WorldWideScience

Sample records for quality patient care

  1. Carepaths: a framework for quality patient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazanec, Susan; Antunez, Antonio; Novak, Louis; Vinkler, Robert; Stark, Bonita; Mangosh, Linda; Pillai, Kunjan; Jackson, Celeste; Wilkenfeld, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The goals of a carepath are to provide a framework for quality patient care, enhance collaborative practice, improve resource utilization, and increase patient satisfaction. Carepaths are designed to move the patient toward specific clinical outcomes, which have been defined by a multidisciplinary team. Carepaths enhance the quality improvement process by tracking clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. The purpose of this report is to share the 1996 results of our breast cancer carepath. Methods: In 1994 the multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Committee of the Division of Radiation Oncology constructed a carepath for women with breast cancer receiving breast or chest wall radiation. Eleven clinical outcomes were defined which reflected the educational and selfcare focus of the carepath. Recording on the carepath of patient attainment of the outcomes was done by the RN, RTT and MD. Patient satisfaction tools were designed by the quality improvement committee in conjunction with the Department of Marketing Support. Each patient was given a written survey at two points along the carepath: post simulation and post treatment. Results: Ninety-five women were placed on the breast carepath in 1996. Outcomes were reviewed for 40 of these carepaths. The return rate of patient satisfaction surveys post simulation and post treatment approached 99%. Overall satisfaction was high with 76% of patients feeling 'very satisfied' with the simulation process and 93% 'very satisfied' with the treatment experience. Common themes noted in anecdotes related to comfort and privacy issues. Conclusions: Based on our experience, carepaths facilitated the structuring of a comprehensive and collaborative approach to patient care. Strategies for process improvement were guided by the ongoing surveillance of clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction

  2. Experiencing health care service quality: through patients' eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembri, Sharon

    2015-02-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to consider health care service quality from the patients' perspective, specifically through the patient's eyes. A narrative analysis was performed on 300 patient stories. This rigorous analysis of patient stories is designed to identify and describe health care service quality through patients' eyes in an authentic and accurate, experiential manner. The findings show that there are variant and complex ways that patients experience health care service quality. Patient stories offer an authentic view of the complex ways that patients experience health care service quality. Narrative analysis is a useful tool to identify and describe how patients experience health care service quality. Patients experience health care service quality in complex and varying ways.

  3. [Care quality in intensive care evaluated by the patients using a service quality scale (SERVQUAL)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regaira Martínez, E; Sola Iriarte, M; Goñi Viguria, R; Del Barrio Linares, M; Margall Coscojuela, M A; Asiain Erro, M C

    2010-01-01

    The evaluation made by the patients on the quality of service received is important to introduce improvement strategies in the care quality. 1. To evaluate the care quality through the analysis of the differences obtained between expectations and perceptions, that the patients have of the service received in the ICU. 2. To analyze if there is any relationship between care quality evaluated by the patients and the sociodemographic variables. A total of 86 patients who were conscious and oriented during their stay in the ICU were studied prospectively. At 24h of the discharge from the ICU, the SERVQUAL (Service Quality) scale, adapted for the hospital setting by Babakus and Mangold (1992), was applied. This scale measures the care quality based on the difference in scores obtained between expectations and perceptions of the patients. The positive scores indicate that the perceptions of the patients exceed their expectations. The scale has 5 dimensions: Tangibility, Reliability, Responsiveness, Assurances and Empathy. It includes 15 items for perceptions and the same for expectations, with 5 grades of response (1 totally disagree - 5 totally agree). The mean score of perceptions 66.92) exceeded that of the expectations (62.30). The mean score of the difference between perceptions and expectations for the total of the SERVQUAL scale was 4.62. It was also positive for each one of the dimensions: Tangibility=1.44, Reliability=0.53, Responsiveness=0.95, Assurances=0.99, Empathy=0.71. No statistically significant associations were found between care quality evaluated by the patients and the sociodemographic variables. The care quality perceived by the patients in the ICU exceeds their expectations, and had no relationship with the sociodemographic characteristics. Copyright 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  4. Older Patients' Perspectives on Quality of Serious Illness Care in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Al Hamayel, Nebras; Isenberg, Sarina R; Hannum, Susan M; Sixon, Joshua; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Dy, Sydney M

    2018-01-01

    Despite increased focus on measuring and improving quality of serious illness care, there has been little emphasis on the primary care context or incorporation of the patient perspective. To explore older patients' perspectives on the quality of serious illness care in primary care. Qualitative interview study. Twenty patients aged 60 or older who were at risk for or living with serious illness and who had participated in the clinic's quality improvement initiative. We used a semistructured, open-ended guide focusing on how older patients perceived quality of serious illness care, particularly in primary care. We transcribed interviews verbatim and inductively identified codes. We identified emergent themes using a thematic and constant comparative method. We identified 5 key themes: (1) the importance of patient-centered communication, (2) coordination of care, (3) the shared decision-making process, (4) clinician competence, and (5) access to care. Communication was an overarching theme that facilitated coordination of care between patients and their clinicians, empowered patients for shared decision-making, related to clinicians' perceived competence, and enabled access to primary and specialty care. Although access to care is not traditionally considered an aspect of quality, patients considered this integral to the quality of care they received. Patients perceived serious illness care as a key aspect of quality in primary care. Efforts to improve quality measurement and implementation of quality improvement initiatives in serious illness care should consider these aspects of care that patients deem important, particularly communication as an overarching priority.

  5. Improving Quality of Care in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberifiroozi, Mehdi

    2017-10-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a major chronic disease in the field of digestive diseases. It causes more than one million deaths per year. Despite established evidence based guidelines, the adherence to standard of care or quality indicators are variable. Complete adherence to the recommendations of guidelines is less than 50%. To improve the quality of care in patients with cirrhosis, we need a more holistic view. Because of high rate of death due to cardiovascular disease and neoplasms, the care of comorbid conditions and risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, high blood sugar or cholesterol, would be important in addition to the management of primary liver disease. Despite a holistic multidisciplinary approach for this goal, the management of such patients should be patient centered and individualized. The diagnosis of underlying etiology and its appropriate treatment is the most important step. Definition and customizing the quality indicators for quality measure in patients are needed. Because most suggested quality indicators are designed for measuring the quality of care in decompensated liver cirrhosis, we need special quality indicators for compensated and milder forms of chronic liver disease as well. Training the patients for participation in their own management, design of special clinics with dedicated health professionals in a form of chronic disease model, is suggested for improvement of quality of care in this group of patients. Special day care centers by a dedicated gastroenterologist and a trained nurse may be a practical model for better management of such patients.

  6. Patient satisfaction and quality of surgical care in US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Thomas C; Orav, E John; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between patient satisfaction and surgical quality is unclear for US hospitals. Using national data, we examined if hospitals with high patient satisfaction have lower levels of performance on accepted measures of the quality and efficiency of surgical care. Federal policymakers have made patient satisfaction a core measure for the way hospitals are evaluated and paid through the value-based purchasing program. There is broad concern that performance on patient satisfaction may have little or even a negative correlation with the quality of surgical care, leading to potential trade-offs in efforts to improve patient experience with other surgical quality measures. We used the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey data from 2010 and 2011 to assess performance on patient experience. We used national Medicare data on 6 common surgical procedures to calculate measures of surgical efficiency and quality: risk-adjusted length of stay, process score, risk-adjusted mortality rate, risk-adjusted readmission rate, and a composite z score across all 4 metrics. Multivariate models adjusting for hospital characteristics were used to assess the independent relationships between patient satisfaction and measures of surgical efficiency and quality. Of the 2953 US hospitals that perform one of these 6 procedures, the median patient satisfaction score was 69.5% (interquartile range, 63%-75.5%). Length of stay was shorter in hospitals with the highest levels of patient satisfaction (7.1 days vs 7.7 days, P patient satisfaction had the higher process of care performance (96.5 vs 95.5, P patient satisfaction also had a higher composite score for quality across all measures (P patient satisfaction provided more efficient care and were associated with higher surgical quality. Our findings suggest there need not be a trade-off between good quality of care for surgical patients and ensuring a positive patient experience.

  7. Patients' Evaluation of the Quality of Diabetes Care (PEQD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Snoek, Frank J

    2002-01-01

    aspects of the quality of diabetes care as delivered by the specialist in internal medicine (internist) and the diabetes nurse specialist (DNS). Two principal components analyses (internist/DNS) both yielded one 14 item factor with a high internal consistency. Satisfaction with diabetes care, fewer......OBJECTIVES: To develop a brief measure of patients' evaluation of the quality of diabetes care and to study predictors of consumers' rating of the quality of diabetes care. DESIGN: A prospective design. SUBJECTS: 176 adults with type 1 (39%) or type 2 (61%) diabetes. MAIN MEASURES: Demographic...... variables, HbA1c, number of diabetes complications, satisfaction with diabetes care, diabetes related distress, and fear of hypoglycaemia were assessed by self-report. In addition, satisfaction with diabetes care and evaluations about quality of the care were measured at 16 month follow up. Statistical...

  8. Improving quality of care among patients hospitalised with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette; Mainz, Jan; Svendsen, Marie Louise

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of systematic quality improvement initiatives in psychiatric care remains unclear. AIMS: To examine whether quality of care has changed following implementation of a systematic monitoring programme of hospital performance measures. METHOD: In a nationwide population.......27-1.62), psychoeducation (RR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.19-1.48), psychiatric aftercare (RR: 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01-1.11) and suicide risk assessment (RR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.21-1.42). CONCLUSIONS: Quality of care improved from 2004 to 2011 among patients hospitalised with schizophrenia in Denmark. DECLARATION OF INTEREST: None. COPYRIGHT...

  9. Evaluation of patients ' satisfaction with quality of care provided at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The umpteenth threats to change of healthcare provider by dissatisfied patients on formal sector health insurance are well known and can be a proxy indicator for the need for quality improvement in service delivery. Objective: This study was aimed at evaluating patientsf satisfaction with quality of care provided ...

  10. Managing Quality in Health Care: Involving Patient Care Information Systems and Healthcare Professionals in Quality Monitoring and Improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Mul (Marleen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIt is no longer possible to ignore the issue of quality in health care. Care institutions strive to provide all patients with effective, efficient, safe, timely, patient-centered care. Increased attention for quality is also found in discussions regarding use of information

  11. Patient satisfaction with quality of primary health care in Benghazi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To assess patient satisfaction with quality of PHC assessed in terms of (a) customer profile, (b) patient satisfaction, and (c) health care-seeking behavior. Methodology: A sample of nine health centers and seven polyclinics from various locations in Benghazi, Libya were selected for gathering information by ...

  12. Quality Measures for the Care of Patients with Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Jack D.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Deriy, Ludmila; Germain, Anne; Lewin, Daniel S.; Ong, Jason C.; Morgenthaler, Timothy I.

    2015-01-01

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned five Workgroups to develop quality measures to optimize management and care for patients with common sleep disorders including insomnia. Following the AASM process for quality measure development, this document describes measurement methods for two desirable outcomes of therapy, improving sleep quality or satisfaction, and improving daytime function, and for four processes important to achieving these goals. To achieve the outcome of improving sleep quality or satisfaction, pre- and post-treatment assessment of sleep quality or satisfaction and providing an evidence-based treatment are recommended. To realize the outcome of improving daytime functioning, pre- and post-treatment assessment of daytime functioning, provision of an evidence-based treatment, and assessment of treatment-related side effects are recommended. All insomnia measures described in this report were developed by the Insomnia Quality Measures Workgroup and approved by the AASM Quality Measures Task Force and the AASM Board of Directors. The AASM recommends the use of these measures as part of quality improvement programs that will enhance the ability to improve care for patients with insomnia. Citation: Edinger JD, Buysse DJ, Deriy L, Germain A, Lewin DS, Ong JC, Morgenthaler TI. Quality measures for the care of patients with insomnia. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):311–334. PMID:25700881

  13. Library and information services: impact on patient care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Joanne Gard; Morgan, Jennifer Craft; Thompson, Cheryl A; Wells, Amber L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore library and information service impact on patient care quality. A large-scale critical incident survey of physicians and residents at 56 library sites serving 118 hospitals in the USA and Canada. Respondents were asked to base their answers on a recent incident in which they had used library resources to search for information related to a specific clinical case. Of 4,520 respondents, 75 percent said that they definitely or probably handled patient care differently using information obtained through the library. In a multivariate analysis, three summary clinical outcome measures were used as value and impact indicators: first, time saved; second, patient care changes; and third, adverse events avoided. The outcomes were examined in relation to four information access methods: first, asking librarian for assistance; second, performing search in a physical library; third, searching library's web site; or fourth, searching library resources on an institutional intranet. All library access methods had consistently positive relationships with the clinical outcomes, providing evidence that library services have a positive impact on patient care quality. Electronic collections and services provided by the library and the librarian contribute to patient care quality.

  14. Patient's experiences with quality of hospital care: the Dutch Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbe, J.H.; Brouwer, W.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients' feedback is of great importance in health care policy decisions. The Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire (CQI Cataract) was used to measure patients' experiences with quality of care after a cataract operation. This study aims to evaluate the reliability and the

  15. Quality of care in cancer: An exploration of patient perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Mahapatra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction is as important as is the care itself. When the patient has a disease like cancer it becomes even more important. A cancer patient not only suffers from the disease but also undergoes substantial mental trauma, agony, stress, uncertainty, and apprehension. There are limited studies in India eliciting patient's views on the quality of care being received by cancer patients. Methodology: A cross-sectional triangulation data transformation model mixed method design (Quant + Qual was used to conduct the study between March and May 2015 among patients attending specialty hospitals providing oncology services in Odisha, India. The quantitative data were collected using, Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire-18 to assess satisfaction. The qualitative data were obtained through in-depth interviews using open-ended questionnaire. Results: The results showed that general satisfaction among the patients was 60%. The maximum score was obtained for the communication of doctors. The qualitative findings revealed that travel for distant places for minor illness, waiting period, and lack of services at the primary care facilities were reasons for patient's dissatisfaction. Conclusion: The study found that the patients were generally satisfied with the quality of services. However, more studies should be conducted including perceptions of the patients as well as the caregiver.

  16. Satisfaction with Quality of Care Received by Patients without ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    communication (3.8), and hospital environment (3.6) and dissatisfaction with patient waiting time (2.4), hospital bureaucracy (2.5), and cost of care (2.6). Conclusion: The overall non.NHI patientfs satisfaction with the services provided was good. The hospital should set targets for quality improvement in the current domains ...

  17. Satisfaction with quality of ICU care for patients and families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Gerritsen, Rik T; Koopmans, Matty

    2017-01-01

    as reflective indicators was supported by analysis of a factor representing satisfaction with communication, measured with a combination of causal and reflective indicators. CONCLUSIONS: Most family members were moderately or very satisfied with patient care, family care, information and decision-making...... in and support during decision-making processes. Exploratory factor analysis suggested four underlying factors, but confirmatory factor analysis failed to yield a multi-factor model with between-country measurement invariance. A hypothesis that this failure was due to misspecification of causal indicators......BACKGROUND: Families' perspectives are of great importance in evaluating quality of care in the intensive care unit (ICU). This Danish-Dutch study tested a European adaptation of the "Family Satisfaction in the ICU" (euroFS-ICU). The aim of the study was to examine assessments of satisfaction...

  18. Quality indicators for all dimensions of infertility care quality: consensus between professionals and patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dancet, E.A.; D'Hooghe, T.M.; Spiessens, C.; Sermeus, W.; Neubourg, D. De; Karel, N.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the relative importance of the six dimensions of quality of care according to different stakeholders and can a quality indicator set address all six quality dimensions and incorporate the views from professionals working in different disciplines and from patients? SUMMARY

  19. Physician burnout, work engagement and the quality of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerbroks, A; Glaser, J; Vu-Eickmann, P; Angerer, P

    2017-07-01

    Research suggests that burnout in physicians is associated with poorer patient care, but evidence is inconclusive. More recently, the concept of work engagement has emerged (i.e. the beneficial counterpart of burnout) and has been associated with better care. Evidence remains markedly sparse however. To examine the associations of burnout and work engagement with physicians' self-perceived quality of care. We drew on cross-sectional data from physicians in Germany. We used a six-item version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory measuring exhaustion and depersonalization. We employed the nine-item Utrecht Work Engagement Scale to assess work engagement and its subcomponents: vigour, dedication and absorption. We measured physicians' own perceptions of their quality of care by a six-item instrument covering practices and attitudes. We used continuous and categorized dependent and independent variables in linear and logistic regression analyses. There were 416 participants. In multivariable linear regression analyses, increasing burnout total scores were associated with poorer perceived quality of care [unstandardized regression coefficient (b) = 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37, 0.54]. This association was stronger for depersonalization (b = 0.37, 95% CI 0.29, 0.44) than for exhaustion (b = 0.26, 95% CI 0.18, 0.33). Increasing work engagement was associated with higher perceived quality care (b for the total score = -0.20, 95% CI -0.28, -0.11). This was confirmed for each subcomponent with stronger associations for vigour (b = -0.21, 95% CI -0.29, -0.13) and dedication (b = -0.16, 95% CI -0.24, -0.09) than for absorption (b = -0.12, 95% CI -0.20, -0.04). Logistic regression analyses yielded comparable results. Physician burnout was associated with self-perceived poorer patient care, while work engagement related to self-reported better care. Studies are needed to corroborate these findings, particularly for work engagement. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford

  20. Virtual Patient Technology: Engaging Primary Care in Quality Improvement Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Amanda C; May, Christine N; Sadasivam, Rajani S; Houston, Thomas K

    2017-02-15

    Engaging health care staff in new quality improvement programs is challenging. We developed 2 virtual patient (VP) avatars in the context of a clinic-level quality improvement program. We sought to determine differences in preferences for VPs and the perceived influence of interacting with the VP on clinical staff engagement with the quality improvement program. Using a participatory design approach, we developed an older male smoker VP and a younger female smoker VP. The older male smoker was described as a patient with cardiovascular disease and was ethnically ambiguous. The female patient was younger and was worried about the impact of smoking on her pregnancy. Clinical staff were allowed to choose the VP they preferred, and the more they engaged with the VP, the more likely the VP was to quit smoking and become healthier. We deployed the VP within the context of a quality improvement program designed to encourage clinical staff to refer their patients who smoke to a patient-centered Web-assisted tobacco intervention. To evaluate the VPs, we used quantitative analyses using multivariate models of provider and practice characteristics and VP characteristic preference and analyses of a brief survey of positive deviants (clinical staff in practices with high rates of encouraging patients to use the quit smoking innovation). A total of 146 clinical staff from 76 primary care practices interacted with the VPs. Clinic staff included medical providers (35/146, 24.0%), nurse professionals (19/146, 13.0%), primary care technicians (5/146, 3.4%), managerial staff (67/146, 45.9%), and receptionists (20/146, 13.7%). Medical staff were mostly male, and other roles were mostly female. Medical providers (OR 0.031; CI 0.003-0.281; P=.002) and younger staff (OR 0.411; CI 0.177-0.952; P=.038) were less likely to choose the younger, female VP when controlling for all other characteristics. VP preference did not influence online patient referrals by staff. In high

  1. Structural violence and simplified paternalistic ideas of patient empowerment decreases health care access, quality & outcome for ethnic minority patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    Increasing complexity of health care organization, rapid hyperspecialization of medical care, lack of ’patient literacy’ and pressure on patients to take over responsibility, challenges political dreams of equal access to patient centered high quality secure care....

  2. Preventative foot care in people with diabetes: Quality patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: preventative foot care; diabetes; risk stratification: self care. Introduction ... diabetes is considered to be a key indicator of the quality of foot ... loss of protective sensation, the importance of foot monitoring on a daily basis, the proper ...

  3. Quality of care and patient satisfaction in hospitals with high concentrations of black patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks-Carthon, J Margo; Kutney-Lee, Ann; Sloane, Douglas M; Cimiotti, Jeannie P; Aiken, Linda H

    2011-09-01

    To examine the influence of nursing-specifically nurse staffing and the nurse work environment-on quality of care and patient satisfaction in hospitals with varying concentrations of Black patients. Cross-sectional secondary analysis of 2006-2007 nurse survey data collected across four states (Florida, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and California), the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey, and administrative data. Global analysis of variance and linear regression models were used to examine the association between the concentration of Black patients on quality measures (readiness for discharge, patient or family complaints, health care-associated infections) and patient satisfaction, before and after accounting for nursing and hospital characteristics. Nurses working in hospitals with higher concentrations of Blacks reported poorer confidence in patients' readiness for discharge and more frequent complaints and infections. Patients treated in hospitals with higher concentrations of Blacks were less satisfied with their care. In the fully adjusted regression models for quality and patient satisfaction outcomes, the effects associated with the concentration of Blacks were explained in part by nursing and structural hospital characteristics. This study demonstrates a relationship between nursing, structural hospital characteristics, quality of care, and patient satisfaction in hospitals with high concentrations of Black patients. Consideration of nursing factors, in addition to other important hospital characteristics, is critical to understanding and improving quality of care and patient satisfaction in minority-serving hospitals. © 2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  4. Barriers to quality patient care in rural district hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna E. Eygelaar

    2012-05-01

    Reliability of the instrument was verified using the Cronbach alpha coefficient and a pilot study. The validity, specifically construct and content validity, were assured by means of an extensive literature review, pilot study and use of experts. Ethics approval was obtained from the relevant stakeholders. Results showed that 272 participants (97% disagreed that provision of staff was adequate, with staff above 40 years of age more likely to disagree (p = <0.01. A statistically significant association was shown between availability of doctors and staff not being able to cope with emergencies (p = <0.01. Most participants (n =212; 76% indicated that they were not receiving continuing education, with the registered nurses more likely to disagree (χ² test, p = 0.02. Participants in both hospital types A (n = 131; 82% and B (n = 108; 91% also disagreed that provision of equipment and consumables was adequate. The research showed that inadequacies relating to human resources, professional development, consumables and equipment influenced the quality of patient care. Urgent attention should be given to the problems identified to ensure quality of patient care in rural hospitals.

  5. Surgical adverse outcomes and patients' evaluation of quality of care: inherent risk or reduced quality of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; van Duijn-Bakker, Nanny; Kievit, Job

    2007-12-01

    Previous research has shown that sicker patients are less satisfied with their healthcare, but specific effects of adverse health outcomes have not been investigated. The present study aimed to assess whether patients who experience adverse outcomes, in hospital or after discharge, differ in their evaluation of quality of care compared with patients without adverse outcomes. In hospital adverse outcomes were prospectively recorded by surgeons and surgical residents as part of routine care. Four weeks after discharge, patients were interviewed by telephone about the occurrence of post-discharge adverse outcomes, and their overall evaluation of quality of hospital care and specific suggestions for improvements in the healthcare provided. Of 2145 surgical patients admitted to the Leiden University Medical Center in 2003, 1876 (88%) agreed to be interviewed. Overall evaluation was less favourable by patients who experienced post-discharge adverse outcomes only (average 19% lower). These patients were also more often dissatisfied (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.24 to 3.31) than patients without adverse outcomes, and they more often suggested that improvements were needed in medical care (OR 2.07, 1.45 to 2.95) and that patients were discharged too early (OR 3.26, 1.72 to 6.20). The effect of in hospital adverse outcomes alone was not statistically significant. Patients with both in hospital and post-discharge adverse outcomes also found the quality of care to be lower (on average 33% lower) than patients without adverse outcomes. Post-discharge adverse outcomes negatively influence patients' overall evaluation of quality of care and are perceived as being discharged too early, suggesting that patients need better information at discharge.

  6. Barriers to Quality Care for Dying Patients in Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vorst, Rebecca F.; Crane, Lori A.; Barton, Phoebe Lindsey; Kutner, Jean S.; Kallail, K. James; Westfall, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Barriers to providing optimal palliative care in rural communities are not well understood. Purpose: To identify health care personnel's perceptions of the care provided to dying patients in rural Kansas and Colorado and to identify barriers to providing optimal care. Methods: An anonymous self-administered survey was sent to health care…

  7. [Primary care for diabetic patients: a quality improvement cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Martínez, A; Suárez-Beke, M P; Sánchez-Nicolás, J A; Lázaro-Aragues, P; de Jesús Jiménez-Vázquez, E; Huertas-de Mora, O

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and improve the quality of medical care provided to diabetic patients following the standards proposed by the American Diabetes Association. The study was conducted in three phases by analyzing data from the computerized clinical history of a sample of 340 patients. First phase (2010): cross-sectional, descriptive study which assessed the proportion of patients who met the standards related to the screening of diabetes, and goals of control and treatment. Subsequently, health professionals reviewed the results in order to promote the implementation of corrective action. Finally (2012), a new assessment with the same standards was performed. An increase in the number of patients treated with insulin (12.7% in 2010 and 20.2% in 2012) was observed (P < .01). There were also percentage increases in the number of patients who met the screening standards as regards analytical determinations: glycosylated hemoglobin (from 44.4% to 68.2%), lipid profile (47.6%-73.8%), creatinine (32.5% - 73.5%), and albumin-creatinine ratio (9.2%-24.4%) (P < .001). Only 6.4% (CI: 3.2- 9.8) of diabetic patients attained the composite target of glycosylated hemoglobin < 7%, blood pressure < 130/80 mmHg and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol < 100 mg/dl in 2012. This study shows that medical care has improved the goals related to analytical determinations and the number of insulin-treated diabetic type 2 patients. An optimal level was also maintained in metabolic control of diabetes, but there was still poor control of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Reaching common ground: a patient-family-based conceptual framework of quality EOL care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Doris; Brazil, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Improvement in the quality of end-of-life (EOL) care is a priority health care issue since serious deficiencies in quality of care have been reported across care settings. Increasing pressure is now focused on Canadian health care organizations to be accountable for the quality of palliative and EOL care delivered. Numerous domains of quality EOL care upon which to create accountability frameworks are now published, with some derived from the patient/family perspective. There is a need to reach common ground on the domains of quality EOL care valued by patients and families in order to develop consistent performance measures and set priorities for health care improvement. This paper describes a meta-synthesis study to develop a common conceptual framework of quality EOL care integrating attributes of quality valued by patients and their families.

  9. Patients' perceptions of palliative care: adaptation of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective instrument for use in palliative care, and description of patients' perceptions of care received.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsdalen, Tuva; Rystedt, Ingrid; Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Hov, Reidun; Høye, Sevald; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil

    2015-11-02

    Instruments specific to palliative care tend to measure care quality from relative perspectives or have insufficient theoretical foundation. The instrument Quality from the Patient's Perspective (QPP) is based on a model for care quality derived from patients' perceptions of care, although it has not been psychometrically evaluated for use in palliative care. The aim of this study was to adapt the QPP for use in palliative care contexts, and to describe patients' perceptions of the care quality in terms of the subjective importance of the care aspects and the perceptions of the care received. A cross-sectional study was conducted between November 2013 and December 2014 which included 191 patients (73% response rate) in late palliative phase at hospice inpatient units, hospice day-care units, wards in nursing homes that specialized in palliative care and homecare districts, all in Norway. An explorative factor analysis using principal component analysis, including data from 184 patients, was performed for psychometric evaluation. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha and paired t-tests were used to describe patients' perceptions of their care. The QPP instrument was adapted for palliative care in four steps: (1) selecting items from the QPP, (2) modifying items and (3) constructing new items to the palliative care setting, and (4) a pilot evaluation. QPP instrument specific to palliative care (QPP-PC) consists of 51 items and 12 factors with an eigenvalue ≥1.0, and showed a stable factor solution that explained 68.25% of the total variance. The reliability coefficients were acceptable for most factors (0.79-0.96). Patients scored most aspects of care related to both subjective importance and actual care received as high. Areas for improvement were symptom relief, participation, continuity, and planning and cooperation. The QPP-PC is based on a theoretical model of quality of care, and has its roots in patients' perspectives. The instrument was

  10. Patient safety, quality of care, and knowledge translation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Dale M

    2010-07-01

    A large gap exists between the completion of clinical research demonstrating the benefit of new treatment interventions and improved patient outcomes resulting from implementation of these interventions as part of routine clinical practice. This gap clearly affects patient safety and quality of care. Knowledge translation is important for addressing this gap, but evaluation of the most appropriate and effective knowledge translation methods is still ongoing. Through describing one model for knowledge translation and an example of its implementation, insights can be gained into systematic methods for advancing the implementation of evidence-based interventions to improve safety, quality, and patient outcomes.

  11. The Quality of Care Provided to Patients with Chronic Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Communicable Diseases is very low in both settings though it is relatively better in Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Therefore, a continuous process of quality improvement is recommended in both settings. KEYWORDS: Health care, Health ...

  12. Individual care plans for chronically ill patients within primary care in the Netherlands: Dissemination and associations with patient characteristics and patient-perceived quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Daphne L; Heijmans, Monique; Rijken, Mieke

    2015-06-01

    To examine the use of individual care plans (ICPs) within primary chronic illness care in the Netherlands, and to explore the relationships between ICP use, patient characteristics, and patient-perceived quality of care. Cross-sectional study using survey data from a panel of chronically ill patients and medical registration data provided by their general practices. A sample of 1377 patients with somatic chronic disease(s) randomly selected in general practices throughout the Netherlands, supplemented with a sample of 225 COPD patients, also recruited from general practices. (i) Percentage of ICP use based on self-report by chronically ill patients, and (ii) patient-perceived quality of care as assessed using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC). ICP use among the total generic sample was low (9%), but slightly higher (13%) among patients diagnosed with diabetes or COPD, diseases for which disease management programmes have been set up in the Netherlands. Patients with a low educational level and patients with poor(er) self-rated health were more likely to have an ICP. Compared with patients without an ICP, patients with an ICP more often reported that the care they received was patient-centred, proactive, planned, and included collaborative goal setting, problem-solving, and follow-up support. Findings reveal a discrepancy between practice and policy aspirations regarding ICP use in primary chronic illness care. More research is needed to gain insight into the effectiveness of ICPs to improve the quality of chronic illness care in various patient populations.

