalian local anesthetic drug, prilocaine hydrochloride (0.25-0.5%, 5-10 min) caused temporal earthworm immobilization followed by recovery, thus showing utility as an efficient earthworm anesthetic.

  5. Cardiovascular effects of tramadol in dogs anesthetized with sevoflurane.

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    Itami, Takaharu; Tamaru, Naomichi; Kawase, Kodai; Ishizuka, Tomohito; Tamura, Jun; Miyoshi, Kenjirou; Umar, Mohammed A; Inoue, Hiroki; Yamashita, Kazuto

    2011-12-01

    Cardiovascular effects of tramadol were evaluated in dogs anesthetized with sevoflurane. Six beagle dogs were anesthetized twice at 7 days interval. The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane was earlier determined in each dog. The dogs were then anesthetized with sevoflurane at 1.3 times of predetermined individual MAC and cardiovascular parameters were evaluated before (baseline) and after an intravenous injection of tramadol (4 mg/kg). The administration of tramadol produced a transient and mild increase in arterial blood pressure (ABP) (P=0.004) with prolonged increase in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) (Ppressure, right atrial pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. In conclusion, the administration of tramadol produces a prolonged peripheral vascular constriction in dogs anesthetized with sevoflurane, which is accompanied with a transient and mild increase in arterial blood pressure. It also indicated that the degree of vasoconstriction might depend on the plasma concentration of tramadol.

  6. Effect of local anesthetics on serotonin1A receptor function.

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    Rao, Bhagyashree D; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    The fundamental mechanism behind the action of local anesthetics is still not clearly understood. Phenylethanol (PEtOH) is a constituent of essential oils with a pleasant odor and can act as a local anesthetic. In this work, we have explored the effect of PEtOH on the function of the hippocampal serotonin1A receptor, a representative neurotransmitter receptor belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Our results show that PEtOH induces reduction in ligand binding to the serotonin1A receptor due to lowering of binding affinity, along with a concomitant decrease in the degree of G-protein coupling. Analysis of membrane order using the environment-sensitive fluorescent probe DPH revealed decrease in membrane order with increasing PEtOH concentration, as evident from reduction in rotational correlation time of the probe. Analysis of results obtained shows that the action of local anesthetics could be attributed to the combined effects of specific interaction of the receptor with anesthetics and alteration of membrane properties (such as membrane order). These results assume relevance in the perspective of anesthetic action and could be helpful to achieve a better understanding of the possible role of anesthetics in the function of membrane receptors.

  7. Effect of some anesthetics on memory and exploration.

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    Valzelli, L; Kozak, W; Skorupska, M

    1988-04-01

    A light ether anesthesia in laboratory mice resulted in the complete drop of their memory retrieval to zero for more than three days after the administration. On the contrary, mice that underwent the exploration test after the light ether anesthesia performed as expected, confirming that impairment of memory does not necessarily reflect on exploratory performance. The effect of some anesthetic drugs was then studied on memory retrieval and exploratory behavior. Within this general framework, the anesthetics here studied all worsen memory retrieval, however without inducing clear and long-lasting amnesic effect comparable to that exerted by ether anesthesia. Contrarily, the classically amnesic drug scopolamine, orally administered, enhances memory retrieval and improves exploration.

  8. Effect of general anesthetics on the developing brain

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    S Velayudha Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on rodents and subhuman primates suggest that prolonged exposure to general anesthetics may induce widespread neuronal cell death and neurological sequelae; seriously questioning the safety of pediatric anesthesia. This review presents recent developments in this rapidly emerging field. There is mounting and convincing preclinical evidence in rodents and nonhuman primates that anesthetics in common clinical use are neurotoxic to the developing brain in vitro and cause long-term neurobehavioral abnormalities in vivo. Prior to the publication of animal data and after the publication of animal data, there are several human cohort studies that demonstrate the association of poor neurodevelopmental outcome in neonates, who underwent major surgery during their neonatal period. This review summarizes our present understanding of some of the key components responsible for anesthesia-induced neuroapoptosis and offers some of neuroprotective strategies that could be beneficial as adjunct therapy in preventing anesthesia-induced death of developing neurons in the neonates. A randomized literature search was carried out using search words apoptosis, general anesthetics, and developing brain from 1979 to 2011 for effects of general anesthetics on developing brain in PUBMED and relevant published literature reviewed. General anesthetics may produce neurotoxicity and enduring cognitive impairment in young and aged animals, but the issue has not been adequately studied in humans. It is premature to recommend a change clinical practice based on the present data.

  9. The effect of sub-anesthetic and anesthetic ketamine on water maze memory acquisition, consolidation and retrieval.

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    Moosavi, Maryam; Yadollahi Khales, Golnaz; Rastegar, Karim; Zarifkar, Asadollah

    2012-02-29

    Ketamine, a non-selective inhibitor of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) channels is used in anesthetic or sub-anesthetic doses to induce analgesia, amnesia, to suppress fear, anxiety and depression. Although the ketamine's effect on memory acquisition is known, its effects on other aspects of memory are controversial. Morris water maze is a task which assesses spatial learning and memory. This study was aimed to assess the ketamine's differential effect on water maze memory acquisition, consolidation and retrieval. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-350 g) were trained in water maze single training session. 24h later a probe trial which was consisted of a single trial without platform was done. To assess the effect of ketamine on water maze memory acquisition it was administered before training; to assess its effect on memory consolidation it was administered immediately after training and to assess its effect on memory retrieval it was injected before probe trial. Ketamine both in sub-anesthetic and anesthetic doses impaired water maze memory acquisition, its anesthetic dose but not sub-anesthetic dose impaired memory consolidation and on retrieval stage, both doses deteriorated memory retrieval. It seems that NMDA receptor activity is not just necessary during water maze memory acquisition but also their post-learning reactivation is required to maintain memory consolidation and retrieval.

  10. Effect of flumazenil on sevoflurane requirements for minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake and recovery status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liang, Peng; Zhou, Cheng; Li, Kai-Yu; Guo, Li-Juan; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    .... This study was to detect the effect of GABA receptors on the hypnotic action of volatile anesthetics by evaluation of the effect of intravenous flumazenil on sevoflurane minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake (MAC-Awake...

  11. The Anesthetic Effect of Anterior Middle Superior Alveolar Technique (AMSA)

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    de Souza Tolentino, Lívia; Barbisan Souza, André; Girardi, Ana Alice; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre; Araújo, Maurício Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Anesthesia of the soft and hard tissues of the maxilla may require up to 5 injections. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of the anterior middle superior alveolar (AMSA) and supraperiosteal injection techniques during subgingival scaling and root planing (SRP). Thirty individuals with periodontitis were scheduled for SRP on the buccal aspect of teeth in the anterior maxilla. Before SRP, on a randomly chosen side of the maxilla, the supraperiosteal injection was performed in 1 session, while the AMSA injection was conducted in the contralateral side of the same patient in another session. Immediately after each SRP session, patients rated their pain perception during the procedure with a visual analog scale. No statistically significant differences in mean pain ratings during SRP were found after both anesthetic techniques (P > .05). This preliminary study demonstrated that the AMSA and supraperiosteal injection techniques provided similar anesthetic comfort during SRP. The AMSA injection could be an alternative to anesthetize the buccal aspect of maxilla, without the undesirable effects on facial structures such as the upper lip, nostrils, and lower eyelids. However, further randomized clinical trials with larger samples are necessary to confirm such results. PMID:26650493

  12. The effect of adenosine triphosphate on sevoflurane requirements for minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration and minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake.

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    Suzuki, A; Katoh, T; Ikeda, K

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of i.v. adenosine triphosphate (ATP) on sevoflurane minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) and MAC-Awake. The study group included healthy patients 20-60 yr of age. The study groups for MAC-Awake determination included 49 patients who were scheduled for elective surgery. The study groups for MAC determination included 53 patients scheduled for elective surgery involving a skin incision. These patients were randomly assigned to two groups, an ATP group and a control group. The ATP group received 100 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 ATP i.v., and the control group received no medication. The ATP group and the control group were compared with regard to MAC-Awake (anesthetic concentration achieving 50% probability of eye opening in response to a verbal command) and MAC (anesthetic concentration achieving 50% probability of no movement in response to skin incision). The MAC-Awake was 0.7% +/- 0.1% in the control group (mean +/- SD) and 0.7% +/- 0.1% in the ATP group. MAC was 1.9% +/- 0.1% in the control group and 2.1% +/- 0.2% in the ATP group. The differences in MAC and MAC-Awake between the two groups were not statistically significant. We conclude that ATP infusion (100 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) has no effect on sevoflurane MAC and MAC-Awake. We found that an i.v. adenosine triphosphate infusion (100 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) has no effect on sevoflurane minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (anesthetic concentration achieving 50% probability of no movement in response to skin incision) and minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-Awake (anesthetic concentration achieving 50% probability of eye opening in response to a verbal command) in humans.

  13. Effect of anesthetics on bending elasticity of lipid membranes

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    Yi, Zheng; Michihiro, Nagao; Bossev, Dobrin

    2008-03-01

    Change in physical and chemical properties of bio-membranes is of great interest for understanding the mechanism of anesthetic action on membranes. Hypothetically the anesthetic alters the lipid membrane structure (promoting pore formation across membranes or at least switching transmembrane channels) and therefore the biophysical properties of the membrane. We have used neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy to study the effect of anesthetic molecule, lidocaine, on the bending elasticity (BE) of lipid membranes. BE of lipid bilayers made of (1,2-Dimyristoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine) DMPC and 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DPPC) have been measured at different temperatures and different in the fluid (Lα) phase. Using Zilman-Granek theory the BE were obtained from the decay of the NSE intermediate scattering function. We have found that in the presence of lidocaine the BE of DMPC and DPPC bilayers increases. The results were correlated with those from differential scanning calorimetry. Increase in the lidocaine concentration leads to decrease in the liquid/crystalline transition temperature.

  14. Electrocardiographic effects of toluene in the anesthetized rat.

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    Vidrio, H; Magos, G A; Lorenzana-Jimenez, M

    1986-01-01

    The influence of inhalation of near lethal quantities of toluene on some ECG parameters, as well as the possible cardiac sensitizing effect of the solvent, were determined in chloralose-anesthetized rats. These actions were compared with those of its close analogue benzene. Both solvents produced tachycardia; toluene increased the duration of QRS and specially PR, while benzene decreased P wave duration. No other systematic changes in ECG morphology or evidence of arrhythmia were observed. Toluene appeared to decrease the number of ectopic beats induced by epinephrine, in contrast to benzene, which increased it markedly. These results suggest that toluene administered by inhalation up to near lethal doses is devoid of untoward ECG effect in the chloralose-anesthetized rat, its only action being a decrease in intraventricular and particularly AV conduction. It does not share the myocardial sensitizing properties of benzene and in fact appears to elicit some protection from the arrhythmogenic effects of epinephrine, although no definite conclusions as to this action can be derived due to limitations in the experimental model used.

  15. Effect of anesthetics on the radiosensitivity of a murine tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Chu, A.M.

    1979-09-01

    The effect of four anesthetics on the single dose of x rays required to locally control 50% of implanted MT tumors was investigated. Compared with unanesthetized animals, no change in radiosensitivity was observed if mice were irradiated under either tribromoethanol or fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam anesthesia. However, a small but significant degree of radioprotection was observed under chloral hydrate or pentobarbital anesthesia. Hypothermia or increased hypoxia are considered unlikely mechanisms for the protection, a direct chemical action being most probable. The preferred method for immobilizing the mice in order to locally irradiate the tumors was by simple physical restraint (with care taken to minimize physiological stress). However, if anesthesia was a necessity, the present work suggests that for the MT tumor at least the nonprotecting tribromoethanol and fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam are preferable to the protecting chloral hydrate and pentobarbital. Tribromoethanol is preferable to fetanyl-fluanisone-diazepam in that it produces a smaller drop in temperature. However, it is only a short-acting anesthetic, and prolongation of the state of anesthesia by repeated doses simply prolongs the temperature decline so that there may be no real benefit over fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam.

  16. Anesthetic effects of a three-drugs mixture--comparison of administrative routes and antagonistic effects of atipamezole in mice.

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    Kirihara, Yumiko; Takechi, Mayumi; Kurosaki, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Yuta; Saito, Yoji; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The anesthetic mixture of medetomidine (MED), midazolam (MID) and butorphanol (BUT) produced anesthetic duration of around 40 minutes (min) in ICR mice. We reported that this anesthetic mixture produced almost the same anesthetic effects in both male and female BALB/c and C57BL/6J strains. Intraperitoneal (IP) administration of drugs has been widely used in mice. However, various injectable routes of the anesthetic mixture may cause different anesthetic effects. First, we examined effects of the anesthetic mixture by subcutaneous (SC) and intravenous (IV) injection compared to IP injection. After injection of the anesthetic mixture, administration of atipamezole (ATI) induced mice recovery from anesthesia. Secondly, we examined how different dosage and optimum injection timing of ATI affected mice recovery from anesthesia. We used an anesthetic score to measure anesthetic duration and a pulse oximeter to monitor vital signs under anesthesia. Usually, drugs from SC injection work more weakly than IP or IV injection. However, we found no significant differences of anesthetic duration among the three different injection routes. Antagonistic effects of ATI (0.3 mg/kg and 1.5 mg/kg) worked equally when administered at 30 min after injection of the anesthetic mixture. Antagonistic effects of ATI (1.5 mg/kg) were stronger than ATI (0.3 mg/kg) at 10 min after injection of the anesthetic mixture. The anesthetic mixture is a useful drug to induce nearly the same anesthetic effects by different injection routes and has an antagonist of ATI which helps mice quickly recover from anesthesia. These results may contribute to the welfare of laboratory animals.

  17. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  18. Inhibition of firefly luciferase by general anesthetics: effect on in vitro and in vivo bioluminescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen Keyaerts

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Bioluminescence imaging is routinely performed in anesthetized mice. Often isoflurane anesthesia is used because of its ease of use and fast induction/recovery. However, general anesthetics have been described as important inhibitors of the luciferase enzyme reaction. AIM: To investigate frequently used mouse anesthetics for their direct effect on the luciferase reaction, both in vitro and in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, ketamine, xylazine, medetomidine, pentobarbital and avertin were tested in vitro on luciferase-expressing intact cells, and for non-volatile anesthetics on intact cells and cell lysates. In vivo, isoflurane was compared to unanesthetized animals and different anesthetics. Differences in maximal photon emission and time-to-peak photon emission were analyzed. RESULTS: All volatile anesthetics showed a clear inhibitory effect on the luciferase activity of 50% at physiological concentrations. Avertin had a stronger inhibitory effect of 80%. For ketamine and xylazine, increased photon emission was observed in intact cells, but this was not present in cell lysate assays, and was most likely due to cell toxicity and increased cell membrane permeability. In vivo, the highest signal intensities were measured in unanesthetized mice and pentobarbital anesthetized mice, followed by avertin. Isoflurane and ketamine/medetomidine anesthetized mice showed the lowest photon emission (40% of unanesthetized, with significantly longer time-to-peak than unanesthetized, pentobarbital or avertin-anesthetized mice. We conclude that, although strong inhibitory effects of anesthetics are present in vitro, their effect on in vivo BLI quantification is mainly due to their hemodynamic effects on mice and only to a lesser extent due to the direct inhibitory effect.

  19. [Clinical anesthetic effects of epidural ropivacaine with tramadol].

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    Cai, Jin; Guo, Qu-Lian; Zou, Wang-Yuan

    2004-04-01

    To observe the anesthesic effects of epidural ropivacaine with tramadol during lower limbs surgery. Thirty patients (ASA I - II) scheduled for the lower limbs surgery were randomly divided into 2 groups with 15 patients in each group: group ropivacaine (R) and group ropivacaine with tramadol (T). The puncture was performed at the interspace of L2-3. Each patient was given 2% lidocaine 3 ml with 0.75% ropivacaine 10 ml which included NS 1 ml in Group R or tramadol 50 mg in Group T. The potency of analgesia, the time of sensation block to T12 and T10, the time to the highest plane of analgesia, the lasting time of analgesia, the degree of sedation, the degree of motor block, and the side effects were recorded and analyzed during anesthesia after the first dose. The time of sensation block which reached T12 and T10 and the time to the highest plane of analgesia decreased significantly in Group T than that in Group R (P 0.05). The epidural ropivacaine with tramadol enhanced the anesthetic effects of ropivacaine.

  20. Antimicrobial effects of liquid anesthetic isoflurane on Candida albicans

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    Barodka, Viachaslau M; Acheampong, Edward; Powell, Garry; Lobach, Ludmila; Logan, David A; Parveen, Zahida; Armstead, Valerie; Mukhtar, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that can grow in yeast morphology or hyphal form depending on the surrounding environment. This ubiquitous fungus is present in skin and mucus membranes as a potential pathogen that under opportunistic conditions causes a series of systemic and superficial infections known as candidiasis, moniliasis or simply candidiasis. There has been a steady increase in the prevalence of candidiasis that is expressed in more virulent forms of infection. Although candidiasis is commonly manifested as mucocutaneous disease, life-threatening systemic invasion by this fungus can occur in every part of the body. The severity of candidal infections is associated with its morphological shift such that the hyphal morphology of the fungus is most invasive. Of importance, aberrant multiplication of Candida yeast is also associated with the pathogenesis of certain mucosal diseases. In this study, we assessed the anti-candidal activity of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane in liquid form in comparison with the anti-fungal agent amphotericin B in an in vitro culture system. Exposure of C. albicans to isoflurane (0.3% volume/volume and above) inhibited multiplication of yeast as well as formation of hyphae. These data suggest development of potential topical application of isoflurane for controlling a series of cutaneous and genital infections associated with this fungus. Elucidiation of the mechanism by which isoflurane effects fungal growth could offer therapeutic potential for certain systemic fungal infections. PMID:17094810

  1. Antimicrobial effects of liquid anesthetic isoflurane on Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstead Valerie

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that can grow in yeast morphology or hyphal form depending on the surrounding environment. This ubiquitous fungus is present in skin and mucus membranes as a potential pathogen that under opportunistic conditions causes a series of systemic and superficial infections known as candidiasis, moniliasis or simply candidiasis. There has been a steady increase in the prevalence of candidiasis that is expressed in more virulent forms of infection. Although candidiasis is commonly manifested as mucocutaneous disease, life-threatening systemic invasion by this fungus can occur in every part of the body. The severity of candidal infections is associated with its morphological shift such that the hyphal morphology of the fungus is most invasive. Of importance, aberrant multiplication of Candida yeast is also associated with the pathogenesis of certain mucosal diseases. In this study, we assessed the anti-candidal activity of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane in liquid form in comparison with the anti-fungal agent amphotericin B in an in vitro culture system. Exposure of C. albicans to isoflurane (0.3% volume/volume and above inhibited multiplication of yeast as well as formation of hyphae. These data suggest development of potential topical application of isoflurane for controlling a series of cutaneous and genital infections associated with this fungus. Elucidiation of the mechanism by which isoflurane effects fungal growth could offer therapeutic potential for certain systemic fungal infections.

  2. Latency of auditory evoked potential monitoring the effects of general anesthetics on nerve fibers and synapses

    OpenAIRE

    Bowan Huang; Feixue Liang; Lei Zhong; Minlin Lin; Juan Yang; Linqing Yan; Jinfan Xiao; Zhongju Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Auditory evoked potential (AEP) is an effective index for the effects of general anesthetics. However, it’s unknown if AEP can differentiate the effects of general anesthetics on nerve fibers and synapses. Presently, we investigated AEP latency and amplitude changes to different acoustic intensities during pentobarbital anesthesia. Latency more regularly changed than amplitude during anesthesia. AEP Latency monotonically decreased with acoustic intensity increase (i.e., latency-intensity curv...

  3. Doxepin Has a Potent and Long-Acting Spinal Anesthetic Effect in Rats

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    Bor-Chin Cheng

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Doxepin, a tricyclic antidepressant, was recently found to be effective in the treatment of various acute and chronic painful conditions. However, the mechanism of its actions was not clear, especially when involving the spine. The aim of our study was to evaluate the spinal anesthetic effect of doxepin. Two commonly used traditional local anesthetics, bupivacaine and lidocaine, were used as controls. The potencies and durations of the drugs' action were evaluated in male Sprague-Dawley rats. We found that intrathecally administered doxepin, like bupivacaine and lidocaine, produced dose-related spinal anesthetic effects on motor activity, proprioception, and nociception. Among the three drugs, doxepin produced spinal anesthetic effects in rats more potent than that of lidocaine (p < 0.001, in each comparison and longer than that of bupivacaine and lidocaine (p < 0.001, in each comparison. The spinal activity of doxepin may provide some explanation of its clinical effect in pain management.

  4. The effects of anesthetics on cortical spreading depression elicitation and c-fos expression in rats.

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    Kitahara, Y; Taga, K; Abe, H; Shimoji, K

    2001-01-01

    The effects of anesthetics on the generation of cortical spreading depression (CSD) were investigated. Volatile anesthetics halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 MAC), and the intravenous anesthetic pentobarbital were studied. Cortical spreading depression was induced by 3M-KCl applied to a surface of brain cortex for 30 minutes. Direct current (DC) potential was recorded, and the number, amplitude, and duration of CSDs were observed. With increasing concentrations of each volatile anesthetic, there was a dose-related reduction in CSD frequency but not in CSD amplitude. At 2.0 MAC of sevoflurane the suppression of CSD was less than with the other volatile anesthetics. In addition, the influence of anesthetics on expression of c-fos mRNA was investigated. Additional animals anesthetized by isoflurane or sevoflurane were studied. Five CSDs were elicited by electric stimulation (0.5 mV, 1 second) in each animal. In situ hybridization with 35S-labeled oligonucleotides was used to evaluate the level of c-fos mRNA. The expression of c-fos was observed in the hemisphere in which CSD was elicited, but there was no difference in expression of c-fos among the groups. We conclude that volatile anesthetics can induce suppression of CSD elicitation in a dose dependent manner, but that at high concentrations sevoflurane is significantly less effective than other volatile agents. Pentobarbital has the least effect on KCl-induced CSD. These data suggest that the choice of anesthetics can impact the results of studies examining membrane depolarization and the ionic changes initiated by CSD.

  5. Nitrogen narcosis and pressure reversal of anesthetic effects in node of Ranvier.

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    Kendig, J J

    1984-01-01

    To compare sodium channel block by hyperbaric nitrogen with that induced by other anesthetics and to examine the basis for pressure antagonism to anesthetic condition block, voltage clamped nodes of Ranvier were exposed to nitrogen at pressures at 1-14 atm alone and in combination with helium to a total pressure of up to 100 atm. At 7 and 14 atm nitrogen, sodium currents were reversibly depressed without accompanying changes in the current-voltage relation. The curve relating steady-state inactivation (h infinity) to voltage was shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction, as is the case with other general anesthetic agents. The time constant of inactivation (tau h) was slightly decreased at depolarized potentials. The preceding companion paper demonstrated an opposite effect of hyperbaric helium on the properties of sodium inactivation. Addition of helium pressure in the presence of nitrogen at 14 atm did not increase peak sodium current with inactivation maximally removed, but it did shift the h infinity curve back toward control levels, thus increasing sodium current at points on the slope of the curve. It is proposed that these opposing shifts in steady-state inactivation levels are the basis for pressure antagonism to anesthetic conduction block. In the case of inert gases and volatile anesthetic agents, the antagonism may be direct but has not been shown to be so. In the case of the local anesthetic benzocaine, differences in the voltage dependence of anesthetic and pressure-induced changes in tau h indicate the antagonism is indirect.

  6. Lack of effect of flurothyl, a non-anesthetic fluorinated ether, on rat brain synaptic plasma membrane calcium-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, J L; Janicki, P K; Franks, J J

    1999-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA), a regulator of intracellular calcium, is inhibited by volatile anesthetics and by xenon and nitrous oxide. Response of a cellular system to anesthetics, particularly to volatile agents, raises the question of non-specific, even toxic, side effects unrelated to anesthetic action. Compounds with chemical and physical properties similar to halogenated anesthetics, but which lack anesthetic effect, have been used to address this question. We have compared the effects of halothane and flurothyl, a non-anesthetic fluorinated ether, on PMCA Ca2+ transport across isolated brain synaptic plasma membranes (SPM). Flurothyl, at concentrations predicted by the Meyer-Overton curve to range from 0.4 to 2.6 MAC (minimum alveolar concentration), had no significant on PMCA activity. In contrast halothane, 1.3 MAC, reduced Ca2+ transport 30 to 40%. These findings provide further evidence for a specific effect of inhalation anesthetics on neuronal plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase.

  7. The effect of different anesthetics on tumor cytotoxicity by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazawa, Kazumasa; Koutsogiannaki, Sophia; Chamberlain, Matthew; Yuki, Koichi

    2017-01-15

    A number of retrospective studies have suggested that choice of anesthetic drugs during surgical tumor resection might affect tumor recurrence/metastasis, or outcome of patients. The recent study showed that volatile anesthetics-based general anesthesia was associated with the worse outcomes than intravenous anesthetics-based general anesthesia. However, the underlying mechanism is yet to be determined. Because natural killer (NK) cells are implicated as important immune cells for tumor recurrence/metastasis in the perioperative period, we examined the effect of different anesthetics on NK cell-mediated tumor cytotoxicity. Because adhesion molecule leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) is functionally important in NK cells and is inhibited by commonly used volatile anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane, we hypothesized that these anesthetics would attenuate NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Using human NK cell line NK92-MI cells and tumor cell line K562 cells as a model system, we performed cytotoxicity, proliferation, conjugation and degranulation assays. Lytic granule polarization was also assessed. We showed that isoflurane, sevoflurane and LFA-1 inhibitor BIRT377 attenuated cytotoxicity, and reduced conjugation and polarization, but not degranulation of NK cells. Our data suggest that isoflurane and sevoflurane attenuated NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity at least partly by their LFA-1 inhibition in vitro. Whether or not isoflurane and sevoflurane attenuate NK cell-mediated tumor cytotoxicity in patients needs to be determined in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The relation between the duty cycle and anesthetic effect in lidocaine iontophoresis using alternating current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, Ryo; Nakajima, Atsushi; Haida, Yu; Umino, Masahiro; Fukayama, Haruhisa

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the effect of the duty cycle on the anesthetic effect during lidocaine alternating current (AC) iontophoresis. A solution of 2% lidocaine was delivered to the medial antecubital skin for 20 minutes using AC iontophoresis with a duty cycle of 60%, 70%, or 80%. The von Frey test was then performed to evaluate the anesthetic effect. In the groups treated with a duty cycle of 80% or 70% the touch thresholds (TT) were significantly elevated from 0 minutes to 30 minutes and from 0 minutes to 20 minutes. TT were significantly elevated at 0 minutes in the group treated with a 60% duty cycle. The anesthetic effect was significantly enhanced in a duty cycle-dependent manner.

  9. Anesthetic effectiveness of the supplemental intraligamentary injection, administered with a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system, in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusstein, John; Claffey, Elizabeth; Reader, Al; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the anesthetic effectiveness of the supplemental intraligamentary injection, administered with a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system, in mandibular posterior teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis when the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block failed. Fifty-four emergency patients, diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth, received an inferior alveolar nerve block and had moderate to severe pain upon endodontic access. A computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system was then used to administer intraligamentary injections of 1.4 ml of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Success of the intraligamentary injection was defined as none or mild pain upon endodontic access or initial instrumentation. The results demonstrated that anesthetic success was obtained in 56% (30 of 54) of the patients. We concluded that when the inferior alveolar nerve block failed to provide profound pulpal anesthesia in mandibular posterior teeth of patients presenting with irreversible pulpitis, the intraligamentary injection administered with a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system was successful approximately 56% of the time.

  10. Anticholeretic effect of substance P in anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, I; Thulin, L; Hellgren, M

    1978-03-01

    Nine anesthetized dogs were provided with acute common duct fistulas after exclusion of the gallbladder. Synthetic Substance P was administered as caval infusions in a dosage of 0.5-20 ng x kg-1 x min-1, duration 10 min. The output of hepatic bile, sodium and amylase decreased during infusion by 40-52 per cent at the highest doses. After termination of infusion all 3 parameters increased by 19-60 per cent above the basal level. The biliary concentration of sodium was constant, while that of amylase increased during infusion. The responses were dose-related. The anticholeresis induced by substance P might be due to inhibition of the canalicular bile fraction, which presumably is mediated by active sodium transport and independent of bile salt excretion.

  11. The effects of anesthetic agents on oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakan, Selvinaz; Düzgüner, Vesile

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress can be defined as the instability between antioxidant defense of the body and the production of free radical that causes peroxydation on the lipid layer. Free radicals are reactive oxygen species that are produced in the course of normal metabolisms of aerobe organisms and they may cause disorders in cell structure and organelles by interacting macromolecules, like lipid, protein, nucleic acids. Therefore, they may cause cardiovascular, immune system, liver, kidney illnesses and many other illnesses like cancer, aging, cataract, diabetes. It is known that many drugs used for the purpose of anesthetizing may cause lipid peroxidation in organism. For these reasons, determining the Oxidative stress index of anaesthetic stress chosen in the ones that are exposed to long term anaesthetic agents and anaesthesia appliccations, is so substantial.

  12. An estimation of the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound guidance facilitates precise needle and injectate placement, increasing axillary block success rates, reducing onset times, and permitting local anesthetic dose reduction. The minimum effective volume of local anesthetic in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block is unknown. The authors performed a study to estimate the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (2% LidoEpi) in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  13. The modifying effect of anesthetic technique on the metabolic and endocrine responses to anesthesia and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1988-01-01

    and the widespread use of the term "stress free anesthesia" in surgery is therefore not valid. However, continuous administration of local anesthetic agents in the epidural space is the most effective technique in so far as reduction of the stress response is concerned. The clinical implication of a variable...... reduction in the stress response to surgery by different anesthetic techniques remains largely unsettled, since only few controlled studies have been published on the clinical effects of pain relief and general anesthesia. However, a vast amount of data exist from controlled studies comparing regional...... anesthesia with local anesthetics and general anesthesia. The cumulative experience from these studies have demonstrated an advantageous effect on postoperative morbidity parameters such as blood loss, postoperative thromboembolic complications, pulmonary infective complications, gastrointestinal motility...

  14. Anesthetic Effects of a Mixture of Medetomidine, Midazolam and Butorphanol in Two Strains of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirihara, Yumiko; Takechi, Mayumi; Kurosaki, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Yuta; Kurosawa, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    The combination of ketamine and xylazine is a widely used anesthetic for laboratory animals. However, due to an abuse problem in Japan, ketamine has been specified as a narcotic since 2007. Instead of using ketamine, Kawai et al. reported an injectable formula with an equivalent effect to the mixture of ketamine and xylazine [11]. The mixture of 0.3 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) medetomidine (Med.), 4.0 mg/kg b.w. midazoram (Mid.), and 5.0 mg/kg b.w. butorphanol (But.) produced an anesthetic duration of around 40 min in outbred ICR mice. However, the anesthetic effect of the mixture for inbred mice strains remains unknown. Therefore, we examined anesthetic effects of the mixture of Med., Mid., and But. in the BALB/c and C57BL/6J strains. After intraperitoneal injection into mice, right front paw, left hind paw, and tail pinch reflexes as well as corneal and righting reflexes were observed. Every 5 min, we scored each reflex category as 0 for reaction or 1 for no reaction. As long as the total score was at least 4 out of 5, we considered the mixture as putting a mouse in a surgical anesthetic state. The mixture produced an anesthetic duration of more than 45 min in both strains of mice. These results indicate that the mixture of Med., Mid., and But. can be a useful and effective anesthesia for the BALB/c and C57BL/6J strains of inbred mice as well as outbred ICR mice. PMID:23903051

  15. General anesthetics have differential inhibitory effects on gap junction channels and hemichannels in astrocytes and neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinhe; Gangoso, Ester; Yi, Chenju; Jeanson, Tiffany; Kandelman, Stanislas; Mantz, Jean; Giaume, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Astrocytes represent a major non-neuronal cell population actively involved in brain functions and pathologies. They express a large amount of gap junction proteins that allow communication between adjacent glial cells and the formation of glial networks. In addition, these membrane proteins can also operate as hemichannels, through which "gliotransmitters" are released, and thus contribute to neuroglial interaction. There are now reports demonstrating that alterations of astroglial gap junction communication and/or hemichannel activity impact neuronal and synaptic activity. Two decades ago we reported that several general anesthetics inhibited gap junctions in primary cultures of astrocytes (Mantz et al., (1993) Anesthesiology 78(5):892-901). As there are increasing studies investigating neuroglial interactions in anesthetized mice, we here updated this previous study by employing acute cortical slices and by characterizing the effects of general anesthetics on both astroglial gap junctions and hemichannels. As hemichannel activity is not detected in cortical astrocytes under basal conditions, we treated acute slices with the endotoxin LPS or proinflammatory cytokines to induce hemichannel activity in astrocytes, which in turn activated neuronal hemichannels. We studied two extensively used anesthetics, propofol and ketamine, and the more recently developed dexmedetomidine. We report that these drugs have differential inhibitory effects on gap junctional communication and hemichannel activity in astrocytes when used in their respective, clinically relevant concentrations, and that dexmedetomidine appears to be the least effective on both channel functions. In addition, the three anesthetics have similar effects on neuronal hemichannels. Altogether, our observations may contribute to optimizing the selection of anesthetics for in vivo animal studies.

  16. Effect of buprenorphine on total intravenous anesthetic requirements during spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelemsky, Yury; Schauer, Jacob; Loo, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a partial mu receptor agonist and kappa/delta antagonist commonly used for the treatment of opioid dependence or as an analgesic. It has a long plasma half-life and a high binding affinity for opioid receptors. This affinity is so high, that the effects are not easily antagonized by competitive antagonists, such as naloxone. The high affinity also prevents binding of other opioids, at commonly used clinical doses, to receptor sites - preventing their analgesic and likely minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) reducing benefits. This case report contrasts the anesthetic requirements of a patient undergoing emergency cervical spine surgery while taking buprenorphine with anesthetic requirements of the same patient undergoing a similar procedure after weaning of buprenorphine. Use of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring prevented use of paralytics and inhalational anesthetics during both cases, therefore total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) was maintained with propofol and remifentanil infusions. During the initial surgery, intraoperative patient movement could not be controlled with very high doses of propofol and remifentanil. The patient stopped moving in response to surgical stimulation only after the addition of a ketamine. Buprenorphine-naloxone was discontinued postoperatively. Five days later the patient underwent a similar cervical spine surgery. She had drastically reduced anesthetic requirements during this case, suggesting buprenorphine's profound effect on anesthetic dosing. This case report elegantly illustrates that discontinuation of buprenorphine is likely warranted for patients who present for major spine surgery, which necessitates the avoidance of volatile anesthetic and paralytic agents. The addition of ketamine may be necessary in patients maintained on buprenorphine in order to ensure a motionless surgical field.

  17. Effects of different general anesthetics on serum hemolysis and hepatic and muscular glycogenolysis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.F.A. Machado

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetics can affect the structure and biological function of tissues and systems differentially. The aim of the present study was to compare three injectable anesthetics generally used in experiments with animals in terms of the degree of hemolysis and glycogenolysis occurring after profound anesthesia. Twenty-four male Wistar rats (330-440 g were divided into three groups (N = 8: chloral hydrate (CH, ketamine + xylazine (KX, Zoletil 50® (zolazepam and tiletamine + xylazine (ZTX. After deep anesthesia, total blood was collected. The liver and white (WG and red gastrocnemius (RG muscles were also immediately removed. The degree of serum hemolysis was quantified on the basis of hemoglobin concentration (g/L. Hepatic and muscular glycogen concentrations (mmol/kg wet tissue were quantified by the phenol-sulfuric method. The CH and KX groups exhibited serum hemolysis (4.0 ± 2.2 and 1.9 ± 0.9 g/L, respectively; P < 0.05 compared to the ZTX group, which presented none. Only KX induced elevated glycogenolysis (mmol/kg wet tissue in the liver (86.9 ± 63.2 and in WG (18.7 ± 9.0 and RG (15.2 ± 7.2; P < 0.05. The CH and ZTX groups exhibited no glycogenolysis in the liver (164.4 ± 41.1 and 176.8 ± 54.4, respectively, WG (28.8 ± 4.4, 32.0 ± 6.5, respectively or RG (29.0 ± 4.9; 25.3 ± 8.6, respectively. Our data indicate that ZTX seems to be an appropriate general anesthetic for studies that seek to simultaneously quantify the concentration of glycogen and serum biochemical markers without interferences. ZTX is reasonably priced, found easily at veterinary markets, quickly induces deep anesthesia, and presents a low mortality rate.

  18. Effects of different general anesthetics on serum hemolysis and hepatic and muscular glycogenolysis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, E F A; Normand, A C R; Nunes, L A S; Brenzikofer, R; Macedo, D V

    2009-11-01

    Anesthetics can affect the structure and biological function of tissues and systems differentially. The aim of the present study was to compare three injectable anesthetics generally used in experiments with animals in terms of the degree of hemolysis and glycogenolysis occurring after profound anesthesia. Twenty-four male Wistar rats (330-440 g) were divided into three groups (N = 8): chloral hydrate (CH), ketamine + xylazine (KX), Zoletil 50(R) (zolazepam and tiletamine) + xylazine (ZTX). After deep anesthesia, total blood was collected. The liver and white (WG) and red gastrocnemius (RG) muscles were also immediately removed. The degree of serum hemolysis was quantified on the basis of hemoglobin concentration (g/L). Hepatic and muscular glycogen concentrations (mmol/kg wet tissue) were quantified by the phenol-sulfuric method. The CH and KX groups exhibited serum hemolysis (4.0 +/- 2.2 and 1.9 +/- 0.9 g/L, respectively; P glycogenolysis (mmol/kg wet tissue) in the liver (86.9 +/- 63.2) and in WG (18.7 +/- 9.0) and RG (15.2 +/- 7.2; P glycogenolysis in the liver (164.4 +/- 41.1 and 176.8 +/- 54.4, respectively), WG (28.8 +/- 4.4, 32.0 +/- 6.5, respectively) or RG (29.0 +/- 4.9; 25.3 +/- 8.6, respectively). Our data indicate that ZTX seems to be an appropriate general anesthetic for studies that seek to simultaneously quantify the concentration of glycogen and serum biochemical markers without interferences. ZTX is reasonably priced, found easily at veterinary markets, quickly induces deep anesthesia, and presents a low mortality rate.

  19. Comparison of the effects of xylazine bolus versus medetomidine constant rate infusion on the stress response, urine production, and anesthetic recovery characteristics in horses anesthetized with isoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Catherine M; Lemke, Kip A; Lamont, Leigh A; Horney, Barbara S; Doyle, Aimie J

    2012-04-15

    To compare the effect of xylazine bolus versus medetomidine constant rate infusion (MCRI) on serum cortisol and glucose concentrations, urine production, and anesthetic recovery characteristics in dorsally recumbent, spontaneously breathing, isoflurane-anesthetized horses. Prospective, randomized crossover study. 10 healthy Standardbreds. Horses were premedicated with xylazine or medetomidine IV. Anesthesia was induced with diazepam and ketamine and maintained with isoflurane for 150 minutes. For the xylazine treatment, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.7% and xylazine (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb]), IV) was administered as a bolus at the end of anesthesia. For the MCRI treatment, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.4% and medetomidine (0.005 mg/kg/h [0.0023 mg/lb/h], IV) was infused throughout anesthesia. Serum cortisol and glucose concentrations were measured before, during, and after anesthesia. Urine specific gravity and volume were measured during anesthesia. Unassisted anesthetic recoveries were recorded by a digital video camera for later evaluation by 2 observers who were blinded to treatment. Serum cortisol concentration was lower and serum glucose concentration was higher with MCRI treatment, compared with xylazine treatment. Time to sternal recumbency was longer with MCRI treatment, but no difference was seen between treatments for times to extubation, first movement, or standing. Objective (mean attempt interval) and subjective (visual analog score) recovery scores were significantly better with MCRI treatment, compared with xylazine treatment. In isoflurane-anesthetized horses, premedication and administration of medetomidine as a constant rate infusion resulted in decreased serum cortisol concentration, increased serum glucose concentration, and superior anesthetic recovery characteristics, compared with conventional treatment with xylazine.

  20. The effects of anesthetic technique and ambient temperature on thermoregulation in lower extremity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Ayse B; Tosun, Fadime; Demirel, Ismail; Unlu, Serap; Bayar, Mustafa K; Erhan, Omer L

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the effects of anesthetic technique and ambient temperature on thermoregulation for patients undergoing lower extremity surgery. Our study included 90 male patients aged 18-60 years in American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status groups I or II who were scheduled for lower extremity surgery. Patients were randomly divided into three groups according to anesthetic technique: general anesthesia (GA), epidural anesthesia (EA), and femoral-sciatic block (FS). These groups were divided into subgroups according to room temperature: the temperature for group I was 20-22 °C and that for group II was 23-25 °C. Therefore, we labeled the groups as follows: GA I, GA II, EA I, EA II, FS I, and FS II. Probes for measuring tympanic membrane and peripheral temperature were placed in and on the patients, and mean skin temperature (MST) and mean body temperature (MBT) were assessed. Postoperative shivering scores were recorded. During anesthesia, tympanic temperature and MBT decreased whereas MST increased for all patients. There was no significant difference between tympanic temperatures in either the room temperature or anesthetic method groups. MST was lower in group GA I than in group GA II after 5, 10, 15, 20, 60 and 90 min whereas MBT was significantly lower at the basal level (p thermoregulation among anesthetic techniques. Room temperature affected thermoregulation in Group GA.

  1. Effects of remifentanil on measures of anesthetic immobility and analgesia in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pypendop, Bruno H; Siao, Kristine T; Stanley, Scott D

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate effects of various doses of remifentanil on measures of analgesia in anesthetized cats. 6 healthy adult cats. Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) for isoflurane and thermal threshold responses were evaluated in anesthetized cats. Remifentanil infusions of 0 (baseline), 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 microg/kg/min were administered; after a 45-minute equilibration period, isoflurane MAC and responses were determined. Isoflurane MAC was determined in anesthetized cats once for each remifentanil infusion rate by use of a standard tail clamp technique. Thermal threshold was measured in awake cats by use of a commercially available analgesiometric probe placed on the lateral portion of the thorax; remifentanil infusions were administered in randomized order to anesthetized cats, and thermal threshold determinations were made by an investigator who was unaware of the infusion rate. Mean +/- SEM median effective concentration (EC(50)) for remifentanil and its active metabolite, GR90291, for the thermal threshold test was 1.00 +/- 0.35 ng/mL and 307 +/- 28 ng/mL of blood, respectively. Dysphoria was detected in all awake cats at the 2 highest remifentanil infusion rates. However, isoflurane MAC during remifentanil infusions was unchanged from baseline values, even at blood opioid concentrations approximately 75 times the analgesic EC(50). Immobility and analgesia as reflected by thermal threshold testing were independent anesthetic end points in the cats. Results of MAC-sparing evaluations should not be used to infer analgesic potency without prior validation of an MAC-analgesia relationship for specific drugs and species.

  2. Effectiveness of topical anesthetics on reducing tactile sensitivity in the paws of newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, Misty M; Vineyard, Mary Ann; Roberto, Megan E; Brumley, Michele R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of three local, topical anesthetics on touch response thresholds of the paws of 1-day-old rats. Touch response thresholds were measured using Semmes Weinstein monofilaments after treatment of the paws with EMLA (2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine), alcaine (.5% proparacaine), triocaine (20% benzocaine, 6% lidocaine, and 4% tetracaine), or petroleum jelly (treatment control). Touch thresholds significantly increased after treatment with EMLA 18% of the time, and there was no evidence of a systemic effect. Touch thresholds were not significantly altered after treatment with alcaine, triocaine, or petroleum jelly. Therefore, EMLA appears to be a slightly effective topical anesthetic for reducing tactile sensitivity in newborn rats.

  3. Anesthetics drug pharmacodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, P; Schneider, G; Kochs, E

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesia cannot be defined in an unambiguous manner. The essential components of general anesthesia are absence of consciousness and pain. This translates into two particular qualities: (1) sedation and hypnosis, i.e., mental blockade and (2) analgesia/antinociception, i.e., sensory blockade. Anesthetic actions on these two subcomponents are difficult to separate. On the one hand, very few anesthetics act exclusively on one of these components. On the other hand, these components are closely related to each other. Unconsciousness prevents (conscious) perception of pain, and nociception may serve as an arousal stimulus and change the level of sedation and hypnosis. The art of anesthesia lies in adequate dosing of drugs to reach both mental and sensory blockade. Drug administration can be based on pharmacokinetic considerations. Pharmacokinetic models allow an estimation of what happens to the administered drug in the body. Models with an effect site compartment may facilitate a tailored administration of anesthetic drugs. Finally, the quantification of pharmacodynamic effects allows a precise titration of drugs. Clinical assessment of mental blockade is often dichotomous, and therefore not very helpful to guide drug administration. Several scoring systems exist, but once consciousness is lost they become less reliable, in particular because reaction to stimuli is assessed, which mixes assessment of mental blockade with assessment of sensory blockade. Clinical assessment of analgesia requires a conscious patient, so antinociception is difficult to measure. Several methods of objective quantification on the basis of electrical brain activity are discussed including EEG and evoked potentials. Despite numerous indexes of the hypnotic component of anesthesia, there is no parameter that unambiguously quantifies the level of mental or sensory blockade.

  4. Quantifying truncation errors in effective field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Furnstahl, R J; Phillips, D R; Wesolowski, S

    2015-01-01

    Bayesian procedures designed to quantify truncation errors in perturbative calculations of quantum chromodynamics observables are adapted to expansions in effective field theory (EFT). In the Bayesian approach, such truncation errors are derived from degree-of-belief (DOB) intervals for EFT predictions. Computation of these intervals requires specification of prior probability distributions ("priors") for the expansion coefficients. By encoding expectations about the naturalness of these coefficients, this framework provides a statistical interpretation of the standard EFT procedure where truncation errors are estimated using the order-by-order convergence of the expansion. It also permits exploration of the ways in which such error bars are, and are not, sensitive to assumptions about EFT-coefficient naturalness. We first demonstrate the calculation of Bayesian probability distributions for the EFT truncation error in some representative examples, and then focus on the application of chiral EFT to neutron-pr...

  5. Effects of anesthetic agents on brain blood oxygenation level revealed with ultra-high field MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Ciobanu

    Full Text Available During general anesthesia it is crucial to control systemic hemodynamics and oxygenation levels. However, anesthetic agents can affect cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in a drug-dependent manner, while systemic hemodynamics is stable. Brain-wide monitoring of this effect remains highly challenging. Because T(2*-weighted imaging at ultra-high magnetic field strengths benefits from a dramatic increase in contrast to noise ratio, we hypothesized that it could monitor anesthesia effects on brain blood oxygenation. We scanned rat brains at 7T and 17.2T under general anesthesia using different anesthetics (isoflurane, ketamine-xylazine, medetomidine. We showed that the brain/vessels contrast in T(2*-weighted images at 17.2T varied directly according to the applied pharmacological anesthetic agent, a phenomenon that was visible, but to a much smaller extent at 7T. This variation is in agreement with the mechanism of action of these agents. These data demonstrate that preclinical ultra-high field MRI can monitor the effects of a given drug on brain blood oxygenation level in the absence of systemic blood oxygenation changes and of any neural stimulation.

  6. Chiral selective effects of doxazosin enantiomers on blood pressure and urinary bladder pressure in anesthetized rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-ping MA; Lei-ming REN; Ding ZHAO; Zhong-ning ZHU; Miao WANG; Hai-gang LU; Li-hua DUAN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study chiral selective effects of doxazosin enantiomers on blood pressure and urinary bladder pressure in anesthetized rats. Methods: In anesthetized rats, the carotid blood pressure, left ventricular pressure of the heart and the urinary bladder pressure were recorded. Results: Administration of S-doxazosin at 0.25, 2.5, 25, and 250 nmol/kg iv produced a dose-dependent decrease in blood pressure, but its depressor effect was significantly weaker than that induced by R-doxazosin and racemic-doxazosin (rac-doxazosin), and the ED30 values (producing a 30% decrease in mean arterial pressure) of R-doxazosin, rac-doxazosin and S-doxazosin were 15.64,45.93, and 128.81, respectively. Rac-doxazosin and its enantiomers administered cumulatively in anesthetized rats induced a dose-dependent decrease in the left ventricular systolic pressure and ±dp/dtmax, and the potency order of the 3 agents was R-doxazosin >rac-doxazosin >S-doxazosin. Rac-doxazosin and its enantiomers decreased the vesical micturition pressure dose-dependently at 2.5,25, and 250 nmol/kg, and the inhibitory potency among the 3 agents was not significantly different. Conclusion: S-doxazosin decreases the carotid blood pressure and left ventricular pressure of the heart less than R-doxazosin and rac-doxazosin, but its effect on the vesical micturition pressure is similar to R-doxazosin and rac-doxazosin, indicating that S-doxazosin has chiral selectivity between cardiovascular system and urinary system in anesthetized rats.

  7. Protective effects of anesthetics on vascular function related to K⁺ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Shinji; Nakahata, Katsutoshi; Azma, Toshiharu; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Cook, David J; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    K(+) channels play an essential role in the membrane potential of arterial smooth muscle, and also in regulating contractile tone. Especially, in vascular smooth muscle, the opening of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channels leads to membrane hyperpolarization, resulting in muscle relaxation and vasodilation. This activation also plays a role in tissues during pathophysiologic events such as ischemia, hypoxia, and vasodilatory shock. In this review, we will describe the physiological and pathophysiological roles of vascular smooth muscle KATP channels in relation to the effects of anesthetics. Although accumulated evidence suggests that many anesthetics modify the above function of K(+) channels as a metabolic sensor, further studies are certainly needed to resolve certain issues, especially in clinical settings of anesthesia use.

  8. Cardioprotective effects of anesthetic preconditioning in rats with ischemia-reperfusion injury: propofol versus isoflurane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing TAO; Ling-qiao LU; Qing XU; Shu-ren LI; Mao-tsun LIN

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We compare the cardioprotective effects of anesthetic preconditioning by propofol and/or isoflurane in rats with ischemia-reperfusion injury. Methods: Male adult Wistar rats were subjected to 60 min of anterior descending coronary artery occlusion followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Before the long ischemia, anesthetics were administered twice for 10 min followed by 5 min washout. Isoflurane was inhaled at I MAC (0.016) in I group, whereas propofol was inhaled intravenously at 37.5 mg/(kg.h) in P group. A combination ofisoflurane and propofol was administered simultaneously in I+P group. Results: In control (without anesthetic preconditioning, C group), remarkable myocardial infarction and apoptosis accompanied by an increased level of cardiac troponin T were noted 120 rain after ischemia-reperfusion. As compared to those of control group, I and P groups had comparable cardioprotection. In addition, I+P group shares with I and P groups the comparable cardioprotective effects in terms of myocardial infarction and cardiac troponin T elevation. Conclusion: A combination of isoflurane and propofol produced no ad-ditional cardioprotection.

  9. Effects of intravenous anesthetic agents on vascular endothelium

    OpenAIRE

    Alp Gurbet; Fatma Nur Kaya; Alper Bayraktar; İlkin Cavuşoğlu; Serap Şirvancı; Berin Özcan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to comparethe effects of Propofol 1%, Propofol 2%, Ketamine, Pentothal,Etomidate and Etomidate-lipuro on venous endothelium.Materials and methods: The study was done fromAugust 2007 to May 2008 after approval of Faculty’sEthic Committee. Forty rabbits were obtained. Propofol1% (n=6), Propofol 2% (n=6), Ketamin (n=6), Penthotal(n=6), Etomidate (n=6), Etomidate lipuro (n=6) and normalsaline (Control Group, n=4) was given 1 cc via externaljugular vein....

  10. Effects of intravenous anesthetic agents on vascular endothelium

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    Alp Gurbet

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to comparethe effects of Propofol 1%, Propofol 2%, Ketamine, Pentothal,Etomidate and Etomidate-lipuro on venous endothelium.Materials and methods: The study was done fromAugust 2007 to May 2008 after approval of Faculty’sEthic Committee. Forty rabbits were obtained. Propofol1% (n=6, Propofol 2% (n=6, Ketamin (n=6, Penthotal(n=6, Etomidate (n=6, Etomidate lipuro (n=6 and normalsaline (Control Group, n=4 was given 1 cc via externaljugular vein. After 5 minutes from the injenction 6species 2 mm in length segments were taken from theinjencted veins. Species were fixed in 4˚C gluteraldehydethan postfixed in 4°C osmium tetroxide. Visualisation wasperformed with scanning electron microscope.Results: In Propofol 1 %, Propofol 2% and Penthotalgroups normal endothelial structures were observed. InEtomidate group damage of the endothelial cells were observedsignificantly compared with control. In Etomidatelipuro group minimal deformation was observed comparedto control.Conclusion: Etomidat causes significant endothelial deformation,moreover lipuro minimalises these effects. Inorder to need to use etomidate for general anesthesia,for less pain during injection depending on vascular injurylipuro form would be more appropriate. However, furtherstudy is required. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 3(2: 164-167

  11. The Anesthetic Effect of Dexmedetomidine on ERCP of Senile Patients

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    Liang Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to discuss the effectiveness and security of Dexmedetomidine’s conscious-sedation application in ERCP of senile patients. Method: selecting 80 senile patients performed with ERCP and randomly dividing them into Dexmedetomidine group (group D and normal saline group (group C with 40 cases in each group. Pumping 0.5 ~ 0.8 ug/kg Dexmedetomidine through the vein 15 min after surgery while pumping isodose NS to group C at the same time. Results: both the two groups completed the ERCP treatment. The tolerance of group C is poorer with more adverse reactions; the operating time of group D is shorter, but the difference has no statistical significance. During the operation, compared with group D, the MBP and HR value of group C rose obviously with significant difference (P < 0.05 while the MBP has no obvious change within the group; HR declined sharply after pump injection (P < 0.05, but the value is within the normal range. The contrast of SPO2 and RR within and between the two groups have no significant difference. Conclusion: applying Dexmedetomidine for conscioussedation in senile patients’ ERCP leads to hemodynamic stability and no respiratory depression with less adverse reactions. The application during the perioperative period is effective, safe and comfortable, worthy of popularization and application in clinic.

  12. The effects of clonidine premedication on sevoflurane requirements and anesthetic induction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, S; Yaguchi, Y; Toyooka, H

    1999-07-01

    We assessed the effects of oral clonidine preanesthetic medication (4.5 microg/kg) on the vital capacity rapid-inhalation anesthetic induction time (VCRII time) and minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) to prevent a response to a verbal command in 50% of patients (MAC-Awake) by its hypnotic effect, and on MAC-Skin incision for the analgesic effect in patients anesthetized with sevoflurane. We studied 104 adult patients (control group: n = 52, clonidine group: n = 52) aged 30-48 yr scheduled to undergo general anesthesia. Fifty-two patients received oral clonidine 4.5 microg/kg 1.5 h before arrival in the operating room (clonidine group). The patients exhaled to residual volume and took three vital capacity breaths of 5% sevoflurane in oxygen. The VCRII time was defined as the time interval between the initiation of the VCRII and the disappearance of the response to verbal command. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen and air. The end-tidal (ET) sevoflurane concentration reached a predetermined value, then the ratio of predetermined ET to inspiratory concentration was maintained at > or =0.95 for at least 15 min before skin incision. After skin incision, the patients were observed for gross purposeful muscular movements. MAC was defined as the average of the cross-over midpoints in each cross-over. After maintaining the ET sevoflurane concentration for 15 min, patients were judged to be awake or asleep. Average times for VCRII using 5% sevoflurane were achieved in 44+/-11 s (mean +/- SD) and 27+/-6 s in the control and clonidine groups, respectively (P = 0.0001). MAC-Awake values of sevoflurane were 0.66%+/-0.03% and 0.35%+/-0.02% (P = 0.0001), and MAC-Skin incision values were 1.97%+/-0.19% and 1.29%+/-0.13% (P = 0.0001) in the control and clonidine groups, respectively. These results suggest that clonidine may have a more potent hypnotic effect than analgesic effect. Oral clonidine preanesthetic medication (4.5 microg/kg) significantly

  13. Prophylactic Antiarrhythmic Effect of Anesthetics at Subanesthetic Concentration on Epinephrine-Induced Arrhythmias in Rats after Brain Death

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    Yuka Miyata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study using brain death model of rats was designed to examine whether prophylactic administration of volatile anesthetics and propofol prevent the epinephrine-induced arrhythmias. A Fogarty catheter was placed intracranially for induction of brain death. After brain death, the rats were randomly assigned to five groups: the control group (no anesthetics, the sevoflurane group (0.8%, the isoflurane group (0.5%, the halothane group (0.3%, and the propofol group (195 μg·kg−1·min−1. These anesthetics were about 30% of ED50 of each anesthetic. The arrhythmogenic dose of epinephrine was determined in each anesthetic group. In addition, we examined left ventricular levels of connexin 43 phosphorylation 30 min after administration of each anesthetic with Western blot analysis. The arrhythmogenic dose of epinephrine in the sevoflurane group was significantly higher than that in the control group, while the arrhythmogenic dose of epinephrine in any other anesthetic group was not different. On the other hand, the ratio of phosphorylated-connexin 43/total connexin 43 was also similar among the study groups. Thus, prophylactic administration of subanesthetic dose of sevoflurane is effective in preventing epinephrine-induced arrhythmias after brain death, but phosphorylation of connexin is not involved in the antiarrhythmic property of sevoflurane.

  14. Prophylactic antiarrhythmic effect of anesthetics at subanesthetic concentration on epinephrine-induced arrhythmias in rats after brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Yuka; Iwasaki, Mitsuo; Yamanaka, Hiroo; Sato, Masanori; Kamibayashi, Takahiko; Fujino, Yuji; Hayashi, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The present study using brain death model of rats was designed to examine whether prophylactic administration of volatile anesthetics and propofol prevent the epinephrine-induced arrhythmias. A Fogarty catheter was placed intracranially for induction of brain death. After brain death, the rats were randomly assigned to five groups: the control group (no anesthetics), the sevoflurane group (0.8%), the isoflurane group (0.5%), the halothane group (0.3%), and the propofol group (195 μg·kg(-1) ·min(-1)). These anesthetics were about 30% of ED50 of each anesthetic. The arrhythmogenic dose of epinephrine was determined in each anesthetic group. In addition, we examined left ventricular levels of connexin 43 phosphorylation 30 min after administration of each anesthetic with Western blot analysis. The arrhythmogenic dose of epinephrine in the sevoflurane group was significantly higher than that in the control group, while the arrhythmogenic dose of epinephrine in any other anesthetic group was not different. On the other hand, the ratio of phosphorylated-connexin 43/total connexin 43 was also similar among the study groups. Thus, prophylactic administration of subanesthetic dose of sevoflurane is effective in preventing epinephrine-induced arrhythmias after brain death, but phosphorylation of connexin is not involved in the antiarrhythmic property of sevoflurane.

  15. Effects of Injectable Anesthetic Combinations on Left Ventricular Function and Cardiac Morphology in Sprague–Dawley Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sabatini, Carla F; O'Sullivan, M. Lynne; Valcour, James E.; Sears, William; Johnson, Ron J

    2013-01-01

    Novel anesthetic agents or combinations may provide superior general anesthesia for echocardiography in rodents with the potential for reduced adverse effects. This study sought to characterize the effects of 3 injectable anesthetics on left ventricular (LV) systolic function and cardiac morphology in healthy male and female rats. Rats underwent echocardiographic assessment after general anesthesia via pentobarbital or combinations of ketamine and medetomidine (KME) and ketamine and midazolam...

  16. Evaluation of the anesthetic effect of epinephrine-free articaine and mepivacaine through quantitative sensory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said Yekta-Michael, Sareh; Stein, Jamal M; Marioth-Wirtz, Ernst

    2015-02-07

    Long lasting anesthesia of the soft tissue beyond the dental treatment affects patients in daily routine. Therefore a sophisticated local anesthesia is needed. The purpose of this study was an evaluation of the clinical use of epinephrine-free local anesthetic solutions in routine short-time dental treatments. In a prospective, single-blind, non-randomized and controlled clinical trial, 31 patients (16 male, 15 female patients) undergoing short-time dental treatment under local anesthesia (plain solutions of articaine 4% and mepivacaine 3%) in area of maxillary canine were tested with quantitative sensory testing QST. Paired-Wilcoxon-testing (signed-rank-test) and Mc Nemar tests have been used for statistical results. Significant differences in all tested parameters to the time of measurements were found. Mepivacaine showed a significantly stronger impact for the whole period of measurement (128 min) on thermal and mechanical test parameters and to the associated nerve fibers. Plain articaine shows a faster onset of action associated with a shorter time of activity in comparison to plain mepivacaine. In addition to this articaine shows a significant low-graded effect on the tested nerve-fibers and therefore a least affected anesthesia to the patient. The clinical use of an epinephrine-free anesthetic solution can be stated as possible option in short dental routine treatments to the frequently used vasoconstrictor containing local anesthetics. Patients may benefit from shorter numbness.

  17. Effect of flumazenil on sevoflurane requirements for minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake and recovery status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Peng; Zhou, Cheng; Li, Kai-Yu; Guo, Li-Juan; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    It is controversial that whether the GABA receptors contribute to the hypnotic action of volatile anesthetics. This study was to detect the effect of GABA receptors on the hypnotic action of volatile anesthetics by evaluation of the effect of intravenous flumazenil on sevoflurane minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake (MAC-Awake) and emergence mental status. This study included two steps. Firstly, 49 healthy patients, aged 20-40 years scheduled for elective surgeries, were randomly assigned to two groups, a flumazenil group (n=24) and a saline group (n=25). The flumazenil group received 0.006 mg/Kg IV, and the control group received the same volume of saline 20 min before induction. The flumazenil group and the control group were compared with regard to MAC-Awake (anesthetic concentration achieving 50% probability of eye opening in response to a verbal command). We used the mask inhalation to measure the MAC-Awake by up-and-down method. The second steps, 60 patients undergoing lower abdomen surgeries were randomly divided into two groups, a experimental group (n=30) and a saline group (n=30). All patients were anesthetized with sevoflurane/sulfentanil. The experimental group received flumazenil at 0.006 mg/Kg IV, and the control group received the same volume of saline at the end of surgery. We recorded the time to awake and extubation. After extubation, the patients' recovery status was scored with the Mini-Mental state examination (MMSE) system in post anesthesia care unit (PACU). The MAC-Awake was 0.65% in the control group and 0.82% in the flumazenil group (p=0.34). After extubation, the recovery time and time to extubation showed no difference between the flumazenil group and the saline group (p>0.05). But the 10 min and 15 min MMSE scores after extubation were better in the flumazenil group than those in the saline group (pMAC-Awake in humans. A single intravenous injection of flumazenil (0.006 mg/Kg) can partially reverse the hypnotic effect of

  18. Cardiovascular effects of ritodrine are blocked by metoprolol in the anesthetized dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritse, R; Reuwer, P J; Pinas, I M; Beijer, H J; Charbon, G A; Haspels, A A

    1985-11-01

    Inhibition of ritodrine-induced cardiac and peripheral vascular effects by the beta 1-adrenergic blocker metoprolol, was studied by electromagnetic flow measurements in anesthetized dogs. As expected, metoprolol inhibited the ritodrine-induced/increased cardiac workload and heart rate. Metoprolol also inhibited ritodrine-induced peripheral vasodilation. This leads to questions about the cardiac beta 1-adrenergic selectivity of metoprolol. Regarding earlier studies showing no interference in labor inhibition, the combination of ritodrine and metoprolol might be useful in treatment of preterm labor, while economizing cardiovascular performance centrally as well as peripherally.

  19. Systematic review of the effect of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy for local anesthetic toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgberg, Lotte Christine Groth; Bania, Theodore C; Lavergne, Valéry

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following national and regional recommendations, intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) has become established in clinical practice as a treatment for acute local anesthetic (LA) toxicity, although evidence of efficacy is limited to animal studies and human case reports. A collaborative lipid...... emulsion workgroup was therefore established by the American Academy of Clinical Toxicology to review the evidence on the effect of ILE for LA toxicity. METHODS: We performed a systematic review of the literature published through 15 December 2014. Relevant articles were determined based on pre...

  20. Effects of local anesthetics and hemicholinium-3 on 45-Ca efflux in barnacle muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S S

    1975-04-01

    Benzocaine, which occurs in the uncharged form in the physiological range of pH, caused inhibition of 45-Ca efflux in branacle muscle fibers. By contrast, in the presence of a low external Ca-2+ concentration it produced stimulation of the efflux. Both the inhibitory and stimulatory actions of benzocaine appeared to be less potent than those of procaine. Hemicholinium-3 (HC-3), on the other hand, which exists only in the charged form, caused a large stimulation of the 45-Ca efflux following microinjection, and the potency of this action was found to be at least 10 times greater than that of procaine. External application of HC-3 produced inhibition occasionally. Effects of tetracaine were similar to those produced by procaine; however, its inhibitory action was greater in more alkaline solution, which is the opposite of that observed with procaine. Lidocaine produced a less consistent effect than procaine; the inhibitory action of the former was less potent but the stimulatory action of the two anesthetics were comparable, p-Aminobenzoic acid was without effect on 45-Ca efflux. These results indicate that both the charged and uncharged forms of local anesthetics are capable of causing stimulatory and inhibitory effects on 45-Ca efflux in barnacle muscle fibers, and that the inhibition produced is the result of action on the CA-Ca exchange system whereas the stimulation is the result of release of Ca from internal storage sites.

  1. Evaluation of the anesthetic effects of MS222 in the adult Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum

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    Zullian C

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chiara Zullian,1 Aurore Dodelet-Devillers,1 Stéphane Roy,2 Pascal Vachon1 1Département de Biomédecine Vétérinaire, Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, Saint-Hyacinthe, 2Département de Stomatologie, Faculté de Médecine Dentaire, Montréal, Québec, Canada Abstract: The Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum is a unique research model in several fields of medicine, where surgical and invasive procedures may be required. As yet, little is known about the efficacy of MS222 (tricaine methanesulfonate, which is the most commonly used anesthetic agent in amphibians. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate the anesthetic effects and physiological changes in adult axolotls following a 20-minute immersion bath, containing progressive MS222 concentrations starting at 0.1%. Depth of anesthesia and physiological changes were evaluated every 15 minutes post-MS222 exposure with the following parameters: righting behavior, withdrawal reflex, acetic acid test response, heart rate, and blood oxygen saturation, as well as cloacal and body surface temperatures. A 20-minute exposure in a 0.1% MS222 immersion bath (n=6 animals had no anesthetic effects on adult axolotls after 20 minutes of exposure. With a 0.2% MS222 solution, all axolotls (n=9 were deeply anesthetized at 15 minutes, and 80% were still unresponsive at 30 minutes postexposure. Blood oxygen saturation and heart rate were slightly, but significantly, increased when compared with the baseline value and remained stable up to recovery. There was no significant increase in surface and cloaca temperatures, compared with baseline. With the 0.4% MS222 solution, the duration of anesthesia lasted for 90 minutes to at least 120 minutes (n=3 animals and this concentration was deemed too high. In conclusion, a 20-minute immersion bath with 0.2% MS222 may be used for short procedures (15–30 minutes requiring anesthesia of adult axolotls. Keywords: Ambystoma mexicanum

  2. Participation of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E. Brown essential oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heldwein, C.G.; Silva, L.L. [Departamento de Farmácia Industrial, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Reckziegel, P. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Barros, F.M.C. [Departamento de Farmácia Industrial, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Bürger, M.E.; Baldisserotto, B. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Mallmann, C.A. [Departamento de Medicina Veterinária Preventiva, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Schmidt, D.; Caron, B.O. [Departamento de Ciências Agronômicas e Ambientais, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Campus de Frederico Westphalen, Frederico Westphalen, RS (Brazil); Heinzmann, B.M. [Departamento de Farmácia Industrial, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2012-04-05

    The objective of this study was to identify the possible involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba essential oil (EO). We propose a new animal model using silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) exposed to an anesthetic bath to study the mechanism of action of EO. To observe the induction and potentiation of the anesthetic effect of EO, juvenile silver catfish (9.30 ± 1.85 g; 10.15 ± 0.95 cm; N = 6) were exposed to various concentrations of L. alba EO in the presence or absence of diazepam [an agonist of high-affinity binding sites for benzodiazepinic (BDZ) sites coupled to the GABA{sub A} receptor complex]. In another experiment, fish (N = 6) were initially anesthetized with the EO and then transferred to an anesthetic-free aquarium containing flumazenil (a selective antagonist of binding sites for BDZ coupled to the GABA{sub A} receptor complex) or water to assess recovery time from the anesthesia. In this case, flumazenil was used to observe the involvement of the GABA-BDZ receptor in the EO mechanism of action. The results showed that diazepam potentiates the anesthetic effect of EO at all concentrations tested. Fish exposed to diazepam and EO showed faster recovery from anesthesia when flumazenil was added to the recovery bath (12.0 ± 0.3 and 7.2 ± 0.7, respectively) than those exposed to water (9.2 ± 0.2 and 3.5 ± 0.3, respectively). In conclusion, the results demonstrated the involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of L. alba EO on silver catfish.

  3. Participation of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba (Mill. N.E. Brown essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.G. Heldwein

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the possible involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba essential oil (EO. We propose a new animal model using silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen exposed to an anesthetic bath to study the mechanism of action of EO. To observe the induction and potentiation of the anesthetic effect of EO, juvenile silver catfish (9.30 ± 1.85 g; 10.15 ± 0.95 cm; N = 6 were exposed to various concentrations of L. alba EO in the presence or absence of diazepam [an agonist of high-affinity binding sites for benzodiazepinic (BDZ sites coupled to the GABA A receptor complex]. In another experiment, fish (N = 6 were initially anesthetized with the EO and then transferred to an anesthetic-free aquarium containing flumazenil (a selective antagonist of binding sites for BDZ coupled to the GABA A receptor complex or water to assess recovery time from the anesthesia. In this case, flumazenil was used to observe the involvement of the GABA-BDZ receptor in the EO mechanism of action. The results showed that diazepam potentiates the anesthetic effect of EO at all concentrations tested. Fish exposed to diazepam and EO showed faster recovery from anesthesia when flumazenil was added to the recovery bath (12.0 ± 0.3 and 7.2 ± 0.7, respectively than those exposed to water (9.2 ± 0.2 and 3.5 ± 0.3, respectively. In conclusion, the results demonstrated the involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of L. alba EO on silver catfish.

  4. Participation of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E. Brown essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldwein, C G; Silva, L L; Reckziegel, P; Barros, F M C; Bürger, M E; Baldisserotto, B; Mallmann, C A; Schmidt, D; Caron, B O; Heinzmann, B M

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the possible involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba essential oil (EO). We propose a new animal model using silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) exposed to an anesthetic bath to study the mechanism of action of EO. To observe the induction and potentiation of the anesthetic effect of EO, juvenile silver catfish (9.30 ± 1.85 g; 10.15 ± 0.95 cm; N = 6) were exposed to various concentrations of L. alba EO in the presence or absence of diazepam [an agonist of high-affinity binding sites for benzodiazepinic (BDZ) sites coupled to the GABA A receptor complex]. In another experiment, fish (N = 6) were initially anesthetized with the EO and then transferred to an anesthetic-free aquarium containing flumazenil (a selective antagonist of binding sites for BDZ coupled to the GABA A receptor complex) or water to assess recovery time from the anesthesia. In this case, flumazenil was used to observe the involvement of the GABA-BDZ receptor in the EO mechanism of action. The results showed that diazepam potentiates the anesthetic effect of EO at all concentrations tested. Fish exposed to diazepam and EO showed faster recovery from anesthesia when flumazenil was added to the recovery bath (12.0 ± 0.3 and 7.2 ± 0.7, respectively) than those exposed to water (9.2 ± 0.2 and 3.5 ± 0.3, respectively). In conclusion, the results demonstrated the involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of L. alba EO on silver catfish.

  5. Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors mediate the analgesic but not hypnotic effects of emulsified volatile anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Dai, Ti-Jun; Zeng, Yin-Ming

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in hypnosis and analgesia induced by emulsified volatile anesthetics. After having established the mice model of hypnosis and analgesia by intraperitoneally injecting (i.p.) appropriate doses of ether, enflurane, isoflurane or sevoflurane, we intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intrathecally (i.t.) injected different doses of strychnine and then observed the effects on the sleeping time using the awaken test and the pain index in hot-plate test (HPPI) using the hot-plate test. In the awaken test, strychnine 1, 2, 4 microg (i.c.v.) had no distinctive effect on the sleeping time of the mice treated with the four emulsified inhalation anesthetics mentioned above (p > 0.05); in the hot-plate test, strychnine 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 microg (i.t.) can significantly and dose-dependently decrease the HPPI of the mice treated with emulsified ether, enflurane and sevoflurane (p strychnine 0.1 microg (i.t.) did not affect the HPPI of the mice treated with emulsified isoflurane (p > 0.05), but 0.2 and 0.4 microg (i.t.) can significantly decrease the HPPI of the mice treatedwith emulsified isoflurane (p strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors may contribute to the analgesic but not to the hypnotic effects induced by ether, enflurane, isoflurane and sevoflurane. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Effect of Lidocaine-Ketamine Infusions Combined with Morphine or Fentanyl in Sevoflurane-Anesthetized Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Michela; Canfrán, Susana; Largo, Carlota; Gómez de Segura, Ignacioa A

    2016-01-01

    Providing lidocaine, ketamine, and an opioid greatly decreases the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of volatile anesthetics in dogs. However, the efficacy of this combination shows marked interspecies variation, and opioids are likely to be less effective in pigs than in other species. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of constant-rate infusion of lidocaine and ketamine combined with either morphine or fentanyl on the MAC of sevoflurane in pigs. In a prospective, randomized, crossover design, 8 healthy crossbred pigs were premedicated with ketamine and midazolam, and anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane. Pigs then received ketamine (0.6 mg/kg/h) and lidocaine (3 mg/kg/h) combined with either morphine (0.24 mg/kg/h; MLK) or fentanyl (0.0045 mg/kg/h; FLK) after a loading dose; the control group received Ringers lactate solution. The anesthetic-sparing action of the 2 infusion protocols was calculated according to the MAC, by using dewclaw clamping as the standard noxious stimulus. The sevoflurane MAC (mean ± 1 SD) was 2.0% ± 0.2%, 1.9% ± 0.4%, and 1.8% ± 0.2% in the control, MLK, and FLK groups, respectively. No differences among groups or treatments were found. In conclusion, the administration of MLK or FLK at the studied doses did not reduce the MAC of sevoflurane in pigs.

  7. Effect of Lidocaine–Ketamine Infusions Combined with Morphine or Fentanyl in Sevoflurane-Anesthetized Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Michela; Canfrán, Susana; Largo, Carlota; de Segura, Ignacio A Gómez

    2016-01-01

    Providing lidocaine, ketamine, and an opioid greatly decreases the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of volatile anesthetics in dogs. However, the efficacy of this combination shows marked interspecies variation, and opioids are likely to be less effective in pigs than in other species. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of constant-rate infusion of lidocaine and ketamine combined with either morphine or fentanyl on the MAC of sevoflurane in pigs. In a prospective, randomized, crossover design, 8 healthy crossbred pigs were premedicated with ketamine and midazolam, and anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane. Pigs then received ketamine (0.6 mg/kg/h) and lidocaine (3 mg/kg/h) combined with either morphine (0.24 mg/kg/h; MLK) or fentanyl (0.0045 mg/kg/h; FLK) after a loading dose; the control group received Ringers lactate solution. The anesthetic-sparing action of the 2 infusion protocols was calculated according to the MAC, by using dewclaw clamping as the standard noxious stimulus. The sevoflurane MAC (mean ± 1 SD) was 2.0% ± 0.2%, 1.9% ± 0.4%, and 1.8% ± 0.2% in the control, MLK, and FLK groups, respectively. No differences among groups or treatments were found. In conclusion, the administration of MLK or FLK at the studied doses did not reduce the MAC of sevoflurane in pigs. PMID:27177566

  8. Local anesthetic effects of cocaethylene and isopropylcocaine on rat peripheral nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuno, Hajime A; Bradberry, Charles W; Everill, Brian; Agulian, Samuel K; Wilkes, Steven; Baldwin, Ronald M; Tamagnan, Gilles D; Kocsis, Jeffery D

    2004-01-23

    Cocaethylene is a naturally occurring cocaine derivative that has been used as a tool in both clinical studies of cocaine reward and as a potential model compound for agonist substitution therapy in cocaine dependence. It is equipotent to cocaine at inhibiting dopamine uptake in-vitro and in-vivo. Because it has been reported that local anesthetic properties may influence the reinforcing effects of dopamine uptake inhibitors, we investigated the local anesthetic properties of cocaethylene as well as isopropylcocaine, another potential pharmacological tool in studies of cocaine reward and agonist substitution therapy. We compared the efficacy of nerve impulse blockade by lidocaine, cocaine, cocaethylene and isopropylcocaine using rat sciatic nerves and dorsal roots (DRs). Nerves were placed in a modified sucrose gap chamber and repetitively stimulated at high frequency. The amplitude of compound action potentials (CAPs) at the beginning and end of each stimulus train was measured before and after exposure to each compound. All compounds produced concentration-dependent and use-dependent decrements in CAP amplitude, but cocaethylene and isopropylcocaine at medium to high concentration (0.375-1.875 mM) showed a more prolonged block after washout relative to cocaine or lidocaine. Patch clamp studies on dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons indicated a use-dependent blockade of sodium channels. These studies provide a more complete understanding of the pharmaocology of potential agonist treatment candidates, and suggest a mechanism whereby cocaethylene produces a decreased euphoria in humans compared to cocaine.

  9. Effect of waste anesthetic gas and vapor exposure on reproductive outcome in veterinary personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate potential adverse reproductive outcome in veterinary personnel who are exposed to waste anesthetic gas and vapor at levels near the NIOSH recommended standards. Subjects for this case-control study of births with congenital abnormalities and spontaneous abortion, selected from the American Veterinary Medical Association roster, were contacted by mail and asked to complete a screening questionnaire regarding reproductive history. Crude prevalence rates for spontaneous abortion, births with congenital abnormalities and stillbirths, determined on the basis of the responses to the screening questionnaire, showed no excess rates when compared with national statistics. All pregnancies resulting in spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, or birth with congenital abnormality were selected as cases. Controls were selected from the reported normal births on a stratified random basis to match maternal age and pregnancy number for cases. Occupational exposure to waste anesthetic gas and vapor in general was not found to be significantly associated with adverse reproductive outcome when adjustment was made for radiation exposure. For nitrous oxide exposure, however, an odds ratio significantly greater than one was found for spontaneous abortion among female veterinary assistants and wives of exposed male veterinarians. Use of diagnostic x-rays in veterinary practice was associated with spontaneous abortion in exposed females with a statistically significant dose response effect observed in female veterinarians.

  10. The anesthetic effect of alcohols and alkanes in caenorhabditis elegans (C. E. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anton, A.H.; Berk, A.I.; Nicholls, C.H. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The authors colleagues reported that the non-parasitic roundworm, C.E., was reversibly immobilized by volatile anesthetics, whose potencies were directly related to their lipid solubilities as in other animals. In further studies on this phenomenon, they tested a homologous series of organic solvents, to determine whether they also had a reversible anesthetic effect in C.E. as in other animals. Synchronized 3-1/2 day-old cultures of about 100 worms each were exposed to increasing concentrations of the alcohols (C{sub 1} - C{sub 14}) and alkanes (C{sub 5} -C{sub 10}) in 15 ml sealed bottles in a volume of 0.5 ml. The dose that reversibly immobilized 50% of the worms was determined and a straight line was plotted against the octanol/water partition coefficient (K) of each series. As with other animals, potency was directly related to the lipid solubility of these agents so that, for example, the ID{sub 50} for methanol was 1,000 mmol (K=0.12) whereas it was 0.17 mmol for heptanol (K=3,000). The alcohols were about 20 times more potent than the alkanes even though the latter were about 10 times more lipid soluble than the alcohols. In spite of these differences, the cut-off point was at C{sub 9} in the two series.

  11. The effects of epinine on arterial blood pressure and regional vascular resistances in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mir, I; Palop, V; Morales-Olivas, F J; Estañ, L; Rubio, E

    1998-07-01

    1. We carried out experiments in anesthetized rats to study the hemodynamic effects of intravenous injections of epinine. 2. Epinine (1-320 micrograms/kg) produced a biphasic effect on mean arterial blood pressure (n = 30). At doses lower than 40 micrograms/kg, arterial blood pressure decreased (by as much as 21.5 +/- 3.4%), though at higher doses it increased dose dependently (by as much as 73.2 +/- 14.5%). Epinine also produced bradicardia in a dose-dependent manner (by as much as 26.4 +/- 4.9%). Sulpiride (100 micrograms/kg) suppressed the hypotensive effect of epinine but did not change the hypertensive effect. In the presence of prazosin (1,000 micrograms/kg), arterial blood pressure remained significantly decreased at all doses of epinine. Neither sulpiride nor prazosin changed the bradycardic effect of epinine. 3. Prazosin produced a significant decrease in renal vascular resistance. Epinine (5 micrograms/kg) after prazosin reverted the effects of prazosin in renal vascular resistance, without any significant modification in the renal blood flows. However, 20 micrograms/kg epinine increased the renal vascular resistances and, moreover, produced a significant decrease in the blood flows of both kidneys. Neither prazosin nor epinine produced modifications in the intestinal vascular bed. 4. Although epinine possesses significant dopamine and alpha-adrenergic activities that are involved in the biphasic effect of the agent on mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats, in the presence of prazosin, it is not possible to manifest dopaminergic activity involved in the increase in renal or mesenteric blood flow; this may be due to the low tone of the vascular wall induced by the alpha-adrenergic antagonist, though an alpha 2-activity cannot be discarded.

  12. Effects of angiotensin, vasopressin and atrial natriuretic peptide on intraocular pressure in anesthetized rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, D. E.; Shue, S. G.; Keil, L. C.; Balaban, C. D.; Severs, W. B.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), vasopressin (AVP) and angiotensin (ANG) on blood and intraocular pressures of pentobarbital anesthetized rats were evaluated following intravenous, intracerebroventricular or anterior chamber routes of administration. Central injections did not affect intraocular pressure. Equipressor intravenous infusions of ANG raised, whereas AVP decreased, intraocular pressure. Direct infusions of a balanced salt solution (0.175 microliter/min) raised intraocular pressure between 30 and 60 min. Adding ANG or ANP slightly reduced this solvent effect but AVP was markedly inhibitory. An AVP-V1 receptor antagonist reversed the blunting of the solvent-induced rise by the peptide, indicating receptor specificity. Acetazolamide pretreatment lowered intraocular pressure, but the solvent-induced rise in intraocular pressure and inhibition by AVP still occurred without altering the temporal pattern. Thus, these effects appear unrelated to aqueous humor synthesis rate. The data support the possibility of intraocular pressure regulation by peptides acting from the blood and aqueous humor.

  13. Pharmacology of Casimiroa edulis; Part I. Blood pressure and heart rate effects in the anesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magos, G A; Vidrio, H

    1991-02-01

    The effect of an alcoholic extract of seeds of Casimiroa edulis on blood pressure and heart rate was determined in rats anesthetized with pentobarbital and compared with that of histamine. The extract induced hypotension, accompanied at high doses by tachycardia. Hypotension after histamine was more transient and was not accompanied by changes in heart rate. Experiments with a variety of autonomic antagonists revealed that extract-induced hypotension was not mediated by histamine H2, muscarinic, or beta-adrenergic receptors, but involved an H1 mechanism. After H1 blockade, the depressor response was reversed to a pressor effect, mediated by alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation. The increase in heart rate was due in part to H1 and in part to beta-adrenergic receptor activation. It was suggested that imidazole derivatives could be responsible for the depressor effect observed. The pressor response could be caused by these or other components of the extract.

  14. Effects of the local anesthetic benzocaine on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Villena, Fernando; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2004-04-01

    The interaction of the local anesthetic benzocaine with the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models is described. The latter consisted of isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphospatidylcholine (DMPC), and phospholipid multilayers of DMPC and dimyristoylphospatidyletanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Optical and scanning electron microscopy of human erythrocytes revealed that benzocaine induced the formation of echinocytes. Experiments performed on IUM and DMPC LUV by fluorescence spectroscopy showed that benzocaine interacted with the phospholipid bilayer polar groups and hydrophobic acyl chains. X-ray diffraction analysis of DMPC confirmed these results and showed that benzocaine had no effects on DMPE. The effect on sodium transport was also studied using the isolated toad skin. Electrophysiological measurements indicated a significant decrease in the potential difference (PD) and in the short-circuit current (Isc) after the application of benzocaine, reflecting inhibition of active ion transport.

  15. Local anesthetic effects of cocaine and several extracts of the coca leaf (E. coca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, J A; Turner, C E; Elsohly, H N

    1984-05-01

    Cocaine and a number of different fractions of a crude ethanol extract of the coca leaf (E. coca) were subjected to a local anesthetic screen using rat tail withdrawal from electric shock. Following an intradermal injection of 0.1 ml of a 2.0% (w.v) solution of cocaine HCl, an immediate response was observed. Two of the coca fractions also produced some local anesthesia. An alkaloidal fraction, containing an equivalent amount of cocaine, produced a maximum effect that was approximately 20% less than that observed with cocaine. The only other fraction producing any effect, a water soluble cocaine-free fraction, showed a maximum response that was approximately 30% of that observed with cocaine.

  16. Effects of common anesthetic agents on [(18)F]flumazenil binding to the GABAA receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palner, Mikael; Beinat, Corinne; Banister, Sam

    2016-01-01

    mice. CONCLUSIONS: Anesthesia has pronounced effects on the binding and blood-brain distribution of [(18)F]flumazenil. Consequently, considerable caution must be exercised in the interpretation of preclinical and clinical PET studies of GABAA receptors involving the use of anesthesia....... in preclinical imaging studies and clinical imaging studies involving patient populations that do not tolerate relatively longer scan times. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of anesthesia on the binding of [(18)F]flumazenil to GABAA receptors in mice. METHODS: Brain and whole blood......BACKGROUND: The availability of GABAA receptor binding sites in the brain can be assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) using the radioligand, [(18)F]flumazenil. However, the brain uptake and binding of this PET radioligand are influenced by anesthetic drugs, which are typically needed...

  17. DESENSITIZATION OF ACETYLCHOLINE ON THE INHIBITION EFFECTS OF BLOOD PRESSURE IN ANESTHETIZED CANINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莉娜; 吕军; 臧伟进; 于晓江; 孙晓东; 高小利

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the desensitization of acetylcholine (Ach) on the inhibition effects of blood pressure (BP) in anesthetized canine and build a model for studying desensitization in vivo. Methods Through changing the intervals (120, 100, 80, 60, 40, 20 seconds) of twice Ach administration (each was 15μg*kg-1,I.v.), the desensitization on the effect of systemic blood pressure of the first Ach injection towards the subsequent Ach administration was observed. Results When Ach administration intervals were 40, 60, 80, 100 seconds, the percentages of desensitization of Ach on systemic blood pressure were significantly increased (P0.05). Conclusion The results indicated that Ach contents in blood might influence the action of next Ach administration. To some extent, the higher the concentration of Ach in blood, the bigger the ratio of desensitization of exogenous Ach is. In addition, this method of twice drug administration could be used as a model of studying desensitization in vivo.

  18. Effectiveness of Hypnosis in Combination with Conventional Techniques of Behavior Management in Anxiety/Pain Reduction during Dental Anesthetic Infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Carrasco, A.; Butrón-Téllez Girón, C.; Sanchez-Armass, O.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective. Anxiety/pain are experiences that make dental treatment difficult for children, especially during the time of anesthesia. Hypnosis is used in pediatric clinical situations to modify thinking, behavior, and perception as well as, recently, in dentistry; therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of hypnosis combined with conventional behavior management techniques during infiltration anesthetic. Methods. Anxiety/pain were assessed with the FLACC scale during the anesthetic moment, as well as heart rate variability and skin conductance before and during the anesthetic moment, between the control and experimental group. Results. A marginal statistical difference (p = 0.05) was found in the heart rate between baseline and anesthetic moment, being lower in the hypnosis group. No statistically significant differences were found with the FLACC scale or in the skin conductance (p > 0.05). Conclusion. Hypnosis combined with conventional behavior management techniques decreases heart rate during anesthetic infiltration showing that there may be an improvement in anxiety/pain control through hypnotic therapy. PMID:28490941

  19. Effectiveness of Hypnosis in Combination with Conventional Techniques of Behavior Management in Anxiety/Pain Reduction during Dental Anesthetic Infiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ramírez-Carrasco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Anxiety/pain are experiences that make dental treatment difficult for children, especially during the time of anesthesia. Hypnosis is used in pediatric clinical situations to modify thinking, behavior, and perception as well as, recently, in dentistry; therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of hypnosis combined with conventional behavior management techniques during infiltration anesthetic. Methods. Anxiety/pain were assessed with the FLACC scale during the anesthetic moment, as well as heart rate variability and skin conductance before and during the anesthetic moment, between the control and experimental group. Results. A marginal statistical difference (p=0.05 was found in the heart rate between baseline and anesthetic moment, being lower in the hypnosis group. No statistically significant differences were found with the FLACC scale or in the skin conductance (p>0.05. Conclusion. Hypnosis combined with conventional behavior management techniques decreases heart rate during anesthetic infiltration showing that there may be an improvement in anxiety/pain control through hypnotic therapy.

  20. Comparison of propofol and thiopental as anesthetic agents for electroconvulsive therapy: a randomized, blinded comparison of seizure duration, stimulus charge, clinical effect, and cognitive side effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Jeanett; Hageman, Ida; Dam, Henrik;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: To compare propofol and thiopental as anesthetic agents for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) with respect to seizure duration, stimulus charge, clinical effect, and cognitive side effects. METHODS:: Randomized, blinded study of 62 depressed patients treated with bilateral ECT. Algorithm...

  1. [New anesthetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F

    2000-01-01

    Since the introduction of cocaine local analgesia in 1886, and the subsequent development of procaine (1904) and other closely related ester-type compounds, dentistry has prided itself on being as close to 'painless' as possible. In the late 1940s the newest group of the local anesthetic compounds, the amides, was introduced. The initial amide local analgesic, lignocaine (Xylocaine), revolutionised pain control in dentistry worldwide. In succeeding years other amide-type local anesthetics, mepivacaine, prilocaine, bupivacaine and etidocaine, were introduced. They gave the dental practitioner a local anesthetic armamentarium which provided pulpal analgesia for periods of from 20 minutes (mepivacaine) to as long as three hours (bupivacaine and etidocaine with adrenaline). In addition these popular drugs proved to be more rapid-acting than the older ester-type drug and, at least from the perspective of allergenicity, more safe. In 1976, in Germany, the newest amide local analgesic, carticaine HCl was introduced into dentistry. Articaine (the generic name was changed) possesses properties similar to lignocaine but has additional properties which made the drug quite attractive to the general dental practitioner. In 1986 articaine was introduced in North America (Canada) where it has become the most used local anesthetic, supplanting lignocaine. Articaine has been approved for use in the United Kingdom. In this introductory discussion we review the development of articaine and discuss its place in the dental local analgesic armamentarium.

  2. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  3. Effect of Inhalational Anesthetics on Cytotoxicity and Intracellular Calcium Differently in Rat Pheochromocytoma Cells (PC12)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiujun WANG; Kezhong LI; Shanglong YAO

    2008-01-01

    Isoflurane, a commonly used inhaled anesthetic, induces apoptosis in rat pheochromo-cytoma cells (PC12) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner with unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that isoflurane induced apoptosis by causing abnormal calcium release from the endo-plasmic reticulum (ER) via activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors. Alzheimer's pre-senilin-1 (PS1) mutation increased activity of IP3 receptors and therefore rendered cells vulnerable to isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity. Sevoflurane and desflurane had less ability to disrupt intraceUular calcium homeostasis and thus being less potent to cause cytotoxicity. This study examined and com- pared the cytotoxic effects of various inhaled anesthetics on PC12 cells transfected with the Alz- heimer's mutated Psi (L286V) and the disruption of intracellular calcium homeostasis. PC12 cells transfected with wild type (WT) and mutated PS1 (L286V) were treated with equivalent of 1 MAC of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane for 12 h. MTT reduction and LDH release assays were per- formed to evaluate cell viability. Changes of calcium concentration in cytosolic space ([Ca2+]c) were determined after exposing different types of cells to various inhalational anesthetics. The effects of IP3 receptor antagonist xestospongin C on isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity and calcium release from the ER in L286V PC12 cells were also determined. The results showed that isoflurane at 1 MAC for 12 h induced cytoxicity in L286V but not WT PC12 cells, which was also associated with greater and faster elevation of peak [Ca2+]c in L286V than in the WT cells. Xestospongin C significantly amelio- rated isoflurane cytotoxicity in L286V cells, as well as inhibited the calcium release from the ER in L286V cells. Sevoflurane and desflurane at equivalent exposure to isoflurane did not induce similar cytotoxicity or elevation of peak [Ca2+]c in L286V PC12 cells. These results suggested that isoflurane induced cytoxicity by

  4. A Comparison of Hamster Anesthetics and Their Effect on Mosquito Blood Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamsters or mice are often anesthetized when they are used as the hosts for insect feeding experiments. An experiment was done to determine if there was a difference in mosquito blood feeding success when fed on hamsters anesthetized using two commonly used protocols. The number of blood-fed females...

  5. Effects of tertiary amine local anesthetics on the assembly and disassembly of brain microtubules in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genna, J M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1980-09-01

    From kinetic and electron microscopy studies on the effects of procaine, tetracaine and dibucaine on the polymerization and depolymerization of the microtubules isolated from pig and rat brains the following results were obtained. 1. Procaine or tetracaine, at the concentration range of 0.5--20 mM and of 0.5--5 mM respectively, increases the rate of tubulin polymerization (24 degrees C or 37 degrees C) and of microtubule depolymerization (4 degrees C) as a linear function of the concentration of the anesthetics, while identical amounts of microtubules are formed. In the absence of microtubule-associated proteins the polymerization of tubulin is not induced by 10 mM procaine, furthermore, the critical concentration of microtubule proteins necessary for assembly into microtubules is not affected at this concentration level of the anesthetic. This suggests that procaine affects not the nucleation, but rather the elongation process. 2. Dibucaine, from 0.5 mM to 3 mM increases the lag time of the polymerization reaction, while from 0.5 mM to 2 mM it linearly decreases both tubulin polymerization (24 degrees C) and microtubule depolymerization (4 degrees C) rates. Dibucaine, up to mM concentration, does not affect the extent of tubulin polymerization; however, above this concentration it induces the formation of amorphous aggregates. 3. Procaine or tetracaine enhances the depolymerizing effect of calcium on microtubules. The half-maximal values for the depolymerizing effect of calcium were 0.96, 0.71 and 0.51 mM for the control, in the presence of 10 mM procaine and 5 mM tetracaine respectively.

  6. Effect of anesthetics on gastric damage using two models of portal hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paula; RS; Camara; Gisele; P; Moi; José; Geraldo; P; Ferraz; José; Murilo; R; Zeitune

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of sodium pentobarbitone(SP) or ketamine/xylazine(KX) anesthetics on acute gastric injury.METHODS:Portal hypertension was induced by bile duct ligation(BDL) or portal vein stenosis(PVS).Ethanol(EtOH)-induced gastric damage was assessed using ex vivo gastric chamber experiments.Gastric blood flow(GBF) was also measured by laser doppler flowmetry.RESULTS:EtOH-induced gastric damage was reduced in BDL rats under KX anesthesia in comparison to those under SP anesthesia.GBF dysfunction in fasted BDL rats was partially restored under KX anesthesia.In contrast,in fasted PVS rats,EtOH-induced gastric damage was increased under KX anesthesia while GBF was reduced.CONCLUSION:The use of KX anesthesia in experimental procedures involving cirrhotic rats(but not those with pure portal hypertension) is preferable to SP anesthesia.

  7. Effect of sedative-hypnotics, anesthetics and analgesics on sleep architecture in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntire, Dan M; Kirkpatrick, Daniel R; Kerfeld, Mitchell J; Hambsch, Zakary J; Reisbig, Mark D; Agrawal, Devendra K; Youngblood, Charles F

    2014-11-01

    The perioperative care of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients is currently receiving much attention due to an increased risk for complications. It is established that postoperative changes in sleep architecture occur and this may have pathophysiological implications for OSA patients. Upper airway muscle activity decreases during rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). Severe OSA patients exhibit exaggerated chemoreceptor-driven ventilation during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS), which leads to central and obstructive apnea. This article critically reviewed the literature relevant to preoperative screening for OSA, prevalence of OSA in surgical populations and changes in postoperative sleep architecture relevant to OSA patients. In particular, we addressed three questions in regard to the effects of sedative-hypnotics, anesthetics and analgesics on sleep architecture, the underlying mechanisms and the relevance to OSA. Indeed, these classes of drugs alter sleep architecture, which likely significantly contributes to abnormal postoperative sleep architecture, exacerbation of OSA and postoperative complications.

  8. Plasma concentration and cardiovascular effects of lidocaine during continuous epidural administration in dogs anesthetized with isoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakonju, Iwao; Maeda, Kenichi; Karasawa, Koichi; Tadokoro, Toshiyuki; Kakuta, Tomoko; Takase, Katsuaki

    2011-03-01

    The cardiovascular effects of continuous epidural administration (CEA) of lidocaine were investigated in anesthetized dogs. Loading epidural injections of 2, 4, or 6 mg/kg of lidocaine were followed by CEA with 1, 2, or 3 mg/kg/hr lidocaine, respectively, for 2 hr under 2.0% isoflurane anesthesia. Heart rate, direct blood pressure, cardiac index, and stroke volume decreased dose-dependently during CEA, whereas systemic vascular resistance did not significantly differ with dose, and no characteristic changes were observed in any groups. Plasma lidocaine concentration reached a steady state during CEA and increased in a dose-dependent manner. Circulatory suppression caused by lidocaine CEA was not attributable to peripheral vasodilation, but rather to the direct cardiac action of systemic lidocaine absorption from the peridural space.

  9. Effects of Electroacupuncture at PC6 and ST36 on Heart Rate Variability in Anesthetized Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yu Wang; Wei He; Hong Shi; Hong-Yan Shang; Yang-Shuai Su; Xiang-Hong Jing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the change of heart rate variability in anesthetized mice after electroacupuncture on PC6 and ST36, and compare the difference between these points. Methods: A total of 33 C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into control, PC6 and ST36 groups with 11 mice in each group. The electrocardiogram was recorded by two needle electrodes. The HRV data were analyzed by time and frequency analysis with heart rate, Standard Deviation of R-R Intervals and LF/HF Ratio. Result: During the EA at PC6, SDRR was significantly increased (P Conclusion: EA at PC6 and ST36 protected anesthesia mice against decline of HRV. In comparison with ST36, the effect of EA at PC6 was more significant, which was caused by the increase of the sympathetic nerve activities from the postganglionic fibers with the same spinal cord segments to heart.

  10. Effects of injectable anesthetic combinations on left ventricular function and cardiac morphology in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Carla F; O'Sullivan, M Lynne; Valcour, James E; Sears, William; Johnson, Ron J

    2013-01-01

    Novel anesthetic agents or combinations may provide superior general anesthesia for echocardiography in rodents with the potential for reduced adverse effects. This study sought to characterize the effects of 3 injectable anesthetics on left ventricular (LV) systolic function and cardiac morphology in healthy male and female rats. Rats underwent echocardiographic assessment after general anesthesia via pentobarbital or combinations of ketamine and medetomidine (KME) and ketamine and midazolam (KMI) according to a crossover Latin-square design. Blood samples for serum estradiol measurements were obtained from all females after echocardiography with each anesthetic. Rats given KMI showed superior LV systolic function with the highest values for fractional shortening (FS), ejection fraction (EF) and stroke volume, whereas heart rate was greatest with pentobarbital, followed by KMI and then KME. KME produced the greatest effects on cardiac morphology, most notably during systole, including reduced septal and posterior wall thickness and increased LV chamber dimensions and volumes. In addition, KME had the greatest cardiac-depressing effects on LV systolic function, including reduced FS, EF, and heart rate values. Compared with male rats, female rats had superior LV function with greater EF and FS values, whereas male rats showed higher heart rate. Significant negative correlations were noted between serum estradiol levels and FS and EF values in female rats receiving KME. We conclude that the combination of KMI may be a superior anesthetic for use in male and female rats undergoing echocardiography.

  11. Addition of local anesthetics to contrast media. Pt. 1. Effects on patient discomfort and hemodynamics in aortofemoral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, P.; Almen, T.; Golman, K.; Jonsson, K.; Nyman, U.

    Effects of equiosmolar solutions (osmolality 1.35 mol/kg) of the ratio 1.5 contrast medium metrizoate (250 mg I/ml) containing either the local anesthetic mepivacaine or saline were evaluated on subjective discomfort, aortic blood pressure and heart rate in 17 patients referred for aortofemoral angiography due to intermittent claudication. Each patient was injected with 30 ml (15 ml/s) of each solution in random double-blind order. Each patient was then injected with 45 ml (12 ml/s) of the raio 3 medium ioxaglate (320 mg I/ml, osmolality 0.58 ml/kg). Ioxaglate caused significantly less total discomfort, pain, heat, vocal reaction, involuntary movements and hemodynamic effects than mitrizoate-mepivacaine and metrizoate-saline. The effects of the two metrizoate solutions did not differ significantly. Previous contradictory reports on the effects of anesthetics in contrast media were reviewed with regard to experimental design, different osmolality of the test and control solutions, premedication, and pH dependence of local anesthetics. Ratio 3 media are recommended because they produce a more reliable relief of patient discomfort and fewer hemodynamic changes than the addition of local anesthetics to ratio 1.5 media.

  12. [Effect sites of anesthetics in the central nervous system network--looking into the mechanisms for natural sleep and anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Satoru; Yasuda, Atsushi; Lu, Zhihong; Takata, Jyunko; Sawai, Atsushi; Sento, Yoshiki; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Morita, Shigeho

    2011-05-01

    We showed the effect sites of anesthetics in the central nervous system (CNS) network. The thalamus is a key factor for loss of consciousness during natural sleep and anesthesia. Although the linkages among neurons within the CNS network in natural sleep are complicated, but sophisticated, the sleep mechanism has been gradually unraveled. Anesthesia disrupts the link-ages between cortical and thalamic neurons and among the cortical neurons, and thus it loses the integration of information derived from the arousal and sleep nuclei. It has been considered that anesthesia does not share the common pathway as natural sleep at the level of unconsciousness, because anesthetics have multiple effect sites within CNS network and may induce disintegration among neurons. Recent literatures have shown that the effects of anesthetics are specific rather than global in the brain. It is interesting to note that thalamic injection of anti-potassium channel materials restored consciousness during inhalation anesthesia, and that the sedative components of certain intravenous anesthesia may share the same pathway as natural sleep. To explore the sensitivity and susceptibility loci for anesthetics in the thalamocortical neurons as well as arousal and sleep nuclei within CNS network may be an important task for future study.

  13. Comparison of anesthetics in electroconvulsive therapy: an effective treatment with the use of propofol, etomidate, and thiopental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahavi GS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Guy Sender Zahavi,1 Pinhas Dannon1,2 1Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel; 2Brain Stimulation Unit at Beer Yaakov-Ness Ziona Mental Health Center, Israel Objectives: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered to be one of the most effective treatments in psychiatry. Currently, three medications for anesthesia are used routinely during ECT: propofol, etomidate, and thiopental. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the anesthetics used in ECT on seizure threshold and duration, hemodynamics, recovery from ECT, and immediate side effects. Methods: Our study is a retrospective cohort study, in which a comparison was made between three groups of patients who underwent ECT and were anesthetized with propofol, etomidate, or thiopental. The main effect compared was treatment dose and seizure duration. All patients were chosen as responders to ECT. Results: Data were gathered about 91 patients (39 were anesthetized with thiopental, 29 with etomidate, and 23 with propofol. Patients in the thiopental group received a lower electrical dose compared to the propofol and etomidate group (mean of 459 mC compared to 807 mC and 701 mC, respectively, P<0.001. Motor seizure duration was longer in the thiopental group compared to propofol and etomidate (mean of 40 seconds compared to 21 seconds and 23 seconds, respectively, P=0.018. Seizure duration recorded by electroencephalography was similar in the thiopental and etomidate groups and lower in the propofol group (mean of 57 seconds in both groups compared to 45 seconds, respectively, P=0.038. Conclusion: Patients who were anesthetized with thiopental received a lower electrical treatment dose without an unwanted decrease in seizure duration. Thiopental might be the anesthetic of choice when it is congruent with other medical considerations. Keywords: anesthesia, ECT, seizure

  14. Effect of intravenous anesthetic propofol on synaptic vesicle exocytosis at the frog neuromuscular junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luciana Ferreira LEITE; Renato Santiago GOMEZ; Matheus de Castro FONSECA; Marcus Vinicius GOMEZ; Cristina GUATIMOSIM

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the presynaptic effects of propofol, a short-acting intravenous anesthetic, in the frog neuromuscular junction. Methods: Frog cutaneous pectoris nerve muscle preparations were prepared. A fluorescent tool (FM1-43) was used to visualize the effect of propofol on synaptic vesicle exocytosos in the frog neuromuscular junction. Results: Low concentrations of propofol, ranging from 10 to 25 μmol/L, enhanced spontaneous vesicle exocytosis monitored by FM1-43 in a Ca2+-dependent and Na+-independent fashion. Higher concentrations of propofol (50, 100, and 200 μmol/L) had no effect on spontaneous exocytosis. By contrast, higher concentrations of propofol inhibited the Na+-dependent exocytosis evoked by 4-aminopyri-dine but did not affect the Na+-independent exocytosis evoked by KCI. This action was similar and non-additive with that observed by tetrodotoxin, a Na+ channel blocker.Conclusion: Our data suggest that propofol has a dose-dependent presynaptic effect at the neuromuscular transmission which mayhelp to understand some of the clinical effects of this agent on neuromuscular function.

  15. Hemodynamic effects of python neuropeptide gamma in the anesthetized python, Python regius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard, Nini; Galli, Gina; Taylor, Edwin W; Conlon, J Michael; Wang, Tobias

    2005-05-15

    The effects of python neuropeptide gamma (NPgamma) on hemodynamic parameters have been investigated in the anesthetized ball python (Python regius). Bolus intra-arterial injections of synthetic python NPgamma (1-300 pmol kg-1) produced a dose-dependent decrease in systemic arterial blood pressure (Psys) concomitant with increases in systemic vascular conductance (Gsys), total cardiac output and stroke volume, but only minor effects on heart rate. The peptide had no significant effect on pulmonary arterial blood pressure (Ppul) and caused only a small increase in pulmonary conductance (Gpul) at the highest dose. In the systemic circulation, the potency of the NK1 receptor-selective agonist [Sar9,Met(0(2))11] substance P was >100-fold greater than the NK2 receptor-selective agonist [betaAla8] neurokinin A-(4-10)-peptide suggesting that the python cardiovascular system is associated with a receptor that resembles the mammalian NK1 receptor more closely than the NK2 receptor. Administration of the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, L-nitro-arginine-methylester (L-NAME; 150 mg kg-1), resulted in a significant (Ppython, but neither nitric oxide nor prostaglandins mediate the vasodilatory action of NPgamma.

  16. Effects of Corocalm (Shuguan Capsule,疏冠胶囊) on Acute Myocardial Ischemia in Anesthetized Dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of Corocalm (Shuguan Capsule, 疏冠胶囊) on acute myocardial ischemia in anesthetized dogs and its possible therapeutic mechanism. Methods: The acute ischemia model was established by ligating the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Twentyfive dogs were randomly divided into 5 groups (5 dogs in each group): the control group (treated with normal saline 3 mL/kg), the refined Guanxin Capsule group (精制冠心胶囊, GXC 200 mg/kg), high and Iow dose Corocalm groups (48.5 mg/kg for low dose group and 194.0 mg/kg for high dose group) and the Diltiazem group (5 mg/kg). The animals were treated via a single duodenal administration after the model was established. The experiments used epicardial electrocardiogram (EECG) to measure the scope and degree of myocardial ischemia. Simultaneously, the coronary blood flow (CBF) and serum activity levels of creatine phosphokinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured by electromagnetic flow meter and automatic biochemical analyzer respectively. The plasma endothelin (ET) content was quantified by radioimmunoassay. Results: Corocalm (48.5 mg/kg and 194.0 mg/kg) significantly decreased the degree and scope of myocardial ischemia, reduced the infarct area, markedly increased the CBF, and inhibited the increase of CK and LDH activities and ET levels induced by myocardial ischemia/infarction. Conclusion: Corocalm could improve the state of acute myocardial ischemia and infarction in dogs. The mechanism of action might be correlated to increasing CBF,inhibiting CK and LDH activities and preventing ET release.

  17. Cardiopulmonary effects of dobutamine and norepinephrine infusion in healthy anesthetized alpacas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Caitlin J; Hawley, Alexander T; Rozanski, Elizabeth A; Lascola, Kara M; Bedenice, Daniela

    2009-10-01

    To characterize the cardiopulmonary effects of dobutamine and norepinephrine infusion in isoflurane-anesthetized healthy alpacas. 8 adult alpacas. Initial baseline cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic variables were obtained 30 minutes after induction of isoflurane anesthesia in 8 alpacas (3 females and 5 sexually intact males). Four treatments (dobutamine at 4 and 8 microg/kg/min and norepinephrine at 0.3 and 1 microg/kg/min) were administered in random order via constant rate infusion over 15 minutes, followed by repeat measurements of cardiopulmonary values and a 20-minute washout period. Subsequent baseline and posttreatment measurements were similarly repeated until both drugs and dosages were administered to each animal. Baseline data in awake alpacas were obtained 18 to 24 hours following recovery from anesthesia. Both dobutamine and norepinephrine significantly increased cardiac index and arterial blood pressure from baseline values. Similar increases in hemoglobin concentration, oxygen content, and oxygen delivery were observed following administration of each drug at either dosage. Only dobutamine, however, reduced relative oxygen consumption while improving overall tissue oxygenation. Furthermore, heart rate was selectively enhanced by dobutamine and systemic vascular resistance by norepinephrine. Norepinephrine infusion resulted in dose-dependent changes in cardiopulmonary variables. Results indicated that both dobutamine and norepinephrine were appropriate choices to improve cardiac index, mean arterial pressure, and overall oxygen delivery in alpacas with isoflurane-induced hypotension. Careful titration by use of low infusion rates of dobutamine and norepinephrine is recommended to avoid potential arrhythmogenic effects and excessive vasoconstriction, respectively.

  18. Dose-dependent effects of the clinical anesthetic isoflurane on Octopus vulgaris: a contribution to cephalopod welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polese, Gianluca; Winlow, William; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress in animal welfare legislation relating to invertebrates has provoked interest in methods for the anesthesia of cephalopods, for which different approaches to anesthesia have been tried but in most cases without truly anesthetizing the animals. For example, several workers have used muscle relaxants or hypothermia as forms of "anesthesia." Several inhalational anesthetics are known to act in a dose-dependent manner on the great pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis, a pulmonate mollusk. Here we report, for the first time, on the effects of clinical doses of the well-known inhalational clinical anesthetic isoflurane on the behavioral responses of the common octopus Octopus vulgaris. In each experiment, isoflurane was equilibrated into a well-aerated seawater bath containing a single adult O. vulgaris. Using a web camera, we recorded each animal's response to touch stimuli eliciting withdrawal of the arms and siphon and observed changes in the respiratory rate and the chromatophore pattern over time (before, during, and after application of the anesthetic). We found that different animals of the same size responded with similar behavioral changes as the isoflurane concentration was gradually increased. After gradual application of 2% isoflurane for a maximum of 5 min (at which time all the responses indicated deep anesthesia), the animals recovered within 45-60 min in fresh aerated seawater. Based on previous findings in gastropods, we believe that the process of anesthesia induced by isoflurane is similar to that previously observed in Lymnaea. In this study we showed that isoflurane is a good, reversible anesthetic for O. vulgaris, and we developed a method for its use.

  19. Effects of dobutamine hydrochloride on cardiovascular function in horses anesthetized with isoflurane with or without acepromazine maleate premedication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schier, Mara F; Raisis, Anthea L; Secombe, Cristy J; Hosgood, Giselle; Musk, Gabrielle C; Lester, Guy D

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of acepromazine maleate premedication on cardiovascular function before and after infusion of dobutamine hydrochloride for 30 minutes in isoflurane-anesthetized horses. ANIMALS 6 healthy adult horses. PROCEDURES Each horse was anesthetized once following premedication with acepromazine (0.02 mg/kg, IV) administered 30 minutes prior to anesthetic induction (ACP+ treatment) and once without premedication (ACP- treatment). Anesthesia was induced with IV administration of xylazine hydrochloride (0.8 mg/kg), ketamine hydrochloride (2.2 mg/kg), and diazepam (0.08 mg/kg). Horses were positioned in right lateral recumbency, and anesthesia was maintained via inhalation of isoflurane delivered in oxygen. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was adjusted to achieve a target mean arterial blood pressure of 60 mm Hg (interquartile range [25th to 75th percentile], 57 to 63 mm Hg) for at least 15 minutes. Cardiac index, oxygen delivery index, and femoral arterial blood flow indices were determined 60 minutes after anesthetic induction (baseline). Dobutamine was then infused to achieve a target mean arterial blood pressure of 80 mm Hg (interquartile range, 76 to 80 mm Hg). Data collection was repeated 30 minutes after the start of dobutamine infusion for comparison with baseline values. RESULTS Complete data sets were available from 5 of the 6 horses. Dobutamine administration resulted in significant increases in oxygen delivery and femoral arterial blood flow indices but no significant change in cardiac index for each treatment. However, at baseline or 30 minutes after the start of dobutamine infusion, findings for the ACP+ and ACP- treatments did not differ. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In isoflurane-anesthetized horses, dobutamine administration increased oxygen delivery and femoral arterial blood flow indices, but these changes were unaffected by premedication with acepromazine.

  20. The Effect of Local Anesthetic Volume Within the Adductor Canal on Quadriceps Femoris Function Evaluated by Electromyography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grevstad, Ulrik; Jæger, Pia; Sørensen, Johan Kløvgaard;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-injection adductor canal block (ACB) provides analgesia after knee surgery. Which nerves that are blocked by an ACB and what influence-if any-local anesthetic volume has on the effects remain undetermined. We hypothesized that effects on the nerve to the vastus medialis muscle...... (which besides being a motor nerve innervates portions of the knee) are volume-dependent. METHODS: In this assessor- and subject-blinded randomized trial, 20 volunteers were included. On 3 separate days, subjects received an ACB with different volumes (10, 20, and 30 mL) of lidocaine 1%. In addition......L was used (P = 0.0001). No statistically significant differences were found between volume and effect on the vastus lateralis (P = 0.81) or in muscle strength (P = 0.15). CONCLUSIONS: For ACB, there is a positive correlation between local anesthetic volume and effect on the vastus medialis muscle. Despite...

  1. Clinical Study on Effect of Electro-acupuncture Combined with Different Anesthetics on Auditory-evoked Potential Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) on auto regressive with exogenous input model (ARX-model) auditory evoked index (AAI) in patients anesthetized with different anesthetics. Methods: Forty-eight adult patients undergoing scheduled surgical operation were enrolled and divided into two groups (24 in each group) according to the anesthetics applied, Group A was anesthetized with propofol sedation and Group B with Isoflurane-epidural anesthesia. Group A was subdivided into three groups of low, middle and high concentration of target effect-site of 1.0 μg/ml, 1.5 μg/ml and 2.0 μg/ml through target controlled infusion (TCI) and Group B into 3 subgroups of minimum alveolar effective concentration of isoflurane (0.4 MAC, 0.6 MAC and 0.8 MAC for B1, B2 and B3 subgroups) respectively, with 8 patients in every subgroup. EA on acupoints of Hegu (LI4) and Neiguan (P6) was applied on all the patients during anesthesia, and the change of AAI at various time points was recorded. Results: In the three subgroups of Group A, levels of AAI were significantly elevated in the first few minutes after EA, and significantly lowered 20 min after EA in subgroup A2. While in the subgroups of Group B, except the elevating in Group B1 1 -2 min after EA, levels of AAI remained unchanged at other time points. Conclusion: Pain response could be reflected by AAI during EA. EA could enhance the sedative effect of propofol in middle concentration, but its effect on isoflurane epidural anesthesia is insignificant.

  2. Effect of needle puncture and electro-acupuncture on mucociliary clearance in anesthetized quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tianshan

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acupuncture therapy for obstructive respiratory diseases has been effectively used in clinical practice and the acupuncture points or acupoints of Zhongfu and Tiantu are commonly-used acupoints to treat patients with the diseases. Since the impaired mucociliary clearance is among the most important features of airway inflammation in most obstructive respiratory diseases, the effect of needle puncture and electro-acupuncture at the specific acupoints on tracheal mucociliary clearance was investigated in anesthetized quails. Methods Mucociliary transport velocity on tracheal mucosa was measured through observing the optimal pathway, and fucose and protein contents in tracheal lavages were determined with biochemical methods. In the therapeutic group, needle puncture or electro-acupuncture stimulation to the acupoints was applied without or with constant current output in 2 mA and at frequency of 100 Hz for 60 minutes. In the sham group, electro-acupuncture stimulation to Liangmen was applied. Results Our present experiments demonstrated that the electro-acupuncture stimulation to Zhongfu and Tiantu significantly increased tracheal mucociliary transport velocity and decreased the content of protein in the tracheal lavage, compared with the control group. Moreover, either needle puncture or electro-acupuncture stimulation to Zhongfu and Tiantu significantly reverted the human neutrophil elastase-induced decrease in tracheal mucociliary transport velocity and human neutrophil elastase -induced increase in the contents of fucose and protein in the tracheal lavage, compared with the control group. Conclusion These results suggest that either needle puncture or electro-acupuncture stimulation to the effective acupoints significantly improves both airway mucociliary clearance and the airway surface liquid and that the improvements maybe ascribed to both the special function of the points and the substantial stimulation of electricity.

  3. Cardiorespiratory effects of a 5HT2 antagonist (R51703) in awake and anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, T J; McDonell, W N; Dyson, D H; Black, W D

    1996-07-01

    To investigate cardiorespiratory effects of an experimental 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist (R51703) with sedative properties, intramuscular doses of the drug were studied in 6 awake dogs of mixed breed, and in 6 anesthetized beagles. Two doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg) of R51703 and a saline control were studied in the awake dogs using a randomized crossover trial. Subsequently, the higher dose of R51703 was included as a component of halothane anesthesia to determine whether the halothane sparing effect of R51703 produced a beneficial alteration of hemodynamic function. Data were obtained at equipotent halothane/R51703 (H/R) and halothane/saline (H/S) doses equivalent to 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 MAC. In awake dogs, heart rates tended to be lower in dogs sedated with R51703, significantly so at 30 min for both doses, and at 90 and 120 min for the 0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg doses, respectively (P MAC, CI tended to be lower with H/R than with H/S, though the difference was not significant. Heart rate and stroke volume index also tended to be lower in the dogs treated with R51703, while systemic vascular resistance tended to be higher: these changes were not significant. Mean and SBP were higher at each MAC multiple in the H/R group. It was concluded that the halothane sparing effect of R51703 did not substantially improve hemodynamic function compared to the use of halothane alone at equipotent doses.

  4. ROLE OF STEROIDS IN HYPEREXCITATORY ADVERSE AND ANESTHETIC EFFECTS OF SEVOFLURANE IN NEONATAL RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaqiang; Xu, Changqing; Puentes, Dyanet L.; Seubert, Christoph N.; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Martynyuk, Anatoly E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that long-term developmental effects of neonatal anesthesia were more prominent in males. We tested whether steroids in general and sex steroids in particular, are involved in mediation of sevoflurane-caused paradoxical cortical seizures during the early postnatal period. Methods Cortical electroencephalograms, hippocampal synaptic activity, serum levels of steroids and the loss of the righting reflex (LORR), a marker of anesthetic effect, were measured in postnatal day 4–6 Sprague Dawley rats of both genders exposed to 2.1% sevoflurane. Results Episodes of seizures, persistent spikes in electroencephalograms and increases in serum corticosterone were similar in both genders. In order of increasing potency the corticosteroid receptor antagonist, RU28318, the estradiol receptor antagonist, ICI182780, and the estradiol synthesis inhibitor, formestane depressed sevoflurane-caused seizures. Exogenous estradiol increased sevoflurane-caused seizures, spikes and serum levels of corticosterone. These estradiol-enhanced seizures and spikes were depressed by ICI 182780 and the NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide, while RU28318 depressed seizures only. In hippocampal CA1 neurons, estradiol increased the amplitude, rise time and area under curve of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR)-mediated miniature postsynaptic currents. Exogenous estradiol shortened, while ICI 182780 and formestane, lengthened the time needed for sevoflurane to induce LORR. Conclusion These findings provide evidence for gender-independent acute electroencephalographic effects of sevoflurane at this age. Corticosterone and estradiol are involved in mediation of sevoflurane-caused seizures. Estradiol, but not corticosterone, also contributes to sevoflurane-caused spikes, by enhancing GABAAR-mediated excitation in the cortex. By enhancing GABAAR-mediated inhibition in more mature caudal regions of the brain, estradiol, contributes to sevoflurane-induced LORR. PMID:26159049

  5. 比较亚麻醉剂量氯胺酮和七氟醚用于麻醉的临床效果%Comparison of Clinical Anesthetic Effects between Sub-anesthetic Ketamine and Sevoflurane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪宇

    2015-01-01

    目的:对比七氟醚与亚麻醉剂量氯胺酮用于临床麻醉效果。方法对2013年4月-2014年9月入诊该院的100例需实施麻醉的患者按照50例为一组分成两组,观察组使用亚麻醉剂量氯胺酮,对照组使用七氟醚,观察并记录两组麻醉效果及不良反应发生情况,同时进行组间对比。结果观察组总体麻醉效果优于对照组,其总体用药量较少、起效时间较短,完全阻滞时间同样短于对照组(P<0.01);观察组患者治疗后均未出现任何不良反应,对照组中有9例出现恶心症状(P<0.01)。结论临床使用亚麻醉剂量氯胺酮的麻醉效果显著优于七氟醚,且不会引起不良反应症状发生,临床可推广应用。%Objective To compared the clinical anesthetic effects of sub-anesthetic ketamine and sevoflurane. Methods 100 pa-tients to be narcotized were divided into the observation group and the control group, with 50 patients in each group. The observa-tion group was given sub-anesthetic ketamine and the control group was given sevoflurane. The anesthetic effect and adverse reac-tion of both groups were observed, recorded and compared. Results The anesthetic effect of the observation group was better than that of the control group, with less dosage, efficacy time, and complete retardant time (P<0.01). The patients of the observation group had no adverse reaction after treatment, while 9 patients of the control group had nausea symptom (P<0.01). Conclusion The clinical anesthetic effect of sub-anesthetic ketamine is significantly better than that of sevoflurane. Ketamine will not cause any adverse reaction, and thus is worth clinical promotion.

  6. Analgesic Effect of Botulinum Toxin A in Myofascial Pain Syndrome Patients Previously Treated with Local Infiltration of Anesthetic and Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena-Sevilla, Joaquín; García-Fernández, María R; Vicente-Villena, Juan P

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin A (BoNTA) injections in patients with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) who were previously treated with the local infiltration of anesthetic and steroids (LIAS). The study included a retrospective phase and a longitudinal open-label prospective phase, which were conducted on consecutive patients with MPS previously treated with the local infiltration of anesthetic (levobupivacaíne 0.25%) and steroids (triamcinolone 40 mg). Eligible patients were treated with a single intramuscular injection of BoNTA (Botox; Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA). The treatment efficacy was determined according to the degree of pain relief obtained. Eighty-two patients met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were included in the study. Successful results were obtained for 32 (39.0%) and 30 (36.6%) patients, during treatment with BoNTA and LIAS, respectively. The mean (standard deviation) length of the analgesic effect was significantly longer with BoNTA (29.6 [SD = 17.7] weeks) than with LIAS (8.5 [SD = 6.4] weeks), P <.0001. As regards the side effects, 19 (23.2%) patients reported transient soreness at the injection site for 2 to 3 days with BoNTA. The MPS patients previously treated with a local infiltration of anesthetic and steroids who then received a single injection of BoNTA experienced significantly reduced pain for a relatively long time.

  7. Comparison of Local Anesthetic Effect of Bupivacaine versus Bupivacaine plus Dexamethasone in Nasal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhosein Ma’somi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Adequate pain control is an important consideration in the post-surgical management of patients. Local nerve blockade added to general anesthesia can provide excellent pain control during and after most nasal surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the combined effect of local anesthetic drugs with corticosteroids in nasal surgery. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind clinical study, 60 patients who underwent different nasal surgical procedures were matched and divided into two equal groups. Bilateral local nerve blockade was used in both groups. Bupivacaine or bupivacaine plus dexamethasone was administered by injection (groups B and B+D, respectively. Postoperative visual analog scale (VAS pain values and the need for oral/intramuscular analgesic treatment in the first 24 h were recorded in all patients. Results: Thirty-eight male (63.3% and 22 female (36.7% patients were included in this study, with a mean age of 28.3 ± 8.2 years. At 1, 2, 4, 6, and 12 h post surgery, VAS pain values were significantly lower in the B+D group than in the B group. The analgesic requirement was significantly lower in the B+D group compared with the B group. No relevant complications were seen during surgery or postoperative hospitalization. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the positive effect of a combination of a dexamethasone with a bupivacaine in reducing pain and the need for analgesic drugs after different nasal surgeries. No acute or short-term post-surgical complications were observed in this study.   

  8. Memory-impairing effects of local anesthetics in an elevated plus-maze test in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Blatt

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Post-training intracerebroventricular administration of procaine (20 µg/µl and dimethocaine (10 or 20 µg/µl, local anesthetics of the ester class, prolonged the latency (s in the retention test of male and female 3-month-old Swiss albino mice (25-35 g body weight; N = 140 in the elevated plus-maze (mean ± SEM for 10 male mice: control = 41.2 ± 8.1; procaine = 78.5 ± 10.3; 10 µg/µl dimethocaine = 58.7 ± 12.3; 20 µg/µl dimethocaine = 109.6 ± 5.73; for 10 female mice: control = 34.8 ± 5.8; procaine = 55.3 ± 13.4; 10 µg/µl dimethocaine = 59.9 ± 12.3 and 20 µg/µl dimethocaine = 61.3 ± 11.1. However, lidocaine (10 or 20 µg/µl, an amide class type of local anesthetic, failed to influence this parameter. Local anesthetics at the dose range used did not affect the motor coordination of mice exposed to the rota-rod test. These results suggest that procaine and dimethocaine impair some memory process(es in the plus-maze test. These findings are interpreted in terms of non-anesthetic mechanisms of action of these drugs on memory impairment and also confirm the validity of the elevated plus-maze for the evaluation of drugs affecting learning and memory in mice

  9. Heart rate effects of intraosseous injections using slow and fast rates of anesthetic solution deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Louis; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel; Drum, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a single-blind manner, 3 primary intraosseous injections to 61 subjects using: the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 45 seconds (fast injection); the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection); a conventional syringe injection at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection), in 3 separate appointments spaced at least 3 weeks apart. A pulse oximeter measured heart rate (pulse). The results demonstrated the mean maximum heart rate was statistically higher with the fast intraosseous injection (average 21 to 28 beats/min increase) than either of the 2 slow intraosseous injections (average 10 to 12 beats/min increase). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 slow injections. We concluded that an intraosseous injection of 1.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine with the Wand at a 45-second rate of anesthetic deposition resulted in a significantly higher heart rate when compared with a 4-minute and 45-second anesthetic solution deposition using either the Wand or traditional syringe.

  10. Genotoxicity of Anesthetics Evaluated In Vivo (Animals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Mariana G.; Karahalil, Bensu

    2015-01-01

    The anesthesia has been improved all over the years. However, it can have impact on health, in both patients and animals anesthetized, as well as professionals exposed to inhaled anesthetics. There is continuing effort to understand the possible effects of anesthetics at molecular levels. Knowing the effects of anesthetic agents on genetic material could be a valuable basic support to better understand the possible mechanisms of these agents. Thus, the purpose of this review is to provide an overview on the genotoxic potential, evaluated in animal models, of many anesthetics that have already been used and those currently used in anesthesia. PMID:26199936

  11. [Effects on the newborn infant of thiopental and propofol used in anesthetic induction in cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, E; Redondo, J A; Catalán, P A; Carrillo, F

    1994-01-01

    To compare the effects of an anesthetic induction dose of thiopental to that of propofol on the vitality of the neonate, as measured by Apgar score and the interval between extraction of the newborn and unassisted respiration. One hundred ASA I-II women undergoing cesarean section were randomly assigned to two groups of 50. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental 4 mg/kg in one group; in the other group, propofol 2 mg/kg was used. Time intervals recorded were induction-to-extraction, uterine incision-to-extraction and extraction-to-unassisted respiration. An Apgar score was recorded 1, 5 and 10 min after birth. For statistical analysis, each group was divided into three subgroups, in accordance with the reason for performing the cesarean section: subgroup 1, elective cesarean; subgroup 2, emergency cesarean due to dystocia or failure; subgroup 3, emergency cesarean section due to acute fetal distress. Means of intervals for induction-extraction and uterine incision-extraction showed no significant differences. All induction-extraction intervals were under 10 min (4.94 +/- 1.55 min) and all uterine incision-extraction intervals were under 180 sec, with most staying under 90 sec (43.13 +/- 25.76 sec). No statistically significant differences were found for vitality between the two groups of neonates. If the induction-extraction interval is 10 min or less, both thiopental (4 mg/kg) and propofol (2 mg/kg) given in a single dose for induction of general anesthesia in all types of cesarean section are equally safe for the newborn infant.

  12. Minimum effective local anesthetic dose of intrathecal hyperbaric ropivacaine and bupivacaine for cesarean section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Zhi-yu; WANG Dong-xin; WU Xin-min

    2011-01-01

    Background Intrathecal anesthesia is commonly used for cesarean section. Bupivacaine and ropivacaine have all been used as intrathecal drugs. The minimum effective local anesthetic dose (MLAD) of intrathecal ropivacaine for nonobstetric patients has been reported. However, few data are available on the MLAD of hyperbaric ropivacine for obstetric patients and the relative potency to bupivacaine has not been fully determined. In this study, we sought to determine the MLAD of intrathecal ropivacaine and bupivacaine for elective cesarean section and to define their relative potency ratio.Methods We enrolled forty parturients undergoing elective cesarean section under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia and randomized them to one of two groups to receive intrathecal 0.5% hyperbaric ropivacaine or bupivacaine.The initial dose was 10 mg, and was increased in increments of 1 mg, using the technique of up-down sequential allocation. Efficacy was accepted if adequate sensory dermatomal anesthesia to pin prick to T7 or higher was attained within 20 minutes after intrathecal injection, and required no supplementary epidural injection for procedure until at least 50 minutes after the intrathecal injection.Results The intrathecal MLAD was 9.45 mg (95%confidence interval (CI), 8.45-10.56 mg) for ropivacaine and 7.53 mg (95%CI, 7.00-8.10 mg) for bupivacaine. The relative potency ratio was 0.80 (95% Cl, 0.74-0.85) for ropivacaine/bupivacaine when given intrathecally in cesarean section.Conclusion Ropivacaine is 20% less potent than bupivacaine during intrathecal anesthesia for cesarean delivery.

  13. Effects of anesthetic propofol on release of amino acids from the spinal cord during visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaobo; Wu, Anshi; Wu, Jing; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yongqian; Yue, Yun; Fang, Li; Wang, Yun

    2010-11-05

    As one of general anesthetics, propofol, has been used for surgical procedures of visceral organs. However, the mechanisms underlying the action of propofol on visceral nociception remain controversial. The aim of this study is to test whether the antinociception of systemic administration of propofol against visceral stimuli is related to the changes in release of excitatory and inhibitory amino acids in the spinal cord. The spinal microdialysis catheters were implanted subarachnoidally via the atlanto-occipital membrane in healthy SD rats. The rats received an intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid for visceral pain induction 10min after intraperitoneal pretreatment with vehicle or propofol (100mg/kg). The acetic acid-induced writhing assay was used to determine the degree of antinociception. Cerebrospinal fluid dialysate was collected by microdialysis from the spinal subarachnoid space before pretreatment and after visceral pain induction. Visceral pain-induced release of amino acids into the dialysate, including glutamate, aspartate, and γ-amino butyric acid was evaluated by measuring the changes in the concentrations of these amino acids. Acetic acid increased release of aspartate and glutamate, and decreased release of γ-amino butyric acid in the cerebrospinal fluid as measured by microdialysis. Pretreatment with propofol significantly decreased writhing responses induced by visceral pain, suppressed the visceral pain-induced aspartate and glutamate release, and reversed the decreased release of γ-amino butyric acid in the cerebrospinal fluid. These data provide evidence for a potential mechanism for the antinociceptive effects of propofol on visceral nociception. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Median effective effect-site concentration of intravenous anesthetics for loss of consciousness in neoadjuvant chemotherapy patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Zi-jing; HU Yong-hua; FAN Zhi-yi

    2011-01-01

    Background In recent years, increasing numbers of patients are accepting neoadjuvant chemotherapy before their operation in order to get a better prognosis. But chemotherapy has many side-effects. We have observed that patients who accepted neoadjuvant chemotherapy are more sensitive to anesthetics. The aim of this study was to determine the median effective dose (EC50) of intravenous anesthetics for neoadjuvant chemotherapy patients to lose consciousness during target-controlled infusion.Methods Two hundred and forty breast cancer patients undergoing elective operations were assigned to six groups according to treatment received before their operation and the use of intravenous anesthetics during anesthesia;non-adjuvant chemotherapy+propofol group (group NP, n=40), Taxol+propofol group (group TP, n=40),adriamycine+cyclophosphamide+5-Fu+propofol group (group CP, n=40), non-adjuvant chemotherapy+etomidate group (group NE, n=40), taxol+etomidate group (group TE, n=40), adriamycine+cyclophosphamide+5-Fu+etomidate group (group CE, n=40). We set the beginning effect-site concentration (Ce) of propofol as 3.0 μg/ml and etomidate as 0.2μg/ml. The concentration was increased by steps until the patient was asleep, (OAAS class Ⅰ-Ⅱ), then gave fentanyl 3μg/kg and rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg and intubated three minutes later. The patients' age, height, and weight were recorded.BIS was recorded before induction, at the initial effect-site concentration and at loss of consciousness. The effect-site concentration was recorded when patient lost consciousness.Results There were no significant differences between groups in general conditions before treatment; such as BIS of consciousness, age, sex and body mass index. The EC50 of propofol in the NP, TP and CP groups was 4.11 μg/ml (95%CI: 3.96-4.26), 2.94 μg/ml (95% CI: 3.36-3.47) and 2.91 μg/ml (95% CI: 3.35-3.86), respectively. The EC50 of etomidate in the NE, TE and CE groups was 0.61 μg/ml (95% CI: 0.55-0.67), 0.38

  15. Effects of inhaled anesthetic isoflurane on long-term potentiation of CA3 pyramidal cell afferents in vivo

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    Ballesteros KA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kristen A Ballesteros,1 Angela Sikorski,2 James E Orfila,3 Joe L Martinez Jr41Department of Biology, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA; 2Texas A&M University Texarkana, Texarkana, TX, USA; 3University of Colorado in Denver, Denver, CO, USA; 4University of Illinois in Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Isoflurane is a preferred anesthetic, due to its properties that allow a precise concentration to be delivered continually during in vivo experimentation. The major mechanism of action of isoflurane is modulation of the γ-amino butyric acid (GABAA receptor-chloride channel, mediating inhibitory synaptic transmission. Animal studies have shown that isoflurane does not cause cell death, but it does inhibit cell growth and causes long-term hippocampal learning deficits. As there are no studies characterizing the effects of isoflurane on electrophysiological aspects of long-term potentiation (LTP in the hippocampus, it is important to determine whether isoflurane alters the characteristic responses of hippocampal afferents to cornu ammonis region 3 (CA3. We investigated the effects of isoflurane on adult male rats during in vivo induction of LTP, using the mossy fiber pathway, the lateral perforant pathway, the medial perforant pathway, and the commissural CA3 (cCA3 to CA3, with intracranial administration of Ringer’s solution, naloxone, RS-aminoindan-1, 5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA, or 3-[(R-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl]-propo-2-enyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP. Then, we compared these responses to published electrophysiological data, using sodium pentobarbital as an anesthetic, under similar experimental conditions. Our results showed that LTP was exhibited in animals anesthetized with isoflurane under vehicle conditions. With the exception of AIDA in the lateral perforant pathway, the defining characteristics of the four pathways appeared to remain intact, except for the observation that LTP was markedly reduced in animals

  16. [The individual and integral effects of brief simulated descents and anesthetic pharmacological preparations on human metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviatova, N V; Buravkova, L B

    1999-01-01

    In short-term chamber (GVK-250) "descents" by three healthy male volunteers mechanisms of hyperbaric narcosis against high partial pressures of indifferent nitrogen and argon were compared with anesthetic ketamine and sibason. Clinical biochemistry was engaged to determine any possible changes in metabolism due to the "descents" up to 0.4-0.6 MPa. Cubital vein blood was sampled prior to and following decompression. Plasma spectrophotometry was performed using biochemical analyzer EPAC-6140 (Eppendorf, Germany) and standard sets of reagents by Raichem (USA) and Biocon (Germany). On the whole, shifts in albumin, total protein, uric acid, lactate, and the creatine kinase activity were found to be within the physiological norm. However, several cases of excursion outside the boundaries of the clinical norm (A/T, AT, lactate dehydrogenase, triglycerides, lipase) could be associated with changes in the functional state of the liver caused by administration of the anesthetics during the hyperbaric exposure.