  13. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J E; Lemmens, Lidwien C.; Baan, Caroline A.; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2016-01-01

    Background: More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined

  14. Developing patient-centred care: an ethnographic study of patient perceptions and influence on quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renedo, Alicia; Marston, Cicely

    2015-04-23

    Understanding quality improvement from a patient perspective is important for delivering patient-centred care. Yet the ways patients define quality improvement remains unexplored with patients often excluded from improvement work. We examine how patients construct ideas of 'quality improvement' when collaborating with healthcare professionals in improvement work, and how they use these understandings when attempting to improve the quality of their local services. We used in-depth interviews with 23 'patient participants' (patients involved in quality improvement work) and observations in several sites in London as part of a four-year ethnographic study of patient and public involvement (PPI) activities run by Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for Northwest London. We took an iterative, thematic and discursive analytical approach. When patient participants tried to influence quality improvement or discussed different dimensions of quality improvement their accounts and actions frequently started with talk about improvement as dependent on collective action (e.g. multidisciplinary healthcare professionals and the public), but usually quickly shifted away from that towards a neoliberal discourse emphasising the role of individual patients. Neoliberal ideals about individual responsibility were taken up in their accounts moving them away from the idea of state and healthcare providers being held accountable for upholding patients' rights to quality care, and towards the idea of citizens needing to work on self-improvement. Participants portrayed themselves as governed by self-discipline and personal effort in their PPI work, and in doing so provided examples of how neoliberal appeals for self-regulation and self-determination also permeated their own identity positions. When including patient voices in measuring and defining 'quality', governments and public health practitioners should be aware of how neoliberal rationalities at the

  15. Complementary effect of patient volume and quality of care on hospital cost efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong Hoon; Park, Imsu; Jung, Ilyoung; Dey, Asoke

    2017-06-01

    This study explores the direct effect of an increase in patient volume in a hospital and the complementary effect of quality of care on the cost efficiency of U.S. hospitals in terms of patient volume. The simultaneous equation model with three-stage least squares is used to measure the direct effect of patient volume and the complementary effect of quality of care and volume. Cost efficiency is measured with a data envelopment analysis method. Patient volume has a U-shaped relationship with hospital cost efficiency and an inverted U-shaped relationship with quality of care. Quality of care functions as a moderator for the relationship between patient volume and efficiency. This paper addresses the economically important question of the relationship of volume with quality of care and hospital cost efficiency. The three-stage least square simultaneous equation model captures the simultaneous effects of patient volume on hospital quality of care and cost efficiency.

  16. Patient Satisfaction with Hospital Inpatient Care: Effects of Trust, Medical Insurance and Perceived Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Linghan; Li, Ye; Ding, Ding; Wu, Qunhong; Liu, Chaojie; Jiao, Mingli; Hao, Yanhua; Han, Yuzhen; Gao, Lijun; Hao, Jiejing; Wang, Lan; Xu, Weilan; Ren, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Deteriorations in the patient-provider relationship in China have attracted increasing attention in the international community. This study aims to explore the role of trust in patient satisfaction with hospital inpatient care, and how patient-provider trust is shaped from the perspectives of both patients and providers. We adopted a mixed methods approach comprising a multivariate logistic regression model using secondary data (1200 people with inpatient experiences over the past year) from the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS, 2013) in Heilongjiang Province to determine the associations between patient satisfaction and trust, financial burden and perceived quality of care, followed by in-depth interviews with 62 conveniently selected key informants (27 from health and 35 from non-health sectors). A thematic analysis established a conceptual framework to explain deteriorating patient-provider relationships. About 24% of respondents reported being dissatisfied with hospital inpatient care. The logistic regression model indicated that patient satisfaction was positively associated with higher level of trust (OR = 14.995), lower levels of hospital medical expenditure (OR = 5.736-1.829 as compared with the highest quintile of hospital expenditure), good staff attitude (OR = 3.155) as well as good ward environment (OR = 2.361). But patient satisfaction was negatively associated with medical insurance for urban residents and other insurance status (OR = 0.215-0.357 as compared with medical insurance for urban employees). The qualitative analysis showed that patient trust-the most significant predictor of patient satisfaction-is shaped by perceived high quality of service delivery, empathic and caring interpersonal interactions, and a better designed medical insurance that provides stronger financial protection and enables more equitable access to health care. At the core of high levels of patient dissatisfaction with hospital care is the lack of trust. The

  17. Quality of delivered care for people with type 2 diabetes: a new patient-centred model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Jafar S

    2009-12-28

    The quality of care from the perspective of people with Type 2 diabetes using a new model (CQMH) including three dimensions of quality in health care (Technical, Service and Customer Quality) was assessed. A cross-sectional survey with a sample of 577 people with Type 2 diabetes was conducted. Measures were self-reported adherence to national guidelines for technical quality, the Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research questionnaire for service quality and the short form of the Patient Activation Measure for Customer Quality. There was a significant gap in technical quality between what diabetes care the patients reported receiving and what was recommended in the guideline, particularly for management and lifestyle aspects. For service quality, the lowest scores were for choice of care provider and accessibility of care. The mean Customer Quality score was 64.5 (meaning higher score indicating better quality). A positive relationship was demonstrated between higher technical, service and customer quality scores, and better diabetes control status as well as maintaining continuity of care. The average Quality Index was 70.0 of a 0-100 scale. Customer Quality appears to be a useful third dimension in conceptualising quality in health care, particularly in the context of chronic disease, where good self-management can improve the outcomes of care. A high proportion of Queensland adults with Type 2 diabetes reported receiving suboptimal care in the majority aspects of provided care services as reflected in the overall Quality Index score indicating substantial room for quality improvement.

  18. Improving the quality of care for patients with hypertension in Moshupa District, Botswana: Quality improvement cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Kande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are no prevalence studies on hypertension in Botswana, this condition is thought to be common and the quality of care to be poor.Aim: The aim of this project was to assess and improve the quality of primary care forhypertension.Setting: Moshupa clinic and catchment area, Botswana.Methods: Quality improvement cycle.Results: Two hundred participants were included in the audit. Sixty-eight per cent were women with a mean age of 55 years. In the baseline audit none of the target standards were met. During the re-audit six months later, six out of nine structural target standards, five out of 11 process target standards and one out of two outcome target standards were achieved. Statistically-significant improvement in performance (p < 0.05 was shown in 10 criteria although the target standard was not always met. In the re-audit, the target of achieving blood pressure control (< 140/90 in 70% of patients was achieved.Conclusion: The quality of care for hypertension was suboptimal in our setting. Simple interventions were designed and implemented to improve the quality of care. These interventions led to significant improvement in structural and process criteria. A corresponding significant improvement in the control of blood pressure was also seen.

  19. Quality of diabetes care in Dutch care groups: no differences between diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone R de Bruin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the relationship between presence and nature of co-morbidity and quality of care for diabetes patients enrolled in diabetes disease management programmes provided by care groups.Methods: We performed an observational study within eight Dutch diabetes care groups. Data from patient record systems of care groups and patient questionnaires were used to determine quality of care. Quality of care was measured as provision of the recommended diabetes care, patients’ achievement of recommended clinical outcomes and patients’ perception of coordination and integration of care.Results: 527 diabetes patients without and 1187 diabetes patients with co-morbidity were included. Of the co-morbid patients, 7.8% had concordant co-morbid conditions only, 63.8% had discordant co-morbid diseases only and 28.4% had both types of conditions. Hardly any differences were observed between patients with and without co-morbidity in terms of provided care, achievement of clinical outcomes and perceived coordination and integration of care.Conclusions: Our study implies that care groups are able to provide similar quality of diabetes care for diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity. Considering the expected developments regarding additional disease management programmes in care groups, it is of importance to monitor quality of care, including patient experiences, for all chronic diseases. It will then become clear whether accountable provider-led organisations such as care groups are able to ensure quality of care for the increasing number of patients with multiple chronic conditions.

  20. Quality assurance of radiotherapy in cancer treatment. Toward improvement of patient safety and quality of care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    The process of radiotherapy (RT) is complex and involves understanding of the principles of medical physics, radiobiology, radiation safety, dosimetry, radiation treatment planning, simulation and interaction of radiation with other treatment modalities. Each step in the integrated process of RT needs quality control and quality assurance (QA) to prevent errors and to give high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. Recent advances in RT, including intensity-modulated and image-guided RT, focus on the need for a systematic RTQA program that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. It is necessary to develop more formal error mitigation and process analysis methods, such as failure mode and effect analysis, to focus available QA resources optimally on process components. External audit programs are also effective. The International Atomic Energy Agency has operated both an on-site and off-site postal dosimetry audit to improve practice and to assure the dose from RT equipment. Several countries have adopted a similar approach for national clinical auditing. In addition, clinical trial QA has a significant role in enhancing the quality of care. The Advanced Technology Consortium has pioneered the development of an infrastructure and QA method for advanced technology clinical trials, including credentialing and individual case review. These activities have an impact not only on the treatment received by patients enrolled in clinical trials, but also on the quality of treatment administered to all patients treated in each institution, and have been adopted globally; by the USA, Europe and Japan also. (author)

  1. Quality assurance of radiotherapy in cancer treatment: toward improvement of patient safety and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    The process of radiotherapy (RT) is complex and involves understanding of the principles of medical physics, radiobiology, radiation safety, dosimetry, radiation treatment planning, simulation and interaction of radiation with other treatment modalities. Each step in the integrated process of RT needs quality control and quality assurance (QA) to prevent errors and to give high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. Recent advances in RT, including intensity-modulated and image-guided RT, focus on the need for a systematic RTQA program that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. It is necessary to develop more formal error mitigation and process analysis methods, such as failure mode and effect analysis, to focus available QA resources optimally on process components. External audit programs are also effective. The International Atomic Energy Agency has operated both an on-site and off-site postal dosimetry audit to improve practice and to assure the dose from RT equipment. Several countries have adopted a similar approach for national clinical auditing. In addition, clinical trial QA has a significant role in enhancing the quality of care. The Advanced Technology Consortium has pioneered the development of an infrastructure and QA method for advanced technology clinical trials, including credentialing and individual case review. These activities have an impact not only on the treatment received by patients enrolled in clinical trials, but also on the quality of treatment administered to all patients treated in each institution, and have been adopted globally; by the USA, Europe and Japan also.

  2. Standardizing the care of detox patients to achieve quality outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kathy; Semrow, Sue

    2006-03-01

    Providing appropriate treatment for detoxification patients is both challenging and difficult because alcohol abuse and dependence are largely underestimated in the acute hospital setting. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is treated not only by addictionologists on chemical dependency units, but also by primary care physicians in acute inpatient settings. The need for consistent inpatient treatment through the use of identified protocols can help provide safe and effective care. The need for consistent, inpatient medical-surgical detoxification treatment in our organization became apparent with the staff's identification of patient care concerns. Using an organizational approach, a multidisciplinary team was created to standardize the care of detoxification patients, beginning with patient admission and ending with discharge and referral for outpatient management. Standardization would ensure consistent assessment and intervention, and improve communication among the clinical team members. A protocol was developed for both the emergency department and the inpatient units. The goals of the team were to decrease the adverse events related to detoxification, such as seizures and aggression, and provide a consistent method of treatment for staff to follow.

  3. Preventative foot care in people with diabetes: Quality patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foot ulceration and amputation cause extensive burden on individuals and health care systems. One of the reasons for the poor outcome of foot complications in developing countries is the lack of patient education. Due to the multi-factorial pathology of diabetic foot ulceration, the person with diabetes should receive health ...

  4. Quality of Care and Outcomes of Heart Failure Among Patients With Schizophrenia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Mette; Mainz, Jan; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    care among patients with schizophrenia included patient-specific factors (age, gender, Global Assessment of Functioning [GAF] score, alcohol or drug abuse, duration of schizophrenia); provider-specific factors (quality of schizophrenia care); and system-specific factors (patient-volume defined......Research on the association between schizophrenia and the quality of care and clinical outcomes of heart failure (HF) remains sparse. This nationwide study compared the quality of care and clinical outcomes of HF among Danish patients with and without schizophrenia. In a population-based cohort...... study, we identified 36,718 patients with incident HF with hospital contacts, including 108 with schizophrenia, using Danish registries between 2004 and 2013. High quality of HF care was defined as receiving ≥ 80% guideline-recommended process-performance measures of care. Potential predictors of HF...

  5. Inpatient Volume and Quality of Mental Health Care Among Patients With Unipolar Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line Ryberg; Mainz, Jan; Jørgensen, Mette

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relationship between inpatient volume and the quality of mental health care remains unclear. This study examined the association between inpatient volume in psychiatric hospital wards and quality of mental health care among patients with depression admitted to wards in Denmark...... was assessed by receipt of process performance measures reflecting national clinical guidelines for care of depression. RESULTS: Compared with patients admitted to low-volume psychiatric hospital wards, patients admitted to very-high-volume wards were more likely to receive a high overall quality of mental...... wards was associated with a greater chance of receiving guideline-recommended process performance measures for care of depression....

  6. Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care Rationale:  Despite the fact that communication has become a core topic in health care, patients still experience the information provided...... as insufficient or incorrect and a lack of involvement. Objective:  To investigate whether adult orthopaedic patients' evaluation of the quality of care had improved after a communication skills training course for healthcare professionals. Design and methods:  The study was designed as an intervention study...... offering professionals training in communicating with patients and colleagues. The outcome was measured by assessing patients' experience of quality of care. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and analysed using a linear regression model. Approval was obtained from the Danish Data Protection...

  7. Development and validation of the quality care questionnaire -palliative care (QCQ-PC): patient-reported assessment of quality of palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Young Ho; Kang, Eun Kyo; Lee, Jihye; Choo, Jiyeon; Ryu, Hyewon; Yun, Hye-Min; Kang, Jung Hun; Kim, Tae You; Sim, Jin-Ah; Kim, Yaeji

    2018-03-05

    In this study, we aimed to develop and validate an instrument that could be used by patients with cancer to evaluate their quality of palliative care. Development of the questionnaire followed the four-phase process: item generation and reduction, construction, pilot testing, and field testing. Based on the literature, we constructed a list of items for the quality of palliative care from 104 quality care issues divided into 14 subscales. We constructed scales of 43 items that only the cancer patients were asked to answer. Using relevance and feasibility criteria and pilot testing, we developed a 44-item questionnaire. To assess the sensitivity and validity of the questionnaire, we recruited 220 patients over 18 years of age from three Korean hospitals. Factor analysis of the data and fit statistics process resulted in the 4-factor, 32-item Quality Care Questionnaire-Palliative Care (QCQ-PC), which covers appropriate communication with health care professionals (ten items), discussing value of life and goals of care (nine items), support and counseling for needs of holistic care (seven items), and accessibility and sustainability of care (six items). All subscales and total scores showed a high internal consistency (Cronbach alpha range, 0.89 to 0.97). Multi-trait scaling analysis showed good convergent (0.568-0.995) and discriminant (0.472-0.869) validity. The correlation between the total and subscale scores of QCQ-PC and those of EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, MQOL, SAT-SF, and DCS was obtained. This study demonstrates that the QCQ-PC can be adopted to assess the quality of care in patients with cancer.

  8. An observational study of patient care outcomes sensitive to handover quality in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillibridge, Nichole; Botti, Mari; Wood, Beverley; Redley, Bernice

    2017-12-01

    To identify patient care outcome indicators sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover between the anaesthetist and the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit nurse. The relationship between interprofessional clinical handover when patients are transferred from the operating theatre to the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and patient outcomes of subsequent patient care delivery is not well understood. Naturalistic, exploratory descriptive design using observation. Observations of 31 patient journeys through Post-Anaesthetic Care Units across three public and private hospitals. Characteristics of interprofessional handover on arrival in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, the trajectory of patient care activities in Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and patient outcomes were observed. Of the 821 care activities observed across 31 "patient journeys" in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, observations (assessments and vital signs) (52.5 %), communication (15.8 %) and pain management (assessment of pain and analgesic administration) (10.3%) were most common. Examination of patterns in handover communications and subsequent trajectories of patient care activities revealed three patient trajectory typologies and two patient outcome indicators expected to be sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover communication in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit: pain on discharge from the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and timely response to clinical deterioration. An additional process indicator, seeking missing information, was also identified. Patient's pain on discharge from Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, escalation of care in response to early signs of deterioration and the need for nurses to seek out missing information to deliver care are indicators expected to be sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover communication in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit. Future research should test these indicators. Patient outcomes sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover on patient

  9. Development and Validation of Quality Criteria for Providing Patient- and Family-centered Injury Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jamie M; Burton, Rachael; Butler, Barb L; Dyer, Dianne; Evans, David C; Felteau, Melissa; Gruen, Russell L; Jaffe, Kenneth M; Kortbeek, John; Lang, Eddy; Lougheed, Val; Moore, Lynne; Narciso, Michelle; Oxland, Peter; Rivara, Frederick P; Roberts, Derek; Sarakbi, Diana; Vine, Karen; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the content validity of quality criteria for providing patient- and family-centered injury care. Quality criteria have been developed for clinical injury care, but not patient- and family-centered injury care. Using a modified Research AND Development Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Methodology, a panel of 16 patients, family members, injury and quality of care experts serially rated and revised criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care identified from patient and family focus groups. The criteria were then sent to 384 verified trauma centers in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand for evaluation. A total of 46 criteria were rated and revised by the panel over 4 rounds of review producing 14 criteria related to clinical care (n = 4; transitions of care, pain management, patient safety, provider competence), communication (n = 3; information for patients/families; communication of discharge plans to patients/families, communication between hospital and community providers), holistic care (n = 4; patient hygiene, kindness and respect, family access to patient, social and spiritual support) and end-of-life care (n = 3; decision making, end-of-life care, family follow-up). Medical directors, managers, or coordinators representing 254 trauma centers (66% response rate) rated 12 criteria to be important (95% of responses) for patient- and family-centered injury care. Fewer centers rated family access to the patient (80%) and family follow-up after patient death (65%) to be important criteria. Fourteen-candidate quality criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care were developed and shown to have content validity. These may be used to guide quality improvement practices.

  10. Service quality and patient experiences of ambulatory care in a specialized clinic vs. a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Regge, Melissa; De Groote, Hélène; Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul; Brugada, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    Health care organizations are constantly looking for ways to establish a differential advantage to attract customers. To this end, service quality has become an important differentiator in the strategy of health care organizations. In this study, we compared the service quality and patient experience in an ambulatory care setting of a physician-owned specialized facility with that of a general hospital. A comparative case study with a mixed method design was employed. Data were gathered through a survey on health service quality and patient experience, completed with observations, walkthroughs, and photographic material. Service quality and patient experiences are high in both the investigated health care facilities. A significant distinction can be made between the two facilities in terms of interpersonal quality (p = 0.001) and environmental quality (P ≤ 0.001), in favor of the medical center. The difference in environmental quality is also indicated by the scores given by participants who had been in both facilities. Qualitative analysis showed higher administrative quality in the medical center. Environmental quality and patient experience can predict the interpersonal quality; for environmental quality, interpersonal quality and age are significant predictors. Service quality and patient experiences are high in both facilities. The medical center has higher service quality for interpersonal and environmental service quality and is more process-centered.

  11. Venous leg ulcer patient priorities and quality of care: results of a survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica Linda; Mainz, Jan; Sorensen, Lars Tue

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive patient evaluation of quality of care encompasses assessment and patient-rated prioritization of the various provisions of care. One hundred consecutive venous leg ulcer patients treated in a multidisciplinary wound healing center were invited to participate in a cross-sectional s...

  12. Intensive care nurses' perceptions of Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds to improve trauma patient care-A quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Fiona L; Mitchell, Marion

    2017-06-01

    Trauma patient management is complex and challenging for nurses in the Intensive Care Unit. One strategy to promote quality and evidence based care may be through utilising specialty nursing experts both internal and external to the Intensive Care Unit in the form of a nursing round. Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds have the potential to improve patient care, collaboration and nurses' knowledge. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to improve trauma patient care and evaluate the nurses perception of improvement. The project included structured, weekly rounds that were conducted at the bedside. Nursing experts and others collaborated to assess and make changes to trauma patients' care. The rounds were evaluated to assess the nurse's perception of improvement. There were 132 trauma patients assessed. A total of 452 changes to patient care occurred. On average, three changes per patient resulted. Changes included nursing management, medical management and wound care. Nursing staff reported an overall improvement of trauma patient care, trauma knowledge, and collaboration with colleagues. Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds utilizes expert nursing knowledge. They are suggested as an innovative way to address the clinical challenges of caring for trauma patients and are perceived to enhance patient care and nursing knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campmans-Kuijpers MJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marjo JE Campmans-Kuijpers,1 Lidwien C Lemmens,2 Caroline A Baan,2 Guy EHM Rutten1 1Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, 2Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Utrecht, the Netherlands Background: More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention.Methods: This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100% was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non parametric tests.Results: Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002, and on its subdomains “access to

  14. Evaluation of patients' satisfaction with quality of care provided at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-02

    Feb 2, 2012 ... Objective: This study was aimed at evaluating patients' satisfaction with quality of care provided at the National Health. Insurance Scheme .... patient values and preferences. Several ... and patient centered,[8] and that the health consumer's .... socio-demographic factors[13] influence the perceived quality.

  15. Editorial: Advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve the quality and safety of patient care

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth M. Borycki

    2015-01-01

    This special issue of the Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal is dedicated to describing “Advances in Healthcare Provider and Patient Training to Improve the Quality and Safety of Patient Care.” Patient safety is an important and fundamental requirement of ensuring the quality of patient care. Training and education has been identified as a key to improving healthcare provider patient safety competencies especially when working with new technologies such as electronic ...

  16. The relationship between patients' perceptions of care quality and three factors: nursing staff job satisfaction, organizational characteristics and patient age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, Tarja; Voutilainen, Ari; Mäntynen, Raija; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2014-10-18

    The relationship between nurses' job satisfaction and their perceptions of quality of care has been examined in previous studies. There is little evidence, however, about relationships between the job satisfaction of nursing staff and quality of care perceived by the patients. The aim of this study was to analyze, how the job satisfaction of nursing staff, organizational characteristics (hospital and unit type), and patients' age relate to patients' perceptions of the quality of care. The study was cross-sectional and descriptive, based on a secondary analysis of survey data acquired during the At Safe study in Finland. The study included 98 units at four acute care hospitals between autumn 2008 and spring 2009. The participants were 1909 patients and 929 nursing staff. Patients' perceptions of quality of care were measured using the 42-item RHCS questionnaire. Job satisfaction of nursing staff was measured with the 37-item KUHJSS scale. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, principal component analysis, t-tests, analysis of variance, linear regression, and multivariate analysis of variance. Patients' perceptions of overall quality of care were positively related to general job satisfaction of nursing staff. Adequate numbers of staff appeared to be the clearest aspect affecting quality of care. Older patients were more satisfied with staff number than younger patients. Patients cared for in outpatient departments felt more respected than patients in wards, whereas patients in wards reported better care of basic needs (e.g., hygiene, food) than outpatients. The evaluation of resources by nursing staff is related to patients' perceptions of the adequacy of nursing staff levels in the unit. The results emphasize the importance of considering patients' perceptions of the quality of care and assessments by nurses of their job satisfaction at the hospital unit level when evaluating quality of care.

  17. Determinants of Quality of Life in Primary Care Patients with Diabetes: Implications for Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat; Gross, Revital; Tabenkin, Hava; Porath, Avi; Heymann, Anthony; Porter, Boaz

    2008-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional design of 400 primary care patients with diabetes, the authors evaluated demographics, health status, subjective health and mental health, health behaviors, health beliefs, knowledge of diabetes treatment, satisfaction with medical care, and quality of medical care as potential predictors of QoL and QoL in the hypothetical…

  18. Patients' evaluation of quality of care in general practice: what are the cultural and linguistic barriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmsen, J A M; Bernsen, R M D; Bruijnzeels, M A; Meeuwesen, L

    2008-07-01

    Increased migration implies increased contacts for physicians with patients from diverse cultural backgrounds who have different expectations about healthcare. How satisfied are immigrant patients, and how do they perceive the quality of care? This study investigated which patient characteristics (such as cultural views and language proficiency) are related to patients' satisfaction and perceived quality of care. Patients (n=663) from 38 general practices in Rotterdam (The Netherlands) were interviewed. General satisfaction with the general practitioner (GP) was measured by a report mark. Perceived quality of care was measured using the 'Quote-mi' scale (quality of care through the patient's eyes-for migrants), which contains an ethnic-specific subscale and a communication process subscale. Using multilevel regression techniques, the relation between patient characteristics (ethnicity, age, education, Dutch language proficiency, cultural views) and satisfaction and perceived quality of care was analysed. In general, patients seemed fairly satisfied. Non-Western patients perceived less quality of care and were less satisfied than Dutch-born patients. The older the patients and the more modern cultural views they had, the more satisfied they were about the GP in general, as well as about the communication process. However, non-Western patients holding more modern views were the most critical regarding the ethnic-specific quality items. The poorer patients' Dutch language proficiency, the more negative they were about the communication process. It is concluded that next to communication aspects, especially when the patient's proficiency in Dutch is poor, physician awareness about the patient's cultural views is very important during the consultation. This holds especially true when the immigrant patient seems to be more or less acculturated. Medical students and physicians should be trained to become aware of the relevance of patients' different cultural backgrounds

  19. Patients' perceptions of service quality dimensions: an empirical examination of health care in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemes, M D; Ozanne, L K; Laurensen, W L

    2001-01-01

    The 1984 liberalization of the New Zealand economy has resulted in a health care sector that has become very competitive (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). The private sector is now able to supply health care services and, as a result, a greater value is being placed on patient satisfaction (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). However, despite the increasing focus on customer satisfaction, research into health care patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality is scarce. This can be problematic, as quality of care is an essential issue in the strategic marketing of health care services (Turner and Pol, 1995). This study takes a step towards addressing this deficiency by identifying patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality in health care. The findings of this study are based on the empirical analysis of a sample of 389 respondents interviewed by telephone. The findings indicate that the service quality dimensions identified in this health care specific study differ in number and dimensional structure from the widely adopted service quality dimensions first identified by Parasuraman, Berry and Zeithaml (1988): reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy and tangibles. The service quality dimensions identified in this study were: reliability, tangibles, assurance, empathy, food, access, outcome, admission, discharge and responsiveness. In addition, health care patients perceive the service quality dimensions relating to the core product in health care delivery (for example, outcome and reliability) as more important than the service quality dimensions relating to the peripheral product in health care delivery (for example, food, access and tangibles). Finally, the results of this study suggest that patients with different geographic, demographic, and behavioristic characteristics have different needs and wants during health care delivery and therefore perceive different service quality dimensions as important.

  20. Relationship Between Patients' Perceptions of Care Quality and Health Care Errors in 11 Countries: A Secondary Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapie, Ana L; Slack, Marion; Malone, Daniel C; MacKinnon, Neil J; Warholak, Terri L

    2016-01-01

    Patients may be the most reliable reporters of some aspects of the health care process; their perspectives should be considered when pursuing changes to improve patient safety. The authors evaluated the association between patients' perceived health care quality and self-reported medical, medication, and laboratory errors in a multinational sample. The analysis was conducted using the 2010 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey, a multinational consumer survey conducted in 11 countries. Quality of care was measured by a multifaceted construct developed using Rasch techniques. After adjusting for potentially important confounding variables, an increase in respondents' perceptions of care coordination decreased the odds of self-reporting medical errors, medication errors, and laboratory errors (P < .001). As health care stakeholders continue to search for initiatives that improve care experiences and outcomes, this study's results emphasize the importance of guaranteeing integrated care.

  1. Educational background of nurses and their perceptions of the quality and safety of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Reece P; Pretorius, Ronel; Klopper, Hester

    2015-04-30

    International health systems research confirms the critical role that nurses play in ensuring the delivery of high quality patient care and subsequent patient safety. It is therefore important that the education of nurses should prepare them for the provision of safe care of a high quality. The South African healthcare system is made up of public and private hospitals that employ various categories of nurses. The perceptions of the various categories of nurses with reference to quality of care and patient safety are unknown in South Africa (SA). To determine the relationship between the educational background of nurses and their perceptions of quality of care and patient safety in private surgical units in SA. A descriptive correlational design was used. A questionnaire was used for data collection, after which hierarchical linear modelling was utilised to determine the relationships amongst the variables. Both the registered- and enrolled nurses seemed satisfied with the quality of care and patient safety in the units were they work. Enrolled nurses (ENs) indicated that current efforts to prevent errors are adequate, whilst the registered nurses (RNs) obtained high scores in reporting incidents in surgical wards. From the results it was evident that perceptions of RNs and ENs related to the quality of care and patient safety differed. There seemed to be a statistically-significant difference between RNs and ENs perceptions of the prevention of errors in the unit, losing patient information between shifts and patient incidents related to medication errors, pressure ulcers and falls with injury.

  2. Evaluating quality of patient care communication in integrated care settings: a mixed methods apporach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulmans, J.; Gulmans, J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; van Harten, Willem H.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Owing to the involvement of multiple professionals from various institutions, integrated care settings are prone to suboptimal patient care communication. To assure continuity, communication gaps should be identified for targeted improvement initiatives. However, available assessment

  3. Ethical leadership, professional caregivers' well-being, and patients' perceptions of quality of care in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Nicolas; Fouquereau, Evelyne; Coillot, Hélène; Bonnetain, Franck; Dupont, Sophie; Moret, Leïla; Anota, Amélie; Colombat, Philippe

    2018-04-01

    Although quality of care and caregivers' well-being are important issues in their own right, relatively few studies have examined both, especially in oncology. The present research thus investigated the relationship between job-related well-being and patients' perceptions of quality of care. More specifically, we examined the indirect effects of ethical leadership on patients' perceived quality of care through caregivers' well-being. A cross-sectional design was used. Professional caregivers (i.e., doctors, nurses, assistant nurses, and other members of the medical staff; n = 296) completed a self-report questionnaire to assess perceptions of ethical leadership and well-being, while patients (n = 333) competed a self-report questionnaire to assess their perceptions of quality of care. The study was conducted in 12 different oncology units located in France. Results revealed that ethical leadership was positively associated with professional caregivers' psychological well-being that in turn was positively associated with patients' perceptions of quality of care. Professional caregivers' well-being is a psychological mechanism through which ethical leadership relates to patients' perceptions of quality of care. Interventions to promote perceptions of ethical leadership behaviors and caregivers' mental health may thus be encouraged to ultimately enhance the quality of care in the oncology setting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Involving patients in care decisions improves satisfaction: an outcomes-based quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Ellen W

    2004-05-01

    A home care agency used quality improvement processes to improve patient satisfaction survey ratings. The focus was on involving patients in decisions about their care. A multidisciplinary team developed creative strategies to increase staff awareness and enhance customer service skills, which had dramatic results.