  17. The effects of general anesthetics on ESR spectra of spin labels in phosphatidylcholine vesicles containing purified Na,K-ATPase or microsomal protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuya, Makiko, E-mail: shibu@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University (Japan); Hiraoki, Toshifumi [Division of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University (Japan); Kimura, Kunie; Fukushima, Kazuaki [Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University (Japan); Suzuki, Kuniaki [Department of Molecular Cell Pharmacology, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the effects of general anesthetics on liposome using ESR spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two spin labels, 5-DSA and 16-DSA, were located in different position in liposome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anesthetics did not change the environment around the spin labels in the liposome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anesthetics remained on the surface of the lipid bilayer of liposome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteins in the liposome did not change the effects of anesthetics on liposome. - Abstract: We investigated the effects of general anesthetics on liposome containing spin labels, 5-doxyl stearic acid (5-DSA) and 16-doxyl stearic acid (16-DSA), and purified Na,K-ATPase or membrane protein of microsome using an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The spectra of 16-DSA in liposomes with both proteins showed three sharp signals compared with 5-DSA. The difference in the order parameter S value of 5-DSA and 16-DSA suggested that the nitroxide radical location of 5-DSA and 16-DSA were different in the membrane bilayer. The results were almost the same as those obtained in liposomes without proteins. The addition of sevoflurane, isoflurane, halothane, ether, ethanol and propofol increased the intensity of the signals, but the clinical concentrations of anesthetics did not significantly alter the S and {tau} values, which are indices of the fluidity of the membrane. These results suggest that anesthetics remain on the surface of the lipid bilayer and do not act on both the inside hydrophobic area and the relatively hydrophilic area near the surface. These results and others also suggest that the existence of Na,K-ATPase and microsomal proteins did not affect the environment around the spin labels in the liposome and the effects of anesthetics on liposome as a model membrane.

  18. Effects of single injection of local anesthetic agents on intervertebral disc degeneration: ex vivo and long-term in vivo experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Iwasaki

    Full Text Available Analgesic discography (discoblock can be used to diagnose or treat discogenic low back pain by injecting a small amount of local anesthetics. However, recent in vitro studies have revealed cytotoxic effects of local anesthetics on intervertebral disc (IVD cells. Here we aimed to investigate the deteriorative effects of lidocaine and bupivacaine on rabbit IVDs using an organotypic culture model and an in vivo long-term follow-up model.For the organotypic culture model, rabbit IVDs were harvested and cultured for 3 or 7 days after intradiscal injection of local anesthetics (1% lidocaine or 0.5% bupivacaine. Nucleus pulposus (NP cell death was measured using confocal microscopy. Histological and TUNEL assays were performed. For in vivo study, each local anesthetic was injected into rabbit lumbar IVDs under a fluoroscope. Six or 12 months after the injection, each IVD was prepared for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and histological analysis.In the organotypic culture model, both anesthetic agents induced time-dependent NP cell death; when compared with injected saline solution, significant effects were detected within 7 days. Compared with the saline group, TUNEL-positive NP cells were significantly increased in the bupivacaine group. In the in vivo study, MRI analysis did not show any significant difference. Histological analysis revealed that IVD degeneration occurred to a significantly level in the saline- and local anesthetics-injected groups compared with the untreated control or puncture-only groups. However, there was no significant difference between the saline and anesthetic agents groups.In the in vivo model using healthy IVDs, there was no strong evidence to suggest that discoblock with local anesthetics has the potential of inducing IVD degeneration other than the initial mechanical damage of the pressurized injection. Further studies should be performed to investigate the deteriorative effects of the local injection of analgesic agents

  19. Effect of the ketamine/xylazine anesthetic on the auditory brainstem response of adult gerbils

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    J.P. Lima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The auditory brainstem response (ABR is a test widely used to assess the integrity of the brain stem. Although it is considered to be an auditory-evoked potential that is influenced by the physical characteristics of the stimulus, such as rate, polarity and type of stimulus, it may also be influenced by the change in several parameters. The use of anesthetics may adversely influence the value of the ABR wave latency. One of the anesthetics used for e ABR assessment, especially in animal research, is the ketamine/xylazine combination. Our objective was to determine the influence of the ketamine/xylazine anesthetic on the ABR latency values in adult gerbils. The ABRs of 12 adult gerbils injected with the anesthetic were collected on three consecutive days, or a total of six collections, namely: pre-collection and A, B, C, D, and E collections. Before each collection the gerbil was injected with a dose of ketamine (100 mg/kg/xylazine (4 mg/kg. For the capture of the ABR, 2000 click stimuli were used with rarefaction polarity and 13 stimuli per second, 80 dBnHL intensity and in-ear phones. A statistically significant difference was observed in the latency of the V wave in the ABR of gerbils in the C and D collections compared to the pre-, A and E collections, and no difference was observed between the pre-, A, B, and E collections. We conclude that the use of ketamine/xylazine increases the latency of the V wave of the ABR after several doses injected into adult gerbils; thus clinicians should consider the use of this substance in the assessment of ABR.

  20. C-terminal amide to alcohol conversion changes the cardiovascular effects of endomorphins in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ye; Wang, Chang-lin; Cui, Yun; Fan, Ying-zhe; Liu, Jing; Shao, Xuan; Liu, Hong-mei; Wang, Rui

    2006-01-01

    Endomorphin1-ol (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-ol, EM1-ol) and endomorphin2-ol (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-ol, EM2-ol), with C-terminal alcohol (-ol) containing, have been shown to exhibit higher affinity and lower intrinsic efficacy in vitro than endomorphins. In the present study, in order to investigate the alterations of systemic hemodynamic effects induced by C-terminal amide to alcohol conversion, responses to intravenous (i.v.) or intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of EM1-ol, EM2-ol and their parents were compared in the system arterial pressure (SAP) and heart rate (HR) of anesthetized rats. Both EM1-ol and EM2-ol induced dose-related decrease in SAP and HR when injected in doses of 3-100 nmol/kg, i.v. In terms of relative vasodepressor activity, it is interesting to note that EM2-ol was more potent than endomorphin2 [the dose of 25% decrease in SAP (DD25) = 6.01+/-3.19 and 13.99+/-1.56 nmol/kg, i.v., respectively] at a time when responses to EM1-ol were less potent than endomorphin1. Moreover, decreases in SAP in response to EM1-ol and EM2-ol were reduced by naloxone, atropine sulfate, L-NAME and bilateral vagotomy. It indicated that the vasodepressor responses were possibly mediated by a naloxone-sensitive, nitric oxide release, vagus-activated mechanism. It is noteworthy that i.c.v. injections of -ol derivatives produced dose-related decreases in SAP and HR, which were significantly less potent than endomorphins and were attenuated by naloxone and atropine sulfate. In summary, the results of the present study indicated that the C-terminal amide to alcohol conversion produced different effects on the vasodepressor activity of endomorphin1 and endomorphin2 and endowed EM2-ol distinctive hypotension characters in peripheral (i.v.) and central (i.c.v.) tissues. Moreover, these results provided indirect evidence that amidated C-terminus might play an important role in the regulation of the cardiovascular system.

  1. Effect of four-alpha-helix bundle cavity size on volatile anesthetic binding energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manderson, Gavin A; Michalsky, Stuart J; Johansson, Jonas S

    2003-09-30

    Currently, it is thought that inhalational anesthetics cause anesthesia by binding to ligand-gated ion channels. This is being investigated using four-alpha-helix bundles, small water-soluble analogues of the transmembrane domains of the "natural" receptor proteins. The study presented here specifically investigates how multiple alanine-to-valine substitutions (which each decrease the volume of the internal binding cavity by 38 A(3)) affect structure, stability, and anesthetic binding affinity of the four-alpha-helix bundles. Structure remains essentially unchanged when up to four alanine residues are changed to valine. However, stability increases as the number of these substitutions is increased. Anesthetic binding affinities are also affected. Halothane binds to the four-alpha-helix bundle variants with 0, 1, and 2 substitutions with equivalent affinities but binds to the variants with 3 and 4 more tightly. The same order of binding affinities was observed for chloroform, although for a particular variant, chloroform was bound less tightly. The observed differences in binding affinities may be explained in terms of a modulation of van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions between ligand and receptor. These, in turn, could result from increased four-alpha-helix bundle binding cavity hydrophobicity, a decrease in cavity size, or improved ligand/receptor shape complementarity.

  2. Effect of 50% and maximal inspired oxygen concentrations on respiratory variables in isoflurane-anesthetized horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerche Phillip

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 0.5 fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2 and >0.95 FiO2 on pulmonary gas exchange, shunt fraction and oxygen delivery (DO2 in dorsally recumbent horses during inhalant anesthesia. The use of 0.5 FiO2 has the potential to reduce absorption atelectasis (compared to maximal FiO2 and augment alveolar oxygen (O2 tensions (compared to ambient air thereby improving gas exchange and DO2. Our hypothesis was that 0.5 FiO2 would reduce ventilation-perfusion mismatching and increase the fraction of pulmonary blood flow that is oxygenated, thus improving arterial oxygen content and DO2. Results Arterial partial pressures of O2 were significantly higher than preanesthetic levels at all times during anesthesia in the >0.95 FiO2 group. Arterial partial pressures of O2 did not change from preanesthetic levels in the 0.5 FiO2 group but were significantly lower than in the >0.95 FiO2 group from 15 to 90 min of anesthesia. Alveolar to arterial O2 tension difference was increased significantly in both groups during anesthesia compared to preanesthetic values. The alveolar to arterial O2 tension difference was significantly higher at all times in the >0.95 FiO2 group compared to the 0.5 FiO2 group. Oxygen delivery did not change from preanesthetic values in either group during anesthesia but was significantly lower than preanesthetic values 10 min after anesthesia in the 0.5 FiO2 group. Shunt fraction increased in both groups during anesthesia attaining statistical significance at varying times. Shunt fraction was significantly increased in both groups 10 min after anesthesia but was not different between groups. Alveolar dead space ventilation increased after 3 hr of anesthesia in both groups. Conclusions Reducing FiO2 did not change alveolar dead space ventilation or shunt fraction in dorsally recumbent, mechanically ventilated horses during 3 hr of isoflurane anesthesia. Reducing FiO2 in

  3. Anesthetic effect on mandibular permanent molar by periodontal ligament injection using single tooth anesthetic delivery system%牙周韧带注射对下颌磨牙牙髓麻醉效果的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨勤; 杨素真; 张国金; 郑晖

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the anesthetic effect on mandibular permanent molar by periodontal ligament (PDL) injection using single tooth anesthetic (STA) delivery system. Methods 120 mandibular permanent molars diagnosised as deep caries, chronic pulpitis and acute pulpitis were randomly divided into two groups. Using STA system, 60 teeth received PDL injection by standard technique, 60 teeth received PDL injection by improved technique. After anesthetic injection, cavity filling treatment or root canal therapy was performed. Anesthetic effectiveness according to pain sense during treatment period was recorded. Results The anesthetic effect rate on mandibular permanet molars was 92.5%. In deep caries group, the anesthetic effect rate was 100. 0%. In chronic pulpitis group, the anesthetic effective rate was 90%. In acute pulpitis group, the anesthetic effect rate was 85% injected by standard technique and 90% injected by improved technique respectively. There was no significant statistic difference between standard and improved technique (χ2 = 9.445, P = 0.49 ). Conclusion It is a satisfied approach to use either standard or improved technique in PDL injection with STA system in mandibular permanent molar anesthesia.%目的 观察单颗牙麻醉(single tooth anesthesia,STA)系统对下颌磨牙进行牙周韧带(periodontal ligament,PDL)注射后的牙髓麻醉效果.方法 120颗患牙分为深龋、慢性牙髓炎、急性牙髓炎3组,每组各40颗.每组再按照随机原则平均分为2个亚组,分别采用STA系统标准法和改良法麻醉,其中标准法注射点为舌侧PDL,改良法注射点为颊侧PDL.观察记录患者治疗中的疼痛反应,评价牙髓麻醉效果.结果 STA系统对下颌磨牙进行PDL注射后牙髓麻醉的总有效率为92.5%.深龋组标准法和改良法的牙髓麻醉有效率均为100%;慢性牙髓炎组标准法和改良法的牙髓麻醉有效率均为90%;急性牙髓炎组标准法的牙髓麻醉有效率为85

  4. Quantifying nonadditive selection caused by indirect ecological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TerHorst, Casey P; Lau, Jennifer A; Cooper, Idelle A; Keller, Kane R; La Rosa, Raffica J; Royer, Anne M; Schultheis, Elizabeth H; Suwa, Tomomi; Conner, Jeffrey K

    2015-09-01

    In natural biological communities, species interact with many other species. Multiple species interactions can lead to indirect ecological effects that have important fitness consequences and can cause nonadditive patterns of natural selection. Given that indirect ecological effects are common in nature, nonadditive selection may also be quite common. As a result, quantifying nonadditive selection resulting from indirect ecological effects may be critical for understanding adaptation in natural communities composed of many interacting species. We describe how to quantify the relative strength of nonadditive selection resulting from indirect ecological effects compared to the strength of pairwise selection. We develop a clear method for testing for nonadditive selection caused by indirect ecological effects and consider how it might affect adaptation in multispecies communities. We use two case studies to illustrate how our method can be applied to empirical data sets. Our results suggest that nonadditive selection caused by indirect ecological effects may be common in nature. Our hope is that trait-based approaches, combined with multifactorial experiments, will result in more estimates of nonadditive selection that reveal the relative importance of indirect ecological effects for evolution in a community context.

  5. Neonatal pain control and neurologic effects of anesthetics and sedatives in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Christopher; Grunau, Ruth E

    2014-03-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated the adverse consequences of untreated pain and stress on brain development in the preterm infant. Sucrose has widely been implemented as standard therapy for minor procedural pain. Anesthetics are commonly utilized in preterm infants during major surgery. Pharmacologic agents (benzodiazepines and opioids) have been examined in clinical trials of preterm infants requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. Controversy exists regarding the safety and long-term impact of these interventions. Ongoing multidisciplinary research will help define the impact of these agents and identify potential alternative therapies.

  6. Effect of local anesthetics on perioperative oxidative stress injury and nerve conduction function in diabetic or non-diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Yang Zhu; Ping Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of local anesthetics on perioperative oxidative stress injury and nerve conduction function in diabetic or non-diabetic patients.Methods:A total of 100 c diabetic patients and 100 non-diabetic patients who received selective surgery under intraspinal block anesthesia were selected as the research subjects, diabetic patients were selected as observation group, non-diabetic patients were selected as control group, serum and urine were collected respectively before and after operation, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), 8-hydroxy-2 deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels were determined; electromyography was carried out, and the motor nerve conduction velocity of median nerve and common peroneal nerve as well as sensory nerve conduction velocity of median nerve and superficial peroneal nerve were determined.Results:One day before operation and 1 day after operation, serum ROS and MDA levels and urine 8-OHdG levels of observation group were significantly higher than those of control group, and serum SOD levels were significantly lower than those of control group; ROS, MDA, SOD and 8-OHdG levels of observation group before and after operation changed more significantly than those of control group. 1 week after operation, MNCV of median nerve and common peroneal nerve as well as SNCV of median nerve and superficial peroneal nerve of observation group were significantly lower than those before operation, and MNCV of median nerve and common peroneal nerve as well as SNCV of median nerve and superficial peroneal nerve of control group were not significantly different from those before operation.Conclusions: Local anesthetics can cause peripheral nerve conduction function impairment in diabetic patients, and the possible molecular mechanism is that local anesthetics activate perioperative oxidative stress more significantly in diabetic patients than in non-diabetic patients.

  7. Effects of isradipine and other calcium antagonists on arteriovenous-shunt flow in anesthetized rabbits and cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hof, R.P.

    1989-04-17

    The effects of vasodilators on arteriovenous (AV)-shunt flow was investigated in anesthetized cats and rabbits, using the tracer microsphere method. In cats, the calcium antagonist isradipine reduced AV-shunt flow; verapamil showed a similar tendency and nicardipine was without effect. Dihydralazine strongly increased, but nitroglycerin and dipyridamole decreased AV-shunt flow. In rabbits, the effects of isradipine and verapamil were similar to those seen in cats. Sodium nitroprusside had no effect, whereas prazosin, minoxidil, and the potassium-channel activator cromakalim increased AV-shunt flow. The contrasting effects of drugs sharing the same mechanism of action suggest that target-tissue selectivity is more important than the mechanism of action. An increase of AV-shunt flow is unlikely to be beneficial but could be associated with a number of undesirable side effects. It might negatively affect migraine sufferers and, if AV-shunt dilatation shows no tolerance development, it represents an unnecessary hemodynamic burden for the heart.

  8. Effects of repetitive exposure to anesthetics and analgesics in the Tg2576 mouse Alzheimer's model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Carolina; Chaparro, Rafael E; Karlnoski, Rachel; Erasso, Diana; Gordon, Marcia; Morgan, David; Bosco, Gerardo; Rubini, Alessandro; Parmagnani, Andrea; Paoli, Antonio; Mangar, Devanand; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2014-11-01

    The use of anesthetics and sedatives has been suggested to be a contributor to Alzheimer's disease neuropathogenesis. We wanted to address the in vivo relevance of those substances in the Tg2576 Alzheimer's mouse model. Tg7526 mice were anesthesia-sedated for 90 min once a week for 4 weeks. Y maze, Congo Red, and amyloid beta (Aβ) immunochemistry were performed. We did not find any significant change in the navigation behavior of the exposed mice compared to the controls. Significantly less deposition of Aβ in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and frontal cortex of mice exposed to isoflurane, propofol, diazepam, ketamine, and pentobarbital was observed. In the dentate gyrus, Aβ deposition was significantly greater in the group treated with pentobarbital. Congo Red staining evidenced significantly fewer fibrils in the cortex of mice exposed to diazepam, ketamine, or pentobarbital. The adopted repetitive exposure did not cause a significant detriment in Tg7526 mouse.

  9. Effects of local anesthetics on Na+ channels containing the equine hyperkalemic periodic paralysis mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, R L; Tsushima, R G; Backx, P H

    1998-08-01

    We examined the ability of local anesthetics to correct altered inactivation properties of rat skeletal muscle Na+ channels containing the equine hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (eqHPP) mutation when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Increased time constants of current decay in eqHPP channels compared with wild-type channels were restored by 1 mM benzocaine but were not altered by lidocaine or mexiletine. Inactivation curves, which were determined by measuring the dependence of the relative peak current amplitude after depolarization to -10 mV on conditioning prepulse voltages, could be shifted in eqHPP channels back toward that observed for wild-type (WT) channels using selected concentrations of benzocaine, lidocaine, and mexiletine. Recovery from inactivation at -80 mV (50-ms conditioning pulse) in eqHPP channels followed a monoexponential time course and was markedly accelerated compared with wild-type channels (tauWT = 10.8 +/- 0.9 ms; taueqHPP = 2.9 +/- 0.4 ms). Benzocaine slowed the time course of recovery (taueqHPP,ben = 9.6 +/- 0.4 ms at 1 mM) in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, the recovery from inactivation with lidocaine and mexiletine had a fast component (taufast,lid = 3.2 +/- 0.2 ms; taufast,mex = 3.1 +/- 0.2 ms), which was identical to the recovery in eqHPP channels without drug, and a slow component (tauslow,lid = 1,688 +/- 180 ms; tauslow,mex = 2,323 +/- 328 ms). The time constant of the slow component of the recovery from inactivation was independent of the drug concentration, whereas the fraction of current recovering slowly depended on drug concentrations and conditioning pulse durations. Our results show that local anesthetics are generally incapable of fully restoring normal WT behavior in inactivation-deficient eqHPP channels.

  10. Optimization of anesthesia protocol for resting-state fMRI in mice based on differential effects of anesthetics on functional connectivity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Joanes; Schroeter, Aileen; Batata, Imene; Rudin, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Resting state-fMRI (rs-fMRI) in mice allows studying mechanisms underlying functional connectivity (FC) as well as alterations of FC occurring in murine models of neurological diseases. Mouse fMRI experiments are typically carried out under anesthesia to minimize animal movement and potential distress during examination. Yet, anesthesia inevitably affects FC patterns. Such effects have to be understood for proper interpretation of data. We have compared the influence of four commonly used anesthetics on rs-fMRI. Rs-fMRI data acquired under isoflurane, propofol, and urethane presented similar patterns when accounting for anesthesia depth. FC maps displayed bilateral correlation with respect to cortical seeds, but no significant inter-hemispheric striatal connectivity. In contrast, for medetomidine, we detected bilateral striatal but compromised inter-hemispheric cortical connectivity. The spatiotemporal patterns of the rs-fMRI signal have been rationalized considering anesthesia depth and pharmacodynamic properties of the anesthetics. Our results bridge the results from different studies from the burgeoning field of mouse rs-fMRI and offer a framework for understanding the influences of anesthetics on FC patterns. Utilizing this information, we suggest the combined use of medetomidine and isoflurane representing the two proposed classes of anesthetics; the combination of low doses of the two anesthetics retained strong correlations both within cortical and subcortical structures, without the potential seizure-inducing effects of medetomidine, rendering this regimen an attractive anesthesia for rs-fMRI in mice.

  11. Anesthetics interacting with lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeiras, Cátia; Serro, Ana Paula; Luzyanin, Konstantin; Fernandes, Anabela; Saramago, Benilde

    2013-01-23

    The exact mechanism by which anesthetics induce cell membrane-mediated modifications is still an open question. Although the fluidization effect of the anesthetic molecules on the cellular membrane is widely recognized, it is not known if anesthetics show any preference for specific membrane domains, namely the lipid rafts. The importance of these membrane micro-domains derives from the fact that they have been associated with cell signaling pathways, as well as with specific drug interactions. The objective of this work is to contribute for the elucidation of this question through the comparison of the anesthetic interactions with membranes of various lipid compositions. Liposomes prepared with an equimolar mixture of POPC, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, were chosen as models for lipid rafts. The interactions of these liposomes with two local anesthetics, tetracaine and lidocaine, and one general anesthetic, propofol, were studied. The effect of cholesterol was investigated by comparing anesthetic interactions with POPC/SM liposomes and POPC/SM/CHOL liposomes. The following experimental techniques were used: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, differential scanning calorimetry and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance. Although the liposomes investigated by the different techniques are not in the same conditions, it is possible to assemble the information obtained from all experimental techniques employed to reach a general conclusion. Tetracaine interacts more with raftlike domains, lidocaine induces stronger modifications on POPC/SM liposomes and the results for propofol are not fully conclusive but it seems to be the least prone to lipid interactions. The results were compared with those obtained with DMPC-containing liposomes, reported in a previous work.

  12. Fuzzy logic model to describe anesthetic effect and muscular influence on EEG Cerebral State Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brás, S; Gouveia, S; Ribeiro, L; Ferreira, D A; Antunes, L; Nunes, C S

    2013-06-01

    The well-known Cerebral State Index (CSI) quantifies depth of anesthesia and is traditionally modeled with Hill equation and propofol effect-site concentration (Ce). This work brings out two novelties: introduction of electromyogram (EMG) and use of fuzzy logic models with ANFIS optimized parameters. The data were collected from dogs (n=27) during routine surgery considering two propofol administration protocols: constant infusion (G1, n=14) and bolus (G2, n=13). The median modeling error of the fuzzy logic model with Ce and EMG was lower or similar than that of the Hill with Ce (p=0.012-G1, p=0.522-G2). Furthermore, there was no significant performance impact due to model structure alteration (p=0.288-G1, p=0.330-G2) and EMG introduction increased or maintained the performance (p=0.036-G1, p=0.798-G2). Therefore, the new model can achieve higher performance than Hill model, mostly due to EMG information and not due to changes in the model structure. In conclusion, the fuzzy models adequately describe CSI data with advantages over traditional Hill models.

  13. Quantifying the effect of baryon physics on weak lensing tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Semboloni, Elisabetta; Schaye, Joop; van Daalen, Marcel P; McCarthy, Ian J

    2011-01-01

    We use matter power spectra from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to quantify the effect of baryon physics on the weak gravitational lensing shear signal. The simulations consider a number of processes, such as radiative cooling, star formation, supernovae and feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN). Van Daalen et al. (2011) used the same simulations to show that baryon physics, in particular the strong feedback that is required to solve the overcooling problem, modifies the matter power spectrum on scales relevant for cosmological weak lensing studies. As a result, the use of power spectra from dark matter simulations can lead to significant biases in the inferred cosmological parameters. We show that the typical biases are much larger than the precision with which future missions aim to constrain the dark energy equation of state, w_0. For instance, the simulation with AGN feedback, which reproduces X-ray and optical properties of groups of galaxies, gives rise to a ~40% bias in w_0. We demonstrate ...

  14. Clinical parameters of the local anesthetic effects of bupivacaine applied with and without a vasoconstrictor in oral implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duka Miloš

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Bupivacaine (Marcaine®, homologue of mepivacaine, chemically related to lidocaine, is used as a local anesthetic for local infiltration, peripheral nerve block, retrobulbar block, symphathetic block, and caudal and epidural anesthesia. The aim of this investigation was to determine and to compare clinical parameters of the local anesthetic effects of bupivacaine applied with and without a vasoconstrictor. Methods. This investigation included a total of 30 randomly selected patients, who ranged in age from 30−60 years, with partial or total anodontia in the molar region of the mandible. These patients with total or partial edentulous molar part of the mandible, scheduled for dental implantation placement, were asked to participate in the study. In the first phase of the investigation, the patients were subjected to local anesthesia with 3.5 cm3 of 0.5% bupivacaine with a vasoconstrictor (adrenalin, 1: 200 000 in the right side of the mandible. After administering local anesthesia, the placement of blade, cylindrical, transdental (B.C.T. implants was performed. In the second stage of the investigation, in 7−10 days period after the first oral surgery, the patients were subjected to local anesthesia with 3.5 cm3 of 0.5% bupivacaine, but without a vasoconstrictor, in the left side of the mandible. After administering local anesthesia, the placement of B.C.T. implants was performed. During the performance of both oral surgery procedures, the following clinical parameters of the local anesthetic effects were monitored: latent period, duration and the potency of anesthesia, and the evaluation of the postoperative pain level. Results. The latent period under local anesthesia with 3.5 cm3 of 0.5% bupivacaine and vasoconstrictor was statistically significantly shorter than without vasoconstrictor. The duration of local anesthesia was longer without vasoconstrictor. There was no difference in the potency of anesthesia with or without a

  15. Benzocaine loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: Formulation design, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of local anesthetic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Mona; Abd El-Alim, Sameh Hosam; Kassem, Ahmed Alaa; El Awdan, Sally; Awad, Gamal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is the development and evaluation of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) as carrier system for topical delivery of benzocaine (BZC) improving its local anesthesia aiming to produce a fast acting and long lasting topical formulation. BZC loaded SLNs were prepared using a full factorial design to study the influence of the type of polyoxyethylene sorbitan ester surfactants as well as their concentration as independent variables on the particle size, entrapment efficacy and zeta potential selected as dependent variables. Design of experiment (DOE) and the analysis of variance (ANOVA) were conducted to assess the optimization of the developed formulations. The results indicated that the fatty acid chain length of tested surfactants and their concentration had a significant effect on the studied responses. The optimized formulations were spherical in shape of mean particle diameters<350 nm with negatively charged surface <-20mV. Particles were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction confirming the amorphous nature and the uniformity of drug inclusion in the lipid matrix. Optimized BZC-SLNs were incorporated into hydrogels characterized by a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian behavior. In vitro release study revealed an apparently biphasic release process with sustained release profile following Higuchi kinetics. BZC loaded SLNs hydrogels showed more potent anesthetic effect compared to BZC hydrogel evaluated using tail-flick analgesimeter, confirming significant improvement in both the intensity and duration of anesthetic effect. The above results proved that SLNs represent good candidates to encapsulate BZC improving its therapeutic efficacy for the topical treatment of pain.

  16. Quantifying antiepileptic drug effects using intrinsic excitability measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Christian; Plenz, Dietmar; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Reichmann, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Pathologic increases in excitability levels of cortical tissue commonly underlie the initiation and spread of seizure activity in patients with epilepsy. By reducing the excitability levels in neural tissue, antiepileptic drug (AED) pharmacotherapy aims to reduce seizure severity and frequency. However, AEDs may also bring about adverse effects, which have been reported to increase with higher AED load. Measures that monitor the dose-dependent effects of AEDs on cortical tissue and quantify its excitability level are therefore of prime importance for efficient clinical care and treatment but have been difficult to identify. Here, we systematically analyze continuous multiday electrocorticography (ECoG) data from 10 patients under different levels of AED load and derive the recently proposed intrinsic excitability measures (IEMs) from different brain regions and across different frequency bands. We find that IEMs are significantly negatively correlated with AED load (prescribed daily dose/defined daily dose). Furthermore, we demonstrate that IEMs derived from different brain regions can robustly capture global changes in the degree of excitability. These results provide a step toward the ultimate goal of developing a reliable quantitative measure of central physiologic effects of AEDs in patients with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Upscaling nitrogen-mycorrhizal effects to quantify CO2 fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrer, C.; Franklin, O.; Kaiser, C.; Vicca, S.; Stocker, B.; Prentice, I. C.; Soudzilovskaia, N.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems sequester annually about a quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However, it has been proposed that nitrogen (N) availability will limit plants' capacity to absorb increasing quantities of CO2 in the atmosphere. Experiments in which plants are fumigated with elevated CO2 show contrasting results, leaving open the debate of whether the magnitude of the CO2 fertilization effect will be limited by N. By synthesizing data from CO2 experiments through meta-analysis, we found that the magnitude of the CO2 fertilization effect can be explained based on the interaction between N availability and type of mycorrhizal association. Indeed, N availability is the most important driver of the CO2 fertilization effect, however, plants that associate with ectomycorrhizal fungi can overcome N limitations and grow about 30% more under 650ppm than under 400ppm of atmospheric CO2. On the other hand, plants that associate with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi show no CO2 fertilization effect under low N availability. Using this framework, we quantified biomass responses to CO2 as a function of the soil parameters that determine N availability for the two mycorrhizal types. Then, by overlaying the distribution of mycorrhizal plants with global projections of the soil parameters that determine N availability, we estimated the amount of extra CO2 that terrestrial plants can sequester in biomass for an increase in CO2, as well as the distribution of the CO2 fertilization effect. This synthesis reconciles contrasting views of the role of N in terrestrial carbon uptake and emphasizes the plant control on N availability through interaction with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Large-scale ecosystem models should account for the influence of nitrogen and mycorrhizae reported here, which will improve representation of the CO2 fertilization effect, critical for projecting ecosystem responses and feedbacks to climate change.

  18. The effect of peripheral resistance on impedance cardiography measurements in the anesthetized dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, Lester A H; Peng, Zhi Y; Fok, Benny S; James, Anthony E

    2005-06-01

    In the vasodilated and septic patient, the impedance method of measuring cardiac output (CO) may underestimate the true value. In this study, we sought to determine whether impedance CO (COIC) measurements are influenced by total peripheral resistance (TPR). In eight anesthetized and ventilated dogs, a high-precision flowprobe was placed on the ascending aorta, and direct CO was measured (CO flowprobe (COFP)). Mean arterial blood pressure was measured from the femoral artery. Simultaneous COIC measurements were made. TPR (mean arterial blood pressure x 80/COFP) was varied over 1-2 h by using infusions of phenylephrine and adrenaline and inhaled halothane. The bias between methods of CO measurement (COIC-COFP) was calculated and compared with TPR by using correlation and regression analysis. A total of 547 pairs of CO measurements were collected from the 8 dogs as TPR was varied. COFP changed by a mean of 190% (range, 89%-425%), and TPR changed by a mean of 266% (range, 94%-580%) during the experiment. The impedance method underestimated CO when TPR was low and overestimated CO when TPR was high. There was a logarithmic relationship between the CO bias and TPR. Correlation coefficients (r) between the CO bias and TPR ranged from 0.46 to 0.89 (P TPR halved or doubled. This finding explains the poor agreement between COIC and other methods of CO measurement found in validation studies involving critically ill patients.

  19. 常用麻醉药物对QT间期的影响%The effect of the commonly used anesthetic on the QT interval

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张巧云; 滕金亮

    2012-01-01

    背景 迄今为止,临床资料显示有近30多种药物会对QT间期(QT interval,QTc)产生影响,其中包括某些麻醉药物.目的 了解各种常用麻醉药物对QTc的不同影响,有助于临床合理选择麻醉用药.内容 常用的麻醉药及麻醉辅助用药对QTc的不同影响.趋向 通过了解常用麻醉药物对QTc的不同影响,有助于麻醉医师针对不同患者选择合适的麻醉药物,从而有效预防一些可能发生的不良症状.%Background According to the clinical data,more than 30 kinds of drugs,including some commonly used anesthetics,could affect the QT interval.Objective With better understanding the effects of different anesthetics on the QT interval,anesthetists can choose anesthetics for clinical use rationally.Content Different effects of the commonly used anesthetics and the adjuvant drugs on the QT interval are compared.Trend It is better for the anesthetists to choose the proper anesthetics for different patients with the understanding different anesthetics affecting on the QT interval as some adverse symptom can be prevented efficiently.

  20. [Anesthetic effect and safety of ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral blockade in sympathectomy for palmar hyperhidrosis: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin-Dong; Yu, Li-Na; Zhao, Da-Qiang; Xie, Liang; Zhou, Hai-Yu; Wang, Sheng

    2016-12-20

    To explore the anesthetic effect and safety of ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral blockade in video-assisted thoracoscopic sympathectomy for treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis. A total of 120 patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic sympathectomy for moderate or severe hyperhidrosis were randomized to receive ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral blockade (group A, n=60) or general anesthesia with tracheal intubation (group B, n=60). In both groups routine monitoring and radial artery catheterization were used. The patients in group A were given oxygen inhalation via a nasal tube after thoracic paravertebral blockade, and those in group B had intratracheal intubation. Blood gas analyses were conducted 5 min before and 5 min after the operation and the clinical outcomes and complications were recorded in each group. All the patients completed the operations safely and none of the patients with thoracic paravertebral blockade required conversion to general anesthesia. Significant differences were recorded between groups A and B in anesthetic preparation time (6.26∓2.09 vs 46.32∓15.76 min), awakening time (6.26∓2.09 vs 46.32∓15.76 min), and mean hospitalization expense (6355.54∓426.00 vs 8932.25∓725.98 RMB Yuan). Compared with those in group B, the patients in group A showed a significantly lower rate of postoperative throat discomfort (0% vs 100%), a shorter monitoring time (2 h vs 12 h), and faster recovery time for food intake (2 h vs 6 h). The parameters of artery blood gas analysis both before and after the operation were similar between the two groups, but the postoperative variations differed significantly between the two groups in pH value and PaCO2 but not in PaO2. Ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral blockade is safe and effective in video-assisted thoracoscopic sympathectomy for palmar hyperhidrosis and is associated with less complications and better postoperative recovery.

  1. Evaluation of the effect of locally administered amitriptyline gel as adjunct to local anesthetics in irreversible pulpitis pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moghadamnia A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amitriptyline is one of the most common tricyclic antidepressants, which binds to pain sensory nerve fibers close to the sodium channel; hence, it could interact to some degree with receptors of local anesthetics. This study was designed to assess the additional analgesic effects of 2% Amitriptyline local gel administration in irreversible pulpitis pain of the molars. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, double-blind clinical trial that was performed on 56 consented adult patients who did not receive enough analgesia after a lidocaine nerve block for their tooth pulpitis pain. Patients were treated with 0.2 ml of either 2% amitriptyline or placebo, which was directly injected into their mandibular molar pulp chamber after they had received two routine lidocaine injections. Patients were asked to score their pain as a mark on a 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS at different timepoints: 0 (just before gel administration, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 minutes after the treatments. Results: There was a 92.5% decrease in VAS scores of patients 9 minutes after amitriptyline administration compared to Time 0, while in the placebo group this difference was only 13.5%. Further, in the amitriptyline group, the VAS score at all timepoints was statistically different from Time 0 ( P < 0.01. The overall pain reduction and its trend was significantly higher in the amitriptyline group compared with the placebo group ( P < 0.001. Conclusion: Inter-pulp space administration of amitriptyline 2% gel for completing analgesia in irreversible pulpitis pain could be effective and useful as a conjunctive therapy to injections of local anesthetics.

  2. Spatially quantifying the leadership effectiveness in collective behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Haitao [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wang Ning [Department of Control Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen, Michael Z Q [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam Road, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Su Riqi; Zhou Tao [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhou Changsong, E-mail: zht@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: cszhou@hkbu.edu.hk, E-mail: zhutou@ustc.edu [Department of Physics, Centre for Nonlinear Studies, and Beijing-Hong Kong-Singapore Joint Centre for Nonlinear and Complex Systems (Hong Kong), Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2010-12-15

    Among natural biological flocks/swarms or mass social activities, when the collective behavior of the followers has been dominated by the direction or opinion of one leader group, it seems difficult for later-coming leaders to reverse the orientation of the mass followers, especially when they are in quantitative minority. This paper, however, reports a counter-intuitive phenomenon, i.e. Following the Later-coming Minority, provided that the later-comers obey a favorable distribution pattern that enables them to spread their influence to as many followers as possible within a given time and to be dense enough to govern these local followers they can influence directly from the beginning. We introduce a discriminant index to quantify the whole group's orientation under competing leaderships, with which the eventual orientation of the mass followers can be predicted before launching the real dynamical procedure. From the application point of view, this leadership effectiveness index also helps us to design an economical way for the minority later-coming leaders to defeat the dominating majority leaders solely by optimizing their spatial distribution pattern provided that the premeditated goal is available. Our investigation provides insights into effective leadership in biological systems with meaningful implications for social and industrial applications.

  3. Effect of prophylactic vitamin D on anesthetic outcome in children with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Shams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few previous studies proved that complications related to sickle cell disease (SCD were common with regional anesthesia compared with general anesthesia while others reported no differences. This study was carried out to evaluate the role of prophylactic vitamin D on anesthetic outcome among male children with SCD undergoing circumcision. Materials and Methods: A comparative study was carried out on 58 children undergoing circumcision with the regional block under light general anesthesia. The study sample was classified into two groups: one group received daily 400 IU vitamin D for 6 months before surgery while the other group without vitamin D. All patients were followed regarding the post-operative analgesia and the incidence of post-operative SCD related complications (acute chest syndrome, painful crisis and cerebrovascular accident. Data were analyzed with Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 13, produced by IBM SPSS, Inc. in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Results: There was a highly significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.001 regarding first analgesic request and total analgesic consumption per day: there was delayed analgesic request and less total analgesic consumption per day in vitamin D group. Comparison of post-operative sedation scores showed highly significant difference (P < 0.001 between the two groups, Sedation scores was increased significantly in vitamin D group. This study also reported that the administration of vitamin D was associated with less noticeable post-operative SCD complications. Conclusion: The use of prophylactic vitamin D in SCD will result in delayed post-operative analgesic request and less total analgesic requirement. Administration of vitamin D was also associated with less post-operative complications.

  4. Pitfalls in quantifying species turnover: the residency effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin Chase Burns

    2014-01-01

    The composition of ecological communities changes continuously through time and space. Understanding this turnover in species composition is a central goal in biogeography, but quantifying species turnover can be problematic. Here, I describe an underappreciated source of bias in quantifying species turnover, namely ‘the residency effect’, which occurs when the contiguous distributions of species across sampling domains are small relative to census intervals. I present the results of a simula...

  5. Effects of various anesthetic techniques and PaCO2 levels on cerebral oxygen balance in neurosurgical patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈绍洋; 王强; 熊利泽; 胡胜; 曾祥龙

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of various anesthetic techniques and PaCO2 levels on cerebral oxygen supply/consumption balance during craniotomy for removal of tumors, and to explore an anesthetic technique for neurosurgery and an appropriate degree of PaCO2 during neuroanesthesia. Methods: One hundred and fourteen patients with supratentorial tumors for elective craniotomy, ASA grade Ⅰ-Ⅱ, were randomly allocated to six groups. Patients were anesthetized with continuous intravenous infusion of 2% procaine 1.0 mg*kg-1*min-1 in Group Ⅰ, inhalation of 1.0%-1.5% isoflurane in Group Ⅱ, and infusion of 2% procaine 0.5 mg*kg-1*min-1 combined with inhalation of 0.5%-0.7% isoflurane in Group Ⅲ during the period of study. The end-tidal pressure of CO2 (PET CO2 )was maintained at 4.0 kPa in these 3 groups. In Group Ⅳ, Ⅴ and Ⅵ, the anesthetic technique was the same as that in Group Ⅰ but the PETCO2 was adjusted to 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5 kPa respectively for 60 min during which the study was performed. The radial arterial and retrograde jugular venous blood samples were obtained at the onset and the end of this study for determining jugular venous bulb oxygen saturation (SjvO2), arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO2) and cerebral extraction of oxygen (CEO2). Results: In Group Ⅰ and Ⅲ SjvO2, AVDO2 and CEO2 remained stable. Although SjvO2 kept constant, AVDO2 and CEO2 decreased significantly (P<0.05) in Group Ⅱ. Moreover, AVDO2 and CEO2 in Group Ⅱ were significantly lower than those of Group Ⅲ (P<0.05). In Group Ⅳ, 60 min after hyperventilation, SjvO2 and jugular venous oxygen content(CjvO2) decreased markedly (P<0.01) while CEO2 increased significantly (P<0.01). In addition, SjvO2, CjvO2 and CEO2 in Group Ⅳ were significantly different from the corresponding parameters in Group Ⅴ and Group Ⅵ (P<0.05). In view of sustained excessive hyperventilation, SjvO2 was less than 50% in 37.5% patients of Group Ⅳ. Conclusion: Anesthesia with

  6. 丁香酚纳米乳对鲢鱼麻醉作用研究%The Anesthetic Effect of Eugenol nanoemulsion on Hypophthalmichehys molitrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴宗梅; 吕世明; 谭艾娟

    2012-01-01

    The anesthetic effect of eugenol nanoemulsion on Hypophthalmichehys molitrix was investigated in the present work. The results demonstrated that the eugenol nanoemulsion showed strong anesthetic effect to Hypophthalmichehys molitrix, and the optimal concentration was 20mg/L. The EC5O and LC50(24h) of eugenol nanoemulsion to Hypophthalmichehys molitrix were 16. 6 mg/L, and 176. 2 mg/L, respectively. The treatment indice of eugenol nanoemulsion to anesthetize Hypophthalmichehys molitrix was 10. 61. The eugenol nanoemulsion is a safe, efficient anesthetic to this species.%将鲢鱼置于不同浓度的丁香酚纳米乳中,研究其对鲢鱼的麻醉效果.结果表明:丁香酚纳米乳对鲢鱼的麻醉作用强,诱导期短;麻醉最适浓度为20 mg/L,丁香酚纳米乳对鲢鱼的EC50为16.6 mg/L,24h的LC50为176.2mg/L,治疗指数为10.61.因此,丁香酚纳米乳是一种高效、安全的鲢鱼麻醉剂.

  7. Effect of intraoperative lidocaine on anesthetic consumption, and bowel function, pain intensity, analgesic consumption and hospital stay after breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo Joo; Kim, Myung Hee; Jeong, Hui Yeon; Lee, Jeong Jin

    2012-05-01

    Perioperative lidocaine infusion improves postoperative outcomes, mostly after abdominal and urologic surgeries. Knowledge of the effect of lidocaine on peripheral surgeries is limited. Presently, we investigated whether intraoperative lidocaine infusion reduced anesthetic consumption, duration of ileus, pain intensity, analgesic consumption and hospital stay after breast plastic surgeries. Sixty female patients, aged 20-60 years, enrolled in this prospective study were randomly and equally divided to two groups. One group (n = 30) received a 1.5 mg/kg bolus of lidocaine approximately 30 min before incision followed by continuous infusion of lidocaine (1.5 mg/kg/h) until skin closure (lidocaine group). The other group (n = 30) was untreated (control group). Balanced inhalation (sevoflurane) anesthesia and multimodal postoperative analgesia were standardized. End tidal sevoflurane concentration during surgery, time to the first flatus and defecation, visual analog pain scale (0-10), analgesic consumption and associated side effects at 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery, hospital stay, and patient's general satisfaction were assessed. Compared to the control group, intraoperative lidocaine infusion reduced by 5% the amount of sevoflurane required at similar bispectral index (P = 0.014). However, there were no significant effects of lidocaine regarding the return of bowel function, postoperative pain intensity, analgesic sparing and side effects at all time points, hospital stay, and level of patient's satisfaction for pain control. Low dose intraoperative lidocaine infusion offered no beneficial effects on return of bowel function, opioid sparing, pain intensity and hospital stay after various breast plastic surgeries.

  8. The effects of anesthetics and misonidazole on the development of radiation-induced lung damage in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Down, J.D. (Inst. of Cancer Research, Surrey, England); Collis, C.H.; Jeffery, P.K.; Steel, G.G.

    1983-02-01

    The measurement of breathing frequency as a functional end-point of radiation-induced lung injury in mice allowed two phases of damage to be discerned; the first was manifest at 12-20 weeks after irradiation, the second beyond 28 weeks. Anesthesia by pentobarbitone sodium or steroids gave significant radioprotection of the lung during the early pneumonitic phase. Addition of the hypoxic cell sensitizer misonidazole removed the protective influence of the anesthetics but did not sensitize the lungs of unanesthetized mice. No anesthetic protection was detected for the late response, showing evidence for dissociation between early and late lung damage. The degree of epilation was measured on the dorsal thoracic region of the same mice. Protection by anesthetics and its reversal by misonidazole was also demonstrated. These results provide a warning of potential hazards in the laboratory evaluation of chemical radiosensitizers. The use of anesthetics at the time of irradiation could lead to an exaggerated enhancement of normal tissue damage.

  9. Subchronic anesthetic ketamine injections in rats impair choice reversal learning, but have no effect on reinforcer devaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Charles L; Aurand, Lexia; Hunt, Joshua; Fisher, Hayley

    2017-01-21

    Previous exposure to a variety of drugs of abuse has been shown to cause long-term impairments in reversal learning and reinforcer devaluation tasks. However, there is mixed evidence in the literature for a long-term effect of ketamine exposure on reversal learning and the long-term effect of ketamine exposure on devaluation is not known. We determined whether repeated injections of an anesthetic dose of ketamine would lead to impairments in choice reversal learning after discrimination learning or impairments in reinforcer devaluation. In two experiments, rats received three injections once-daily of ketamine (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or saline and then began behavioral training 19 days later so that the key reversal learning and devaluation tests would occur about 1 month after the final ketamine injection. This ketamine exposure regimen did not impair learning in our discrimination task, but led to an increase in perseverative errors in reversal learning. However, the same ketamine exposure regimen (or injections of a lower 50 mg/kg dose) had no effect on behavior in the devaluation task. The behavioral patterns observed suggest possible neural mechanisms for the effects of ketamine, but future neurobiological investigations will be needed to isolate these mechanisms.

  10. CARDIOPROTECTION BY VOLATILE ANESTHETICS: FROM BENCH TO BEDSIDE AND BACK

    OpenAIRE

    Sedlić, Filip; Šepac, A; Muravyeva, M; Bošnjak, Željko

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury of the heart can be ameliorated by volatile anesthetics (VAs). Application of VAs prior to the ischemic event triggers endogenous cardioprotective program that persists even after anesthetic removal, and it is called anesthetic-induced preconditioning (APC) (1). VAs can also reduce infarct size if applied during the reperfusion period (anesthetic postconditioning), where they can also exert protection by the direct effects on cardiac cel...

  11. Effects of Various Antiepileptics Used to Alleviate Neuropathic Pain on Compound Action Potential in Frog Sciatic Nerves: Comparison with Those of Local Anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhei Uemura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiepileptics used for treating neuropathic pain have various actions including voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels, glutamate-receptor inhibition, and GABAA-receptor activation, while local anesthetics are also used to alleviate the pain. It has not been fully examined yet how nerve conduction inhibitions by local anesthetics differ in extent from those by antiepileptics. Fast-conducting compound action potentials (CAPs were recorded from frog sciatic nerve fibers by using the air-gap method. Antiepileptics (lamotrigine and carbamazepine concentration dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP (IC50=0.44 and 0.50 mM, resp.. Carbamazepine analog oxcarbazepine exhibited an inhibition smaller than that of carbamazepine. Antiepileptic phenytoin (0.1 mM reduced CAP amplitude by 15%. On the other hand, other antiepileptics (gabapentin, sodium valproate, and topiramate at 10 mM had no effect on CAPs. The CAPs were inhibited by local anesthetic levobupivacaine (IC50=0.23 mM. These results indicate that there is a difference in the extent of nerve conduction inhibition among antiepileptics and that some antiepileptics inhibit nerve conduction with an efficacy similar to that of levobupivacaine or to those of other local anesthetics (lidocaine, ropivacaine, and cocaine as reported previously. This may serve to know a contribution of nerve conduction inhibition in the antinociception by antiepileptics.

  12. Effect of anesthetic, tag size, and surgeon experience on postsurgical recovering after implantation of electronic tags in a neotropical fish: Prochilodus lineatus (Valenciennes, 1837 (Characiformes: Prochilodontidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M. Lopes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Implantation of telemetry transmitters in fish can be affected by different parameters. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of type of anesthetic, tag size, and surgeon experience on surgical and postsurgical wound healing in the neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus . In total, eighty fish were surgically implanted with telemetry transmitters and forty fish were kept as controls. Forty fish were implanted with a small tag and other forty were implanted with a large tag. Similarly, forty fish were anesthetized with eugenol and forty fish were anesthetized by electroanesthesia, and forty surgeries were performed by an expert surgeon and forty surgeries were performed by novice surgeons. At the end of the experimental period seventeen (21.3% tagged fish had postsurgical complications, including death (1.3%, tag expulsion (2.5%, antenna migration (2.5%, and infection (15%. Tag size was the key determinant for postsurgical complications. Surgical details and postsurgical wound healing were not affected by type of anesthetic. Incision size, duration of surgery, and wound area were significantly affected by tag size and surgeon experience, and the number of sutures was significantly affected by tag size only. The results indicate that successful implantation of telemetry transmitters is dependent upon surgeon experience and tag size.

  13. Anesthetic activity of the essential oil of Ocimum americanum in Rhamdia quelen (Quoy & Gaimard, 1824 and its effects on stress parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenise de Lima Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the anesthetic activity of the essential oil (EO of Ocimum americanum L. in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen . In the first experiment, the depressor effects and chemical composition of the leaf EO (LEO and inflorescence EO (IEO were compared. Juveniles (n = 10 were placed in aquaria containing different concentrations of EO (25 - 500 mg L-1 to determine the point at which anesthesia was induced and the length of the recovery period. In the following experiment, the effects of 300 and 500 mg L-1 LEO exposure on stress parameters (plasma cortisol, glucose and sodium levels after air exposure for 1 min were assayed. Fish (n = 10 per sampling time were sampled immediately or transferred to anesthetic-free aquaria until sampling (15, 30, 60 or 240 min. LEO was composed mainly of β-linalool and 1,8-cineole in similar proportions, whereas IEO showed β-linalool as major compound. Anesthesia was obtained in silver catfish with 200-500 mg L-1 between 4-8 min for LEO and 6-16 min for IEO. Lower EO concentrations did not reach anesthetic stage up to 30 min. LEO used as anesthetic prevented the cortisol increase and sodium loss induced by aerial exposure. Glucose levels were raised in catfish exposed to LEO compared to basal group (not air exposed in almost all observation times. EO of O. americanum obtained from leaves was considered suitable to anesthetic procedures due to its fast induction and handling-induced stress prevention.

  14. Comparative evaluation of effectiveness of intra-pocket anesthetic gel and injected local anesthesia during scaling and root planing – A split-mouth clinical trial

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    Kalyan Chintala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Pain control is an important outcome measure for successful periodontal therapy. Injected local anesthesia has been used to secure anesthesia for scaling and root planing (SRP and continues to be the anesthetic of choice for pain control. Alternatively, intra-pocket anesthetic gel has been used as an anesthetic during SRP. Hence, this clinical trial was done to compare the effectiveness of intra-pocket anesthetic gel and injected local anesthesia during SRP and also to assess the influence of intra-pocket anesthetic gel on treatment outcomes in chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: Fifteen systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients were recruited. The dental quadrants on right side received either intra-pocket 20% benzocaine gel (Gel group or infiltration/block by 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 adrenaline (injection group. Quadrants on the left side received the alternative. Pain perception and patients preference for the type of anesthesia was recorded. Clinical parameters: plaque index, modified gingival index, modified sulcular bleeding index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were recorded at baseline and 1 month after treatment. Results: No difference was observed in visual analog scale (P > 0.05 and verbal rating scale (P > 0.05 pain perception between gel group and injection group. A slightly increased preference to gel as anesthesia (53% vs. 47% was observed. The treatment outcome after SRP did not show a significant difference between gel and injection group (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Intra-pocket administration of 20% benzocaine gel may be effective for pain control during SRP and may offer an alternative to conventional injection anesthesia.

  15. Anesthetic effects of adding intrathecal neostigmine or magnesium sulphate to bupivacaine in patients under lower extremities surgeries

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    Seyed Hamid Reza Faiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regional anesthesia is widely used to perform different surgical procedures including those performed on the extremities. In this study, the anesthetic effects of adding intrathecal neostigmine or magnesium sulphate to bupivacaine in patients under lower extremities surgeries were assessed. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, 90 patients, candidate for lower extremities surgeries in a training hospital, were recruited. The patients with ASA class I and II aging from 20 to 65 years between 2009 and 2010 were evaluated. The selected patients were randomly assigned to receive either bupivacaine alone (Group A, n=30, or bupivacaine plus magnesium sulphate 50% (Group B, n=30, or bupivacaine plus neostigmine (Group C, n=30. Then sensory and motor onset and complete block and the time of recovery were measured. Results: The sensory block onset time were 3.03 ± 0.981 in group A, 3.90 ± 2.71 in group B and 3.7 ± 1.08 in group C and knee flexion time were not significantly different among the three groups (P > 0.05, whereas the time to complete motor block was significantly longer in group C and motor recovery time were significantly different between groups (P=0.001. Conclusions: According to the obtained results, it may be concluded that magnesium sulphate is a safe and effective adjuvant for increasing the onset time of motor block.

  16. Pitfalls in quantifying species turnover: the residency effect

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    Kevin Chase Burns

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The composition of ecological communities changes continuously through time and space. Understanding this turnover in species composition is a central goal in biogeography, but quantifying species turnover can be problematic. Here, I describe an underappreciated source of bias in quantifying species turnover, namely ‘the residency effect’, which occurs when the contiguous distributions of species across sampling domains are small relative to census intervals. I present the results of a simulation model that illustrates the problem theoretically and then I demonstrate the problem empirically using a long-term dataset of plant species turnover on islands. Results from both exercises indicate that empirical estimates of species turnover may be susceptible to significant observer bias, which may potentially cloud a better understanding of how the composition of ecological communities changes through time.

  17. Effects of Methadone on the Minimum Anesthetic Concentration of Isoflurane, and Its Effects on Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Ventilation during Isoflurane Anesthesia in Hens (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, André; da Rocha, Rozana Wendler; Pypendop, Bruno Henri; Zangirolami Filho, Darcio; Sousa, Samuel Santos; Valadão, Carlos Augusto Araújo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the temporal effects of intramuscular methadone administration on the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in hens, and to evaluate the effects of the isoflurane-methadone combination on heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure and ventilation. Thirteen healthy adult hens weighing 1.7 ± 0.2 kg were used. The MAC of isoflurane was determined in each individual using the bracketing method. Subsequently, the reduction in isoflurane MAC produced by methadone (3 or 6 mg kg(-1), i.m.) was determined by the up-and-down method. Stimulation was applied at 15 and 30 minutes, and at 45 minutes if the bird had not moved at 30 minutes. Isoflurane MAC reduction was calculated at each time point using logistic regression. After a washout period, birds were anesthetized with isoflurane and methadone, 6 mg kg(-1) i.m. was administered. Heart rate and rhythm, respiratory rate, blood gas values and invasive blood pressure were measured at 1.0 and 0.7 isoflurane MAC, and during 45 minutes after administration of methadone once birds were anesthetized with 0.7 isoflurane MAC. Fifteen minutes after administration of 3 mg kg(-1) of methadone, isoflurane MAC was reduced by 2 (-9 to 13)% [logistic regression estimate (95% Wald confidence interval)]. Administration of 6 mg kg(-1) of methadone decreased isoflurane MAC by 29 (11 to 46)%, 27 (-3 to 56)% and 10 (-8 to 28)% after 15, 30 and 45 minutes, respectively. Methadone (6 mg kg(-1)) induced atrioventricular block in three animals and ventricular premature contractions in two. Methadone caused an increase in arterial blood pressure and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, while heart rate and pH decreased. Methadone, 6 mg kg(-1) i.m. significantly reduced isoflurane MAC by 30% in hens 15 minutes after administration. At this dose, methadone caused mild respiratory acidosis and increase in systemic blood pressure.

  18. Cross-approximate entropy of cortical local field potentials quantifies effects of anesthesia - a pilot study in rats

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    Schwarz Cornelius

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anesthetics dose-dependently shift electroencephalographic (EEG activity towards high-amplitude, slow rhythms, indicative of a synchronization of neuronal activity in thalamocortical networks. Additionally, they uncouple brain areas in higher (gamma frequency ranges possibly underlying conscious perception. It is currently thought that both effects may impair brain function by impeding proper information exchange between cortical areas. But what happens at the local network level? Local networks with strong excitatory interconnections may be more resilient towards global changes in brain rhythms, but depend heavily on locally projecting, inhibitory interneurons. As anesthetics bias cortical networks towards inhibition, we hypothesized that they may cause excessive synchrony and compromise information processing already on a small spatial scale. Using a recently introduced measure of signal independence, cross-approximate entropy (XApEn, we investigated to what degree anesthetics synchronized local cortical network activity. We recorded local field potentials (LFP from the somatosensory cortex of three rats chronically implanted with multielectrode arrays and compared activity patterns under control (awake state with those at increasing concentrations of isoflurane, enflurane and halothane. Results Cortical LFP signals were more synchronous, as expressed by XApEn, in the presence of anesthetics. Specifically, XApEn was a monotonously declining function of anesthetic concentration. Isoflurane and enflurane were indistinguishable; at a concentration of 1 MAC (the minimum alveolar concentration required to suppress movement in response to noxious stimuli in 50% of subjects both volatile agents reduced XApEn by about 70%, whereas halothane was less potent (50% reduction. Conclusions The results suggest that anesthetics strongly diminish the independence of operation of local cortical neuronal populations, and that the

  19. Effect of patient age, breast density, and topical anesthetic cream on perceived pain with sentinel lymph node scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Kimberly J; Hunt, Christopher H; Morreale, Robert; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Peller, Patrick J

    2012-03-01

    Although an extremely useful technique for sentinel lymph node (SLN) identification in breast cancer, injections of (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid can be quite painful. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a correlation between perceived pain of injection and age, breast density, or timing of topical anesthetic cream administration. A retrospective review was conducted of women with breast cancer who received injections for sentinel lymphoscintigraphy from 2008 to 2010. After receiving 4 unilateral, intradermal, periareolar injections, women ranked their pain using a comparative scale (0 = no pain; 10 = unbearable pain). There were 3 categories based on length of time that topical anesthetic cream (2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine) was applied before injection (1 h prior, 20 min prior, or no cream). In addition, other demographic information and breast density on mammography were analyzed for correlation with the comparative pain scale. Among the 82 women (mean age, 58 y; range, 32-87 y), a wide spectrum on the comparative pain scale was recorded (mean, 4.0; SD, 2.6), with 35% attesting to significant pain, rated 5 or greater. The demographic information and breast density per the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System were retrospectively reviewed (density: fatty, 14.6%; scattered fibroglandular, 36.6%; heterogeneous, 39.0%; extremely dense, 9.8%). Using bivariate linear regression, no correlation between the comparative pain scale and age (R(2) = 0.0029, P = 0.63) or breast density (R(2) = 0.00049, P = 0.84) was identified. Most patients had topical anesthetic cream applied 20 min before injection (n = 47, or 57.3%) with 24 (29.3%) having topical anesthetic cream applied 1 h beforehand. Eleven women (13.4%) had no topical anesthetic cream applied because of patient preference or concern about allergy. Again, no correlation was found between comparative pain scale and time of application or use of topical anesthetic cream (Kruskal-Wallis: χ(2

  20. Acute physiological responses to castration-related pain in piglets: the effect of two local anesthetics with or without meloxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonastre, C; Mitjana, O; Tejedor, M T; Calavia, M; Yuste, A G; Úbeda, J L; Falceto, M V

    2016-09-01

    Methods to reduce castration-related pain in piglets are still issues of concern and interest for authorities and producers. Our objectives were to estimate the effectiveness of two protocols of local anesthesia (lidocaine and the combination of lidocaine+bupivacaine) as well as the use of meloxicam as a postoperative analgesic in alleviating castration-related pain, measured by acute physiological responses. Eight groups (15 piglets/group) were included in the study: (1) castration without anesthesia or analgesia, without meloxicam (TRAD WITHOUT), (2) castration without anesthesia or analgesia, but with meloxicam (TRAD WITH), (3) handling without meloxicam (SHAM WITHOUT), (4) handling with meloxicam (SHAM WITH), (5) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine but without meloxicam (LIDO WITHOUT), (6) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine and meloxicam (LIDO WITH), (7) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine+bupivacaine without meloxicam (LIDO+BUPI WITHOUT), (8) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine+bupivacaine and meloxicam (LIDO+BUPI WITH). Acute physiological responses measured included skin surface temperature and serum glucose and cortisol concentrations. On days 4 and 11 post-castration BW was recorded and average daily gain was calculated over this period. Furthermore, piglet mortality was recorded over the 11-day post-castration period. Administration of local anesthetic or meloxicam did not prevent the decrease in skin surface temperature associated with castration. Lidocaine reduced the increase in glucose concentration associated with castration. For castrated pigs, the joint use of lidocaine and meloxicam caused a significant decrease in cortisol concentration; the combination of intratesticular lidocaine and bupivacaine did not seem to be more effective than lidocaine alone. No effect of treatments on mortality and growth were detected.

  1. In Vitro Effect of Local Anesthetics on Candida albicans Germ Tube Formation

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    Acácio Rodrigues

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was planned to clarify the in vitro effect of lidocaine and bupivacaine on germ tube formation by Candida albicans isolates from cases of clinical vaginal candidiasis.

  2. Anesthetizing the obese child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Anette; Lenz, Katja; Abildstrøm, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing. The focus of this review is the special anesthetic considerations regarding the perioperative management of obese children. With obesity the risk of comorbidity such as asthma, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and diabetes increases....... The obese child has an increased risk of perioperative complications especially related to airway management and ventilation. There is a significantly increased risk of difficult mask ventilation and perioperative desaturation. Furthermore, obesity has an impact on the pharmacokinetics of most anesthetic...

  3. LOCAL ANESTHETICS IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.

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    risto Daskalov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A significant problem in the dental medicine is pain alleviation. Many studies in the dental anesthesiology result in the production of new agents for locoregional anesthesia. Objective: This article aim to present the results of the last studies on the effect of the local anesthetics used in the oral surgery on patients with cardiovascular diseases. Material: A general review of the existing literature on the effect of the adrenaline, included as vasoconstrictor in the local anesthetics, used in patients with cardiovascular diseases is made. The benefits of vasoconstrictors for the quality of the anesthetic effect are proven. Conclusion: A small amount of adrenaline in the anesthetic solution does not result in complications development in patients with controlled cardiovascular diseases. Articaine is recommended agent of first choice for local anesthesia in the oral surgery.

  4. Changes in synaptic effectiveness of myelinated joint afferents during capsaicin-induced inflammation of the footpad in the anesthetized cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudomin, P; Hernández, E

    2008-05-01

    The present series of experiments was designed to examine, in the anesthetized cat, the extent to which the synaptic efficacy of knee joint afferents is modified during the state of central sensitization produced by the injection of capsaicin into the hindlimb plantar cushion. We found that the intradermic injection of capsaicin increased the N2 and N3 components of the focal potentials produced by stimulation of intermediate and high threshold myelinated fibers in the posterior articular nerve (PAN), respectively. This facilitation lasted several hours, had about the same time course as the paw inflammation and was more evident for the N2 and N3 potentials recorded within the intermediate zone in the L6 than in the L7 spinal segments. The capsaicin-induced facilitation of the N2 focal potentials, which are assumed to be generated by activation of fibers signaling joint position, suggests that nociception may affect the processing of proprioceptive and somato-sensory information and, probably also, movement. In addition, the increased effectiveness of these afferents could activate, besides neurons in the intermediate region, neurons located in the more superficial layers of the dorsal horn. As a consequence, normal joint movements could produce pain representing a secondary hyperalgesia. The capsaicin-induced increased efficacy of the PAN afferents producing the N3 focal potentials, together with the reduced post-activation depression that follows high frequency autogenetic stimulation of these afferents, could further contribute to the pain sensation from non-inflamed joints during skin inflammation in humans. The persistence, after capsaicin, of the inhibitory effects produced by stimulation of cutaneous nerves innervating non-inflamed skin regions may account for the reported reduction of the articular pain sensations produced by trans-cutaneous stimulation.

  5. Effect of a local anesthetic lozenge in relief of symptoms in burning mouth syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treldal, Charlotte; Jacobsen, C B; Mogensen, Stine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS) often represent a clinical challenge as available agents for symptomatic treatment are few and often ineffective. The aim was to evaluate the effect of a bupivacaine lozenge on oral mucosal pain, xerostomia, and taste alterations in patients w...

  6. Advances in the Researches of the Antidepressant Effects of Anesthetics%麻醉药抗抑郁作用的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐世霞; 杨春; 杨建军; 周志强

    2011-01-01

    抑郁症是当今社会常见的严重危害人类身心健康的心理疾病,是自杀的首要原因.新近的研究发现临床上常用的部分麻醉药具有一定的抗抑郁效果,本文就麻醉药的抗抑郁作用及其可能机制进行综述.%Depression is a common mood disorder in present society, which is the primary cause of suicide, thereby doing great harm to the public health. Recent studies have shown that some of the anesthetics possess certain antidepressant efficacy. This article is to review the antidepressant effects of these anesthetics and the possible underlying mechanisms.

  7. General Anesthetic Versus Light Sedation: Effect on Pediatric Endoscopy Wait Times

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    Christine Edwards

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wait times are an important measure of health care system effectiveness. There are no studies describing wait times in pediatric gastroenterology for either outpatient visits or endoscopy. Pediatric endoscopy is performed under light sedation or general anesthesia. The latter is hypothesized to be associated with a longer wait time due to practical limits on access to anesthesia in the Canadian health care system.

  8. [Respiratory stimulant effect of S 2620 in the dog anesthetized with pentobarbital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaud, M; Dolisi, C; Camous, J P; Gibelli, A; Ripoll, B; Ardisson, J L

    1975-01-01

    In the dog under pentobarbitone anesthesia, the intravenous injection of 1 mg/kg S 2620 is followed by a significant increase in respiratory rate, PaO2 and pHa and by a large decrease in PaCO2. Cervical vagotomy and chemoreceptor denervation reduced and even abolished these effects. They can be induced again by a second intravenous injection or by direct instillation in the fourth ventricle. These results suggest a central action of the drug.

  9. The Effect of Topical Local Anesthetics on Thermal Pain Sensitivity in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

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    Anthony Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized hypersensitivity that extends into somatic areas is common in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. The sensitized state, particularly assessed by experimental methods, is known to persist even during remissions of clinical pain. It was hypothesized that disease-related nociceptive activity in the gut maintains a systemic-sensitized state. The present study evaluated responses to prolonged thermal stimuli maintained at constant temperature or constant pain intensity during stimulation. The effect of topically applied rectal lidocaine on heat sensitivity was also evaluated. The question is whether silencing potential intestinal neural activity (which may not always lead to a conscious pain experience with lidocaine attenuates sensitization of somatic areas. Tests were also performed where lidocaine was applied orally to control for systemic or placebo effects of the drug. The IBS subjects exhibited a greater sensitivity to somatic heat stimuli compared to controls; however, lidocaine had no discernible effect on sensitization in this sample of IBS patients, where most of the individuals did not have clinical pain on the day of testing.