  5. Trauma patient discharge and care transition experiences: Identifying opportunities for quality improvement in trauma centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlib Conn, Lesley; Zwaiman, Ashley; DasGupta, Tracey; Hales, Brigette; Watamaniuk, Aaron; Nathens, Avery B

    2018-01-01

    Challenges delivering quality care are especially salient during hospital discharge and care transitions. Severely injured patients discharged from a trauma centre will go either home, to rehabilitation or another acute care hospital with complex management needs. This purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of trauma patients and families treated in a regional academic trauma centre to better understand and improve their discharge and care transition experiences. A qualitative study using inductive thematic analysis was conducted between March and October 2016. Telephone interviews were conducted with trauma patients and/or a family member after discharge from the trauma centre. Data collection and analysis were completed inductively and iteratively consistent with a qualitative approach. Twenty-four interviews included 19 patients and 7 family members. Participants' experiences drew attention to discharge and transfer processes that either (1) Fostered quality discharge or (2) Impeded quality discharge. Fostering quality discharge was ward staff preparation efforts; establishing effective care continuity; and, adequate emotional support. Impeding discharge quality was perceived pressure to leave the hospital; imposed transfer decisions; and, sub-optimal communication and coordination around discharge. Patient-provider communication was viewed to be driven by system, rather than patient need. Inter-facility information gaps raised concern about receiving facilities' ability to care for injured patients. The quality of trauma patient discharge and transition experiences is undermined by system- and ward-level processes that compete, rather than align, in producing high quality patient-centred discharge. Local improvement solutions focused on modifiable factors within the trauma centre include patient-oriented discharge education and patient navigation; however, these approaches alone may be insufficient to enhance patient experiences. Trauma patients

  6. Health care access and quality for persons with disability: Patient and provider recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Heather F; Kurichi, Jibby E; Barg, Frances K; Krueger, Alice; Colletti, Patrice M; Wearing, Krizia A; Bogner, Hillary R

    2018-07-01

    Significant disparities in health care access and quality persist between persons with disabilities (PWD) and persons without disabilities (PWOD). Little research has examined recommendations of patients and providers to improve health care for PWD. We sought to explore patient and health care provider recommendations to improve health care access and quality for PWD through focus groups in the physical world in a community center and in the virtual world in an online community. In all, 17 PWD, 4 PWOD, and 6 health care providers participated in 1 of 5 focus groups. Focus groups were conducted in the virtual world in Second Life ® with Virtual Ability, an online community, and in the physical world at Agape Community Center in Milwaukee, WI. Focus group data were analyzed using a grounded theory methodology. Themes that emerged in focus groups among PWD and PWOD as well as health care providers to improve health care access and quality for PWD were: promoting advocacy, increasing awareness and knowledge, improving communication, addressing assumptions, as well as modifying and creating policy. Many participants discussed political empowerment and engagement as central to health care reform. Both PWD and PWOD as well as health care providers identified common themes potentially important for improving health care for PWD. Patient and health care provider recommendations highlight a need for modification of current paradigms, practices, and approaches to improve the quality of health care provision for PWD. Participants emphasized the need for greater advocacy and political engagement. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of horticultural therapy on the quality of life of palliative care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Claudia Kam-Yuk; Lau, Carmen Ka-Yan; Kan, Wai Yin; Lam, Wai Man; Fung, Connie Yuen Yee

    2017-01-01

    Palliative care patients experience a variety of needs and perceive their quality of life as being only fair. This study adopted a single-group repeated-measure design to investigate the effect of horticultural therapy on the quality of life of palliative care patients using the Quality of Life Concern in End of Life Questionnaire. Significant differences in the domains of "existential distress" and "health care concern" were observed immediately postintervention and at 4 weeks postintervention, respectively. No other significant differences were seen in the other domains or in the total mean score of the outcome measure.

  8. Assessment of the Quality of Delivered Care for Iranian patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis by Using Comprehensive Quality Measurement Model in Health Care (CQMH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Karimi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of care has become increasingly critical in the evaluation of healthcare and healthcare services. The aim of this study was to assess quality of delivered care among patients with rheumatoid arthritis using a model of Comprehensive Quality Measurement in Health Care (CQMH. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 172 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA who were received care from private clinics of Isfahan University of medical sciences in 2013. CQMH questionnaires were used for assessing the quality of care. Data were analyzed using SPSS for Windows. Results: The mean scores of Quality Index, Service Quality (SQ, Technical Quality (TQ, and Costumer Quality (CQ were 72.70, 79.09, 68.54 and 70.25 out of 100, respectively. For CQ only 19.8% of participations staying the course of action even under stress and financial constraints, there is a significant gap between what RA care they received with what was recommended in the guideline for TQ. Scores of service quality was low in majority of aspects especially in "availability of support group" section. Conclusion: Study shows paradoxical findings and expresses that quality scores of service delivery for patients with arthritis rheumatoid from patient's perspective is relatively low. Therefore, for fixing this paradoxical problem, improving the participation of patients and their family and empowering them for self-management and decision should be regarded by health systems.

  9. Management of patients with coronary heart disease in family medicine: correlates of quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tušek-Bunc, Ksenija; Petek, Davorina

    2018-04-10

    Family medicine plays an important role in quality of care (QoC) of coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. This study's aim was to determine the quality of secondary cardiovascular disease prevention in the everyday practice of family physicians. This study was observational cross-sectional. About 36 randomly selected family medicine practices stratified by size and location in Slovenia. CHD patients randomly selected from a patient register available in family medicine practices. The instrument for assessment of quality included a form for collecting data from medical records, a general practice assessment questionnaire and a patient questionnaire. QoC was defined by two composite variables, namely risk factor registration and CHD patient process of care, as the two care outcomes. In multivariate analysis, we performed multilevel regression analysis to identify the associations between QoC, the patient and the practice characteristics. The final sample included 423 CHD patients from 36 family medicine practices. Risk factor registration was associated with the practice organisation score (P = 0.004), practice size (P = 0.042), presence of comorbid atherosclerotic diseases (P = 0.043) and a lower age of CHD patients (P = 0.001). CHD patient process of care was associated with the practice organisation score (0.045) and a lower age of CHD patients (P = 0.035). The most important factors affecting the quality of CHD patient care were linked to the organisational characteristics of the family medicine practices.

  10. Effects of primary care team social networks on quality of care and costs for patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Marlon P; Gilchrist, Valerie J; Fleming, Michael F; Zakletskaia, Larissa I; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Beasley, John W

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. Primary care teams can be best suited to improve quality of care and lower costs for patients with cardiovascular disease. This study evaluates the associations between primary care team communication, interaction, and coordination (ie, social networks); quality of care; and costs for patients with cardiovascular disease. Using a sociometric survey, 155 health professionals from 31 teams at 6 primary care clinics identified with whom they interact daily about patient care. Social network analysis calculated variables of density and centralization representing team interaction structures. Three-level hierarchical modeling evaluated the link between team network density, centralization, and number of patients with a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease for controlled blood pressure and cholesterol, counts of urgent care visits, emergency department visits, hospital days, and medical care costs in the previous 12 months. Teams with dense interactions among all team members were associated with fewer hospital days (rate ratio [RR] = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50-0.77) and lower medical care costs (-$556; 95% CI, -$781 to -$331) for patients with cardiovascular disease. Conversely, teams with interactions revolving around a few central individuals were associated with increased hospital days (RR = 1.45; 95% CI, 1.09-1.94) and greater costs ($506; 95% CI, $202-$810). Team-shared vision about goals and expectations mediated the relationship between social network structures and patient quality of care outcomes. Primary care teams that are more interconnected and less centralized and that have a shared team vision are better positioned to deliver high-quality cardiovascular disease care at a lower cost. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  11. Measuring the quality of patient-centered care: why patient-reported measures are critical to reliable assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzelepis F

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Flora Tzelepis, Robert W Sanson-Fisher, Alison C Zucca, Elizabeth A FradgleyPriority Research Centre for Health Behaviour, University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaPurpose: The Institute of Medicine (IOM identified patient-centeredness as crucial to quality health care. The IOM endorsed six patient-centeredness dimensions that stipulated that care must be: respectful to patients’ values, preferences, and expressed needs; coordinated and integrated; provide information, communication, and education; ensure physical comfort; provide emotional support; and involve family and friends. Patient-reported measures examine the patient’s perspective and are essential to the accurate assessment of patient-centered care. This article’s objectives are to: 1 use the six IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimensions as a framework to outline why patient-reported measures are crucial to the reliable measurement of patient-centered care; and 2 to identify existing patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centered care dimension.Methods: For each IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimension, the published literature was searched to highlight the essential role of patients in assessing patient-centered care and informing quality improvement efforts. Existing literature was also searched to identify examples of patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centeredness dimension.Conclusion: Patient-reported measures are arguably the best way to measure patient-centeredness. For instance, patients are best positioned to determine whether care aligns with patient values, preferences, and needs and the Measure of Patient Preferences is an example of a patient-reported measure that does so. Furthermore, only the patient knows whether they received the level of information desired, and if information was understood and can be recalled. Patient-reported measures that examine information provision include

  12. How Health Care Organizations Are Using Data on Patients' Race and Ethnicity to Improve Quality of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlby, Ruth; Jorgensen, Selena; Siegel, Bruce; Ayanian, John Z

    2011-01-01

    Context: Racial and ethnic disparities in the quality of health care are well documented in the U.S. health care system. Reducing these disparities requires action by health care organizations. Collecting accurate data from patients about their race and ethnicity is an essential first step for health care organizations to take such action, but these data are not systematically collected and used for quality improvement purposes in the United States. This study explores the challenges encountered by health care organizations that attempted to collect and use these data to reduce disparities. Methods: Purposive sampling was used to identify eight health care organizations that collected race and ethnicity data to measure and reduce disparities in the quality and outcomes of health care. Staff, including senior managers and data analysts, were interviewed at each site, using a semi-structured interview format about the following themes: the challenges of collecting and collating accurate data from patients, how organizations defined a disparity and analyzed data, and the impact and uses of their findings. Findings: To collect accurate self-reported data on race and ethnicity from patients, most organizations had upgraded or modified their IT systems to capture data and trained staff to collect and input these data from patients. By stratifying nationally validated indicators of quality for hospitals and ambulatory care by race and ethnicity, most organizations had then used these data to identify disparities in the quality of care. In this process, organizations were taking different approaches to defining and measuring disparities. Through these various methods, all organizations had found some disparities, and some had invested in interventions designed to address them, such as extra staff, extended hours, or services in new locations. Conclusion: If policymakers wish to hold health care organizations accountable for disparities in the quality of the care they

  13. Collaborative care model improves self-care ability, quality of life and cardiac function of patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Y. Hua

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heart failure (CHF is a common chronic disease that requires much care. This study aimed to explore the effects of collaborative care model (CCM on patients with CHF. A total of 114 CHF patients were enrolled in this study, and were randomly and equally divided into two groups: control and experimental. Patients in the two groups received either usual care or CCM for 3 continuous months. The impacts of CCM on the self-care ability and quality of life were assessed using self-care of heart failure index and short form health survey 12, respectively. Further, cardiac function was assessed by measuring left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and the level of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, and by the 6-min walking test. Clinical and demographic characteristics of patients in the control and CCM groups were statistically equivalent. Compared with usual care, CCM significantly enhanced self-care abilities of patients with CHF, including self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence (all P<0.05. The physical and mental quality of life was also significantly improved by CCM (P<0.01 or P<0.05. Compared with usual care, CCM significantly increased the LVEF (P<0.01, decreased the NT-proBNP level (P<0.01, and enhanced exercise capacity (P<0.001. In conclusion, CCM improved the self-care, quality of life and cardiac function of patients with CHF compared with usual care.

  14. HOME CARE NURSES’ ROLES IN ENHANCING QUALITY OF NURSING CARE FOR PATIENTS AT HOME: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY

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    Titan Ligita

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Provision of health care service at home is one of the advanced forms of care for patients being discharged from hospitalization. Little is known about the experience of nurses providing home care services through a nursing home-care model especially in Indonesian context. Objective: This study aims to explore the experience in order to increase understanding on the form of home care provision, and consequently the nurses may understand the form of home care globally. Methods: This study employed a phenomenological design and performed interview in the process of data collection. Data were analysed by using content analysis. Results: The main contexts of home care nurse experiences were generated. There were definition and role of home care nurses, the involvement of family members in the provision of care, the facilitating and hindering factors contributed to home care provision as well as manual on providing home care nursing. Conclusion: The implication from this study is that nursing care should be given to the patients continuously and consequently the need for family involvement is important. Additionally, in providing the home care, a proper manual is needed by home care nurses as the guidance to give best quality of care to patients.

  15. Work conditions, mental workload and patient care quality: a multisource study in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Matthias; Müller, Andreas; Holland, Stephan; Wedel, Susanne; Woloshynowych, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Workflow interruptions, multitasking and workload demands are inherent to emergency departments (ED) work systems. Potential effects of ED providers' work on care quality and patient safety have, however, been rarely addressed. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and associations of ED staff's workflow interruptions, multitasking and workload with patient care quality outcomes. We applied a mixed-methods design in a two-step procedure. First, we conducted a time-motion study to observe the rate of interruptions and multitasking activities. Second, during 20-day shifts we assessed ED staff's reports on workflow interruptions, multitasking activities and mental workload. Additionally, we assessed two care quality indicators with standardised questionnaires: first, ED patients' evaluations of perceived care quality; second, patient intrahospital transfers evaluated by ward staff. The study was conducted in a medium-sized community ED (16 600 annual visits). ED personnel's workflow was disrupted on average 5.63 times per hour. 30% of time was spent on multitasking activities. During 20 observations days, data were gathered from 76 ED professionals, 239 patients and 205 patient transfers. After aggregating daywise data and controlling for staffing levels, prospective associations revealed significant negative associations between ED personnel's mental workload and patients' perceived quality of care. Conversely, workflow interruptions were positively associated with patient-related information on discharge and overall quality of transfer. Our investigation indicated that ED staff's capability to cope with demanding work conditions was associated with patient care quality. Our findings contribute to an improved understanding of the complex effects of interruptions and multitasking in the ED environment for creating safe and efficient ED work and care systems. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  16. Is quality of care a key predictor of perinatal health care utilization and patient satisfaction in Malawi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creanga, Andreea A; Gullo, Sara; Kuhlmann, Anne K Sebert; Msiska, Thumbiko W; Galavotti, Christine

    2017-05-22

    The Malawi government encourages early antenatal care, delivery in health facilities, and timely postnatal care. Efforts to sustain or increase current levels of perinatal service utilization may not achieve desired gains if the quality of care provided is neglected. This study examined predictors of perinatal service utilization and patients' satisfaction with these services with a focus on quality of care. We used baseline, two-stage cluster sampling household survey data collected between November and December, 2012 before implementation of CARE's Community Score Card© intervention in Ntcheu district, Malawi. Women with a birth during the last year (N = 1301) were asked about seeking: 1) family planning, 2) antenatal, 3) delivery, and 4) postnatal care; the quality of care received; and their overall satisfaction with the care received. Specific quality of care items were assessed for each type of service, and up to five such items per type of service were used in analyses. Separate logistic regression models were fitted to examine predictors of family planning, antenatal, delivery, and postnatal service utilization and of complete satisfaction with each of these services; all models were adjusted for women's socio-demographic characteristics, perceptions of the closest facility to their homes, service use indicators, and quality of care items. We found higher levels of perinatal service use than previously documented in Malawi (baseline antenatal care 99.4%; skilled birth attendance 97.3%; postnatal care 77.5%; current family planning use 52.8%). Almost 73% of quality of perinatal care items assessed were favorably reported by > 90% of women. Women reported high overall satisfaction (≥85%) with all types of services examined, higher for antenatal and postnatal care than for family planning and delivery care. We found significant associations between perceived and actual quality of care and both women's use and satisfaction with the perinatal health

  17. QUALITY OF NURSING CARE BASED ON ANALYSIS OF NURSING PERFORMANCE AND NURSE AND PATIENT SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Muhith

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nurses who frequently often contact to patients and most of their time serve patients in 24 hours, have an important role in caring for the patient. Patient satisfaction as quality indicator is the key success for competitiveness of service in hospital. The aim of this research was to develop nursing service quality model based on the nursing performance, nurse and patient satisfaction. Method: The research method used cross sectional study, at 14 wards of Gresik Hospital. Research factors were namely: oganization characteristic (organization culture and leadership, work factors (feedback and variety of nurses work, nurse characteristics (motivation, attitude, commitment and mental model, nursing practice, interpersonal communication, nurse and patient satisfaction. Statistical analysis of study data was analyzed by Partial Least Square (PLS. Results: The results of nursing performance revealed that nurse characteristic were not affected by organization culture and leadership style, nurse characteristics were affected by work factors, nurse characteristics affected nursing quality service (nursing practice, nursing professional, nurse and patient satisfaction, nurse satisfaction did not affect nursing professionals. Discussion: Based on the overall results of the development of nursing care model that was originally only emphasizes the process of nursing care only, should be consider the input factor of organizational characteristics, job characteristics, and characteristics of individual nurses and consider the process factors of nursing care standards and professional performance of nurses and to consider the outcome factors nurse and patient satisfaction. So in general the development model of quality of existing nursing care refers to a comprehensive system of quality.

  18. Cancer patients' perceptions of quality-of-care attributes-Associations with age, perceived health status, gender and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, Riitta; Stolt, Minna; Berg, Agneta; Katajisto, Jouko; Lemonidou, Chryssoula; Patiraki, Elisabeth; Sjövall, Katarina; Charalambous, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the associations between patients' gender, education, health status in relation to assessments of patient-centred quality and individuality in care and trust in nurses for those education were not related to their assessments of care quality attributes: person-centred care quality, individuality in care and trust in nurses. Subgroup analysis of the older adults and those of working age showed clear associations with patients' assessments of quality-of-care attributes and perceived health status. The lower the perceived health status, the lower the assessment of care quality attributes. The results suggest that the cancer itself is the strongest determinant of the care delivered, rather than any patient characteristics, such as age, education or gender. Perceived health status, in association with cancer patient assessments of care quality attributes, may be useful in the development of patient-centred, individualised care strategies alongside a stronger focus on people instead of cancer-care-related processes and duties. Health status was the only factor associated with cancer patients' assessments of care quality attributes. Cancer itself may be the strongest determinant of the care quality perceptions, rather than any patient characteristics. The findings of this study have implications for cancer care professionals in terms of patient assessment and care planning. The measures may be useful in assessing quality of cancer nursing care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Patient issues in health research and quality of care: an inventory and data synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, G.J.; Visse, M.A.; Boer, P.; Abma, T.A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this review is to generate an inventory of issues that matter from a patient perspective in health research and quality of care. From these issues, criteria will be elicited to support patient(s) (groups) in their role as advisor or advocate when appraising health research, health

  20. Fostering evidence-based quality improvement for patient-centered medical homes: Initiating local quality councils to transform primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Susan E; Zuchowski, Jessica; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Sapir, Negar; Yano, Elizabeth M; Altman, Lisa; Fickel, Jacqueline J; McDougall, Skye; Dresselhaus, Timothy; Hamilton, Alison B

    Although the patient-centered medical home endorses quality improvement principles, methods for supporting ongoing, systematic primary care quality improvement have not been evaluated. We introduced primary care quality councils at six Veterans Health Administration sites as an organizational intervention with three key design elements: (a) fostering interdisciplinary quality improvement leadership, (b) establishing a structured quality improvement process, and (c) facilitating organizationally aligned frontline quality improvement innovation. Our evaluation objectives were to (a) assess design element implementation, (b) describe implementation barriers and facilitators, and (c) assess successful quality improvement project completion and spread. We analyzed administrative records and conducted interviews with 85 organizational leaders. We developed and applied criteria for assessing design element implementation using hybrid deductive/inductive analytic techniques. All quality councils implemented interdisciplinary leadership and a structured quality improvement process, and all but one completed at least one quality improvement project and a toolkit for spreading improvements. Quality councils were perceived as most effective when service line leaders had well-functioning interdisciplinary communication. Matching positions within leadership hierarchies with appropriate supportive roles facilitated frontline quality improvement efforts. Two key resources were (a) a dedicated internal facilitator with project management, data collection, and presentation skills and (b) support for preparing customized data reports for identifying and addressing practice level quality issues. Overall, quality councils successfully cultivated interdisciplinary, multilevel primary care quality improvement leadership with accountability mechanisms and generated frontline innovations suitable for spread. Practice level performance data and quality improvement project management support

  1. Creating patient value in glaucoma care : applying quality costing and care delivery value chain approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F. de Korne (Dirk); J.C.A. Sol (Kees); T. Custers (Thomas); E. van Sprundel (Esther); B.M. van Ineveld (Martin); H.G. Lemij (Hans); N.S. Klazinga (Niek)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore in a specific hospital care process the applicability in practice of the theories of quality costing and value chains. Design/methodology/approach: In a retrospective case study an in-depth evaluation of the use of a quality cost model

  2. Differences between Proxy and Patient Assessments of Cancer Care Experiences and Quality Ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roydhouse, Jessica K; Gutman, Roee; Keating, Nancy L; Mor, Vincent; Wilson, Ira B

    2018-04-01

    To assess the impact of proxy survey responses on cancer care experience reports and quality ratings. Secondary analysis of data from Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance (CanCORS). Recruitment occurred from 2003 to 2005. The study was a cross-sectional observational study. The respondents were patients with incident colorectal or lung cancer or their proxies. Analyses used linear regression models with an independent variable for proxy versus patient responses as well as study site and clinical covariates. The outcomes were experiences with medical care, nursing care, care coordination, and care quality rating. Multiple imputation was used for missing data. Among 6,471 respondents, 1,011 (16 percent) were proxies. The proportion of proxy respondents varied from 6 percent to 28 percent across study sites. Adjusted proxy scores were modestly higher for medical care experiences (+1.28 points [95 percent CI:+ 0.05 to +2.51]), but lower for nursing care (-2.81 [95 percent CI: -4.11 to -1.50]) and care coordination experiences (-2.98 [95 percent CI: -4.15 to -1.81]). There were no significant differences between adjusted patient and proxy ratings of quality. Proxy responses have small but statistically significant differences from patient responses. However, if ratings of care are used for financial incentives, such differences could be exaggerated across practices or areas if proxy use varies. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Effect of home care service on the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Demet; Terzioglu, Fusun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to determine the effect of home care service on the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer. This randomized case control study was carried out in a womans hospital between September 2011 and February 2012. Women undergoing gynecological cancer treatment were separated into intervention and control groups, of 35 patients each. The intervention group was provided with nursing care service through hospital and home visits (1st, 12th weeks) within the framework of a specifically developed nursing care plan. The control group was monitored without any intervention through the hospital routine protocols (1st, 12th weeks). Data were collected using An Interview Form, Home Visit Monitoring Form and Quality of Life Scale/Cancer Survivors. Effects of home care service on the quality of life in gynecological cancer patients were investigated using chi-square tests, McNemar's test, independent t-test and ANOVA. This study found that the intervention group receiving home care service had a moderately high quality of life (average mean: 6.01±0.64), while the control group had comparatively lower quality (average mean: 4.35±0.79) within the 12 week post- discharge period (phome care services to be efficient in improving the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer.

  4. Quality of care in the intensive care unit from the perspective of patient's relatives: development and psychometric evaluation of the consumer quality index 'R-ICU'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensen, Ans; van Mol, Margo M; Menheere, Ilse; Nijkamp, Marjan D; Verhoogt, Ellen; Maris, Bea; Manders, Willeke; Vloet, Lilian; Verharen, Lisbeth

    2017-01-24

    The quality standards of the Dutch Society of Intensive Care require monitoring of the satisfaction of patient's relatives with respect to care. Currently, no suitable instrument is available in the Netherlands to measure this. This study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the questionnaire-based Consumer Quality Index 'Relatives in Intensive Care Unit' (CQI 'R-ICU'). The CQI 'R-ICU' measures the perceived quality of care from the perspective of patients' relatives, and identifies aspects of care that need improvement. The CQI 'R-ICU' was developed using a mixed method design. Items were based on quality of care aspects from earlier studies and from focus group interviews with patients' relatives. The time period for the data collection of the psychometric evaluation was from October 2011 until July 2012. Relatives of adult intensive care patients in one university hospital and five general hospitals in the Netherlands were approached to participate. Psychometric evaluation included item analysis, inter-item analysis, and factor analysis. Twelve aspects were noted as being indicators of quality of care, and were subsequently selected for the questionnaire's vocabulary. The response rate of patients' relatives was 81% (n = 455). Quality of care was represented by two clusters, each showing a high reliability: 'Communication' (α = .80) and 'Participation' (α = .84). Relatives ranked the following aspects for quality of care as most important: no conflicting information, information from doctors and nurses is comprehensive, and health professionals take patients' relatives seriously. The least important care aspects were: need for contact with peers, nuisance, and contact with a spiritual counsellor. Aspects that needed the most urgent improvement (highest quality improvement scores) were: information about how relatives can contribute to the care of the patient, information about the use of meal-facilities in the hospital, and

  5. Quality-of-care initiative in patients treated surgically for perforated peptic ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M H; Larsson, Heidi Jeanet; Rosenstock, S

    2013-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity are considerable after treatment for perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). Since 2003, a Danish nationwide quality-of-care (QOC) improvement initiative has focused on reducing preoperative delay, and improving perioperative monitoring and care for patients with PPU. The present...... study reports the results of this initiative....

  6. Quality of care provided to patients with diabetes mellitus in Puerto Rico; managed care versus fee-for-service experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vigil, Efraín; Kianes-Pérez, Zaira

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the quality of diabetes care in a large managed care system and fee-for-service payment system in Puerto Rico. This retrospective cross-sectional study assessed the adherence to standards of diabetes care in 1,687,202 subjects--226,210 from a fee-for-service population and 1,460,992 from a managed care group. Patients with diabetes mellitus were identified from insurance claims reports. Type of health-care provider, service location, number of visits, and laboratory utilization were also assessed. From the analysis, we identified 90,616 patients with diabetes (5.4% of the overall study group). Of these, 66,587 (73.5%) were found to have at least one encounter with a physician in a medical visit. Of the 66,586 patients with diabetes who visited a physician, only 4% were treated by an endocrinologist. General laboratory utilization was 34% for the entire population of patients with diabetes studied. In the group of patients with documented laboratory tests, 93% had a documented fasting blood glucose test; in contrast, hemoglobin A lc testing was performed in only 9% of the patients. The fee-for-service group had a higher rate of visits to medical specialists and general laboratory utilization, whereas the managed care group had a higher rate of hospital admissions and emergency department visits. The quality of diabetes management and the subsequent outcomes are related to patient and health-care provider adherence to standards of care. In this analysis, we found that patients and physicians are responsible for low compliance with recognized standards of diabetes care in Puerto Rico. The lack of adequate management will lead to increased mortality, development and severity of chronic complications, and increased emergency department utilization. Therefore, health-care providers and payers should find ways to achieve more effective promotion of adherence to accepted standards of care for patients with diabetes.

  7. Quality of pharmaceutical care at the pharmacy counter: patients' experiences versus video observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Ellen S; Blom, Lyda; Overbeeke, Marloes R; Philbert, Daphne; Vervloet, Marcia; Koopman, Laura; van Dijk, Liset

    2016-01-01

    Consumer Quality Index questionnaires are used to assess quality of care from patients' experiences. To provide insight into the agreement about quality of pharmaceutical care, measured both by a patient questionnaire and video observations. Pharmaceutical encounters in four pharmacies were video-recorded. Patients completed a questionnaire based upon the Consumer Quality Index Pharmaceutical Care after the encounter containing questions about patients' experiences regarding information provision, medication counseling, and pharmacy staff's communication style. An observation protocol was used to code the recorded encounters. Agreement between video observation and patients' experiences was calculated. In total, 109 encounters were included for analysis. For the domains "medication counseling" and "communication style", agreement between patients' experiences and observations was very high (>90%). Less agreement (45%) was found for "information provision", which was rated more positive by patients compared to the observations, especially for the topic, encouragement of patients' questioning behavior. A questionnaire is useful to assess the quality of medication counseling and pharmacy staff's communication style, but might be less suitable to evaluate information provision and pharmacy staff's encouragement of patients' questioning behavior. Although patients may believe that they have received all necessary information to use their new medicine, some information on specific instructions was not addressed during the encounter. When using questionnaires to get insight into information provision, observations of encounters are very informative to validate the patient questionnaires and make necessary adjustments.

  8. Satisfied doctors ... satisfied patients?: the relationship between patient-, GP-and practice characteristics and the quality of care ratings of patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sixma, H.J.; Spreeuwenberg, P.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Quality of care from the patients’ perspective can be seen as a key element of health care policy and the management of health care services. Aim: The aims of this paper are twofold. 1) To look at differences in the quality of care ratings of GP patients. 2) To explore the

  9. Assessing decision quality in patient-centred care requires a preference-sensitive measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Cunich, Michelle; Salkeld, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    A theory-based instrument for measuring the quality of decisions made using any form of decision technology, including both decision-aided and unaided clinical consultations is required to enable person- and patient-centred care and to respond positively to individual heterogeneity in the value...... aspects of decision making. Current instruments using the term 'decision quality' have adopted a decision- and thus condition-specific approach. We argue that patient-centred care requires decision quality to be regarded as both preference-sensitive across multiple relevant criteria and generic across all...

  10. Social support, self-care, and quality of life in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanucharurnkul, S.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study was two-fold: (1) to examine the relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life in adult cancer patients receiving radiotherapy while the selected basic conditioning factors of age, marital and socio-economic status, living arrangement, stage and site of cancer were statistically controlled; and (2) to test a theoretical model which postulated that (a) quality of life was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors, social support and self-care, and (b) self-care was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors and social support. A convenience sample of 112 adult cervical and head/neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy was obtained from radiotherapy outpatient clinic in three hospitals located in Bangkok, Thailand. Results of the study indicated positive relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life. Socio-economic status, site of cancer, and self-care were significant predictors for reported quality of life. Social support appeared to be a significant predictor of quality of life indirectly through self-care. Socio-economic status and social support were also significant predictors of self-care, whereas, stage and site of cancer seemed to predict self-care indirectly through social support

  11. Impact of weight bias and stigma on quality of care and outcomes for patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, S M; Burgess, D J; Yeazel, M W; Hellerstedt, W L; Griffin, J M; van Ryn, M

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to critically review the empirical evidence from all relevant disciplines regarding obesity stigma in order to (i) determine the implications of obesity stigma for healthcare providers and their patients with obesity and (ii) identify strategies to improve care for patients with obesity. We conducted a search of Medline and PsychInfo for all peer-reviewed papers presenting original empirical data relevant to stigma, bias, discrimination, prejudice and medical care. We then performed a narrative review of the existing empirical evidence regarding the impact of obesity stigma and weight bias for healthcare quality and outcomes. Many healthcare providers hold strong negative attitudes and stereotypes about people with obesity. There is considerable evidence that such attitudes influence person-perceptions, judgment, interpersonal behaviour and decision-making. These attitudes may impact the care they provide. Experiences of or expectations for poor treatment may cause stress and avoidance of care, mistrust of doctors and poor adherence among patients with obesity. Stigma can reduce the quality of care for patients with obesity despite the best intentions of healthcare providers to provide high-quality care. There are several potential intervention strategies that may reduce the impact of obesity stigma on quality of care. © 2015 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Association for the Study of Obesity (IASO).