  10. 全麻药物对脑神经毒作用的研究进展%Recend development on toxic effects of general anesthetics on cerebral neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗铁山; 陶国才

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence from cells culture, rodents and sub-human primates's experimental study suggest that clinical commonly used general anesthetics not only can cause neurotoxicity to neuronal cells of different periods with subsequent central nervous system injury, especially during the brain growth spurt period, but also affect learning and memory function. We review the evidence of neurotoxic effects of anesthetic agents and hypothesis of mechanism, in order to allow people to understand the latest research progress of general anesthetics on toxic effects and change some concept of clinical anesthesia.%从细胞培养、啮齿类动物和非人类灵长类动物的实验研究中得到越来越多的证据:临床常用全麻药物对各期脑神经细胞产生毒性作用,损伤中枢神经系统,特别对处于发育高峰期的大脑影响更大,并影响以后的学习记忆功能.现综述这些事实及目前全麻药物神经毒性作用的机制假设,目的 是让人们对全麻药物毒性作用的最新研究进展有一了解,转变临床麻醉的一些观念.

  11. A Comparative Study of Cardioprotective Effect of Three Anesthetic Agents by Measuring Serum Level of Troponin-T after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

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    Vali Imantalab

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac surgery is associated with some degree of myocardial injury. Preconditioning first described in 1986 was pharmacologic and non- pharmacologic. Among the long list of anesthetic drugs, isoflurane as an inhaling agent along with midazolam and propofol as injectable substances have been documented to confer some preconditioning effects on myocardium. Objectives: In this study cardiac Troponin T (cTnT ,as a reliable marker, was used for evaluating myocardial injury. Methods: This prospective double blind study was comprised of 60 patients scheduled for CABG and were randomly assigned into three groups who received infusion of propofol or midazolam or isoflorane. Surgical procedures and anesthetics were similar for 3 groups. cTnT measured preoperatively and at 12, 24 and 36hr after arrival in ICU. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in mean cTnT levels between three groups in the preoperative period and 12-24 hours after arrival in ICU. However, mean cTnT in 3 groups at 36 hours after arrival in ICU were different (P< 0.013 and cTnT level was significantly higher in midazolam group (P<0.001 and lowest in isoflurane group (P=0.002. Conclusion: There were significant differences on cTnT levels between anesthetic groups of isofluran, midazolam and propofol at 36 hr after surgery. Preconditioning effect of isoflurane was higher than the other two groups.

  12. The Effects of Two Anesthetics, Propofol and Sevoflurane, on Liver Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

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    Zhijie Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Propofol and sevoflurane are widely used in clinical anesthesia, and both have been reported to exert a protective effect in organ ischemia/reperfusion (IR. This study aims to investigate and compare the effects of propofol and sevoflurane on liver ischemia/reperfusion and the precise molecular mechanism. Methods and Materials: Rats were randomized into four groups: the sham group, I/R group, propofol treatment group (infused with 1% propofol at 500 µg· kg-1· min-1, and sevoflurane treatment group (infused with 3% (2 L/min sevoflurane. The liver ischemia/reperfusion model was used to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect on ischemic injury. Liver enzyme leakage, liver cytokines and histopathological examination were used to evaluate the extent of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury. Oxidative stress was investigated by evaluating the levels of Malondialdehyde(MDA, Superoxide Dismutase(SOD and NO. The terminal dexynucleotidyl transferase(TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay and western blot were applied to detect apoptosis in the ischemic liver tissue and its mechanism. Results: Both propofol and sevoflurane attenuated the extent of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury which is evident from the hisopathological studies and alterations in liver enzymes such as AST and LDH by inhibiting Nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB activation and subsequent alterations in inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1(IL-1, interleukin-6(IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a and increased IL10 release. Propofol exhibited a similar protective effect and a lower IL-1 release, while sevoflurane decreased TNF-a leakage more significantly. Meanwhile, oxidative stress was attenuated by reduced MDA and NO and elevated SOD release. The expression of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl were enhanced while that of apoptotic protein Bax and Bak were reduced by both propofol and sevoflurane to regulate hepatic apoptosis. In addition, propofol

  13. Effect of tramadol as an adjuvant to local anesthetics for brachial plexus block: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hye Won; Ju, Bum Jun; Jang, Yoo Kyung; You, Hae Seun; Kang, Hyun; Park, Ji Yong

    2017-01-01

    Tramadol, a 4-phenyl-piperidine analog of codeine, has a unique action in that it has a central opioidergic, noradrenergic, serotonergic analgesic, and peripheral local anesthetic (LA) effect. Many studies have reported contradictory findings regarding the peripheral analgesic effect of tramadol as an adjuvant to LA in brachial plexus block (BPB). This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effects of tramadol as an adjunct to LA in BPB during shoulder or upper extremity surgery. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, KoreaMed databases, and Google Scholar for eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared BPB with LA alone and BPB with LA and tramadol. Primary outcomes were the effects of tramadol as an adjuvant on duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia. Secondary outcomes were the effects of tramadol as an adjuvant on time to onset of sensory block and motor block and on adverse effects. We performed the meta-analysis using Review Manager 5.3 software. We identified 16 RCTs with 751 patients. BPB with tramadol prolonged the duration of sensory block (mean difference [MD], -61.5 min; 95% CI, -95.5 to -27.6; P = 0.0004), motor block (MD, -65.6 min; 95% CI, -101.5 to -29.7; P = 0.0003), and analgesia (MD, -125.5 min; 95% CI, -175.8 to -75.3; P tramadol. Tramadol also shortened the time to onset of sensory block (MD, 2.1 min; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.1; P tramadol 100 mg (P tramadol 50 mg. The quality of evidence was high for duration of analgesia according to the GRADE system. Adverse effects were comparable between the studies. In upper extremity surgery performed under BPB, use of tramadol 100 mg as an adjuvant to LA appears to prolong the duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia, and shorten the time to onset of sensory and motor blocks without altering adverse effects.

  14. Spinal Reflexes and Windup In Vitro: Effects of Analgesics and Anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Arconada, Ivan; Roza, Carolina; Lopez-Garcia, Jose A

    2016-02-01

    The spinal cord is the first relay center for nociceptive information. Following peripheral injury, the spinal cord sensitizes. A sign of spinal sensitization is the hyper-reflexia which develops shortly after injury and can be detected in the isolated spinal cord as a "memory of pain." In this context, it is easy to understand that many analgesic compounds target spinally located sites of action to attain analgesia. In vitro isolated spinal cord preparations have been used for a number of years, and experience on the effects of compounds of diverse pharmacological families on spinal function has accumulated. Recently, we have proposed that the detailed study of spinal segmental reflexes in vitro may produce data relevant to the evaluation of the analgesic potential of novel compounds. In this review, we describe the main features of segmental reflexes obtained in vitro and discuss the effects of compounds of diverse chemical nature and pharmacological properties on such reflexes. Our aim was to compare the different profiles of action of the compounds on segmental reflexes in order to extract clues that may be helpful for pharmacological characterization of novel analgesics. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Oral mucosal injection of a local anesthetic solution containing epinephrine enhances muscle relaxant effects of rocuronium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Asako; Terakawa, Yui; Matsuura, Nobuyuki; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how submucosal injection of a clinically relevant dose of a lidocaine hydrochloride solution containing epinephrine affects the muscle relaxant effects of rocuronium bromide. Sixteen patients scheduled for orthognathic surgery participated in this study. All patients were induced with fentanyl citrate, a target-controlled infusion of propofol and rocuronium bromide. Anesthesia was maintained by total intravenous anesthesia. After nasotracheal intubation, an infusion of rocuronium bromide was started at 7 µg/kg/min, and the infusion rate was then adjusted to maintain a train of four (TOF) ratio at 10 to 15%. The TOF ratio just prior to oral mucosal injection of a 1% lidocaine hydrochloride solution containing 10 µg/mL epinephrine (LE) was taken as the baseline. TOF ratio was observed for 20 minutes, with 1-minute intervals following the start of injection. Mean epinephrine dose was 85.6 ± 18.6 µg and mean infusion rate of rocuronium bromide was 6.3 ± 1.6 µg/kg/min. TOF ratio began to decrease 2 minutes after the injection of LE, reached the minimum value at 3.1 ± 3.6% 12 minutes after the injection, and then began to recover. We conclude that oral mucosal injection of LE enhances the muscle relaxant effects of rocuronium bromide.

  16. Evaluation of the effects of transvenous pacing site on left ventricular function and synchrony in healthy anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisenbacher, Herbert W; Estrada, Amara H; Prosek, Robert; Shih, Andre C; Vangilder, James M

    2009-04-01

    OBJECTIVE-To compare the acute effects of cardiac pacing from various transvenous pacing sites on left ventricular (LV) function and synchrony in clinically normal dogs. ANIMALS-10 healthy adult mixed-breed dogs. PROCEDURES-Dogs were anesthetized, and dual-chamber transvenous biventricular pacing systems were implanted. Dogs were paced in single-chamber mode from the right atrial appendage (RAA) alone and in dual-chamber mode from the right ventricular apex (RVA), from the left ventricular free wall (LVFW), and simultaneously from the RVA and LVFW (BiV). Standard ECG and echocardiographic measurements, cardiac output measured with the lithium dilution method (LiDCO), and tissue Doppler-derived measurements of LV synchrony were obtained during each of the pacing configurations. RESULTS-Placement of the biventricular pacing systems was possible in 8 of the 10 dogs. The QRS duration was significantly different among all pacing sites, and the order of increasing duration was RAA, BiV, LVFW, and RVA. Pacing sites did not differ with respect to fractional shortening; however, pacing from the RVA resulted in a significantly lower ejection fraction than pacing from all other sites. During RVA and LVFW pacing, LiDCO was significantly lower than that at other sites; there was no significant difference between RAA and BiV pacing with respect to LiDCO. Although the degree of dyssynchrony was significantly lower during pacing from the RAA versus other ventricular pacing sites, it was not significantly different among sites. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Ventricular activation by RAA pacing provided the best LV function and synchrony. Pacing from the RVA worsened LV function, and although pacing from the LVFW improved it, BiV pacing may provide additional improvement.

  17. [Local anesthetic effect and subjective tolerance of 0.5% levobunolol in normal eyes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höh, H

    1990-07-01

    In a randomized, prospective, parallel double-blind clinical trial with positive and negative placebo control, the corneal sensitivity of 30 subjects with normal eyes was measured using the Cochet & Bonnet esthesiometer prior to and 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, and 30 minutes after topical application of levobunolol 0.5% (Vistagan 0.5% Liquifilm, Pharm-Allergan Vertrieb GmbH, Karlsruhe; 20 eyes). Proxymetacain 0.5% (proparacaine 0.5%, Ursapharm, Saarbrücken; 10 eyes) served as a positive, NaCl 0.9% as a negative control substance (placebo). Indomethacin 1% (Chibro-Amuno 3, Chibret Pharmazeutische GmbH, Munich; 10 eyes) was tested as a further control substance. The subjects assessed the subjective tolerance of the test substances on a 4-point scale. Levobunolol 0.5% caused a statistically significant reduction in corneal sensitivity, attaining its maximum effect in the first minute after application and lasting on average for 6 minutes. The reduction was greater than that caused by timolol 0.5% and approximately one-half of that caused by betaxolol 0.5%. Proxymetacain 0.5% reduced corneal sensitivity to below the upper limit of the Cochet & Bonnet esthesiometer (200 mg) for up to 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, corneal sensitivity reverted to its initial value in all subjects. NaCl 0.9% eye drops did not decrease corneal sensitivity. After one minute an increase in corneal sensitivity (exercise effect) was observed which was significant as compared to the initial value as of the 15th minute after application. Indomethacin 1% likewise failed to reduce corneal sensitivity. In subjects with normal eyes, levobunolol 0.5% causes only a slight reduction in sensitivity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Cardiovascular Effects of Dobutamine and Phenylephrine Infusion in Sevoflurane-anesthetized Thoroughbred Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    OHTA, Minoru; KURIMOTO, Shinjiro; ISHIKAWA, Yuhiro; TOKUSHIGE, Hirotaka; MAE, Naomi; NAGATA, Shun-ichi; MAMADA, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT To determine dose-dependent cardiovascular effects of dobutamine and phenylephrine during anesthesia in horses, increasing doses of dobutamine and phenylephrine were infused to 6 healthy Thoroughbred horses. Anesthesia was induced with xylazine, guaifenesin and thiopental and maintained with sevoflurane at 2.8% of end-tidal concentration in all horses. The horses were positioned in right lateral recumbency and infused 3 increasing doses of dobutamine (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 µg/kg/min) for 15 min each dose. Following to 30 min of reversal period, 3 increasing doses of phenylephrine (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 µg/kg/min) were infused. Cardiovascular parameters were measured before and at the end of each 15-min infusion period for each drug. Blood samples were collected every 5 min during phenylephrine infusion period. There were no significant changes in heart rate throughout the infusion period. Both dobutamine and phenylephrine reversed sevoflurane-induced hypotension. Dobutamine increased both mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and cardiac output (CO) as the result of the increase in stroke volume, whereas phenylephrine increased MAP but decreased CO as the result of the increase in systemic vascular resistance. Plasma phenylephrine concentration increased dose-dependently, and these values at 15, 30 and 45 min were 6.2 ± 1.2, 17.0 ± 4.8 and 37.9 ± 7.3 ng/ml, respectively. PMID:23832627

  19. Effects of Rosa Canina L. on Ischemia/ Reperfusion Injury in Anesthetized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Karimi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ischemia/reperfusion induced acute renal failure causes excretory functional disorders of nephrons. Ischemia/reperfusion injury is accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species that leads to dysfunction, injury, and death of renal cells. Antioxidants of plant origin minimize the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species. The aim of this study was to determine the possible therapeutic potentials of Rosa canina L. in preventing renal functional disturbances during the post-ischemic reperfusion period. Methods: In this experimental study undertaken for evaluating renal excretory function in 30 male Wistar rats, renal ischemia was induced by occluding both renal arteries for 45 min, followed by 24 h of reperfusion. The rats received 2 ml of tap water or a hydroalcoholic extract of Rosa canina (500 mg/kg orally for 7 days before induction of ischemia. In plasma samples, creatinine and urea nitrogen levels were measured, and in renal tissue samples, red blood cells were counted. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Duncan tests.Results: Renal ischemia for 45 minutes increased plasma levels of creatinine (P<0.001 and nitrogen urea (P<0.01 while reducing red blood cell counts in renal glomeruli (P<0.001. Rosa canina administration diminished the increase in creatinine (P<0.001 and nitrogen urea concentrations (P<0.01, and prevented reductions in red blood cell counts in renal glomeruli (P<0.001. Conclusion: Rosa canina seems to be useful as a preventive agent against renal damages induced by ischemia/reperfusion injuries in rats.

  20. Effects of estradiol on uterine perfusion in anesthetized cyclic mares affected with uterine vascular elastosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller-Vico, A; Liu, I K M; Vaughan, B; Steffey, E P; Brosnan, R J

    2016-01-01

    Uterine vascular elastosis in mares is characterized by degeneration of uterine vasculature through thickening of the elastin layers. Factors commonly associated with this degeneration include age, parity, and chronic uterine endometritis. Affected mares have also been shown to exhibit decreases in uterine blood flow and perfusion of the uterus. Due to the increased thickness of the elastin layers, we hypothesize that vasodilatation of the uterine vasculature is also impaired. To test the functionality of these vessels, we evaluated the vasodilatory effects of estradiol on the uterine vascular bed in mares with normal vasculature and mares with severe elastosis. Both groups were tested in estrus and diestrus. Fluorescent microspheres were used to determine basal blood perfusion, followed by the intravenous administration of 1.0 μg/kg of 17β-estradiol. After 90 min, perfusion was measured once again to determine the vascular response to estradiol. Control mares in estrus displayed a significant increase in total uterine blood flow after the administration of estradiol when compared to baseline levels. No other group had a significant increase in total blood flow and perfusion after estradiol administration. The administration of estradiol in control mares induced regional increases in perfusion in the uterine horns and uterine body during estrus and only in the uterine horns during diestrus. Mares affected by elastosis exhibited no regional differences in perfusion levels post-estradiol administration. The difference in the vasodilatory response induced by estradiol between reproductively healthy mares and mares affected with elastosis indicates that the functionality of the affected vessels is compromised.

  1. CARDIORESPIRATORY EFFECTS OF DEXMEDETOMIDINE-BUTORPHANOL-MIDAZOLAM (DBM): A FULLY REVERSIBLE ANESTHETIC PROTOCOL IN CAPTIVE AND SEMI-FREE-RANGING CHEETAHS (ACINONYX JUBATUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woc Colburn, A Margarita; Murray, Suzan; Hayek, Lee-Ann C; Marker, Laurie; Sanchez, Carlos R

    2017-03-01

    Multiple anesthesia protocols have been used in the cheetah ( Acinonyx jubatus ). Twenty healthy, captive cheetahs were immobilized with dexmedetomidine (15.8 ± 1.9 μg/kg), butorphanol (0.22 ± 0.03 mg/kg), and midazolam (0.18 ± 0.03 mg/kg) by intramuscular injection. Induction, recumbency, and recovery times were recorded, and physiologic parameters were monitored. Anesthesia was antagonized with atipamezole (0.125 ± 0.02 mg/kg) and naltrexone (0.1 ± 0.014 mg/kg) intramuscularly. All cheetahs were safely anesthetized with this protocol. Cheetahs were laterally recumbent by 8 ± 3.5 min. Cardiorespiratory values were stable throughout the length of anesthesia. Moderate hypertension, with systolic blood pressure ranging from 178 ± 19.8 mm Hg, was initially observed but decreased over time. There was a statistical decreasing trend in temperature; SpO2; and systolic, mean, and diastolic blood pressure, but not in heart rate and end-tidal CO2. Recoveries were rapid, with cheetahs standing by 11.3 ± 5.7 min postreversal administration. This is the first report of a dexmedetomidine-butorphanol-midazolam anesthetic combination in cheetahs. Overall, this anesthetic protocol proved to be safe and effective.

  2. Quantifying Update Effects in Citizen-Oriented Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Ivan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Defining citizen-oriented software. Detailing technical issues regarding update process in this kind of software. Presenting different effects triggered by types of update. Building model for update costs estimation, including producer-side and consumer-side effects. Analyzing model applicability on INVMAT – large scale matrix inversion software. Proposing a model for update effects estimation. Specifying ways for softening effects of inaccurate updates.

  3. [Facial locoregional anesthetics: principles and precautions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefort, H; Lacroix, G; Cordier, A; Bey, E; Duhamel, P

    2009-12-01

    Facial locoregional anesthetics (ALR) with nervous blocks are simple and reliable to perform, need little technical resources with a very low iatrogenic risk. These blocks allow anesthesia without deforming wound banks using the same materials as usual local anesthetic procedures. Three principal nervous blocks, in a straight line along the vertical pupil axis, allow managing - even extensive - facial wounds. Few side effects may occur which can be easily prevented. It is a good alternative to local anesthetic for the treatment of extensive and deep areas which is performed with a lower number of injections and a high rate of success. These techniques are easy to learn and practise. These anesthetic techniques allow a nice treatment of different kinds of facial wounds from simple suture to flaps.

  4. SYSTEMIC TOXIC REACTIONS TO LOCAL ANESTHETICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Daniel C.; Green, John

    1956-01-01

    The topical use of anesthetic agents involves an element of risk. Systemic toxic reactions are rare, but they do occur and may result in death. When a reaction occurs from a topical application, it usually progresses rapidly to respiratory and cardiovascular collapse, and thus therapy must be instituted with more haste to avoid deaths. Fatal systemic toxic reactions from topically administered anesthetic drugs are, in effect, usually not due to well informed use of the drug but to misuse owing to less than complete understanding of absorption. Emphasis is placed on the causes, prophylaxis and treatment of severe systemic toxic reactions which follow the topical application of local anesthetic drugs. If systemic toxic reactions resulting from a safe dose of a local anesthetic agent are correctly treated, there will usually follow an uneventful recovery rather than a catastrophe. PMID:13343009

  5. QUANTIFYING OBSERVATIONAL PROJECTION EFFECTS USING MOLECULAR CLOUD SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumont, Christopher N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai' i, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Offner, Stella S.R. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Shetty, Rahul; Glover, Simon C. O. [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Goodman, Alyssa A., E-mail: beaumont@ifa.hawaii.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    The physical properties of molecular clouds are often measured using spectral-line observations, which provide the only probes of the clouds' velocity structure. It is hard, though, to assess whether and to what extent intensity features in position-position-velocity (PPV) space correspond to 'real' density structures in position-position-position (PPP) space. In this paper, we create synthetic molecular cloud spectral-line maps of simulated molecular clouds, and present a new technique for measuring the reality of individual PPV structures. Using a dendrogram algorithm, we identify hierarchical structures in both PPP and PPV space. Our procedure projects density structures identified in PPP space into corresponding intensity structures in PPV space and then measures the geometric overlap of the projected structures with structures identified from the synthetic observation. The fractional overlap between a PPP and PPV structure quantifies how well the synthetic observation recovers information about the three-dimensional structure. Applying this machinery to a set of synthetic observations of CO isotopes, we measure how well spectral-line measurements recover mass, size, velocity dispersion, and virial parameter for a simulated star-forming region. By disabling various steps of our analysis, we investigate how much opacity, chemistry, and gravity affect measurements of physical properties extracted from PPV cubes. For the simulations used here, which offer a decent, but not perfect, match to the properties of a star-forming region like Perseus, our results suggest that superposition induces a ∼40% uncertainty in masses, sizes, and velocity dispersions derived from {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0). As would be expected, superposition and confusion is worst in regions where the filling factor of emitting material is large. The virial parameter is most affected by superposition, such that estimates of the virial parameter derived from PPV and PPP information

  6. Study of electrokinetic effects to quantify groundwater flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S.R. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haupt, R.W. [MIT Lincoln Lab., Lexington, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An experimental study of electrokinetic effects (streaming potential) in earth materials was undertaken. The objective was to evaluate the measurement of electrokinetic effects as a method of monitoring and predicting the movement of groundwater, contaminant plumes, and other fluids in the subsurface. The laboratory experiments verified that the electrokinetic effects in earth materials are prominent, repeatable, and can be described well to first order by a pair of coupled differential equations.

  7. [Effect of intracerebroventricular injection of histamine on carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex in anesthetized rats and its mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Xi-Ping; Huang, Wei-Qiu

    2002-12-25

    The changes in carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex (CSR) performance induced by intracerebroventricular injection (i.c.v.) of histamine (HA) were investigated. The effects of pretreatment with HA receptors antagonists into the cerebroventricle or nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) on the responses of CSR to HA were also examined. Intracarotid sinus pressure (ISP)-mean arterial pressure (MAP) relationship curve was constructed by fitting to the logistic function with five parameters in 50 Wistar rats anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. The left and right carotid sinus regions were isolated from the systemic circulation and the ISP was altered in a stepwise manner. The main results obtained are as follows. (1) i.c.v. injection of HA (100 ng) significantly shifted the ISP-MAP relationship curve upwards and moved the middle part of ISP-Gain relationship curve downwards, and reduced the MAP range and maximum gain (G(max)), but increased the threshold pressure (TP), saturation pressure (SP) and ISP at G(max) (ISP (Gmax)). (2) The pretreatment with H(1) or H(2) receptors antagonist, chlorpheniramine (CHL, 5 microg) or cimetidine (CIM, 15 microg), could obviously diminish the above-mentioned changes in CSR performance induced by HA, but the effect of CIM was less remarkable than that of CHL. (3) The pretreatment with both CHL and CIM (5 microg and 15 microg) at the same time abolished the responses of CSR performance to HA completely. (4) After microinjection of CHL (0.5 microg) or CIM (1.5 microg) into the NTS, the responses of CSR to HA were similar to those after i.c.v. CHL or CIM, but the change in TP was significantly decreased. These findings suggest that the intracerebroventricular administration of HA results in a rapid resetting of CSR and a decrease in reflex sensitivity. The response of CSR to HA might be mediated by both central H(1) and H(2) receptors, especially by H(1) receptors. The effects of the central HA on CSR might be related to a histaminergic

  8. Effect of Different Formulations of Magnesium Chloride Used As Anesthetic Agents on the Performance of the Isolated Heart of Octopus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Chiara; Mazza, Rosa; Andrews, Paul L. R.; Cerra, Maria C.; Fiorito, Graziano; Gattuso, Alfonsina

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium chloride (MgCl2) is commonly used as a general anesthetic in cephalopods, but its physiological effects including those at cardiac level are not well-characterized. We used an in vitro isolated perfused systemic heart preparation from the common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, to investigate: (a) if in vivo exposure to MgCl2 formulations had an effect on cardiac function in vitro and, if so, could this impact recovery and (b) direct effects of MgCl2 formulations on cardiac function. In vitro hearts removed from animals exposed in vivo to 3.5% MgCl2 in sea water (20 min) or to a mixture of MgCl2+ ethanol (1.12/1%; 20 min) showed cardiac function (heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output) comparable to hearts removed from animals killed under hypothermia. However, 3.5% MgCl2 (1:1, sea water: distilled water, 20 min) produced a significant impairment of the Frank-Starling response as did 45 min exposure to the MgCl2+ ethanol mixture. Perfusion of the isolated heart with MgCl2± ethanol formulations produced a concentration-related bradycardia (and arrest), a decreased stroke volume and cardiac output indicating a direct effect on the heart. The cardiac effects of MgCl2 are discussed in relation to the involvement of magnesium, sodium, chloride, and calcium ions, exposure time and osmolality of the formulations and the implications for the use of various formulations of MgCl2 as anesthetics in octopus. Overall, provided that the in vivo exposure to 3.5% MgCl2 in sea water or to a mixture of MgCl2+ ethanol is limited to ~20 min, residual effects on cardiac function are unlikely to impact post-anesthetic recovery. PMID:28082904

  9. Quantifying Effects of Voids in Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Marlana B.; Sankar, Bhavani V.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Randomness in woven ceramic matrix composite architecture has been found to cause large variability in stiffness and strength. The inherent voids are an aspect of the architecture that may cause a significant portion of the variability. A study is undertaken to investigate the effects of many voids of random sizes and distributions. Response surface approximations were formulated based on void parameters such as area and length fractions to provide an estimate of the effective stiffness. Obtaining quantitative relationships between the properties of the voids and their effects on stiffness of ceramic matrix composites are of ultimate interest, but the exploratory study presented here starts by first modeling the effects of voids on an isotropic material. Several cases with varying void parameters were modeled which resulted in a large amount of variability of the transverse stiffness and out-of-plane shear stiffness. An investigation into a physical explanation for the stiffness degradation led to the observation that the voids need to be treated as an entity that reduces load bearing capabilities in a space larger than what the void directly occupies through a corrected length fraction or area fraction. This provides explanation as to why void volume fraction is not the only important factor to consider when computing loss of stiffness.

  10. Flooding of tunnels: Quantifying climate change effects on infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibregtse, J.N.; Napoles, O.M.; Dewit, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    To develop climate proof road infrastructure it is of importance to understand the quantitative effects of expected climate change on the performance of individual components, such as tunnels and road sections, and their contributions to the performance of the overall road network.A full understandi

  11. Quantifying the effectiveness of early warning systems for natural hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sättele

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Early warning systems (EWS are increasingly applied as preventive measures within an integrated risk management approach for natural hazards. At present, common standards and detailed guidelines for the evaluation of their effectiveness are lacking. To support decision-makers in the identification of optimal risk mitigation measures, a three-step framework approach for the evaluation of EWS is presented. The effectiveness is calculated in function of the technical and the inherent reliability of the EWS. The framework is applicable to automated and non-automated EWS and combinations thereof. To address the specifics and needs of a wide variety of EWS designs, a classification of EWS is provided, which focuses on the degree of automations encountered in varying EWS. The framework and its implementation are illustrated through a series of example applications of EWS in an alpine environment.

  12. Quantifying Airborne Induced Polarization effects in helicopter time domain electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnae, James

    2016-12-01

    This paper derives the Airborne Induced Polarization (AIP) response of an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) system to a horizontal, thin sheet conductor. A vertical component double-dipole approximates helicopter systems with towed concentric horizontal transmitter and receiver loops in frequency- or time-domain. In time domain, the AIP effect typically shows up as late-time negative data with amplitude 4 to 5 orders of magnitude smaller than the early-time peak of the positive AEM responses. Because of limited bandwidth from the short sample time after the decay of inductive responses, accurate extraction of intrinsic AIP parameters other than a minimum chargeability is almost impossible. Modelling further suggests that AIP effects in double-dipole AEM systems can only be reliably detected from polarizable material in the top few tens of metres. A titanium mineral exploration case history from the Lac Brûlé area, Quebec, Canada illustrates strong spatial coherence of AIP minimum chargeability estimates and their independence from other effects such as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility.

  13. The effects of ultrasound guidance and neurostimulation on the minimum effective anesthetic volume of mepivacaine 1.5% required to block the sciatic nerve using the subgluteal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelli, Giorgio; Ghisi, Daniela; Fanelli, Andrea; Ortu, Andrea; Moschini, Elisa; Berti, Marco; Ziegler, Stefanie; Fanelli, Guido

    2009-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that ultrasound (US) guidance may reduce the minimum effective anesthetic volume (MEAV(50)) of 1.5% mepivacaine required to block the sciatic nerve with a subgluteal approach compared with neurostimulation (NS). After premedication and single-injection femoral nerve block, 60 patients undergoing knee arthroscopy were randomly allocated to receive a sciatic nerve block with either NS (n = 30) or US (n = 30). In the US group, the sciatic nerve was localized between the ischial tuberosity and the greater trochanter. In the NS group, the appropriate muscular response (foot plantar flexion or inversion) was elicited (1.5 mA, 2 Hz, 0.1 ms) and maintained to mepivacaine required to block the sciatic nerve compared with NS.

  14. Effectiveness of various formulations of local anesthetics and additives for topical anesthesia – a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilbach C

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Christian Weilbach,1 Christian Hoppe,2 Matthias Karst,3 Michael Winterhalter,4 Konstantinos Raymondos,3 Arthur Schultz,3 Niels Rahe-Meyer2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Pain Therapy, St. Josefs-Hospital Cloppenburg, Cloppenburg, 2Clinic for Anesthesiology and Operational Intensive Care, Franziskus Hospital Bielefeld, Bielefeld, 3Clinic for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, 4Clinic for Anesthesiology and Pain Therapy, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen, Germany Background: Topical anesthesia is used to control pain associated with many procedures in medicine. Today, the product most commonly applied for topical anesthesia in Germany is EMLA® (lidocaine/prilocaine. However, since prilocaine is a methemoglobin-inducing agent, there are limitations to its use, especially in neonates and infants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prilocaine and lidocaine as well as propylene glycol, a penetration enhancer, and trometamol, a buffer substance, in anesthetic creams.Patients and methods: Twenty-nine healthy adults participated in this study. Standardized creams with eight different compositions were applied and left for 20, 40 or 60 min. After exposure to standardized painful stimuli (blunt/sharp with pressures of 0.2, 0.4 or 0.8 N, subjects rated the experimental pain using a visual analog scale.Results: Significant results were only found with an exposure time of 60 min and a stamp pressure of 0.8 N. At a concentration of 20%, lidocaine was more effective compared to placebo and equally effective compared to lidocaine/prilocaine in controlling pain. The analgesic effect of the cream containing lidocaine 10% and additional trometamol was significantly superior to that of placebo and non-inferior to that of lidocaine/prilocaine. In this study, the penetration enhancer propylene glycol did not accelerate the onset of the analgesic effect. In contrast

  15. Arsenic from community water fluoridation: quantifying the effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Emily; Shapiro, Howard; Li, Ye; Minnery, John G; Copes, Ray

    2016-04-01

    Community water fluoridation is a WHO recommended strategy to prevent dental carries. One debated concern is that hydrofluorosilicic acid, used to fluoridate water, contains arsenic and poses a health risk. This study was undertaken to determine if fluoridation contributes to arsenic in drinking water, to estimate the amount of additional arsenic associated with fluoridation, and compare this to the National Sanitation Foundation/American National Standards Institute (NSF/ANSI) standard and estimates from other researchers. Using surveillance data from Ontario drinking water systems, mixed effects linear regression was performed to examine the effect of fluoridation status on the difference in arsenic concentration between raw water and treated water samples. On average, drinking water treatment was found to reduce arsenic levels in water in both fluoridated and non-fluoridated systems by 0.2 μg/L. However, fluoridated systems were associated with an additional 0.078 μg/L (95% CI 0.021, 0.136) of arsenic in water when compared to non-fluoridated systems (P = 0.008) while controlling for raw water arsenic concentrations, types of treatment processes, and source water type. Our estimate is consistent with concentrations expected from other research and is less than 10% of the NSF/ANSI standard of 1 μg/L arsenic in water. This study provides further information to inform decision-making regarding community water fluoridation.

  16. Quantifying ligand effects in high-oxidation-state metal catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billow, Brennan S.; McDaniel, Tanner J.; Odom, Aaron L.

    2017-09-01

    Catalysis by high-valent metals such as titanium(IV) impacts our lives daily through reactions like olefin polymerization. In any catalysis, optimization involves a careful choice of not just the metal but also the ancillary ligands. Because these choices dramatically impact the electronic structure of the system and, in turn, catalyst performance, new tools for catalyst development are needed. Understanding ancillary ligand effects is arguably one of the most critical aspects of catalyst optimization and, while parameters for phosphines have been used for decades with low-valent systems, a comparable system does not exist for high-valent metals. A new electronic parameter for ligand donation, derived from experiments on a high-valent chromium species, is now available. Here, we show that the new parameters enable quantitative determination of ancillary ligand effects on catalysis rate and, in some cases, even provide mechanistic information. Analysing reactions in this way can be used to design better catalyst architectures and paves the way for the use of such parameters in a host of high-valent processes.

  17. Quantifying the effect of investors' attention on stock market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen-Hua; Liu, Jian-Guo; Yu, Chang-Rui; Han, Jing-Ti

    2017-01-01

    The investors' attention has been extensively used to predict the stock market. Different from existing proxies of the investors' attention, such as the Google trends, Baidu index (BI), we argue the collective attention from the stock trading platforms could reflect the investors' attention more closely. By calculated the increments of the attention volume for each stock (IAVS) from the stock trading platforms, we investigate the effect of investors' attention measured by the IAVS on the movement of the stock market. The experimental results for Chinese Securities Index 100 (CSI100) show that the BI is significantly correlated with the returns of CSI100 at 1% significance level only in 2014. However, it should be emphasized that the correlation of the new proposed measure, namely IAVS, is significantly at 1% significance level in 2014 and 2015. It shows that the effect of the measure IAVS on the movement of the stock market is more stable and significant than BI. This study yields important invest implications and better understanding of collective investors' attention.

  18. Quantifying the effect of investors’ attention on stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen-Hua; Liu, Jian-Guo; Yu, Chang-Rui; Han, Jing-Ti

    2017-01-01

    The investors’ attention has been extensively used to predict the stock market. Different from existing proxies of the investors’ attention, such as the Google trends, Baidu index (BI), we argue the collective attention from the stock trading platforms could reflect the investors’ attention more closely. By calculated the increments of the attention volume for each stock (IAVS) from the stock trading platforms, we investigate the effect of investors’ attention measured by the IAVS on the movement of the stock market. The experimental results for Chinese Securities Index 100 (CSI100) show that the BI is significantly correlated with the returns of CSI100 at 1% significance level only in 2014. However, it should be emphasized that the correlation of the new proposed measure, namely IAVS, is significantly at 1% significance level in 2014 and 2015. It shows that the effect of the measure IAVS on the movement of the stock market is more stable and significant than BI. This study yields important invest implications and better understanding of collective investors’ attention. PMID:28542216

  19. Quantifying Chiral Magnetic Effect from Anomalous-Viscous Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Yin; Yin, Yi; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is the macroscopic manifestation of the fundamental chiral anomaly in a many-body system of chiral fermions, and emerges as anomalous transport current in the fluid dynamics framework. Experimental observation of CME is of great interest and has been reported in Dirac and Weyl semimetals. Significant efforts have also been made to search for CME in heavy ion collisions. Encouraging evidence of CME-induced charge separation in those collisions has been reported, albeit with ambiguity due to background contamination. Crucial for addressing such issue, is the need of quantitative predictions for CME signal with sophisticated modelings. In this paper we develop such a tool, the Anomalous Viscous Fluid Dynamics (AVFD) framework, which simulates the evolution of fermion currents in QGP on top of the data-validated VISHNU bulk hydrodynamic flow. With realistic initial conditions and magnetic field lifetime, the AVFD-predicted CME signal could be quantitatively consistent with measured ch...

  20. Quantifying the "chamber effect" in CO2 flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihermaa, Leena; Childs, Amy; Long, Hazel; Waldron, Susan

    2014-05-01

    The significance of aquatic CO2 emissions has received attention in recent years. For example annual aquatic emissions in the Amazon basin have been estimated as 500 Mt of carbon1. Methods for determining the flux rates include eddy covariance flux tower measurements, flux estimates calculated from partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in water and the use floating flux chambers connected to an infra-red gas analyser. The flux chamber method is often used because it is portable, cheaper and allows smaller scale measurements. It is also a direct method and hence avoids problems related to the estimation of the gas transfer coefficient that is required when fluxes are calculated from pCO2. However, the use of a floating chamber may influence the flux measurements obtained. The chamber shields the water underneath from effects of wind which could lead to lower flux estimates. Wind increases the flux rate by i) causing waves which increase the surface area for efflux, and ii) removing CO2 build up above the water surface, hence maintaining a higher concentration gradient. Many floating chambers have an underwater extension of the chamber below the float to ensure better seal to water surface and to prevent any ingress of atmospheric air when waves rock the chamber. This extension may cause additional turbulence in flowing water and hence lead to overestimation of flux rates. Some groups have also used a small fan in the chamber headspace to ensure thorough mixing of air in the chamber. This may create turbulence inside the chamber which could increase the flux rate. Here we present results on the effects of different chamber designs on the detected flux rates. 1Richey et al. 2002. Outgassing from Amazonian rivers and wetlands as a large tropical source of atmospheric CO2. Nature 416: 617-620.

  1. Quantifying the Intercontinental and Global Reach and Effects of Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Guo, Zitan

    2000-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling Group is participating in an international effort to explore the projected interactions of the atmosphere with biota, human activity, and the natural environment over the next three decades. The group uses computer simulations and statistical analyses to compare theory and observations of the composition of the lower atmosphere. This study of global habitability change is part of a more ambitious activity to understand global habitability. This broad planetary understanding is central to planetary habitability, biomarker detection, and similar aspects of Astrobiology. The group has made highly detailed studies of immense intercontinental plumes that affect the chemistry of the global atmosphere, especially the region below the ozone (O3) layer whose chemical composition defines the conditions for healthy humans and the biosphere. For some decades there has been concern about the pollution from cities and industrial burning and its possible effect in increasing smog ozone, not only in continental regions, but also in plumes that spread downwind. Recently, there has been new concern about another kind of pollution plume. Projections for a greatly expanded aircraft fleet imply that there will be plumes of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) from jet exhaust in the Northern Hemisphere downwind of major air traffic routes. Both of these are tied to large-scale O3 in the troposphere, where it is toxic to humans and plant tissues.

  2. Commonly used intravenous anesthetics decrease bladder contractility: An in vitro study of the effects of propofol, ketamine, and midazolam on the rat bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceran, Canan; Pampal, Arzu; Goktas, Ozgur; Pampal, H. Kutluk; Olmez, Ercument

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to test the hypothesis that propofol, ketamine, and midazolam could alter the contractile activity of detrusor smooth muscle. Materials and Methods: Four detrusor muscle strips isolated from each rat bladder (n = 12) were placed in 4 tissue baths containing Krebs-Henseleit solution. The carbachol (10 −8to 10−4mol/L)-induced contractile responses as well as 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 Hz electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked contractile responses of the detrusor muscles were recorded using isometric contraction measurements. After obtaining basal responses, the in vitro effects of propofol, ketamine, midazolam (10−5 to 10−3 mol/L), and saline on the contractile responses of the detrusor muscle strips were recorded and evaluated. Results: All the 3 drugs reduced the carbachol-induced and/or EFS-evoked contractile responses of rat detrusor smooth muscles in different degrees. Midazolam (10−4 to 10−3 mol/L) caused a significant decrease in the contractile responses elicited by either EFS or carbachol (P=0.000−0.013). Propofol (10−3mol/L) caused a decrease only in EFS-evoked contractile responses (P=0.001−0.004) and ketamine (10−3mol/L) caused a decrease only in carbachol-induced contractile responses (P=0.001−0.034). Conclusion: We evaluated the effects of the 3 different intravenous anesthetics on detrusor contractile responses in vitro and found that there are possible interactions between anesthetic agents and detrusor contractile activity. The depressant effects of midazolam on the contractile activity were found to be more significant than ketamine and propofol. Despite the necessity of further studies, it could be a piece of wise advice to clinicians to keep the probable alterations due to intravenous anesthetics in mind, while evaluating the results of urodynamic studies in children under sedation. PMID:21116355

  3. Dexmedetomidine (12.5 μg/mL) improves tissue distribution, anesthetic action, and hemodynamic effects of lidocaine after palatal infiltration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Takuma; Hashimoto, Shuichi; Sunada, Katsuhisa

    2016-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine hydrochloride (DEX) is a α2-adrenergic receptor agonist that causes vasoconstriction by acting on α2B-adrenergic receptors in peripheral blood vessels. The authors aimed to determine the influence of DEX on tissue distribution, anesthetic action, and hemodynamic effects of lidocaine in rats. The investigators injected indigo carmine-containing (14)C-labeled lidocaine hydrochloride (2 %) without and with 3.1, 12.5, or 50 μg/mL DEX or 10 μg/mL epinephrine into the right palatal mucosa mesial to the maxillary first molar of specific pathogen-free male Wistar rats. Autoradiography and liquid scintillation counting were performed to evaluate (14)C-labeled lidocaine concentrations in the palatal mucosa, maxillary bone, maxillary nerve, and peripheral blood. Somatosensory-evoked potentials were measured to analyze anesthetic action, and blood pressure and pulse rate were measured to compare hemodynamic effects. DEX extended the tissue distribution of lidocaine in a concentration-dependent manner. Lidocaine with 12.5 μg/mL DEX had similar blood peak arrival time and peak-to-peak amplitude as lidocaine with 10 μg/mL epinephrine, but it reduced pulse rate. The results of this study suggest that 12.5 μg/mL DEX improves tissue distribution, anesthetic action, and hemodynamic effects of lidocaine in rats. Therefore, 12.5 μg/mL DEX may be a suitable alternative to epinephrine in lidocaine formulations, especially for patients with ischemic heart disease and hypertension.

  4. Effects of anesthetic agents on cellular {sup 123}I-MIBG transport and in vivo {sup 123}I-MIBG biodistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Bong-Ho; Paik, Jin-Young; Jung, Kyung-Ho; Bae, Jun-Sang; Lee, Eun Jung; Choe, Yearn Seong; Kim, Byung-Tae; Lee, Kyung-Han [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-03-15

    Small animal imaging with meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) allows characterization of animal models, optimization of tumor treatment strategies, and monitoring of gene expression. Anesthetic agents, however, can affect norepinephrine (NE) transport and systemic sympathetic activity. We thus elucidated the effects of anesthetic agents on MIBG transport and biodistribution. SK-N-SH neuroblastoma and PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells were measured for {sup 123}I-MIBG uptake after treatment with ketamine (Ke), xylazine (Xy), Ke/Xy, or pentobarbital (Pb). NE transporters were assessed by Western blots. Normal ICR mice and PC-12 tumor-bearing mice were injected with {sup 123}I-MIBG 10 min after anesthesia with Ke/Xy, Ke, Xy, or Pb. Plasma NE levels and MIBG biodistribution were assessed. Cellular {sup 123}I-MIBG uptake was dose-dependently inhibited by Ke and Xy but not by Pb. Treatment for 2 h with 300 {mu}M Ke, Xy, and Ke/Xy decreased uptake to 46.0 {+-} 1.6, 24.8 {+-} 1.5, and 18.3 {+-} 1.6% of controls. This effect was completely reversed by fresh media, and there was no change in NE transporter levels. In contrast, mice anesthetized with Ke/Xy showed no decrease of MIBG uptake in target organs. Instead, uptakes and organ-to-blood ratios were increased in the heart, lung, liver, and adrenals. Plasma NE was notably reduced in the animals with corresponding decreases in blood MIBG, which partly contributed to the increase in target organ uptake. In spite of their inhibitory effect at the transporter level, Ke/Xy anesthesia is a satisfactory method for MIBG imaging that allows favorable target tissue uptake and contrast by reducing circulating NE and MIBG. (orig.)

  5. Effect of clenbuterol on cardiopulmonary parameters and intramuscular blood flow by laser Doppler flowmetry in anesthetized ponies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong H.; Clarke, Kathleen W.; Alibhai, Hatim I. K.

    1994-09-01

    The cardiopulmonary affects and the affects on muscular microperfusion of the beta adrenergic agonist, clenbuterol (0.8 mcg/kg intravenously), were investigated in dorsally recumbent anesthetized ponies. Muscle microcirculation was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry, utilizing fine optical fiber probes. Other measurements included heart rate, cardiac output, arterial blood pressure, and arterial blood gas tensions. Clenbuterol injection caused a regular, but transitory rise in muscle microcirculation, an increase in heart rate, and cardiac output and a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure. Clenbuterol did appear to prevent the continuing fall in arterial blood oxygen tensions seen in the treatment groups, but had only minimal affects in reversing the hypoxia already present.

  6. Anesthetic activity of the essential oil of Aloysia triphylla and effectiveness in reducing stress during transport of albino and gray strains of silver catfish, Rhamdia quelen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Thaylise V; Cunha, Mauro A; Becker, Alexssandro G; Zeppenfeld, Carla C; Martins, Dirlaine I; Koakoski, Gessi; Barcellos, Leonardo Gil; Heinzmann, Berta M; Baldisserotto, Bernardo

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of the essential oil (EO) of Aloysia triphylla as an anesthetic for albino and gray strains of silver catfish, Rhamdia quelen. Juveniles were exposed to concentrations between 20 and 800 μL L(-1) EO of A. triphylla to evaluate time of induction and recovery from anesthesia. In another experiment, both strains were divided into four groups such as 0 (control), 30, 40, or 50 μL L(-1) EO and transported for 5 h. The longest time for anesthetic induction and recovery was observed in the albinos. Both strains reached anesthesia in the 100-800 μL L(-1) (11.1-1.24 min) range, without mortality, being 200 μL L(-1) the best response considering time to anesthesia (5.35 min). Albinos transported with all EO concentrations showed higher values of carbon dioxide in the water of transport, but lower levels were observed in grays transported with 40 and 50 μL L(-1) EO when compared to control fish. The same concentrations did not prevent significant whole-body cortisol rise at the end of transport in the albino strain. Juveniles of both strains transported with EO presented lower ion loss to the water compared to control fish. The EO of A. triphylla is an effective anesthetic for albino and gray silver catfish. This EO increases whole-body cortisol levels in the albino strain, but as it reduces net ion loss as in the gray strain, it can be also recommended for transport.

  7. Interaction of anesthetics with neurotransmitter release machinery proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zheng; McMillan, Kyle; Pike, Carolyn M; Cahill, Anne L; Herring, Bruce E; Wang, Qiang; Fox, Aaron P

    2013-02-01

    General anesthetics produce anesthesia by depressing central nervous system activity. Activation of inhibitory GABA(A) receptors plays a central role in the action of many clinically relevant general anesthetics. Even so, there is growing evidence that anesthetics can act at a presynaptic locus to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our own data identified the neurotransmitter release machinery as a target for anesthetic action. In the present study, we sought to examine the site of anesthetic action more closely. Exocytosis was stimulated by directly elevating the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration at neurotransmitter release sites, thereby bypassing anesthetic effects on channels and receptors, allowing anesthetic effects on the neurotransmitter release machinery to be examined in isolation. Three different PC12 cell lines, which had the expression of different release machinery proteins stably suppressed by RNA interference, were used in these studies. Interestingly, there was still significant neurotransmitter release when these knockdown PC12 cells were stimulated. We have previously shown that etomidate, isoflurane, and propofol all inhibited the neurotransmitter release machinery in wild-type PC12 cells. In the present study, we show that knocking down synaptotagmin I completely prevented etomidate from inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Synaptotagmin I knockdown also diminished the inhibition produced by propofol and isoflurane, but the magnitude of the effect was not as large. Knockdown of SNAP-25 and SNAP-23 expression also changed the ability of these three anesthetics to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our results suggest that general anesthetics inhibit the neurotransmitter release machinery by interacting with multiple SNARE and SNARE-associated proteins.

  8. Effect of Commonly Used Anesthetics on Heart Rate Variability%常用麻醉药对心率变异性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙海林

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate variability( HRV )is a quantitative indicator of the cardiac autonomic nervous balance, often used in cardiac nervous system function monitoring. The effect of commonly used anesthetic in induction and maintenance of anesthesia on the HRV changes the tension and balance of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic, which influences the stability of cardiovascular function and generates adverse effects on the bodies especially those with heart disease complications. Perioperative anesthetic HRV analysis not only monitors the cardiac neurological effects,but also predicts the occurrence of adverse cardiac events.%心率变异性(HRV)是心脏自主神经均衡性的定量指标,常用于心脏神经系统功能变化的监测.常用麻醉药在麻醉诱导和维持中对HRV的影响,使心脏交感和副交感神经的张力及其平衡发生变化,从而影响心血管功能的稳定,对机体特别是并发心脏疾病者产生不利影响.围术期HRV分析不但可以监测麻醉药对心脏神经功能的影响,还可以预测心脏不良事件的发生.

  9. EFFECTS OF TRAMADOL ON THE MINIMUM ANESTHETIC CONCENTRATION OF ISOFLURANE IN WHITE-EYED PARAKEETS (PSITTACARA LEUCOPHTHALMUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, André; da Rocha, Rozana Wendler; Midon, Monica; de Almeida, Ricardo Miyasaka; Filho, Darcio Zangirolami; Werther, Karin

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) of isoflurane, and to investigate if tramadol changes the isoflurane MAC in white-eyed parakeets (Psittacara leucophthalmus). Ten adult birds weighing 157 ± 9 g were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen under mechanical ventilation. Isoflurane concentration for the first bird was adjusted to 2.2%, and after 15 min an electrical stimulus was applied in the thigh area to observe the response (movement or nonmovement). Isoflurane concentration for the subsequent bird was increased by 10% if the previous bird moved, or decreased by 10% if the previous bird did not move. This procedure was performed serially until at least four sequential crossover events were detected. A crossover event was defined as a sequence of two birds with different responses (positive or negative) to the electrical stimulus. Isoflurane MAC was calculated as the mean isoflurane concentration value at the crossover events. After 1 wk, the same birds were reanesthetized with isoflurane and MAC was determined at 15 and 30 min after intramuscular administration of 10 mg/kg of tramadol using the same method. A paired t-test (P tramadol administration were indistinguishable from each other (pooled value was 2.50 ± 0.18%); they were also indistinguishable from isoflurane MAC without tramadol. The isoflurane MAC value in white-eyed parakeets is higher than reported for other bird species. Tramadol (10 mg/kg, i.m.) does not change isoflurane MAC in these birds.

  10. Moderate hypothermia and its effects in reducing the applied dose of anesthetics for patients with opium dependence in cardiac surgery: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghadomi, Reza Jalaian; Golmakani, Ebrahim; Alizadeh, Kambiz; Mottahedi, Behrooz; Rahdari, Ali; Sheybani, Shima

    2016-01-01

    Background An increasing number of patients addicted to opium are experiencing awareness during coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) as a result of tolerance to anesthetics. Objectives This research was primarily intended to determine the potential diminishing effects of moderate hypothermia on anesthetic dosage and recall of anesthesia during the procedure. Methods In this double-blind randomized controlled trial, a total of 80 CABG candidates with known addiction to opium were divided into two groups: one normothermic (N) and the other moderately hypothermic (H), both undergoing induction as well as close monitoring from September 2014 to January 2016. The candidates were initially set for a target bispectral index (BIS) score of between 40 and 60. As the score rose to 60, an additional dose of propofol was administered, alongside rise in blood pressure and tear-shedding. To enhance the accuracy of our evaluation of anesthetic depth, we also used two questionnaires to test candidates’ recall filled with the assistance of a colleague 24 hours following surgery. Independent-samples t-test and chi-square test were used by SPSS v 18 for data analysis. Results Eighty patients were studied in two groups of normothermic (N) (n = 40) and hypothermic (H) (n = 40). Given similar demographic data as well as the duration of surgery, we arrived at a propofol dose of 122.52±13.11 cc for normothermic patients and 101.28±14.06 cc for hypothermic subjects (p=0.001). As for fentanyl, the total required sum came up to 39.60±21.04 cc and 31.72±5.81 cc for the above-mentioned groups in order (p=0.025). Moreover, the post-operative interview showed that there was no report of a patient with memory recall following surgery. Conclusions Moderate hypothermia can substantially reduce the need for anesthetics in patients with addiction to opium when undergoing CABG surgery. Trial registration This study is registered in Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials with registration number of

  11. The effect of preoperative suggestions on perioperative dreams and dream recalls after administration of different general anesthetic combinations: a randomized trial in maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyulaházi, Judit; Varga, Katalin; Iglói, Endre; Redl, Pál; Kormos, János; Fülesdi, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Images evoked immediately before the induction of anesthesia with the help of suggestions may influence dreaming during anesthesia.The aim of the study was to assess the incidence of evoked dreams and dream recalls by employing suggestions before induction of anesthesia while administering different general anesthetic combinations. This is a single center, prospective randomized including 270 adult patients scheduled for maxillofacial surgical interventions. Patients were assigned to control, suggestion and dreamfilm groups according to the psychological method used. According to the anesthetic protocol there were also three subgroups: etomidate & sevoflurane, propofol & sevoflurane, propofol & propofol groups. Primary outcome measure was the incidence of postoperative dreams in the non-intervention group and in the three groups receiving different psychological interventions. Secondary endpoint was to test the effect of perioperative suggestions and dreamfilm-formation training on the occurrance of dreams and recallable dreams in different general anesthesiological techniques. Dream incidence rates measured in the control group did not differ significantly (etomidate & sevoflurane: 40%, propofol & sevoflurane: 26%, propofol & propofol: 39%). A significant increase could be observed in the incidence rate of dreams between the control and suggestion groups in the propofol & sevoflurane (26%-52%) group (p = 0.023). There was a significant difference in the incidence of dreams between the control and dreamfilm subgroup in the propofol & sevoflurane (26% vs. 57%), and in the propofol & propofol group (39% vs.70%) (p = 0.010, and p = 0.009, respectively). Similar to this, there was a significant difference in dream incidence between the dreamfilm and the suggestion subgroups (44% vs. 70%) in the propofol & propofol group (p = 0.019). Propofol as an induction agent contributed most to dream formation and recalls (χ2-test p value: 0.005). The content of images and dreams

  12. Anesthetic management of ostriches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, J L; Jensen, J

    1992-06-01

    We evaluated and characterized several anesthetic induction protocols used to facilitate intubation and anesthetic maintenance with isoflurane in 7 adult ostriches and 1 juvenile ostrich. Induction protocols included IV administration of zolazepam/tiletamine, IV administration of diazepam/ketamine with and without xylazine, IV administration of xylazine/ketamine, IM administration of carfentanil or xylazine/carfentanil, and mask induction with isoflurane. General anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen for various procedures, including proventriculotomy (6 birds), tibial (1 bird) or mandibular (1 bird) fracture repair, and drainage of an iatrogenic hematoma (1 bird). Heart rate and respiratory rate varied greatly among birds. The arterial blood pressure values recorded from 6 of the birds during maintenance of general anesthesia were higher than values recorded for most mammalian species, but were comparable to values reported for awake chickens and turkeys.

  13. Salinity does not alter the effectiveness of menthol as an anesthetic and sedative during the handling and transport of juvenile fat snook (Centropomus parallelus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulchro, L C O 'r; Carvalho, M A G; Gomes, L C

    2016-04-19

    The effectiveness of menthol as anesthetic and sedative for fat snook (Centropomus parallelus) was tested at different salinities. In the first experiment, the fish were exposed to different concentrations of menthol (25, 37 and 50 mg L-1) in water at different salinities (0, 17 and 36 ppt). In the second experiment, the fish were transported for 10 hours in water with menthol at concentrations of 0, 3.7 and 7.4 mg L-1 under different salinities. Na+ and K+ ions from fish body and water were analyzed after transport. The optimal concentrations of menthol for a short handling period and surgical induction was 37 and 50 mg L-1, respectively, and these values were independent of salinity. After transport, neither mortality nor significant changes in ammonia or dissolved oxygen were observed between treatments at the different salinities. The nitrite levels were lower in freshwater than in brackish and saltwater, but did not change with mentol. The total body levels of Na+ increased with the salinity increase. Menthol is an effective anesthetic for handling of juvenile fat snook at different salinities. Menthol did not influence the measured water parameters and body ions, and it is not necessary for the transport of fat snook.

  14. Inhibitory Effects of 658 nm Laser Irradiation on Skin Temperature in Anesthetized Rats: Preliminary Results from a Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Litscher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Red laser light stimulation can have many physiological effects. The goal of this animal experimental study was to investigate how red laser stimulation influences the temperature of anesthetized rats at different acupuncture points and nonacupoints. For that reason 12 adult male Wistar Han rats (300–380 g were investigated. Six anesthetized rats underwent red laser stimulation (wavelength 658 nm, output power 40 mW, diameter 500 µm, and duration 10 min at the Baihui (GV20 acupoint, the Zusanli acupoint (ST36, bilateral, and a control point on the forelimb. The other six rats underwent the same procedure; however, the laser remained switched off. Significant decreases in temperature were found at the acupoints Baihui, Zusanli left, and Zusanli right. In addition there was no significant temperature effect at a control point. During placebo laser irradiation (deactivated laser there were also significant temperature changes. The mechanism underlying the results is currently unknown, but brain stimulation (via laser or mechanical pressure and mainly direct central mechanisms may be responsible for the local and peripheral temperature decrease.

  15. Effect of mepivacaine in an infraorbital nerve block on minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in clinically normal anesthetized dogs undergoing a modified form of dental dolorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Christopher J; Snyder, Lindsey B C

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the effects of a routinely used infraorbital nerve block, performed for dental procedures, on the anesthetic requirement for isoflurane in dogs. Prospective controlled study. 8 healthy adult Beagles. Dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane, and the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane was established. A modification of a well-established method of stimulating the dental pulp, dental dolorimetry, was used to deliver a noxious stimulus (electrical stimulation) for isoflurane MAC determination. Once the isoflurane MAC was established, an infraorbital nerve block was performed with mepivacaine. The isoflurane MAC was then determined with the addition of the nerve block. Measurements of heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure were obtained at specified time points (baseline and prevention and elicitation of purposeful movement) during the determination of MAC and in response to the noxious stimulus. The mean ± SD isoflurane MAC without an infraorbital nerve block was 1.12 ± 0.13%. Isoflurane MAC with the regional mepivacaine anesthesia was 0.86 ± 0.11%. A significant reduction in isoflurane MAC (23%) was seen after the infraorbital nerve block, compared with results before the nerve block. With the exception of baseline measurements, no significant differences were found between treatments (isoflurane alone vs isoflurane with regional mepivacaine anesthesia) in heart rate or mean arterial blood pressure before or after the noxious stimulus. The significant reduction in MAC of isoflurane supported the practice of the addition of regional anesthesia for painful dental procedures to reduce the dose-dependent cardiorespiratory effects of general anesthesia.

  16. Effects of changing body position on oxygenation and arterial blood pressures in foals anesthetized with guaifenesin, ketamine, and xylazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Christina; Trim, Cynthia M; Eggleston, Randy B

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the impact of a change in body position on blood gases and arterial blood pressures in foals anesthetized with guaifenesin, ketamine, and xylazine. Prospective, randomized experimental study. Twelve Quarter Horse foals, age of 5.4 +/-0.9 months and weighing 222 +/- 48 kg. Foals were anesthetized with guaifenesin, ketamine, and xylazine for 40 minutes in lateral recumbency and then assigned to a change in lateral recumbency after hoisting (Group 1, n = 6), or no change (Group 2, n = 6). Oxygen 15 L minute(-1) was insufflated into the endotracheal tube throughout anesthesia. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate (f(R)), inspired fraction of oxygen (FIO(2)), and end-tidal carbon dioxide (PE'CO(2)) were measured every 5 minutes. Arterial pH and blood gases [arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO(2)), arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO(2))] were measured at 10, 30, and 40 minutes after induction, and 5 minutes after hoisting. Alveolar dead space ventilation and PaO(2)/FIO(2) were calculated. Two repeated measures models were used. All hypothesis tests were two-sided and significance level was alpha = 0.05. All values are presented as least square means +/- SE. Values at time-matched points from the two groups were not significantly different so they were combined. Arterial partial pressure of oxygen decreased significantly from 149 +/- 14.4 mmHg before hoisting to 92 +/- 11.6 mmHg after hoisting (p = 0.0013). The PaO(2)/FIO(2) ratio decreased from 275 +/- 30 to 175 +/- 24 (p = 0.0055). End-tidal carbon dioxide decreased significantly from 48.7 +/- 1.6 to 44.5 +/- 1.2 mmHg (p = 0.021). Arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, blood pressures and heart rates measured 5 minutes after hoisting were not different from measurements obtained before hoisting. Hoisting decreased PaO(2) in anesthetized healthy foals. Administration of supplemental oxygen is recommended to counter the decrease in oxygenation and PaO(2

  17. Anesthetic Techniques and Cancer Recurrence after Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Fodale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the most common anesthetics are used in surgical oncology, yet effects on cancer cells are still not known. Anesthesia technique could differentially affect cancer recurrence in oncologic patients undergoing surgery, due to immunosuppression, stimulation of angiogenesis, and dissemination of residual cancer cells. Data support the use of intravenous anesthetics, such as propofol anesthesia, thanks to antitumoral protective effects inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2 and prostaglandins E2 in cancer cells, and stimulation of immunity response; a restriction in the use of volatile anesthetics; restriction in the use of opioids as they suppress humoral and cellular immunity, and their chronic use favors angiogenesis and development of metastases; use of locoregional anesthesia compared with general anesthesia, as locoregional appears to reduce cancer recurrence after surgery. However, these findings must be interpreted cautiously as there is no evidence that simple changes in the practice of anesthesia can have a positive impact on postsurgical survival of cancer patients.

  18. Knowledge about local anesthetics in odontology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Alvarez, Rodrigo; Campos Sepúlveda, Alfonso Efraín; Martínez González, Adrian Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the level of knowledge of local anesthetics frequently used in the surgical clinic by third and fourth year dental students in daily practice. The importance of pharmacology in dental practice in underscored by potential drug toxicity. The study was performed with 244 third and fourth grade career dental students (CDS). Eleven items regarding the knowledge over local anesthetics at the clinic; i.e., the appropriate doses, possible toxic effects and side effects were examined. The reference questionnaire which is in a validation process, is a way to evaluate student knowledge about most drugs used in odontology practice such as: NSAIDs, antibiotics and local anesthetics. The results were found to be unsatisfactory with a high percentage of students failing (less than six of eleven items correct). We conclude that determination of practice knowledge is an essential step in informing the institution about cognitive deficiencies identified in order to plan learning solutions.

  19. 薄荷醇对仿刺参幼参的麻醉效果%Anesthetic effect of menthol on juvenile sea cucumber Apos-tichopus japonicus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩莎; 胡炜; 李成林; 赵斌; 严芳

    2016-01-01

    为确立一种准确测量仿刺参体长的方法,选用薄荷醇(menthol)为麻醉剂,在不同麻醉浓度条件下,观察了对仿刺参(Apostichopus japonicus)幼参的麻醉反应,同时比较了在不同水温(11、13、15、17、19、21℃)环境条件下对不同规格((L)42.37 g±1.99 g、(M)22.91 g±1.03 g、(S)12.09 g±1.51g)幼参的麻醉效果。结果显示:当薄荷醇浓度在4%以内时对仿刺参具有良好的麻醉效果,麻醉起效迅速,复苏率为100%;在麻醉体积分数为0.25%、0.5%、1%时,对大规格幼参麻醉时间及复苏时间影响显著,而对中小规格影响不显著;水温11~19℃时,随着温度的升高,仿刺参幼参的麻醉时间从15.62 min±1.31 min 缩短到12.17 min±0.21 min,但复苏时间从13.61 min±4.85 min 显著增加到28.10 min±7.35 min,不同水温下薄荷醇对仿刺参幼参的麻醉效果差异显著(P<0.05),当水温超过21℃时幼参麻醉状态出现异常,不适宜进行麻醉。研究表明:薄荷醇是一种对仿刺参安全有效的麻醉剂,在水温11~21℃进行测量体长的实验中,对体质量20 g 以上的幼参适宜的麻醉体积分数为0.5%~1%,对体质量20 g 以下的幼参适宜的麻醉体积分数为0.25%~0.5%。%The aim of this study was to establish an anesthetic method for accurate body length measurement. We investigated the anesthetic effect of menthol on different-sized (large, 42.37 g±1.99 g; medium, 22.91 g±1.03 g;small, 12.09 g±1.51 g) Apostichopus japonicus juvenile sea cucumbers in different concentrations and at different water temperatures (11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21℃). The results showed that the anesthetic effect of menthol took effect quickly and the recovery rate reached 100% at concentrations less than 4%. The anesthetic time and recovery time were significantly different for large individuals at concentrations of 0.25%, 0.5%, and 1%, but they were not sig-nificantly different for medium-sized and small ones. Within the temperature

  20. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedula, L. Sangeetha; Brannigan, Grace; Economou, Nicoleta J.; Xi, Jin; Hall, Michael A.; Liu, Renyu; Rossi, Matthew J.; Dailey, William P.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Loll, Patrick J.; (Drexel-MED); (UPENN)

    2009-10-21

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  1. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  2. A Unitary Anesthetic-Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedula, L.; Brannigan, G; Economou, N; Xi, J; Hall, M; Liu, R; Rossi, M; Dailey, W; Grasty, K; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABAA receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  3. The use of dye surrogates to illustrate local anesthetic drug sequestration by lipid emulsion: a visual demonstration of the lipid sink effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Aikaterini; Willers, Johann W; Samuels, Theophilus L; Uncles, David R

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that by substituting a dye surrogate in place of local anesthetic, we could visually demonstrate dye sequestration by lipid emulsion that would be dependent on both dye lipophilicity and the amount of lipid emulsion used. We selected 2 lipophilic dyes, acid blue 25 and Victoria blue, with log P values comparable to lidocaine and bupivacaine, respectively. Each dye solution was mixed with combinations of lipid emulsion and water to emulate "lipid rescue" treatment at dye concentrations equivalent to fatal, cardiotoxic, and neurotoxic local anesthetic plasma concentrations. The lipid emulsion volumes added to each dye solution emulated equivalent intravenous doses of 100, 500, and 900 mL of 20% Intralipid in a 75-kg adult. After mixing, the samples were separated into a lipid-rich supernatant and a lipid-poor subnatant by heparin flocculation. The subnatants were isolated, and their colors compared against a graduated dye concentration scale. Lipid emulsion addition resulted in significant dye acquisition by the lipid compartment accompanied by a reduction in the color intensity of the aqueous phase that could be readily observed. The greatest amount of sequestration occurred with the dye possessing the higher log P value and the greatest amount of lipid emulsion. Our study provides a visual demonstration of the lipid sink effect. It supports the theory that lipid emulsion may reduce the amount of free drug present in plasma from concentrations associated with an invariably fatal outcome to those that are potentially survivable.

  4. 麻醉剂浓度对大鼠暴发-抑制脑电特征的影响%The Effect of Anesthetic Concentration on Burst-suppression of the EEG in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丹丹; 贾晓枫; 丁海艳

    2012-01-01

    The term "burst-suppression" is used to describe the electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern characterized by 0 or d waves, at times intermixed with faster waves, and intervening periods of relative quiescence. Burst-suppression pattern can reflect the seriously suppressed brain activity under deep anesthesia. To investigate the relationship between burst-suppression features and anesthetic concentration, we adopted four straightforward indexes, i. e. , burst-suppression ratio (BSR). burst frequency, burst amplitude and suppression amplitude, and used them to analyze the EEG recordings in ten isoflurane-anesthetized rats. It was found that all the four burst-suppression indexes changed along with anesthetic concentration, that BSR and burst amplitude increased with higher concentration of isoflurane while burst frequency and suppression amplitude decreased, and that BSR was the most sensitive and consistent measurement to indicate isoflurane concentration so it constituted a valuable tool for timely evaluation of burst-suppression feature under deep anesthesia. The result also showed that the composition of carrier gas (i. e. pure oxygen vs. mixed oxygen) did not influence the effect of anesthesia significantly;and the four indexes of burst-suppression features could keep relatively stable within 60min under the isoflurane concentration of 2%. The present study provides quantitative information of burst-suppression features under different anesthetic depth and may help to develop a clinically satisfied system that could quantify the characteristics of EEG and rigorously evaluate the cerebral state of patients.%暴发-抑制脑电图(EEG)是深度麻醉状态下EEG活动受到严重抑制的表现.为定量研究暴发-抑制波形特征与麻醉剂浓度之间的关系,本文采用暴发-抑制比、暴发频率、暴发幅度和抑制幅度4个时域指标,分析大鼠麻醉模型在不同异氟烷浓度下的EEG特征.结果表明,暴发-抑制脑电的4个指标均

  5. Opposing effects of the anesthetic propofol at pentameric ligand-gated ion channels mediated by a common site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy Peter; Laube, Bodo

    2014-01-01

    Propofol is an intravenous general anesthetic that alters neuronal excitability by modulating agonist responses of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs). Evidence suggests that propofol enhancement of anion-selective pLGICs is mediated by a binding site between adjacent subunits, whereas...... propofol inhibition of cation-selective pLGICs occurs via a binding site contained within helices M1-M4 of individual subunits. We considered this idea by testing propofol modulation of homomeric human glycine receptors (GlyRs) and nematode glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) recombinantly expressed...... in Xenopus laevis oocytes with electrophysiology. The Haemonchus contortus AVR-14B GluCl was inhibited by propofol with an IC50 value of 252 ± 48 μM, providing the first example of propofol inhibition of an anion-selective pLGIC. Remarkably, inhibition was converted to enhancement by a single I18'S...