  12. Quality of life and religious-spiritual coping in palliative cancer care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ticiane Dionizio de Sousa Matos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: to compare the quality of life and religious-spiritual coping of palliative cancer care patients with a group of healthy participants; assess whether the perceived quality of life is associated with the religious-spiritual coping strategies; identify the clinical and sociodemographic variables related to quality of life and religious-spiritual coping. Method: cross-sectional study involving 96 palliative outpatient care patient at a public hospital in the interior of the state of São Paulo and 96 healthy volunteers, using a sociodemographic questionnaire, the McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Brief Religious-Spiritual Coping scale. Results: 192 participants were interviewed who presented good quality of life and high use of Religious-Spiritual Coping. Greater use of negative Religious-Spiritual Coping was found in Group A, as well as lesser physical and psychological wellbeing and quality of life. An association was observed between quality of life scores and Religious-Spiritual Coping (p<0.01 in both groups. Male sex, Catholic religion and the Brief Religious-Spiritual Coping score independently influenced the quality of life scores (p<0.01. Conclusion: both groups presented high quality of life and Religious-Spiritual Coping scores. Male participants who were active Catholics with higher Religious-Spiritual Coping scores presented a better perceived quality of life, suggesting that this coping strategy can be stimulated in palliative care patients.

  13. Directing Improvements in Primary Care Patient Experience through Analysis of Service Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson Smith, Mel; Smith, David

    2018-06-03

    To examine the influence of dimensions of service quality on patient experience of primary care. Data from the national GP Patient Survey in England 2014/15, with responses from 858,351 patients registered at 7,918 practices. Expert panel and principal component analysis helped identify relevant dimensions of service quality. Regression was then used to examine the relationships between these dimensions and reported patient experience. Aggregated scores for each practice were used, comprising the proportion of positive responses to each element of the study. Of eight service quality dimensions identified, six have statistically significant impacts on patient experience but only two have large effects. Patient experience is highly influenced by practice responsiveness and the interactions with the physician. Other dimensions have small or even slightly negative influence. Service quality provided by nurses has negligible effect on patient experience. To improve patient experience in primary health care, efforts should focus on practice responsiveness and interactions with the physician. Other areas have little influence over patient experience. This suggests a gap in patients' perspectives on health care, which has policy implications for patient education. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  14. Studying physician effects on patient outcomes: physician interactional style and performance on quality of care indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Peter; Jerant, Anthony F; Fiscella, Kevin; Shields, Cleveland G; Tancredi, Daniel J; Epstein, Ronald M

    2006-01-01

    Many prior studies which suggest a relationship between physician interactional style and patient outcomes may have been confounded by relying solely on patient reports, examining very few patients per physician, or not demonstrating evidence of a physician effect on the outcomes. We examined whether physician interactional style, measured both by patient report and objective encounter ratings, is related to performance on quality of care indicators. We also tested for the presence of physician effects on the performance indicators. Using data on 100 US primary care physician (PCP) claims data on 1,21,606 of their managed care patients, survey data on 4746 of their visiting patients, and audiotaped encounters of 2 standardized patients with each physician, we examined the relationships between claims-based quality of care indicators and both survey-derived patient perceptions of their physicians and objective ratings of interactional style in the audiotaped standardized patient encounters. Multi-level models examined whether physician effects (variance components) on care indicators were mediated by patient perceptions or objective ratings of interactional style. We found significant physician effects associated with glycohemoglobin and cholesterol testing. There was also a clinically significant association between better patient perceptions of their physicians and more glycohemoglobin testing. Multi-level analyses revealed, however, that the physician effect on glycohemoglobin testing was not mediated by patient perceived physician interaction style. In conclusion, similar to prior studies, we found evidence of an apparent relationship between patient perceptions of their physician and patient outcomes. However, the apparent relationships found in this study between patient perceptions of their physicians and patient care processes do not reflect physician style, but presumably reflect unmeasured patient confounding. Multi-level modeling may contribute to better

  15. Patients living with disabilities: The need for high-quality primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofters, Aisha; Guilcher, Sara; Maulkhan, Niraj; Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    To compare the potential risk factors for lower-quality primary care, the potential markers of unmet needs in primary care, and the willingness to participate in future research among primary care patients with versus without physical disabilities. A waiting room survey using a convenience sample. A family health team (FHT) in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont, with a designated Mobility Clinic. A total of 40 patients seen at the FHT Mobility Clinic and 80 patients from the general patient population of the same FHT. Socioeconomic status and social capital, number of self-reported emergency department visits and hospitalizations in the preceding year, and willingness of the patients in the 2 groups to participate in future research studies. Patients from the Mobility Clinic were more than twice as likely to be receiving benefits or social assistance (75.0% vs 32.1%, P data for research, 82.5% of Mobility Clinic patients agreed versus 55.0% of those in the general patient population (P = .004). In this study, patients with disabilities were at a social disadvantage compared with their peers without disabilities and were more likely to use the emergency department, suggesting that they had unmet health needs. Future research should continue to explore this patient population and to investigate if an interprofessional primary health care team approach focused on patients with disabilities can help to increase quality of care. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  16. Patient-Focused Quality Improvement in Primary Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UNIBEN

    optimal performance) in relation to thresholds of a standard performance ... PHC is a recognised means of quality .... 20.26 The population reference was created ... This was done by calculating ... performance were then used to stratify units'.

  17. Prescription for antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Buregyeya, Esther; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety......-line drug for treatment of pneumonia in children according to the guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: There is urgent need to regulate drug shop practices of prescribing and selling antibiotics, for the safety of patients seeking care at these outlets....

  18. Is failure to meet spiritual needs associated with cancer patients' perceptions of quality of care and their satisfaction with care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrow, Alan B; Wexler, Ann; Texeira, Kenneth; He, M Kai; Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2007-12-20

    Few studies regarding patients' views about spirituality and health care have included patients with cancer who reside in the urban, northeastern United States. Even fewer have investigated the relationship between patients' spiritual needs and perceptions of quality and satisfaction with care. Outpatients (N = 369) completed a questionnaire at the Saint Vincent's Comprehensive Cancer Center in New York, NY. The instrument included the Quality of End-of-Life Care and Satisfaction with Treatment quality-of-care scale and questions about spiritual and religious beliefs and needs. The participants' mean age was 58 years; 65% were female; 67% were white; 65% were college educated; and 32% had breast cancer. Forty-seven percent were Catholic; 19% were Jewish; 16% were Protestant; and 6% were atheist or agnostic. Sixty-six percent reported that they were spiritual but not religious. Only 29% attended religious services at least once per week. Seventy-three percent reported at least one spiritual need; 58% thought it appropriate for physicians to inquire about their spiritual needs. Eighteen percent reported that their spiritual needs were not being met. Only 6% reported that any staff members had inquired about their spiritual needs (0.9% of inquiries by physicians). Patients who reported that their spiritual needs were not being met gave lower ratings of the quality of care (P = .009) and reported lower satisfaction with care (P = .006). Most patients had spiritual needs. A slight majority thought it appropriate to be asked about these needs, although fewer thought this compared with reports in other settings. Few had their spiritual needs addressed by the staff. Patients whose spiritual needs were not met reported lower ratings of quality and satisfaction with care.

  19. Improving the quality of palliative care for ambulatory patients with lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Plessen, Christian; Aslaksen, Aslak

    2005-01-01

    and energy in organisational aspects of care that could be better used in direct interaction with patients. DESIGN: Quality improvement study using direct observation and run and flow charts, and focus group meetings with patients and families regarding perceptions of the clinic and with staff regarding...

  20. The quality of care of diabetic patients in rural Malawi: A case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Quality of diabetes care provided to diabetic patients attended to Mangochi hospital was sub-optimal due to lack of knowledge among patients and clinicians and resources. More efforts are needed towards retention of trained staff, provision of pharmaceutical and laboratory resources and health education.

  1. Patient-reported assessment of quality care at end of life: development and validation of Quality Care Questionnaire-End of Life (QCQ-EOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Young Ho; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Lee, Kyoung-Min; Park, Sang Min; Lee, Chang Geol; Choi, Youn Seon; Lee, Won Sup; Kim, Si-Young; Heo, Dae Seog

    2006-09-01

    Our goal was to validate an instrument with which terminally ill patients could evaluate the quality of care they receive at the end of life (EOL). Questionnaire development followed a four-phase process: item generation and reduction, construction, pilot testing, and field-testing. Using relevance and priority criteria and pilot testing, we developed a 16-item questionnaire. Factor analyses of data from 235 patients resulted in the Quality Care Questionnaire-End of Life (QCQ-EOL) covering dignity-conserving care, care by health care professionals, individualised care, and family relationships. All subscales and total scores showed high internal consistency (Cronbach alpha range, 0.73-0.89). The ability of total score and selective subscale scores clearly differentiated patients on the basis of clinical situation, sense of dignity, and general rating of care quality. Correlations of scores between patients and caregivers were substantial. The QCQ-EOL can be adopted to assess the quality of care received by terminally ill patients.

  2. Technical Quality of Delivered Care for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Tabriz Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Somi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and objectives : Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD is a chronic disease and requires complex treatment. Due to the various treatment options and gradual understanding of specialists about the risks and benefits of different treatments of IBD, delivering care according to the treatment protocols and guidelines is essential. This study was conducted to assess delivered care from the perspective of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Material and Methods : This cross-sectional study was conducted with 94 participants with IBD selected randomly in Emam Reza hospital and Golgasht clinic in Tabriz. Data were collected by an approved researcher-made questionnaire via interviewing patients. Chi-Squared Test was used to evaluate the relationship between demographic variables and accordance of delivered care with standards. SPSS17 was used for data analysis. Results : The results indicated that "visit by specialist" and "providing dietary recommendation by nutritionist" aspects had highest and lowest degree of accordance with standards, respectively. Furthermore, the aspects of “delivered care in exacerbation status of disease” and “delivered care by other specialists” had only 20 percent compliance with standards. Also, there was a significant relationship between age, job, education status, smoking and compliance with related standards in some care aspects (p Conclusion : The study results indicated that there is a deep gap between delivered cares for patients with inflammatory bowel disease and related standards. These deficiencies showed the parts that need improvement and require healthcare managers and policy makers’ attention.

  3. The Impact of Person-Organization Fit on Nurse Job Satisfaction and Patient Care Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risman, K L; Erickson, Rebecca J; Diefendorff, James M

    2016-08-01

    In the current healthcare context, large health care organizations may increasingly emphasize profit, biomedicine, efficiency, and customer service in the delivery of care. This orientation toward nursing work by large organizations may be perceived by nurses as incompatible with professional caring. Ordinary Least Squares regression was used to explore the impact of person-organization fit (i.e., value congruence between self and employing organization) on nurses' general job satisfaction and quality of patient care (n=753). Nurses' perceived person-organization fit is a significant predictor of general job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The implications of our findings are discussed and recommendations for nursing leaders and future research are made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient satisfaction with quality of primary health care in Benghazi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-10-21

    Oct 21, 2010 ... units, and workplaces (1), free of cost and within close proximity. ... and reduce gross inequality in health status. Quality of .... scores of all the items except items 2 and 14 (payment and billing ... Women have been reported to ...

  5. How nurses and their work environment affect patient experiences of the quality of care: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieft, R.A.M.M.; de Brouwer, B.B.J.M.; Francke, A.L.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare organisations monitor patient experiences in order to evaluate and improve the quality of care. Because nurses spend a lot of time with patients, they have a major impact on patient experiences. To improve patient experiences of the quality of care, nurses need to know what

  6. How nurses and their work environment affect patient experiences of the quality of care: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieft, R.A.M.M.; Brouwer, B.B.J.M. de; Francke, A.L.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare organisations monitor patient experiences in order to evaluate and improve the quality of care. Because nurses spend a lot of time with patients, they have a major impact on patient experiences. To improve patient experiences of the quality of care, nurses need to know what

  7. How nurses and their work environment affect patient experiences of the quality of care : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieft, R.A.M.M.; Brouwer, B.J.M.; Francke, A.L.; Delnoij, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare organisations monitor patient experiences in order to evaluate and improve the quality of care. Because nurses spend a lot of time with patients, they have a major impact on patient experiences. To improve patient experiences of the quality of care, nurses need to know what

  8. Evaluating the link between human resource management decisions and patient satisfaction with quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppel, Eva-Maria; Winter, Vera; Schreyögg, Jonas

    Patient satisfaction with quality of care is becoming increasingly important in the competitive hospital market. Simultaneously, the growing shortage of clinical staff poses a considerable challenge to ensuring a high quality of care. In this context, a question emerges regarding whether and how human resource management (HRM) might serve as a means to reduce staff shortage problems and to increase patient satisfaction. Although considerable efforts have been devoted to understanding the concepts of patient satisfaction and HRM, little is known about the interrelationships between these concepts or about the link between staff shortage problems and patients' satisfaction with quality of care. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between strategic human resource management (SHRM), staff shortage problems, and patients' satisfaction with care. Furthermore, we analyze how the HRM decision to fill short-term vacancies through temporary staffing affects patient satisfaction. We differentiate between physicians and nurses. We develop and empirically test a theoretical model. The data (n = 165) are derived from a survey on SHRM that was sent to 732 German hospitals and from a survey on patient satisfaction that comprises 436,848 patient satisfaction ratings. We use a structural equation modeling approach to test the model. The results indicate that SHRM significantly reduces staff shortage problems for both occupational groups. Having fewer physician shortage problems is significantly associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction, whereas this effect is not significant for nurses. Furthermore, the use of temporary staffing considerably reduces patients' satisfaction with care. Hospital managers are advised to consider the effects of HRM decisions on patients' satisfaction with care. In particular, investments in SHRM targeted at physicians have significantly positive effects on patient satisfaction, whereas the temporary staffing of physicians

  9. Crossing the patient-centered divide: transforming health care quality through enhanced faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Richard M; Eddins-Folensbee, Florence; Inui, Thomas S

    2011-04-01

    In the report "Crossing the Quality Chasm," the Institute of Medicine asserted that patient-centered care is one of the six domains of quality. In this article, the authors consider how the patient- and relationship-centered components of quality can be achieved in all aspects of medical care. They suggest that faculty development in three key areas-mindful practice, formation, and training in communication skills-is necessary to achieve patient- and relationship-centeredness.The authors first review the philosophical and scientific foundations of patient-centered and relationship-centered care. They next describe and provide concrete examples to illustrate the underlying theory and practices associated with each of the three faculty development areas. They then propose five key areas for faculty development in patient- and relationship-centered care: (1) making it a central competency in all health care interactions, (2) developing a national curriculum framework, (3) requiring performance metrics for professional development, (4) partnering with national health care organizations to disseminate the curriculum framework, and (5) preserving face-to-face educational methods for delivering key elements of the curriculum. Finally, the authors consider the issues faced in faculty development today in light of the medical education issues Abraham Flexner identified more than a century ago. © by the Association of American Medical Colleges.

  10. [Endorsement of risk management and patient safety by certification of conformity in health care quality assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waßmuth, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Certification of conformity in health care should provide assurance of compliance with quality standards. This also includes risk management and patient safety. Based on a comprehensive definition of quality, beneficial effects on the management of risks and the enhancement of patient safety can be expected from certification of conformity. While these effects have strong face validity, they are currently not sufficiently supported by evidence from health care research. Whether this relates to a lack of evidence or a lack of investigation remains open. Advancing safety culture and "climate", as well as learning from adverse events rely in part on quality management and are at least in part reflected in the certification of healthcare quality. However, again, evidence of the effectiveness of such measures is limited. Moreover, additional factors related to personality, attitude and proactive action of healthcare professionals are crucial factors in advancing risk management and patient safety which are currently not adequately reflected in certification of conformity programs.

  11. [Evaluations by hospital-ward physicians of patient care management quality for patients hospitalized after an emergency department admission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartiaux, M; Mols, P

    2017-01-01

    patient management in the acute and sub-acute setting of an Emergency Department is challenging. An assessment of the quality of provided care enables an evaluation of failings. It contributes to the identification of areas for improvement. to obtain an analysis, by hospital-ward physicians, of adult patient care management quality, as well as of the correctness of diagnosis made during emergency admissions. To evaluate the consequences of inadequate patient care management on morbidity, mortality and cost and duration of hospitalization. prospective data analysis obtained between the 1/12/2009 and the 21/12/2009 from physicians using a questionnaire on adult-patient emergency admissions and subsequent hospitalization. questionnaires were completed for 332 patients. Inadequate management of patient care were reported for 73/332 (22 %) cases. Incorrect diagnoses were reported for 20/332 (6 %) cases. 35 cases of inadequate care management (10.5 % overall) were associated with morbidity (34 cases) or mortality (1 case), including 4 cases (1.2 % ) that required emergency intensive-care or surgical interventions. this quality study analyzed the percentage of patient management cases and incorrect diagnoses in the emergency department. The data for serious outcome and wrong diagnosis are comparable with current literature. To improve performance, we consider the process for establishing a diagnosis and therapeutic care.

  12. Patient-focused quality improvement in primary health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Secondary analyses of data obtained from a cross-sectional national representative exit survey of patients' experiences of PHC which was conducted with the PES. The PES QUALISTAT is an array of analytic procedures and approaches for presenting data on PHC performance. Colour coding of performance (red ...

  13. Impact of physician specialty on quality care for patients hospitalized with decompensated cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Lim

    Full Text Available Decompensated cirrhosis is a common precipitant for hospitalization, and there is limited information concerning factors that influence the delivery of quality care in cirrhotic inpatients. We sought to determine the relation between physician specialty and inpatient quality care for decompensated cirrhosis.We reviewed 247 hospital admissions for decompensated cirrhosis, managed by hospitalists or intensivists, between 2009 and 2013. The primary outcome was quality care delivery, defined as adherence to all evidence-based specialty society practice guidelines pertaining to each specific complication of cirrhosis. Secondary outcomes included new complications, length-of-stay, and in-hospital death.Overall, 147 admissions (59.5% received quality care. Quality care was given more commonly by intensivists, compared with hospitalists (71.7% vs. 53.1%, P = .006, and specifically for gastrointestinal bleeding (72% vs. 45.8%, P = .03 and hepatic encephalopathy (100% vs. 63%, P = .005. Involvement of gastroenterology consultation was also more common in admissions in which quality care was administered (68.7% vs. 54.0%, P = .023. Timely diagnostic paracentesis was associated with reduced new complications in admissions for refractory ascites (9.5% vs. 46.6%, P = .02, and reduced length-of-stay in admissions for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (5 days vs. 13 days, P = .02.Adherence to quality indicators for decompensated cirrhosis is suboptimal among hospitalized patients. Although quality care adherence appears to be higher among cirrhotic patients managed by intensivists than by hospitalists, opportunities for improvement exist in both groups. Rational and cost-effective strategies should be sought to achieve this end.

  14. Quality of care for patients with non-communicable diseases in the Dedza District, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Wood

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Malawi, non-communicable diseases (NCDs are thought to cause 28% of deaths in adults. The aim of this study was to establish the extent of primary care morbidity related to NCDs, as well as to audit the quality of care, in the primary care setting of Dedza District, central Malawi. Methods: This study was a baseline audit using clinic registers and a questionnaire survey of senior health workers at 5 clinics, focusing on care for hypertension, diabetes, asthma and epilepsy. Results: A total of 82 581 consultations were recorded, of which 2489 (3.0% were for the selected NCDs. Only 5 out of 32 structural criteria were met at all 5 clinics and 9 out of 29process criteria were never performed at any clinic. The only process criteria performed at all five clinics was measurement of blood pressure. The staff’s knowledge on NCDs was basic and the main barriers to providing quality care were lack of medication and essential equipment, inadequate knowledge and guidelines, fee-for-service at two clinics, geographic inaccessibility and lack of confidence in the primary health care system by patients. Conclusion: Primary care morbidity from NCDs is currently low, although other studies suggest a significant burden of disease. This most likely represents a lack of utilisation, recognition, diagnosis and ability to manage patients with NCDs. Quality of care is poor due to a lack of essential resources, guidelines, and training.

  15. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world.In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care.I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  16. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC)/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world. In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care. I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  17. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world. In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care. I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  18. Measuring nursing essential contributions to quality patient care outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgast, Kelly A; Taylor, Katherine; Garcia, Dawn; Watkins, Miko

    2011-01-01

    Workload Management System for Nursing (WMSN) is a core Army Medical Department business system that has provided near real-time, comprehensive nursing workload and manpower data for decision making at all levels for over 25 years. The Army Manpower Requirements and Documentation Agency populates data from WMSN into the Manpower Staffing Standards System (Inpatient module within Automated Staffing Assessment Model). The current system, Workload Management System for Nursing Internet (WMSNi), is an interim solution that requires additional functionalities for modernization and integration at the enterprise level. The expanding missions and approved requirements for WMSNi support strategic initiatives on the Army Medical Command balanced scorecard and require continued sustainment for multiple personnel and manpower business processes for both inpatient and outpatient nursing care. This system is currently being leveraged by the TRICARE Management Activity as an interim multiservice solution, and is being used at 24 Army medical treatment facilities. The evidenced-based information provided to Army decision makers through the methods used in the WMSNi will be essential across the Army Medical Command throughout the system's life cycle.

  19. Evaluation of Quality of Life and Care Needs of Turkish Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

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    Neslisah Yasar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive study explored the quality of life and care needs of Turkish patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study sample consisted of 100 hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Their quality of life was assessed using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant Scale. The mean patient age was 44.99 ± 13.92 years. Changes in sexual functions, loss of hair, loss of taste, loss of appetite, and sleep disturbances were the most common symptoms. The quality of life of transplant patients was moderately affected; the functional well-being and social/family well-being subscales were the most adversely and least negatively affected (12.13 ± 6.88 dimensions, respectively. Being female, being between 50 and 59 years of age, being single, having a chronic disease, and having a history of hospitalization were associated with lower quality of life scores. Interventions to improve functional status, physical well-being, and emotional status of patients during the transplantation process may help patients cope with treatment-related impairments more effectively. Frequent screening and management of patient symptoms in order to help patients adapt to life following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are crucial for meeting care needs and developing strategies to improve their quality of life.

  20. Determining the quality and effectiveness of surgical spine care: patient satisfaction is not a valid proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godil, Saniya S; Parker, Scott L; Zuckerman, Scott L; Mendenhall, Stephen K; Devin, Clinton J; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J

    2013-09-01

    Given the unsustainable costs of the US health-care system, health-care purchasers, payers, and hospital systems are adopting the concept of value-based purchasing by shifting care away from low-quality providers or hospitals. Legislation now allows public reporting of these quality rankings. True measures of quality, such as surgical morbidity and validated questionnaires of effectiveness, are burdensome and costly to collect. Hence, patients' satisfaction with care has emerged as a commonly used metric as a proxy for quality because of its feasibility of collection. However, patient satisfaction metrics have yet to be validated as a measure of overall quality of surgical spine care. We set out to determine whether patient satisfaction is a valid measure of safety and effectiveness of care in a prospective longitudinal spine registry. Prospective longitudinal cohort study. All patients undergoing elective spine surgery for degenerative conditions over a 6-month period at a single medical center. Patient-reported outcome instruments (numeric rating scale [NRS], Oswestry disability index [ODI], neck disability index [NDI], short-form 12-item survey [SF-12], Euro-Qol-5D [EQ-5D], Zung depression scale, and Modified Somatic Perception Questionnaire [MSPQ] anxiety scale), return to work, patient satisfaction with outcome, and patient satisfaction with provider care. All patients undergoing elective spine surgery for degenerative conditions over a 6-month period at a single medical center were enrolled into a prospective longitudinal registry. Data collected on all patients included demographics, disease characteristics, treatment variables, readmissions/reoperations, and all 90-day surgical morbidity. Patient-reported outcome instruments (NRS, ODI, NDI, SF-12, EQ-5D, Zung depression scale, and MSPQ anxiety scale), return to work, patient satisfaction with outcome, and patient satisfaction with provider care were recorded at baseline and 3 months after treatment

  1. Patient Satisfaction and Perceived Quality of Care Among Older Adults According to Activity Limitation Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Hillary R.; de Vries McClintock, Heather F.; Hennessy, Sean; Kurichi, Jibby E.; Streim, Joel E.; Xie, Dawei; Pezzin, Liliana E.; Kwong, Pui L.; Stineman, Margaret G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine whether patient satisfaction and perceived quality of medical care was related to stages of activity limitations among older adults. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) for calendar years 2001-2011. PARTICIPANTS A population-based sample (n= 42,584) of persons 65 years of age and older living in the community. INTERVENTIONS Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S) MCBS questions were categorized under 5 patient satisfaction and perceived quality dimensions: care coordination and quality, access barriers, technical skills of primary care physicians, interpersonal skills of primary care physicians, and quality of information provided by primary care physicians. Persons were classified into a stage of activity limitation (0-IV) derived from self-reported difficulty levels performing activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). RESULTS Compared to older beneficiaries with no limitations at ADL Stage 0, the adjusted odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals (CI)) for Stage I (mild) to Stage III (severe) for satisfaction with care coordination and quality ranged from OR = 0.85 (95% CI: 0.80-0.92) to OR = 0.79 (95% CI: 0.70-0.89). Compared to ADL Stage 0, satisfaction with access barriers ranged from OR = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.76-0.87) at Stage I (mild) to a minimum of OR = 0.67 (95% CI: 0.59-0.76) at Stage III (severe). Similarly, compared to older beneficiaries at ADL Stage 0, perceived quality of the technical skills of their primary care physician ranged from OR = 0.87 (95% CI: 0.82-0.94) at Stage I (mild) to a minimum of OR = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.72-0.91) at Stage III (severe). CONCLUSIONS Medicare beneficiaries at higher stages of activity limitation although not necessarily the highest stage of activity limitation reported less satisfaction with medical care. PMID:26119464

  2. Improving patient care through student leadership in team quality improvement projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschannen, Dana; Aebersold, Michelle; Kocan, Mary Jo; Lundy, Francene; Potempa, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    In partnership with a major medical center, senior-level nursing students completed a root cause analysis and implementation plan to address a unit-specific quality issue. To evaluate the project, unit leaders were asked their perceptions of the value of the projects and impact on patient care, as well as to provide exemplars depicting how the student root cause analysis work resulted in improved patient outcome and/or unit processes. Liaisons noted benefits of having an RCA team, with positive impact on patient outcomes and care processes.

  3. Quality Indicators for In-Hospital Pharmaceutical Care of Dutch Elderly Patients Development and Validation of an ACOVE-Based Quality Indicator Set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, Peter C.; Klopotowska, Joanna E.; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; van Kan, Hendrikus J.; Bijleveld, Yuma A.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In 2001, the ACOVE (Assessing Care Of Vulnerable Elders) quality indicators (QIs) were developed in the US to measure the quality of care of vulnerable elderly patients. However, the ACOVE QI set was developed mainly to assess the overall quality of care of community-dwelling vulnerable

  4. The "Palliative Care Quality of Life Instrument (PQLI" in terminal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouvaris John

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the development of a new quality of life instrument in advanced cancer patients receiving palliative care. Methods The Palliative Care Quality of Life Instrument incorporates six multi-item and one single-item scale. The questionnaire was completed at baseline and one-week after. The final sample consisted of 120 patients. Results The average time required to complete the questionnaire, in both time points, was approximately 8 minutes. All multi-item scales met the minimal standards for reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficient ≥.70 either before or during palliative treatment. Test-retest reliability in terms of Spearman-rho coefficient was also satisfactory (p Conclusion The PQLI is a reliable and valid measure for the assessment of quality of life in patients with advanced stage cancer.

  5. Health-related quality of life in patients by COPD severity within primary care in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, P. W.; Brusselle, G.; Dal Negro, R. W.; Ferrer, M.; Kardos, P.; Levy, M. L.; Perez, T.; Soler-Cataluna, J. J.; van der Molen, T.; Adamek, L.; Banik, N.

    Pan-European data on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are lacking. This cross-sectional epidemiological study evaluated health status in 1817 COPD patients from an 'all-comers' primary care population in seven European countries (87% stable

  6. How wide is the gap in defining quality care? Comparison of patient and nurse perceptions of important aspects of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W B; Minnick, A F; Marcantonio, R

    1996-05-01

    The authors determine the importance that patients, nurses, and nurse managers place on aspects of care and measure nurses' care values based on their perceptions of their patients and nurse manager care values and their desire to meet these care expectations. The literature has documented gaps in how nurses and patients define quality and value specific care aspects, but little is known about the situation in the current continuous quality improvement and patient-centered care environment, which emphasizes a customer focus. Misunderstanding patients' values and expectations may impede service improvement. Information about any existing gaps could help managers begin to devise patient satisfaction improvement strategies. Two thousand fifty-one medical-surgical patients, 1264 staff members, and 97 nurse managers from 17 randomly selected hospitals participated in study activities related to selected aspects of patient care. Trained interviewers surveyed patients by telephone within 26 days of discharge using a pretested instrument. Staff members and managers completed a coordinated written tool. Descriptive and correlational statistics were used in individual and unit-level analyses. Staff members perceive correctly that patients value differently various aspects of care but do not agree with their managers on patients' value of aspects of care. Unit staff members' and managers' beliefs regarding patients' care values did not match those of their patients (-14 to 0.11 and -0.01 to 0.06 zero order correlations, respectively). A unit's errors in defining patients' values may be self-reinforcing. Strategies to reorient personnel, including adoption of those suggested by the diffusion of innovation literature, may help bridge the gap and change practice.

  7. Assessment of patient satisfaction with acute pain management service: Monitoring quality of care in clinical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fizzah Farooq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Assessment of patient satisfaction is an important tool for monitoring the quality of care in hospitals. The aim of this survey was to develop a reliable tool to assess patient satisfaction with acute pain management service (APMS and identify variables affecting this so that care can be improved. Methods: A questionnaire was developed and administered to  patients after being discharged from APMS care by an unbiased person. Data collected from record included patient demographics, surgical procedure, analgesic modality, co-analgesics and dynamic and static pain scores. Questions included pain expected and pain experienced, APMS response time, quality of pain relief with treatment, professionalism of APMS team, overall experience of pain relief and choosing/suggesting same modality for themselves/family/friends again. Five-point Likert scale was used for most of the options. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 19. Results: Frequency and percentages were computed for qualitative observation and presented on pie chart and histogram. Seventy-one per cent patients expected severe pain while 43% actually experienced it. About 79.4% would choose same analgesia modality in future for self/family/friends. Ninety-nine per cent found APMS staff courteous and professional. About 89% rated their experience of pain management as excellent to very good. Conclusion: The survey of patients′ satisfaction to monitor the quality of care provided by APMS provided positive inputs on its role. This also helps to identify areas requiring improvement in care and as a tool to gauge the quality of care.