  6. Anesthetic and physiologic effects of tiletamine, zolazepam, ketamine, and xylazine combination (TKX) in feral cats undergoing surgical sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cistola, Alexis M; Golder, Francis J; Centonze, Lisa A; McKay, Lindsay W; Levy, Julie K

    2004-10-01

    Tiletamine (12.5 mg), zolazepam (12.5 mg), ketamine (20 mg), and xylazine (5 mg) (TKX; 0.25 ml, IM) combination was evaluated as an anesthetic in 22 male and 67 female adult feral cats undergoing sterilization at high-volume sterilization clinics. Cats were not intubated and breathed room air. Oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), mean blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), respiration rate (RR), and core body temperature were recorded. Yohimbine (0.25 ml, 0.5 mg, IV) was administered at the completion of surgery. TKX produced rapid onset of lateral recumbency (4+/-1 min) and surgical anesthesia of sufficient duration to complete surgical procedures in 92% of cats. SpO(2) measured via a lingual pulse oximeter probe averaged 92+/-3% in male cats and 90+/-4% in females. SpO(2) fell below 90% at least once in most cats. MBP measured by oscillometry averaged 136+/-30 mm Hg in males and 113+/-29 mm Hg in females. MBP increased at the onset of surgical stimulation suggesting incomplete anti-nociceptive properties. HR averaged 156+/-19 bpm, and RR averaged 18+/-8 bpm. Neither parameter varied between males and females or over time. Body temperature decreased significantly over time, declining to 38.0+/-0.8 degrees C at the time of reversal in males and 36.6+/-0.8 degrees C at the time of reversal in females. Time from anesthetic reversal to sternal recumbency was prolonged (72+/-42 min). Seven cats (8%) required an additional dose of TKX to maintain an adequate plane of anesthesia at the onset of surgery, and this was associated with significantly longer recovery times (108+/-24 min).

  7. Fentanyl, dexmedetomidine, dexamethasone as adjuvant to local anesthetics in caudal analgesia in pediatrics: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham M. El-Feky

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Both caudal dexmedetomidine and caudal dexamethasone added to local anesthetics are good alternatives in prolongation of postoperative analgesia compared to caudal local anesthetic alone or added to caudal fentanyl. Also they showed less side effects compared to caudal fentanyl.

  8. Llama anesthetic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, R B

    1989-03-01

    Llamas are anesthetized conveniently with guaifenesin thiamylal mixes, or, for short periods of time, with xylazine/ketamine. Small individuals must be accurately weighed. Estimating weight without experience is dangerous in this species. The greatest levels of safety and control, especially for critical patients, is afforded by inhalation anesthesia techniques using small animal equipment. All neonates and juveniles can be masked readily but in adults intravenous induction is most satisfactory. Intubation is aided by a long blade laryngoscope. Blood pressure monitoring is best accomplished with an arterial line in the ear artery. However, doppler equipment on the tail or distal leg usually works well.

  9. Anesthetic-Induced Developmental Neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-RenLiu; Qian Liu; Jing Li; Sulpicio G. Soriano

    2011-01-01

    1 IntroductionMillions of newborn and infants receive anesthetic,sedative and analgesic drugs for surgery and painful procedures on a daily basis.Recent laboratory reports clearly demonstrate that anesthetic and sedative drugs induced both neuroapoptosis and neurocognitive deficits in laboratory models.This issue is of paramount interest to pediatric anesthesiologists and intensivists because it questions the safety of anesthetics used for fetal and neonatal anesthesia[1-2].In an attempt to summarize the rapidly expanding laboratorybased literature on anesthetic-induced developmental neurotoxicity (AIDN),this review will examine published reports on the characterization,mechanisms and alleviation of this phenomenon.

  10. Reduced anesthetic requirements, diminished brain plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase pumping, and enhanced brain synaptic plasma membrane phospholipid methylation in diabetic rats: effects of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, P K; Horn, J L; Singh, G; Janson, V E; Franks, W T; Franks, J J

    1995-01-01

    We have recently reported that streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats was associated with i) reduced Ca2+ pumping by rat brain synaptic plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) and ii) a substantial reduction in the partial pressures of halothane and xenon required to prevent movement in response to stimulation (minimum effective dose or MED). MED for both agents correlated well with the degree of hemoglobin glycation and with PMCA activity. We now report that MEDs for isoflurane, enflurane, and desflurane were also substantially reduced in STZ-diabetic rats, compared with placebo-injected controls. In addition, we examined the effect of insulin treatment, begun 2 weeks after induction of diabetes and continued for 3 more weeks, on isoflurane MED and on brain synaptic PMCA and phospholipid-N-methyltransferase I (PLMT I), another enzyme altered by inhalation anesthetics (IA). Partial treatment of diabetes, as indicated by decreased glycated hemoglobin (GHb) compared to untreated diabetic rats, was associated with an isoflurane MED of 1.05 vol%, intermediate between a control mean of 1.57 vol% and an untreated diabetic mean of 0.82 vol% (p SPM from diabetic rats did not differ from control values, but PMCA pumping in SPM from the D-M was reduced to about 85% of control levels. Good correlation (r = 0.89, p < 0.01) was found between isoflurane MED and GHb in all treatment groups. These findings provide further evidence for an important role for PMCA in IA action. They also suggest that anesthetic effects on the calcium pump at specific anatomic sites may be of major importance in producing anesthesia.

  11. Administration and monitoring of intravenous anesthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahinovic, Marko M.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The importance of accuracy in controlling the dose-response relation for intravenous anesthetics is directly related to the importance of optimizing the efficacy and quality of anesthesia while minimizing adverse drug effects. Therefore, it is important to measure and control all

  12. Quantifying effects of land use change on soil organic matter at the landscape scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, M.P.W.; Apeldoorn, van D.F.; Pepers, K.H.; Hanegraaf, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 14, EGU2012-8153, 2012 EGU General Assembly 2012 © Author(s) 2012 Quantifying effects of land use change on soil organic matter at the landscape scale M.P.W. Sonneveld (1), D.F. Van Apeldoorn (1), K.H. Pepers (1), and M.C. Hanegraaf (2) (1) Land Dynamics Group, Wa

  13. Enhanced computational methods for quantifying the effect of geographic and environmental isolation on genetic differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botta, Filippo; Eriksen, Casper; Fontaine, Michael Christophe; Guillot, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    In a recent paper, Bradburd et al. (2013) proposed a model to quantify the relative effect ofgeographic and environmental distance on genetic differentiation. Here, we enhance this method in several ways. 1. We modify the covariance model so as to fit better with mainstream geostatistical models and

  14. Quantifying the effects of pesticide exposure on annual reproductive success of birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Markov chain nest productivity model (MCnest) was developed for quantifying the effects of specific pesticide-use scenarios on the annual reproductive success of simulated populations of birds. Each nesting attempt is divided into a series of discrete phases (e.g., egg layin...

  15. Quantifying the effects of pesticide exposure on annual reproductive success of birds (presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Markov chain nest productivity model (MCnest) was developed for quantifying the effects of specific pesticide‐use scenarios on the annual reproductive success of simulated populations of birds. Each nesting attempt is divided into a series of discrete phases (e.g., egg ...

  16. Quantifying effects of land use change on soil organic matter at the landscape scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, M.P.W.; Apeldoorn, van D.F.; Pepers, K.H.; Hanegraaf, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 14, EGU2012-8153, 2012 EGU General Assembly 2012 © Author(s) 2012 Quantifying effects of land use change on soil organic matter at the landscape scale M.P.W. Sonneveld (1), D.F. Van Apeldoorn (1), K.H. Pepers (1), and M.C. Hanegraaf (2) (1) Land Dynamics Group,

  17. Quantifying the effects of nitrogen on fruit growth and yield of cucumber crop in greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dai, J.; Liu, S.; Zhang, W.; Xu, R.; Luo, W.; Yin, X.; Han, L.; Chen, S.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen supply can improve crop growth and yield. An over-use of nitrogen fertilizer in greenhouse crop productions, however, causes many environmental problems. The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of nitrogen on fruit growth and yield so as to facilitate the optimization of nitrogen

  18. Effectiveness of MS-222 as anesthetic agents for Andrias davidianus%MS-222对大鲵麻醉效果的初步观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜维; 王启军; 赵虎; 张红星; Andy Kouba; 张璐; Ruth Marcec

    2014-01-01

    观测MS-222对大鲵( Andrias davidianus)的麻醉效果。12~15℃水温下,使用0.6 g/L MS-222对16尾4.7龄宁陕县东河的大鲵和16尾2.7龄周至县黑河的大鲵进行浸浴麻醉,每间隔5 min,观测个体的逃匿反应、翻正反射及痛感反应,记录个体麻醉时间和恢复时间并进行数据分析。使用0.6 g/L MS-222对大鲵进行浸浴处理,32尾个体均达到深度麻醉,所需时间为11~30 min,苏醒时间为30~180 min;体重与麻醉时间呈显著的正相关关系( r=0.320),水温与麻醉时间呈显著的强负相关关系( r=-0.698)。试验过程中没有个体死亡。%This study represents the first attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of MS-222 as anesthetic agents for Andrias davidianus.Two groups of A.davidianus, sixteen from Heihe river basin and sixteen from Donghe river basin , were anes-thetized in a 12 ℃ water bath containing MS-222 ( 600 mg/L of water ) . After a one half month period , eight of the A.davidianus were randomly chosen for anesthesia in a 15℃water bath.Escape, right, superficial pain, and deep pain reflexes were monitored at every five-minute intervals after exposure to anesthetics .The duration of deep anesthesia and of recovery was recorded .MS-222 administered at 0.6 g/L produced deep anesthesia in all of the A.davidianus either in 12 ℃water bath or in 15 ℃ water bath.The time for anesthesia and recovery ranged between 11 ~30 min and 30 ~180 min, respectively .The higher water temperature significantly ( P<0.01 ) reduced the time required for deep anesthe-sia and for recovery at both groups .A slightly positive correlation ( r=0.320 ) was found between body mass and the time for anesthesia and recovery .

  19. Anesthetic effect observation of percutaneous nephroscopy on miniature Rongchang pigs%小型猪经皮肾镜术复合麻醉效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮定红; 于文春; 杨秀江; 龙平华; 邱明

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨小型猪经皮肾镜术的麻醉效果.方法 选择健康雌性(阉割)荣昌小型猪32只,术中予以静脉泵入枸橼酸苏芬太尼3~4 μg·kg-1·h-1、咪唑安定0.15 mg·kg-1·h-1和盐酸氯胺酮15~20 mg·kg-1·h-1维持麻醉,观察麻醉效果.结果 小型猪麻醉诱导、维持和苏醒时间分别为(4.9±0.5)、(120.3±11.5)、(104.9±10.5)min;术中小型猪心率、呼吸、脉搏血氧饱和度(SpO2)分别为(103.9±8.8)次/min、(21.0±3.4)次/min、(96.8±1.8)%.结论 应用枸橼酸苏芬太尼、咪唑安定和盐酸氯胺酮复合麻醉具有麻醉效果好、操作简便、安全性高,且无需气管插管的优点,是建立小型猪经皮肾镜模型实验中一种较为理想的麻醉方法.%Objective To investigate the anesthetic effect of percutaneous nephroscopy in miniature pigs. Methods 32 healthy male miniature Rongchang pigs were selected. During operation,fentanyl citrate 3 - 4 μg · Kg-1 · H-1 ,midazolam 0. 15 mg · Kg-1 · H-1 and ketamine hydrochloride 15 - 20 mg · Kg-1 · H-1 were intravenously pumped for maintenance anesthesia. The anesthetic effects were observed. Results The anesthesia induction time, anesthesia duration time and recovery time in the experiment were (4. 9 + 0. 5) min,(120. 3 + 11. 5) min and (104. 9 + 10. 5) min respetively. The heart rate,respiration and oxygen saturation in the experimental pigs were(103. 9 + 8. 8) times/min, (21. 0 + 3. 4) times/min and (96.8 + 1.8)% respectively. Conclusion The combined application of fentanyl citrate, midazolam and ketamine hydrochloride has good anesthetic effects, simple operation and high security without endotracheal intubation, which is an ideal anesthetic method for establishing of miniature pig experimental model of percutaneous nephroscopy.

  20. Effects of rocuronium bromide on globe position and respiratory function in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs: a comparison between three different dosages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briganti, Angela; Barsotti, Giovanni; Portela, Diego A; Di Nieri, Camilla; Breghi, Gloria

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effect on globe position and respiration of three dosages of intravenous rocuronium in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs. Thirty-two dogs anesthetized for ophthalmic procedures. The dogs were divided into four groups, each of eight animals (G1-G4). G1, G2, G3 received 0.075, 0.05, 0.03 mg/kg of IV rocuronium, respectively; G4 received 0.9% NaCl IV; all the treatments were administered when an end-tidal isoflurane of 1.1-1.2% was reached. Anesthesia was obtained with dexmedetomidine (2.5 mcg/kg IV), methadone (0.1 mg/kg IV), propofol (2 mg/kg IV), and isoflurane in oxygen. Neuromuscular function was assessed with acceleromyography by stimulation of the peroneal nerve using the train-of-four (ToF) and the ToF ratio (ToFR). Monitoring of cardiovascular and respiratory functions was performed. Changes in globe position were recorded. All three dosages of rocuronium produced centralization of the globe. Duration was 24.3 ± 4.2, 23.4 ± 3.6, and 8.7 ± 2.8 min, for G1, G2, and G3, respectively. The control group did not show globe centralization. No significant differences were found among the four groups in cardiovascular and respiratory parameters. Minute volume and ToFR were significantly lower in G1 compared with baseline values. All doses of rocuronium resulted in globe centralization. The higher dose provoked a transient respiratory depression and some degree of skeletal muscular blockade detectable with ToFR. No alterations in respiratory activity were present when 0.05 mg/kg was used. The 0.03 mg/kg dosage could be useful for very short ophthalmic procedures. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  1. Comparison of the effects of xylazine bolus versus medetomidine constant rate infusion on cardiopulmonary function and depth of anesthesia in horses anesthetized with isoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Catherine M; Lemke, Kip A; Lamont, Leigh A; Horney, Barbara S; Riley, Christopher B

    2012-04-15

    To compare the effects of xylazine bolus versus medetomidine constant rate infusion (MCRI) on cardiopulmonary function and depth of anesthesia in dorsally recumbent, spontaneously breathing, isoflurane-anesthetized horses. Prospective, randomized crossover study. 10 healthy adult Standardbreds. Horses were premedicated with xylazine or medetomidine IV. Anesthesia was induced with diazepam and ketamine and maintained with isoflurane for 150 minutes. For the xylazine treatment, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.7%, and xylazine (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb], IV) was administered as a bolus at the end of anesthesia. For the MCRI treatment, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.4%, and medetomidine (0.005 mg/kg/h [0.0023 mg/lb/h], IV) was infused throughout anesthesia. Physiologic data (ie, heart rate, respiratory rate, rectal temperature, bispectral index, and electromyographic values) were compared between treatments with xylazine bolus versus MCRI. Heart rate was lower, but mean arterial blood pressure was higher from 20 to 40 minutes with MCRI treatment, compared with conventional treatment with xylazine. Respiratory rate and rectal temperature were greater with MCRI treatment. Bispectral index was lower with MCRI treatment from 80 to 150 minutes, and electromyographic values were lower with MCRI treatment from 30 to 150 minutes. In isoflurane-anesthetized horses, premedication with medetomidine followed by administration of medetomidine as a constant rate infusion resulted in decreased heart rate, higher arterial blood pressure from 20 through 40 minutes after induction of anesthesia, and better preserved body temperature, compared with conventional treatment with xylazine. Greater depth of anesthesia and muscle relaxation were seen with MCRI treatment, despite the lower isoflurane concentration.

  2. Effect of administration of water enriched in O2 by injection or electrolysis on transcutaneous oxygen pressure in anesthetized pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charton, Antoine; Péronnet, François; Doutreleau, Stephane; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Klein, Alexis; Jimenez, Liliana; Geny, Bernard; Diemunsch, Pierre; Richard, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral administration of oxygenated water has been shown to improve blood oxygenation and could be an alternate way for oxygen (O2) supply. In this experiment, tissue oxygenation was compared in anesthetized pigs receiving a placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or a new electrolytic process. Methods Forty-two pigs randomized in three groups received either mineral water as placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or the electrolytic process (10 mL/kg in the stomach). Hemodynamic parameters, partial pressure of oxygen in the arterial blood (PaO2), skin blood flow, and tissue oxygenation (transcutaneous oxygen pressure, or TcPO2) were monitored during 90 minutes of general anesthesia. Absorption and tissue distribution of the three waters administered were assessed using dilution of deuterium oxide. Results Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, PaO2, arteriovenous oxygen difference, and water absorption from the gut were not significantly different among the three groups. The deuterium to protium ratio was also similar in the plasma, skin, and muscle at the end of the protocol. Skin blood flow decreased in the three groups. TcPO2 slowly decreased over the last 60 minutes of the experiment in the three groups, but when compared to the control group, the values remained significantly higher in animals that received the water enriched in O2 by electrolysis. Conclusions In this protocol, water enriched in O2 by electrolysis lessened the decline of peripheral tissue oxygenation. This observation is compatible with the claim that the electrolytic process generates water clathrates which trap O2 and facilitate O2 diffusion along pressure gradients. Potential applications of O2-enriched water include an alternate method of oxygen supply. PMID:25210438

  3. 临床药师参与麻醉用药监管对麻醉质量及效率的影响%The Effect of Clinical Pharmacist Participating in the Administration of Anesthetics on the Anesthetic Quality and Efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡蕤; 谢悦旭; 王本军

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of clinical pharmacist participating in the administration of anesthetics on the anesthetic quality and efficiency. Methods 200 patients who received operation with anesthesia in the hospital during February 2012 to February 2014 were selected and were randomly divided into the control group and the observation group with 100 cases in each group. Operation with anesthesia was performed in the control group, strictly following the procedure of anesthetics. In the observation group, operation with anesthesia was performed with clinical pharmacist participating in the administration of drugs, based on referring to the standard of useage of anesthetics. The anesthetic quality assessment score and the excellent and good rate of patient self evaluation in the two groups were observed. Results The anesthetic quality assessment score in the observation group were(90.6±3.7)points which were higher than(84.4±7.2)ponts in the con-trol group, which was statistically(P<0.05). The excellent and good rate of anesthesia self evaluation in the observation group was 95.0%which was higher than 86.0%in the control group, which was statistically significant(P<0.05). Conclusion Clin-ical pharmacist participating in the administration of anesthetics can effectively improve the tedious procedure management, standardize the use of anesthetics and improve the efficiency. It is of important clinical value in reducing the risk of anes-thesia and operative pain.%目的 研究临床药师参与麻醉用药监管对麻醉质量及效率的影响. 方法 选取该院2012年2月—2014年2月200例进行麻醉手术患者,抽签随机分为对照组和观察组,每组各100例. 对照组严格遵循麻醉药品的用药程序进行麻醉手术,观察组在参考麻醉药品用药标准的基础上由临床药师参与用药监管行麻醉手术. 观察两组麻醉质量考核评价得分和患者自我评价麻醉优良率.结果 观察组麻醉质量评分(90.6±3

  4. Effect of local anesthetic volume (15 vs 40 mL) on the duration of ultrasound-guided single shot axillary brachial plexus block: a prospective randomized, observer-blinded trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, K.P.; Wegener, J.T.; Stienstra, R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: One of the advantages of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block is that visualization of local anesthetic spread allows for a reduction in dose. However, little is known about the effect of dose reduction on sensory and motor block duration. The purpose of the present st

  5. Effect of local anesthetic volume (15 vs 40 mL) on the duration of ultrasound-guided single shot axillary brachial plexus block: a prospective randomized, observer-blinded trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, K.P.; Wegener, J.T.; Stienstra, R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: One of the advantages of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block is that visualization of local anesthetic spread allows for a reduction in dose. However, little is known about the effect of dose reduction on sensory and motor block duration. The purpose of the present

  6. 笑气在肠镜检查中的应用研究%Anesthetic effects of nitrous oxide for colonoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨成志; 梁桃

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the anesthetic effects of nitrous oxide for colonoscopy. Methods A total of 180 patients were randomly divided into N2O group (inhalation with nitrous oxide) , propofol group (injection with propofol) and control group. Analgesic effects as well as incidence of adverse effects were observed and compared between the three groups. Results There was no significant difference in analgesic effects between the N2O group and the propofol group,but the adverse effect was lower in N2O group than that in propofol group(P < 0. 05). While the analgesic effects in N2O group were significantly higher than that in control group. Conclusion Anesthetic effects of N2O is effective and safe in colonoscopy. Being simple and economical, the N2O is worthy for application in clinical work in large scale.%目的 研究笑气应用于肠镜检查的效果与安全性.方法 将180例需要进行肠镜检查的患者随机分为笑气组(用笑气麻醉)、丙泊酚组(用丙泊酚麻醉)和对照组,每组60例;观察比较3组术中镇痛效果和不良反应情况.结果 笑气组镇痛效果与丙泊酚组比较无差异,但不良反应发生率低于丙泊酚组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);而笑气组镇痛效果明显高于对照组,差异显著(P<0.05).结论 笑气吸入应用于肠镜检查术,镇痛效果优越,安全性高,且操作简单,经济实惠,值得临床推广应用.

  7. 丁香酚对中国对虾幼虾麻醉效果的初步研究%Studies on Anesthetic Effect of Eugenol on Juvenile Fenneropenaeus chinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄雪芹; 孔杰; 张天时; 罗坤; 赖光艳

    2008-01-01

    [Objective] The aim of the study is to seek a good anesthetic to Fenneropenaeus chinensis. [Method] The anesthetic effect of eugenol to juvenile Fenneropenaeus chinensis was investigated. [Result] The juveniles could be effectively anaesthetized by 50-400 mg/L eugenol aqueous solution with temperature of 24 ℃. Within the concentration range of 50-400 mg/L, the increase of the eugenol concentration could shorten the time required for anesthesia, meanwhile could prolong the time for recovery. The recovered rate of prawn reached 100% when the eugenol concentration was lower than 200 mg/L, while the recovered rate of prawn was just 66.67% when the eugenol concentration was higher than 400 mg/L. The survival rate of prawns in test group was 100% from the observation of three consecutive days. For the specific dose, the anesthetic effect enhanced with the increase of water temperature (18-27℃). [Conclusion] Eugenol is a safe and efficient anesthetics that can be applied in genetic breeding of prawn.

  8. The effects of handling and anesthetic agents on the stress response and carbohydrate metabolism in northern elephant seals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory D Champagne

    Full Text Available Free-ranging animals often cope with fluctuating environmental conditions such as weather, food availability, predation risk, the requirements of breeding, and the influence of anthropogenic factors. Consequently, researchers are increasingly measuring stress markers, especially glucocorticoids, to understand stress, disturbance, and population health. Studying free-ranging animals, however, comes with numerous difficulties posed by environmental conditions and the particular characteristics of study species. Performing measurements under either physical restraint or chemical sedation may affect the physiological variable under investigation and lead to values that may not reflect the standard functional state of the animal. This study measured the stress response resulting from different handling conditions in northern elephant seals and any ensuing influences on carbohydrate metabolism. Endogenous glucose production (EGP was measured using [6-(3H]glucose and plasma cortisol concentration was measured from blood samples drawn during three-hour measurement intervals. These measurements were conducted in weanlings and yearlings with and without the use of chemical sedatives--under chemical sedation, physical restraint, or unrestrained. We compared these findings with measurements in adult seals sedated in the field. The method of handling had a significant influence on the stress response and carbohydrate metabolism. Physically restrained weanlings and yearlings transported to the lab had increased concentrations of circulating cortisol (F(11, 46 = 25.2, p<0.01 and epinephrine (F(3, 12 = 5.8, p = 0.01. Physical restraint led to increased EGP (t = 3.1, p = 0.04 and elevated plasma glucose levels (t = 8.2, p<0.01. Animals chemically sedated in the field typically did not exhibit a cortisol stress response. The combination of anesthetic agents (Telazol, ketamine, and diazepam used in this study appeared to alleviate a

  9. Effect of administration of water enriched in O2 by injection or electrolysis on transcutaneous oxygen pressure in anesthetized pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charton A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Antoine Charton,1 François Péronnet,2 Stephane Doutreleau,3 Evelyne Lonsdorfer,3 Alexis Klein,4 Liliana Jimenez,4 Bernard Geny,3 Pierre Diemunsch,1 Ruddy Richard5 1Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, and EA 3072, Hôpital de Hautepierre; University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France; 2Department of Kinesiology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3CHRU of Strasbourg, Physiology and Functional Explorations Department, New Civil Hospital, Strasbourg, France and University of Strasbourg, Faculty of Medicine, Physiology Department, Strasbourg, France; 4Danone Research, Palaiseau, France; 5Department of Sport Medicine and Functional Explorations, CHU Clermont-Ferrand and INRA UMR 1019, CRNH-Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France Background: Oral administration of oxygenated water has been shown to improve blood oxygenation and could be an alternate way for oxygen (O2 supply. In this experiment, tissue oxygenation was compared in anesthetized pigs receiving a placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or a new electrolytic process. Methods: Forty-two pigs randomized in three groups received either mineral water as placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or the electrolytic process (10 mL/kg in the stomach. Hemodynamic parameters, partial pressure of oxygen in the arterial blood (PaO2, skin blood flow, and tissue oxygenation (transcutaneous oxygen pressure, or TcPO2 were monitored during 90 minutes of general anesthesia. Absorption and tissue distribution of the three waters administered were assessed using dilution of deuterium oxide. Results: Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, PaO2, arteriovenous oxygen difference, and water absorption from the gut were not significantly different among the three groups. The deuterium to protium ratio was also similar in the plasma, skin, and muscle at the end of the protocol. Skin blood flow decreased in the three groups. TcPO2 slowly decreased over the last 60 minutes of the experiment in

  10. Comparison of anesthetic agents in the sea otter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, T.D.; Kocher, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    Five anesthetic agents (CI744, etorphine, fentanyl, ketamine hydrochloride, and halothane) were tested to establish the dosage of a safe, effective, short-acting anesthetic for use in the sea otter. Etorphine, at a dosage of 0.75 mg per adult otter and used in conjunction with diazepam, at a dosage of 1.25 mg per adult otter, met most of the requirements for use under field conditions. Halothane, administered through an anesthetic machine, proved to be effective for use in a veterinary hospital.

  11. Pain fiber anesthetic reduces brainstem Fos after tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badral, B; Davies, A J; Kim, Y H; Ahn, J S; Hong, S D; Chung, G; Kim, J S; Oh, S B

    2013-11-01

    We recently demonstrated that pain-sensing neurons in the trigeminal system can be selectively anesthetized by co-application of QX-314 with the TRPV1 receptor agonist, capsaicin (QX cocktail). Here we examined whether this new anesthetic strategy can block the neuronal changes in the brainstem following molar tooth extraction in the rat. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received infiltration injection of anesthetic 10 min prior to lower molar tooth extraction. Neuronal activation was determined by immunohistochemistry for the proto-oncogene protein c-Fos in transverse sections of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Sp5C). After tooth extraction, c-Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI) detected in the dorsomedial region of bilateral Sp5C was highest at 2 hrs (p tooth extraction; reduced Fos-LI was also observed with the conventional local anesthetic lidocaine. Pulpal anesthesia by infiltration injection was confirmed by inhibition of the jaw-opening reflex in response to electrical tooth pulp stimulation. Our results suggest that the QX cocktail anesthetic is effective in reducing neuronal activation following tooth extraction. Thus, a selective pain fiber 'nociceptive anesthetic' strategy may provide an effective local anesthetic option for dental patients in the clinic.

  12. Can anesthetic treatment worsen outcome in status epilepticus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Raoul; Kaplan, Peter W

    2015-08-01

    Status epilepticus refractory to first-line and second-line antiepileptic treatments challenges neurologists and intensivists as mortality increases with treatment refractoriness and seizure duration. International guidelines advocate anesthetic drugs, such as continuously administered high-dose midazolam, propofol, and barbiturates, for the induction of therapeutic coma in patients with treatment-refractory status epilepticus. The seizure-suppressing effect of anesthetic drugs is believed to be so strong that some experts recommend using them after benzodiazepines have failed. Although the rationale for the use of anesthetic drugs in patients with treatment-refractory status epilepticus seems clear, the recommendation of their use in treating status epilepticus is based on expert opinions rather than on strong evidence. Randomized trials in this context are lacking, and recent studies provide disturbing results, as the administration of anesthetics was associated with poor outcome independent of possible confounders. This calls for caution in the straightforward use of anesthetics in treating status epilepticus. However, there are still more questions than answers, and current evidence for the adverse effects of anesthetic drugs in patients with status epilepticus remains too limited to advocate a change of treatment algorithms. In this overview, the rationale and the conflicting clinical implications of anesthetic drugs in patients with treatment-refractory status epilepticus are discussed, and remaining questions are elaborated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus".

  13. Age, minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration, and minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eger, E I

    2001-10-01

    Two defining effects of inhaled anesthetics (immobility in the face of noxious stimulation, and absence of memory) correlate with the end-tidal concentrations of the anesthetics. Such defining effects are characterized as MAC (the concentration producing immobility in 50% of patients subjected to a noxious stimulus) and MAC-Awake (the concentration suppressing appropriate response to command in 50% of patients; memory is usually lost at MAC-Awake). If the concentrations are monitored and corrected for the effects of age and temperature, the concentrations may be displayed as multiples of MAC for a standard age, usually 40 yr. This article provides an algorithm that might be used to produce such a display, including provision of an estimate of the effect of nitrous oxide. Two defining effects of inhaled anesthetics (immobility in the face of noxious stimulation, and absence of memory) correlate with the end-tidal concentrations of the anesthetics. Thus, these defining effects may be monitored and the results displayed if the concentrations are known and corrected for the effects of age and temperature.

  14. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction: physiology and anesthetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, Andrew B; Slinger, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) represents a fundamental difference between the pulmonary and systemic circulations. HPV is active in utero, reducing pulmonary blood flow, and in adults helps to match regional ventilation and perfusion although it has little effect in healthy lungs. Many factors affect HPV including pH or PCO2, cardiac output, and several drugs, including antihypertensives. In patients with lung pathology and any patient having one-lung ventilation, HPV contributes to maintaining oxygenation, so anesthesiologists should be aware of the effects of anesthesia on this protective reflex. Intravenous anesthetic drugs have little effect on HPV, but it is attenuated by inhaled anesthetics, although less so with newer agents. The reflex is biphasic, and once the second phase becomes active after about an hour of hypoxia, this pulmonary vasoconstriction takes hours to reverse when normoxia returns. This has significant clinical implications for repeated periods of one-lung ventilation.

  15. Local anesthetics: dentistry's most important drugs, clinical update 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, Stanley F

    2006-12-01

    Local anesthetics are the safest most effective drugs in medicine for the control and management of pain. They also represent the most important drugs in dentistry. Today, dentistry has a spectrum of local anesthetics that permit pain control to be tailored to the specific needs of the patient: short-, intermediate-, and long-acting drugs. Bupivacaine has become a standard part of the armamentarium for postsurgical pain control while articaine has become the second-most used local anesthetic in the United States since its introduction in 2000. Despite an increase in anecdotal reports of paresthesia since articaine's introduction there is yet, no supporting scientific evidence.

  16. Neurotoxicity versus Neuroprotection of Anesthetics: Young Children on the Ropes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizaga Rebollar, Ramón; García Palacios, María V; Morales Guerrero, Javier; Torres Morera, Luis M

    2017-08-01

    Normal brain development in young children depends on a balance between excitation and inhibition of neurons, and alterations to this balance may cause apoptosis. During the perioperative period, both surgical stimuli and anesthetics can induce neurotoxicity. This article attempts to expand the perspective of a topical issue-anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity-by also considering the protective effect of general anesthetics against surgery-induced neurotoxicity, all of which may generate some controversy in the current literature. The "new" major factor influencing neurotoxicity-nociceptive stimulus-is discussed together with other factors to develop clinical and research strategies to obtain a balance between neurotoxicity and neuroprotection.

  17. Blood profiles in unanesthetized and anesthetized guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wendy R; Johnston, Matthew S; Higgins, Sarah; Izzo, Angelo A; Kendall, Lon V

    2016-01-01

    The guinea pig is a common animal model that is used in biomedical research to study a variety of systems, including hormonal and immunological responses, pulmonary physiology, corticosteroid response and others. However, because guinea pigs are evolutionarily a prey species, they do not readily show behavioral signs of disease, which can make it difficult to detect illness in a laboratory setting. Minimally invasive blood tests, such as complete blood counts and plasma biochemistry assays, are useful in both human and veterinary medicine as an initial diagnostic technique to rule in or rule out systemic illness. In guinea pigs, phlebotomy for such tests often requires that the animals be anesthetized first. The authors evaluated hematological and plasma biochemical effects of two anesthetic agents that are commonly used with guinea pigs in a research setting: isoflurane and a combination of ketamine and xylazine. Hematological and plasma biochemical parameters were significantly different when guinea pigs were under either anesthetic, compared to when they were unanesthetized. Plasma proteins, liver enzymes, white blood cells and red blood cells appeared to be significantly altered by both anesthetics, and hematological and plasma biochemical differences were greater when guinea pigs were anesthetized with the combination of ketamine and xylazine than when they were anesthetized with isoflurane. Overall these results indicate that both anesthetics can significantly influence hematological and plasma biochemical parameters in guinea pigs.

  18. Glottic closing force in an anesthetized, awake pig model: biomechanical effects on the laryngeal closure reflex resulting from altered central facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y H; Sasaki, C T

    2001-01-01

    Reflex sphincteric closure of the larynx, essential to lower airway protection, is most efficiently achieved through strong reflex adduction by both vocal cords. Because the conversion of a bilaterally evoked response to a unilaterally evoked one appears anesthesia-dependent, we hypothesized that central facilitation is an essential component of a bilateral adductor reflex and that its disturbance could result in weakened sphincteric closure. Six adult 50 kg pigs were used in this study. During electrical stimulation of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (iSLN) using bipolar platinum-iridium electrodes, the force of the evoked glottic closure response was measured using a pressure transducer positioned between both vocal cords, while electromyographic evoked response was recorded from both thyroarytenoid muscles under varying levels [0.5-1.0 minimal alveolar concentration (MAC)] of isoflurane anesthesia. The force of glottic closure appeared less under deep anesthesia, even with bilateral stimulation of the iSLN, than under light anesthesia with unilateral stimulation. As anesthetic levels approached 1.0 MAC, the glottic closing force decreased to 52-72% of the force measured under 0.5 MAC light anesthesia. Although it is generally understood that alteration of central facilitation by deepening anesthesia abolishes the crossed adductor reflex, the biomechanical effects of altered central facilitation on force differentials have never been previously demonstrated. Precise understanding of this effect may improve the prevention of aspiration in patients emerging from heavy sedation or under prolonged psychotropic control.

  19. Investigation of the effects of naratriptan, rizatriptan, and sumatriptan on jugular venous oxygen saturation in anesthetized pigs: implications for their mechanism of acute antimigraine action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létienne, Robert; Verscheure, Yvan; John, Gareth W

    2003-10-01

    The effects of naratriptan, rizatriptan, and sumatriptan on arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference and carotid hemodynamics were compared in the anesthetized pig. Oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures in systemic arterial and jugular venous blood as well as hemoglobin oxygen saturation were determined by conventional blood gas analysis. Vehicle (n = 19) or naratriptan, rizatriptan, or sumatriptan (0.63, 2.5, 10, 40, 160, 630, and 2,500 microg/kg i.v.; n = 7/group) were infused cumulatively. In naratriptan-, rizatriptan-, and sumatriptan-treated animals, jugular venous oxygen saturation decreased dose dependently (geometric mean ED50 values of 3.1, 17.9, and 16.0 microg/kg, respectively) concomitantly with increases in carotid vascular resistance. Rizatriptan significantly and dose dependently, from 160 microg/kg, increased PvCO2 (P animals studied. Maximal variations in PvCO2 were found to correlate highly with those in PvO2 (P = 0.002), but maximal variations in carotid resistance failed to correlate with those in PvCO2 (P = 0.76) or PvO2 (P = 0.28). The results demonstrate that the triptans investigated robustly produced carotid vasoconstriction, but elicited less consistent decreases in VOS and increases in jugular PvCO2, possibly suggestive of distinct mechanisms. Collectively, the data suggest that triptan-induced increases in arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference and carbon dioxide partial pressure in venous blood draining the head are class effects.

  20. Effects of acute intravenous administration of pentamidine, a typical hERG-trafficking inhibitor, on the cardiac repolarization process of halothane-anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Yuji; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Yukitoshi; Hoshiai, Kiyotaka; Mitsumori, Yoshitaka; Sugiyama, Atsushi

    2009-08-01

    Although acute treatment of pentamidine does not directly modify any ionic channel function in the heart at clinically relevant concentrations, its continuous exposure can prolong QT interval. Recent in vitro studies have indicated that hERG trafficking inhibition may play an important role in the onset of pentamidine-induced long QT syndrome. In this study, we examined acute in vivo electropharmacological effects of pentamidine using the halothane-anesthetized canine model (n = 5). The clinically relevant total dose of 4 mg/kg of pentamidine (namely, 1 mg/kg, i.v. over 10 min followed by 3 mg/kg, i.v. over 10 min with a pause of 20 min) decreased the mean blood pressure, ventricular contraction, preload to the left ventricle, and peripheral vascular resistance. Pentamidine also enhanced the atrioventricular conduction in parallel with its cardiohemodynamic actions, but it gradually prolonged both the ventricular repolarization period and effective refractory period, whereas no significant change was detected in the intraventricular conduction. Thus, acute administration of a clinically relevant dose of pentamidine can suppress cardiac function and vascular tone with reflex-mediated increase of sympathetic activity, whereas it may delay the repolarization process, suggesting that inhibition of potassium-channel trafficking might be induced more acutely in vivo than those previously expected in vitro.

  1. Efeitos cardiorrespiratórios da buprenorfina em cães anestesiados pelo desfluorano Cardiorespiratory effects of buprenorphine in dogs anesthetized with desflurane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almir Pereira de Souza

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, com este estudo, avaliar os efeitos da buprenorfina sobre variáveis cardiovasculares e respiratórias em cães durante anestesia com desfluorano. Para tanto, foram utilizados 20 cães adultos, distribuídos em dois grupos (GB e GC. A anestesia foi induzida com propofol (8mg kg-1 IV e em seguida os animais foram intubados com sonda de Magill, a qual foi conectada ao aparelho de anestesia para administração de desfluorano (1,5 CAM. Após 30 minutos, foi aplicado no GB buprenorfina (0,02mg kg-1 e no GC solução de NaCl à 0,9% (0,05ml kg-1. Avaliaram-se: freqüências cardíaca e respiratória (FC e ¦; pressões arteriais sistólica, diastólica e média (PAS, PAD e PAM; débito cardíaco (DC; pressão venosa central (PVC; e as variáveis hemogasométricas pH, PaCO2, PaO2, HCO3, SatO2 e DB. As colheitas dos dados foram feitas aos 30 minutos após o início da administração do desfluorano (MO, 15 minutos após a administração do opióide ou placebo (M15, e a cada 15 minutos após Ml5 (M30, M45, M60 e M75. A avaliação estatística dos dados foi efetuada por meio de Análise de Perfil (P¦ e o pH tiveram reduções no GB, enquanto a PaCO2 esteve aumentada. Concluiu-se que a inclusão da buprenorfina durante anestesia inalatória pelo desfluorano determina discretas alterações cardiovasculares, bem-como potencializa a hipoventilação promovida pelo desfluorano, com a manifestação de hipercapnia, o que não contra-indica o seu uso em pacientes estáveis.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of buprenorphine on cardiovascular and respiratory variables in dogs anesthetized with desflurane. Twenty adult healthy male and female mongrel dogs were randomly distributed in two groups of ten animals each (GB and GC. The anesthetic induction was done using propofol (8mg kg-1, IV, and immediately, the dogs were intubated and submited to desflurane anesthesia administrated at 1.5 MAC. After 30 minutes of induction, animals

  2. Opioid induced hyperalgesia in anesthetic settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Yeomans, David C

    2014-11-01

    Pain is difficult to investigate and difficult to treat, in part, because of problems in quantification and assessment. The use of opioids, combined with classic anesthetics to maintain hemodynamic stability by controlling responses to intraoperative painful events has gained significant popularity in the anesthetic field. However, several side effects profiles concerning perioperative use of opioid have been published. Over the past two decades, many concerns have arisen with respect to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which is the paradoxical effect wherein opioid usage may decrease pain thresholds and increase atypical pain unrelated to the original, preexisting pain. This brief review focuses on the evidence, mechanisms, and modulatory and pharmacologic management of OIH in order to elaborate on the clinical implication of OIH.

  3. The effect of midazolam on the recovery quality, recovery time and the minimum alveolar concentration for extubation in the isoflurane-anesthetized pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, S A; Quandt, J E; Hofmeister, E H; Peroni, J

    2015-04-01

    There are no reported studies evaluating the effect of midazolam on recovery quality, recovery time or minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) at which extubation occurs (MAC extubation). Our hypotheses were that midazolam administered prior to recovery would decrease MAC extubation, prolong recovery time but provide a smoother recovery. Sixteen Yorkshire pigs were anesthetized with isoflurane for approximately 5 h. The end-tidal isoflurane concentration was then stabilized at 1.4% for 20 min. Pigs were randomly assigned to receive midazolam or saline. The vaporizer was decreased by 10% every 10 min until extubation. Pigs were declared awake by a blinded observer and were assigned a recovery score by the same observer. Mean MAC extubation was not significantly different for pigs receiving saline prior to recovery compared with those pigs receiving midazolam. The overall mean MAC extubation for both groups was 0.6 ± 0.4 vol%. Time to extubation was not significantly longer with midazolam (124 ± 36 min) compared with the saline group (96 ± 61 min; P = 0.09). Recovery score was not significantly different between groups (midazolam, 0.86 ± 1.1; saline 0.5 ± 0.5; P = 0.26). In conclusion, midazolam did not affect MAC extubation. There was no advantage of administering midazolam in the recovery period when performing step-down titration of isoflurane anesthesia.

  4. Quantifying the Effect of Metformin Treatment and Dose on Glycemic Control

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer A Hirst; Farmer, Andrew J.; Ali, Raghib; Roberts, Nia W.; Stevens, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Metformin is the first-line oral medication recommended for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. We reviewed the literature to quantify the effect of metformin treatment on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in all types of diabetes and examine the impact of differing doses on glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched from 1950 to June 2010 for trials of at least 12 weeks’ duration in which diabetic patients w...

  5. Enhanced computational methods for quantifying the effect of geographic and environmental isolation on genetic differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botta, Filippo; Eriksen, Casper; Fontaine, Michaël C.;

    2015-01-01

    method allowing us to deal with genomic data sets (several hundred thousands loci). 3. We also illustrate the potential of the method by re-analysing three data sets, namely harbour porpoises in Europe, coyotes in California and herrings in the Baltic Sea. 4. The computer program developed here is freely......1. In a recent paper, Bradburd et al. (Evolution, 67, 2013, 3258) proposed a model to quantify the relative effect of geographic and environmental distance on genetic differentiation. Here, we enhance this method in several ways. 2. We modify the covariance model so as to fit better with mainstream...

  6. Effect of glutamate stimulation of the cuneiform nucleus on cardiovascular regulation in anesthetized rats: role of the pontine Kolliker-Fuse nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Nasimi, Ali

    2011-04-18

    Cuneiform nucleus (CnF) is a reticular nucleus of the midbrain involved in cardiovascular function and stress. There is no report on the cardiovascular effects of the glutamatergic system in the CnF. In the present study, we investigated the cardiovascular effects of glutamate and its NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptors in the CnF. In addition, the possible mediation of Kolliker-Fuse (KF) nucleus in the cardiovascular effects of the CnF was explored. l-glutamate, AP5 (an NMDA receptor antagonist), and CNQX (an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist) (50-100 nl) were microinjected into the CnF of anesthetized rats. Also, the KF was blocked by cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) then l-glutamate was microinjected into the CnF. The maximum changes of blood pressure and heart rate were compared with the pre-injection (paired t-test) and control (independent t-test) values. Microinjection of glutamate (25 nmol/100 nl) into the CnF produced either a short pressor and bradycardic or a long pressor and tachycardic responses. Microinjection of AP5 or CNQX alone did not affect the basal arterial pressure and heart rate. However, co-injection of glutamate with AP5 strongly attenuated the short and moderately attenuated the long cardiovascular responses elicited by glutamate. Co-injection of glutamate with CNQX did not attenuate the short and weakly attenuated the long cardiovascular responses elicited by glutamate. These data suggest that the responses are mediated mainly through NMDA receptors. Blockade of the KF nucleus strongly attenuated the short response and weakly attenuated the long response to glutamate microinjection, suggesting that the cardiovascular effects of glutamate in the CnF, especially the short responses, were mediated by the KF nucleus. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Persistence in epidemic metapopulations: quantifying the rescue effects for measles, mumps, rubella and whooping cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, C Jessica E; Hampson, Katie; Tatem, Andrew J; Grenfell, Bryan T; Bjørnstad, Ottar N

    2013-01-01

    Metapopulation rescue effects are thought to be key to the persistence of many acute immunizing infections. Yet the enhancement of persistence through spatial coupling has not been previously quantified. Here we estimate the metapopulation rescue effects for four childhood infections using global WHO reported incidence data by comparing persistence on island countries vs all other countries, while controlling for key variables such as vaccine cover, birth rates and economic development. The relative risk of extinction on islands is significantly higher, and approximately double the risk of extinction in mainland countries. Furthermore, as may be expected, infections with longer infectious periods tend to have the strongest metapopulation rescue effects. Our results quantitate the notion that demography and local community size controls disease persistence.

  8. Persistence in epidemic metapopulations: quantifying the rescue effects for measles, mumps, rubella and whooping cough.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Jessica E Metcalf

    Full Text Available Metapopulation rescue effects are thought to be key to the persistence of many acute immunizing infections. Yet the enhancement of persistence through spatial coupling has not been previously quantified. Here we estimate the metapopulation rescue effects for four childhood infections using global WHO reported incidence data by comparing persistence on island countries vs all other countries, while controlling for key variables such as vaccine cover, birth rates and economic development. The relative risk of extinction on islands is significantly higher, and approximately double the risk of extinction in mainland countries. Furthermore, as may be expected, infections with longer infectious periods tend to have the strongest metapopulation rescue effects. Our results quantitate the notion that demography and local community size controls disease persistence.

  9. Quantifying Environmental and Line-of-Sight Effects in Models of Strong Gravitational Lens Systems

    CERN Document Server

    McCully, Curtis; Wong, Kenneth C; Zabludoff, Ann I

    2016-01-01

    Matter near a gravitational lens galaxy or projected along the line of sight (LOS) can affect strong lensing observables by more than contemporary measurement errors. We simulate lens fields with realistic three-dimensional mass configurations (self-consistently including voids), and then use lens models to quantify biases and uncertainties associated with different ways of treating the lens environment (ENV) and LOS. We identify the combination of mass, projected offset, and redshift that determines the importance of a perturbing galaxy for lensing. Foreground structures have a stronger effect on the lens potential than background structures, due to non-linear effects in the foreground and downweighting in the background. There is dramatic variation in the net strength of ENV/LOS effects across different lens fields; modeling fields individually yields stronger priors on $H_0$ than ray tracing through N-body simulations. Lens systems in groups tend to have stronger ENV/LOS contributions than non-group lenses...

  10. Nanoscale Quantifying the Effects of Targeted Drug on Chemotherapy in Lymphoma Treatment Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2016-10-01

    The applications of targeted drugs in treating cancers have significantly improved the survival rates of patients. However, in the clinical practice, targeted drugs are commonly combined with chemotherapy drugs, causing that the exact contribution of targeted drugs to the clinical outcome is difficult to evaluate. Quantitatively investigating the effects of targeted drugs on chemotherapy drugs on cancer cells is useful for us to understand drug actions and design better drugs. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a powerful tool for probing the nanoscale physiological activities of single live cells. In this paper, the detailed changes in cell morphology and mechanical properties were quantified on single lymphoma cells during the actions of rituximab (a monoclonal antibody targeted drug) and two chemotherapy drugs (cisplatin and cytarabine) by AFM. AFM imaging revealed the distinct changes of cellular ultramicrostructures induced by the drugs. The changes of cellular mechanical properties after the drug stimulations were measured by AFM indenting. The statistical histograms of cellular surface roughness and mechanical properties quantitatively showed that rituximab could remarkably strengthen the killing effects of chemotherapy drugs. The study offers a new way to quantify the synergistic interactions between targeted drugs and chemotherapy drugs at the nanoscale, which will have potential impacts on predicting the efficacies of drug combinations before clinical treatments.

  11. Day-surgery patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain than those anesthetized with sevoflurane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, Terry

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been recent studies suggesting that patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain compared with patients anesthetized with volatile anesthetics. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind study, 80 patients undergoing day-case diagnostic laparoscopic gynecological surgery were either anesthetized with IV propofol or sevoflurane. The primary outcome measured was pain on a visual analog scale. RESULTS: Patients anesthetized with propofol had less pain compared with patients anesthetized with sevoflurane (P = 0.01). There was no difference in any of the other measured clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The patients anesthetized with propofol appeared to have less pain than patients anesthetized with sevoflurane.

  12. Anesthetic Effect and Comfort of Patients with Different Smoking Frequency in Bronchoscopy%不同吸烟量患者支气管镜检查时麻醉效果及舒适感的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁爱蓉

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the anesthetic effects, anesthetics additional amount and comfort in patients with different smoking frequency in bronchoscopy. Methods A total of 365 patients were divided into non-smoker group (ra=105), light smoker group (n= 122) and heavy smoker group (n=138). The comparison was made of the anesthetic effect and anesthetics additional amount and comfort in bronchoscopy in three groups. Results The anesthetic effect in heavy smoker group was less noticeable than that in non-smoker group and light smoker group (P<0.05). The comparison of anesthetics additional amount and comfort in heavy smoker group, light smoker group and non-smoker group indicated statistic significance (P<0.05). Conclusion Smoking frequency exerts impact on anesthetic effect, anesthetics additional amount and patients' comfort in bronchoscopy. Effective measures should be taken to relieve patients' discomfort and make them more satisfied.%目的 比较不同吸烟量患者支气管镜检查的麻醉效果、麻醉药追加量及舒适感.方法 365例支气管镜检查患者根据吸烟状况分为非吸烟组105例,轻度吸烟组122例,重度吸烟组138例,比较3组患者支气管镜检查中的麻醉效果、麻醉药追加量及检查后对舒适感的评价.结果 不同吸烟量的患者检查中麻醉效果不同,重度吸烟组患者麻醉效果最差,轻度吸烟组和非吸烟组较好;轻度吸烟组、重度吸烟组与非吸烟组追加麻醉药量和舒适度差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05),重度吸烟组麻醉药追加量最大,舒适感最低,非吸烟组麻醉药追加量最少,舒适感最高.结论 吸烟量会影响支气管镜检查患者麻醉效果、麻醉用药量及舒适感,护士需有针对性地采用适时适当的方法,为患者提供更多的关爱和照顾,减轻患者生理及心理的不适,提升患者的满意度.

  13. Quantifying the effectiveness of virtual reality pain management: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulea, Camelia; Soomro, Ahmad; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Wiederhold, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Sensory pathways, consisting of chains of neurons, which spread from the receptor organ to the cerebral cortex, are responsible for the perception of sensations (including pain). In this study, we set out to determine how effective virtual reality (VR) could be in distracting patients from pain experienced through thermoreceptors on the skin. Six healthy subjects were exposed to uncomfortable pain stimuli with and without VR distraction. Subjects reported a drop in pain while in the VR environment, and mean pain rating was significantly lower than the session with no VR distraction. These results indicate that VR distraction can diminish pain experienced by subjects, thus we conclude by eliciting future directions for quantifying effectiveness of VR as a pain management solution.

  14. Anesthetic Maintenance of Thyroid Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Negovsky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid diseases are most common in endocrinology. Thyrotoxicosis induces dysfunction of virtually all organs and systems, the blood circulatory system being subjected to considerable changes. Cardiovascular diseases affect not only the quality of life in a patient, but significantly increase a risk from surgery that is the only radical treatment. For this reason, most authors consider thyrotoxicosis to be a contraindication to elective surgical intervention. At the same time it is known that drug compensation of thyrotoxicosis may be attained in not all patients. In this case, the results of treatment and a patient’s safety during surgery depend on the type and quality of anesthetic protection. The capabilities of anesthetic maintenance of thyroid surgery have recently expanded substantially. The paper deals with the preparation of patients with thyrotoxicosis for surgical intervention and the perioperative management of these patients. Key words: thyroid, toxic goiter, thyrotoxicosis, premedication, anesthetic mode, sevoflurane, xenon.

  15. Study on the anesthetic effect of combined intravenous-inhalation general anesthesia under nasopharyngeal airway-mask spontaneous breathing for laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the anesthetic effect of combined intravenous-inhalation general anesthesia under nasopharyngeal airway-mask spontaneous breathing for laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery in children.Methods:A total of118 cases of children with inguinal hernia who received laparoscopic surgery in our hospital from August 2012 to August 2014 were enrolled as research subjects and randomly divided into observation group 59 cases and control group 59 cases. Control group received conventional tracheal intubation intravenous general anesthesia, observation group received combined intravenous-inhalation general anesthesia under nasopharyngeal airway-mask spontaneous breathing, and then differences in respiratory and circulatory indicators, awareness-related indicators, G-6PD, PFK and inflammatory factor levels and oxidative stress levels between two groups were compared.Results:HR and MAP values of observation group at T1 and T2 were lower than those of control group, and SpO2 value was higher than that of control group; intraoperative Ppeak, Pplat, Raw, D(A-a)O2 and RI levels of observation group were lower than those of control group, and levels of Cdyn and OI were higher than those of control group; intraoperative G-6PD, PFK, CRP and IL-6 levels of observation group were lower than those of control group, and IL-10 level was higher than that of control group; intraoperative NO, SOD and GSH levels of observation group were higher than those of control group, and levels of ET-1, CAT and blood glucose were lower than those of control group.Conclusion:Combined intravenous-inhalation general anesthesia under nasopharyngeal airway-mask spontaneous breathing for laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery in children can effectively stabilize respiratory and circulatory level, reduce intraoperative systemic inflammation and oxidative stress state and contribute to early postoperative rehabilitation.

  16. Comparison of the effects of PEEP levels on respiratory mechanics and elimination of volatile anesthetic agents in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy; a prospective, randomized, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinalp, Hüsnü Mert; Bakan, Nurten; Karaören, Gülşah; Şahin, Ömer Torun; Çeliksoy, Emre

    2016-06-23

    In laparoscopic procedures, intraabdominal carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflation can cause decreased compliance, increased airway resistance, and impaired ventilation-perfusion ratios. We aimed to investigate the effects of intraoperative positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) treatment on respiratory dynamics and elimination time of volatile anesthetic agents. In the present study, 75 ASA I-II patients were randomized into 3 groups to receive 0 cmH2O PEEP (group I), 5 cmH2O PEEP (group II), or 8 cmH2O PEEP (group III). Hemodynamic parameters, peak and plateau inspiratory airway pressures (Ppeak, Pplateau), compliance values, the ratio of the fractions of inspired and expired concentration of sevoflurane (Fi/Fexp sevoflurane) at 1 MAC, times from 1 to 0.3 and 0.1 MAC and values for pulmonary function tests (PFT) were recorded. Ppeak and Pplateau in group III were higher; compliance values in group I and the extent of reduction in postoperative forced vital capacity (FVC) in group III were lower than those in the other groups (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed between the groups regarding times from 1 to 0.3 MAC and times from 0.3 to 0.1 MAC. It was found that 8 cmH2O PEEP increased compliance without clinically significant pulmonary deterioration and that 8 cmH2O PEEP led to less impairment in postoperative PFTs compared to 0 and 5 cmH2O PEEP but had no effect on sevoflurane elimination time.

  17. No antiinflammatory effect of short-term topical and subcutaneous administration of local anesthetics on postburn inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Dahl, J B; Brennum, J

    1993-01-01

    , development of blister and ulcerations, or the intensity of inflammation after burn injury between the control legs and EMLA- or bupivacaine-treated legs, respectively. CONCLUSION. No antiinflammatory effect of short-term preinjury and postinjury topical 5% EMLA or subcutaneous 0.5% bupivacaine could...

  18. AerChemMIP: quantifying the effects of chemistry and aerosols in CMIP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, William J.; Lamarque, Jean-François; Schulz, Michael; Boucher, Olivier; Eyring, Veronika; Hegglin, Michaela I.; Maycock, Amanda; Myhre, Gunnar; Prather, Michael; Shindell, Drew; Smith, Steven J.

    2017-02-01

    The Aerosol Chemistry Model Intercomparison Project (AerChemMIP) is endorsed by the Coupled-Model Intercomparison Project 6 (CMIP6) and is designed to quantify the climate and air quality impacts of aerosols and chemically reactive gases. These are specifically near-term climate forcers (NTCFs: methane, tropospheric ozone and aerosols, and their precursors), nitrous oxide and ozone-depleting halocarbons. The aim of AerChemMIP is to answer four scientific questions. 1. How have anthropogenic emissions contributed to global radiative forcing and affected regional climate over the historical period? 2. How might future policies (on climate, air quality and land use) affect the abundances of NTCFs and their climate impacts? 3.How do uncertainties in historical NTCF emissions affect radiative forcing estimates? 4. How important are climate feedbacks to natural NTCF emissions, atmospheric composition, and radiative effects? These questions will be addressed through targeted simulations with CMIP6 climate models that include an interactive representation of tropospheric aerosols and atmospheric chemistry. These simulations build on the CMIP6 Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima (DECK) experiments, the CMIP6 historical simulations, and future projections performed elsewhere in CMIP6, allowing the contributions from aerosols and/or chemistry to be quantified. Specific diagnostics are requested as part of the CMIP6 data request to highlight the chemical composition of the atmosphere, to evaluate the performance of the models, and to understand differences in behaviour between them.

  19. Effects of helium-neon laser irradiation and local anesthetics on potassium channels in pond snail neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatov, Yu D; Vislobokov, A I; Vlasov, T D; Kolpakova, M E; Mel'nikov, K N; Petrishchev, I N

    2005-10-01

    Intracellular dialysis and membrane voltage clamping were used to show that He-Ne laser irradiation of a pond snail neuron at a dose of 0.7 x 10(-4) J (power density 1.5 x 10(2) W/m2) increases the amplitude of the potential-dependent slow potassium current, while a dose of 0.7 x 10(-3) J decreases this current. Bupivacaine suppresses the potassium current. Combined application of laser irradiation at a dose of 0.7 x 10(-3) J increased the blocking effect of 10 microM bupivacaine on the slow potassium current, while an irradiation dose of 0.7 x 10(-4) J weakened the effect of bupivacaine.

  20. COMPARISON OF GLYCEMIC EFFECT OF ADRENALIN CONTAINING LOCAL ANESTHETIC IN DIABETIC AND NON-DIABETIC PATIENTS UNDERGOING MINOR ORAL SURGICAL PROCEDURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM To compare the changes in blood glucose level associated with administration of adrenaline containing local anesthetic in diabetic and non-diabetic patients undergoing minor oral surgical procedures. METHODS AND MATERIAL The study included 150 well controlled diabetic patients and 150 non-diabetic healthy patients in age group of 40-60 years who underwent minor oral surgical procedures (trans alveolar extractions, alveoplasty and flap surgeries. Patients in both the group were administered 1.8ml of local anesthetic agent containing 1:100,000 adrenaline for inferior alveolar nerve block and 0.2 ml of anesthetic agent for long buccal nerve block. Blood glucose levels were assessed and compared during pre-operative and one hour post-operative period. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS The comparison of the random blood sugar levels preop and postop in both the groups were compared using paired t test and RBS levels between two groups were analysed using unpaired t test. P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS No statistically significant change in post-operative blood glucose level was noted between the diabetic and non-diabetic patients. CONCLUSION The study concluded that it is safe to administer local anesthetic containing 1:100,000 adrenaline in smaller volumes to well controlled diabetic patients.

  1. Quantifying mediating effects of endogenous estrogen and insulin in the relation between obesity, alcohol consumption, and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla A; Gunter, Marc J; Lange, Theis

    2012-01-01

    Increased exposure to endogenous estrogen and/or insulin may partly explain the relationship of obesity, physical inactivity, and alcohol consumption and postmenopausal breast cancer. However, these potential mediating effects have not been formally quantified in a survival analysis setting....

  2. Quantifying Direct and Indirect Effects of Elevated CO2 on Ecosystem Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatichi, S.; Leuzinger, S.; Paschalis, A.; Donnellan-Barraclough, A.; Hovenden, M. J.; Langley, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide are expected to affect carbon assimilation, evapotranspiration (ET) and ultimately plant growth. Direct leaf biochemical effects have been widely investigated, while indirect effects, although documented, are very difficult to quantify in experiments. We hypothesize that the interaction of direct and indirect effects is a possible reason for conflicting results concerning the magnitude of CO2 fertilization effects across different climates and ecosystems. A mechanistic ecohydrological model (Tethys-Chloris) is used to investigate the relative contribution of direct (through plant physiology) and indirect (via stomatal closure and thus soil moisture, and changes in Leaf Area Index, LAI) effects of elevated CO2 across a number of ecosystems. We specifically ask in which ecosystems and climate indirect effects are expected to be largest. Data and boundary conditions from flux-towers and free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments are used to force the model and evaluate its performance. Numerical results suggest that indirect effects of elevated CO2, through water savings and increased LAI, are very significant and sometimes larger than direct effects. Indirect effects tend to be considerably larger in water-limited ecosystems, while direct effects correlate positively with mean air temperature. Increasing CO2 from 375 to 550 ppm causes a total effect on Net Primary Production in the order of 15 to 40% and on ET from 0 to -8%, depending on climate and ecosystem type. The total CO2 effect has a significant negative correlation with the wetness index and positive correlation with vapor pressure deficit. These results provide a more general mechanistic understanding of relatively short-term (less than 20 years) implications of elevated CO2 on ecosystem response and suggest plausible magnitudes for the expected changes.

  3. Analgesic and Sensory Effects of the Pecs Local Anesthetic Block in Patients with Persistent Pain after Breast Cancer Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijayasinghe, Nelun; Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Kehlet, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    proposes to block these nerves and has provided pain relief for patients undergoing breast cancer surgery, but has yet to be evaluated in patients with PPBCS. METHODS: The aim of this pilot study was to examine the effects of the Pecs block on summed pain intensity (SPI) and sensory function (through...... quantitative sensory testing [QST]) in eight patients with PPBCS. SPI and QST measurements were recorded before and 30 minutes after administration of the Pecs block (20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine). Pain intensity and sleep interference were measured daily before and after the block for 7 days. RESULTS: Patients...

  4. To spatially explicitly quantify the indirect effect of disturbances on carbon cycle of Canada's forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Cihlar, J.; Wang, S.; Zhang, Q.; Ung, C.; Price, D.; Fernandes, R.; Fraser, R.

    2001-12-01

    Disturbances (i.e., fire, insects-induced mortality, and harvesting) affect the carbon cycle of forested ecosystems directly in the year of occurrence and indirectly in many years after. For example, forest fire directly releases a fraction of carbon in biomass and forest floor to the atmosphere. The carbon cycle is also affected indirectly by disturbances which set the disturbed stand to age zero. So far, most studies estimate the indirect effect of disturbances on carbon balance at regional to national scales by aggregated forests in a region or a country into a few units, and largely ignoring the effect of spatial heterogeneity of disturbances and environmental factors. Because the effects of disturbances and environmental factors are usually non-linear, ignoring their spatial heterogeneity may introduce large error in the carbon budget estimates. In order to reduce this potential large error, spatially explicit quantification of the indirect effect of disturbances are urgently needed. Spatially explicit estimates of carbon cycle at 1-km resolution also allow direct testing against field measurements, as well as provide essential information for sustainable development of natural resources. To spatially explicitly quantify the indirect effect of disturbances on carbon cycle, we need first to quantify how stand age affects NPP. Our early results indicated the effect of stand age on NPP is species and site quality dependent. Therefore, age-NPP relationships are needed for all major forest species to carry out the spatially explicitly quantification of indirect effect of disturbances. We will derive these age-NPP relationships using existing yield tables, biomass allometric equations, and recent data on fine root and foliage production. To apply these age-NPP relationships, we need geo-spatial information on species, age, and site quality. Several initiatives have been underway to develop these spatial data layers. Because the NPP derived using these age

  5. Effect of local anesthetic concentration, dose and volume on the duration of single-injection ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block with mepivacaine: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenten, Maaike G E; Schoenmakers, Karin P W; Heesterbeek, Petra J C; Scheffer, Gert Jan; Stienstra, Rudolf

    2015-09-30

    In what way volume, concentration and dose affect block duration is controversial. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of dose, volume and concentration of mepivacaine on the duration of sensory and motor blockade in ultrasound-guided single shot axillary brachial plexus blockade. In this parallel group randomized trial conducted in the Sint Maartenskliniek Nijmegen, 45 adult patients undergoing minor orthopaedic forearm, wrist or hand surgery were randomized to 3 groups. Group A: 20 mL mepivacaine 1.5 %, Group B: 30 mL mepivacaine 1 % and Group C: 30 mL mepivacaine 1.5 %. Randomization was computer-generated, with allocation concealment by opaque sequentially numbered sealed envelopes. Patients and observers were blinded to group allocation. duration of sensory block. Forty-five patients were randomized, four patients were excluded and replaced, and 15 patients in each group were included in the analysis. Mean (95 % CI) sensory and motor block duration was 256 (230-282) and 254 (226-282) minutes in Group A, 226 (209-243) and 220 (200-240) minutes in Group B and 270 (249-291) and 264 (244-284) minutes in Group C. Duration of sensory and motor block duration differed significantly between groups (p = 0.012 and p = 0.016 respectively). Post-hoc analysis showed a significantly reduced sensory and motor block duration in Group B when compared to Group C of 44 min. No local anesthetic systemic toxicity was reported. When using mepivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block, a higher dose and concentration was associated with a longer duration of sensory and motor blockade, but not a higher volume. The Netherlands National Trial Register NTR3648 . Registered October 3, 2012.

  6. The Effects of Spinal, Inhalation, and Total Intravenous Anesthetic Techniques on Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Arthroscopic Knee Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müge Koşucu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the effects of different anesthesia techniques on tourniquet-related ischemia-reperfusion by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, ischemia-modified albumin (IMA and neuromuscular side effects. Methods. Sixty ASAI-II patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery were randomised to three groups. In Group S, intrathecal anesthesia was administered using levobupivacaine. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane in Group I and TIVA with propofol in Group T. Blood samples were obtained before the induction of anesthesia (t1, 30 min after tourniquet inflation (t2, immediately before (t3, and 5 min (t4, 15 min (t5, 30 min (t6, 1 h (t7, 2 h (t8, and 6 h (t9 after tourniquet release. Results. MDA and IMA levels increased significantly compared with baseline values in Group S at t2–t9 and t2–t7. MDA levels in Group T and Group I were significantly lower than those in Group S at t2–t8 and t2–t9. IMA levels in Group T were significantly lower than those in Group S at t2–t7. Postoperatively, a temporary 1/5 loss of strength in dorsiflexion of the ankle was observed in 3 patients in Group S and 1 in Group I. Conclusions. TIVA with propofol can make a positive contribution in tourniquet-related ischemia-reperfusion.