  8. Patient-reported quality indicators for osteoarthritis: a patient and public generated self-report measure for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Steven; Higginbottom, Adele; Taylor, Robert; Bird, Jo; Østerås, Nina; Hagen, Kåre Birger; Edwards, John J; Jordan, Kelvin P; Jinks, Clare; Dziedzic, Krysia

    2016-01-01

    People with osteoarthritis desire high quality care, support and information. However, the quality of care for people with OA in general practice is not routinely collected. Quality Indicators can be used to benefit patients by measuring whether minimum standards of quality care are being met from a patient perspective. The aim of this study was to describe how a Research User Group (RUG) worked alongside researchers to co-produce a set of self-reported quality indicators for people with osteoarthritis when visiting their general practitioner or practice nurse (primary care). These were required in the MOSAICS study, which developed and evaluated a new model of supported self-management of OA to implement the NICE quality standards for OA. This article describes the public involvement in the MOSAICS study. This was 1) the co-development by RUG members and researchers of an Osteoarthritis Quality Indicators United Kingdom (OA QI (UK)) questionnaire for use in primary care, and 2) the comparison of the OA QI (UK) with a similar questionnaire developed in Norway. This study shows how important and effective a research user group can be in working with researchers in developing quality care indicators for osteoarthritis for use in a research study and, potentially, routine use in primary care. The questionnaire is intended to benefit patients by enabling the assessment of the quality of primary care for osteoarthritis from a patient's perspective. The OA QI (UK) has been used to examine differences in the quality of osteoarthritis care in four European countries. Background People with osteoarthritis (OA) desire high quality care, support and information about OA. However, the quality of care for people with OA in general practice is not routinely collected. Quality Indicators (QI) can be used to benefit patients by measuring whether minimum standards of quality care (e.g. NICE quality standards) are being met from a patient perspective. A Research User Group (RUG

  9. Use of multiple methods to determine factors affecting quality of care of patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khunti, K

    1999-10-01

    The process of care of patients with diabetes is complex; however, GPs are playing a greater role in its management. Despite the research evidence, the quality of care of patients with diabetes is variable. In order to improve care, information is required on the obstacles faced by practices in improving care. Qualitative and quantitative methods can be used for formation of hypotheses and the development of survey procedures. However, to date few examples exist in general practice research on the use of multiple methods using both quantitative and qualitative techniques for hypothesis generation. We aimed to determine information on all factors that may be associated with delivery of care to patients with diabetes. Factors for consideration on delivery of diabetes care were generated by multiple qualitative methods including brainstorming with health professionals and patients, a focus group and interviews with key informants which included GPs and practice nurses. Audit data showing variations in care of patients with diabetes were used to stimulate the brainstorming session. A systematic literature search focusing on quality of care of patients with diabetes in primary care was also conducted. Fifty-four potential factors were identified by multiple methods. Twenty (37.0%) were practice-related factors, 14 (25.9%) were patient-related factors and 20 (37.0%) were organizational factors. A combination of brainstorming and the literature review identified 51 (94.4%) factors. Patients did not identify factors in addition to those identified by other methods. The complexity of delivery of care to patients with diabetes is reflected in the large number of potential factors identified in this study. This study shows the feasibility of using multiple methods for hypothesis generation. Each evaluation method provided unique data which could not otherwise be easily obtained. This study highlights a way of combining various traditional methods in an attempt to overcome the

  10. Optimizing Quality of Care and Patient Safety in Malaysia: The Current Global Initiatives, Gaps and Suggested Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Jarrar, Mu?taman; Rahman, Hamzah Abdul; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Demand for health care service has significantly increased, while the quality of healthcare and patient safety has become national and international priorities. This paper aims to identify the gaps and the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. Design: Review of the current literature. Highly cited articles were used as the basis to retrieve and review the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patie...

  11. Patients characteristics and perception of quality of care in a teaching hospital in Anambra State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelumadu, O F; Ndulue, C N

    2012-01-01

    Patients' assessment of quality of health care despite its importance in uptake of available services has not been closely examined in developing countries. The main objective of this study was to assess patient's perception of the quality of healthcare services as offered at the General Outpatients Department (GOPD) of a teaching hospital in order to obtain rational information for effective policy formulation on improved patient care in our hospitals. This was a four-week duration descriptive cross-sectional study involving three hundred and ninety (390) new adult patients seen at the General Out-Patients' Department of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi. Using a self-administered pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire in English language, relevant information was obtained from the participants. A total of 390 adult new patients with mean age 31.4 years participated in the study of which females 216 (55.5%) were slightly more than males 174 (45.5%). About 225 (57.7%) of the respondents received at most a primary school education. The major reasons for seeking care at the GOPD were expectations of being attended to by qualified doctors and nurses (38%); receiving efficient and quality service (36%) and obtaining cheaper and affordable drugs (14.5%). A quarter ofthe patients (25%) waited for up to one hour to register, while 38% spent more than an hour before being attended to by a doctor. Seventy percent (70%) of thepatients opined that the nurses were friendly, 94.5% of the patients rated the doctors as being friendly while 82.5% expressed satisfaction with the care received from the doctors. The conditions of the waiting hall were deemed very comfortable by 42%,and 42% felt hat it was uncomfortable. In all 79% of the patients felt at the quality of care was good and 82% were willing to return for consultations in future if need be. The waiting time for obtaining the patients card and doctors' consultation appeared to be acceptably long in this

  12. Improving the quality of care of patients with rheumatic disease using patient-centric electronic redesign software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Eric D; Lerch, Virginia; Billet, Jon; Berger, Andrea; Kirchner, H Lester

    2015-04-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are not optimized for chronic disease management. To improve the quality of care for patients with rheumatic disease, we developed electronic data capture, aggregation, display, and documentation software. The software integrated and reassembled information from the patient (via a touchscreen questionnaire), nurse, physician, and EHR into a series of actionable views. Core functions included trends over time, rheumatology-related demographics, and documentation for patient and provider. Quality measures collected included patient-reported outcomes, disease activity, and function. The software was tested and implemented in 3 rheumatology departments, and integrated into routine care delivery. Post-implementation evaluation measured adoption, efficiency, productivity, and patient perception. Over 2 years, 6,725 patients completed 19,786 touchscreen questionnaires. The software was adopted for use by 86% of patients and rheumatologists. Chart review and documentation time trended downward, and productivity increased by 26%. Patient satisfaction, activation, and adherence remained unchanged, although pre-implementation values were high. A strong correlation was seen between use of the software and disease control (weighted Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.5927, P = 0.0095), and a relative increase in patients with low disease activity of 3% per quarter was noted. We describe innovative software that aggregates, stores, and displays information vital to improving the quality of care for patients with chronic rheumatic disease. The software was well-adopted by patients and providers. Post-implementation, significant improvements in quality of care, efficiency of care, and productivity were demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Improving the Quality of Care for Patients Diagnosed With Glioma During the Perioperative Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riblet, Natalie B.V.; Schlosser, Evelyn M.; Homa, Karen; Snide, Jennifer A.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Simmons, Nathan E.; Sargent, David H.; Mason, Linda P.; Cooney, Tobi J.; Kennedy, Nancy L.; Fadul, Camilo E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although there is agreement on the oncologic management of patients with glioma, few guidelines exist to standardize other aspects of care, including supportive care. Methods: A quality improvement (QI) project was chartered to improve the care provided to patients with glioma. A multidisciplinary team was convened and identified 10 best-practice measures. Using a plan-do-study-act framework, the team brainstormed and implemented various improvement interventions between June 2011 and October 2012. Statistical process control charts were used to evaluate progress. A dashboard of quality measures was generated to allow for ongoing measurement and reporting. Results: The retrospective assessment phase consisted of 43 patients with diagnosis of glioma. A manual medical record review for these patients showed that compliance with 10 best-practice measures ranged from 23% to 100%. Several factors contributed to less-than-ideal process performance, including poor communication among disciplines and lack of familiarity with the larger system of care. After implementing improvement interventions, performance was measured in 96 consecutive patients with glioma. The proportion of patients who met criteria for 10 practice measures significantly improved (pre-QI work, 63%; post-QI work, 85%; P = .003). The largest improvement was observed in the measure assessing for preoperative notification of the neuro-oncology program (pre-QI work, 39%; post-QI work, 97%; P sustaining process improvements. PMID:25294392

  14. Harnessing implementation science to improve care quality and patient safety: a systematic review of targeted literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Marks, Danielle; Taylor, Natalie

    2014-06-01

    Getting greater levels of evidence into practice is a key problem for health systems, compounded by the volume of research produced. Implementation science aims to improve the adoption and spread of research evidence. A linked problem is how to enhance quality of care and patient safety based on evidence when care settings are complex adaptive systems. Our research question was: according to the implementation science literature, which common implementation factors are associated with improving the quality and safety of care for patients? We conducted a targeted search of key journals to examine implementation science in the quality and safety domain applying PRISMA procedures. Fifty-seven out of 466 references retrieved were considered relevant following the application of exclusion criteria. Included articles were subjected to content analysis. Three reviewers extracted and documented key characteristics of the papers. Grounded theory was used to distil key features of the literature to derive emergent success factors. Eight success factors of implementation emerged: preparing for change, capacity for implementation-people, capacity for implementation-setting, types of implementation, resources, leverage, desirable implementation enabling features, and sustainability. Obstacles in implementation are the mirror image of these: for example, when people fail to prepare, have insufficient capacity for implementation or when the setting is resistant to change, then care quality is at risk, and patient safety can be compromised. This review of key studies in the quality and safety literature discusses the current state-of-play of implementation science applied to these domains. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  15. Assessing decision quality in patient-centred care requires a preference-sensitive measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltoft, Mette; Cunich, Michelle; Salkeld, Glenn; Dowie, Jack

    2014-01-01

    A theory-based instrument for measuring the quality of decisions made using any form of decision technology, including both decision-aided and unaided clinical consultations is required to enable person- and patient-centred care and to respond positively to individual heterogeneity in the value aspects of decision making. Current instruments using the term ‘decision quality’ have adopted a decision- and thus condition-specific approach. We argue that patient-centred care requires decision quality to be regarded as both preference-sensitive across multiple relevant criteria and generic across all conditions and decisions. MyDecisionQuality is grounded in prescriptive multi criteria decision analysis and employs a simple expected value algorithm to calculate a score for the quality of a decision that combines, in the clinical case, the patient’s individual preferences for eight quality criteria (expressed as importance weights) and their ratings of the decision just taken on each of these criteria (expressed as performance rates). It thus provides an index of decision quality that encompasses both these aspects. It also provides patients with help in prioritizing quality criteria for future decision making by calculating, for each criterion, the Incremental Value of Perfect Rating, that is, the increase in their decision quality score that would result if their performance rating on the criterion had been 100%, weightings unchanged. MyDecisionQuality, which is a web-based generic and preference-sensitive instrument, can constitute a key patient-reported measure of the quality of the decision-making process. It can provide the basis for future decision improvement, especially when the clinician (or other stakeholders) completes the equivalent instrument and the extent and nature of concordance and discordance can be established. Apart from its role in decision preparation and evaluation, it can also provide real time and relevant documentation for the patient

  16. Patient quality of life in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions program: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faucher J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Joshua Faucher,1 Jordan Rosedahl,2 Dawn Finnie,3 Amy Glasgow,3 Paul Takahashi4 1Mayo Medical School, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 2Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Science Research, Mayo Clinic, 3Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, 4Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Background: Transitional care programs are common interventions aimed at reducing medical complications and associated readmissions for patients recently discharged from the hospital. While organizations strive to reduce readmissions, another important related metric is patient quality of life (QoL. Aims: To compare the relationship between QoL in patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions (MCCT program versus usual care, and to determine if QoL changed in MCCT participants between baseline and 1-year follow-up. Methods: A baseline survey was mailed to MCCT enrollees in March 2013. Those who completed a baseline survey were sent a follow-up survey 1 year later. A cross-sectional survey of usual care participants was mailed in November 2013. We included in our analysis 199 participants (83 in the MCCT and 116 in usual care aged over 60 years with multiple comorbidities and receiving primary care. Primary outcomes were self-rated QoL; secondary outcomes included self-reported general, physical, and mental health. Intra- and intergroup comparisons of patients were evaluated using Pearson’s chi-squared analysis. Results: MCCT participants had more comorbidities and higher elder risk assessment scores than those receiving usual care. At baseline, 74% of MCCT participants reported responses of good-to-excellent QoL compared to 64% after 1 year (P=0.16. Between MCCT and usual care, there was no significant difference in self-reported QoL (P=0.21. Between baseline and follow-up in MCCT patients, and compared to usual care, there were no significant

  17. Quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care and in outpatient treatment

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    Mihanović M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mate Mihanović,1,2 Branka Restek-Petrović,1,2 Anamarija Bogović,1 Ena Ivezić,1 Davor Bodor,1 Ivan Požgain3 1Psychiatric Hospital “Sveti Ivan”, Zagreb, 2Faculty of Medicine Osijek, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, 3Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Center Osijek, Osijek, Croatia Background: The Sveti Ivan Psychiatric Hospital in Zagreb, Croatia, offers foster home care treatment that includes pharmacotherapy, group psychodynamic psychotherapy, family therapy, and work and occupational therapy. The aim of this study is to compare the health-related quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care with that of patients in standard outpatient treatment. Methods: The sample consisted of 44 patients with schizophrenia who, upon discharge from the hospital, were included in foster home care treatment and a comparative group of 50 patients who returned to their families and continued receiving outpatient treatment. All patients completed the Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire on the day they completed hospital treatment, 6 months later, and 1 year after they participated in the study. The research also included data on the number of hospitalizations for both groups of patients. Results: Though directly upon discharge from the hospital, patients who entered foster home care treatment assessed their health-related quality of life as poorer than patients who returned to their families, their assessments significantly improved over time. After 6 months of treatment, these patients even achieved better results in several dimensions than did patients in the outpatient program, and they also had fewer hospitalizations. These effects remained the same at the follow-up 1 year after the inclusion in the study. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that treatment in foster home care is associated with an improvement in the quality of life of patients

  18. Editorial: Advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve the quality and safety of patient care

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    Elizabeth M. Borycki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal is dedicated to describing “Advances in Healthcare Provider and Patient Training to Improve the Quality and Safety of Patient Care.” Patient safety is an important and fundamental requirement of ensuring the quality of patient care. Training and education has been identified as a key to improving healthcare provider patient safety competencies especially when working with new technologies such as electronic health records and mobile health applications. Such technologies can be harnessed to improve patient safety; however, if not used properly they can negatively impact on patient safety. In this issue we focus on advances in training that can improve patient safety and the optimal use of new technologies in healthcare. For example, use of clinical simulations and online computer based training can be employed both to facilitate learning about new clinical discoveries as well as to integrate technology into day to day healthcare practices. In this issue we are publishing papers that describe advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve patient safety as it relates to the use of educational technologies, health information technology and on-line health resources. In addition, in the special issue we describe new approaches to training and patient safety including, online communities, clinical simulations, on-the-job training, computer based training and health information systems that educate about and support safer patient care in real-time (i.e. when health professionals are providing care to patients. These educational and technological initiatives can be aimed at health professionals (i.e. students and those who are currently working in the field. The outcomes of this work are significant as they lead to safer care for patients and their family members. The issue has both theoretical and applied papers that describe advances in patient

  19. Health related quality of life and care dependency among elderly hospital patients: an international comparison.

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    Dijkstra, Ate; Hakverdioğlu, Gülendam; Muszalik, Marta; Andela, Richtsje; Korhan, Esra Akın; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia

    2015-03-01

    Many countries in Europe and the world have to cope with an aging population. Although health policy in many countries aims at increasing disability-free life expectancy, elderly patients represent a significant proportion of all patients admitted to different hospital departments. The aim of the research was to investigate the relationship between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the care dependency status among elderly hospital patients. In 2012, a descriptive survey was administered to a convenience sample of 325 elderly hospital patients (> 60 years) from The Netherlands (N = 125), from Poland (N = 100), and from Turkey (N = 100). We employed the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) Measurement System and the Care Dependency Scale. FACIT is a collection of HRQOL questionnaires that assess multidimensional health status in people with various chronic illnesses. From demographic variables, gender (female) (r = -0.13, p < 0.05), age and informal care given by family members (r = -0.27 to 0.27, p < 0.01) were significantly correlated with the care dependency status for the whole samples. All HRQOL variables, hearing aid and duration of illness correlated with care dependency status (r = -0.20 to 0.50, p < 0.01). Moreover, the FACIT sum score (Poland and Turkey) and functional wellbeing (The Netherlands) are significantly associated with the decrease in care dependency status. Thus, the FACIT variables are the most powerful indicators for care dependency. The study provides healthcare professionals insight into improvement of quality of care in all three countries.

  20. Linking Six Sigma to simulation: a new roadmap to improve the quality of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Giovanni; Costa, Antonio; Fichera, Sergio; Tringali, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Improving the quality of patient care is a challenge that calls for a multidisciplinary approach, embedding a broad spectrum of knowledge and involving healthcare professionals from diverse backgrounds. The purpose of this paper is to present an innovative approach that implements discrete-event simulation (DES) as a decision-supporting tool in the management of Six Sigma quality improvement projects. A roadmap is designed to assist quality practitioners and health care professionals in the design and successful implementation of simulation models within the define-measure-analyse-design-verify (DMADV) or define-measure-analyse-improve-control (DMAIC) Six Sigma procedures. A case regarding the reorganisation of the flow of emergency patients affected by vertigo symptoms was developed in a large town hospital as a preliminary test of the roadmap. The positive feedback from professionals carrying out the project looks promising and encourages further roadmap testing in other clinical settings. The roadmap is a structured procedure that people involved in quality improvement can implement to manage projects based on the analysis and comparison of alternative scenarios. The role of Six Sigma philosophy in improvement of the quality of healthcare services is recognised both by researchers and by quality practitioners; discrete-event simulation models are commonly used to improve the key performance measures of patient care delivery. The two approaches are seldom referenced and implemented together; however, they could be successfully integrated to carry out quality improvement programs. This paper proposes an innovative approach to bridge the gap and enrich the Six Sigma toolbox of quality improvement procedures with DES.

  1. Obstetric patients' health-related quality of life before and after intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pia, Seppänen; Reijo, Sund; Tero, Ala-Kokko; Mervi, Roos; Jukka, Uotila; Mika, Helminen; Tarja, Suominen

    2018-03-23

    Intensive care admissions during pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum period are relatively well investigated. However, very little is known about these obstetric patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) before and after critical care. The objective of this study was to assess obstetric patients' HRQoL before intensive care admission (baseline) and at 6 months after discharge (follow-up) DESIGN: This was a retrospective database study. In a 5-year period, the data of all women admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) during pregnancy, delivery, or up to 42 days postpartum were analysed. Four multidisciplinary ICUs of Finnish University hospitals participated. The HRQoL was assessed using the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) instrument with utility score (EQsum) and visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS). A total of 283 obstetric patients were identified from the clinical information system. Of these, 99 (35%) completed the EQ-5D questionnaires both at baseline and follow-up, and 65 of them (23%) completed EQ-VAS. The comparison of patients' EQsum scores before intensive care admission and after discharge showed that patients' HRQoL remained good (0.970 vs 0.972) (max 1.0) or increased (0.788 vs 0.982) in 80.8% of the patients. Patients reported improved overall health on the EQ-VAS at 6 months follow-up (EQ-VAS mean, 71.86 vs 88.20; p ≤ 0.001) (max 100). However, 19.2% of the patients had lower HRQoL (EQsum mean 0.987 vs 0.798) at follow-up. Following intensive care, 15% of the patients had more pain/discomfort, and 11% expressed more depression/anxiety. Multiparous patients were more likely to suffer from worsened depression/anxiety (p = 0.024). In the majority of the obstetric patients, HRQoL at 6 months follow-up remained good or had increased from baseline. However, nearly one-fifth of the patients had impaired HRQoL after discharge. Thus, intensive care management should take in to consideration follow-up program after intensive care of ICU-admitted obstetric

  2. Impact of Information Technology, Clinical Resource Constraints, and Patient-Centered Practice Characteristics on Quality of Care

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    JongDeuk Baek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Factors in the practice environment, such as health information technology (IT infrastructure, availability of other clinical resources, and financial incentives, may influence whether practices are able to successfully implement the patient-centered medical home (PCMH model and realize its benefits. This study investigates the impacts of those PCMH-related elements on primary care physicians’ perception of quality of care. Methods: A multiple logistic regression model was estimated using the 2004 to 2005 CTS Physician Survey, a national sample of salaried primary care physicians (n = 1733. Results: The patient-centered practice environment and availability of clinical resources increased physicians’ perceived quality of care. Although IT use for clinical information access did enhance physicians’ ability to provide high quality of care, a similar positive impact of IT use was not found for e-prescribing or the exchange of clinical patient information. Lack of resources was negatively associated with physician perception of quality of care. Conclusion: Since health IT is an important foundation of PCMH, patient-centered practices are more likely to have health IT in place to support care delivery. However, despite its potential to enhance delivery of primary care, simply making health IT available does not necessarily translate into physicians’ perceptions that it enhances the quality of care they provide. It is critical for health-care managers and policy makers to ensure that primary care physicians fully recognize and embrace the use of new technology to improve both the quality of care provided and the patient outcomes.

  3. Social integration and the quality of life of schizophrenic patients in different types of complementary care.

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    Leisse, M; Kallert, T W

    2000-12-01

    Following reunification in Germany in 1990 the new states in the Federal Republic faced the task of restructuring and rebuilding the structures of complementary care for the chronically mentally ill. First and foremost, residential facilities had to be established that would correspond to and meet the currently high need for de-hospitalization by making different types of care and care concepts available. Five groups of patients with chronic schizophrenic psychoses (N = 245 patients) who live in different types of psychiatric care facilities (psychiatric nursing home, social therapeutic hostel, sheltered community residence) or at home, either with or without a family network, were studied. In addition to the sociodemographic data, the psychopathology and the extent of social disabilities were also surveyed, as well as data on the living situation and the subjective quality of life with an emphasis on 'social relationships', 'recreation/leisure activities', and 'general independence'. The five groups differed with regard to various sociodemographic and disorder-related variables, particularly with regard to the extent of social disabilities. Especially relevant, however, are the differences among the patient groups in the extent of daily social life and recreational/leisure activities that are partially reflected in their statements on the subjective quality of life. Primarily for the two groups of home residents, but also in part for the patients living in sheltered community care, social contacts are more or less limited to the residential situation and patients are more or less otherwise socially isolated. This is due among other things to the fact that patients who have been hospitalized for long periods do not as a rule return to their prior area of residence; thus, the available compensatory mediation of relationships with the social environment does not suffice. Demands for the further development of complementary systems of psychiatric care derive from

  4. Validation of Surgical Intensive Care-Infection Registry: a medical informatics system for intensive care unit research, quality of care improvement, and daily patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golob, Joseph F; Fadlalla, Adam M A; Kan, Justin A; Patel, Nilam P; Yowler, Charles J; Claridge, Jeffrey A

    2008-08-01

    We developed a prototype electronic clinical information system called the Surgical Intensive Care-Infection Registry (SIC-IR) to prospectively study infectious complications and monitor quality of care improvement programs in the surgical and trauma intensive care unit. The objective of this study was to validate SIC-IR as a successful health information technology with an accurate clinical data repository. Using the DeLone and McLean Model of Information Systems Success as a framework, we evaluated SIC-IR in a 3-month prospective crossover study of physician use in one of our two surgical and trauma intensive care units (SIC-IR unit versus non SIC-IR unit). Three simultaneous research methodologies were used: a user survey study, a pair of time-motion studies, and an accuracy study of SIC-IR's clinical data repository. The SIC-IR user survey results were positive for system reliability, graphic user interface, efficiency, and overall benefit to patient care. There was a significant decrease in prerounding time of nearly 4 minutes per patient on the SIC-IR unit compared with the non SIC-IR unit. The SIC-IR documentation and data archiving was accurate 74% to 100% of the time depending on the data entry method used. This accuracy was significantly improved compared with normal hand-written documentation on the non SIC-IR unit. SIC-IR proved to be a useful application both at individual user and organizational levels and will serve as an accurate tool to conduct prospective research and monitor quality of care improvement programs.

  5. ‌Effect of Orems self care theory on quality of life in patients with CVA

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    hamid Momeni

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available One of disorder with destroyed of function and perception of body’s structure is cerebrovascular accident (CVA. By current statistical results, CVA is the third agents of death. Self care is the one section of rehabilitation in patients with CVA. By nurse’s support, the patient will performance self care and he will acquire feeling self- respect. Materials and Methods: This quasi experimental research was carried out on 42 CVA patients. Data collection instrument was SS- QOL questionnaire. First QOL indicator was measured by SS- QOL questionnaire. In experimental group self care program was instructed. After 5 weeks, patient’s QOL in two groups were measured again by the same questionnaire. T test, Chi Square and Willcaxon test was used to data analysis. Results: A significant difference was observed between QOL score before and after self care program in experimental group (p≥0.001, as well as a significant difference was seen between QOL score in experimental and control groups (p≥0.00128. Conclusion: Findings of this research showed that education of self care to patients by nurses in hospital or home can increase quality of life in the patients with CVA.

  6. Patient perceptions of electronic medical records use and ratings of care quality

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    Finney Rutten LJ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lila J Finney Rutten,1 Sana N Vieux,2 Jennifer L St Sauver,1 Neeraj K Arora,2 Richard P Moser,2 Ellen Burke Beckjord,3 Bradford W Hesse2 1Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Healthcare Delivery, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA; 3Biobehavioral Medicine in Oncology Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Purpose: Despite considerable potential for improving health care quality, adoption of new technologies, such as electronic medical records (EMRs, requires prudence, to ensure that such tools are designed, implemented, and used meaningfully to facilitate patient-centered communication and care processes, and better health outcomes. The association between patients’ perceptions of health care provider use of EMRs and health care quality ratings was assessed. Method: Data from two iterations of the Health Information National Trends Survey, fielded in 2011 and 2012, were pooled for these analyses. The data were collected via mailed questionnaire, using a nationally representative listing of home addresses as the sampling frame (n=7,390. All data were weighted to provide representative estimates of quality of care ratings and physician use of EMR, in the adult US population. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, and multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted. Results: EMR use was reported significantly more frequently by females, younger age groups, non-Hispanic whites, and those with higher education, higher incomes, health insurance, and a usual source of health care. Respondents who reported physician use of EMRs had significantly higher ratings of care quality (Beta=4.83, standard error [SE]=1.7, P<0.01, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, usual source of health care, and health insurance status. Conclusion: Nationally representative

  7. Linking Nurses' Clinical Leadership to Patient Care Quality: The Role of Transformational Leadership and Workplace Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boamah, Sheila

    2018-03-01

    Background While improving patient safety requires strong nursing leadership, there has been little empirical research that has examined the mechanisms by which leadership influences patient safety outcomes. Aim To test a model examining relationships among transformational leadership, structural empowerment, staff nurse clinical leadership, and nurse-assessed adverse patient outcomes. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a randomly selected sample of 378 registered nurses working in direct patient care in acute care hospitals across Ontario, Canada. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized model. Results The model had an acceptable fit, and all paths were significant. Transformational leadership was significantly associated with decreased adverse patient outcomes through structural empowerment and staff nurse clinical leadership. Discussion This study highlights the importance of transformational leadership in creating empowering practice environments that foster high-quality care. The findings indicate that a more complete understanding of what drives desired patient outcomes warrants the need to focus on how to empower nurses and foster clinical leadership practices at the point of care. Conclusion In planning safety strategies, managers must demonstrate transformational leadership behaviors in order to modify the work environment to create better defenses for averting adverse events.

  8. Consumer Quality Index Chronic Skin Disease (CQI-CSD): a new instrument to measure quality of care from the patient's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cranenburgh, O. D.; Krol, M. W.; Hendriks, M. C. P.; de Rie, M. A.; Smets, E. M. A.; de Korte, J.; Sprangers, M. A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Assessing quality of care from the patient's perspective is considered to be highly relevant. As a standardized instrument in dermatology was lacking, we developed a patient experience questionnaire regarding chronic skin disease care: the Consumer Quality Index Chronic Skin Disease (CQI-CSD). (i)

  9. A Conceptual Model for Assessing Quality of Care for Patients Boarding in the Emergency Department: Structure-Process-Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan W.; Singer, Sara J.; Sun, Benjamin C.; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Many believe that the “boarding” of emergency department (ED) patients awaiting inpatient beds compromises quality of care. To better study the quality of care of boarded patients, one should identify and understand the mechanisms accounting for any potential differences in care. This paper present a conceptual boarding “structure-process-outcome” model to help assess quality of care provided to boarded patients, and to aid in recognizing potential solutions to improve that quality, if it is deficient. The goal of the conceptual model is to create a practical framework on which a research and policy agenda can be based to measure and improve quality of care for boarded patients. PMID:21496148

  10. Optimizing Quality of Care and Patient Safety in Malaysia: The Current Global Initiatives, Gaps and Suggested Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrar, Mu'taman; Abdul Rahman, Hamzah; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-10-20

    Demand for health care service has significantly increased, while the quality of healthcare and patient safety has become national and international priorities. This paper aims to identify the gaps and the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. Review of the current literature. Highly cited articles were used as the basis to retrieve and review the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety. The country health plan of Ministry of Health (MOH) Malaysia and the MOH Malaysia Annual Reports were reviewed. The MOH has set four strategies for optimizing quality and sustaining quality of life. The 10th Malaysia Health Plan promotes the theme "1 Care for 1 Malaysia" in order to sustain the quality of care. Despite of these efforts, the total number of complaints received by the medico-legal section of the MOH Malaysia is increasing. The current global initiatives indicted that quality performance generally belong to three main categories: patient; staffing; and working environment related factors. There is no single intervention for optimizing quality of care to maintain patient safety. Multidimensional efforts and interventions are recommended in order to optimize the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia.

  11. Optimizing Quality of Care and Patient Safety in Malaysia: The Current Global Initiatives, Gaps and Suggested Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrar, Mu’taman; Rahman, Hamzah Abdul; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Demand for health care service has significantly increased, while the quality of healthcare and patient safety has become national and international priorities. This paper aims to identify the gaps and the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. Design: Review of the current literature. Highly cited articles were used as the basis to retrieve and review the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety. The country health plan of Ministry of Health (MOH) Malaysia and the MOH Malaysia Annual Reports were reviewed. Results: The MOH has set four strategies for optimizing quality and sustaining quality of life. The 10th Malaysia Health Plan promotes the theme “1 Care for 1 Malaysia” in order to sustain the quality of care. Despite of these efforts, the total number of complaints received by the medico-legal section of the MOH Malaysia is increasing. The current global initiatives indicted that quality performance generally belong to three main categories: patient; staffing; and working environment related factors. Conclusions: There is no single intervention for optimizing quality of care to maintain patient safety. Multidimensional efforts and interventions are recommended in order to optimize the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. PMID:26755459

  12. Quality of Care Improves for Patients with Diabetes in Medicare Shared Savings Accountable Care Organizations: Organizational Characteristics Associated with Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraze, Taressa K; Lewis, Valerie A; Tierney, Emily; Colla, Carrie H

    2017-12-06

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs), a primary care-centric delivery and payment model, aim to promote integrated population health, which may improve care for those with chronic conditions such as diabetes. Research has shown that, overall, the ACO model is effective at reducing costs, but there is substantial variation in how effective different types of ACOs are at impacting costs and improving care delivery. This study examines how ACO organizational characteristics - such as composition, staffing, care management, and experiences with health reform - were associated with quality of care delivered to patients with diabetes. Secondary data were analyzed retrospectively to examine Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) ACOs' performance on diabetes metrics in the first 2 years of ACO contracts. Ordinary least squares was used to analyze 162 MSSP ACOs with publicly available performance data and the National Survey of ACOs. ACOs improved performance significantly for patients with diabetes between contract years 1 and 2. In year 1, also having a private payer contract and an increased number of services within the ACO were positively associated with performance, while having a community health center or a hospital were negatively associated with performance. Better performance in year 1 was negatively associated with improved performance in year 2. This study found that ACOs substantively improved diabetes management within initial contract years. ACOs may need different types of support throughout their contracts to ensure continued improvements in performance.