  7. Quantifying the Antiviral Effect of IFN on HIV-1 Replication in Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hiroki; Godinho-Santos, Ana; Rato, Sylvie; Vanwalscappel, Bénédicte; Clavel, François; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Iwami, Shingo; Mammano, Fabrizio

    2015-06-01

    Type-I interferons (IFNs) induce the expression of hundreds of cellular genes, some of which have direct antiviral activities. Although IFNs restrict different steps of HIV replication cycle, their dominant antiviral effect remains unclear. We first quantified the inhibition of HIV replication by IFN in tissue culture, using viruses with different tropism and growth kinetics. By combining experimental and mathematical analyses, we determined quantitative estimates for key parameters of HIV replication and inhibition, and demonstrate that IFN mainly inhibits de novo infection (33% and 47% for a X4- and a R5-strain, respectively), rather than virus production (15% and 6% for the X4 and R5 strains, respectively). This finding is in agreement with patient-derived data analyses.

  8. A Mathematical Model Quantifies Proliferation and Motility Effects of TGF-β on Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizhen Emily Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor (TGF-β is known to have properties of both a tumour suppressor and a tumour promoter. While it inhibits cell proliferation, it also increases cell motility and decreases cell–cell adhesion. Coupling mathematical modelling and experiments, we investigate the growth and motility of oncogene-expressing human mammary epithelial cells under exposure to TGF-β. We use a version of the well-known Fisher–Kolmogorov equation, and prescribe a procedure for its parametrisation. We quantify the simultaneous effects of TGF-β to increase the tendency of individual cells and cell clusters to move randomly and to decrease overall population growth. We demonstrate that in experiments with TGF-β treated cells in vitro, TGF-β increases cell motility by a factor of 2 and decreases cell proliferation by a factor of 1/2 in comparison with untreated cells.

  9. Quantifying the interplay between environmental and social effects on aggregated-fish dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capello, Manuela; Cotel, Pascal; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Dagorn, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Demonstrating and quantifying the respective roles of social interactions and external stimuli governing fish dynamics is key to understanding fish spatial distribution. If seminal studies have contributed to our understanding of fish spatial organization in schools, little experimental information is available on fish in their natural environment, where aggregations often occur in the presence of spatial heterogeneities. Here, we applied novel modeling approaches coupled to accurate acoustic tracking for studying the dynamics of a group of gregarious fish in a heterogeneous environment. To this purpose, we acoustically tracked with submeter resolution the positions of twelve small pelagic fish (Selar crumenophthalmus) in the presence of an anchored floating object, constituting a point of attraction for several fish species. We constructed a field-based model for aggregated-fish dynamics, deriving effective interactions for both social and external stimuli from experiments. We tuned the model parameters that...

  10. Tuning and Quantifying Steric and Electronic Effects of N-Heterocyclic Carbenes

    KAUST Repository

    Falivene, Laura

    2014-07-12

    This chapter states that the main handles for tuning steric and electronic effects are the substituents on N atoms, the nature of the C4-C5 bridge (either saturated or unsaturated), and the substituents on the C4 and C5 atoms. The initial intuition that steric properties of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) could be modulated and could impact catalytic behavior stimulated the development of steric descriptors to quantify the steric requirement of different NHCs and, possibly, to compare them with tertiary phosphines. NHCs can be classified as typically strong σ-basic/π-acid ligands, although they have been also shown to exhibit reasonable π-basic properties. This electronic modularity allows NHC ligands to adapt flexibly to different chemical environments represented by a transition metal and the other ligands. © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantifying the effect of vegetation change on regional water balance within the Budyko Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Yang, D.

    2015-12-01

    Budyko framework is widely used to investigate impacts of climate and landscape changes on regional hydrology, but quantifying the effect of vegetation change is still a challenge due to the lack of an explicit expression of vegetation change in Budyko equations. This study attempts to establish a relationship between the change of landscape parameter in a Budyko equation and the change of vegetation (represented by NDVI) in Yellow River Basin and Hai River Basin of China, where vegetation and regional hydrology changed significantly during the past 30 years. It is found that the ratio of landscape parameter change to NDVI change has a good relationship with the aridity index, and thus vegetation change can be converted into landscape parameter change. Then the NDVI elasticity of runoff is introduced and formulized under the Budyko framework. It provides a useful tool for quantitative evaluation of regional hydrological response to vegetation change.

  12. Quantifying Diurnal Cloud Radiative Effects by Cloud Type in the Tropical Western Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burleyson, Casey D.; Long, Charles N.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2015-06-01

    Cloud radiative effects are examined using long-term datasets collected at the three Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities in the tropical western Pacific. We quantify the surface radiation budget, cloud populations, and cloud radiative effects by partitioning the data by cloud type, time of day, and as a function of large scale modes of variability such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phase and wet/dry seasons at Darwin. The novel facet of our analysis is that we break aggregate cloud radiative effects down by cloud type across the diurnal cycle. The Nauru cloud populations and subsequently the surface radiation budget are strongly impacted by ENSO variability whereas the cloud populations over Manus only shift slightly in response to changes in ENSO phase. The Darwin site exhibits large seasonal monsoon related variations. We show that while deeper convective clouds have a strong conditional influence on the radiation reaching the surface, their limited frequency reduces their aggregate radiative impact. The largest source of shortwave cloud radiative effects at all three sites comes from low clouds. We use the observations to demonstrate that potential model biases in the amplitude of the diurnal cycle and mean cloud frequency would lead to larger errors in the surface energy budget compared to biases in the timing of the diurnal cycle of cloud frequency. Our results provide solid benchmarks to evaluate model simulations of cloud radiative effects in the tropics.

  13. Effects of intravenous terbutaline on heart rate, arterial pressure and blood gases in anesthetized horses breathing air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaro, Isla; Fischer, Berit L; Lascola, Kara M; Clark-Price, Stuart C

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of intravenous (IV) administration of terbutaline on PaO2, PaCO2, pH, heart rate (HR) and arterial pressures in healthy, laterally recumbent horses breathing ambient air under total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA). Prospective experimental study. Eight healthy adult horses were enrolled. Six horses, four mares and two geldings weighing 433-624 kg, completed the study. Horses were sedated with xylazine (1.0 mg kg(-1)) IV for placement of arterial and venous catheters. Anesthesia was induced with midazolam (0.1 mg kg(-1)) and ketamine (2.2 mg kg(-1)) IV and maintained with an IV infusion of guaifenesin (50 mg mL(-1)), ketamine (2 mg mL(-1)) and xylazine (0.5 mg mL(-1)) at 1.9 ± 0.3 mL kg(-1) hour(-1). Horses were in left lateral recumbency and breathed air spontaneously. Arterial blood was collected for pH and blood gas analysis during xylazine sedation, 15 minutes after induction of anesthesia, immediately before and 5, 15 and 30 minutes after administration of terbutaline (2 μg kg(-1)), and when the horse was standing after recovery from anesthesia. HR, systolic (SAP), mean (MAP) and diastolic (DAP) arterial pressures were recorded at 5 minute intervals during anesthesia. Normal data were analyzed with anova and non-normal data were analyzed with a Friedman test with a p < 0.05 considered significant. The mean PaO2 decreased from baseline to <60 mmHg (8.0 kPa) during anesthesia (p < 0.0001) and did not improve after administration of terbutaline. After terbutaline administration, HR increased (p = 0.002), and SAP, MAP and DAP decreased (p < 0.001) with the greatest changes occurring immediately after terbutaline administration. Terbutaline (2 μg kg(-1)) IV did not improve PaO2 and was associated with adverse cardiovascular effects during TIVA in healthy, laterally recumbent horses breathing air. Copyright © 2016 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier

  14. The development of ventricular fibrillation due to etomidate for anesthetic induction: a very rare side effect, case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Karcioglu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Ventricular fibrillation occurring in a patient can result in unexpected complications. Here, our aim is to present a case of ventricular fibrillation occurring immediately after anesthesia induction with etomidate administration. Case report: A fifty-six-year-old female patient with a pre-diagnosis of gallstones was admitted to the operating room for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The induction was performed by etomidate with a bolus dose of 0.3 mg/kg. Severe and fast adduction appeared in the patient's arms immediately after induction. A tachycardia with wide QRS and ventricular rate 188 beat/min was detected on the monitor. The rhythm turned to VF during the preparation of cardioversion. Immediately we performed defibrillation to the patient. Sinus rhythm was obtained. It was decided to postpone the operation due to the patient's unstable condition. Conclusion: In addition to other known side effects of etomidate, very rarely, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation can be also seen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case regarding etomidate causing VF in the literature.

  15. Anesthetic effectiveness of topical levobupivacaine 0.75% versus topical proparacaine 0.5% for intravitreal injections

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    Nurgül Örnek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Today no method of topical anesthesia for intravitreal injection administration has been proven to make the patient comfortable yet. We compared the efficacy of topical levobupivacaine 0.75% and proparacaine 0.5% in patients undergoing intravitreal injections. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized study comparing two agents for topical anesthesia in intravitreal injections. Ninety-six consecutive patients were enrolled into two groups to receive either topical levobupivacaine 0.75% (n=48 or proparacaine 0.5% (n=48. Patients were asked to score their pain using a visual analog scale (VAS immediately following the injection. The average of these scores was used as the primary outcome. The surgeon performing the procedure scored his perception of the patients′ pain using the Wong-Baker FACES scale. Results: Mean VAS pain scores for two groups were found to be 44.77 ± 16.42 and 34.18 ± 14.83, respectively. Mean VAS pain score in the proparacaine group was significantly lower than that in the levobupivacaine group (P= 0.003. Mean Wong-Baker FACES scores for the two groups were 1.08 ± 0.49 and 1.10 ± 0.30, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between levobupivacaine and proparacaine groups (P=0.824. Conclusions: Topical proparacaine 0.5% was more effective in preventing pain during intravitreal injections.

  16. EFEITO ANALGÉSICO DO BUTORFANOL NA DOR SOMÁTICA EM GATOS ANESTESIADOS COM PROPOFOL ANALGESIC EFFECT OF BUTORPHANOL ON SOMATIC PAIN IN CATS ANESTHETIZED WITH PROPOFOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Ciniello Araujo

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available O propofol é um agente anestésico intravenoso usado para indução e manutenção da anestesia, mas produz analgesia limitada, havendo a necessidade do uso concomitante de analgésicos. Avaliou-se o efeito analgésico do butorfanol na dor somática em gatos anestesiados com doses fracionadas de propofol. Foram utilizados 16 animais, distribuídos aleatoriamente em dois grupos. Os animais do grupo controle foram pré-tratados com 0,2mg/kg de acepromazina por via IM e, após 15 minutos, receberam 6mg/kg de propofol por via IV. Os animais do grupo tratamento foram pré-medicados com uma combinação de acepromazina (0,2mg/kg e butorfanol (0,8mg/kg, administrados na mesma seringa por via IM, e, após 15 minutos, receberam 6mg/kg de propofol por via IV. Em ambos os grupos, a manutenção da anestesia foi feita com administrações de propofol, na dose de 3mg/kg, por via IV, sempre que necessário, durante 60 minutos. A necessidade de readministração de propofol foi verificada pela resposta apresentada ao pinçamento cutâneo, através de uma pinça de Kocher. Avaliaram-se também as freqüências cardíaca e respiratória, pressão arterial média, saturação de oxiemoglobina e temperatura retal. A administração de butorfanol causou apenas redução nas freqüências cardíaca e respiratória e na saturação de oxiemoglobina, em comparação com o grupo controle,sem exercer influência significativa sobre o período hábil, a dose total administrada e o período de recuperação do propofol. Concluiu-se que a adição de butorfanol não produziu analgesia somática em gatos anestesiados com doses fracionadas de propofol.Propofol is an intravenous anesthetic agent used for induction and maintenance of anesthesia but produces limited analgesia, and concomitant use of analgesics is necessary. The analgesic effect of butorphanol in somatic pain in cats anesthetized with intermittent doses of propofol was evaluated. Sixteen animals were randomly

  17. Low-order non-spatial effects dominate second-order spatial effects in the texture quantifier analysis of 18F-FDG-PET images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J Brooks

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in applying image texture quantifiers to assess the intra-tumor heterogeneity observed in FDG-PET images of various cancers. Use of these quantifiers as prognostic indicators of disease outcome and/or treatment response has yielded inconsistent results. We study the general applicability of some well-established texture quantifiers to the image data unique to FDG-PET.We first created computer-simulated test images with statistical properties consistent with clinical image data for cancers of the uterine cervix. We specifically isolated second-order statistical effects from low-order effects and analyzed the resulting variation in common texture quantifiers in response to contrived image variations. We then analyzed the quantifiers computed for FIGOIIb cervical cancers via receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves and via contingency table analysis of detrended quantifier values.We found that image texture quantifiers depend strongly on low-effects such as tumor volume and SUV distribution. When low-order effects are controlled, the image texture quantifiers tested were not able to discern only the second-order effects. Furthermore, the results of clinical tumor heterogeneity studies might be tunable via choice of patient population analyzed.Some image texture quantifiers are strongly affected by factors distinct from the second-order effects researchers ostensibly seek to assess via those quantifiers.

  18. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ran, E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Liu, Jing, E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Jia [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  19. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia (42-46°C, treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  20. Quantifying the effect of sentiment on information diffusion in social media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Ferrara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Social media has become the main vehicle of information production and consumption online. Millions of users every day log on their Facebook or Twitter accounts to get updates and news, read about their topics of interest, and become exposed to new opportunities and interactions. Although recent studies suggest that the contents users produce will affect the emotions of their readers, we still lack a rigorous understanding of the role and effects of contents sentiment on the dynamics of information diffusion. This work aims at quantifying the effect of sentiment on information diffusion, to understand: (i whether positive conversations spread faster and/or broader than negative ones (or vice-versa; (ii what kind of emotions are more typical of popular conversations on social media; and, (iii what type of sentiment is expressed in conversations characterized by different temporal dynamics. Our findings show that, at the level of contents, negative messages spread faster than positive ones, but positive ones reach larger audiences, suggesting that people are more inclined to share and favorite positive contents, the so-called positive bias. As for the entire conversations, we highlight how different temporal dynamics exhibit different sentiment patterns: for example, positive sentiment builds up for highly-anticipated events, while unexpected events are mainly characterized by negative sentiment. Our contribution represents a step forward to understand how the emotions expressed in short texts correlate with their spreading in online social ecosystems, and may help to craft effective policies and strategies for content generation and diffusion.

  1. Inferior Oblique Muscle Weakening: Is It Possible to Quantify Its Effects on Horizontal Deviations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Taylan Sekeroglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate and quantify the effect of inferior oblique muscle weakening on horizontal deviations. Methods. The medical files of patients who had undergone an inferior oblique weakening as a single procedure were all reviewed. The main measures were the type of inferior oblique overaction (IOOA, pre- and postoperative amount of IOOA, and horizontal deviations in primary position. Results. The study was conducted with 66 patients (30 males, 36 females. The median age was 11 years (1–49. Of the 66 patients, 30 (45.5% had primary and 36 (54.5% had secondary IOOA. The most common procedure was inferior oblique anteriorization in 32 patients (48.5%. The mean postoperative horizontal and vertical deviations and the amount of IOOA were decreased postoperatively ( for all. The median amount of correction of horizontal near and distance deviations was (0–20. The preoperative amount of IOOA, the presence of fourth nerve palsy, and the type of the weakening procedure had no significant effect on the amount of correction of horizontal deviations. Conclusion. The inferior oblique weakening procedures have secondary effects and warrant reduction of horizontal deviations in varying degrees. This should be borne in mind in planning a simultaneous horizontal muscle surgery and setting the surgical amount.

  2. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF SIMULATION AND TIME SERIES MODEL IN QUANTIFYING BULLWHIP EFFECT IN SUPPLY CHAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. O. Fabson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Bullwhip (or whiplash effect is an observed phenomenon in forecast driven distribution channeland careful management of these effects is of great importance to managers of supply chain.Bullwhip effect refers to situations where orders to the suppliers tend to have larger variance thansales to the buyer (demand distortion and the distortion increases as we move up the supply chain.Due to the fact that demand of customer for product is unstable, business managers must forecast inorder to properly position inventory and other resources. Forecasts are statistically based and in mostcases, are not very accurate. The existence of forecast errors made it necessary for organizations tooften carry an inventory buffer called “safety stock”. Moving up the supply chain from the end userscustomers to raw materials supplier there is a lot of variation in demand that can be observed, whichcall for greater need for safety stock.This study compares the efficacy of simulation and Time Series model in quantifying the bullwhipeffects in supply chain management.

  3. Quantifying the Effects of Wildfire Severity on Snow Water Equivalent in the Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A.; Cunningham, S.; Sodergren, C.; Anzelc, J.; Cate, N.; Arya, V.

    2015-12-01

    Snowpack in the Sierra Nevada is a crucial component of the California water supply. Climate change effects on forest ecosystems in this region have reduced snowpack and resulted in earlier snowmelt. Wildfire frequency and severity in the Sierra Nevada have also increased, due to higher temperatures, drought, and a legacy of fire suppression policies leading to fuel loads augmented beyond the historic range of variability. These combined factors have the potential to severely impact California water supply. Using 2014 California Basin Characterization Model (BCM) climate data and automated classification of various Landsat imagery, this study geospatially quantified the effects of low, moderate, and high- severity wildfire on snowpack and snow water equivalent (SWE) in the Sierra Nevada. An assessment of modeled SWE data were also conducted to examine its usefulness in better understanding areas effected by wildfire. Results indicate little to no significant change in post-fire SWE for high and moderate severity wildfire, however, delineated a significant decrease in post-fire SWE in the low severity wildfire. Additionally, tests show little no significant change in fractional snow cover post-fire. This use of remote sensing and modeled data will assist in decision and policy making related to management of forest ecosystems and water resources within the Sierra Nevada.

  4. Quantifiable effectiveness of experimental scaling of river- and delta morphodynamics and stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Maarten G.; van Dijk, Wout M.; van de Lageweg, Wietse I.; Hoyal, David C. J. D.; Markies, Henk; van Maarseveen, Marcel; Roosendaal, Chris; van Weesep, Wendell; van Breemen, Dimitri; Hoendervoogt, Remko; Cheshier, Nathan

    2014-06-01

    Laboratory experiments to simulate landscapes and stratigraphy often suffer from scale effects, because reducing length- and time scales leads to different behaviour of water and sediment. Classically, scaling proceeded from dimensional analysis of the equations of motion and sediment transport, and minor concessions, such as vertical length scale distortion, led to acceptable results. In the past decade many experiments were done that seriously violated these scaling rules, but nevertheless produced significant and insightful results that resemble the real world in quantifiable ways. Here we focus on self-formed fluvial channels and channel patterns in experiments. The objectives of this paper are 1) to identify what aspects of scaling considerations are most important for experiments that simulate morphodynamics and stratigraphy of rivers and deltas, 2) to establish a design strategy for experiments based on a combination of relaxed classical scale rules, theory of bars and meanders, and small-scale experiments focussed at specific processes. We present a number of small laboratory setups and protocols that we use to rapidly quantify erosional and depositional types of forms and dynamics that develop in the landscape experiments as a function of detailed properties, such as effective material strength, and to assess potential scale effects. Most importantly, the width-to-depth ratio of channels determines the bar pattern and meandering tendency. The strength of floodplain material determines these channel dimensions, and theory predicts that laboratory rivers should have 1.5 times larger width-to-depth ratios for the same bar pattern. We show how floodplain formation can be controlled by adding silt-sized silicaflour, bentonite, Medicago sativa (alfalfa) or Partially Hydrolyzed PolyAcrylamide (a synthetic polymer) to poorly sorted sediment. The experiments demonstrate that there is a narrow range of conditions between no mobility of bed or banks, and too much

  5. Effect of buprenorphine as an adjunct with plain local anesthetic solution in supraclavicular brachial plexus block on quality and duration of postoperative analgesia

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    Surekha Patil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Supraclavicular brachial plexus block is ideal for upper limb surgical procedures. Buprenorphine, an agonist antagonist opioid has been used as an adjunct to prolong analgesia. We aimed to evaluate the quality and duration of postoperative analgesia by addition of buprenorphine to local anesthetic solution. Material and Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind control study was conducted on 50 healthy patients of ASA Grade I/II of age group 20-70 years scheduled for orthopedic and reconstructive surgery of upper limb under supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Patients were allocated into two groups, 25 in each group viz.: Group B (buprenorphine group received 20 ml 0.5% bupivacaine + 15 ml 2% lignocaine with adrenaline (1:200,000 + 4 ml normal saline + 1500 units hyaluronidase + 3 μg/kg buprenorphine diluted to 1 ml normal saline. Group C (control group received 20 ml 0.5% bupivacaine + 15 ml 2% lignocaine with adrenaline (1:200,000 + 4 ml normal saline + 1500 units hyaluronidase + 1 ml normal saline. The parameters observed were onset and duration of sensory and motor block, quality and duration of analgesia and side-effects. Results: The mean duration of postoperative analgesia was significantly longer in Group B (16.04 ± 3.19 h than in Group C (6.20 ± 0.74 h. There was no difference between two groups on mean onset of sensory block. The mean duration motor block was significantly longer in Group B (4.93 ± 0.94 h than in Group C (2.25 ± 0.62 h [P < 0.05]. The mean duration of sensory block was also significantly longer in Group B (5.71 ± 0.94 h than in Group C (4.94 ± 0.70 h with P < 0.05. Conclusion: Addition of 3 μg/kg buprenorphine to 0.5% bupivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block prolonged duration of postoperative analgesia and sensory blockade without an increase in side effects.

  6. Anesthetic Implications of Obesity in the Surgical Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dority, Jeremy; Hassan, Zaki-Udin; Chau, Destiny

    2011-01-01

    The obese patient presents many challenges to both anesthesiologist and surgeon. A good understanding of the pathophysiologic effects of obesity and its anesthetic implications in the surgical setting is critical. The anesthesiologist must recognize increased risks and comorbidities inherent to the obese patient and manage accordingly, optimizing multisystem function in the perioperative period that leads to successful outcomes. Addressed from an organ systems approach, the purpose of this review is to provide surgical specialists with an overview of the anesthetic considerations of obesity. Minimally invasive surgery for the obese patient affords improved analgesia, postoperative pulmonary function, and shorter recovery times at the expense of a more challenging intraoperative anesthetic course. The physiologic effects of laparoscopy are discussed in detail. Although laparoscopy's physiologic effects on various organ systems are well recognized, techniques provide means for compensation and reversing such effects, thereby preserving good patient outcomes. PMID:23204937

  7. Quantifying Variation in Gait Features from Wearable Inertial Sensors Using Mixed Effects Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kellen Garrison; Shin, Yongyun; Chen, Shanshan

    2017-02-25

    The emerging technology of wearable inertial sensors has shown its advantages in collecting continuous longitudinal gait data outside laboratories. This freedom also presents challenges in collecting high-fidelity gait data. In the free-living environment, without constant supervision from researchers, sensor-based gait features are susceptible to variation from confounding factors such as gait speed and mounting uncertainty, which are challenging to control or estimate. This paper is one of the first attempts in the field to tackle such challenges using statistical modeling. By accepting the uncertainties and variation associated with wearable sensor-based gait data, we shift our efforts from detecting and correcting those variations to modeling them statistically. From gait data collected on one healthy, non-elderly subject during 48 full-factorial trials, we identified four major sources of variation, and quantified their impact on one gait outcome-range per cycle-using a random effects model and a fixed effects model. The methodology developed in this paper lays the groundwork for a statistical framework to account for sources of variation in wearable gait data, thus facilitating informative statistical inference for free-living gait analysis.

  8. Quantifying Variation in Gait Features from Wearable Inertial Sensors Using Mixed Effects Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellen Garrison Cresswell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The emerging technology of wearable inertial sensors has shown its advantages in collecting continuous longitudinal gait data outside laboratories. This freedom also presents challenges in collecting high-fidelity gait data. In the free-living environment, without constant supervision from researchers, sensor-based gait features are susceptible to variation from confounding factors such as gait speed and mounting uncertainty, which are challenging to control or estimate. This paper is one of the first attempts in the field to tackle such challenges using statistical modeling. By accepting the uncertainties and variation associated with wearable sensor-based gait data, we shift our efforts from detecting and correcting those variations to modeling them statistically. From gait data collected on one healthy, non-elderly subject during 48 full-factorial trials, we identified four major sources of variation, and quantified their impact on one gait outcome—range per cycle—using a random effects model and a fixed effects model. The methodology developed in this paper lays the groundwork for a statistical framework to account for sources of variation in wearable gait data, thus facilitating informative statistical inference for free-living gait analysis.

  9. Quantifying Multiscale Habitat Structural Complexity: A Cost-Effective Framework for Underwater 3D Modelling

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    Renata Ferrari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Coral reef habitat structural complexity influences key ecological processes, ecosystem biodiversity, and resilience. Measuring structural complexity underwater is not trivial and researchers have been searching for accurate and cost-effective methods that can be applied across spatial extents for over 50 years. This study integrated a set of existing multi-view, image-processing algorithms, to accurately compute metrics of structural complexity (e.g., ratio of surface to planar area underwater solely from images. This framework resulted in accurate, high-speed 3D habitat reconstructions at scales ranging from small corals to reef-scapes (10s km2. Structural complexity was accurately quantified from both contemporary and historical image datasets across three spatial scales: (i branching coral colony (Acropora spp.; (ii reef area (400 m2; and (iii reef transect (2 km. At small scales, our method delivered models with <1 mm error over 90% of the surface area, while the accuracy at transect scale was 85.3% ± 6% (CI. Advantages are: no need for an a priori requirement for image size or resolution, no invasive techniques, cost-effectiveness, and utilization of existing imagery taken from off-the-shelf cameras (both monocular or stereo. This remote sensing method can be integrated to reef monitoring and improve our knowledge of key aspects of coral reef dynamics, from reef accretion to habitat provisioning and productivity, by measuring and up-scaling estimates of structural complexity.

  10. Ergogenic effects of β-alanine and carnosine: proposed future research to quantify their efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, John; Charles, Jessica; Unruh, Kayla; Giebel, Rachel; Learmonth, Lexis; Potter, William

    2012-07-01

    β-alanine is an amino acid that, when combined with histidine, forms the dipeptide carnosine within skeletal muscle. Carnosine and β-alanine each have multiple purposes within the human body; this review focuses on their roles as ergogenic aids to exercise performance and suggests how to best quantify the former's merits as a buffer. Carnosine normally makes a small contribution to a cell's total buffer capacity; yet β-alanine supplementation raises intracellular carnosine concentrations that in turn improve a muscle's ability to buffer protons. Numerous studies assessed the impact of oral β-alanine intake on muscle carnosine levels and exercise performance. β-alanine may best act as an ergogenic aid when metabolic acidosis is the primary factor for compromised exercise performance. Blood lactate kinetics, whereby the concentration of the metabolite is measured as it enters and leaves the vasculature over time, affords the best opportunity to assess the merits of β-alanine supplementation's ergogenic effect. Optimal β-alanine dosages have not been determined for persons of different ages, genders and nutritional/health conditions. Doses as high as 6.4 g day(-1), for ten weeks have been administered to healthy subjects. Paraesthesia is to date the only side effect from oral β-alanine ingestion. The severity and duration of paraesthesia episodes are dose-dependent. It may be unwise for persons with a history of paraesthesia to ingest β-alanine. As for any supplement, caution should be exercised with β-alanine supplementation.

  11. Towards risk-based drought management in the Netherlands: quantifying the welfare effects of water shortage

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vat, Marnix; Femke, Schasfoort; Rhee Gigi, Van; Manfred, Wienhoven; Nico, Polman; Joost, Delsman; den Hoek Paul, Van; Maat Judith, Ter; Marjolein, Mens

    2016-04-01

    It is widely acknowledged that drought management should move from a crisis to a risk-based approach. A risk-based approach to managing water resources requires a sound drought risk analysis, quantifying the probability and impacts of water shortage due to droughts. Impacts of droughts are for example crop yield losses, hydropower production losses, and water shortage for municipal and industrial use. Many studies analyse the balance between supply and demand, but there is little experience in translating this into economic metrics that can be used in a decision-making process on investments to reduce drought risk. We will present a drought risk analysis method for the Netherlands, with a focus on the underlying economic method to quantify the welfare effects of water shortage for different water users. Both the risk-based approach as well as the economic valuation of water shortage for various water users was explored in a study for the Dutch Government. First, an historic analysis of the effects of droughts on revenues and prices in agriculture as well as on shipping and nature was carried out. Second, a drought risk analysis method was developed that combines drought hazard and drought impact analysis in a probabilistic way for various sectors. This consists of a stepwise approach, from water availability through water shortage to economic impact, for a range of drought events with a certain return period. Finally, a local case study was conducted to test the applicability of the drought risk analysis method. Through the study, experience was gained into integrating hydrological and economic analyses, which is a prerequisite for drought risk analysis. Results indicate that the risk analysis method is promising and applicable for various sectors. However, it was also found that quantification of economic impacts from droughts is time-consuming, because location- and sector-specific data is needed, which is not always readily available. Furthermore, for some

  12. Quantifying soil burn severity for hydrologic modeling to assess post-fire effects on sediment delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, Mariana; Brooks, Erin; Lew, Roger; Kolden, Crystal; Quinn, Dylan; Elliot, William; Robichaud, Pete

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion is a secondary fire effect with great implications for many ecosystem resources. Depending on the burn severity, topography, and the weather immediately after the fire, soil erosion can impact municipal water supplies, degrade water quality, and reduce reservoirs' storage capacity. Scientists and managers use field and remotely sensed data to quickly assess post-fire burn severity in ecologically-sensitive areas. From these assessments, mitigation activities are implemented to minimize post-fire flood and soil erosion and to facilitate post-fire vegetation recovery. Alternatively, land managers can use fire behavior and spread models (e.g. FlamMap, FARSITE, FOFEM, or CONSUME) to identify sensitive areas a priori, and apply strategies such as fuel reduction treatments to proactively minimize the risk of wildfire spread and increased burn severity. There is a growing interest in linking fire behavior and spread models with hydrology-based soil erosion models to provide site-specific assessment of mitigation treatments on post-fire runoff and erosion. The challenge remains, however, that many burn severity mapping and modeling products quantify vegetation loss rather than measuring soil burn severity. Wildfire burn severity is spatially heterogeneous and depends on the pre-fire vegetation cover, fuel load, topography, and weather. Severities also differ depending on the variable of interest (e.g. soil, vegetation). In the United States, Burned Area Reflectance Classification (BARC) maps, derived from Landsat satellite images, are used as an initial burn severity assessment. BARC maps are classified from either a Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) or differenced Normalized Burned Ratio (dNBR) scene into four classes (Unburned, Low, Moderate, and High severity). The development of soil burn severity maps requires further manual field validation efforts to transform the BARC maps into a product more applicable for post-fire soil rehabilitation activities

  13. Local anesthetics as pain therapy in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Thomas J; Seddighi, M Reza

    2010-12-01

    This article describes the rationale behind the use of systemically administered lidocaine as an analgesic. The analgesic efficacy of intravenously administered lidocaine is well documented by studies in human patients and laboratory animals. The mechanism by which systemically administered lidocaine produces analgesia is uncertain but is thought to include action at sodium, calcium, and potassium channels and the N-methyl-D-aspartate acid receptor. In addition, the anti-inflammatory actions of lidocaine are important in producing analgesia because inflammatory mediators augment neuronal excitability. The available studies of systemically administered lidocaine in horses provide evidence for the analgesic and anesthetic effects of intravenous lidocaine in this species.

  14. Mimosa pudica, Dionaea muscipula and anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luccia, Thiago Paes de Barros

    2012-09-01

    Some studies showed that anesthetics reduce the response of physical stimuli in Mimosa pudica and in Venus Flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), peculiar plants that have the ability to respond to touch stimuli. In this research we tested the effects of ketamine, lidocaine, diethyl ether, and amlodipine on the movements of Mimosa pudica and Venus Flytrap. With a literature review, we tried to bring elements to theorize about the interaction of these substances with these plants. The angular displacement in Mimosa´s petiole and in Dionaea leaves is what was measured to compare the drugs group with control groups.

  15. Loss of anatomical landmarks with eutectic mixture of local anesthetic cream for neonatal male circumcision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Rebeca M; Kubiak, David W; Abdullahi, Rasak Bamidele; Ndubuka, Nnamdi; Nkgau, Maggie M; Dapaah-Siakwan, Fredrick; Powis, Kathleen M; Lockman, Shahin

    2013-02-01

    We report two cases of newborns who developed marked local edema after application of a eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) topical anesthetic cream for neonatal male circumcision (NMC). Although local edema and erythema are known potential side effects of EMLA cream, a common anesthetic used for NMC, the loss of landmarks precluding safe NMC has not previously been reported, and is described here. Although we cannot recommend an alternate local anesthetic for neonates with this reaction to EMLA, based on a review of the published data we think that serious systemic adverse events related to EMLA are extremely rare.

  16. Reconstructing ice-age palaeoclimates: Quantifying low-CO2 effects on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, I. C.; Cleator, S. F.; Huang, Y. H.; Harrison, S. P.; Roulstone, I.

    2017-02-01

    We present a novel method to quantify the ecophysiological effects of changes in CO2 concentration during the reconstruction of climate changes from fossil pollen assemblages. The method does not depend on any particular vegetation model. Instead, it makes use of general equations from ecophysiology and hydrology that link moisture index (MI) to transpiration and the ratio of leaf-internal to ambient CO2 (χ). Statistically reconstructed MI values are corrected post facto for effects of CO2 concentration. The correction is based on the principle that e, the rate of water loss per unit carbon gain, should be inversely related to effective moisture availability as sensed by plants. The method involves solving a non-linear equation that relates e to MI, temperature and CO2 concentration via the Fu-Zhang relation between evapotranspiration and MI, Monteith's empirical relationship between vapour pressure deficit and evapotranspiration, and recently developed theory that predicts the response of χ to vapour pressure deficit and temperature. The solution to this equation provides a correction term for MI. The numerical value of the correction depends on the reconstructed MI. It is slightly sensitive to temperature, but primarily sensitive to CO2 concentration. Under low LGM CO2 concentration the correction is always positive, implying that LGM climate was wetter than it would seem from vegetation composition. A statistical reconstruction of last glacial maximum (LGM, 21±1 kyr BP) palaeoclimates, based on a new compilation of modern and LGM pollen assemblage data from Australia, is used to illustrate the method in practice. Applying the correction brings pollen-reconstructed LGM moisture availability in southeastern Australia better into line with palaeohydrological estimates of LGM climate.

  17. Quantifying the effect of riming on snowfall using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseev, Dmitri; von Lerber, Annakaisa; Tiira, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based observations of ice particle size distribution and ensemble mean density are used to quantify the effect of riming on snowfall. The rime mass fraction is derived from these measurements by following the approach that is used in a single ice-phase category microphysical scheme proposed for the use in numerical weather prediction models. One of the characteristics of the proposed scheme is that the prefactor of a power law relation that links mass and size of ice particles is determined by the rime mass fraction, while the exponent does not change. To derive the rime mass fraction, a mass-dimensional relation representative of unrimed snow is also determined. To check the validity of the proposed retrieval method, the derived rime mass fraction is converted to the effective liquid water path that is compared to microwave radiometer observations. Since dual-polarization radar observations are often used to detect riming, the impact of riming on dual-polarization radar variables is studied for differential reflectivity measurements. It is shown that the relation between rime mass fraction and differential reflectivity is ambiguous, other factors such as change in median volume diameter need also be considered. Given the current interest on sensitivity of precipitation to aerosol pollution, which could inhibit riming, the importance of riming for surface snow accumulation is investigated. It is found that riming is responsible for 5% to 40% of snowfall mass. The study is based on data collected at the University of Helsinki field station in Hyytiälä during U.S. Department of Energy Biogenic Aerosols Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) field campaign and the winter 2014/2015. In total 22 winter storms were analyzed, and detailed analysis of two events is presented to illustrate the study.

  18. Quantifying beetle-mediated effects on gas fluxes from dung pats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atte Penttilä

    Full Text Available Agriculture is one of the largest contributors of the anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs responsible for global warming. Measurements of gas fluxes from dung pats suggest that dung is a source of GHGs, but whether these emissions are modified by arthropods has not been studied. A closed chamber system was used to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O from dung pats with and without dung beetles on a grass sward. The presence of dung beetles significantly affected the fluxes of GHGs from dung pats. Most importantly, fresh dung pats emitted higher amounts of CO2 and lower amounts of CH4 per day in the presence than absence of beetles. Emissions of N2O showed a distinct peak three weeks after the start of the experiment--a pattern detected only in the presence of beetles. When summed over the main grazing season (June-July, total emissions of CH4 proved significantly lower, and total emissions of N2O significantly higher in the presence than absence of beetles. While clearly conditional on the experimental conditions, the patterns observed here reveal a potential impact of dung beetles on gas fluxes realized at a small spatial scale, and thereby suggest that arthropods may have an overall effect on gas fluxes from agriculture. Dissecting the exact mechanisms behind these effects, mapping out the range of conditions under which they occur, and quantifying effect sizes under variable environmental conditions emerge as key priorities for further research.

  19. Quantifying Beetle-Mediated Effects on Gas Fluxes from Dung Pats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttilä, Atte; Slade, Eleanor M.; Simojoki, Asko; Riutta, Terhi; Minkkinen, Kari; Roslin, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Agriculture is one of the largest contributors of the anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) responsible for global warming. Measurements of gas fluxes from dung pats suggest that dung is a source of GHGs, but whether these emissions are modified by arthropods has not been studied. A closed chamber system was used to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from dung pats with and without dung beetles on a grass sward. The presence of dung beetles significantly affected the fluxes of GHGs from dung pats. Most importantly, fresh dung pats emitted higher amounts of CO2 and lower amounts of CH4 per day in the presence than absence of beetles. Emissions of N2O showed a distinct peak three weeks after the start of the experiment – a pattern detected only in the presence of beetles. When summed over the main grazing season (June–July), total emissions of CH4 proved significantly lower, and total emissions of N2O significantly higher in the presence than absence of beetles. While clearly conditional on the experimental conditions, the patterns observed here reveal a potential impact of dung beetles on gas fluxes realized at a small spatial scale, and thereby suggest that arthropods may have an overall effect on gas fluxes from agriculture. Dissecting the exact mechanisms behind these effects, mapping out the range of conditions under which they occur, and quantifying effect sizes under variable environmental conditions emerge as key priorities for further research. PMID:23940758

  20. Quantifying the Effect of the Principal-Agent Problem on USResidential Energy Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant

    2006-08-12

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) initiated andcoordinated this project to investigate the effects of market failures inthe end-use of energy that may isolate some markets or portions thereoffrom energy price signals in five member countries. Quantifying theamount of energy associated with market failures helps to demonstrate thesignificance of energy efficiency policies beyond price signals. In thisreport we investigate the magnitude of the principal-agent (PA) problemaffecting four of the major energy end uses in the U.S. residentialsector: refrigeration, water heating, space heating, and lighting. Usingdata from the American Housing Survey, we develop a novel approach toclassifying households into a PA matrix for each end use. End use energyvalues differentiated by housing unit type from the Residential EnergyConsumption Survey were used to estimate the final and primary energy useassociated with the PA problem. We find that the 2003 associated siteenergy use from these four end uses totaled over 3,400 trillion Btu,equal to 35 percent of the site energy consumed by the residentialsector.

  1. Quantifying the effects of tempering on individual phase properties of DP980 steel with nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, G.; Zhang, F.; Ruimi, A.; Field, D. P.; Sun, X.

    2016-06-01

    We conduct a series of thermal and mechanical testing on a commercial dual phase (DP) 980 steel in order to quantify the effects of tempering on its individual phase properties. Tempering treatment is conducted at 250 °C and 400 °C for 60 minutes each. Ferrite and martensite grains are distinguished using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM), and the martensite volume fractions (MVF) are determined based on the image quality (IQ) map. Multi-scale indentation tests combined with a newly developed inverse method are used to obtain the individual phase flow properties in each tempered DP980 sample. The results show that, i) tempering significantly reduces martensite yield strength, while it only slightly reduces the ferrite yield strength; ii) tempering temperature has a more significant influence on the work hardening exponent of ferrite than that of martensite; iii) the elastic modulus of martensite is consistently higher than that of ferrite. As a validation, a simple rule of mixtures is used to verify the above-predicted individual phase flow stresses with the experimentally obtained overall true stress vs. true strain curves. The methodology and the corresponding results shown in this study can help guide the selection of tempering parameters in optimizing the mechanical properties of DP steels for their intended applications.

  2. ESR technique for noninvasive way to quantify cyclodextrins effect on cell membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grammenos, A., E-mail: A.Grammenos@ulg.ac.be [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, B5, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman (Belgium); Mouithys-Mickalad, A. [Center of Oxygen, Research and Development (CORD), Department of Chemistry, B6a, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman (Belgium); Guelluy, P.H.; Lismont, M. [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, B5, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman (Belgium); Piel, G. [Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Pharmacy, CHU, B36, University of Liege, 1 Av. de l' Hopital (Belgium); Hoebeke, M. [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, B5, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman (Belgium)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} ESR: a new tool for cyclodextrins study on living cells. {yields} Cholesterol and phospholipid extraction by Rameb in a dose- and time-dependent way. {yields} Extracted phospholipids and cholesterol form stable aggregates. {yields} ESR spectra show that lipid rafts are damaged by Rameb. {yields} Quantification of the cholesterol extraction on cell membranes in a noninvasive way. -- Abstract: A new way to study the action of cyclodextrin was developed to quantify the damage caused on cell membrane and lipid bilayer. The Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to study the action of Randomly methylated-beta-cyclodextrin (Rameb) on living cells (HCT-116). The relative anisotropy observed in ESR spectrum of nitroxide spin probe (5-DSA and cholestane) is directly related to the rotational mobility of the probe, which can be further correlated with the microviscosity. The use of ESR probes clearly shows a close correlation between cholesterol contained in cells and cellular membrane microviscosity. This study also demonstrates the Rameb ability to extract cholesterol and phospholipids in time- and dose-dependent ways. In addition, ESR spectra enabled to establish that cholesterol is extracted from lipid rafts to form stable aggregates. The present work supports that ESR is an easy, reproducible and noninvasive technique to study the effect of cyclodextrins on cell membranes.

  3. Quantifying the Effects of Photoperiod, Temperature and Daily Irradiance on Flowering Time of Soybean Isolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elroy R. Cober

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Soybean isolines with different combinations of photoperiod sensitivity alleles were planted in a greenhouse at different times during the year resulting in natural variation in daily incident irradiance and duration. The time from planting to first flower were observed. Mathematical models, using additive and multiplicative modes, were developed to quantify the effect of photoperiod, temperature, photoperiod-temperature interactions, rate of photoperiod change, and daily solar irradiance on flowering time. Observed flowering times correlated with predicted times (R2 = 0.92, Standard Error of the Estimate (SSE = 2.84 d, multiplicative mode; R2 = 0.91, SSE = 2.88 d, additive mode. The addition of a rate of photoperiod change function and an irradiance function to the temperature and photoperiod functions improved the accuracy of flowering time prediction. The addition of a modified photoperiod function, which allowed for photoperiod sensitivity at shorter photoperiods, improved prediction of flowering time. Both increasing and decreasing rate of photoperiod change, as well as low levels of daily irradiance delayed flowering in soybean. The complete model, which included terms for the rate of photoperiod change, photoperiod, temperature and irradiance, predicted time to first flower in soybean across a range of environmental conditions with an SEE of 3.6 days when tested with independent data.

  4. Quantifying effects of abiotic and biotic drivers on community dynamics with multivariate autoregressive (MAR) models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Stephanie E; Holmes, Elizabeth E; Scheef, Lindsay P; Scheuerell, Mark D; Katz, Stephen L; Pendleton, Daniel E; Ward, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    Long-term ecological data sets present opportunities for identifying drivers of community dynamics and quantifying their effects through time series analysis. Multivariate autoregressive (MAR) models are well known in many other disciplines, such as econometrics, but widespread adoption of MAR methods in ecology and natural resource management has been much slower despite some widely cited ecological examples. Here we review previous ecological applications of MAR models and highlight their ability to identify abiotic and biotic drivers of population dynamics, as well as community-level stability metrics, from long-term empirical observations. Thus far, MAR models have been used mainly with data from freshwater plankton communities; we examine the obstacles that may be hindering adoption in other systems and suggest practical modifications that will improve MAR models for broader application. Many of these modifications are already well known in other fields in which MAR models are common, although they are frequently described under different names. In an effort to make MAR models more accessible to ecologists, we include a worked example using recently developed R packages (MAR1 and MARSS), freely available and open-access software.

  5. Quantifying the effects of land use and climate on Holocene vegetation in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquer, Laurent; Gaillard, Marie-José; Sugita, Shinya; Poska, Anneli; Trondman, Anna-Kari; Mazier, Florence; Nielsen, Anne Birgitte; Fyfe, Ralph M.; Jönsson, Anna Maria; Smith, Benjamin; Kaplan, Jed O.; Alenius, Teija; Birks, H. John B.; Bjune, Anne E.; Christiansen, Jörg; Dodson, John; Edwards, Kevin J.; Giesecke, Thomas; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Kangur, Mihkel; Koff, Tiiu; Latałowa, Małgorzata; Lechterbeck, Jutta; Olofsson, Jörgen; Seppä, Heikki

    2017-09-01

    Early agriculture can be detected in palaeovegetation records, but quantification of the relative importance of climate and land use in influencing regional vegetation composition since the onset of agriculture is a topic that is rarely addressed. We present a novel approach that combines pollen-based REVEALS estimates of plant cover with climate, anthropogenic land-cover and dynamic vegetation modelling results. This is used to quantify the relative impacts of land use and climate on Holocene vegetation at a sub-continental scale, i.e. northern and western Europe north of the Alps. We use redundancy analysis and variation partitioning to quantify the percentage of variation in vegetation composition explained by the climate and land-use variables, and Monte Carlo permutation tests to assess the statistical significance of each variable. We further use a similarity index to combine pollen-based REVEALS estimates with climate-driven dynamic vegetation modelling results. The overall results indicate that climate is the major driver of vegetation when the Holocene is considered as a whole and at the sub-continental scale, although land use is important regionally. Four critical phases of land-use effects on vegetation are identified. The first phase (from 7000 to 6500 BP) corresponds to the early impacts on vegetation of farming and Neolithic forest clearance and to the dominance of climate as a driver of vegetation change. During the second phase (from 4500 to 4000 BP), land use becomes a major control of vegetation. Climate is still the principal driver, although its influence decreases gradually. The third phase (from 2000 to 1500 BP) is characterised by the continued role of climate on vegetation as a consequence of late-Holocene climate shifts and specific climate events that influence vegetation as well as land use. The last phase (from 500 to 350 BP) shows an acceleration of vegetation changes, in particular during the last century, caused by new farming

  6. Geomorphically Effective Energy Expenditure for Quantifying Channel Responses to Extreme Floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amponsah, William; Righini, Margherita; Wohl, Ellen E.; Borga, Marco; Marchi, Lorenzo; Rathburn, Sara L.; Surian, Nicola; Zoccatelli, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Flash floods are characterized by strong spatio-temporal rainfall variability and therefore show variations in energy expenditure and associated geomorphic impacts that depend on geological controls on channel geometry and sediment characteristics, as well as on variations in flood intensity. Geomorphic modification is expected to occur in river channels when driving forces (i.e., hydraulic and abrasive forces of water and sediment acting on the channel) exceed threshold of resisting forces (i.e., the ability of channel boundaries to remain unchanged by the passage of water and sediments). However, these forces that determine the capacity of floods to modify existing channel configuration are extremely difficult to quantify. Geomorphic impacts or hazards usually take the form of erosional and depositional modification of the pre-flood channel and valley geometry. A central question in hydrogeomorphology relates to why flash floods of similar magnitudes and intensities sometimes produce dissimilar geomorphic results? In fact, some less magnitude floods in terms of discharge per unit of drainage area have been found to produce major geomorphic damage than some high magnitude events. Furthermore, the use of peak instantaneous flow parameters such as discharge, velocity, shear stress and stream power to quantify geomorphic changes have often been non-deterministic and/or inconclusive. Investigations are therefore needed on how factors such as channel geometry, substrate, riparian vegetation, sediment supply, and flood magnitude and duration can interact and influence geomorphic effectiveness of high magnitude floods. The main objective of this study is to assess the coupled influence of flood-flow duration and total energy expenditure on geomorphic response to extreme flash floods, which is aimed at developing an index that combines flow duration, stream power per unit area and threshold for major channel erosion to be evaluated as a predictor of geomorphic adjustment

  7. Anesthetic Related Advances with Cyclodextrins

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Welliver; John P. McDonough

    2007-01-01

    Cyclodextrins encapsulate and electrostatically bind to lipophilic molecules. The exterior of cyclodextrins are water-soluble and maintain aqueous solubility despite encapsulation of non-aqueous soluble molecules. This unique ability to encapsulate lipophilic molecules and maintain water solubility confers numerous pharmacologic advantages for both drug delivery and removal. Cyclodextrins, a component part of supramolecular chemistry, may be in its infancy of anesthetic application but recent...

  8. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings.

  9. Nonclassical effects in plasmonics: an energy perspective to quantify nonclassical effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-01-01

    propose a nonclassical-impact parameter (NCI) to characterize the degree of nonclassical effects from an energy perspective, i.e., which fraction of the total electromagnetic energy is attributed to classical electrodynamic terms and which fraction is correspondingly to be assigned to nonclassical degrees...... of an infinite work function....

  10. Explaining Social Class Inequalities in Educational Achievement in the UK: Quantifying the Contribution of Social Class Differences in School "Effectiveness"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Graham

    2016-01-01

    There are large social class inequalities in educational achievement in the UK. This paper quantifies the contribution of one mechanism to the production of these inequalities: social class differences in school "effectiveness," where "effectiveness" refers to a school's impact on pupils' educational achievement (relative to…

  11. Infrared imaging to quantify the effects of nicotine-induced vasoconstriction in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Siegfried; Kargel, Christian

    2009-05-01

    Smoking is the most significant source of preventable morbidity and premature mortality worldwide (WHO-2008). One of the many effects of nicotine is vasoconstriction which is triggered by the autonomic nervous system. The constriction of blood vessels e.g. of the skin's vascular bed is responsible for a decrease of the supply with oxygen and nutrients and a lowering of the skin temperature. We used infrared imaging to quantify temperature decreases caused by cigarette smoking in the extremities of smokers and also monitored heart rate as well as blood pressure. The results - including thermograms showing "temporary amputations" of the fingertips due to a significant temperature drop - can help increase the awareness of the dangers of smoking and the success of withdrawal programs. Surprisingly, in our control persons (3 brave non-smoking volunteers who smoked a cigarette) we also found temperature increases suggesting that vasodilation (widening of blood vessels) was provoked by cigarettes. To verify this unexpected finding and eliminate effects from the 4000 chemical compounds in the smoke, we repeated the experiment following a stringent protocol ruling out physiological and psychological influences with 9 habitual smokers and 17 nonsmokers who all chew gums with 2 mg of nicotine. Task-optimized digital image processing techniques (target detection, image-registration and -segmentation) were applied to the acquired infrared image sequences to automatically yield temperature plots of the fingers and palm. In this paper we present the results of our study in detail and show that smokers and non-smokers respond differently to the administration of nicotine.

  12. Ergogenic Effects of β-Alanine and Carnosine: Proposed Future Research to Quantify Their Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Caruso

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available β-alanine is an amino acid that, when combined with histidine, forms the dipeptide carnosine within skeletal muscle. Carnosine and β-alanine each have multiple purposes within the human body; this review focuses on their roles as ergogenic aids to exercise performance and suggests how to best quantify the former’s merits as a buffer. Carnosine normally makes a small contribution to a cell’s total buffer capacity; yet β-alanine supplementation raises intracellular carnosine concentrations that in turn improve a muscle’s ability to buffer protons. Numerous studies assessed the impact of oral β-alanine intake on muscle carnosine levels and exercise performance. β-alanine may best act as an ergogenic aid when metabolic acidosis is the primary factor for compromised exercise performance. Blood lactate kinetics, whereby the concentration of the metabolite is measured as it enters and leaves the vasculature over time, affords the best opportunity to assess the merits of β-alanine supplementation’s ergogenic effect. Optimal β-alanine dosages have not been determined for persons of different ages, genders and nutritional/health conditions. Doses as high as 6.4 g day−1, for ten weeks have been administered to healthy subjects. Paraesthesia is to date the only side effect from oral β-alanine ingestion. The severity and duration of paraesthesia episodes are dose-dependent. It may be unwise for persons with a history of paraesthesia to ingest β-alanine. As for any supplement, caution should be exercised with β-alanine supplementation.

  13. Quantifying the effects of mixing and residual circulation on trends of stratospheric mean age of air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeger, Felix; Abalos, Marta; Birner, Thomas; Konopka, Paul; Legras, Bernard; Müller, Rolf; Riese, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Trends in stratospheric mean age of air are driven both by changes in the (slow, large scale) residual mean mass circulation and by changes in (fast, locally acting) eddy mixing. However, to what degree both effects affect mean age trends is an open question. Here, we present a method that allows the effects of mixing and residual circulation on trends of mean age of air to be quantified. This method is based on mean age simulations with the Lagrangian chemistry transport model CLaMS driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis, and on the mean age tracer continuity equation integrated along the residual circulation. CLaMS simulated climatological mean age in the lower stratosphere shows reliable agreement with balloon borne in-situ obsevations and with satellite observations by MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding). During 1990--2013, CLaMS simulated mean age decreases throughout most of the stratosphere, qualitatively consistent with results based on climate model simulations (e.g., Butchart et al., 2010). Remarkably, in the Northern hemisphere subtropics and mid-latitudes above about 24km CLaMS mean age trends are insignificant, consistent with published mean age trends from in-situ observations (Engel et al., 2009). Furthermore, during 2002--2012 CLaMS mean age changes show a clear hemispheric asymmetry in agreement with MIPAS satellite observations (Stiller et al., 2012; Ploeger et al., 2014) and HCl decadal changes (Mahieu et al., 2014). We find that changes in the transit time along the residual circulation alone cannot explain the mean age trends, and including the effect of mixing integrated along the air parcel history is essential. Therefore, differences in mean age trends between models or between models and observations are likely related to differences in the integrated effect of mixing on mean age of air. Above about 550K, trends in the integrated mixing effect appear to be likely coupled to residual circulation changes. References

  14. Liquid general anesthetics lower critical temperatures in plasma membrane vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Ellyn; Machta, Benjamin B; Veatch, Sarah L

    2013-01-01

    A large and diverse array of small hydrophobic molecules induce general anesthesia. Their efficacy as anesthetics has been shown to correlate both with their affinity for a hydrophobic environment and with their potency in inhibiting certain ligand gated ion channels. Here we explore the effects that n-alcohols and other liquid anesthetics have on the two-dimensional miscibility critical point observed in cell derived giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs). We show that anesthetics depress the critical temperature (Tc) of these GPMVs without strongly altering the ratio of the two liquid phases found below Tc. The magnitude of this affect is consistent across n-alcohols when their concentration is rescaled by the median anesthetic concentration (AC50) for tadpole anesthesia, but not when plotted against the overall concentration in solution. At AC50 we see a 4{\\deg}C downward shift in Tc, much larger than is typically seen in the main chain transition at these anesthetic concentrations. GPMV miscibility critic...

  15. Anesthetic success of 1.8ml lidocaine 2% for mandibular tooth extraction. A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Aravena

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the anesthetic effect of a 1.8ml cartridge of anesthetic lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:100,000 in inferior alveolar nerve block (NAI for the extraction in mandibular teeth. Material and methods: A pilot study with analitic design. Participating patients of Dental Emergency Service volunteers from Valdivia-Chile for mandibular teeth extractions attending between May and July of 2010. The anesthetic technique was performed by a dentist using only one cartridge of anesthetic to the NAI. After 15 minutes, the effect was considered effective when anesthetic not require reinforcement with additional anesthesia during extraction of teeth. We analyzed the relationship between success anesthetic effect with sex, age, diagnosis of tooth and type and level of pain observed (chi-square and logistic regression, p<0.05. Results: 62 patients were selected, of which only 47(75.8% was achieved anesthetic success. There was no statistical association with sex, age, type or dental diagnosis and perceived pain. Conclusion: Using a 1.8ml cartridge of anesthesia was effective in three of four patients treated by extraction of mandibular teeth. It suggests further research in relation to the clinical effectiveness of other anesthetics with the same dose in NAI.

  16. Effects of using the posterior or anterior approaches to the lumbar plexus on the minimum effective anesthetic concentration (MEAC) of mepivacaine required to block the femoral nerve: a prospective, randomized, up-and-down study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelleri, Gianluca; Aldegheri, Giorgio; Ruggieri, Francesco; Carnelli, Franco; Fanelli, Andrea; Casati, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate if psoas compartment block requires a larger concentration of mepivacaine to block the femoral nerve than does an anterior 3-in-1 femoral nerve block. Forty eight patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament repair were randomly allocated to receive an anterior 3-in-1 femoral block (femoral group, n = 24) or a posterior psoas compartment block (psoas group, n = 24) with 30 mL of mepivacaine. The concentration of the injected solution was varied for consecutive patients using an up-and-down staircase method (initial concentration: 1%; up-and-down steps: 0.1%). The minimum effective anesthetic concentration of mepivacaine blocking the femoral nerve in 50% of cases (ED(50)) was 1.06% +/- 0.31% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45%-1.68%) in the femoral group and 1.03% +/- 0.21% (95% CI, 0.6%-1.45%) in the psoas group (P = .83). The lateral femoral cutaneous and obturator nerves were blocked in 4 (16%) and 5 (20%) femoral group patients as compared with 20 (83%) and 19 (80%) psoas group patients (P = .005 and P = .0005, respectively). Intraoperative analgesic supplementation was required by 15 (60%) and 5 (20%) patients in the femoral and psoas groups, respectively (P = .01). Using a posterior psoas compartment approach to the lumbar plexus does not increase the minimum effective anesthetic concentration of mepivacaine required to block the femoral nerve as compared with the anterior 3-in-1 approach, and provides better quality of intraoperative anesthesia due to the more reliable block of the lateral femoral cutaneous and obturator nerves.

  17. 全麻中不同插管方式对麻醉并发症的影响%Effects of Different Endotracheal Intubation on General Anesthesia on Anesthetic Complications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马先春; 厉宝书; 刘静

    2012-01-01

      目的探讨喉罩(LM)及气管插管(EI)在全麻(GA)中对血流动力学及麻醉并发症的影响.方法选取我院近2年来腹腔镜胆囊切除术(LC)患者68例,随机分为 A、B 两组,各组34例,A 组采用 LMA,B 组采用 EIA,比较两组麻醉对血流动力学及术后并发症的影响.结果 A 组置管时、拔管时血流动力学较 B 组稳定,A 组术后麻醉并发症少于 B 组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 LC 中采用LMA 安全性高,不增加不良反应.%  Objective To study the effects of GA using the LM and EI on hemodynamic stability and anesthetic complications. Method Select the past two years in our hospital,68 cases of LC patients, were randomly divided into A and B groups, each 34, A group using the LMA, B group using EIA. The two groups were compared anesthetic effect. Results A group LMA insertion,5min after LMA insertion, removal of LMA, A group of blood flow dynamics than in group B stable, Anesthetic complications after surgery, group A than group B decreased,the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion LC using the LMA safe, without increasing adverse events.

  18. Quantifying Slope Effects and Variations in Crater Density across a Single Geologic Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Heather; Mahanti, Prasun; Robinson, Mark; Povilaitis, Reinhold

    2016-10-01

    Steep underlying slopes (>~5°) significantly increase the rate of degradation of craters [1-3]. As a result, the density of craters is less on steeper slopes for terrains of the same age [2, 4]. Thus, when age-dating a planetary surface, an area encompassing one geologic unit of constant low slope is chosen. However, many key geologic units, such as ejecta blankets, lack sufficient area of constant slope to derive robust age estimates. Therefore, accurate age-dating of such units requires an accurate understanding of the effects of slope on age estimates. This work seeks to determine if the observed trend of decreasing crater density with increasing slopes [2] holds for craters >1 km and to quantify the effect of slope for craters of this size, focusing on the effect of slopes over the kilometer scale. Our study focuses on the continuous ejecta of Orientale basin, where we measure craters >1 km excluding secondaries that occur as chains or clusters. Age-dating via crater density measurements relies on uniform cratering across a single geologic unit. In the case of ejecta blankets and other impact related surfaces, this assumption may not hold due to the formation of auto- secondary craters. As such, we use LRO WAC mosaics [5], crater size-frequency distributions, absolute age estimates, a 3 km slope map derived from the WAC GLD100 [6], and density maps for various crater size ranges to look for evidence of non-uniform cratering across the continuous ejecta of Orientale and to determine the effect of slope on crater density. Preliminary results suggest that crater density does decrease with increasing slope for craters >1 km in diameter though at a slower rate than for smaller craters.References: [1] Trask N. J. and Rowan L. C. (1967) Science 158, 1529-1535. [2] Basilevsky (1976) Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 7th, p. 1005-1020. [3] Pohn and Offield (1970) USGS Prof. Pap., 153-162. [4] Xiao et al. (2013) Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett., 376, pgs. 1-11. doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2013

  19. Effect of Inhalational Anesthetics and Positive-pressure Ventilation on Ultrasound Assessment of the Great Vessels: A Prospective Study at a Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Elaina E; Chen, Aaron E; Panebianco, Nova; Conlon, Thomas; Ju, Na Rae; Carlson, Dustin; Kopenitz, Jason; Nishisaki, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Bedside ultrasound has emerged as a rapid, noninvasive tool for assessment and monitoring of fluid status in children. The inferior vena cava (IVC) varies in size with changes in blood volume and intrathoracic pressure, but the magnitude of change to the IVC with inhalational anesthetic and positive-pressure ventilation (PPV) is unknown. Prospective observational study of 24 healthy children aged 1 to 12 yr scheduled for elective surgery. Ultrasound images of the IVC and aorta were recorded at five time points: awake; spontaneous ventilation with sevoflurane by mask; intubated with peak inspiratory pressure/positive end-expiratory pressure of 15/0, 20/5, and 25/10 cm H2O. A blinded investigator measured IVC/aorta ratios (IVC/Ao) and changes in IVC diameter due to respiratory variation (IVC-RV) from the recorded videos. Inhalational anesthetic decreased IVC/Ao (1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 0.6 ± 0.2; P 0.99). The initiation of PPV increased IVC/Ao (0.64 ± 0.21 vs. 1.16 ± 0.27; P 0.99 for both). Addition of inhalational anesthetic affects IVC/Ao but not IVC-RV, and significant changes in IVC/Ao and IVC-RV occur with initiation of PPV in healthy children. Clinicians should be aware of these expected vascular changes when managing patients. Establishing these IVC parameters will enable future studies to better evaluate these measurements as tools for diagnosing hypovolemia or predicting fluid responsiveness.

  20. Methane emissions from beef and dairy cattle: quantifying the effect of physiological stage and diet characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, P; Rooke, J A; Nevison, I; Waterhouse, A

    2013-11-01

    The prediction of methane outputs from ruminant livestock data at farm, national, and global scales is a vital part of greenhouse gas calculations. The objectives of this work were to quantify the effect of physiological stage (lactating or nonlactating) on predicting methane (CH4) outputs and to illustrate the potential improvement for a beef farming system of using more specific mathematical models to predict CH4 from cattle at different physiological stages and fed different diet types. A meta-analysis was performed on 211 treatment means from 38 studies where CH4, intake, animal, and feed characteristics had been recorded. Additional information such as type of enterprise, diet type, physiological stage, CH4 measurement technique, intake restriction, and CH4 reduction treatment application from these studies were used as classificatory factors. A series of equations for different physiological stages and diet types based on DMI or GE intake explained 96% of the variation in observed CH4 outputs (Pemission factor, in calculating CH4 outputs from 4 diverse beef systems. Observed BW and BW change data from cows with calves at side grazing either hill or lowland grassland, cows and overwintering calves and finishing steers fed contrasting diets were used to predict energy requirements, intake, and CH4 outputs. Compared with using this IPCC equation, NewEqs predicted up to 26% lower CH4 on average from individual lactating grazing cows. At the herd level, differences between equation estimates from 10 to 17% were observed in total annual accumulated CH4 when applied to the 4 diverse beef production systems. Overall, despite the small number of animals used it was demonstrated that there is a biological impact of using more specific CH4 prediction equations. Based on this approach, farm and national carbon budgets will be more accurate, contributing to reduced uncertainty in assessing mitigation options at farm and national level.

  1. Using channelized Hotelling observers to quantify temporal effects of medical liquid crystal displays on detection performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platiša, Ljiljana; Goossens, Bart; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Badano, Aldo; Philips, Wilfried

    2010-02-01

    Clinical practice is rapidly moving in the direction of volumetric imaging. Often, radiologists interpret these images in liquid crystal displays at browsing rates of 30 frames per second or higher. However, recent studies suggest that the slow response of the display can compromise image quality. In order to quantify the temporal effect of medical displays on detection performance, we investigate two designs of a multi-slice channelized Hotelling observer (msCHO) model in the task of detecting a single-slice signal in multi-slice simulated images. The design of msCHO models is inspired by simplifying assumptions about how humans observe while viewing in the stack-browsing mode. For comparison, we consider a standard CHO applied only on the slice where the signal is located, recently used in a similar study. We refer to it as a single-slice CHO (ssCHO). Overall, our results confirm previous findings that the slow response of displays degrades the detection performance of the observers. More specifically, the observed performance range of msCHO designs is higher compared to the ssCHO suggesting that the extent and rate of degradation, though significant, may be less drastic than previously estimated by the ssCHO. Especially, the difference between msCHO and ssCHO is more significant for higher browsing speeds than for slow image sequences or static images. This, together with their design criteria driven by the assumptions about humans, makes the msCHO models promising candidates for further studies aimed at building anthropomorphic observer models for the stack-mode image presentation.

  2. Quantifying the effect of magnetopause shadowing on electron radiation belt dropouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.; Koller, J.; Morley, S. K.

    2013-11-01

    Energetic radiation belt electron fluxes can undergo sudden dropouts in response to different solar wind drivers. Many physical processes contribute to the electron flux dropout, but their respective roles in the net electron depletion remain a fundamental puzzle. Some previous studies have qualitatively examined the importance of magnetopause shadowing in the sudden dropouts either from observations or from simulations. While it is difficult to directly measure the electron flux loss into the solar wind, radial diffusion codes with a fixed boundary location (commonly utilized in the literature) are not able to explicitly account for magnetopause shadowing. The exact percentage of its contribution has therefore not yet been resolved. To overcome these limitations and to determine the exact contribution in percentage, we carry out radial diffusion simulations with the magnetopause shadowing effect explicitly accounted for during a superposed solar wind stream interface passage, and quantify the relative contribution of the magnetopause shadowing coupled with outward radial diffusion by comparing with GPS-observed total flux dropout. Results indicate that during high-speed solar wind stream events, which are typically preceded by enhanced dynamic pressure and hence a compressed magnetosphere, magnetopause shadowing coupled with the outward radial diffusion can explain about 60-99% of the main-phase radiation belt electron depletion near the geosynchronous orbit. While the outer region (L* > 5) can nearly be explained by the above coupled mechanism, additional loss mechanisms are needed to fully explain the energetic electron loss for the inner region (L* ≤ 5). While this conclusion confirms earlier studies, our quantification study demonstrates its relative importance with respect to other mechanisms at different locations.