  13. The relationships between the combination of person- and organization-related conditions and patients' perceptions of palliative care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsdalen, Tuva; Høye, Sevald; Rystedt, Ingrid; Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Hov, Reidun; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil

    2017-12-06

    Little is known about the combination of person- and organization- related conditions and the relationships with patients' perspectives of care quality. Such a combination could contribute knowledge reflecting the complexity of clinical practice, and enhance individualized care. The aim was to investigate the relationships between the combination of person- and organization-related conditions and patients' perceptions of palliative care quality. A cross-sectional study, including 191 patients in the late palliative phase (73% response rate) admitted to hospice inpatient care (n = 72), hospice day care (n = 51), palliative units in nursing homes (n = 30) and home care (n = 38), was conducted between November 2013 and December 2014, using the instrument Quality from the Patients' Perspective specific to palliative care (QPP-PC). Data were analysed, using analysis of covariance, to explore the amount of the variance in the dependent variables (QPP-PC) that could be explained by combination of the independent variables - Person- and organization-related conditions, - while controlling for differences in covariates. Patients scored the care received and the subjective importance as moderate to high. The combination of person- and organization - related conditions revealed that patients with a high sense of coherence, lower age (person - related conditions) and being in a ward with access to and availability of physicians (organization-related condition) might be associated with significantly higher scores for the quality of care received. Gender (women), daily contact with family and friends, and low health-related quality of life (person-related conditions) might be associated with higher scores for subjective importance of the aspects of care quality. Healthcare personnel, leaders and policy makers need to pay attention to person- and organization-related conditions in order to provide person-centered palliative care of high quality. Further studies from

  14. Use of standardised patients to assess quality of tuberculosis care: a pilot, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jishnu; Kwan, Ada; Daniels, Benjamin; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Subbaraman, Ramnath; Bergkvist, Sofi; Das, Ranendra K; Das, Veena; Pai, Madhukar

    2015-11-01

    Existing studies of the quality of tuberculosis care have relied on recall-based patient surveys, questionnaire surveys of knowledge, and prescription or medical record analysis, and the results mostly show the health-care provider's knowledge rather than actual practice. No study has used standardised patients to assess clinical practice. Therefore we aimed to assess quality of care for tuberculosis using such patients. We did a pilot, cross-sectional validation study of a convenience sample of consenting private health-care providers in low-income and middle-income areas of Delhi, India. We recruited standardised patients in apparently good health from the local community to present four cases (two of presumed tuberculosis and one each of confirmed tuberculosis and suspected multidrug-resistant tuberculosis) to a randomly allocated health-care provider. The key objective was to validate the standardised-patient method using three criteria: negligible risk and ability to avoid adverse events for providers and standardised patients, low detection rates of standardised patients by providers, and data accuracy across standardised patients and audio verification of standardised-patient recall. We also used medical vignettes to assess providers' knowledge of presumed tuberculosis. Correct case management was benchmarked using Standards for Tuberculosis Care in India (STCI). Between Feb 2, and March 28, 2014, we recruited and trained 17 standardised patients who had 250 interactions with 100 health-care providers, 29 of whom were qualified in allopathic medicine (ie, they had a Bachelor of Medicine & Surgery [MBBS] degree), 40 of whom practised alternative medicine, and 31 of whom were informal health-care providers with few or no qualifications. The interactions took place between April 1, and April 23, 2014. The proportion of detected standardised patients was low (11 [5%] detected out of 232 interactions among providers who completed the follow-up survey), and

  15. Development of generic quality indicators for patient-centered cancer care by using a RAND modified Delphi method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uphoff, Eleonora P. M. M.; Wennekes, Lianne; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Grol, Richard P. T. M.; Wollersheim, Hub C. H.; Hermens, Rosella P. M. G.; Ottevanger, Petronella B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite growing attention to patient-centered care, the needs of cancer patients are not always met. Using a RAND modified Delphi method, this study aimed to systematically develop evidence-based indicators, to be used to measure the quality of patient-centered cancer care as a first step toward

  16. Convenience, quality and choice: Patient and service-provider perspectives for treating primary care complaints in urgent care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, David

    2017-11-01

    To investigate why patients chose to attend two, nurse-led, minor injury units (MIUs) to access primary healthcare services rather than attend their GP practice. Since the 1980's, healthcare organisations in the UK and elsewhere have implemented an increasingly consumer-orientated model of healthcare provision. As a result, patients with non-urgent presentations are attending Emergency Departments (EDs) and other urgent care facilities in growing numbers. A comparative case study approach was adopted and between October 2014 and May 2015 the researcher was embedded as a participant observer as part of the emergency nurse practitioner team at two, nurse-led, MIUs (site A and B). During this time, 40 patients, 17 service-providers and 1 senior manager were interviewed. Patients and service-providers at both sites identified convenience and quality of care as the principle reasons patients presented for primary healthcare services at MIUs rather than their GP practice. Service-providers were aware that by providing treatment, they established a precedent and a sense of expectation for future care. Patients are acting rationally and predictably in response to healthcare policy promises regarding choice, expectation created by service-providers, and local demographic factors. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Health-related quality of life of patients of Brazilian primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna de Oliveira Ascef

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL of patients of the primary health care of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS and its associated factors. METHODS This is a cross-sectional study with data from the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos – Serviços, 2015 (PNAUM – National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines – Services, 2015. Data were collected with a questionnaire that included the EuroQol 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D instrument. Patients from the five regions of Brazil were interviewed. Multiple linear regression was used to analyze their Health-Related Quality of Life and its associated factors. RESULTS Of the total of 8,590 patients, the most frequent dimensions were pain/discomfort (50.7% and anxiety/depression (38.8%. About 10% of the patients reported extreme problems in these dimensions. The following factors were significantly associated with a worse quality of life: being female; having arthritis, osteoarthritis, or rheumatism; cerebrovascular accident; heart disease; depression; health self-assessment as poor or very poor; drinking alcoholic beverages once or more per month; dieting to lose weight, avoiding salt consumption, and reducing fat intake. Significant association was observed between a better quality of life and: living in the North and Southeast regions of Brazil; practicing physical activities; and having a higher educational level. No association was observed with factors related to the health services. CONCLUSIONS The Health-Related Quality of Life of patients was influenced by demographic and socioeconomic factors that were related to health conditions and lifestyle, being useful to guide specific actions for promoting health and the integral care to patients of the Brazilian Unified Health System.

  18. Quality of life in Chinese patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hou, Cai-Lan; Ma, Xin-Rong; Zhong, Bao-Liang; Zang, Yu; Jia, Fu-Jun; Lin, Yong-Qiang; Lai, Kelly Y C; Chiu, Helen F K; Ungvari, Gabor S; Hall, Brian J; Cai, Mei-Ying; Ng, Chee H; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2017-08-01

    In China, maintenance treatment for clinically stable patients with schizophrenia is usually provided by primary care physicians. This study examined the quality of life (QOL) in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care and explored the demographic and clinical characteristics associated with QOL. Altogether, 612 patients with schizophrenia treated in 22 randomly selected primary care services in China formed the study sample. QOL, psychotic and depressive symptoms, extra-pyramidal symptoms and insight were assessed using standardized instruments. Data analyses were conducted with the one sample t-test and multiple linear regression analyses. Compared with the normative data for the Chinese general population, significantly lower scores in physical and mental QOL domains were found in the patient group. Older age, being unemployed, major medical conditions, no smoking, more severe depressive and negative symptoms, more frequent insomnia, and suicidality were independently associated with poor physical QOL. Male gender, more severe depressive and anxiety symptoms, more frequent insomnia, and suicidality were independently associated with poor mental QOL. Patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care had lower level of QOL in comparison with general population. Effective measures need to be implemented to improve their QOL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A systematic review of vertical integration and quality of care, efficiency, and patient-centered outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machta, Rachel M; Maurer, Kristin A; Jones, David J; Furukawa, Michael F; Rich, Eugene C

    2018-04-02

    Small independent practices are increasingly giving way to more complex affiliations between provider organizations and hospital systems. There are several ways in which vertically integrated health systems could improve quality and lower the costs of care. But there are also concerns that integrated systems may increase the price and costs of care without commensurate improvements in quality and outcomes. Despite a growing body of research on vertically integrated health systems, no systematic review that we know of compares vertically integrated health systems (defined as shared ownership or joint management of hospitals and physician practices) to nonintegrated hospitals or physician practices. We conducted a systematic search of the literature published from January 1996 to November 2016. We considered articles for review if they compared the performance of a vertically integrated health system and examined an outcome related to quality of care, efficiency, or patient-centered outcomes. Database searches generated 7,559 articles, with 29 articles included in this review. Vertical integration was associated with better quality, often measured as optimal care for specific conditions, but showed either no differences or lower efficiency as measured by utilization, spending, and prices. Few studies evaluated a patient-centered outcome; among those, most examined mortality and did not identify any effects. Across domains, most studies were observational and did not address the issue of selection bias. Recent evidence suggests the trend toward vertical integration will likely continue as providers respond to changing payment models and market factors. A growing body of research on comparative health system performance suggests that integration of physician practices with hospitals might not be enough to achieve higher-value care. More information is needed to identify the health system attributes that contribute to improved outcomes, as well as which policy levers

  20. Quality of primary health care and autonomous motivation for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Koponen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study showed, in line with self-determination theory, that of the six central quality dimensions of primary health care (access to care, continuity of care, diabetes counseling, autonomy support from one’s physician, trust, patient-centered care, autonomy support from one’s physician was most strongly associated with autonomous motivation (self-regulation for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes ( n  = 2866. However, overall support for diabetes care received from friends, family members, other patients with diabetes, and health care professionals may even play a greater role.

  1. Quality of life and religious-spiritual coping in palliative cancer care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Ticiane Dionizio de Sousa; Meneguin, Silmara; Ferreira, Maria de Lourdes da Silva; Miot, Helio Amante

    2017-07-10

    to compare the quality of life and religious-spiritual coping of palliative cancer care patients with a group of healthy participants; assess whether the perceived quality of life is associated with the religious-spiritual coping strategies; identify the clinical and sociodemographic variables related to quality of life and religious-spiritual coping. cross-sectional study involving 96 palliative outpatient care patient at a public hospital in the interior of the state of São Paulo and 96 healthy volunteers, using a sociodemographic questionnaire, the McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Brief Religious-Spiritual Coping scale. 192 participants were interviewed who presented good quality of life and high use of Religious-Spiritual Coping. Greater use of negative Religious-Spiritual Coping was found in Group A, as well as lesser physical and psychological wellbeing and quality of life. An association was observed between quality of life scores and Religious-Spiritual Coping (pestrategias de coping religioso-espiritual; identificar las variables clínicas y sociodemográficas relacionadas a la calidad de vida y al coping religioso-espiritual. estudio transversal, desarrollado con 96 pacientes de ambulatorio de cuidados paliativos en un hospital público en el interior del Estado de São Paulo, Brasil, y 96 voluntarios sanos, mediante cuestionario utilizando datos sociodemográficos, el McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire y el Coping Religioso-Espiritual-Breve. fueron entrevistados 192 participantes que presentaron buena calidad de vida y alta utilización del Coping Religioso-Espiritual. Fue encontrado mayor uso de Coping Religioso-Espiritual negativo en el Grupo A, y también menor bienestar físico, psicológico y de calidad de vida. Fue observada asociación entre los scores de calidad de vida y Coping Religioso-Espiritual (pestrategia de enfrentamiento en pacientes bajo cuidados paliativos.

  2. Narrative medicine in metastatic prostate cancer reveals ways to improve patient awareness & quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincentis, Giuseppe De; Monari, Fabio; Baldari, Sergio; Salgarello, Matteo; Frantellizzi, Viviana; Salvi, Elisabetta; Reale, Luigi; Napolitano, Silvia; Conti, Giario; Cortesi, Enrico

    2018-06-15

    To describe the journey of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in treatment with radium-223. A multiperspective analysis was performed using narrative medicine in four Italian centers. The substantial impact of mCRPC on quality of life through all phases of the disease was described. After an initial lack of awareness of the disease or denial of its effects, symptoms of pain, fatigue and side effects often led to sadness, fear and loneliness. The majority underwent radium-223 therapy positively, restoring their quality of life and routine activities. Using narrative medicine, the importance of a patient-centered approach in the pathway of care for patients with mCRPC through all the stages of the disease was highlighted.

  3. Patient safety and quality of care: how may clinical simulation contribute?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    The usability of health information technology (IT) is increasingly recognized as critically important to the development of systems that ensure patient safety and quality of care. The substantial complexity of organizations, work practice and physical environments within the healthcare sector...... influences the development and application of health IT. When health IT is introduced in local clinical work practices, potential patient safety hazards and insufficient support of work practices need to be examined. Qualitative methods, such as clinical simulation, may be used to evaluate new technology...

  4. Patient-reported Communication Quality and Perceived Discrimination in Maternity Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasio, Laura; Kozhimannil, Katy B

    2015-10-01

    High-quality communication and a positive patient-provider relationship are aspects of patient-centered care, a crucial component of quality. We assessed racial/ethnic disparities in patient-reported communication problems and perceived discrimination in maternity care among women nationally and measured racial/ethnic variation in the correlates of these outcomes. Data for this analysis came from the Listening to Mothers III survey, a national sample of women who gave birth to a singleton baby in a US hospital in 2011-2012. Outcomes were reluctance to ask questions and barriers to open discussion in prenatal care, and perceived discrimination during the birth hospitalization, assessed using multinomial and logistic regression. We also estimated models stratified by race/ethnicity. Over 40% of women reported communication problems in prenatal care, and 24% perceived discrimination during their hospitalization for birth. Having hypertension or diabetes was associated with higher levels of reluctance to ask questions and higher odds of reporting each type of perceived discrimination. Black and Hispanic (vs. white) women had higher odds of perceived discrimination due to race/ethnicity. Higher education was associated with more reported communication problems among black women only. Although having diabetes was associated with perceptions of discrimination among all women, associations were stronger for black women. Race/ethnicity was associated with perceived racial discrimination, but diabetes and hypertension were consistent predictors of communication problems and perceptions of discrimination. Efforts to improve communication and reduce perceived discrimination are an important area of focus for improving patient-centered care in maternity services.

  5. The quality of radiation care: the results of focus group interviews and concept mapping to explore the patient's perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, J.L.; Sixma, H.; Triest, B. van; Keus, R.B.; Hendriks, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: In this study, we explore the quality aspects of radiation care from the patient’s perspective in order to develop a draft Consumer Quality Index (CQI) Radiation Care instrument. Materials and methods: Four focus group discussions with (former) cancer patients were held to

  6. Patient satisfaction with quality of primary health care in Benghazi, Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asharaf Abdul Salam

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Libyan National Health System (LNHS is debated for the paradox of its performance versus impact. It has poor performance, but the national health statistics are good and competitive. There are concerted efforts to manage health care services and to regain the lost trust. A primary health care (PHC system that focuses on preventive and promotive care is the core focus of LNHS efforts. Objectives: To assess patient satisfaction with quality of PHC assessed in terms of (a customer profile, (b patient satisfaction, and (c health care-seeking behavior. Methodology: A sample of nine health centers and seven polyclinics from various locations in Benghazi, Libya were selected for gathering information by structured face-to-face interviews. A total of 310 beneficiaries were interviewed by using an Arabic translation of the Charleston Psychiatric Outpatient Satisfaction Scale. Results: The beneficiaries appear to be quite satisfied with the quality of services. Geographical zone, marital status of beneficiary, and type of facility are satisfaction-related factors. There are preferences for facilities located within the City Centre over those located elsewhere. There is also an interaction effect of the geographical zone and the type of facility in creating differences in satisfaction. Conclusions: A customer-friendly facility concept that emphasizes reception, physician interaction, and cordiality shall add value. Polyclinics require more attention as does the Al Slawy area. A few utility services might also be considered.

  7. Patient satisfaction with quality of primary health care in Benghazi, Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Asharaf Abdul; Alshekteria, Amina Abdulla; Abd Alhadi, Hana; Ahmed, Mariam; Mohammed, Anees

    2010-10-21

    The Libyan National Health System (LNHS) is debated for the paradox of its performance versus impact. It has poor performance, but the national health statistics are good and competitive. There are concerted efforts to manage health care services and to regain the lost trust. A primary health care (PHC) system that focuses on preventive and promotive care is the core focus of LNHS efforts. To assess patient satisfaction with quality of PHC assessed in terms of (a) customer profile, (b) patient satisfaction, and (c) health care-seeking behavior. A sample of nine health centers and seven polyclinics from various locations in Benghazi, Libya were selected for gathering information by structured face-to-face interviews. A total of 310 beneficiaries were interviewed by using an Arabic translation of the Charleston Psychiatric Outpatient Satisfaction Scale. The beneficiaries appear to be quite satisfied with the quality of services. Geographical zone, marital status of beneficiary, and type of facility are satisfaction-related factors. There are preferences for facilities located within the City Centre over those located elsewhere. There is also an interaction effect of the geographical zone and the type of facility in creating differences in satisfaction. A customer-friendly facility concept that emphasizes reception, physician interaction, and cordiality shall add value. Polyclinics require more attention as does the Al Slawy area. A few utility services might also be considered.

  8. Quality of previous diabetes care among patients receiving services at ophthalmology hospitals in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Saldana, Joel; Rosales-Campos, Andrea C; Rangel León, Carmen B; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Laura I; Martínez-Castro, Francisco; Piette, John D

    2010-12-01

    To survey a large sample of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Mexico City to determine if patient experience, access to basic services, treatment, and outcomes differed between those with social security coverage and those without. From 2001-2007 a total of 1 000 individuals with T2DM were surveyed in outpatient clinics of the three largest public ophthalmology hospitals in Mexico City. Patients reported information about their health status and receipt of basic diabetes services, such as laboratory glycemic monitoring and diabetes education. Rates were compared between those with (n = 461) and without (n = 539) social security. Almost half of the patients (46%) in these public facilities were social security patients that were unable to access other services and had to pay out-of-pocket for care. Half of respondents were originally identified as potentially diabetic based on symptom complaints (51%), including 11% with visual impairment. Most patients (87.9%) reported that their glycemic level was being monitored exclusively via fasting blood glucose testing or random capillary blood glucose tests; only 5.3% reported ever having a glycated hemoglobin test. While nearly all respondents reported an individual physician encounter ever, only 39% reported ever receiving nutrition counseling and only 21% reported attending one or more sessions of diabetes education in their lifetime. Processes of care and outcomes were no different in patients with and those without social security coverage. In Mexico, the quality of diabetes care is poor. Despite receiving social security, many patients still have to pay out-of-pocket to access needed care. Without policy changes that address these barriers to comprehensive diabetes management, scientific achievements in diagnosis and pharmacotherapy will have limited impact.

  9. Quality of Cancer Care Among Foreign-Born and US-Born Patients With Lung or Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Smith; He, Yulei; Ayanian, John Z.

    2010-01-01

      BACKGROUND: Disparities in care have been documented for foreign-born cancer patients in the United States. However, few data are available regarding patients with lung and colorectal cancer. In the current study, the authors assessed whether patient-reported quality and receipt of recommended...... from 2003 through 2005. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between nativity and patient-reported quality of care and receipt of recommended treatments (adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer, adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for stage II/III rectal cancer......, and curative surgery for stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer). The authors also assessed whether language explained any differences in care by nativity. RESULTS: Overall, 46% of patients reported excellent care, but foreign-born patients were less likely than US-born patients to report excellent quality...

  10. Assessing noninstitutionalized asthma and COPD patients' priorities and perceptions of quality of health care: the development of the QUOTE-CNSLD instrument.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, C. van; Sixma, H.J.; Kerssens, J.J.; Peters, L.

    1997-01-01

    Patient judgments on the quality of health care services have become increasingly important. This research describes the development and empirical testing of an instrument that measures quality of health care services from the perspective of noninstitutionalized patients. The instrument was

  11. Evaluating the Quality of Patient Decision-Making Regarding Post-Acute Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Robert E; Jones, Jacqueline; Lawrence, Emily; Ladebue, Amy; Ayele, Roman; Leonard, Chelsea; Lippmann, Brandi; Matlock, Daniel D; Allyn, Rebecca; Cumbler, Ethan

    2018-05-01

    Despite a national focus on post-acute care brought about by recent payment reforms, relatively little is known about how hospitalized older adults and their caregivers decide whether to go to a skilled nursing facility (SNF) after hospitalization. We sought to understand to what extent hospitalized older adults and their caregivers are empowered to make a high-quality decision about utilizing an SNF for post-acute care and what contextual or process elements led to satisfaction with the outcome of their decision once in SNF. Qualitative inquiry using the Ottawa Decision Support Framework (ODSF), a conceptual framework that describes key components of high-quality decision-making. Thirty-two previously community-dwelling older adults (≥ 65 years old) and 22 caregivers interviewed at three different hospitals and three skilled nursing facilities. We used key components of the ODSF to identify elements of context and process that affected decision-making and to what extent the outcome was characteristic of a high-quality decision: informed, values based, and not associated with regret or blame. The most important contextual themes were the presence of active medical conditions in the hospital that made decision-making difficult, prior experiences with hospital readmission or SNF, relative level of caregiver support, and pressure to make a decision quickly for which participants felt unprepared. Patients described playing a passive role in the decision-making process and largely relying on recommendations from the medical team. Patients commonly expressed resignation and a perceived lack of choice or autonomy, leading to dissatisfaction with the outcome. Understanding and intervening to improve the quality of decision-making regarding post-acute care supports is essential for improving outcomes of hospitalized older adults. Our results suggest that simply providing information is not sufficient; rather, incorporating key contextual factors and improving the

  12. Quality control in health care: an experiment in radiotherapy planning for breast cancer patients after mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holli, Kaija; Laippala, Pekka; Ojala, Antti; Pitkaenen, Maunu

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The importance of evaluating and improving quality in clinical practice is now generally acknowledged. In this study we estimated different sources of variation in radiotherapy planning for breast cancer patients after mastectomy and sought to test the applicability of a reproducibility and repeatability (R and R) study in a clinical context. Methods: Eleven radiation oncologists planned radiotherapy three times for three different kinds of breast cancer patients without knowing they were handling the same patient three times. Variation was divided into different components: physicians as operators, patients as parts, and repeated measurements as trials. Variation due to difference across trials (repeatability), that across the physicians (reproducibility), and that across the patients (variability) were estimated, as well as interactions between physicians and patients. Calculation was based on the sum of squares, and analysis was supported by various graphical presentations such as range charts and box plots. Results: Some parts of the planning process were characterized by higher and different kinds of variation than the others. Interphysician variation (i.e., reproducibility) was not high but there were some clearly outlying physicians. The highest variation was in repeatability (intraphysician variation). The major part of the variation was, however, that from patient to patient: 33% of the total in Parameter 1 and 85% of the total in Parameter 2. Conclusions: R and R studies are applicable and are needed to evaluate and improve quality in clinical practice. This kind of analysis provides opportunities to establish which kinds of patients require particularly careful attention, which points in the process are most critical for variation, which are the most difficult aspects for each physician and call for more careful description in documents, and which physicians need further training

  13. How nurses and their work environment affect patient experiences of the quality of care: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare organisations monitor patient experiences in order to evaluate and improve the quality of care. Because nurses spend a lot of time with patients, they have a major impact on patient experiences. To improve patient experiences of the quality of care, nurses need to know what factors within the nursing work environment are of influence. The main focus of this research was to comprehend the views of Dutch nurses on how their work and their work environment contribute to positive patient experiences. Methods A descriptive qualitative research design was used to collect data. Four focus groups were conducted, one each with 6 or 7 registered nurses in mental health care, hospital care, home care and nursing home care. A total of 26 nurses were recruited through purposeful sampling. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Results The nurses mentioned essential elements that they believe would improve patient experiences of the quality of nursing care: clinically competent nurses, collaborative working relationships, autonomous nursing practice, adequate staffing, control over nursing practice, managerial support and patient-centred culture. They also mentioned several inhibiting factors, such as cost-effectiveness policy and transparency goals for external accountability. Nurses feel pressured to increase productivity and report a high administrative workload. They stated that these factors will not improve patient experiences of the quality of nursing care. Conclusions According to participants, a diverse range of elements affect patient experiences of the quality of nursing care. They believe that incorporating these elements into daily nursing practice would result in more positive patient experiences. However, nurses work in a healthcare context in which they have to reconcile cost-efficiency and accountability with their desire to provide nursing care that is based on patient needs and preferences, and

  14. Ophthalmic patients' utilization of technology and social media: an assessment to improve quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleo, Chelsea L; Hark, Lisa; Leiby, Benjamin; Dai, Yang; Murchison, Ann P; Martinez, Patricia; Haller, Julia A

    2014-10-01

    E-health tools have the potential to improve the quality of care for ophthalmic patients, many of whom have chronic conditions. However, little research has assessed ophthalmic patients' use or acceptance of technological devices and social media platforms for health-related purposes. The present study evaluated utilization of technological devices and social media platforms by eye clinic patients, as well as their willingness to receive health reminders through these technologies. A 31-item paper questionnaire was administered to eye clinic patients (n=843) at an urban, tertiary-care center. Questions focused on technology ownership, comfort levels, frequency of use, and preferences for receiving health reminders. Demographic data were also recorded. Eye clinic patients most commonly owned cellular phones (90%), landline phones (81%), and computers (80%). Overall, eye clinic patients preferred to receive health reminders through phone calls and e-mail and used these technologies frequently and with a high level of comfort. Less than 3% of patients preferred using social networking to receive health reminders. In addition, age was significantly associated with technology ownership, comfort level, and frequency of use (ptechnologies more frequently and with a higher comfort level (ptechnologies for appointment reminders, general eye and vision health information, asking urgent medical questions, and requesting prescription refills. Future controlled trials could further explore the efficacy of e-health tools for these purposes.

  15. A comparative study of occupancy and patient care quality in four different types of intensive care units in a children's hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a comparative study of occupancy and patient care quality in four types of intensive care units in a children's hospital,: an Infant Care Center (ICC), a Medical/Surgical (Med/Surg) unit, a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), and a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), each featuring a mix of multi-bed and private room (PR) patient care environments. The project is prompted by interest by the project sponsor in a pre-occupancy analysis, before the units are upgraded to exclusive PR designs. Methods comprised, for each unit: (1) observations of ergonomic design features; (2) task activity analyses of job performance of selected staff; and (3) use of a survey to collect perceptions by unit nursing and house staff (HS) of indicators of occupancy and patient care quality. (1) the five most common task activities are interaction with patients, charting, and interaction with equipment, co-workers and family members; (2) job satisfaction, patient care, work environment, job, patient care team interaction, and general occupancy quality rankings by ICC and/or NICU respondents are significantly higher than those by other staff respondents; and (3) ergonomic design shortcomings noted are excess noise, problems with equipment, and work environment, job-related health, and patient care quality issues.

  16. Dying in Palliative Care Units and in Hospital: A Comparison of the Quality of Life of Terminal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, Linda L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared quality of life of terminal cancer patients (n=182) in two palliative care units with that of those in general hospital. Patients in specialized palliative care units were found to differ from those dying in hospital, showing less indirectly expressed anger but more positive feelings. They also reported more anxiety about death but less…

  17. Quality improvement in practice: improving diabetes care and patient outcomes in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneman, Alice; Atkinson, David; Davey, Maureen; Marley, Julia V

    2014-10-07

    Management of chronic disease, including diabetes, is a central focus of most Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) in Australia. We have previously demonstrated that diabetes monitoring and outcomes can be improved and maintained over a 10-year period at Derby Aboriginal Health Service (DAHS). While continuous quality improvement (CQI) has been shown to improve service delivery rates and clinical outcome measures, the process of interpreting audit results and developing strategies for improvement is less well described. This paper describes the evaluation of care of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and features of effective CQI in ACCHSs in the remote Kimberley region of north Western Australia. Retrospective audit of records for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary care patients aged ≥15 years with a confirmed diagnosis of T2DM at four Kimberley ACCHSs from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012. Interviews with health service staff and focus group discussions with patients post audit. diabetes care related activities, clinical outcome measures and factors influencing good diabetes related care and effective CQI. A total of 348 patients from the four ACCHSs were included in the study. Clinical care activities were generally high across three of the four health services (at least 71% of patients had cholesterol recorded, 89% blood pressure, 84% HbA1c). Patients from DAHS had lower median cholesterol levels (4.4 mmol/L) and the highest proportion of patients meeting clinical targets for HbA1c (31% v 16% ACCHS-3; P = 0.02). Features that facilitated good care included clearly defined staff roles for diabetes management, support and involvement of Aboriginal Health Workers, efficient recall systems, and well-coordinated allied health services. Effective CQI features included seamless and timely data collection, local ownership of the process, openness to admitting deficiencies and willingness to embrace change. Well

  18. Are characteristics of team members important for quality management of chronic patients at primary care level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Poplas-Susič, Antonija

    2017-12-01

    To determine the possible associations between higher levels of selected quality indicators and the characteristics of providers. In 2011, an ongoing project on a new model of family medicine practice was launched in Slovenia; the family physicians' working team (a family physician and a practice nurse) was extended by a nurse practitioner working 0.5 full-time equivalents. This was an example of a personalised team approach to managing chronic patients. We included all family medicine practices in the six units of the Community Health Centre Ljubljana which were participating in the project in December 2015 (N = 66). Data were gathered from automatic electronic reports on quality indicators provided monthly by each practice. We also collected demographic data. There were 66 family medicine teams in the sample, with 165 members of their teams (66 family physicians, 33 nurse practitioners and 66 practice nurses). Fifty-six (84.4%) of the family physicians were women, as were 32 (97.0%) of the nurse practitioners, and 86 (95.5%) of the practice nurses. Multivariate analysis showed that a higher level of the quality indicator "Examination of diabetic foot once per year" was independently associated with nurse practitioners having attended additional education on diabetes, duration of participation in the project, age and years worked since graduation of nurse practitioners, working in the Center unit and not working in the Bezigrad unit. Characteristics of team members are important in fostering quality management of chronic patients. Nurse practitioners working in new model family practices need obligatory, continuous professional education in the management of chronic patients. The quality of care of chronic patients depends on the specific characteristics of the members of the team, which should be taken into account when planning quality improvements. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Provincial development of a patient-reported outcome initiative to guide patient care, quality improvement, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Robert A; Howard, Fuchsia; Lapointe, Vincent; Schellenberg, Devin; Nichol, Alan; Bowering, Gale; Curtis, Susan; Walter, Allison; Brown, Steven; Thompson, Corinne; Bergin, Jackie; Lomas, Sheri; French, John; Halperin, Ross; Tyldesley, Scott; Beckham, Wayne

    2018-01-01

    The BC Cancer Agency Radiotherapy (RT) program started the Prospective Outcomes and Support Initiative (POSI) at all six centres to utilize patient-reported outcomes for immediate clinical care, quality improvement, and research. Patient-reported outcomes were collected at time of computed tomography simulation via tablet and 2 to 4 weeks post-RT via either tablet or over the phone by a registered nurse. From 2013 to 2016, patients were approached on 20,150 attempts by POSI for patients treated with RT for bone metastases (52%), brain metastases (11%), lung cancer (17%), gynecological cancer (16%), head and neck cancer (2%), and other pilots (2%). The accrual rate for all encounters was 85% (n = 17,101), with the accrual rate varying between the lowest and the highest accruing centre from 78% to 89% ( P < .001) and varying by tumour site ( P < .001). Using the POSI database, we have performed research and quality improvement initiatives that have changed practice.

  20. Clinical informatics to improve quality of care: a population-based system for patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Chaudhry

    2009-06-01

    Conclusions A clinical informatics system, used to deliver proactive, co-ordinated care to a population of patients with diabetes mellitus, can improve process and also quality outcome measures. Larger studies are needed to confirm these early findings.

  1. Quality in trauma care: improving the discharge procedure of patients by means of Lean Six Sigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, Gerard C; Trip, Albert; Ahaus, Kees T B; Does, Ronald J M M; Wendt, Klaus W

    2010-09-01

    The University Medical Center Groningen is a level I trauma center in the northern part of the Netherlands. Sixty-three percent of all the patients admitted at the Trauma Nursing Department (TND) are acute patients who are admitted directly after trauma. In 2006 and 2007, the University Medical Center Groningen was not always capable of admitting all trauma patients to the TND due to the relatively high-bed occupation. Therefore, the reduction of the average length of stay (LOS) formed the objective of the project described in this study. We used the process-focused method of Lean Six Sigma to reduce hospital stay by improving the discharge procedure of patients in the care processes and eliminating waste and waiting time. We used the "Dutch Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol" to identify the possible causes of inappropriate hospital stay. The average LOS of trauma patients at the TND at the beginning of the project was 10.4 days. Thirty percent of the LOS was unnecessary. The main causes of the inappropriate hospital stay were delays in several areas. The implementation of the improvement plan reduced almost 50% of the inappropriate hospital stay, enabling the trauma center to admit almost all trauma patients to the TND. After the implementation of the improvements, the average LOS was 8.5 days. Our study shows that Lean Six Sigma is an effective method to reduce inappropriate hospital stay, thereby improving the quality and financial efficiency of trauma care.

  2. Quality of Sleep Among Intensive Care Unit Patients: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani Younis, Mohammad; Hayajneh, Ferial A

    Investigating sleep disturbances among intensive care unit (ICU) patients and its serious consequences is considered a crucial issue for nurses. The need of sleep increases during hospitalization time to preserve energy for the healing process. Previous studies have demonstrated that sleep disturbance is one of the most common complaints of patients in the ICUs, with a prevalence of more than 50%. Although the total sleep time might be normal, the patients' sleep is fragmented and light in the intensive care settings. The main purpose of this review is to generate a clear view of what is known about sleep disturbances among ICU patients as well as to identify the gap in knowledge regarding this issue. This was done by describing, summarizing, clarifying, and evaluating well-selected previous studies about this topic. In addition, this concise review has focused on the prevalence of sleep disturbances in the ICU, factors contributing to poor quality of sleep among ICU patients, and the physiological effects of poor sleep on the patients' prognosis.

  3. The Relationship between Nursing Care Quality and Patients Satisfaction among Hospitals affiliated to Zahedan University of Medical Sciences in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Gholjeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Obtaining the means of promoting nursing care quality have been always considered by nursing managers. The present study was conducted to determine the relationship between nursing care quality and patients satisfaction in the hospitals affiliated to Zahedan University of Medical Sciences in 2014. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was accomplished on 68 employed nurses and 204 patients during a 4 month random sampling time interval. Three patients per nurse who had utilized at least 72 hours of nursing cares and were about to discharge at the time of research were chosen. Data collection tolls were the standardized questionnaires including nursing care quality measurement tool (Quality patient care scale: QUALPAC and Patient Satisfaction Instrument (PSI. The data were analyzed using Chi-square, One-Way ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient tests. Results: The average age of the nurses and patients were respectively 30.8±4.9 and 37.9±10.7. The average score for QUALPAC was 61.3±12.5 and the quality of care was desirable in 55% of cases. Moreover, the average score for the satisfaction of patients was 71.8±10.9 and the patients expressed an intermediate satisfaction in 61 percent of cases. There was a positive significant correlation between the nursing care and patient satisfaction (P=0001. Conclusion: It seems as if the health care system can provide the satisfaction of patients by enhancing nursing care quality or to employing more skilled nurses.

  4. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Gvozdanovi_

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on the enterprise information systems that will aim to support end-to-end business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: (1 to provide efficient healthcare-related data management in support of decision-making processes; (2 to support a continuous process of healthcare resource spending optimisation. The first project is the Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS on the primary care level; this encompasses the integration of all primary point-of-care facilities and subjects with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Croatian National Institute of Public Health. In years to come, IHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of health care (that is, hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories into a single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of Croatian public healthcare system strategy aims and goals, and focuses on properties and characteristics of the primary care project implementation that started in 2003; it achieved a major milestone in early 2007 - the official grand opening of the project with 350 GPs already fully connected to the integrated healthcare information infrastructure based on the IHCIS solution.

  5. Consumer Quality Index Chronic Skin Disease (CQI-CSD): a new instrument to measure quality of care from the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Cranenburgh, O D; Krol, M W; Hendriks, M C P; de Rie, M A; Smets, E M A; de Korte, J; Sprangers, M A G

    2015-10-01

    Assessing quality of care from the patient's perspective is considered to be highly relevant. As a standardized instrument in dermatology was lacking, we developed a patient experience questionnaire regarding chronic skin disease care: the Consumer Quality Index Chronic Skin Disease (CQI-CSD). (i) To evaluate the dimensional structure of the CQI-CSD, (ii) to assess its ability to distinguish between hospitals according to patients' experiences with quality of care, (iii) to explore patients' experiences with dermatological care and priorities for quality improvement according to the patients, and (iv) to optimize the questionnaire based on psychometric results and stakeholders' input. In a cross-sectional study 5647 adult patients who received dermatological care in the past 12 months in 20 hospitals were randomly selected and invited to fill out the questionnaire. Overall 1160 of 3989 eligible respondents (29% response rate, 30-87 per hospital) were included for analysis. The CQI-CSD comprised seven scales with high internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0·74-0·92). The instrument's discriminative power was limited. Patients were positive about the care provided by nurses and doctors, but the provision of information by healthcare providers, accessibility of care and patient involvement could be improved. We optimized the CQI-CSD, resulting in a revised questionnaire containing 65 items. In conclusion, the CQI-CSD is a useful instrument to measure patient experiences with dermatological care. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. Better experiences with quality of care predict well-being of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Murray Cramm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to (1 identify improvements in care quality and well-being of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the Netherlands and (2 investigate the longitudinal relationship between these factors. Methods: This longitudinal study was conducted among patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease enrolled in the Kennemer Lucht care programme in the Netherlands. Biomarker data (lung capacity were collected at patients’ health care practices in 2012. Complete case analysis was conducted, and the multiple imputation technique allowed us to report pooled results from imputed datasets. Results: Surveys were filled out by 548/1303 (42% patients at T0 (2012 and 569/996 (57% remaining participants at T1. Quality of care improved significantly (p < 0.05. Analyses adjusted for well-being at T0, age, educational level, marital status, gender, lung function and health behaviours showed that patients’ assessments of the quality of chronic care delivery at T0 (p < 0.01 and changes therein (p < 0.001 predicted patients’ well-being at T1. Conclusion: These results clearly show that the quality of care and changes therein are important for the well-being of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the primary care setting. Practice implications: To improve quality of care for chronically ill patients, multicomponent interventions may be needed.

  7. HOME CARE NURSES’ ROLES IN ENHANCING QUALITY OF NURSING CARE FOR PATIENTS AT HOME: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Titan Ligita

    2017-01-01

    Background: Provision of health care service at home is one of the advanced forms of care for patients being discharged from hospitalization. Little is known about the experience of nurses providing home care services through a nursing home-care model especially in Indonesian context. Objective: This study aims to explore the experience in order to increase understanding on the form of home care provision, and consequently the nurses may understand the form of home care globally. Metho...

  8. [Effectiveness of an intervention to improve quality care in reducing cardiovascular risk in hypertense patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Marcos, Manuel A; García Ortiz, Luis; González Elena, Luis Javier; Sánchez Rodríguez, Angel

    2006-05-31

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention on health workers, based on quality improvement through reduction of cardiovascular risk in patients with hypertension. Quasi-experimental study. Primary care. Two urban health centres. A thousand hypertense patients selected by stratified random sampling. One centre (500) was assigned to implement a quality improvement intervention, while at the other centre (500) "usual care" procedures were followed (control group). The quality improvement intervention consisted of a combined program designed for the medical and nursing staff that comprised audit, feedback, training sessions, and implementation of clinical practice guidelines. Coronary risk using the Framingham scale and cardiovascular mortality risk using the SCORE project. Absolute coronary risk decreased from 16.94% (95% CI, 15.92-17.66) to 13.81% (95% CI, 13.09-14.52) (P<.001) in the intervention group; whilst there was no significant change in the control group, which dropped from 17.63% (95% CI, 16.68-18.53) to 16.82% (95% CI, 15.91-17.74). The intervention led to a 2.28% point decrease (95% CI, 1.35-3.21) (P<.001) in coronary risk. Cardiovascular mortality risk decreased from 2.48% (95% CI, 2.35-2.62) to 2.19% (95% CI, 2.07-2.31) (P<.001) in the intervention group, with no significant change in the control group, which changed from 2.45% (95% CI, 2.30-2.59) to 2.52% (95% CI, 2.38-2.66). The intervention led to a 0.36% point decrease (95% CI, 0.05-0.73) (P<.001) in cardiovascular mortality risk. The quality improvement intervention was effective in decreasing coronary risk and cardiovascular mortality risk in patients with hypertension.

  9. Intergroup communication between hospital doctors: implications for quality of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, David G; Watson, Bernadette M; Gallois, Cindy; Ward, Michael; Leggett, Barbara A

    2009-12-01

    Hospitals involve a complex socio-technical health system, where communication failures influence the quality of patient care. Research indicates the importance of social identity and intergroup relationships articulated through power, control, status and competition. This study focused on interspecialty communication among doctors for patients requiring the involvement of multiple specialist departments. The paper reports on an interview study in Australia, framed by social identity and communication accommodation theories of doctors' experiences of managing such patients, to explore the impact of communication. Interviews were undertaken with 45 doctors working in a large metropolitan hospital, and were analysed using Leximancer (text mining software) and interpretation of major themes. Findings indicated that intergroup conflict is a central influence on communication. Contested responsibilities emerged from a model of care driven by single-specialty ownership of the patient, with doctors allowed to evade responsibility for patients over whom they had no sense of ownership. Counter-accommodative communication, particularly involving interpersonal control, appeared as important for reinforcing social identity and winning conflicts. Strategies to resolve intergroup conflict must address structural issues generating an intergroup climate and evoke interpersonal salience to moderate their effect.

  10. [Does implementation of benchmarking in quality circles improve the quality of care of patients with asthma and reduce drug interaction?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann-Kolle, Petra; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Broge, Björn; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Schneider, Antonius

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this cluster-randomised controlled trial was to evaluate the efficacy of quality circles (QCs) working either with general data-based feedback or with an open benchmark within the field of asthma care and drug-drug interactions. Twelve QCs, involving 96 general practitioners from 85 practices, were randomised. Six QCs worked with traditional anonymous feedback and six with an open benchmark. Two QC meetings supported with feedback reports were held covering the topics "drug-drug interactions" and "asthma"; in both cases discussions were guided by a trained moderator. Outcome measures included health-related quality of life and patient satisfaction with treatment, asthma severity and number of potentially inappropriate drug combinations as well as the general practitioners' satisfaction in relation to the performance of the QC. A significant improvement in the treatment of asthma was observed in both trial arms. However, there was only a slight improvement regarding inappropriate drug combinations. There were no relevant differences between the group with open benchmark (B-QC) and traditional quality circles (T-QC). The physicians' satisfaction with the QC performance was significantly higher in the T-QCs. General practitioners seem to take a critical perspective about open benchmarking in quality circles. Caution should be used when implementing benchmarking in a quality circle as it did not improve healthcare when compared to the traditional procedure with anonymised comparisons. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  11. Patients' experiences with continuum of care across hospitals. A multilevel analysis of Consumer Quality Index Continuum of Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Berendsen, Annette J.

    Objective: Communication between professionals is essential because it contributes to an optimal continuum of care. Whether patients experience adequate continuum of care is uncertain. To address this, a questionnaire was developed to elucidate this care process from a patients' perspective. In this

  12. Quality of Care for Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases: Data for Accreditation Plan in Primary Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bożena

    There are scarce reports in the literature on factors affecting the assessment of the quality of care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Such information is relevant in the accreditation process on implementing the healthcare. The study group consisted of 133 adult patients with chronic respiratory diseases and 125 adult patients with chronic non-respiratory diseases. In the present study, the level of satisfaction from healthcare provided by the primary healthcare unit, disease acceptance, quality of life, health behaviors, and met needs were examined, as well as associations between variables with the use of correspondence analysis. The results are that in patients with chronic respiratory diseases an increase in satisfaction depends on the improvement of well-being in the mental sphere. The lack of problems with obtaining a referral to a specialist and a higher level of fulfilled needs also have a positive effect. Additionally, low levels of satisfaction should be expected in those patients with chronic respiratory diseases who wait for an appointment in front of the office for a long time, report problems with obtaining a referral to additional tests, present a low level of health behaviors, and have a low index of benefits.

  13. Quality indicators of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) care in critically ill patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rewa, Oleksa G; Villeneuve, Pierre-Marc; Lachance, Philippe; Eurich, Dean T; Stelfox, Henry T; Gibney, R T Noel; Hartling, Lisa; Featherstone, Robin; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2017-06-01

    Renal replacement therapy is increasingly utilized in the intensive care unit (ICU), of which continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is most common. Despite CRRT being a relatively invasive and resource intensive technology, there remains wide practice variation in its application. This systematic review appraised the evidence for quality indicators (QIs) of CRRT care in critically ill patients. A comprehensive search strategy was developed and performed in five citation databases (Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and PubMed) and select grey literature sources. Two reviewers independently screened, selected, and extracted data using standardized forms. Each retrieved citation was appraised for quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) and Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data were summarized narratively. Our search yielded 8374 citations, of which 133 fulfilled eligibility. This included 97 cohort studies, 24 randomized controlled trials, 10 case-control studies, and 2 retrospective medical audits. The quality of retrieved studies was generally good. In total, 18 QIs were identified that were mentioned in 238 instances. Identified QIs were classified as related to structure (n = 4, 22.2 %), care processes (n = 9, 50.0 %), and outcomes (n = 5, 27.8 %). The most commonly mentioned QIs focused on filter lifespan (n = 98), small solute clearance (n = 46), bleeding (n = 30), delivered dose (n = 19), and treatment interruption (n = 5). Across studies, the definitions used for QIs evaluating similar constructs varied considerably. When identified, QIs were most commonly described as important (n = 144, 48.3 %), scientifically acceptable (n = 32, 10.7 %), and useable and/or feasible (n = 17, 5.7 %) by their primary study authors. We identified numerous potential QIs of CRRT care, characterized by heterogeneous definitions, varying quality of derivation, and limited evaluation. Further study is needed to prioritize a concise

  14. Emergency Overcrowding Impact on the Quality of Care of Patients Presenting with Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Momeni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency overcrowding is defined as when the amount of care required for patients overcomes the available amount. This can cause delays in delivering critical care in situations like stroke. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the possible impact of emergency department (ED crowding on the quality of care for acute stroke patients. Methods: In this cross-sectional prospective study, all patients with symptoms of acute stroke presenting to the ED of educational hospitals were enrolled. All patients were assessed and examined by the emergency medicine (EM residents on shift and a questionnaire was filled out for them. The amount of time that passed from the first triage to performing the required interventions and delivering health services were recorded by the triage nurse. ED crowding was measured by the occupancy rate. Then, the correlation between all of the variables and ED crowding level were calculated. Results: The average daily bed occupancy rate was 184.9 ± 54.3%. The median time passed from the first triage to performing the interventions were as follows: the first EM resident visit after 34 min, the first neurologic visit after 138 min, head CT after 134 min, ECG after 104 min and ASA administration after 210 min. There was no statistically significant relationship between the ED occupancy rate and the time elapsed before different required health services in the management of stroke patients either throughout an entire day or during each 8-hour interval (p > 0.05. Conclusion: In the current study, the ED occupancy rate was not significantly correlated with the time frame associated with management of admitted acute stroke patients.

  15. Prejudices and elderly patients' personality -- the problem of quality of care and quality of life in geriatric medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błachnio, Aleksandra; Buliński, Leszek

    2013-08-16

    The article discusses the position of elderly patients in medical intervention context. The phenomenon of greying population has changed the attitude towards the old but common observations prove that quality of geriatric care is still unsatisfactory. In order to improve specialists' understanding of ageing, the comparative study on personality among people at different age was designed. The results are discussed in relation to the elderly patient-centred paradigm and in order to counterbalance still present ageist practices. The research involved 164 persons in the early and late adulthood stage ages. Among the old there were the young old (aged 65-74) and the older old (aged 75+). All participants were asked to fill the NEO-FFI. The results prove age-related differences in personality. In late adulthood in comparison to early adulthood there is the decline in openness to experiences. Two traits: agreeableness and conscientiousness increase significantly. Age did not differentiate significantly the level of neuroticism and of extraversion. The results of cluster analyses show the further differences in taxonomies of personality traits at different period of life. The results challenge the stereotypes that present older people as neurotic, and aggressive. The age did not differentiate significantly the level of neuroticism and of extraversion. In general, the obtained results prove that the ageist assumption that the geriatric patients are troublesome is not arguable. This article builds support for effective change in geriatric professional practices and improvement in the elderly patients' quality of life.

  16. Picture quality in mammography, and interrelation of radiation exposure. Invisible patient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, Takahide; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In these days when there are rumors about medical radiation exposure, it is the greatest keyword which it was inflicted with to radioactive ray's worker to secure radiation exposure reduction. I assume International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) BSS (Basic Safety Standards) guidance level, the medical radiation exposure reduction targeted value by JART (Japan Association of Radiological Technologists) a reasonable standard and, besides, must be able to tie equality and high quality medical care to an offer of security for a patient by getting rid of a difference in each institution. In mammography that needs is high in cancer death rate high rank of a woman as a background, authorization engineer system and institution authorization system establish it with a made guideline by a mammography precision management central committee, and not only an offer of a high quality picture depicting a minute mental change caused by a disease but also consideration of radiation exposure with the photography is done. Radiation exposure dose of radioactivity reduction by operation of a picture is nominated for possibility in digital system, but that radiation exposure dose of radioactivity increase than S/F system is felt uneasy about because actually I aim at the institution authorization acquisition. Maintain the high quality picture and to consider radiation exposure reduction are real invisible patient care, and I report the picture quality and interrelation of radiation exposure, and also speak a consideration method of the picture of the always equal tolerance level/tolerance level of the radiation exposure that a gap is not over in each institution. (author)

  17. Quality and Variability of Patient Directions in Electronic Prescriptions in the Ambulatory Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuze; Ward-Charlerie, Stacy; Dhavle, Ajit A; Rupp, Michael T; Green, James

    2018-01-18

    The prescriber's directions to the patient (Sig) are one of the most quality-sensitive components of a prescription order. Owing to their free-text format, the Sig data that are transmitted in electronic prescriptions (e-prescriptions) have the potential to produce interpretation challenges at receiving pharmacies that may threaten patient safety and also negatively affect medication labeling and patient counseling. Ensuring that all data transmitted in the e-prescription are complete and unambiguous is essential for minimizing disruptions in workflow at prescribers' offices and receiving pharmacies and optimizing the safety and effectiveness of patient care. To (a) assess the quality and variability of free-text Sig strings in ambulatory e-prescriptions and (b) propose best-practice recommendations to improve the use of this quality-sensitive field. A retrospective qualitative analysis was performed on a nationally representative sample of 25,000 e-prescriptions issued by 22,152 community-based prescribers across the United States using 501 electronic health records (EHRs) or e-prescribing software applications. The content of Sig text strings in e-prescriptions was classified according to a Sig classification scheme developed with guidance from an expert advisory panel. The Sig text strings were also analyzed for quality-related events (QREs). For purposes of this analysis, QREs were defined as Sig text content that could impair accurate and unambiguous interpretation by staff at receiving pharmacies. A total of 3,797 unique Sig concepts were identified in the 25,000 Sig text strings analyzed; more than 50% of all Sigs could be categorized into 25 unique Sig concepts. Even Sig strings that expressed apparently simple and straightforward concepts displayed substantial variability; for example, the sample contained 832 permutations of words and phrases used to convey the Sig concept of "Take 1 tablet by mouth once daily." Approximately 10% of Sigs contained QREs

  18. Improving Health Care Efficiency and Quality Using Tablet Personal Computers to Collect Research-Quality, Patient-Reported Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Amy P; Herndon, James E; Wheeler, Jane L; Patwardhan, Meenal; Shaw, Heather; Lyerly, H Kim; Weinfurt, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine whether e/Tablets (wireless tablet computers used in community oncology clinics to collect review of systems information at point of care) are feasible, acceptable, and valid for collecting research-quality data in academic oncology. Data/Setting Primary/Duke Breast Cancer Clinic. Design Pilot study enrolling sample of 66 breast cancer patients. Methods Data were collected using paper- and e/Tablet-based surveys: Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy General, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast, MD Anderson Symptom Inventory, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT), Self-Efficacy; and two questionnaires: feasibility, satisfaction. Principal Findings Patients supported e/Tablets as: easy to read (94 percent), easy to respond to (98 percent), comfortable weight (87 percent). Generally, electronic responses validly reflected responses provided by standard paper data collection on nearly all subscales tested. Conclusions e/Tablets offer a valid, feasible, acceptable method for collecting research-quality, patient-reported outcomes data in outpatient academic oncology. PMID:18761678

  19. Improved quality of patient care through routine second review of histopathology specimens prior to multidisciplinary meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Chantal C H J; Burger, Gerard; Al-Janabi, Shaimaa; Willems, Stefan M; van Diest, Paul J; Jiwa, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Double reading may be a valuable tool for improving quality of patient care by identifying diagnostic errors before final sign-out, but standard double reading would significantly increase costs of pathology. We assessed the added value of intradepartmental routine double reading of histopathology specimens prior to multidisciplinary meetings. Diagnoses, treatment plans and prognoses of patients are often discussed at multidisciplinary meetings. As part of the daily routine, all pathology specimens to be discussed at upcoming multidisciplinary meetings undergo prior intradepartmental double reading. We identified all histopathology specimens from 2013 that underwent such double reading and determined major and minor discordance rates based on clinical relevance between the initial and consensus sign-out diagnoses. We included 6796 histopathology specimens that underwent double reading, representing approximately 8% of all histopathology cases at our institution in 2013. Double reading diagnoses were concordant in 6566 specimens (96.6%). Major and minor discordances were observed in 60 (0.9%) and 170 (2.5%) specimens, respectively. Urology specimens had significantly more discordances than other tissues of origin, Gleason grading of prostate cancer biopsies being the most frequent diagnostic problem. Furthermore, premalignant and malignant cases showed significantly higher discordance rates than the rest. The vast majority (90%) of discordances represented changes within the same diagnostic category (eg, malignant to malignant). Routine double reading of histopathology specimens prior to multidisciplinary meetings prevents diagnostic errors. It resulted in about 1% discordant diagnoses of potential clinical significance, indicating that second review is worthwhile in terms of patient safety and quality of patient care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Association between obesity, quality of life, physical activity and health service utilization in primary care patients with osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemann, T.J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Herman, K.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of obesity with quality of life, health service utilization and physical activity in a large sample of primary care patients with osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Data were retrieved from the PraxArt project, representing a cohort of 1021 primary care

  1. Patients' level of satisfaction on quality of health care at Mwananyamala hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Kudra; Njau, Bernard

    2014-09-18

    Enhancing quality of health care delivered in public health facilities in developing countries is a key prerequisite to increase utilization and sustainability of health care services in the population. The aim of the study was to determine patients' level of satisfaction on the quality of health care delivered at the out-patient department (OPD) in Mwananyamala hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. A cross-sectional study design was conducted from April to May, 2012. A systematic sampling method was employed to select 422 study subjects. A pre-tested SERVQUAL questionnaire was used to collect data and one-sample t-test was employed to identify patients' level of satisfaction and principal component analysis to identify key items that measure quality of care. Patients' level of satisfaction mean gap score was (-2.88 ± 3.1) indicating overall dissatisfaction with the quality of care. The level of dissatisfaction in the five service dimensions were as follows: assurance (-0.47), reliability (-0.49), tangible (-0.52), empathy (-0.55), and responsiveness (-0.72). Patients attending OPD at Mwananyamala hospital demonstrates an overall dissatisfaction on quality of care. Hospital management should focus on: improvement on communication skills among OPD staff in showing compassion, politeness and active listening, ensure availability of essential drugs, and improvement on clinicians' prescription skills.

  2. Service Quality Of Diagnostic Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology In A Tertiary Care Hospital Of Lahore (Process Measure As Patient's Perspective).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Zainab; Usmani, Rabia Arshed; Rizvi, Amna; Wazir, Salim; Zahra, Taskeen; Rasool, Hafza

    2017-01-01

    Quality of any service is the most important aspect for the manufacturer as well as the consumer. The primary objective of any nation's health system is to provide supreme quality health care services to its patients. The objective of this study was to assess the quality of diagnostic fine needle aspiration cytology service in a tertiary care hospital. As Patient's perspectives provide valuable information on quality of process, therefore, patient's perception in terms of satisfaction with the service was measured. In this cross sectional analytical study, 291 patients undergoing fine needle aspiration cytology in Mayo Hospital were selected by systematic sampling technique. Information regarding satisfaction of patients with four dimensions of service quality process, namely "procedure, sterilization, conduct and competency of doctor" was collected through interview on questionnaire. The questionnaire was developed on SERVQUAL model, a measurement tool, for quality assessment of services provided to patients. All items were assessed on 2- point likert scale (0=dissatisfied, 1=satisfied). Frequencies and percentages of satisfied and dissatisfied patients were recorded for each item and all items in each dimension were scored. If the percentage of sum of all item scores of a dimension was ≥60, the dimension was 'good quality'. Whereas quality' dimension. Data was analysed using epi-info-3.5.1. Fisher test was applied to check statistical significance. (p-value service quality process, Procedure (48.8%), Sterilization (51.5%) and practitioner conduct (50.9%) were perceived as 'poor' by the patients. Only practitioner competency (67.4%) was perceived as 'good'. Comparison of dimensions of service quality scoring with overall level of patient satisfaction revealed that all 4 dimensions were significantly related to patient dissatisfaction (pservice quality of therapeutic and diagnostic procedures in public hospitals should be routinely monitored from the patients

  3. Better Patient Care At High-Quality Hospitals May Save Medicare Money And Bolster Episode-Based Payment Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Thomas C; Greaves, Felix; Zheng, Jie; Orav, E John; Zinner, Michael J; Jha, Ashish K

    2016-09-01

    US policy makers are making efforts to simultaneously improve the quality of and reduce spending on health care through alternative payment models such as bundled payment. Bundled payment models are predicated on the theory that aligning financial incentives for all providers across an episode of care will lower health care spending while improving quality. Whether this is true remains unknown. Using national Medicare fee-for-service claims for the period 2011-12 and data on hospital quality, we evaluated how thirty- and ninety-day episode-based spending were related to two validated measures of surgical quality-patient satisfaction and surgical mortality. We found that patients who had major surgery at high-quality hospitals cost Medicare less than those who had surgery at low-quality institutions, for both thirty- and ninety-day periods. The difference in Medicare spending between low- and high-quality hospitals was driven primarily by postacute care, which accounted for 59.5 percent of the difference in thirty-day episode spending, and readmissions, which accounted for 19.9 percent. These findings suggest that efforts to achieve value through bundled payment should focus on improving care at low-quality hospitals and reducing unnecessary use of postacute care. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  4. Hospital competition and patient-perceived quality of care: Evidence from a single-payer system in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Chen; Cheng, Shou-Hsia

    2010-11-01

    To examine the effects of market competition on patient-perceived quality of care under a single-payer system in Taiwan. Data came from two nationwide surveys conducted on discharged patients and National Health Insurance (NHI) hospital claim datasets in 2002 and 2004. Competition was measured by the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI). Quality of care was measured by patient-rated hospital performance including interpersonal skills and clinical competence domains. We used the instrumental variable approach to address the endogeneity between competition and patient-perceived quality of care. The results showed that HHI was significantly associated with a decrease in the perceived interpersonal skills (coefficient of -0.460; pcompetition. A similar association was found for the perceived clinical competence (coefficient of -0.457; p=0.001). Quality of care from the patients' perspective is sensitive to the degree of competition. By using patient-reported data, this study provides new evidence concerning competition and quality of care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nurse and patient interaction behaviors' effects on nursing care quality for mechanically ventilated older adults in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Marci L; Sereika, Susan M; Hoffman, Leslie A; Barnato, Amber; Donovan, Heidi; Happ, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    The study purposes were to (a) describe interaction behaviors and factors that may effect communication and (b) explore associations between interaction behaviors and nursing care quality indicators among 38 mechanically ventilated patients (age ≥60 years) and their intensive care unit nurses (n = 24). Behaviors were measured by rating videorecorded observations from the Study of Patient-Nurse Effectiveness with Communication Strategies (SPEACS). Characteristics and quality indicators were obtained from the SPEACS dataset and medical chart abstraction. All positive behaviors occurred at least once. Significant (p quality. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Quality of life and use of health care resources among patients with chronic depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villoro, Renata; Merino, María; Hidalgo-Vega, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study estimates the health-related quality of life and the health care resource utilization of patients diagnosed with chronic depression (CD) in Spain. Patients and methods We used the Spanish National Health Survey 2011–2012, a cross-sectional survey representative at the national level, that selects people aged between 18 and 64 years (n=14,691). We estimated utility indices through the EuroQol five-dimensional descriptive system questionnaire included in the survey. We calculated percentage use of health care resources (medical visits, hospitalizations, emergency services, and drug consumption) and average number of resources used when available. A systematic comparison was made between people diagnosed with CD and other chronic conditions (OCCs). The chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test, and Kruskal–Wallis test were used to determine the statistical significance of differences between comparison groups. Multivariate analyses (Poisson regression, logistic regression, and linear regression) were also carried out to assess the relationship between quality of life and consumption of health care resources. Results Approximately, 6.1% of the subjects aged between 18 and 64 years were diagnosed with CD (average age 48.3±11 years, 71.7% females). After controlling for age, sex, and total number of comorbidities, a diagnosis of CD reduced utility scores by 0.09 (P<0.05) vs OCCs, and increased the average number of hospitalizations by 15%, the average number of days at hospital by 51%, and the average number of visits to emergency services by 15% (P<0.05). CD also increased the average number of visits to secondary care by 14% and visits to general practitioners by 4%. People with CD had a higher probability of consuming drugs than people with OCCs (odds ratio [OR]: 1.24, P<0.05), but only 38.6% took antidepressants. Conclusion People with CD had significantly lower health-related quality of life than people with OCCs. CD was associated with

  7. An empirical assessment of boarding and quality of care: delays in care among chest pain, pneumonia, and cellulitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan W; Chang, Yuchiao; Weissman, Joel S; Griffey, Richard T; Thomas, James; Nergui, Suvd; Hamedani, Azita G; Camargo, Carlos A; Singer, Sara

    2011-12-01

    As hospital crowding has increased, more patients have ended up boarding in the emergency department (ED) awaiting their inpatient beds. To the best of our knowledge, no study has compared the quality of care of boarded and nonboarded patients. This study sought to examine whether being a boarded patient and boarding longer were associated with more delays, medication errors, and adverse events among ED patients admitted with chest pain, pneumonia, or cellulitis. This study was a retrospective cohort design in which data collection was accomplished via medical record review from two urban teaching hospitals. Patients admitted with chest pain, pneumonia, or cellulitis between August 2004 and January 2005 were eligible for inclusion. Our outcomes measures were: 1) delays in administration of home medications, cardiac enzyme tests, partial thromboplastin time (PTT), and antibiotics; 2) medication errors; and 3) adverse events or near misses. Primary independent variables were boarded status, boarding time, and boarded time interval. Multiple logistic regression models controlling for patient, ED, and hospital characteristics were used. A total of 1,431 patient charts were included: 811 with chest pain, 387 with pneumonia, and 233 with cellulitis. Boarding time was associated with an increased odds of home medication delays (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05 to 1.10), as were boarded time intervals of 12, 18, and 24 hours. Boarding time also was associated with lower odds of having a late cardiac enzyme test (AOR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.88 to 0.97). Boarding was associated with home medication delays, but fewer cardiac enzyme test delays. Boarding was not associated with delayed PTT checks, antibiotic administration, medication errors, or adverse events/near misses. These findings likely reflect the inherent resources of the ED and the inpatient units. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  8. Impact of nutritional status on the quality of life of advanced cancer patients in hospice home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmoradi, Negar; Kandiah, Mirnalini; Peng, Loh Su

    2009-01-01

    Cancer patients frequently experience malnutrition and this is an important factor in impaired quality of life. This cross-sectional study examined the association between global quality of life and its various subscales with nutritional status among 61 (33 females and 28 males) advanced cancer patients cared for by selected hospices in peninsular Malaysia. The Patient Generated-Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) and the Hospice Quality of Life Index (HQLI) were used to assess nutritional status and quality of life, respectively. Nine (14.7%) patients were well-nourished, 32 (52.5%) were moderately or suspected of being malnourished while 20 (32.8%) of them were severely malnourished. The total HQLI mean score for these patients was 189.9-/+51.7, with possible scores ranging from 0 to 280. The most problem areas in these patients were in the domain of functional well-being and the least problems were found in the social/spiritual domain. PG-SGA scores significantly correlated with total quality of life scores (r2= 0.38, pnutritional status exhibited a lower quality of life. Advanced cancer patients with poor nutritional status have a diminished quality of life. These findings suggest that there is a need for a comprehensive nutritional intervention for improving nutritional status and quality of life in terminally ill cancer patients under hospice care.