  3. Users' reaction to the drought of 2014 in Lebanon; quantifying the effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajalla, Nadim; Haydamous, Patricia; El Hajj, Rana

    2016-04-01

    A drought that Lebanon witnessed during the water cycle of 2013-2014 seemed to mimic the expected decrease in precipitation projected in one of the 2020 scenarios reported in Lebanon's second national communication to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Nationally, data and assessment studies on drought impacts are generally lacking, and thus, this drought presented an opportunity to quantify drought effects. In the aim of understanding the effect drought has on the Lebanese economy, and its different sectors, a survey was conducted to set a baseline of the changes in the direct cost of water as well as other impacts that might have resulted on the water users. The survey reached out to different sectors to include the touristic establishments, industries, agriculture holders, and households. The sample selection and the data collection underwent several controls in order to ensure unbiased data. Moreover, a descriptive analysis was produced from the survey results, using STATA and Microsoft Excel. The main results have shown a shift of dependency towards water tankers during the drought season as opposed to the normal higher dependency on the public networks and private wells. Moreover, the cost incurred in general showed an average of 32% increase to the previous water bills across the different sectors, this in return is expected to have ripple effects on the national economy accounting for around 13.5% of GDP. However, the survey showed that little was done in terms of long term adaptation on the consumers' side, where most of the adaptation done included awareness campaigns for an economized water usage on the short term. The survey brought forward the un-preparedness of the country to react to such extreme events due to the absence of drought preparedness and management plan. . The results highlight the projected losses the country will have if no proper adaptation measures were taken. These impacts were caused by a one-year drought

  4. Final report: mathematical method for quantifying the effectiveness of management strategies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covan, John Morgan; Sena-Henderson, Lisa; Robinett, Rush D. III (.; ); Brewer, Jeffrey D.; Roginski, Robert J.; Cooper, James Arlin

    2005-10-01

    Large complex teams (e.g., DOE labs) must achieve sustained productivity in critical operations (e.g., weapons and reactor development) while maintaining safety for involved personnel, the public, and physical assets, as well as security for property and information. This requires informed management decisions that depend on tradeoffs of factors such as the mode and extent of personnel protection, potential accident consequences, the extent of information and physical asset protection, and communication with and motivation of involved personnel. All of these interact (and potentially interfere) with each other and must be weighed against financial resources and implementation time. Existing risk analysis tools can successfully treat physical response, component failure, and routine human actions. However, many ''soft'' factors involving human motivation and interaction among weakly related factors have proved analytically problematic. There has been a need for an effective software tool capable of quantifying these tradeoffs and helping make rational choices. This type of tool, developed during this project, facilitates improvements in safety, security, and productivity, and enables measurement of improvements as a function of resources expended. Operational safety, security, and motivation are significantly influenced by ''latent effects'', which are pre-occurring influences. One example of these is that an atmosphere of excessive fear can suppress open and frank disclosures, which can in turn hide problems, impede correction, and prevent lessons learned. Another is that a cultural mind-set of commitment, self-responsibility, and passion for an activity is a significant contributor to the activity's success. This project pursued an innovative approach for quantitatively analyzing latent effects in order to link the above types of factors, aggregating available information into quantitative metrics that can contribute to

  5. Quantifiers, Anaphora and Intensionality

    CERN Document Server

    Dalrymple, M; Pereira, F C N; Saraswat, V; Dalrymple, Mary; Lamping, John; Pereira, Fernando; Saraswat, Vijay

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between Lexical-Functional Grammar (LFG) {\\em functional structures} (f-structures) for sentences and their semantic interpretations can be expressed directly in a fragment of linear logic in a way that correctly explains the constrained interactions between quantifier scope ambiguity, bound anaphora and intensionality. This deductive approach to semantic interpretaion obviates the need for additional mechanisms, such as Cooper storage, to represent the possible scopes of a quantified NP, and explains the interactions between quantified NPs, anaphora and intensional verbs such as `seek'. A single specification in linear logic of the argument requirements of intensional verbs is sufficient to derive the correct reading predictions for intensional-verb clauses both with nonquantified and with quantified direct objects. In particular, both de dicto and de re readings are derived for quantified objects. The effects of type-raising or quantifying-in rules in other frameworks here just follow as li...

  6. 挥发性吸入麻醉药对罗库溴铵肌松作用的影响%Effect of inhalational anesthetic agents on muscle relaxation produced by rocuronium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健; 徐光红

    2008-01-01

    Rocuronium bromide is a non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent with the shortest onset time and intermediate duration of action in the clinical use at present. In clinical scenario, inhalational anesthetic agents can significantly enhance the neuromuscular blockade effect, prolong the duration of action and reduce the dosage of rocuronium. At the same time, inhalational anesthetic agents can retard the reversal of rocuronium by anticholinesterase agents. Above reason had been taken as excuses of earlier stopping or decreasing concentrations of inhalational anesthetic agents to avoid retarding recovery time of mnseular tension and reduce respiratory complieations related to postoperative residual muscular relaxant.%罗库溴铵是目前临床使用中起效最快的中时效非去极化肌松药,挥发性吸入麻醉药可明显增强罗库溴铵的肌松效应,延长其作用时间,减少使用剂量;也可降低抗胆碱酯酶药拮抗罗库溴铵的肌松效果,因此有必要适时停用或降低吸入麻醉药的浓度,以避免术后肌张力恢复时间延长,减少术后残余肌松作用引起的呼吸系统并发症.此文就挥发性吸入麻醉药对罗库溴铵肌松作用的影响作一综述.

  7. Bupivacaine Lozenge Compared with Lidocaine Spray as Topical Pharyngeal Anesthetic before Unsedated Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salale, Nesrin; Treldal, Charlotte; Mogensen, Stine;

    2014-01-01

    Unsedated upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE) can induce patient discomfort, mainly due to a strong gag reflex. The aim was to assess the effect of a bupivacaine lozenge as topical pharyngeal anesthetic compared with standard treatment with a lidocaine spray before UGE. Ninety-nine adult...... with a lidocaine spray proved to be a superior option as topical pharyngeal anesthetic before an UGE....

  8. Assessing the impact on global climate from general anesthetic gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads P. Sulbæk; Nielsen, Ole John; Wallington, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Although present in the atmosphere with a combined concentration approximately 100,000 times lower than carbon dioxide (i.e., the principal anthropogenic driver of climate change), halogenated organic compounds are responsible for a warming effect of approximately 10% to 15% of the total...... regarding the impact of anesthetic gas release on the environment, with particular focus on its contribution to the radiative forcing of climate change....... anthropogenic radiative forcing of climate, as measured relative to the start of the industrial era (approximately 1750). The family of anesthetic gases includes several halogenated organic compounds that are strong greenhouse gases. In this short report, we provide an overview of the state of knowledge...

  9. Quantifying the effect of seasonal and vertical habitat tracking on planktonic foraminifera proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkers, Lukas; Kučera, Michal

    2017-06-01

    The composition of planktonic foraminiferal (PF) calcite is routinely used to reconstruct climate variability. However, PF ecology leaves a large imprint on the proxy signal: seasonal and vertical habitats of PF species vary spatially, causing variable offsets from annual mean surface conditions recorded by sedimentary assemblages. PF seasonality changes with temperature in a way that minimises the environmental change that individual species experience and it is not unlikely that changes in depth habitat also result from such habitat tracking. While this behaviour could lead to an underestimation of spatial or temporal trends as well as of variability in proxy records, most palaeoceanographic studies are (implicitly) based on the assumption of a constant habitat. Up to now, the effect of habitat tracking on foraminifera proxy records has not yet been formally quantified on a global scale. Here we attempt to characterise this effect on the amplitude of environmental change recorded in sedimentary PF using core top δ18O data from six species. We find that the offset from mean annual near-surface δ18O values varies with temperature, with PF δ18O indicating warmer than mean conditions in colder waters (on average by -0.1 ‰ (equivalent to 0.4 °C) per °C), thus providing a first-order quantification of the degree of underestimation due to habitat tracking. We use an empirical model to estimate the contribution of seasonality to the observed difference between PF and annual mean δ18O and use the residual Δδ18O to assess trends in calcification depth. Our analysis indicates that given an observation-based model parametrisation calcification depth increases with temperature in all species and sensitivity analysis suggests that a temperature-related seasonal habitat adjustment is essential to explain the observed isotope signal. Habitat tracking can thus lead to a significant reduction in the amplitude of recorded environmental change. However, we show that this

  10. AerChemMIP: Quantifying the effects of chemistry and aerosols in CMIP6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, W.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Schulz, M.; Boucher, Olivier; Eyring, Veronika; Hegglin, Michaela I.; Maycock, Amanda; Myhre, G.; Prather, M.; Shindell, D. T.; Smith, Steven J.

    2017-02-09

    The Aerosol Chemistry Model Intercomparison Project (AerChemMIP) is endorsed by the Coupled-Model Intercomparison Project 6 (CMIP6) and is designed to quantify the climate and air quality impacts of aerosols and chemically-reactive gases. These are specifically near-term climate forcers (NTCFs: tropospheric ozone and aerosols, and their precursors), methane, nitrous oxide and ozone-depleting halocarbons. The aim of AerChemMIP is to answer four scientific questions: 1. How have anthropogenic emissions contributed to global radiative forcing and affected regional climate over th e historical period? 2. How will future policies (on climate, air quality and land use) affect these species and their climate impacts? 3. Can the uncertainties associated with anthropogenic emissions be quantified? 4. Can climate feedbacks occurring through changes in natural emissions be quantified? These questions will be addressed through targeted simulations with CMIP6 climate models that include an interactive representation of tropospheric aerosols and atmospheric chemistry. These simulations build on the CMIP6 Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima (DECK) experiments, the CMIP6 historical simulations, and future projections performed elsewhere in CMIP6, allowing the contributions from aerosols and chemistry to be quantified. Specific diagnostics are requested as part of the CMIP6 data request to evaluate the performance of the models, and to understand any differences in behaviour between them.

  11. Quantifying Littered Cigarette Butts to Measure Effectiveness of Smoking Bans to Building Perimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Christopher M.; Strack, Robert W.; Orsini, Muhsin Michael; Rosario, Carrie; Haugh, Christie; Rice, Rebecca; Wyrick, David L.; Wagner, Lorelei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors estimated the number of violations of a university policy that prohibited smoking within 25 ft of all campus buildings. Participants: The project was conducted by 13 student researchers from the university and a member of the local public health department. Methods: Students quantified cigarette butts that were littered in a…

  12. Quantifying abortion rates of reproductive organs and effects of contributing factors using time-to-event analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubs, A.M.; Heuvelink, E.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Hemerik, L.

    2011-01-01

    Time-to-event analysis, or survival analysis, is a method to analyse the timing of events and to quantify the effects of contributing factors. We apply this method to data on the timing of abortion of reproductive organs. This abortion often depends on source and sink strength. We hypothesise that

  13. Quantifying abortion rates of reproductive organs and effects of contributing factors using time-to-event analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubs, A.M.; Heuvelink, E.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Hemerik, L.

    2011-01-01

    Time-to-event analysis, or survival analysis, is a method to analyse the timing of events and to quantify the effects of contributing factors. We apply this method to data on the timing of abortion of reproductive organs. This abortion often depends on source and sink strength. We hypothesise that t

  14. Anesthetic related advances with cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welliver, Mark; McDonough, John

    2007-03-02

    Cyclodextrins encapsulate and electrostatically bind to lipophilic molecules. The exterior of cyclodextrins are water-soluble and maintain aqueous solubility despite encapsulation of non-aqueous soluble molecules. This unique ability to encapsulate lipophilic molecules and maintain water solubility confers numerous pharmacologic advantages for both drug delivery and removal. Cyclodextrins, a component part of supramolecular chemistry, may be in its infancy of anesthetic application but recent advances have been described as novel and revolutionary. A review of current research coupled with an understanding of cyclodextrin properties is necessary to fully appreciate the current uses and future potentials of these unique molecules.

  15. Anesthetic Related Advances with Cyclodextrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Welliver

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins encapsulate and electrostatically bind to lipophilic molecules. The exterior of cyclodextrins are water-soluble and maintain aqueous solubility despite encapsulation of non-aqueous soluble molecules. This unique ability to encapsulate lipophilic molecules and maintain water solubility confers numerous pharmacologic advantages for both drug delivery and removal. Cyclodextrins, a component part of supramolecular chemistry, may be in its infancy of anesthetic application but recent advances have been described as novel and revolutionary. A review of current research coupled with an understanding of cyclodextrin properties is necessary to fully appreciate the current uses and future potentials of these unique molecules.

  16. Strabismus complications from local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, David L

    2008-01-01

    Strabismus developing after retrobulbar or peribulbar anesthesia for both anterior and posterior segment eye surgery may be due to myotoxicity to an extraocular muscle from the local anesthetic agent. Initial paresis often causes diplopia immediately after surgery, but later progressive segmental fibrosis occurs, and/or hypertrophy of the muscle, producing diplopia in the opposite direction from the direction of the initial diplopia. The inferior rectus muscle is most commonly affected. Usually a large recession on an adjustable suture of the involved muscle(s) yields good alignment. Using topical anesthesia or sub-Tenon's anesthesia can avoid this complication.

  17. Quantifying the Road-Effect Zone: Threshold Effects of a Motorway on Anuran Populations in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Eigenbrod

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The negative effect of roads on wildlife is recognized as a major contributor to the global biodiversity crisis, with anurans being among the most vulnerable groups overall. The "road-effect zone," i.e., the extent of significant ecological effects from the edge of a road (Forman and Alexander 1998, has important management implications, but has never been quantified for anurans. In the first study of its kind, we measured the extent and type of relationship underlying the road-effect zones of a motorway with a high proportion of heavy-truck traffic, particularly at night (Highway 401 for anuran species richness and relative abundance. We surveyed 34 ponds located 68-3262 m from the edge of the motorway, and used piecewise and linear regressions to determine if road-effect zones were clearly delineated by ecological thresholds. We found road-effect zones of 250-1000 m delineated by ecological thresholds for four of seven species and species richness, and road-effect zones of well beyond 1000 m best described by linear regressions for two species. The negative effect of Highway 401 was unexpectedly strong for four of seven species suggest that, in addition to road mortality, very high nighttime truck traffic can actually lead to reduced use of breeding habitat near the motorway either by acting as a barrier to forest habitat on the other side of the highway and/or because of traffic noise. Our results show that most anurans are likely to have reduced abundances near motorways, but that both the extent of the effect of this type of road and the underlying relationship vary considerably between species. Furthermore, the noise and/or barrier effect of very high nighttime traffic volumes can lead to negative effects of motorways even on species that are relatively unaffected by direct road mortality.

  18. Quantifying veterinarians' beliefs on disease control and exploring the effect of new evidence: a Bayesian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, H M; Huxley, J N; Wapenaar, W; Green, M J

    2014-01-01

    The clinical beliefs (expectations and demands) of veterinarians regarding herd-level strategies to control mastitis, lameness, and Johne's disease were quantified in a numerical format; 94 veterinarians working in England (UK) were randomly selected and, during interviews, a statistical technique called probabilistic elicitation was used to capture their clinical expectations as probability distributions. The results revealed that markedly different clinical expectations existed for all 3 diseases, and many pairs of veterinarians had expectations with nonoverlapping 95% Bayesian credible intervals. For example, for a 3-yr lameness intervention, the most pessimistic veterinarian was centered at an 11% population mean reduction in lameness prevalence (95% credible interval: 0-21%); the most enthusiastic veterinarian was centered at a 58% reduction (95% credible interval: 38-78%). This suggests that a major change in beliefs would be required to achieve clinical agreement. Veterinarians' clinical expectations were used as priors in Bayesian models where they were combined with synthetic data (from randomized clinical trials of different sizes) to explore the effect of new evidence on current clinical opinion. The mathematical models make predictions based on the assumption that veterinarians will update their beliefs logically. For example, for the lameness intervention, a 200-farm clinical trial that estimated a 30% mean reduction in lameness prevalence was predicted to be reasonably convincing to the most pessimist veterinarian; that is, in light of this data, they were predicted to believe there would be a 0.92 probability of exceeding the median clinical demand of this sample of veterinarians, which was a 20% mean reduction in lameness. Currently, controversy exists over the extent to which veterinarians update their beliefs logically, and further research on this is needed. This study has demonstrated that probabilistic elicitation and a Bayesian framework are

  19. Anesthetic induction with guaifenesin and propofol in adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Steffey, Eugene P; Escobar, André; Palazoglu, Mine; Fiehn, Oliver

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate whether guaifenesin can prevent adverse anesthetic induction events caused by propofol and whether a guaifenesin-propofol induction combination has brief cardiovascular effects commensurate with rapid drug washout. 8 healthy adult horses. Guaifenesin was administered IV for 3 minutes followed by IV injection of a bolus of propofol (2 mg/kg). Additional propofol was administered if purposeful movement was detected. Anesthesia was maintained for 2 hours with isoflurane or sevoflurane at 1.2 times the minimum alveolar concentration with controlled normocapnic ventilation. Normotension was maintained via a dobutamine infusion. Plasma concentrations of propofol and guaifenesin were measured every 30 minutes. Mean ± SD guaifenesin and propofol doses inducing anesthesia in half of the horses were 73 ± 18 mg/kg and 2.2 ± 0.3 mg/kg, respectively. No adverse anesthetic induction events were observed. By 70 minutes, there was no significant temporal change in the dobutamine infusion rate required to maintain normotension for horses anesthetized with isoflurane or sevoflurane. Mean plasma guaifenesin concentrations were 122 ± 30 μM, 101 ± 33 μM, 93 ± 28 μM, and 80 ± 24 μM at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after anesthetic induction, respectively. All plasma propofol concentrations were below the limit of quantitation. Guaifenesin prevented adverse anesthetic induction events caused by propofol. Guaifenesin (90 mg/kg) followed by propofol (3 mg/kg) should be sufficient to immobilize > 99% of calm healthy adult horses. Anesthetic drug washout was rapid, and there was no change in inotrope requirements after anesthesia for 70 minutes.

  20. Paired assessment of volatile anesthetic concentrations with synaptic actions recorded in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J McDougall

    Full Text Available The volatile anesthetic isoflurane poses a number of experimental challenges in the laboratory. Due to its rapid evaporation, the open conditions of most in vitro electrophysiological recording systems make the determination of actual isoflurane concentrations a challenge. Since the absolute anesthetic concentration in solution is directly related to efficacy, concentration measurements are important to allow comparisons between laboratory and clinical studies. In this study we quantify the sources of isoflurane loss during experimentation and describe a method for the measurement of isoflurane concentrations using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry simultaneous to in vitro electrophysiological measurements. Serial samples of perfused bath solution allowed correlation of isoflurane concentrations with ongoing biological effects. Saturated physiological solutions contained 13.4 +/- 0.2 mM isoflurane and were diluted to desired "nominal" concentrations for experiments. The perfusion system established stable isoflurane concentrations within the bath by 2 minutes. However, bath isoflurane concentrations varied substantially and unpredictably between experiments. The magnitudes of such discrepancies in isoflurane concentrations spanned clinically important levels. Our studies suggest that, despite countermeasures, solution handling significantly impacted the isoflurane content in the tissue bath. The magnitude of these discrepancies appears to necessitate systematic direct measurement of bath isoflurane concentrations during most in vitro conditions.

  1. Anxiety in preoperative anesthetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela Millán, Jaquelyn; Barrera Serrano, José René; Ornelas Aguirre, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Preoperative anxiety is a common and poorly evaluated condition in patients who will undergo an anesthetic and surgical intervention. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anxiety in a group of patients undergoing elective surgery, as assessed by the Amsterdam Anxiety Preoperative and Information (AAPI) scale. We studied 135 patients scheduled for elective surgery applying the AAPI scale 24 h before the surgical procedure to evaluate the presence of anxiety and patient characteristics. A descriptive analysis with mean +/- standard deviation for categorical variables was done. For intragroup differences, chi(2) test was used. Pearson correlation for the association between anxiety and postoperative complications was carried out. A value of p =0.05 was considered significant. One hundred six patients were surgically treated, 88% were female (average age 44 +/- 12 years). Some degree of preoperative anxiety was present in 72 patients (76%; p = 0.001) with a grade point average on the AAPI scale equal to 17 +/- 7 points, of which 95 (70%, OR = 5.08; p = 0.002) were females. Results of this study suggest the presence of high levels of preoperative anxiety in patients scheduled for elective surgery. The origin of the anxiety appears to be related to many factors that can be evaluated in pre-anesthetic consultation. Further study is needed to prevent the presence of this disorder.

  2. A simple and effective method for quantifying spatial anisotropy of time series of precipitation fields

    OpenAIRE

    Niemi, Tero J.; Kokkonen, Teemu; Seed, Alan W.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial shape of a precipitation event has an important role in determining the catchment's hydrological response to a storm. To be able to generate stochastic design storms with a realistic spatial structure, the anisotropy of the storm has to be quantified. In this paper, a method is proposed to estimate the anisotropy of precipitation fields, using the concept of linear Generalized Scale Invariance (GSI). The proposed method is based on identifying the values of GSI parameters that bes...

  3. Ergogenic Effects of β-Alanine and Carnosine: Proposed Future Research to Quantify Their Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    John Caruso; Jessica Charles; Kayla Unruh; Rachel Giebel; Lexis Learmonth; William Potter

    2012-01-01

    β-alanine is an amino acid that, when combined with histidine, forms the dipeptide carnosine within skeletal muscle. Carnosine and β-alanine each have multiple purposes within the human body; this review focuses on their roles as ergogenic aids to exercise performance and suggests how to best quantify the former’s merits as a buffer. Carnosine normally makes a small contribution to a cell’s total buffer capacity; yet β-alanine supplementation raises intracellular carnosine concentrations that...

  4. Quantifying the effect of fire disturbance on free-living nitrogen fixation in tropical ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira Bomfim, B.; Silva, L. C. R.; Marimon-Junior, B. H.; Marimon, B.; Horwath, W. R.; Neves, L.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forests and savannas are among the most important biomes on Earth, supporting more than half of all plant and animal species on the planet. Despite growing interest in biogeochemical processes that affect tropical forest dynamics, many, including biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), are still poorly understood. Free-living N-fixers are thought to play a key role in tropical ecosystems, alleviating N and P limitation, supporting above and below ground biomass production, as well as carbon storage in plants and soil, but this influence has yet to be quantified. Of particular interest, the spatial distribution and identity of free-living BNF under disturbance regimes that commonly lead to the conversion of forests to savannas is currently unknown. To address this critical gap in knowledge, we measured free-living BNF quantifying rates of N fixation under contrasting fire regimes in the Amazon-Cerrado transition of central Brazil. Samples were collected in 4 ha of floodable forests affected by fire and 1 ha of unburned (seasonally flooded) forest located at the Araguaia State Park, Mato Grosso State, Brazil. Free-living N-fixation rates were measured by both 15N2 (98 atom% 15N) and acethylene reduction assay (ARA). Samples were incubated in the field and left in the dark at room temperature for 12 hours. In the next few weeks we will quantify N fixation rates that will be presented in the upcoming AGU meeting.

  5. Can determining the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration of volatile anesthetic be used as an objective tool to assess antinociception in animals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docquier, Marie-Agnes; Lavand'homme, Patricia; Ledermann, Christian; Collet, Valérie; De Kock, Marc

    2003-10-01

    We intended to evaluate the reliability of the minimum anesthetic alveolar concentration (MAC)-sparing effect as an objective measure of the antinociceptive properties of a drug. For this purpose, we tested different variables and analyzed the significance of the results obtained. In a first set of experiments, we studied rats under mechanical ventilation and sevoflurane anesthesia. Outcome variables such as gross purposeful movements consecutive to tail clamping, paw withdrawal consecutive to increasing pressure, and cardio-circulatory reactivity (MACBAR) after these stimuli were recorded. In a second set of experiment, sevoflurane-anesthetized rats under spontaneous breathing conditions were used. Thermal stimuli were compared with pressure. The MAC-sparing effect of several doses of sufentanil and clonidine was evaluated in both anesthetized and awake rodents. When considering the stimulus applied, larger concentrations of sevoflurane were required to suppress reactivity after tail clamp than after paw pressure or radiant heat (1.81 +/- 0.28 versus 1.45 +/- 0.22 and 1.53 +/- 0.26; P MAC values except the smallest one (0.005 micro g x kg(-1) x min(-1)) that significantly increased MACBAR in ventilated animals and both MAC and MACBAR in spontaneously breathing rodents (P MAC and MACBAR to the same degree. In awake animals submitted to radiant heat or pressure challenge, none of the clonidine doses nor sufentanil doses (0.005 and 0.07) were active. In conclusion, the MAC-sparing effect provides several reliable and quantifiable variables that allow comparison between different analgesic substances. However, the observations made are not simply the result of antinociceptive effects of the tested drugs but rather that of complex interactions between these drugs and a halogenated vapor. The MAC-sparing effect provides several variables that allow comparison between different analgesic substances. However, the observations made are not simply the result of the

  6. EFEITOS DA INFUSÃO CONTÍNUA DE CETAMINA S(+ EM EQÜINOS ANESTESIADOS PELO HALOTANO EFFECTS OF S(+-KETAMINE CONTINUOUS RATE INFUSION IN HORSES ANESTHETIZED BY HALOTHANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Henrique Saraiva Borges

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A manutenção da pressão arterial, no transanestésico, consiste grande desafio, principalmente quando se trata da espécie equina, suscetível à instabilidade cardiovascular. Por isso, torna-se imperioso utilizar técnica anestésica que mantenham estáveis os parâmetros cardiovasculares. A cetamina tem sido amplamente empregada na indução anestésica para o halotano em equinos, conferindo-lhes estabilidade cardiovascular. A cetamina S(+, recentemente disponibilizada no mercado, induz estimulação cardiovascular e possui maior potência anestésica e analgésica em relação à cetamina. Todavia, os efeitos dessa substância, administrada por infusão contínua durante a  manutenção da anestesia pelo halotano em equinos, ainda não foram avaliados. Em face da tendência atual de a infusão continuada da cetamina potencializar os anestésicos inalatórios, considerou-se pertinente avaliar os efeitos cardiovasculares e respiratórios desse isômero de cetamina em equinos anestesiados pelo halotano. Conclui-se que a infusão contínua de 0,01mg/kg/min de cetamina S(+ durante anestesia com 1,5 CAM de halotano em equinos não agravou a depressão cardiorrespiratória promovida por esse anestésico inalatório.
     
    PALAVRAS-CHAVES: Cetamina S(+, equinos, halotano, infusão contínua.

    The horse’s blood pressure is susceptible to changes induced by volatile anesthetics. Because of that, the use of anesthesic techniques which keep stable the horse´s blood pressure is essencial. Ketamine is an important induction and maintenance anesthetic agent used in the horse anesthesia practice mainly to improve the blood pressure. S(+-ketamine provides the same effects on the blood pressure, with greater analgesic results and less side effects than the normal ketamine. Although some studies have been conducted with ketamine continuous rate infusion during the halothane anesthetized horses, the S(+-ketamine has not been evaluated

  7. Effect analysis of different anesthetic methods in tension-free inguinal hernia repair%不同麻醉方式应用于腹股沟疝无张力修补术的效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧玉清

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the most suitable anesthetic method for tension-free operation of inguinal hernia.Meth-ods Three hundred patients with inguinal hernia were treated with operation in our hospital.These patients were divided into 3 groups according to anesthetic methods,100 in each group.Patients in the three groups received the simple continuous epidural anesthesia, combined spinal anesthesia and tracheal intubation general anesthesia,respectively.Anesthetic effects were compared among the three groups.Results The anesthetic time and anesthetic effect time were the shortest but the cost was the highest in the general anesthesia group when compared to another two groups(P0.05).No serious adverse reactions and deaths occurred during anes-thesia.Conclusion The combined spinal anesthesia has advantages such as shorter anesthesia time and anesthesia effect time when compared to the epidural anesthesia.Moreover,the anesthesia method has advantages such shorter bed activity time,postoperative ex-haust time and lower urinary retention rate and anesthesia cost when compared to the general anesthesia.Therefore,the combined spinal anesthesia has a higher clinical application value for patients with tension-free inguinal hernia repair.%目的:探讨腹股沟疝无张力修补术最适宜的麻醉方式。方法我院进行手术治疗的腹股沟疝患者300例,分为硬膜外组、腰硬联合组与全麻组各100例,分别给予单纯连续硬膜外麻醉、腰硬联合麻醉及气管插管全身麻醉,比较三组麻醉效果。结果全麻组患者麻醉时间、麻醉起效时间最短,但麻醉费用最多( P<0.05);腰硬联合组麻醉时间、麻醉起效时间明显短于硬膜外组(P<0.05),而麻醉费用没有明显增加。硬膜外组下床活动时间、术后排气时间、尿潴留发生比例最低,而全麻组最高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。三组患者麻醉满意度差异无统计学意义(P>0.05

  8. Quantifying Concordance

    CERN Document Server

    Seehars, Sebastian; Amara, Adam; Refregier, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the concordance between different cosmological experiments is important for testing the validity of theoretical models and systematics in the observations. In earlier work, we thus proposed the Surprise, a concordance measure derived from the relative entropy between posterior distributions. We revisit the properties of the Surprise and describe how it provides a general, versatile, and robust measure for the agreement between datasets. We also compare it to other measures of concordance that have been proposed for cosmology. As an application, we extend our earlier analysis and use the Surprise to quantify the agreement between WMAP 9, Planck 13 and Planck 15 constraints on the $\\Lambda$CDM model. Using a principle component analysis in parameter space, we find that the large Surprise between WMAP 9 and Planck 13 (S = 17.6 bits, implying a deviation from consistency at 99.8% confidence) is due to a shift along a direction that is dominated by the amplitude of the power spectrum. The Surprise disa...

  9. Study of the aging processes in polyurethane adhesives using thermal treatment and differential calorimetric, dielectric, and mechanical techniques ; 1, identifying the aging processes ; 2, quantifying the aging effect

    CERN Document Server

    Althouse, L P

    1979-01-01

    Study of the aging processes in polyurethane adhesives using thermal treatment and differential calorimetric, dielectric, and mechanical techniques ; 1, identifying the aging processes ; 2, quantifying the aging effect

  10. Anesthetizing animals: Similar to humans yet, peculiar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdi, Madhuri S; Ramaswamy, Ashwini H

    2015-01-01

    From time immemorial, animals have served as models for humans. Like humans, animals too have to undergo several types of elective and emergency surgeries. Several anesthetic techniques and drugs used in humans are also used in animals. However, unlike humans, the animal kingdom includes a wide variety of species, breeds, and sizes. Different species have variable pharmacological responses, anatomy, temperament, behavior, and lifestyles. The anesthetic techniques and drugs have to suit different species and breeds. Nevertheless, there are several drugs and many peculiar anesthetic techniques used in animals but not in human beings. Keeping this in mind, literature was hand searched and electronically searched using the words "veterinary anesthesia," "anesthetic drugs and techniques in animals" using Google search engine. The interesting information so collected is presented in this article which highlights some challenging and amazing aspects of anesthetizing animals including the preanesthetic assessment, preparation, premedication, monitoring, induction of general anesthesia, intubation, equipment, regional blocks, neuraxial block, and perioperative complications.

  11. Evaluation of Waste Anesthetic Gas in the Postanesthesia Care Unit within the Patient Breathing Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Kenneth N.; Altamirano, Alfonso V.; Cai, Chunyan; Tran, Stephanie F.; Williams, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Potential health hazards from waste anesthetic gases (WAGs) have been a concern since the introduction of inhalational anesthetics into clinical practice. The potential to exceed recommended exposure levels (RELs) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) exists. The aim of this pilot study was to assess sevoflurane WAG levels while accounting for factors that affect inhalational anesthetic elimination. In this pilot study, 20 adult day surgery patients were enrolled with anesthesia maintained with sevoflurane. Following extubation, exhaled WAG from the patient breathing zone was measured 8 inches from the patient's mouth in the PACU. Maximum sevoflurane WAG levels in the patient breathing zone exceeded National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) RELs for every 5-minute time interval measured during PACU Phase I. Observed WAGs in our study were explained by inhalational anesthetic pharmacokinetics. Further analysis suggests that the rate of washout of sevoflurane was dependent on the duration of anesthetic exposure. This study demonstrated that clinically relevant inhalational anesthetic concentrations result in sevoflurane WAG levels that exceed current RELs. Evaluating peak and cumulative sevoflurane WAG levels in the breathing zone of PACU Phase I and Phase II providers is warranted to quantify the extent and duration of exposure. PMID:26693222

  12. Information quantifiers, entropy squeezing and entanglement properties of superconducting qubit-deformed bosonic field system under dephasing effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrada, K.; Al-Rajhi, M. A.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed study on the evolution of some measures of nonclassicality and entanglement in the framework of the interaction between a superconducting qubit and deformed bosonic fields under decoherence effect. We compare the dynamical behavior of the different quantum quantifiers by exploiting a large set of nonlinear bosonic fields that are characterized by the deformation parameter. Additionally, we demonstrate how the connection between the appearance of the nonlinearity in the deformed field and the quantum information quantifiers. The time correlation between entropy squeezing, purity, and entanglement is examined in terms of the physical parameters involved in the whole system. Lastly, we explore the exact ranges of the physical parameters in order to combat the decoherence effect and maintain high amount of entanglement during the time evolution.

  13. Quantifying anti-HBV effect of targeted ribonuclease by real-time fluorescent PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Liu; Ying-Hui Li; Jin Ding; Wei-Dong Gong; Cai-Fang Xue; Ya Zhao; Yu-Xiao Huang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To quantify the inhibition of HBV replication by targeted ribonuclease by using real-time fluorescent PCR.METHODS: Targeted ribonuclease was introduced into 2.2.15cells by liposome-mediated transfection or HIV-TAT mediated protein transduction. Forty-eight hours after the transfection and 24 h after the transduction, supernatants of 2.2.15 cells were collected and HBV DNA in the supernatants was quantified by real-time fluorescent PCR with a commercial kit.RESULTS: HBV DNA concentrations in the supernatants of2.2.15 cells transfected or transducted with targeted ribonuclease were 4.9±2.4×108 copies/L and 8.3±4.0×108copies/L, respectively. Compared with controls, transfection or transduction of targeted ribonuclease reduced HBV DNA concentration in the supernatants of 2.2.15 cells by 90.4%and 90.1%, respectively (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Targeted ribonuclease can inhibit HBV replication in 2.2.15 cells.

  14. Wound infiltration with local anesthetics for post-operative pain relief in lumbar spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, M; Møiniche, S; Olsen, K S

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery....

  15. Comparison of Two Anesthetic Methods for Intravitreal Ozurdex Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Levent Karabaş

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether subconjunctival lidocaine injection maintains additional anesthetic effect during intravitreal Ozurdex injection. Methods. 63 patients who were diagnosed as central or branch retinal vein occlusion and planned to receive Ozurdex injection for macular edema were prospectively included in the study. The patients were randomized into one of the two anesthetic groups. The first group received topical proparacaine drop and lidocaine applied pledget. The second group received subconjunctival lidocaine injection in addition to the anesthetics in group 1. Results. Mean pain score was 1.90±2.39 in group 1 and 1.71 ± 2.09 in group 2 (p=0.746. Mean subconjunctival hemorrhage grade was 1.67±0.17 in group 1 and 0.90±0.14 in group 2 (p=0.001. There was no relationship between the amount of subconjunctival hemorrhage and pain score of the patients. Conclusions. There was no difference in pain scores between the two anesthetic methods. The addition of subconjunctival lidocaine injection offered no advantage in pain relief compared to lidocaine-applied pledgets.

  16. Quantifying the effect of colony size and food distribution on harvester ant foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Tatiana P; Letendre, Kenneth; Burnside, William R; Fricke, G Matthew; Moses, Melanie E

    2012-01-01

    Desert seed-harvester ants, genus Pogonomyrmex, are central place foragers that search for resources collectively. We quantify how seed harvesters exploit the spatial distribution of seeds to improve their rate of seed collection. We find that foraging rates are significantly influenced by the clumpiness of experimental seed baits. Colonies collected seeds from larger piles faster than randomly distributed seeds. We developed a method to compare foraging rates on clumped versus random seeds across three Pogonomyrmex species that differ substantially in forager population size. The increase in foraging rate when food was clumped in larger piles was indistinguishable across the three species, suggesting that species with larger colonies are no better than species with smaller colonies at collecting clumped seeds. These findings contradict the theoretical expectation that larger groups are more efficient at exploiting clumped resources, thus contributing to our understanding of the importance of the spatial distribution of food sources and colony size for communication and organization in social insects.

  17. Effect of Intraoperative Glucose Infusion on Catabolism of Adipose Tissue and Muscle Protein in Patients Anesthetized With Remifentanil in Combination With Sevoflurane During Major Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Atsushi; Kamada, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Haruko; Ichinose, Hiromichi; Sumita, Shinzo; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2016-10-01

    A harmful effect of stress hormone secretion during surgery is lipolysis and proteolysis to maintain normal blood glucose levels. A well-titrated general anesthetic improves blood glucose control by suppressing secretion of these stress hormones. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of intraoperative glucose infusion on lipolysis and proteolysis in patients undergoing a general anesthetic consisting of sevoflurane and remifentanil during long (>6 hours) major surgery. In this prospective, single-blinded, randomized, multicenter trial, 80 patients with an expected duration of anesthesia of >6 hours were allocated to either the glucose group, consisting of 40 patients who were infused with acetated Ringer's solution with glucose (2 mg/kg/min), or the no glucose group, consisting of 40 patients who were infused with the same solution, but without glucose. After oxygenation, general anesthesia was induced with propofol, fentanyl, and rocuronium and was maintained with sevoflurane, oxygen, rocuronium, and remifentanil infusions. The rates of remifentanil infusion were titrated based on systolic arterial blood pressure, maintaining this parameter within 10% of its postanesthesia values. Seventy-four patients completed the study. Urinary 3-methylhistidine/creatinine (3-MH/Cre) ratio, acetoacetic acid, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, blood glucose, insulin, and cortisol were measured 3 times: at anesthesia induction (0 hour) and at 3 and 6 hours after anesthesia induction. Urinary 3-MH/Cre ratio was the primary study outcome. In the no glucose group, the urinary 3-MH/Cre ratio at 6 hours was increased compared with that at 0 hour (213 [range, 42-1903] vs 124 [18-672] nmol/μmol; the difference in medians, 89; the 95% confidence interval [CI] of the difference, 82-252; P = .0002). Acetoacetic acid and 3-hydroxybutyric acid levels in the no glucose group were greater than those in the glucose group at 6 hours (110 [8-1036] vs 11 [2-238] μmol/L; the difference in medians

  18. Comparation of Anesthetic Effect of Articaine in the Extraction of Mandibular Posterior Teeth under Local Anesthesia and Periodontal Membrane Anesthesia%阿替卡因两种麻醉方式在下颌后牙拔除术中麻醉效果的对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹静; 张建强; 李岩峰; 高飞

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the anesthetic effect of articaine under local anesthesia and periodontal membrane anesthesia on the extraction of mandibular posterior teeth. Methods 204 patients were randomly divided into two groups;local anesthetic group and periodontal membrane anesthetic group. Patients in each group were anesthetized by local anesthesia or periodontal membrane anesthesia. The anesthetic effect was analyzed. Results The excellence rate of periodontal membrane anesthetic group was 84. 3% . Conclusion Periodontal membrane anesthesia for the extraction of mandibular posterior teeth using articaine is more effective than local anesthesia.%目的 比较复方阿替卡因局部浸润麻醉与牙周膜腔麻醉2种方式在下颌后牙拔除术中的麻醉效果.方法 随机选择204名患者,分为局部浸润麻醉组及牙周膜腔麻醉组,采用标尺法由患者对疼痛程度进行打分;口腔医生评价麻醉效果,统计麻醉完全、良好、有效和失败的比例.结果 达到麻醉完全效果的牙周膜腔麻醉与局部浸润麻醉组有显著性差异(P<0.05),两种麻醉方式成功率无显著性差异(P>0.05).结论 用牙周膜腔麻醉效果优于局部浸润麻醉方式.

  19. Therapeutic effect of self - made Huangjingao compress on phlebitis induced by anesthetic drug%自制黄金膏外敷治疗麻醉药物所致静脉炎的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张青; 黄黎明; 傅卫红; 都大伟; 付京; 石鹏; 赵武

    2011-01-01

    目的:观察黄金膏外敷治疗麻醉药物所致静脉炎的临床疗效.方法:选择1998~2010年在医院行全麻腹腔镜下胆囊切除术后发生静脉炎的229病例,随机分为治疗组(黄金膏外敷)和对照组(50%硫酸镁湿敷)两组,分别观察两组患者静脉炎治疗情况,并记录.结果:黄金膏对麻醉药品所致静脉炎的总体疗效优于硫酸镁外敷,尤其对Ⅱ、Ⅲ度静脉炎患者效果显著.结论:黄金膏外敷治疗麻醉药物致静脉炎起效快,药性温和,方法简单,使用方便,值得推广.%Objective: To investigate the effects of self- made Huangjingao (HJG) compress on phlebitis induced by anesthetic drug. Methods: A total of 229 patients who derived phlebitis from 1998 to 2010 in cholecystectomy by general anesthesia were randomly divided into observation group (HJG) and control group(50% magnesium sulfate, MS). The treatment effect of the two groups was observed. Results: The curative effect of HJG was better than that of MS. Conclusion: The self - made HJG compress on phlebitis induced by anesthetic drug is simple,low cost, security and being worth spread in clinic.

  20. Volatile Anesthetics Influence Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity by Modulation of Tight Junction Protein Expression in Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Thal, Serge C.; Clara Luh; Eva-Verena Schaible; Ralph Timaru-Kast; Jana Hedrich; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Kristin Engelhard; Zehendner, Christoph M.

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) results in cerebral edema formation, which is a major cause for high mortalityrnafter traumatic brain injury (TBI). As anesthetic care is mandatory in patients suffering from severe TBI it may be importantrnto elucidate the effect of different anesthetics on cerebral edema formation. Tight junction proteins (TJ) such as zonularnoccludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-5 (cl5) play a central role for BBB stability. First, the influence of the volatile anesthet...

  1. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Novel 2,6-Disubstituted Phenol Derivatives as General Anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Linlin; Ren, Lei; Wan, Songlin; Liu, Guoliang; Luo, Xinfeng; Liu, Zhenhong; Li, Fangqiong; Yu, Yan; Liu, Jianyu; Wei, Yonggang

    2017-05-11

    A novel series of optically active 2,6-disubstituted alkylphenols with improved anesthetic profiles compared to widely used propofol were synthesized. The incorporation of the cyclopropyl group not only increased the steric effect but also introduced stereoselective effects over their anesthetic properties. Compounds 1, 2, and 6 were selected as potential candidates for further preclinical development including studies of their water-soluble prodrugs. Clinical studies of candidate compound 6 (Haisco HSK3486) as a general anesthetic are being performed in Australia and China.

  2. 陆眠宁Ⅱ复合麻醉在小型猪牙种植实验中的效果观察%Observation of Lumianning Ⅱ Compound Anesthetic Effects in Dental Implant Experiment on Minipigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王利民; 郑园娜; 杨国灵; 谷志远

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore a kind of anesthetic methods which is suitable for experimental dental implantation on minipigs.Methods Twelve minipigs undergoing experimental dental implantation were divided randomly into two groups.In one group,animals were induced with intramuscular Lumianning Ⅱ injection in a dose of 0.2mL/kg.While in the other,l:l mixture of Lumianning Ⅱ and ketamine was adopt in the same way of intramuscular injection.The anesthesia induction time,maintenance time,analepsia time,body temperature,breathing frequency and heart rate during the anesthesia period were observed and recorded in both two groups.Results It was found that the anesthesia induction time and maintenance time of Lumianning Ⅱ combined with ketamine were significantly superior to Lumianning Ⅱ alone.The combined anesthetization could improve the effect of Lumianning Ⅱ treatment,and did not interfere with respiration and circulatory system during the anesthesia process.Conclusion Lumianning Ⅱ combined with ketamine was considered as a satisfactory method to anesthetize minipigs during the experimental dental implantation.%目的 探索一种适合小型猪牙种植实验的麻醉方法.方法 小型猪12只,随机均分为2组,单纯麻醉组采用陆眠宁Ⅱ0.2mL/kg肌肉注射,复合麻醉组采用陆眠宁Ⅱ联合氯胺酮0.2mL/kg肌肉注射(按1:1混合).观察麻醉显效时间、维持时间、苏醒时间并记录麻醉过程中体温、呼吸、心跳变化.结果 陆眠宁Ⅱ、氯胺酮复合麻醉组在麻醉显效时间、维持时间上优于陆眠宁Ⅱ单纯麻醉组,复合麻醉可以提高陆眠宁Ⅱ的麻醉效果,且用量较小,对心血管、呼吸无明显抑制.结论 陆眠宁Ⅱ、氯胺酮复合麻醉是小型猪牙种植实验理想的麻醉方法.

  3. Child with aplastic anemia: Anesthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manpreet Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aplastic anemia is a rare heterogeneous disorder of hematopoietic stem cells causing pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia with the depletion of all types of blood cells. This results in anemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, which pose a challenge to both surgical and anesthetic management of such cases. We report a child with aplastic anemia who sustained traumatic ulcer on the arm and underwent split-thickness skin grafting under general anesthesia. There are only two case reports on anesthetic considerations in aplastic anemia patients in the literature. The anesthetic management is challenging because of the rarity of the disease, associated pancytopenia and immunosuppression.

  4. Effects of mitogen-activated protein kinases on neurotoxicity of local anesthetics%丝裂原活化蛋白激酶家族在局麻药神经毒性中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李乐; 徐世元; 卢爱珠

    2013-01-01

    背景 局麻药(local anesthetic,LA)广泛用于神经阻滞、镇痛,其可能引起的神经毒性引起了麻醉医生的关注,其中关于此种毒性作用机制的研究取得了较大的进展. 目的 分析总结各种丝裂原活化蛋白激酶家族(mitogen-activated protein kinases,MAPKs)成员在LA神经毒性中的作用. 内容 越来越多的证据证明LA的神经毒性作用可能与细胞凋亡有关.MAPKs是一种广泛存在细胞内的丝氨酸/苏氨酸蛋白激酶,在细胞凋亡过程中发挥重要作用.故MAPK信号通路逐渐成为LA毒性作用研究中的重点,其中关于细胞外信号调节激酶(extracellular signal-regulated kinase,ERK),c-Jun N-末端激酶(c-jun nterminal kinase,JNK)以及p38MAPK信号转导通路的研究较为成熟. 趋向 MAPKs在LA神经毒性的具体机制中发挥重要作用,这为LA的临床应用及毒性作用防治提供依据和理论指导.%Background The potential toxicity is a well-known side effect of local anesthetics (LA) which is widely used in nerve block and analgesia.The mechanisms of local anesthetic toxicity were further investigated.Objective This review summarized the recent studies examining the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathway and their regulation,and discussed the effects of MAPKs on neurotoxicity of LA.Content Accumulating evidences indicate that neurotoxicity of LA is related to apoptosis.MAPKs,a serine-threonine protein kinase family,play a crucial role in apoptosis of cells.So that the effects of MAPKs signaling pathway on neurotoxicity of LA is becoming a hot issue to be researched.And the impact of extracellular signalregulated kinase (ERK),c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK),p38MAPK are more concerned.Trend The MAPKs signaling pathway and their regulation play an important part in the underlying mechanisms of local anesthetic neurotoxicity which could provide evidences and theory for clinical use of LA.

  5. Quantifying the Effect of Macroeconomic and Social Factors on Illegal E-Waste Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthymiou, Loukia; Mavragani, Amaryllis; Tsagarakis, Konstantinos P

    2016-08-05

    As illegal e-waste trade has been significantly growing over the course of the last few years, the consequences on human health and the environment demand immediate action on the part of the global community. Though it is argued that e-waste flows from developed to developing countries, this subject seems to be more complex than that, with a variety of studies suggesting that income per capita is not the only factor affecting the choice of regions that e-waste is illegally shipped to. How is a country's economic and social development associated with illegal e-waste trade? Is legislation an important factor? This paper aims at quantifying macroeconomic (per capita income and openness of economy) and social (human development and social progress) aspects, based on qualitative data on illegal e-waste trade routes, by examining the percentage differences in scorings in selected indicators for all known and suspected routes. The results show that illegal e-waste trade occurs from economically and socially developed regions to countries with significantly lower levels of overall development, with few exceptions, which could be attributed to the fact that several countries have loose regulations on e-waste trade, thus deeming them attractive for potential illegal activities.

  6. Quantifying the Effect of Aerial Imagery Resolution in Automated Hydromorphological River Characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Rivas Casado

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Existing regulatory frameworks aiming to improve the quality of rivers place hydromorphology as a key factor in the assessment of hydrology, morphology and river continuity. The majority of available methods for hydromorphological characterisation rely on the identification of homogeneous areas (i.e., features of flow, vegetation and substrate. For that purpose, aerial imagery is used to identify existing features through either visual observation or automated classification techniques. There is evidence to believe that the success in feature identification relies on the resolution of the imagery used. However, little effort has yet been made to quantify the uncertainty in feature identification associated with the resolution of the aerial imagery. This paper contributes to address this gap in knowledge by contrasting results in automated hydromorphological feature identification from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV aerial imagery captured at three resolutions (2.5 cm, 5 cm and 10 cm along a 1.4 km river reach. The results show that resolution plays a key role in the accuracy and variety of features identified, with larger identification errors observed for riffles and side bars. This in turn has an impact on the ecological characterisation of the river reach. The research shows that UAV technology could be essential for unbiased hydromorphological assessment.

  7. Quantifying the effect of colony size and food distribution on harvester ant foraging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana P Flanagan

    Full Text Available Desert seed-harvester ants, genus Pogonomyrmex, are central place foragers that search for resources collectively. We quantify how seed harvesters exploit the spatial distribution of seeds to improve their rate of seed collection. We find that foraging rates are significantly influenced by the clumpiness of experimental seed baits. Colonies collected seeds from larger piles faster than randomly distributed seeds. We developed a method to compare foraging rates on clumped versus random seeds across three Pogonomyrmex species that differ substantially in forager population size. The increase in foraging rate when food was clumped in larger piles was indistinguishable across the three species, suggesting that species with larger colonies are no better than species with smaller colonies at collecting clumped seeds. These findings contradict the theoretical expectation that larger groups are more efficient at exploiting clumped resources, thus contributing to our understanding of the importance of the spatial distribution of food sources and colony size for communication and organization in social insects.

  8. Quantifying the effect of intervertebral cartilage on neutral posture in the necks of sauropod dinosaurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Taylor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to reconstruct the neutral neck posture of sauropod dinosaurs, or indeed any tetrapod, are doomed to failure when based only on the geometry of the bony cervical vertebrae. The thickness of the articular cartilage between the centra of adjacent vertebrae affects posture. It extends (raises the neck by an amount roughly proportional to the thickness of the cartilage. It is possible to quantify the angle of extension at an intervertebral joint: it is roughly equal, in radians, to the cartilage thickness divided by the height of the zygapophyseal facets over the centre of rotation. Applying this formula to published measurements of well-known sauropod specimens suggests that if the thickness of cartilage were equal to 4.5%, 10% or 18% of centrum length, the neutral pose of the Apatosaurus louisae holotype CM 3018 would be extended by an average of 5.5, 11.8 or 21.2 degrees, respectively, at each intervertebral joint. For the Diplodocus carnegii holotype CM 84, the corresponding angles of additional extension are even greater: 8.4, 18.6 or 33.3 degrees. The cartilaginous neutral postures (CNPs calculated for 10% cartilage—the most reasonable estimate—appear outlandish. But it must be remembered that these would not have been the habitual life postures, because tetrapods habitually extend the base of their neck and flex the anterior part, yielding the distinctive S-curve most easily seen in birds.

  9. A miniaturized assay to quantify effects of chemicals or physical stimuli upon locust activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BRUNO HOSTE; FILIP SAS; TIM VANDERSMISSEN; ARNOLD DE LOOF; MICHAEL BREUER; JURGEN HUYBRECHTS

    2006-01-01

    Solitary and gregarious locusts differ in many traits, such as body color,morphometrics and behavior. With respect to behavior, solitary animals shun each other,while gregarious animals seek each other's company, hence their crowding behavior.General activity, depending on the temperature, occurs throughout the day but is much lower in solitary locusts. Solitary locusts occasionally fly by night while gregarious locusts fly regularly during daytime (swarming). In search of new assays to identify substances that control or modify aspects of (phase) behavior, we designed a simple activity assay, meant to complement existing behavioral measurement tools. The general activity is reflected in the number of wall hits, that is, the number of contacts between the locust and the vertical walls of a small arena. Using this single parameter we were able to quantify differences in total activity of both nymphs and adults of isolation-reared (solitary), regrouped- and crowdreared (gregarious) locusts under different conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that there are inter- and intra-phase dependent differences in activities of 5th instar nymphs after injections of the three different adipokinetic hormones.

  10. Quantifying the effect of experimental design choices for in vitro scratch assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Stuart T; Ross, Joshua V; Binder, Benjamin J; Sean McElwain, D L; Haridas, Parvathi; Simpson, Matthew J

    2016-07-07

    Scratch assays are often used to investigate potential drug treatments for chronic wounds and cancer. Interpreting these experiments with a mathematical model allows us to estimate the cell diffusivity, D, and the cell proliferation rate, λ. However, the influence of the experimental design on the estimates of D and λ is unclear. Here we apply an approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) parameter inference method, which produces a posterior distribution of D and λ, to new sets of synthetic data, generated from an idealised mathematical model, and experimental data for a non-adhesive mesenchymal population of fibroblast cells. The posterior distribution allows us to quantify the amount of information obtained about D and λ. We investigate two types of scratch assay, as well as varying the number and timing of the experimental observations captured. Our results show that a scrape assay, involving one cell front, provides more precise estimates of D and λ, and is more computationally efficient to interpret than a wound assay, with two opposingly directed cell fronts. We find that recording two observations, after making the initial observation, is sufficient to estimate D and λ, and that the final observation time should correspond to the time taken for the cell front to move across the field of view. These results provide guidance for estimating D and λ, while simultaneously minimising the time and cost associated with performing and interpreting the experiment.

  11. Characteristics and effects of {gamma}-NiOOH on cell performance and a method to quantify it in nickel electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D. [Energizer Power Systems, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics and effects of gamma ({gamma})-NiOOH on cell performance and a method to quantify it in NiCd and NiMH battery systems. {gamma}-NiOOH is formed in nickel electrodes under conditions of aging, high percent overcharge, charge rates, and electrolyte concentrations. Formation of this phase results in swelling of the nickel electrode and leads to possible shorting due to fracturing. The fracturing of particles results in increased surface area. It also plays a role in drying the separator. All of these factors lead to cycle-life failure. These failure characteristics were measured in a NiCd cell as a function of charge and discharge cycles. A method to quantify {gamma}-NiOOH using x-ray diffraction was developed. It was found that the integrated peak intensities obtained from the 003 peak of {gamma}-NiOOH were approximately three times greater than that of the 001 peak of {beta}-NiOOH. These peaks were used since they were related to the highest intensities. This information was used in calculating the ratio of {gamma}/{gamma}+ {beta} in a charged NiOOH electrode. This technique allows one to quantify the amount of {gamma}-NiOOH as a function of cycles, rates, and different depths of discharge.

  12. Efeito de anestésicos locais com e sem vasoconstritor em pacientes com arritmias ventriculares Effect of local anesthetics with and without vasoconstrictor agent in patients with ventricular arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Fernández Cáceres

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A utilização de anestésicos locais associados a vasoconstritores para tratamento odontológico de rotina de pacientes cardiopatas ainda gera controvérsia, em razão do risco de efeitos cardiovasculares adversos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar e comparar os efeitos hemodinâmicos do uso de anestésico local com vasoconstritor não-adrenérgico em pacientes portadores de arritmias ventriculares, em relação ao uso de anestésico sem vasoconstritor. MÉTODOS: Um estudo prospectivo randomizado avaliou 33 pacientes com sorologia positiva para doença de Chagas' e 32 pacientes com doença arterial coronariana, portadores de arritmia ventricular complexa ao Holter (>10 EV/h e TVNS, 21 do sexo feminino, idade de 54,73 + 7,94 anos, submetidos a tratamento odontológico de rotina com anestesia pterigomandibular. Esses pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos: no grupo I, utilizou-se prilocaína a 3% associada a felipressina 0,03 UI/ml, e no grupo II, lidocaína a 2% sem vasoconstritor. Avaliaram-se o número e a complexidade de extra-sístoles, a freqüência cardíaca e a pressão arterial sistêmica dos pacientes no dia anterior, uma hora antes, durante o procedimento odontológico e uma hora após. RESULTADOS: Não foram observadas alterações hemodinâmicas, nem aumento do número e da complexidade da arritmia ventricular, relacionados ao anestésico utilizado, em ambos os grupos. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados sugerem que prilocaína a 3% associada a felipressina 0,03 UI/ml pode ser utilizada com segurança em pacientes chagásicos e coronarianos, com arritmia ventricular complexa.BACKGROUND: The routine use of local anesthetics associated to vasoconstrictors for the dental treatment of patients with cardiopathies is still controversial, due to the risk of adverse cardiovascular effects. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare the hemodynamic effects of the use of local anesthetics with a non-adrenergic vasoconstrictor in patients with ventricular

  13. Transient osteoporosis of pregnancy: A case report and review of anesthetic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Eduardo Anillo Lombana

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the anesthetic implications of this rare disease, particularly the use of a regional technique that removes the restrictive effect of the hip pain, and therefore increases the risk of a fracture.

  14. On the use of radon for quantifying the effects of atmospheric stability on urban emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Chambers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Radon is increasingly being used as a tool for quantifying stability influences on urban pollutant concentrations. Bulk radon gradients are ideal for this purpose, since the vertical differencing substantially removes contributions from processes on timescales greater than diurnal and (assuming a constant radon source gradients are directly related to the intensity of nocturnal mixing. More commonly, however, radon measurements are available only at a single height. In this study we argue that single-height radon observations should not be used quantitatively as an indicator of atmospheric stability without prior conditioning of the time series to remove contributions from larger-scale "non-local" processes. We outline a simple technique to obtain an approximation of the diurnal radon gradient signal from a single-height measurement time series, and use it to derive a 4-category classification scheme for atmospheric stability on a "whole night" basis. A selection of climatological and pollution observations in the Sydney region are then subdivided according to the radon-based scheme on an annual and seasonal basis. We compare the radon-based scheme against a commonly-used Pasquil-Gifford (P-G type stability classification and reveal that the most stable category in the P-G scheme is less selective of the strongly stable nights than the radon-based scheme; this lead to significant underestimation of pollutant concentrations on the most stable nights by the P-G scheme. Lastly, we applied the radon-based classification scheme to mixing height estimates calculated from the diurnal radon accumulation time series, which provided insight to the range of nocturnal mixing depths expected at the site for each of the stability classes.

  15. Imaging in arthritis: quantifying effects of therapeutic intervention using MRI and molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimmino, Marco A; Barbieri, Francesca; Zampogna, Giuseppe; Camellino, Dario; Paparo, Francesco; Parodi, Massimiliano

    2012-01-05

    Modern imaging techniques are becoming increasingly important in assessing the course of arthritis and in permitting measurement of response to treatment as part of the follow-up of patients. They include ultrasonography (US), MRI, PET/CT, and biofluorescence. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, clinical evaluation is significantly less sensitive than either US or MRI in detecting synovitis. As a result, imaging is a useful alternative to achieving proper assessment of disease activity. The different areas in which the new imaging techniques could help practicing rheumatologists and internal physicians include the following: early and differential diagnosis of arthritis, evaluation of disease activity, prognosis, assessment of treatment efficacy, assessment of remission, and evaluation of subclinical disease. MRI is probably the best imaging method to study disease activity in RA, because it can study all the joints with similar efficacy, has been sufficiently standardised, and yields data on inflammation that can be quantified. Different methods, developed to score synovitis activity, are increasingly used in clinical trials. The main application of PET/CT in rheumatology is the diagnosis and follow-up of large vessel vasculitis. More recently, also RA disease activity has been evaluated, allowing a panoramic view of the patient. Molecular imaging studies molecular and cellular processes in intact living organisms in a non-invasive fashion. In fluorescence, dyes, that emit light upon excitation by a light source and are read by a camera, can be used to show inflamed areas where neoangiogenesis, vasodilatation, and increased vessel permeability are present. These dyes can be coupled with different compounds including antibodies and drugs.

  16. Local anesthetics: dentistry's most important drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F

    1994-12-01

    One hundred and fifty years ago, Horace Wells opened the door to local anesthetics. Since then, many advances have been made in pain control. The development of dentistry's most important drugs is highlighted here.

  17. Anesthetic management of a large mediastinal mass for tracheal stent placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Rajagopalan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The anesthetic management of patients with large mediastinal masses can be complicated due to the pressure effects of the mass on the airway or major vessels. We present the successful anesthetic management of a 64-year-old female with a large mediastinal mass that encroached on the great vessels and compressed the trachea. A tracheal stent was placed to relieve the tracheal compression under general anesthesia. Spontaneous ventilation was maintained during the perioperative period with the use of a classic laryngeal mask airway. We discuss the utility of laryngeal mask airway for anesthetic management of tracheal stenting in patients with mediastinal masses.

  18. Anesthetizing animals: Similar to humans yet, peculiar?

    OpenAIRE

    Madhuri S Kurdi; Ramaswamy, Ashwini H

    2015-01-01

    From time immemorial, animals have served as models for humans. Like humans, animals too have to undergo several types of elective and emergency surgeries. Several anesthetic techniques and drugs used in humans are also used in animals. However, unlike humans, the animal kingdom includes a wide variety of species, breeds, and sizes. Different species have variable pharmacological responses, anatomy, temperament, behavior, and lifestyles. The anesthetic techniques and drugs have to suit differ...

  19. Quantifying and understanding the fitness effects of protein mutations: Laboratory versus nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jeffrey I; Bolon, Daniel N A; Tawfik, Dan S

    2016-07-01

    The last decade has seen a growing number of experiments aimed at systematically mapping the effects of mutations in different proteins, and of attempting to correlate their biophysical and biochemical effects with organismal fitness. While insightful, systematic laboratory measurements of fitness effects present challenges and difficulties. Here, we discuss the limitations associated with such measurements, and in particular the challenge of correlating the effects of mutations at the single protein level ("protein fitness") with their effects on organismal fitness. A variety of experimental setups are used, with some measuring the direct effects on protein function and others monitoring the growth rate of a model organism carrying the protein mutants. The manners by which fitness effects are calculated and presented also vary, and the conclusions, including the derived distributions of fitness effects of mutations, vary accordingly. The comparison of the effects of mutations in the laboratory to the natural protein diversity, namely to amino acid changes that have fixed in the course of millions of years of evolution, is also debatable. The results of laboratory experiments may, therefore, be less relevant to understanding long-term inter-species variations yet insightful with regard to short-term polymorphism, for example, in the study of the effects of human SNPs.

  20. Land-use and climate effects on soil respiration quantified with a landscape sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, S.; Jenerette, D.

    2014-12-01

    Land-use change alters the magnitudes and variability of soil respiration (Rs). However, the importance of ecosystem and landscape drivers of Rs remain poorly understood from an empirical and mechanistic standpoint and likely vary across climate gradients. To address this knowledge gap we asked, what regulates the spatial and temporal variation of Rs across a human dominated region? From a landscape perspective, climate and land-use are hypothesized to be key drivers of Rs. From a soil physiological perspective, variability in temperature, moisture, and substrate availability regulate Rs. According to an inverse metabolic activity hypothesis, systems with higher metabolic activity will have less temporal variability in Rs than those with lower rates. Alternatively, soil substrate availability may drive sensitivity of Rs to water inputs. To quantify variability in Rs and test hypotheses of its regulation we deployed an Rs sensor network beginning in November 2013 with nodes distributed across three land-use types - lawn, agriculture, and wildland - at three sub-regions spanning a coastal to inland to desert climate gradient (total 9 sites, 3 land-uses x 3 sub-regions). At each node we are measuring soil Rs using the flux gradient approach, which includes soil state CO2 sensors, temperature, and moisture measured at three depths and at five minute intervals. We analyzed the data for the winter sampling period, which is southern California's rainy season. The mean of Rs was lowest at the coastal and highest in the desert sub-regions for both lawn (3.99 and 4.7 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1) and wildland (0.23 and 0.49 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1) land-uses. Rs was the highest in the inland sub-region for agricultural land-uses (4.1 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1). Lawn and wildland land-uses had increasing coefficient of variation in Rs across the coastal to desert climate gradient, while agriculture had decreasing variation. Sites that had higher mean fluxes and soil organic matter, a proxy for

  1. Quantifying veterinarians’ beliefs on disease control and exploring the effect of new evidence: A Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, H. M.; Huxley, J. N.; Wapenaar, W.; Green, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    The clinical beliefs (expectations and demands) of veterinarians regarding herd-level strategies to control mastitis, lameness and Johne’s disease were quantified in a numerical format; 94 veterinarians working in England (UK) were randomly selected and during interviews, a statistical technique called ‘probabilistic elicitation’ was used to capture their clinical expectations as probability distributions. The results revealed that markedly different clinical expectations existed for all 3 diseases, and many pairs of veterinarians had expectations with non-overlapping 95% Bayesian credible intervals; for example, for a 3 yr lameness intervention, the most pessimistic veterinarian was centred at an 11% population mean reduction in lameness prevalence (95% credible interval: 0-21%); the most enthusiastic veterinarian was centred at a 58% reduction (95% credible interval: 38-78%). This suggests that a major change in beliefs would be required to achieve clinical agreement. The veterinarians’ clinical expectations were used as priors in Bayesian models where they were combined with synthetic data (from randomized clinical trials of different sizes) in order to explore the impact of new evidence on current clinical opinion. The mathematical models make predictions based on the assumption that veterinarians will update their beliefs logically. For example, for the lameness intervention, a 200 farm clinical trial that estimated a 30% mean reduction in lameness prevalence was predicted to be reasonably convincing to the most pessimist veterinarian; i.e. in light of this data, they were predicted to believe there would be a 0.92 probability of exceeding the median clinical demand of this sample of veterinarians, which was a 20% mean reduction in lameness. Currently controversy exists over the extent to which veterinarians update their beliefs logically, and further research on this is needed. This study has demonstrated that probabilistic elicitation and a Bayesian

  2. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy for the Evaluation of Anesthetic Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hernandez-Meza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard-of-care guidelines published by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA recommend monitoring of pulse oximetry, blood pressure, heart rate, and end tidal CO2 during the use of anesthesia and sedation. This information can help to identify adverse events that may occur during procedures. However, these parameters are not specific to the effects of anesthetics or sedatives, and therefore they offer little, to no, real time information regarding the effects of those agents and do not give the clinician the lead-time necessary to prevent patient “awareness.” Since no “gold-standard” method is available to continuously, reliably, and effectively monitor the effects of sedatives and anesthetics, such a method is greatly needed. Investigation of the use of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS as a method for anesthesia or sedation monitoring and for the assessment of the effects of various anesthetic drugs on cerebral oxygenation has started to be conducted. The objective of this paper is to provide a thorough review of the currently available published scientific studies regarding the use of fNIRS in the fields of anesthesia and sedation monitoring, comment on their findings, and discuss the future work required for the translation of this technology to the clinical setting.

  3. Efficacy of benzocaine as an anesthetic for salmonid fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilderhus, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Benzocaine was tested in the laboratory to determine the effective concentrations for anesthetizing juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha an rainbow trout O. mykiss (formerly Salmo gairdneri ). Tests were conducted at three water temperatures, in waters ranging from very soft to very hard, and with groups of rainbow trout from 5 to 47 cm long and chinook salmon 20 cm long. Effective concentrations were defined as those that rendered the fish fully handleable in 3 min or less, allowed recovery of most fish within 10 min, and caused no mortality after 15-min exposures. Concentrations of 25-45 mg/L anesthetized both species over the entire range of conditions tested. Although efficacy was essentially unrelated to species or water quality, it was related to water temperature and size of fish; the concentrations of benzocaine required were highest at the lowest water temperature and for the largest fish.

  4. Awake craniotomy anesthetic management using dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prontera, Andrea; Baroni, Stefano; Marudi, Andrea; Valzania, Franco; Feletti, Alberto; Benuzzi, Francesca; Bertellini, Elisabetta; Pavesi, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Awake craniotomy allows continuous monitoring of patients' neurological functions during open surgery. Anesthesiologists have to sedate patients in a way so that they are compliant throughout the whole surgical procedure, nevertheless maintaining adequate analgesia and anxiolysis. Currently, the use of α2-receptor agonist dexmedetomidine as the primary hypnotic-sedative medication is increasing. Nine patients undergoing awake craniotomy were treated with refined monitored anesthesia care (MAC) protocol consisting of a combination of local anesthesia without scalp block, low-dose infusion of dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil, without the need of airways management. The anesthetic protocol applied in our study has the advantage of decreasing the dose of each drug and thus reducing the occurrence of side effects. All patients had smooth and rapid awakenings. The brain remained relaxed during the entire procedure. In our experience, this protocol is safe and effective during awake brain surgery. Nevertheless, prospective randomized trials are necessary to confirm the optimal anesthetic technique to be used.

  5. [Action of a dental anesthetic on cell respiration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Jeso, F; Truscello, A; Martinotti, G; Colli, S

    1987-01-01

    It is often required to employ local anesthetics in practising dentistry, particularly when children have to be treated. Our researches on neurotropic drugs in the last years follow our hypothesis that the strong effects on nervous system have always hidden more widespread effects on all tissues and cells. In vitro essays carried out on rat liver mitochondria show that a dental anesthetic, lidocaine, depress respiration coupled to phosphorylation in mitochondria having a good respiratory control; so respiratory control too is depressed, but P/O ratio is unaffected; also respiration uncoupled by 2,4-dinitrophenol is depressed. Depressing respiration cooperates with anesthesia; unchanging P/O is good for the health of the cells and tissues treated by the lidocaine.

  6. Heterotrophic denitrification vs. autotrophic anammox – quantifying collateral effects on the oceanic carbon cycle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koeve, W; Kähler, P

    2010-01-01

    .... Recently, it has been suggested that the trophic nature of pelagic N2 -production may have additional, "collateral" effects on the carbon cycle, where heterotrophic denitrification provides a shallow...

  7. Quantifying the effectiveness of SiO2/Au light trapping nanoshells for thin film poly-Si solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In order to enhance light absorption of thin film poly-crystalline silicon(TF poly-Si)solar cells over a broad spectral range, and quantify the effectiveness of nanoshell light trapping structure over the full solar spectrum in theory,the effective photon trapping flux(EPTF)and effective photon trapping efficiency(EPTE)were firstly proposed by considering both the external quantum efficiency of TF poly-Si solar cell and scattering properties of light trapping structures.The EPTF,EPTE and scattering spectrum exhibit different behaviors depending on the geometric size and density of nanoshells that form the light trapping layer.With an optimum size and density of SiO2/Au nanoshell light trapping layer,the EPTE could reach up to 40%due to the enhancement of light trapping over a broad spectral range,especially from 500 to 800 nm.

  8. Adjuvants to local anesthetics: Current understanding and future trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Amlan; Nag, Deb Sanjay; Sahu, Seelora; Samaddar, Devi Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Although beneficial in acute and chronic pain management, the use of local anaesthetics is limited by its duration of action and the dose dependent adverse effects on the cardiac and central nervous system. Adjuvants or additives are often used with local anaesthetics for its synergistic effect by prolonging the duration of sensory-motor block and limiting the cumulative dose requirement of local anaesthetics. The armamentarium of local anesthetic adjuvants have evolved over time from classical opioids to a wide array of drugs spanning several groups and varying mechanisms of action. A large array of opioids ranging from morphine, fentanyl and sufentanyl to hydromorphone, buprenorphine and tramadol has been used with varying success. However, their use has been limited by their adverse effect like respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting and pruritus, especially with its neuraxial use. Epinephrine potentiates the local anesthetics by its antinociceptive properties mediated by alpha-2 adrenoreceptor activation along with its vasoconstrictive properties limiting the systemic absorption of local anesthetics. Alpha 2 adrenoreceptor antagonists like clonidine and dexmedetomidine are one of the most widely used class of local anesthetic adjuvants. Other drugs like steroids (dexamethasone), anti-inflammatory agents (parecoxib and lornoxicam), midazolam, ketamine, magnesium sulfate and neostigmine have also been used with mixed success. The concern regarding the safety profile of these adjuvants is due to its potential neurotoxicity and neurological complications which necessitate further research in this direction. Current research is directed towards a search for agents and techniques which would prolong local anaesthetic action without its deleterious effects. This includes novel approaches like use of charged molecules to produce local anaesthetic action (tonicaine and n butyl tetracaine), new age delivery mechanisms for prolonged bioavailability (liposomal

  9. Intraperitoneal Local Anesthetic in Pediatric Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, James K; Rahiri, Jamie-Lee; Liley, Andrew; Hill, Andrew G

    2016-12-01

    Introduction Systematic reviews report intraperitoneal local anesthetic (IPLA) effective in adults but until now no review has addressed IPLA in children. The objective of this review was to answer the question, does IPLA compared with control reduce pain after pediatric abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods Data sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane databases, trials registries, ProQuest, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Open Gray.

  10. The effectiveness of diclofenac gel and eutectic mixture of local anesthetic cream on vein puncture pain severity with vein catheter in patient undergoing cesarean section: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Sediqeh; Safavi, Mahboubeh; Rezaei, Rozita; Bidmeshki, Maria; Shirzad, Fatemeh; Nasiri, Mostafa

    2014-09-01

    This study was aimed to explore the effect of applying diclofenac gel and a eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) cream on vein puncture pain severity with vein catheter in the patients undergoing cesarean section. The sample comprised 90 women undergoing elective cesarean section that referred to Imam Ali Hospital's maternity section in Amol city (Northern Iran). Data collection tools included visual analog scale for pain severity and a checklist for short term possible side-effects of diclofenac gel, EMLA cream and Vaseline ointment as placebo. The pain of vein puncture with diclofenac gel and EMLA cream was significantly lower than that with the Vaseline ointment (P = 0.001). Similarly, there was a significant difference between using diclofenac gel and EMLA cream in catheter insertion pain severity (P = 0.006). In addition, there was no short term possible side-effect with using diclofenac gel and Vaseline ointment, but a short term side-effect (blanching) was detected in 20% of subjects with EMLA cream. Compared to Vaseline cream, EMLA cream and diclofenac gel application significantly reduces the pain severity associated with vein catheter insertion. Use of diclofenac gel is preferred compared with EMLA cream, because of economics, more efficiency purpose, and no side-effects.

  11. Quantifying the motion of magnetic particles in excised tissue: Effect of particle properties and applied magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Sandip, E-mail: sandip.d.kulkarni@gmail.com [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Ramaswamy, Bharath; Horton, Emily; Gangapuram, Sruthi [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Nacev, Alek [Weinberg Medical Physics, LLC (United States); Depireux, Didier [The Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Otomagnetics, LLC (United States); Shimoji, Mika [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Otomagnetics, LLC (United States); Shapiro, Benjamin [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); The Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Otomagnetics, LLC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a method to investigate how magnetic particle characteristics affect their motion inside tissues under the influence of an applied magnetic field. Particles are placed on top of freshly excised tissue samples, a calibrated magnetic field is applied by a magnet underneath each tissue sample, and we image and quantify particle penetration depth by quantitative metrics to assess how particle sizes, their surface coatings, and tissue resistance affect particle motion. Using this method, we tested available fluorescent particles from Chemicell of four sizes (100 nm, 300 nm, 500 nm, and 1 μm diameter) with four different coatings (starch, chitosan, lipid, and PEG/P) and quantified their motion through freshly excised rat liver, kidney, and brain tissues. In broad terms, we found that the applied magnetic field moved chitosan particles most effectively through all three tissue types (as compared to starch, lipid, and PEG/P coated particles). However, the relationship between particle properties and their resulting motion was found to be complex. Hence, it will likely require substantial further study to elucidate the nuances of transport mechanisms and to select and engineer optimal particle properties to enable the most effective transport through various tissue types under applied magnetic fields.

  12. Quantifying the Hawthorne Effect in Hand Hygiene Compliance Through Comparing Direct Observation With Automated Hand Hygiene Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagel, Stefan; Reischke, Jana; Kesselmeier, Miriam; Winning, Johannes; Gastmeier, Petra; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Scherag, André; Pletz, Mathias W

    2015-08-01

    To quantify the Hawthorne effect of hand hygiene performance among healthcare workers using direct observation. Prospective observational study. Intensive care unit, university hospital. Direct observation of hand hygiene compliance over 48 audits of 2 hours each. Simultaneously, hand hygiene events (HHEs) were recorded using electronic alcohol-based handrub dispensers. Directly observed and electronically recorded HHEs during the 2 hours of direct observation were compared using Spearman correlations and Bland-Altman plots. To quantify the Hawthorne effect, we compared the number of electronically recorded HHEs during the direct observation periods with the re-scaled electronically recorded HHEs in the 6 remaining hours of the 8-hour working shift. A total of 3,978 opportunities for hand hygiene were observed during the 96 hours of direct observation. Hand hygiene compliance was 51% (95% CI, 49%-53%). There was a strong positive correlation between directly observed compliance and electronically recorded HHEs (ρ=0.68 [95% CI, 0.49-0.81], Phand hygiene performance.

  13. How we recall (or don't): the hippocampal memory machine and anesthetic amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A

    2011-02-01

    The hippocampal formation occupies a central position for the processing of sensory input into learned, remembered, and consciously retrievable information. The mechanisms by which anesthetic drugs interfere with these processes are now emerging. We review the current understanding of the role of the hippocampal formation in the generation of memory traces and how anesthetics might interfere with its function. Intraoperative amnesia is a desired endpoint of general anesthesia from the perspective of both the patient and the practitioner. "Intraoperative awareness with recall" can result when learning and memory do occur. In addition, anesthetics are capable of inducing a state of "conscious amnesia" that can provide insight into the workings of the brain and might be useful clinically. Anesthesiologists routinely induce the most fascinating pharmacologic effects in existence, the reversible interference of anesthetics with higher cognitive functions. Understanding how the drugs in our custody exert their effects should be our contribution to mankind's universal knowledge base.

  14. A comparative analysis to quantify the biogeochemical and biogeophysical cooling effects on climate of a white mustard cover crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlicoq, Morgan; Ceschia, Eric; Brut, Aurore; Tallec, Tiphaine; Carrer, Dominique; Pique, Gaetan; Ferroni, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    During the COP21, agriculture was recognised as a strategic sector and an opportunity to strengthen climate mitigation. In particular, the "4 per 1000" initiative relies upon solutions that refer to agro-ecology, conservation agriculture, … that could lead to increase carbon storage. Among those agro-ecology practices, including cover crops during fallow periods is considered as a fundamental agronomic lever for storing carbon. However, if biogeochemical benefits of cover-crops (CC) have already been addressed, their biogeophysical effects on climate have never been quantified and compared to biogeochemical effects. This comparative study (CC vs. bare soil), quantified and compared biogeochemical (including carbon storage) and biophysical effects (albedo and energy partitioning effect) of CC on climate. An experimental campaign was performed in 2013 in Southwest France, during the fallow period following a winter-wheat crop (and before a maize). The experimental plot was divided in two: the northern part was maintained in bare soil (BS) while white-mustard (WM) was grown during 3-months on the southern part. On each subplot, continuous measurements of CO2, latent and sensible fluxes (by eddy covariance) and solar radiation were acquired. Also, N2O emissions were measured by means of automatic chambers on each subplots. Moreover, by using a Life-Cycle-Analysis approach, each component of the greenhouse gas budget (GHGB) was quantified for each subplot, including emissions associated to field operations (FO). To quantify the albedo induced radiative forcing (RFα) caused by the white-mustard, the bare soil subplot was used as a reference state (IPCC, 2007). Finally, the net radiative forcing for each subplot was calculated as the sum of biogeochemical and biogeophysical (albedo effect) radiative forcing. The white-mustard allowed a net CO2 fixation of 63 g C-eq.m-2, corresponding to 20% of the net annual CO2 flux that year (-332 g C-eq.m-2). Through the WM seeds

  15. Quantifying small molecule phenotypic effects using mitochondrial morpho-functional fingerprinting and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Lionel; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet E.; Vogels, Caroline; Pellegrini, Mina; Jonckheere, An I.; Rodenburg, Richard J. T.; Buydens, Lutgarde M. C.; Beyrath, Julien; Willems, Peter H. G. M.; Koopman, Werner J. H.

    2015-01-01

    In primary fibroblasts from Leigh Syndrome (LS) patients, isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency is associated with increased reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial morpho-functional changes. Empirical evidence suggests these aberrations constitute linked therapeutic targets for small chemical molecules. However, the latter generally induce multiple subtle effects, meaning that in vitro potency analysis or single-parameter high-throughput cell screening are of limited use to identify these molecules. We combine automated image quantification and artificial intelligence to discriminate between primary fibroblasts of a healthy individual and a LS patient based upon their mitochondrial morpho-functional phenotype. We then evaluate the effects of newly developed Trolox variants in LS patient cells. This revealed that Trolox ornithylamide hydrochloride best counterbalanced mitochondrial morpho-functional aberrations, effectively scavenged ROS and increased the maximal activity of mitochondrial complexes I, IV and citrate synthase. Our results suggest that Trolox-derived antioxidants are promising candidates in therapy development for human mitochondrial disorders.

  16. A simplified modelling approach for quantifying tillage effects on soil carbon stocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatskikh, Dmitri; Hansen, Søren; Olesen, Jørgen E.

    2009-01-01

    Soil tillage has been shown to affect long-term changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) content in a number of field experiments. This paper presents a simplified approach for including effects of tillage in models of soil C turnover in the tilled-soil layer. We used an existing soil organic matter...... then compared using slopes of linear regressions of SOC changes over time. Results showed that the SOM model captured observed changes in SOC content from differences in rotations, N application and crop residue management for conventional tillage. On the basis of SOC change data a mean TF of 0.48 (standard...... deviation, SD = 0.12) was estimated for NT. The results indicate that (i) the estimated uncertainty of tillage effects on SOC turnover may be smaller than previously thought and (ii) simple scaling of SOM model parameters may be sufficient to capture the effects of soil tillage on SOM turnover in the tilled...

  17. Quantifying Main Trends in Lysozyme Nucleation: The Effects of Precipitant Concentration, Supersaturation and Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael W.; Leardi, Riccardo; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Full factorial experimental design incorporating multi-linear regression analysis of the experimental data allows quick identification of main trends and effects using a limited number of experiments. In this study these techniques were employed to identify the effect of precipitant concentration, supersaturation, and the presence of an impurity, the physiological lysozyme dimer, on the nucleation rate and crystal dimensions of the tetragonal forin of chicken egg white lysozyme. Decreasing precipitant concentration, increasing supers aturation, and increasing impurity, were found to increase crystal numbers. The crystal axial ratio decreased with increasing precipitant concentration, independent of impurity.

  18. Quantifying the effect of squirt flow dispersion from compliant clay porosity in clay bearing sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Compliant porosity in the form of cracks is known to cause significant attenuation and velocity dispersion through pore pressure gradients and consequent relaxation, dubbed squirt flow. Squirt flow from cracks vanish at high confining stress due to crack closing. Studies on clay bearing sandstones......-squirt flow on the bulk modulus of a clay bearing sandstone. The predicted magnitude of the clay-squirt effect on the bulk modulus is compared with experimental data. The clay-squirt effect is found to possibly account for a significant portion of the deviances from Gassmann fluid substitution in claybearing...

  19. Enhanced computational methods for quantifying the effect of geographic and environmental isolation on genetic differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botta, Filippo; Eriksen, Casper; Fontaine, Michaël C.

    2015-01-01

    that allows users to assess which model (e.g. with or without an environment effect) is most suited, (iv) we extend the program to handle several environmental variables jointly, (v) we code all our MCMC algorithms in a mix of compiled languages which allows us to decrease computing time by at least one order...

  20. Enhanced computational methods for quantifying the effect of geographic and environmental isolation on genetic differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botta, Filippo; Eriksen, Casper; Fontaine, Michaël C.

    2015-01-01

    procedure that allows users to assess which model (e.g. with or without an environment effect) is most suited. We code all our MCMC algorithms in a mix of compiled languages which allows us to decrease computing time by at least one order of magnitude. We propose an approximate inference and model selection...

  1. Quantifying the Effect of Discussion Group Membership on Technology Adoption and Farm Profit on Dairy Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Thia; Heanue, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Participatory extension, specifically farm discussion groups, has become a very popular form of agricultural extension in Ireland. The purpose of this article is to assess its effectiveness in promoting the adoption of new technologies and improving farm profit. Design/Methodology/Approach: Following a review of the background and theory…

  2. Estimating required information size by quantifying diversity in random-effects model meta-analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetterslev, Jørn; Thorlund, Kristian; Brok, Jesper;

    2009-01-01

    an intervention effect suggested by trials with low-risk of bias. METHODS: Information size calculations need to consider the total model variance in a meta-analysis to control type I and type II errors. Here, we derive an adjusting factor for the required information size under any random-effects model meta......-analysis. RESULTS: We devise a measure of diversity (D2) in a meta-analysis, which is the relative variance reduction when the meta-analysis model is changed from a random-effects into a fixed-effect model. D2 is the percentage that the between-trial variability constitutes of the sum of the between...... and interpreted using several simulations and clinical examples. In addition we show mathematically that diversity is equal to or greater than inconsistency, that is D2 >or= I2, for all meta-analyses. CONCLUSION: We conclude that D2 seems a better alternative than I2 to consider model variation in any random...

  3. Quantifying the Effect of Discussion Group Membership on Technology Adoption and Farm Profit on Dairy Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Thia; Heanue, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Participatory extension, specifically farm discussion groups, has become a very popular form of agricultural extension in Ireland. The purpose of this article is to assess its effectiveness in promoting the adoption of new technologies and improving farm profit. Design/Methodology/Approach: Following a review of the background and theory…

  4. Tremor side effects of salbutamol, quantified by a laser pointer technique.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nizet, T.; Broeders, M.E.A.C.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study tremor side effects of salbutamol an easily applicable, quick and low-priced method is needed. A new method using a commercially available, pen-shaped laser pointer was developed. Aim of the study was to determine sensitivity, reproducibility, reference values and the agreement w

  5. Quantifying livestock effects on bunchgrass vegetation with Landsat ETM+ data across a single growing season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Working grassland systems provide important habitat for native biodiversity and forage for livestock, with proper livestock grazing playing an important role for sustainable ecosystem function. Traditional in-field techniques to monitor the effects of grazing on vegetation are costly and limited to ...

  6. Enhanced local anesthetic action of mepivacaine from the bioadhesive gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Cheong-Weon; Choi, Jun-Shik; Shin, Sang-Chul

    2011-01-01

    Mepivacaine, an amide-type local anesthetic, has been used to relieve local pain. Among the many drug delivery systems, transdermal drug delivery has some advantages, as it provides controlled drug delivery for an extended period of time. To develop new gel formulations that have suitable bioadhesion, the bioadhesive force of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) was assessed using an auto-peeling tester. The effect of drug concentration on drug release from 2% HPMC gel was studied using synthetic cellulose membrane at 37±0.5°C. The drug concentrations tested were 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5%. The effect of temperature on drug release from the 2% drug gel was evaluated at 27, 32, 37 and 42°C. To increase the skin permeation of mepivacaine from HPMC gel, enhancers such as saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, pyrrolidones, propylene glycol derivatives, glycerides, and non-ionic surfactants were incorporated into the mepivacaine-HPMC gels. The enhancing effect of the enhancer on drug permeation was then examined in the modified Keshary-Chien cell. For the efficacy study, the anesthetic action of the formulated mepivacaine gel containing enhancer and vasoconstrictor was evaluated with the tail-flick analgesimeter. Among the various kinds of HPMC, HPMC-K100M gel showed the highest viscosity and bioadhesive force. As the viscosity of the HPMC gels increased, the bioadhesive forces increased. Increasing the drug concentration or temperature increased the drug release rate. Among the enhancers used, polyoxyethylene 2-oleyl ether showed the greatest enhancement of permeation. Based on the area under the efficacy curve of the rat tail flick test curve, mepivacaine gel containing polyoxyethylene 2-oleyl ether and tetrahydrozoline showed prolonged and increased local anesthetic action compared to the control. For bioadhesive mepivacaine gels with enhanced local anesthetic action, mepivacaine gels containing penetration enhancer and vasoconstrictor could be developed with the

  7. Quantifying the effect of isoflurane and nitrous oxide on somatosensory-evoked potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Devadoss

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthetic techniques may have a significant effect on intraoperative-evoked potentials (EP. The present study is designed to compare Propofol anaesthesia with Isoflurane (with or without nitrous oxide during intraoperative somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP monitoring in 15 ASA Grade I and II patients undergoing surgery for intracranial tumours. SSEPs in response to median and posterior tibial nerve stimulation were recorded under four different anaesthetic conditions: 1 Propofol infusion and ventilation with air-oxygen, 2 Isoflurane, 1.0 MAC and ventilation with air-oxygen, 3 Isoflurane 1.0 MAC and ventilation with nitrous oxide-oxygen, and 4 Return to Isoflurane, 1.0 MAC and ventilation with air-oxygen. Intraoperative monitoring of somatosensory evoked potentials is best recordable using Propofol. The morphology of the EP is reproducible with Isoflurane. This effect is exaggerated when it is advisable to avoid nitrous oxide.

  8. Fiscal Integration with Internal Trade: Quantifying the Effects of Equalizing Transfers

    OpenAIRE

    Trevor Tombe; Jennifer Winter

    2016-01-01

    Financial transfers between regions of a country are ubiquitous. Richer regions contribute (often indirectly) to poorer regions, and this affects their welfare, productivity, and industry composition. Financial inflows raise welfare by funding current account deficits, and imports raise productivity by shutting down the lowest productivity firms. But there is little quantitative work examining these effects for fiscal transfers within countries. We fill this gap by augmenting and exploring a ...

  9. Isoflurane anesthetic hypersensitivity and progressive respiratory depression in a mouse model with isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, S.; Manjeri, G.R.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Driessen, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with mitochondrial disorders are frequently anesthetized for a wide range of operations. These disorders may interfere with the response to surgery and anesthesia. We examined anesthetic sensitivity to and respiratory effects of isoflurane in the Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mouse model

  10. Isoflurane anesthetic hypersensitivity and progressive respiratory depression in a mouse model with isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, S.; Manjeri, G.R.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Driessen, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with mitochondrial disorders are frequently anesthetized for a wide range of operations. These disorders may interfere with the response to surgery and anesthesia. We examined anesthetic sensitivity to and respiratory effects of isoflurane in the Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mouse

  11. Temperature dependence of the superconducting proximity effect quantified by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stępniak, A.; Caminale, M.; Leon Vanegas, A. A.; Oka, H.; Sander, D., E-mail: sander@mpi-halle.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Kirschner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Here, we present the first systematic study on the temperature dependence of the extension of the superconducting proximity effect in a 1–2 atomic layer thin metallic film, surrounding a superconducting Pb island. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) measurements reveal the spatial variation of the local density of state on the film from 0.38 up to 1.8 K. In this temperature range the superconductivity of the island is almost unaffected and shows a constant gap of a 1.20 ± 0.03 meV. Using a superconducting Nb-tip a constant value of the proximity length of 17 ± 3 nm at 0.38 and 1.8 K is found. In contrast, experiments with a normal conductive W-tip indicate an apparent decrease of the proximity length with increasing temperature. This result is ascribed to the thermal broadening of the occupation of states of the tip, and it does not reflect an intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity length. Our tunneling spectroscopy experiments shed fresh light on the fundamental issue of the temperature dependence of the proximity effect for atomic monolayers, where the intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity effect is comparably weak.

  12. Temperature dependence of the superconducting proximity effect quantified by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stępniak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present the first systematic study on the temperature dependence of the extension of the superconducting proximity effect in a 1–2 atomic layer thin metallic film, surrounding a superconducting Pb island. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS measurements reveal the spatial variation of the local density of state on the film from 0.38 up to 1.8 K. In this temperature range the superconductivity of the island is almost unaffected and shows a constant gap of a 1.20 ± 0.03 meV. Using a superconducting Nb-tip a constant value of the proximity length of 17 ± 3 nm at 0.38 and 1.8 K is found. In contrast, experiments with a normal conductive W-tip indicate an apparent decrease of the proximity length with increasing temperature. This result is ascribed to the thermal broadening of the occupation of states of the tip, and it does not reflect an intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity length. Our tunneling spectroscopy experiments shed fresh light on the fundamental issue of the temperature dependence of the proximity effect for atomic monolayers, where the intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity effect is comparably weak.

  13. Quantifying the effects of interacting nutrient cycles on terrestrial biosphere dynamics and their climate feedbacks (QUINCY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaehle, Sönke; Caldararu, Silvia; Eder, Lucia; Engel, Jan; Kern, Melanie; Schrumpf, Marion; Weber, Enrico

    2017-04-01

    Nutrient availability plays a pivotal role in the response of terrestrial ecosystems to increasing atmospheric CO2 and climate change. The first generation of global nutrient-carbon cycle models shows strongly diverging estimates of the nutrient effect, resulting from lacking integration of ecosystem observations and fundamental uncertainties in the representation of governing processes. The two fundamental areas in which advances in modelling are required at i)the effects of nutrient availability on plant photosynthesis and respiration by explicitly taking the energy requirement of nutrient acquisition into account, and ii) the effects of vegetation-soil interactions, namely rhizosphere processes, on plant nutrient availability and soil C turnover. Here we present the methodology and first results of the QUINCY project, which addresses these important issues by an approach encompassing experimentation and model development. In particular, we outline a novel modelling approach to systematically link carbon, nutrient and water flows within the framework of a general land surface model at time-scales of minutes to decades, and illustrate, how (new) experimental data can (better) constrain this novel model.

  14. [Anesthetic Management of Three Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Naoko; Wakimoto, Mayuko; Inamori, Noriko; Nishimura, Shinya; Mori, Takahiko

    2015-08-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronically progressing or relapsing disease caused by immune-mediated peripheral neuropathy. We report the anesthetic management of three CIDP patients who underwent elective orthopedic surgeries. Owing to the risk of neuraxial anesthetics triggering demyelination, general anesthesia was selected to avoid epidural or spinal anesthesia or other neuraxial blockade. It was also judged prudent to avoid prolonged perioperative immobilization, which might compress vulnerable peripheral nerves. For Patient 1, general anesthesia was induced with propofol, remifentanil, and sevoflurane, and was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. For Patients 2 and 3, general anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. For tracheal intubation, under careful monitoring with peripheral nerve stimulators, minimal doses of rocuronium (0.6-0.7 mg x kg(-1)) were administered. When sugammadex was administered to reverse the effect of rocuronium, all patients rapidly regained muscular strength. Postoperative courses were satisfactory without sequelae.

  15. Dissociative anesthetic combination reduces intraocular pressure (IOP in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewaldo de Mattos-Junior

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluate the effects of three anesthetic combinations, ketamine-midazolam, ketamine-xylazine and tiletamine-zolazepam, on IOP in rabbits. In a experimental, blind, randomized, crossover study, six rabbits were anesthetized with each of 3 treatments in random order. Groups KM (ketamine, 30 mg/kg + midazolam, 1 mg/kg; KX (ketamine, 30 mg/kg + xylazine, 3 mg/kg; and TZ (tiletamine + zolazepam, 20 mg/kg. The drugs were mixed in the same syringe injected intramuscularly (IM into the quadriceps muscle. IOP was measured before drug administration (baseline and at 5-minute intervals for 30 minutes. The data were analyzed by a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA followed by Bonferroni test. All groups had significant decreases in IOP compared to baseline (p 0.05. Administration of either ketamine-midazolam, ketamine-xylazine, or tiletamine-zolazepam similarly decrease IOP in rabbits within 30 minutes of injection.

  16. Antidepressants and local anesthetics: drug interactions of interest to dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Rosa Chioca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since there is a vast variety of pharmacological treatments for mental conditions, it has been increasingly more common that patients seeking dentistry treatment are continually using psychoactive drugs as antidepressants. The number of people taking antidepressants is increasing; consequently, dentists should update their knowledge on the interaction between this drug class and those used in dental daily practice, such as local anesthetics and vasoconstrictors. Objective: To conduct a literature review on this subject. Literature review and conclusion: Literature data suggest that sympathomimetic vasoconstrictors (epinephrine, norepinephrine, and phenylephrine associated with local anesthetics may potentiate the side effects of antidepressants, particularly tricyclics and MAO inhibitors, on the cardiovascular system. There are few clinical trials and preclinical studies on this subject, and most of them were carried out between the 60s and 80s. Current studies are needed, since many new antidepressant drugs with different mechanisms of action are currently marketed and being used.

  17. Analysis technique for quantifying the effectiveness of optical-proximity-corrected photomasks and its application to defect printability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Graham G.; Martin, Brian

    1999-04-01

    An analysis technique for quantifying the effectiveness of optical proximity corrected (OPC) photomasks is described. The methodology is able to account for reticle manufacturing tolerances and has a number of applications including the optimization of OPC features and, in the examples described, the analysis of defect printability. The results presented here are generated using aerial image measurements from PROLITH/2, but the technique can be directly transferred to resist image measurements using 3D simulation tools such as PROLITH/3D where other factors such as swing curve effects caused by wafer topography could also be analyzed. With inspection tools such as scanning electron or atomic force microscopes and appropriate image processing and analysis software it should also be possible to apply this methodology to practical results.

  18. Quantifying the Jakobshavn Effect: Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland, compared to Byrd Glacier, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hughes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Jakobshavn Effect is a series of positive feedback mechanisms that was first observed on Jakobshavn Isbrae, which drains the west-central part of the Greenland Ice Sheet and enters Jakobshavn Isfjord at 69°10'. These mechanisms fall into two categories, reductions of ice-bed coupling beneath an ice stream due to surface meltwater reaching the bed, and reductions in ice-shelf buttressing beyond an ice stream due to disintegration of a laterally confined and locally pinned ice shelf. These uncoupling and unbuttressing mechanisms have recently taken place for Byrd Glacier in Antarctica and Jakobshavn Isbrae in Greenland, respectively. For Byrd Glacier, no surface meltwater reaches the bed. That water is supplied by drainage of two large subglacial lakes where East Antarctic ice converges strongly on Byrd Glacier. Results from modeling both mechanisms are presented here. We find that the Jakobshavn Effect is not active for Byrd Glacier, but is active for Jakobshavn Isbrae, at least for now. Our treatment is holistic in the sense it provides continuity from sheet flow to stream flow to shelf flow. It relies primarily on a force balance, so our results cannot be used to predict long-term behavior of these ice streams. The treatment uses geometrical representations of gravitational and resisting forces that provide a visual understanding of these forces, without involving partial differential equations and continuum mechanics. The Jakobshavn Effect was proposed to facilitate terminations of glaciation cycles during the Quaternary Ice Age by collapsing marine parts of ice sheets. This is unlikely for the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets, based on our results for Byrd Glacier and Jakobshavn Isbrae, without drastic climate warming in high polar latitudes. Warming would affect other Antarctic ice streams already weakly buttressed or unbuttressed by an ice shelf. Ross Ice Shelf would still protect Byrd Glacier.

  19. Effect of caffeine ingestion on anaerobic capacity quantified by different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcoverde, Lucyana; Silveira, Rodrigo; Tomazini, Fabiano; Sansonio, André; Bertuzzi, Romulo; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo; Andrade-Souza, Victor Amorim

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether caffeine ingestion before submaximal exercise bouts would affect supramaximal oxygen demand and maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD), and if caffeine-induced improvement on the anaerobic capacity (AC) could be detected by different methods. Nine men took part in several submaximal and supramaximal exercise bouts one hour after ingesting caffeine (5 mg·kg-1) or placebo. The AC was estimated by MAOD, alternative MAOD, critical power, and gross efficiency methods. Caffeine had no effect on exercise endurance during the supramaximal bout (caffeine: 131.3 ± 21.9 and placebo: 130.8 ± 20.8 s, P = 0.80). Caffeine ingestion before submaximal trials did not affect supramaximal oxygen demand and MAOD compared to placebo (7.88 ± 1.56 L and 65.80 ± 16.06 kJ vs. 7.89 ± 1.30 L and 62.85 ± 13.67 kJ, P = 0.99). Additionally, MAOD was similar between caffeine and placebo when supramaximal oxygen demand was estimated without caffeine effects during submaximal bouts (67.02 ± 16.36 and 62.85 ± 13.67 kJ, P = 0.41) or when estimated by alternative MAOD (56.61 ± 8.49 and 56.87 ± 9.76 kJ, P = 0.91). The AC estimated by gross efficiency was also similar between caffeine and placebo (21.80 ± 3.09 and 20.94 ± 2.67 kJ, P = 0.15), but was lower in caffeine when estimated by critical power method (16.2 ± 2.6 vs. 19.3 ± 3.5 kJ, P = 0.03). In conclusion, caffeine ingestion before submaximal bouts did not affect supramaximal oxygen demand and consequently MAOD. Otherwise, caffeine seems to have no clear positive effect on AC.

  20. Quantifying the Effect of Undersampling in Monte Carlo Simulations Using SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfetti, Christopher M [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the effect of undersampling in Monte Carlo calculations on tally estimates and tally variance estimates for burnup credit applications. Steady-state Monte Carlo simulations were performed for models of several critical systems with varying degrees of spatial and isotopic complexity and the impact of undersampling on eigenvalue and flux estimates was examined. Using an inadequate number of particle histories in each generation was found to produce an approximately 100 pcm bias in the eigenvalue estimates, and biases that exceeded 10% in fuel pin flux estimates.

  1. Generalized quantum similarity in atomic systems: A quantifier of relativistic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, A. L.; Angulo, J. C.; Antolín, J.; López-Rosa, S.

    2017-02-01

    Quantum similarity between Hartree-Fock and Dirac-Fock electron densities reveals the depth of relativistic effects on the core and valence regions in atomic systems. The results emphasize the relevance of differences in the outermost subshells, as pointed out in recent studies by means of Shannon-like functionals. In this work, a generalized similarity functional allows us to go far beyond the Shannon-based analyses. The numerical results for systems throughout the Periodic Table show that discrepancies between the relativistic and non-relativistic descriptions are patently governed by shell-filling patterns.

  2. Quantifying Effect of Lactic, Acetic, and Propionic Acids on Growth of Molds Isolated from Spoiled Bakery Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnas, Stéphane; Gauvry, Emilie; Onno, Bernard; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2015-09-01

    The combined effect of undissociated lactic acid (0 to 180 mmol/liter), acetic acid (0 to 60 mmol/liter), and propionic acid (0 to 12 mmol/liter) on growth of the molds Aspergillus niger, Penicillium corylophilum, and Eurotium repens was quantified at pH 3.8 and 25°C on malt extract agar acid medium. The impact of these acids on lag time for growth (λ) was quantified through a gamma model based on the MIC. The impact of these acids on radial growth rate (μ) was analyzed statistically through polynomial regression. Concerning λ, propionic acid exhibited a stronger inhibitory effect (MIC of 8 to 20 mmol/liter depending on the mold species) than did acetic acid (MIC of 23 to 72 mmol/liter). The lactic acid effect was null on E. repens and inhibitory on A. niger and P. corylophilum. These results were validated using independent sets of data for the three acids at pH 3.8 but for only acetic and propionic acids at pH 4.5. Concerning μ, the effect of acetic and propionic acids was slightly inhibitory for A. niger and P. corylophilum but was not significant for E. repens. In contrast, lactic acid promoted radial growth of all three molds. The gamma terms developed here for these acids will be incorporated in a predictive model for temperature, water activity, and acid. More generally, results for μ and λ will be used to identify and evaluate solutions for controlling bakery product spoilage.

  3. Quantifying the effects of halogen bonding by haloaromatic donors on the acceptor pyrimidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Thomas L; Reves, Peyton L; Simms, Briana L; Wilson, Jamey L; Watkins, Davita L; Tschumper, Gregory S; Hammer, Nathan I

    2017-02-28

    The effects of intermolecular interactions by a series of haloaromatic halogen bond donors on the normal modes and chemical shifts of the acceptor pyrimidine are investigated by Raman and NMR spectroscopies and electronic structure computations. Halogen bond interactions with pyrimidine's nitrogen atoms shift normal modes to higher energy and shift 1H and 13C NMR peaks upfield in adjacent nuclei. This perturbation of vibrational normal modes is reminiscent of the effects of hydrogen bonded networks of water, methanol, or silver on pyrimidine. The unexpected observation of vibrational red shifts and downfield 13C NMR shifts in some complexes suggests that other intermolecular forces such as pi-interactions are competing with halogen bonding. Natural bond orbital analyses indicate a wide range of charge transfer from pyrimidine to different haloaromatic donors is possible and computed halogen bond binding energies can be larger than a typical hydrogen bond. These results emphasize the importance in strategic selection of substituents and electron withdrawing groups in developing supramolecular structures based on halogen bonding.

  4. Quantifying cerebral asymmetries for language in dextrals and adextrals with random-effects meta analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, David P.; Johnstone, Leah T.

    2014-01-01

    Speech and language-related functions tend to depend on the left hemisphere more than the right in most right-handed (dextral) participants. This relationship is less clear in non-right handed (adextral) people, resulting in surprisingly polarized opinion on whether or not they are as lateralized as right handers. The present analysis investigates this issue by largely ignoring methodological differences between the different neuroscientific approaches to language lateralization, as well as discrepancies in how dextral and adextral participants were recruited or defined. Here we evaluate the tendency for dextrals to be more left hemisphere dominant than adextrals, using random effects meta analyses. In spite of several limitations, including sample size (in the adextrals in particular), missing details on proportions of groups who show directional effects in many experiments, and so on, the different paradigms all point to proportionally increased left hemispheric dominance in the dextrals. These results are analyzed in light of the theoretical importance of these subtle differences for understanding the cognitive neuroscience of language, as well as the unusual asymmetry in most adextrals. PMID:25408673

  5. Quantifying the effect of waterways and green areas on the surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elis Dener Lima Alves

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The cooling effects of urban parks and green areas, which form the “Park Cool Island” (PCI can help decrease the surface temperature and mitigate the effects of urban heat islands (UHI. Therefore, the objective of this research was to know the temporal variability of PCI intensity, as well as analyze the factors that determines it and propose an equation to predict the PCI intensity in Iporá, Goiás State, Brazil. To this purpose, the PCI intensity values were obtained using the Landsat-8 satellite (band 10, and then correlated with the NDVI and the LAI, in which proposes equations through multiple linear regression to estimate the PCI intensity. The results indicated that: 1 the greater the distance of the natural area, greater the surface temperature; 2 there is a great seasonality in PCI, in which the intensity of PCI is much higher in the spring (or close to it; 3 the relationship between NDVI and LAI variables, showed good coefficients of determination; 4 the equations for the buffer of 200 and 500 m, had low RMSE with high coefficients of determination (r2 = 0.924 and r2 = 0.957 respectively.

  6. Quantifying cerebral asymmetries for language in dextrals and adextrals with random-effects meta analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Peter Carey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Speech and language-related functions tend to depend on the left hemisphere more than the right in most right-handed (dextral participants. This relationship is less clear in non-right handed (adextral people, resulting in surprisingly polarised opinion on whether or not they are as lateralised as right handers. The present analysis investigates this issue by largely ignoring methodological differences between the different neuroscientific approaches to language lateralization, as well as discrepancies in how dextral and adextral participants were recruited or defined. Here we evaluate the tendency for dextrals to be more left hemisphere dominant than adextrals, using random effects meta analyses. In spite of several limitations, including sample size (in the adextrals in particular, missing details on proportions of groups who show directional effects in many experiments, and so on, the different paradigms all point to proportionally increased left hemispheric dominance in the dextrals. These results are analysed in light of the theoretical importance of these subtle differences for understanding the cognitive neuroscience of language, as well as the unusual asymmetry in most adextrals.

  7. Quantifying effects of soil heterogeneity on groundwater pollution at four sites in USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saskia Vuurens; Frank Stagnitti; Gerrit de Rooij; Jan Boll; LI Ling; Marc LeBlanc; Daniel lerodiaconou; Vince Versace; Scott Salzman

    2005-01-01

    Four sites located in the north-eastern region of the United States of America have been chosen to investigate the impacts of soil heterogeneity in the transport of solutes (bromide and chloride) through the vadose zone (the zone in the soil that lies below the root zone and above the permanent saturated groundwater). A recently proposed mathematical model based on the cumulative beta distribution has been deployed to compare and contrast the regions' heterogeneity from multiple sample percolation experiments. Significant differences in patterns of solute leaching were observed even over a small spatial scale, indicating that traditional sampling methods for solute transport, for example the gravity pan or suction lysimeters, or more recent inventions such as the multiple sample percolation systems may not be effective in estimating solute fluxes in soils when a significant degree of soil heterogeneity is present. Consequently, ignoring soil heterogeneity in solute transport studies will likely result in under- or overprediction of leached fluxes and potentially lead to serious pollution of soils and/or groundwater.The cumulative beta distribution technique is found to be a versatile and simple technique of gaining valuable information regarding soil heterogeneity effects on solute transport. It is also an excellent tool for guiding future decisions of experimental designs particularly in regard to the number of samples within one site and the number of sampling locations between sites required to obtain a representative estimate of field solute or drainage flux.

  8. Quantifying the effects of tidal amplitude on river delta network flow partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, M. R.; Sendrowski, A.; Passalacqua, P.

    2014-12-01

    Deltas are generally classified as river-, tide-, or wave-dominated systems, but the influences of all environmental forces cannot be ignored when fully addressing the dynamics of the system. For example, in river-dominated deltas, river flow from the feeder channel acts as the primary driver of dynamics within the system by delivering water, sediment, and nutrients through the distributary channels, but tides and waves may affect their allocation within the network. There has been work on the asymmetry of environmental fluxes at bifurcations, but relatively few studies exist on the water partitioning at the network scale. Understanding the network and environmental effects on the flux of water, sediment, and nutrients would benefit delta restoration projects and management practices. In this study, we investigate the allocation of water flow among the five major distributary channels at Wax Lake Delta (WLD), a micro-tidal river-dominated delta in coastal Louisiana, and the effects of tidal amplitude on distributary channel discharges. We collect and compare discharge results from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity transects between spring and neap tide and between falling and rising tide. The results show that discharges increased from spring to neap tide and from rising to falling tide. We investigate the spatial gradients of tidal influence within the network and validate hydraulic geometry relations for tidally influenced channels. Our results give insight into the control of network structure on flow partitioning and show the degree of tidal influence on channel flow in the river-dominated WLD.

  9. Neuropathological sequelae of developmental exposure to antiepileptic and anesthetic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysanthy eIkonomidou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate (Glu and aminobutyric acid (GABA are major neurotransmitters in the mammalian brain which regulate brain development at molecular, cellular and systems level. Sedative, anesthetic and antiepileptic drugs interact with glutamate and GABA receptors to produce their desired effects. The question is posed whether such interference with glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission may exert undesired, and perhaps even detrimental effects on human brain development. Preclinical research in rodents and non-human primates has provided extensive evidence that sedative, anesthetic and antiepileptic drugs can trigger suicide of neurons and oligodendroglia, suppress neurogenesis, and inhibit normal synapse development and sculpting. Behavioral correlates in rodents and non-human primates consist of long-lasting cognitive impairment. Retrospective clinical studies in humans exposed to anesthetics or antiepileptic drugs in utero, during infancy or early childhood have delivered conflicting but concerning results in terms of a correlation between drug exposure and impaired neurodevelopmental outcomes. Prospective studies are currently ongoing. This review provides a short overview of the current state of knowledge on this topic.

  10. Effective rates of heavy metal release from alkaline wastes--quantified by column outflow experiments and inverse simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrer, Markus; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2008-10-23

    Column outflow experiments operated at steady state flow conditions do not allow the identification of rate limited release processes. This requires an alternative experimental methodology. In this study, the aim was to apply such a methodology in order to identify and quantify effective release rates of heavy metals from granular wastes. Column experiments were conducted with demolition waste and municipal waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash using different flow velocities and multiple flow interruptions. The effluent was analyzed for heavy metals, DOC, electrical conductivity and pH. The breakthrough-curves were inversely modeled with a numerical code based on the advection-dispersion equation with first order mass-transfer and nonlinear interaction terms. Chromium, Copper, Nickel and Arsenic are usually released under non-equilibrium conditions. DOC might play a role as carrier for those trace metals. By inverse simulations, generally good model fits are derived. Although some parameters are correlated and some model deficiencies can be revealed, we are able to deduce physically reasonable release-mass-transfer time scales. Applying forward simulations, the parameter space with equifinal parameter sets was delineated. The results demonstrate that the presented experimental design is capable of identifying and quantifying non-equilibrium conditions. They show also that the possibility of rate limited release must not be neglected in release and transport studies involving inorganic contaminants.

  11. Quantifying the effect of disruptions to temporal coherence on the intelligibility of compressed American Sign Language video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaramello, Frank M.; Hemami, Sheila S.

    2009-02-01

    Communication of American Sign Language (ASL) over mobile phones would be very beneficial to the Deaf community. ASL video encoded to achieve the rates provided by current cellular networks must be heavily compressed and appropriate assessment techniques are required to analyze the intelligibility of the compressed video. As an extension to a purely spatial measure of intelligibility, this paper quantifies the effect of temporal compression artifacts on sign language intelligibility. These artifacts can be the result of motion-compensation errors that distract the observer or frame rate reductions. They reduce the the perception of smooth motion and disrupt the temporal coherence of the video. Motion-compensation errors that affect temporal coherence are identified by measuring the block-level correlation between co-located macroblocks in adjacent frames. The impact of frame rate reductions was quantified through experimental testing. A subjective study was performed in which fluent ASL participants rated the intelligibility of sequences encoded at a range of 5 different frame rates and with 3 different levels of distortion. The subjective data is used to parameterize an objective intelligibility measure which is highly correlated with subjective ratings at multiple frame rates.

  12. Quantifying linguistic coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    ). We employ nominal recurrence analysis (Orsucci et al 2005, Dale et al 2011) on the decision-making conversations between the participants. We report strong correlations between various indexes of recurrence and collective performance. We argue this method allows us to quantify the qualities......Language has been defined as a social coordination device (Clark 1996) enabling innovative modalities of joint action. However, the exact coordinative dynamics over time and their effects are still insufficiently investigated and quantified. Relying on the data produced in a collective decision...

  13. Effects of pre-anesthetic volume expansion on hemodynamics in painless artificial abortion during intravenous anesthesia%预扩容对无痛人流术中血流动力学的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝义军; 刘晨霞; 冉国; 冯丽娟

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察乳酸钠林格液预扩容对丙泊酚静脉麻醉下行无痛人流术中血流动力学的影响.方法 选择择期行无痛人流术者80例,随机分为乳酸钠林格液组(R组)和对照组(C组),每组各40例.麻醉前R组以20mL/(kg·h)的速度输入乳酸钠林格液500mL,A组建立静脉通路但不输液.2组麻醉均用丙泊酚、芬太尼静脉麻醉,且麻醉管理相似.观察2组麻醉后1,3,5,10min各时点患者的收缩压、舒张压、平均动脉压、心率、脉搏氧饱和度的变化,记录发生低血压、恶心呕吐及应用麻黄碱的例数.结果 麻醉后1,3,5min各时点C组的平均动脉压与R组比较明显降低(P均<0.05),麻醉后10min 2组的血流动力学趋于稳定,C组低血压、恶心呕吐发生例数及应用麻黄碱的例数多于R组(P均<0.05).结论 丙泊酚、芬太尼静脉麻醉下行无痛人流术,用乳酸钠林格液预扩容能保持患者术中血流动力学稳定,降低低血压、恶心呕吐等不良反应的发生率.%Objective It is to observe the effects of pre - anesthetic volume expansion in painless artificial abortion during intravenous anesthesia with fentanil combined with propofol. Methods 80 patients of early pregnancy with voluntarily induced abortion were randomly divided into group R and group A( n =40 each ). Before anesthesia, the patients of group R were infused with 500 Ml Lactated Ringer, s solution at a rate of 20 Ml/( kg ? H ), the patients of group C weren' t infused any water although vein channel was established. Each group was anesthetized with fentanil combined with propofol. Anesthesia management was similar in both groups. The changes of SBP, DBP, MAP, HR, Sp( O2 ) in 1, 3, 5, 10 min after the anesthesia were observed in each group, the incidence of hypotension and the side effects such as nausea and vomiting were recorded, and the cases used ephedrine were recorded either. Results The MAP of group C were significantly lower than those in group R

  14. The effect of a photocatalytic air purifier on indoor air quality quantified using different measuring methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Barbara; Wargocki, Pawel; Skorek-Osikowska, A.;

    2010-01-01

    The effect on indoor air quality of an air purifier based on photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) was determined by different measuring techniques: sensory assessments of air quality made by human subjects, Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and chromatographic methods (Gas...... Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography with UV detection). The experiment was conducted in a simulated office, ventilated with 0.6 h(-1), 2.5 h(-1) and 6 h(-1), in the presence of additional pollution sources (carpet, chipboard and linoleum). At the lowest air change rate......, additional measurements were made with no pollution sources present in the office. All conditions were tested with the photocatalytic air purifier turned on and off. The results show that operation of the air purifier in the presence of pollutants emitted by building materials and furniture improves indoor...

  15. SLUG - Stochastically Lighting Up Galaxies. II: Quantifying the Effects of Stochasticity on Star Formation Rate Indicators

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Robert L; Krumholz, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    The integrated light of a stellar population, measured through photometric filters that are sensitive to the presence of young stars, is often used to infer the star formation rate (SFR) for that population. However, these techniques rely on an assumption that star formation is a continuous process, whereas in reality stars form in discrete spatially- and temporally-correlated structures. This discreteness causes the light output to undergo significant time-dependent fluctuations, which, if not accounted for, introduce errors and biases in the inferred SFRs. We use SLUG (a code that Stochastically Lights Up Galaxies) to simulate galaxies undergoing stochastic star formation. We then use these simulations to present a quantitative analysis of these effects and provide tools for calculating probability distribution functions of SFRs given a set of observations. We show that, depending on the SFR tracer used, stochastic fluctuations can produce non-trivial errors at SFRs as high as 1 Msun/yr, and we suggest meth...

  16. Quantifying ionospheric effects on time-domain astrophysics with the Murchison Widefield Array

    CERN Document Server

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Bell, Martin E; Kaplan, David L; Lenc, Emil; Offringa, Andre R; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A A; Emrich, D; Gaensler, B M; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kasper, J C; Kratzenberg, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Ord, S M; Prabu, T; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2015-01-01

    Refraction and diffraction of incoming radio waves by the ionosphere induce time variability in the angular positions, peak amplitudes and shapes of radio sources, potentially complicating the automated cross-matching and identification of transient and variable radio sources. In this work, we empirically assess the effects of the ionosphere on data taken by the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) radio telescope. We directly examine 51 hours of data observed over 10 nights under quiet geomagnetic conditions (global storm index Kp < 2), analysing the behaviour of short-timescale angular position and peak flux density variations of around ten thousand unresolved sources. We find that while much of the variation in angular position can be attributed to ionospheric refraction, the characteristic displacements (10-20 arcsec) at 154 MHz are small enough that search radii of 1-2 arcmin should be sufficient for cross-matching under typical conditions. By examining bulk trends in amplitude variability, we place upper ...

  17. Quantifying effects of environmental and geographical factors on patterns of genetic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    Elucidating the factors influencing genetic differentiation is an important task in biology, and the relative contribution from natural selection and genetic drift has long been debated. In this study, we used a regression-based approach to simultaneously estimate the quantitative contributions of environmental adaptation and isolation by distance on genetic variation in Boechera stricta, a wild relative of Arabidopsis. Patterns of discrete and continuous genetic differentiation coexist within this species. For the discrete differentiation between two major genetic groups, environment has larger contribution than geography, and we also identified a significant environment-by-geography interaction effect. Elsewhere in the species range, we found a latitudinal cline of genetic variation reflecting only isolation by distance. To further confirm the effect of environmental selection on genetic divergence, we identified the specific environmental variables predicting local genotypes in allopatric and sympatric regions. Water availability was identified as the possible cause of differential local adaptation in both geographical regions, confirming the role of environmental adaptation in driving and maintaining genetic differentiation between the two major genetic groups. In addition, the environment-by-geography interaction is further confirmed by the finding that water availability is represented by different environmental factors in the allopatric and sympatric regions. In conclusion, this study shows that geographical and environmental factors together created stronger and more discrete genetic differentiation than isolation by distance alone, which only produced a gradual, clinal pattern of genetic variation. These findings emphasize the importance of environmental selection in shaping patterns of species-wide genetic variation in the natural environment.

  18. Quantifying the effect of crop spatial arrangement on weed suppression using functional-structural plant modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Jochem B; Bastiaans, Lammert

    2016-05-01

    Suppression of weed growth in a crop canopy can be enhanced by improving crop competitiveness. One way to achieve this is by modifying the crop planting pattern. In this study, we addressed the question to what extent a uniform planting pattern increases the ability of a crop to compete with weed plants for light compared to a random and a row planting pattern, and how this ability relates to crop and weed plant density as well as the relative time of emergence of the weed. To this end, we adopted the functional-structural plant modelling approach which allowed us to explicitly include the 3D spatial configuration of the crop-weed canopy and to simulate intra- and interspecific competition between individual plants for light. Based on results of simulated leaf area development, canopy photosynthesis and biomass growth of the crop, we conclude that differences between planting pattern were small, particularly if compared to the effects of relative time of emergence of the weed, weed density and crop density. Nevertheless, analysis of simulated weed biomass demonstrated that a uniform planting of the crop improved the weed-suppression ability of the crop canopy. Differences in weed suppressiveness between planting patterns were largest with weed emergence before crop emergence, when the suppressive effect of the crop was only marginal. With simultaneous emergence a uniform planting pattern was 8 and 15 % more competitive than a row and a random planting pattern, respectively. When weed emergence occurred after crop emergence, differences between crop planting patterns further decreased as crop canopy closure was reached early on regardless of planting pattern. We furthermore conclude that our modelling approach provides promising avenues to further explore crop-weed interactions and aid in the design of crop management strategies that aim at improving crop competitiveness with weeds.

  19. Quantifying the Effects of Combined Waves and Tides on Deltas: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paola, C.; Baumgardner, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    The classical Galloway diagram captures qualitatively the dramatic effect waves and tides have on reshaping river deltas. Here we investigate these controls in a series of laboratory experiments in which the relative energetics of river, wave, and tidal forcing could be controlled and systematically varied. The delta is fed from a single source of water and low-density, sand-size sediment in one corner of a 5m x 5m basin. Experimental tides are produced by transferring water back and forth between the main experimental basin and an auxiliary holding basin. The tidal period is 60 s and a typical tidal range is 30 mm. Waves are produced using a floating, oscillating paddle placed opposite the sediment feed location. They typically have a period of 1 s and an amplitude of 10 mm. The total energy flux associated with waves and tides is controlled by varying the temporal intermittency of each process, while river energy and sediment fluxes are held steady. The experiments show a variation in delta morphology as a function of wave and tidal forcing that parallels that observed in the field: increasing wave strength redistributes sediment and flattens the shoreline; increasing tidal strength creates well defined tidal channels as well as inlets through the wave-worked shoreline. Both waves and tides reduce the mobility of the main fluvial channel. Quantitative morphologic measures of these effects vary systematically as a function of dimensionless relative wave and tidal strength. The image below shows typical experimental delta morphology associated with mixed wave-tide forcing.

  20. Quantified effects of chromosome-nuclear envelope attachments on 3D organization of chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Nicholas Allen; Onufriev, Alexey V; Sharakhov, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    We use a combined experimental and computational approach to study the effects of chromosome-nuclear envelope (Chr-NE) attachments on the 3D genome organization of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) salivary gland nuclei. We consider 3 distinct models: a Null model - without specific Chr-NE attachments, a 15-attachment model - with 15 previously known Chr-NE attachments, and a 48-attachment model - with 15 original and 33 recently identified Chr-NE attachments. The radial densities of chromosomes in the models are compared to the densities observed in 100 experimental images of optically sectioned salivary gland nuclei forming "z-stacks." Most of the experimental z-stacks support the Chr-NE 48-attachment model suggesting that as many as 48 chromosome loci with appreciable affinity for the NE are necessary to reproduce the experimentally observed distribution of chromosome density in fruit fly nuclei. Next, we investigate if and how the presence and the number of Chr-NE attachments affect several key characteristics of 3D genome organization: chromosome territories and gene-gene contacts. This analysis leads to novel insight about the possible role of Chr-NE attachments in regulating the genome architecture. Specifically, we find that model nuclei with more numerous Chr-NE attachments form more distinct chromosome territories and their chromosomes intertwine less frequently. Intra-chromosome and intra-arm contacts are more common in model nuclei with Chr-NE attachments compared to the Null model (no specific attachments), while inter-chromosome and inter-arm contacts are less common in nuclei with Chr-NE attachments. We demonstrate that Chr-NE attachments increase the specificity of long-range inter-chromosome and inter-arm contacts. The predicted effects of Chr-NE attachments are rationalized by intuitive volume vs. surface accessibility arguments.

  1. Sevoflurane: a new inhalational anesthetic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, R F; Regan, B M; Napoli, M D; Stern, I J

    1975-01-01

    Laboratory screening of a series of halogenated methyl isopropyl ethers revealed sevoflurane (fluoromethyl-1,1,1,3,3,3,-hexafluroro-2-propyl ether) as a potent nonexplosive inhalational anesthetic agent. Sevoflurance, a pleasant-smelling liquid, boils at 58.5 degrees C at 760 torr and has a vapor pressure of 200 torr at 25 degrees C. It is nonflammable in air and has lower flammability limits of 11 vols percent in O2 and 10 vols percent in N2O. Sevoflurane exhibits limited chemical reactivity in vitro; it is subject to slight but measurable hydrolysis, and reacts with soda lime to form traces of related ethers. It provides rapid anesthetic induction and recovery consistent with its low distribution coefficients (blood:gas, 0.6; corn oil:gas, 41.6; olive oil:gas, 53.4). In dogs, anesthetic concentrations of sevoflurane did not produce spontaneous cardiac arrhythmias and did not sensitize the heart to epinephrine. Electroencephalographic patterns were similar to those observed during anesthesia with halothane. In rats, small increases in the urinary excretion of inorganic fluoride ion occurred during the first 24 hours after anesthesia. Subacute studies in dogs and rats, using closed-circle absorption with soda lime, revealed no toxicologically significant changes in animals anesthetized frequently for 2 weeks. Sevoflurane appears to be a unique volatile anesthetic agent worthy of further study.

  2. Anesthetic considerations for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Andrew D; Sobey, Jenna H; Stickles, Eric T

    2017-05-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is being used more frequently in the treatment of many chronic and acute psychiatric illnesses in children. The most common psychiatric indications for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy are refractory depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, catatonia, and autism. In addition, a relatively new indication is the treatment of pediatric refractory status epilepticus. The anesthesiologist may be called upon to assist in the care of this challenging and vulnerable patient population. Unique factors for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy include the potential need for preoperative anxiolytic and inhalational induction of anesthesia, which must be weighed against the detrimental effects of anesthetic agents on the evoked seizure quality required for a successful treatment. Dexmedetomidine is likely the most appropriate preoperative anxiolytic as oral benzodiazepines are relatively contraindicated. Methohexital, though becoming less available at many institutions, remains the gold standard for induction of anesthesia for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy though ketamine, propofol, and sevoflurane are becoming increasingly viable options. Proper planning and communication between the multidisciplinary teams involved in the care of children presenting for electroconvulsive therapy treatments is vital to mitigating risks and achieving the greatest therapeutic benefit. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The effect of a photocatalytic air purifier on indoor air quality quantified using different measuring methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolarik, Barbara [Technical University of Denmark, International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark); Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Danish Building Research Institute (SBi), Department of Construction and Health, Dr Neergaards Vej 15, 2970 Hoersholm (Denmark); Wargocki, Pawel [Technical University of Denmark, International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark); Skorek-Osikowska, Anna [Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Wisthaler, Armin [Institute of Ion Physics and Applied Physics, University of Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-06-15

    The effect on indoor air quality of an air purifier based on photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) was determined by different measuring techniques: sensory assessments of air quality made by human subjects, Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and chromatographic methods (Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography with UV detection). The experiment was conducted in a simulated office, ventilated with 0.6 h{sup -1}, 2.5 h{sup -1} and 6 h{sup -1}, in the presence of additional pollution sources (carpet, chipboard and linoleum). At the lowest air change rate, additional measurements were made with no pollution sources present in the office. All conditions were tested with the photocatalytic air purifier turned on and off. The results show that operation of the air purifier in the presence of pollutants emitted by building materials and furniture improves indoor air quality, as documented by sensory assessments made by human subjects. It also reduces concentrations of many chemical compounds present in the air as documented by the PTR-MS technique. For the lowest ventilation, results from measurements using the chromatographic methods have similar tendency, however many of the 50 compounds that were targeted for analysis were not detected at all, independent of whether the purifier was on or off. For the two conditions with higher ventilation the results were inconclusive. (author)

  4. Quantifying the perceived interest of objects in images: effects of size, location, blur, and contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, Vamsi; Pinneli, Srivani; Larson, Eric C.; Chandler, Damon M.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the results of two psychophysical experiments designed to investigate the effects of size, location, blur, and contrast on the perceived visual interest of objects within images. In the first experiment, digital composting was used to create images containing objects (humans, animals, and non-living objects) which varied in controlled increments of size, location, blur, and contrast. Ratings of perceived interest were then measured for each object. We found that: (1) As object size increases, perceived interest increases but exhibits diminished gains for larger sizes; (2) As an object moves from the center of the image toward the image's edge, perceived interest decreases nearly linearly with distance; (3) Blurring imposes a substantial initial decrease in perceived interest, but this drop is relatively lessened for highly blurred objects; (4) As an object's RMS contrast is increased, perceived interest increases nearly linearly. Furthermore, these trends were quite similar for all three categories (human, animal, non-living object). To determine whether these data can predict the perceived interest of objects in real, non-composited images, a second experiment was performed in which subjects rated the visual interest of each of 562 objects in 150 images. Based on these results, an algorithm is presented which, given a segmented image, attempts to generate an object-level interest map.

  5. Quantifying process-based mitigation strategies in historical context: separating multiple cumulative effects on river meander migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander K Fremier

    Full Text Available Environmental legislation in the US (i.e. NEPA requires defining baseline conditions on current rather than historical ecosystem conditions. For ecosystems with long histories of multiple environmental impacts, this baseline method can subsequently lead to a significantly altered environment; this has been termed a 'sliding baseline'. In river systems, cumulative effects caused by flow regulation, channel revetment and riparian vegetation removal significantly impact floodplain ecosystems by altering channel dynamics and precluding subsequent ecosystem processes, such as primary succession. To quantify these impacts on floodplain development processes, we used a model of river channel meander migration to illustrate the degree to which flow regulation and riprap impact migration rates, independently and synergistically, on the Sacramento River in California, USA. From pre-dam conditions, the cumulative effect of flow regulation alone on channel migration is a reduction by 38%, and 42-44% with four proposed water diversion project scenarios. In terms of depositional area, the proposed water project would reduce channel migration 51-71 ha in 130 years without current riprap in place, and 17-25 ha with riprap. Our results illustrate the utility of a modeling approach for quantifying cumulative impacts. Model-based quantification of environmental impacts allow scientists to separate cumulative and synergistic effects to analytically define mitigation measures. Additionally, by selecting an ecosystem process that is affected by multiple impacts, it is possible to consider process-based mitigation scenarios, such as the removal of riprap, to allow meander migration and create new floodplains and allow for riparian vegetation recruitment.

  6. 麻醉睡眠平衡术治疗慢性失眠症的疗效评估%Evaluation of the therapeutic effect of anesthetic sleeping balance for treatment of chronic insomnia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋晓江; 陈向阳; 葛衡江; 姚国恩; 李训军; 闫红; 胡银; 张园

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of anesthetic sleeping balance for treatment of chronic insomnia. Methods Twenty-four patients with chronic insomnia were treated with anesthetic sleeping balance on a voluntary basis with written informed consent. Polysomnographic (PSG) recordings were conducted and the scores of Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire (LSEQ) were measured before and after the therapy. Results Twenty-two of these patients showed an increase in the LSEQ score of over 100 after the therapy, with a total response rate of 92%. The therapy resulted in significant improvements in the sleep latency, sleep quality, alertness and behavioral integrity on the following morning and the total scores (P<0.05). PSG recording suggested increased total sleep duration, decreased sleep interruption frequency and shortened duration of wakefulness after the therapy, showing significant differences from the status before the therapy (P<0.05). Significant favorable changes also occurred in sleep architecture after the therapy, manifested by decreased S1% and increased S3%, S4% and percentage of rapid eye movement time. Conclusion Anesthetic sleeping balance may help minimize the sleep debt in patients with chronic insomnia and has also good effect in improving the sleep architecture in patients with refractory chronic insomnia.%目的 评价麻醉睡眠平衡术治疗慢性失眠症的疗效. 方法 选择第三军医大学大坪医院野战外科研究所脑三科收治的24例慢性失眠症患者,在患者自愿并征得书面同意后给予麻醉睡眠平衡术治疗.采用多导睡眠监测系统及里兹睡眠评估问卷(LSEQ)对患者治疗前后睡眠情况进行评估. 结果 患者经麻醉睡眠平衡术治疗后LSEQ得分增加100分以上患者22例,有效率为22/24(92%).患者在入睡情况、睡眠质量、警觉行为和总分等方面均较治疗前有明显改善,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).多导睡眠监测结果 表明:治疗后患者睡眠

  7. 间氨基苯甲酸乙酯甲磺酸盐对泥鳅的麻醉效果%Anesthetic Effects of 3-Aminobenzoic Acid Ethyl Ester Methanesulfonate (MS-222) on Misgurnus anguillicaudatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩光明; 毕建花; 张家宏; 寇祥明; 朱凌宇; 徐荣; 王桂良; 王守红

    2015-01-01

    根据泥鳅(Misgurnus anguillicaudatus)对20~140 mg/L 麻醉剂间氨基苯甲酸乙酯甲磺酸盐(MS-222)在最终麻醉状态和复苏过程中的行为特征,分别把麻醉程度和复苏过程分为6和4个时期,研究140~340 mg/L的麻醉剂 MS-222在12℃和22℃条件下对泥鳅的麻醉效果,比较180 mg/L 的 MS-222对不同规格(5.1、11.6、28.1 g)泥鳅的麻醉效果差异。结果表明:当 MS-222溶液浓度为80 mg/L 时,泥鳅达到麻醉3期,可以作为泥鳅长途运输的参考剂量;泥鳅呼吸频率受麻醉程度的影响,在麻醉3期之前无显著变化,但是4期之后出现显著下降(P declined clearly until stage 4 under the concentration range of 20 - 140 mg/L. The induction time of the loach under the condition of temperature 12 ℃,in the MS-222 solution with mass concentration of 140- 340 mg/L, were longer than those under the condition of temperature 22 ℃, and the change of recovery time was same to induction time. The effective anesthetic concentrations of MS-222 on loach at 12 and 22 ℃ are 180, 220 mg/L, respectively. Small loach individuals have short anesthesia time and long recovery time (P < 0.05). It is suggested that MS-222 has preferable anesthetic effect to the loach, and at the anesthesia operation, we need to consider factors such as water temperature, fish size in order to use reasonable anesthesia concentration for the loach.

  8. Quantifying uncertainty in urban flooding analysis considering hydro-climatic projection and urban development effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.-W. Jung

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available How will the combined impacts of land use change, climate change, and hydrologic modeling influence changes in urban flood frequency and what is the main uncertainty source of the results? Will such changes differ by catchment with different degrees of current and future urban development? We attempt to answer these questions in two catchments with different degrees of urbanization, the Fanno catchment with 84% urban land use and the Johnson catchment with 36% urban land use, both located in the Pacific Northwest of the US. Five uncertainty sources – general circulation model (GCM structures, future greenhouse gas (GHG emission scenarios, land use change scenarios, natural variability, and hydrologic model parameters – are considered to compare the relative source of uncertainty in flood frequency projections. Two land use change scenarios, conservation and development, representing possible future land use changes are used for analysis. Results show the highest increase in flood frequency under the combination of medium high GHG emission (A1B and development scenarios, and the lowest increase under the combination of low GHG emission (B1 and conservation scenarios. Although the combined impact is more significant to flood frequency change than individual scenarios, it does not linearly increase flood frequency. Changes in flood frequency are more sensitive to climate change than land use change in the two catchments for 2050s (2040–2069. Shorter term flood frequency change, 2 and 5 year floods, is highly affected by GCM structure, while longer term flood frequency change above 25 year floods is dominated by natural variability. Projected flood frequency changes more significantly in Johnson creek than Fanno creek. This result indicates that, under expected climate change conditions, adaptive urban planning based on the conservation scenario could be more effective in less developed Johnson catchment than in the already developed Fanno

  9. Quantifying the effect of air quality control measures during the 2010 Commonwealth Games at Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beig, Gufran; Chate, Dilip M.; Ghude, Sachin. D.; Mahajan, A. S.; Srinivas, R.; Ali, K.; Sahu, S. K.; Parkhi, N.; Surendran, D.; Trimbake, H. R.

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, the XIX Commonwealth Games (CWG-2010) were held in India for the first time at Delhi and involved 71 commonwealth nations and dependencies with more than 6000 athletes participating in 272 events. This was the largest international multi-sport event to be staged in India and strict emission controls were imposed during the games in order to ensure improved air quality for the participating athletes as a significant portion of the population in Delhi is regularly exposed to elevated levels of pollution. The air quality control measures ranged from vehicular and traffic controls to relocation of factories and reduction of power plant emissions. In order to understand the effects of these policy induced control measures, a network of air quality and weather monitoring stations was set-up across different areas in Delhi under the Government of India's System of Air quality Forecasting And Research (SAFAR) project. Simultaneous measurements of aerosols, reactive trace gases (e.g. NOx, O3, CO) and meteorological parameters were made before, during and after CWG-2010. Contrary to expectations, the emission controls implemented were not sufficient to reduce the pollutants, instead in some cases, causing an increase. The measured pollutants regularly exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality limits over the games period. The reasons for this increase are attributed to an underestimation of the required control measures, which resulted in inadequate planning. The results indicate that any future air quality control measures need to be well planned and strictly imposed in order to improve the air quality in Delhi, which affects a large population and is deteriorating rapidly. Thus, the presence of systematic high resolution data and realistic emission inventories through networks such as SAFAR will be directly useful for the future.

  10. Quantifying the effects of China's pollution control on atmospheric mercury emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, H.

    2014-12-01

    China has conducted series of air pollution control policies to reduce the pollutant emissions. Although not specifically for mercury (Hg), those policies are believed to have co-benefits on atmospheric Hg emission control. On the basis of field-tests data and updated information of energy conservation and emission control, we have developed multiple-year inventories of anthropogenic mercury emissions in China from 2005 to 2012. Three scenarios (scenario 0(S0), scenario 1(S1), scenario 2(S2)) with different emission controls and energy path are designed for prediction of the future Hg emissions for the country. In particular, comprehensive assessments has been conducted to evaluate the evolution of emission factors, recent emission trends,