  9. The programmed nursing care for lower extremity deep venous thrombus patients receiving interventional thrombolysis: its effect on living quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Cuiyun; Wang Zhujun; Lan Guiyun; Liang Zhiqiang; Shi Yonmin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Tu study the effect of comprehensive programmed nursing intervention on the living quality in patients with lower extremity deep venous thrombus who receive interventional thrombolysis therapy. Methods: A total of 60 patients receiving interventional thrombolysis due to lower extremity deep venous thrombus were randomly and equally divided into two groups. Patients in study group (n=30) was treated with comprehensive programmed nursing intervention in addition to the conventional therapy and routine nursing care, while patients in control group (n=30) was treated with the conventional therapy and routine nursing care only. The conventional therapy and routine nursing care included the nursing assessment before the operation, observation of the vital signs and the cooperation psychological care during the operation, the performance of medication according to the doctor's orders after the operation, etc. The comprehensive programmed nursing intervention included the nursing assessment of the patient before operation and the scientifically making of the nursing plan, which mainly referred to the cognitive behavior, the psychological care and the health education. They were systematically carried out during the perioperative period. One month after discharge the patients were asked to pay a return visit. The living quality was evaluated with relevant standards, and the results were compared between the two groups. Results: The score of living quality in the study group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: The comprehensive programmed nursing intervention can significantly improve the living quality of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis patients who receive interventional thrombolysis therapy. (authors)

  10. Tailored educational supportive care programme on sleep quality and psychological distress in patients with heart failure: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yia-Ling; Chiou, Ai-Fu; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2016-09-01

    Up to 74% of patients with heart failure report poor sleep in Taiwan. Poor symptom management or sleep hygiene may affect patients' sleep quality. An effective educational programme was important to improve patients' sleep quality and psychological distress. However, research related to sleep disturbance in patients with heart failure is limited in Taiwan. To examine the effects of a tailored educational supportive care programme on sleep disturbance and psychological distress in patients with heart failure. randomised controlled trial. Eighty-four patients with heart failure were recruited from an outpatient department of a medical centre in Taipei, Taiwan. Patients were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=43) or the control group (n=41). Patients in the intervention group received a 12-week tailored educational supportive care programme including individualised education on sleep hygiene, self-care, emotional support through a monthly nursing visit at home, and telephone follow-up counselling every 2 weeks. The control group received routine nursing care. Data were collected at baseline, the 4th, 8th, and 12th weeks after patients' enrollment. Outcome measures included sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, anxiety, and depression. The intervention group exhibited significant improvement in the level of sleep quality and daytime sleepiness after 12 weeks of the supportive nursing care programme, whereas the control group exhibited no significant differences. Anxiety and depression scores were increased significantly in the control group at the 12th week (p.05). Compared with the control group, the intervention group had significantly greater improvement in sleep quality (β=-2.22, pquality and psychological distress in patients with heart failure. We suggested that this supportive nursing care programme should be applied to clinical practice in cardiovascular nursing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Quality of nursing care perceived by patients and their nurses: an application of the critical incident technique. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, S; Norman, I

    1999-07-01

    The aims of the study were to identify indicators of quality of nursing care from the perceptions of patients and nurses, and to determine the congruence between patients' and nurses' perceptions. The paper is presented in two parts. Part 1 includes the background and methods to the study and the findings from the comparison of patients' and nurses' perceptions. Part 2 describes the perceptions of patients and nurses, and the conclusions drawn from the study as a whole. Patients and nurses in hospital wards were interviewed using the critical incident technique. We grouped 4546 indicators of high and low quality nursing care generated from the interview transcripts into 316 subcategories, 68 categories and 31 themes. Congruence between patients' and nurses' perceptions of quality was high and significant, although there was some difference of emphasis.

  12. Perspectives on quality mental health care from Brazilian and Cape Verdean outpatients: implications for effective patient-centered policies and models of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Maria; Earl, Tara R

    2014-01-01

    Mental health providers are increasingly coming into contact with large and growing multi-racial/ethnic and immigrant patient populations in the United States. Knowledge of patient perspectives on what constitutes quality mental health care is necessary for these providers. The aim of this study was to identify indicators of quality of mental health care that matter most to two underrepresented immigrant patient groups of Portuguese background: Brazilians and Cape Verdeans. A qualitative design was adopted using focus group discussions. Six focus groups of patients (n=24 Brazilians; n=24 Cape Verdeans) who received outpatient mental health treatment through public safety net clinics in the northeast region of the United States were conducted. The Consensual Qualitative Research analytic method allowed us to identify three quality of care domains: provider performance, aspects of mental health care environment, and effectiveness of mental health care treatment. Provider performance was associated with five categories: relational, communication, linguistic, cultural, and technical competencies. Aspects of mental health care environment were linked to two categories: psychosocial and physical environment. Effectiveness of mental health care treatment was related to two categories: therapeutic relationship and treatment outcomes. Study findings provide useful data for the development of more culturally appropriate and effective patient-centered models and policies in mental health care.

  13. Using a multi-method, user centred, prospective hazard analysis to assess care quality and patient safety in a care pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escoto Kamisha

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care pathways can be complex, often involving multiple care providers and as such are recognised as containing multiple opportunities for error. Prospective hazard analysis methods may be useful for evaluating care provided across primary and secondary care pathway boundaries. These methods take into account the views of users (staff and patients when determining where potential hazards may lie. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of prospective hazard analysis methods when assessing quality and safety in care pathways that lie across primary and secondary care boundaries. Methods Development of a process map of the care pathway for patients entering into a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD supported discharge programme. Triangulation of information from: care process mapping, semi-structured interviews with COPD patients, semi-structured interviews with COPD staff, two round modified Delphi study and review of prioritised quality and safety challenges by health care staff. Results Interview themes emerged under the headings of quality of care and patient safety. Quality and safety concerns were mostly raised in relation to communication, for example, communication with other hospital teams. The three highest ranked safety concerns from the modified Delphi review were: difficulties in accessing hospital records, information transfer to primary care and failure to communicate medication changes to primary care. Conclusion This study has demonstrated the feasibility of using mixed methods to review the quality and safety of care in a care pathway. By using multiple research methods it was possible to get a clear picture of service quality variations and also to demonstrate which points in the care pathway had real potential for patient safety incidents or system failures to occur. By using these methods to analyse one condition specific care pathway it was possible to uncover a number of hospital

  14. Quality of nursing care perceived by patients and their nurses: an application of the critical incident technique. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, S; Norman, I

    1999-07-01

    The aims of the study were to identify indicators of quality of nursing care from the perceptions of patients and nurses, and to determine the congruence between patients' and nurses' perceptions. The paper is presented in two parts. Part 1 included the background and methods to the study and the findings from the comparison of patients' and nurses' perceptions. Part 2 describes the perceptions of patients and nurses, and draws conclusions drawn from the study as a whole. Patients and nurses in hospital wards were interviewed using the critical incident technique. We grouped 4546 indicators of high and low quality nursing care generated from the interview transcripts into 316 subcategories, 68 categories and 31 themes. The themes were grouped into eight clusters: therapeutic context for care, attitudes and sensitivity, teaching and leadership, motivation to nurse, monitoring and informing, high-dependency care, efficiency and thoroughness, reflection and anticipation. As shown in Part 1 of the paper, congruence between patients' and nurses' perceptions of quality was high and significant, although there was some difference of emphasis. The findings support an emerging theory of interpersonal competence and quality in nursing care.

  15. Quality of Care for Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions: The Role of Comorbidity Interrelatedness

    OpenAIRE

    Zulman, Donna M.; Asch, Steven M.; Martins, Susana B.; Kerr, Eve A.; Hoffman, Brian B.; Goldstein, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    Multimorbidity—the presence of multiple chronic conditions in a patient—has a profound impact on health, health care utilization, and associated costs. Definitions of multimorbidity in clinical care and research have evolved over time, initially focusing on a patient’s number of comorbidities and the associated magnitude of required care processes, and later recognizing the potential influence of comorbidity characteristics on patient care and outcomes. In this article, we review the relation...

  16. The Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire measuring patients' experience with quality of care after a total hip or knee arthroplasty.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbe, J.H.; Gelsema, T.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The Dutch Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire (CQI Hip Knee) was used to assess patients' experiences with and evaluations of quality of care after a total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aim of this study is to evaluate the construct validity and internal

  17. Nurse occupational burnout and patient-rated quality of care: The boundary conditions of emotional intelligence and demographic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Minston; Shih, Chih-Ting; Hsu, Shu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Most previous studies on the relationship between occupational burnout and the quality of care among nurses have used self-reported data on the quality of care from nurses, thus rendering evaluating the relationship between burnout and the quality of care difficult. Hospitals increasingly hire contract nurses and high turnover rates remain a concern. Little is known about whether nurses' emotional intelligence and demographic factors such as contract status, tenure, and marital status affect the quality of care when burnout occurs. This study investigated the relationship between burnout and patient-rated quality of care and investigated the moderating role of emotional intelligence and demographic variables. Hierarchical moderated regression was used to analyze 98 sets of paired data obtained from nurses and their patients at a teaching hospital in northern Taiwan. The results suggest that occupational burnout has a less unfavorable effect on the quality of care from permanent, married, and senior nurses. Nursing management should pay particular attention to retaining permanent, married, and senior nurses. To ensure a sustainable nursing workforce in the future, newly graduated registered nurses should have access to permanent positions and opportunities for long-term professional development. In addition, married nurses should be provided with flexible work-family arrangements to ensure their satisfaction in the nursing profession. © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  18. Outcome predictors and quality of life of severe burn patients admitted to intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buoninsegni Laura

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite significant medical advances and improvement in overall mortality rate following burn injury, the treatment of patients with extensive burns remains a major challenge for intensivists. We present a study aimed to evaluate the short- and the long-term outcomes of severe burn patients (total body surface area, TBSA > 40% treated in a polyvalent intensive care unit (ICU and to assess the quality of life of survivors, one year after the injury using the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D questionnaire. Methods A prospective-observational study was performed in an ICU of a University-affiliated hospital. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors predicting in-hospital mortality. The EQ-5D questionnaire was used to asses participant's long term self-reported general health. Results During a period of five years, 50 patients participated in the study. Their mean age was 53.8 ± 19.8; they had a mean of %TBSA burned of 54.5 ± 18.1. 44% and 10% of patients died in the ICU and in the ward after ICU discharge, respectively. Baux index, SAPS II and SOFA on admission to the ICU, infectious and respiratory complications, and time of first burn wound excision were found to have a significant predictive value for hospital mortality. The level of health of all survivors was worse than before the injury. Problems in the five dimensions studied were present as follows: mobility (moderate 68.5%; extreme 0%, self-care (moderate 21%; extreme 36.9%, usual activities (moderate 68.5%; extreme 21%, pain/discomfort (moderate 68.5%; extreme 10.5%, anxiety/depression (moderate 36.9%; extreme 42.1%. Conclusions In severe burn patients, Baux index, severity of illness on admission to the ICU, complications, and time of first burn wound excision were the major contributors to hospital mortality. Quality of life was influenced by consequences of injury both in psychological and physical health.

  19. THE EFFECTS OF HOSPITAL QUALITY OF CARE ON PATIENT BELONGING: STRUCTURAL EQUALITY MODEL AND MEDIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rıza FİRUZAN

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to measure the effects of perceived and expected service quality levels on patient loyalty. In total, 370 patients participated in this research. The Structural Equation Modeling (SEM method to test the causal relationship model. The corresponding model in the study emerged as acceptable fit with the model. The result of the study indicate that perceived service quality and patient loyalty are statistically significant and positively related to each other. Additionally, perceived service quality has found to be an important mediator between expected service quality and patient loyalty. After patients have treatment in corresponding hospital, they have been affected by service quality as mush as cost of medication. As patient satisfaction increases, their loyalty increases. It is suggested to hospital management that they might course of action to patients for improving Reliability and Assurance SERVQUAL factors

  20. Linking nurses' perceptions of patient care quality to job satisfaction: the role of authentic leadership and empowering professional practice environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Fida, Roberta

    2015-05-01

    A model linking authentic leadership, structural empowerment, and supportive professional practice environments to nurses' perceptions of patient care quality and job satisfaction was tested. Positive work environment characteristics are important for nurses' perceptions of patient care quality and job satisfaction (significant factors for retention). Few studies have examined the mechanism by which these characteristics operate to influence perceptions of patient care quality or job satisfaction. A cross-sectional provincial survey of 723 Canadian nurses was used to test the hypothesized models using structural equation modeling. The model was an acceptable fit and all paths were significant. Authentic leadership had a positive effect on structural empowerment, which had a positive effect on perceived support for professional practice and a negative effect on nurses' perceptions that inadequate unit staffing prevented them from providing high-quality patient care. These workplace conditions predicted job satisfaction. Authentic leaders play an important role in creating empowering professional practice environments that foster high-quality care and job satisfaction.

  1. Effort-reward imbalance and perceived quality of patient care: a cross-sectional study among physicians in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Loerbroks

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work stress may impair physicians’ ability to provide high quality patient care. Prior research remains however sparse and has insufficiently explored explanations for this relationship. It has been suggested that physicians’ poor mental health is one potential explanatory factor. We drew on a well-established model to measure work stress (the effort-reward imbalance [ERI] model in order to test this hypothesis. Further, to address another research gap and to potentially inform the development of better-targeted interventions, we aimed to examine associations of individual ERI constructs with the quality of care. Methods We used cross-sectional data, which had been collected in 2014 among 416 physicians in Germany. ERI constructs (i.e. effort, reward, the ERI ratio, and overcommitment were measured by the established 23-item questionnaire. Physicians’ perceptions of quality of care were assessed by a six-item instrument inquiring after poor care practices or attitudes. Physicians’ mental health was operationalized by the state scale of the Spielberger's State-Trait Depression Scales. We used both continuous and categorized dependent and independent variables in multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses. Results Both an increasing ERI ratio and increasing effort were associated with poorer quality of care while increasing rewards were related to better care. Physicians’ depressive symptoms did not affect these associations substantially. Associations with overcommitment were weak and attenuated to non-significant levels by correction for depressive symptoms. The level of overcommitment did not modify associations between the ERI ratio and quality of care. Conclusions Our study suggests that high work-related efforts and low rewards are associated with reports of poorer patient care among physicians, irrespectively of physicians’ depressive symptoms. Quality of patient care may thus be improved by

  2. Primary care team communication networks, team climate, quality of care, and medical costs for patients with diabetes: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Marlon P; Agneessens, Filip; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Zakletskaia, Larissa I; Kamnetz, Sandra A; Gilchrist, Valerie J

    2016-06-01

    Primary care teams play an important role in providing the best quality of care to patients with diabetes. Little evidence is available on how team communication networks and team climate contribute to high quality diabetes care. To determine whether primary care team communication and team climate are associated with health outcomes, health care utilization, and associated costs for patients with diabetes. A cross-sectional survey of primary care team members collected information on frequency of communication with other care team members about patient care and on team climate. Patient outcomes (glycemic, cholesterol, and blood pressure control, urgent care visits, emergency department visits, hospital visit days, medical costs) in the past 12 months for team diabetes patient panels were extracted from the electronic health record. The data were analyzed using nested (clinic/team/patient) generalized linear mixed modeling. 155 health professionals at 6 U.S. primary care clinics participated from May through December 2013. Primary care teams with a greater number of daily face-to-face communication ties among team members were associated with 52% (rate ratio=0.48, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.94) fewer hospital days and US$1220 (95% CI: -US$2416, -US$24) lower health-care costs per team diabetes patient in the past 12 months. In contrast, for each additional registered nurse (RN) who reported frequent daily face-to-face communication about patient care with the primary care practitioner (PCP), team diabetes patients had less-controlled HbA1c (Odds ratio=0.83, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99), increased hospital days (RR=1.57, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.03), and higher healthcare costs (β=US$877, 95% CI: US$42, US$1713). Shared team vision, a measure of team climate, significantly mediated the relationship between team communication and patient outcomes. Primary care teams which relied on frequent daily face-to-face communication among more team members, and had a single RN communicating patient care

  3. Primary care team communication networks, team climate, quality of care, and medical costs for patients with diabetes: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Marlon P.; Agneessens, Filip; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Zakletskaia, Larissa I.; Kamnetz, Sandra A.; Gilchrist, Valerie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary care teams play an important role in providing the best quality of care to patients with diabetes. Little evidence is available on how team communication networks and team climate contribute to high quality diabetes care. Objective To determine whether primary care team communication and team climate are associated with health outcomes, health care utilization, and associated costs for patients with diabetes. Methods A cross-sectional survey of primary care team members collected information on frequency of communication with other care team members about patient care and on team climate. Patient outcomes (glycemic, cholesterol, and blood pressure control, urgent care visits, emergency department visits, hospital visit days, medical costs) in the past 12 months for team diabetes patient panels were extracted from the electronic health record. The data were analyzed using nested (clinic/team/patient) generalized linear mixed modeling. Participants 155 health professionals at 6 U.S. primary care clinics participated from May through December 2013. Results Primary care teams with a greater number of daily face-to-face communication ties among team members were associated with 52% (Rate Ratio=0.48, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.94) fewer hospital days and US$1220 (95% CI: -US$2416, -US$24) lower health-care costs per team diabetes patient in the past 12 months. In contrast, for each additional registered nurse (RN) who reported frequent daily face-to-face communication about patient care with the primary care practitioner (PCP), team diabetes patients had less-controlled HbA1c (Odds Ratio=0.83, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99), increased hospital days (RR=1.57, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.03), and higher healthcare costs (β=US$877, 95% CI: US$42, US$1713). Shared team vision, a measure of team climate, significantly mediated the relationship between team communication and patient outcomes. Conclusions Primary care teams which relied on frequent daily face-to-face communication among more

  4. Effects of Aromatherapy on the Anxiety, Vital Signs, and Sleep Quality of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Patients in Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mi-Yeon; Min, Eun Sil; Hur, Myung-Haeng; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, sleep, and blood pressure (BP) of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients in an intensive care unit (ICU). Fifty-six patients with PCI in ICU were evenly allocated to either the aromatherapy or conventional nursing care. Aromatherapy essential oils were blended with lavender, roman chamomile, and neroli with a 6 : 2 : 0.5 ratio. Participants received 10 times treatment before PCI, and the same essential oils were inhaled another 10 times after PCI. Outcome measures patients' state anxiety, sleeping quality, and BP. An aromatherapy group showed significantly low anxiety (t = 5.99, P aromatherapy effectively reduced the anxiety levels and increased the sleep quality of PCI patients admitted to the ICU. Aromatherapy may be used as an independent nursing intervention for reducing the anxiety levels and improving the sleep quality of PCI patients. PMID:23476690

  5. A path analysis study of factors influencing hospital staff perceptions of quality of care factors associated with patient satisfaction and patient experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Sandra G; Karimi, Leila; Bartram, Timothy

    2017-11-16

    Hospital staff are interested in information on patient satisfaction and patient experience that can help them improve quality of care. Staff perceptions of quality of care have been identified as useful proxies when patient data are not available. This study explores the organizational factors and staff attitudes that influence staff perceptions of the quality of the care they provide in relation to patient satisfaction and patient experience. Cross sectional survey completed by 258 staff of a large multi-campus, integrated metropolitan hospital in Australia. Structured equation modelling was used to analyse the data. Our data suggest that different perceived organizational factors and staff attitudes contribute to different pathways for patient satisfaction and patient experience indicators. Hospital staff in our sample were more likely to indicate they provided the care that would result in higher patient satisfaction if they felt empowered within a psychologically safe environment. Conversely their views on patient experience were related to their commitment towards their hospital. There was no relationship between the staff perceptions of patient satisfaction and the staff response to the friends and family test. This study provides empirical evidence that staff perceptions of the quality of care they provide that is seen to be related to patient satisfaction and patient experience are enacted through different pathways that reflect differing perceptions of organizational factors and workplace psychological attitudes.

  6. Emergency Department Waiting Times (EDWaT): A Patient Flow Management and Quality of Care Rating mHealth Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Househ, Mowafa; Yunus, Faisel

    2014-01-01

    Saudi hospital emergency departments (ED) have suffered from long waiting times, which have led to a delay in emergency patient care. The increase in the population of Saudi Arabia is likely to further stretch the healthcare services due to overcrowding leading to decreased healthcare quality, long patient waits, patient dissatisfaction, ambulance diversions, decreased physician productivity, and increased frustration among medical staff. This will ultimately put patients at risk for poor health outcomes. Time is of the essence in emergencies and to get to an ED that has the shortest waiting time can mean life or death for a patient, especially in cases of stroke and myocardial infarction. In this paper, we present our work on the development of a mHealth Application - EDWaT - that will: provide patient flow information to the emergency medical services staff, help in quick routing of patients to the nearest hospital, and provide an opportunity for patients to review and rate the quality of care received at an ED, which will then be forwarded to ED services administrators. The quality ratings will help patients to choose between two EDs with the same waiting time and distance from their location. We anticipate that the use of EDWaT will help improve ED wait times and the quality of care provision in Saudi hospitals EDs.

  7. Developing Indicators of Service Quality Provided for Cardiovascular Patients Hospitalized in Cardiac Care Unit

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    Saber Azami-Aghdash

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are among the most prevalent chronic diseases leading to high degrees of mortality and morbidity worldwide and in Iran. The aim of the current study was to determine and develop appropriate indicators for evaluating provided service quality for cardiovascular patients admitted to Cardiac Care Units (CCU in Iran. Methods: In order to determine the indicators for evaluating provided service quality, a four-stage process including reviewing systematic review articles in premier bibliographic databases, interview, performing two rounds of Delphi technique, and holding experts panel by attendance of experts in different fields was adopted. Finally, after recognizing relevant indicators in resources, these indicators were finalized during various stages using ideas of 27 experts in different fields. Results: Among 2800 found articles in the text reviewing phase, 21 articles, which had completely mentioned relevant indicators, were studied and 48 related indicators were extracted. After two interviews with a cardiologist and an epidemiologist, 32 items of the indicators were omitted and replaced by 27 indicators coping with the conditions of Iranian hospitals. Finally, 43 indicators were added into the Delphi phase and after 2 rounds of Delphi with 18 specialists, 7 cases were excluded due to their low scores of applicability. In the experts’ panel stage, 6 items were also omitted and 10 new indicators were developed to replace them. Eventually, 40 indicators were finalized. Conclusion: In this study, some proper indicators for evaluating provided service quality for CCU admissions in Iran were determined. Considering the informative richness of these indicators, they can be used by managers, policy makers, health service providers, and also insurance agencies in order to improve the quality of services, decisions, and policies.

  8. [Quality of care and safety indicators in anticoagulated patients with non-valvular auricular fibrillation and deep venous thromboembolic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio, E; Mira, J J; Campos, F J; López de Sá, E; Lorenzo, A; Caballero, F

    2018-03-19

    To identify and prioritise indicators to assess the quality of care and safety of patients with non-valvular auricular fibrillation (NVAF) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) treated with anticoagulants. Using the consensus conference technique, a group of professionals and clinical experts, the determining factors of the NVAF and DVT care process were identified, in order to define the quality and safety criteria. A proposal was made for indicators of quality and safety that were prioritised, taking into account a series of pre-established attributes. The selected indicators were classified into indicators of context, safety, action, and outcomes of the intervention in the patient. A set of 114 health care and safety quality indicators were identified, of which 35 were prioritised: 15 for NVAF and 20 for DVT. About half (49%) of the indicators (40% for NVAF and 55% for DVT) applied to patient safety, and 26% (33% for NVAF and 20% for DVT) to the outcomes of interventions in the patient. The present work presents a set of agreed indicators by a group of expert professionals that can contribute to the improvement of the quality of care of patients with NVAF and DVT treated with anticoagulants. Copyright © 2018 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Armstrong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. Objective: This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. Methods: During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals (six public, three private in two South African provinces. In each hospital, one of each of the medical, surgical, paediatric, and maternity units was selected (n=36. Following informed consent, each unit manager was observed for a period of 2 hours on the survey day and the activities recorded on a minute-by-minute basis. The activities were entered into Microsoft Excel, coded into categories, and analysed according to the time spent on activities in each category. The observation data were complemented by semi-structured interviews with the unit managers who were asked to recall their activities on the day preceding the interview. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results: The study found that nursing unit managers spent 25.8% of their time on direct patient care, 16% on hospital administration, 14% on patient administration, 3.6% on education, 13.4% on support and communication, 3.9% on managing stock and equipment, 11.5% on staff management, and 11.8% on miscellaneous activities. There were also numerous interruptions and distractions. The semi-structured interviews revealed concordance between unit managers’ recall of the time spent on patient care, but a marked inflation of their perceived time spent on hospital administration. Conclusion: The creation of an enabling practice environment, supportive executive management, and continuing professional development are needed to enable nursing managers to lead the provision

  10. How Co-Creation Helped Address Hierarchy, Overwhelmed Patients, and Conflicts of Interest in Health Care Quality and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israilov, Sigal; Cho, Hyung J

    2017-11-01

    Co-creation is health professionals' and systems' development of health care together with patients and families. Such collaborations yield an exchange of values, ideas, and priorities that can individualize care for each patient. Co-creation has been discussed interchangeably with co-production and shared decision making; this article explores co-creation through the lens of quality improvement. Although there are barriers to co-creation including physician autonomy, patient overwhelm, and conflicts of interest, co-creation has been shown to promote patient engagement, peer learning, and improved outcomes. Further research is needed in co-creation for systems improvement. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Quality care provision for older people: an interview study with patients and primary healthcare professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, Marjolein Helena Johanna; Fluit, Cornelia Rita Maria Gertruda; Lagro, Joep; Niessen, Danielle; Rikkert, Marcellinus Gerardus Maria Olde; Lagro-Janssen, Antoinette Leonarda Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, primary health care for the ageing population has become increasingly complex. Aim This study sought to explore the views and needs of healthcare professionals and older patients relating to primary care in order to identify focal areas for improving primary health care for older people. Design and setting This research was structured as a mixed interview study with focus groups and individual interviews. Participants were made up of primary healthcare professionals and older patients. Patients were recruited from five elderly care homes in a small city in the southern part of the Netherlands. Method All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by two individual researchers applying constant comparative analysis. Data collection proceeded until saturation was reached. Results Participants in the study agreed about the need for primary care for older patients, and showed sympathy with one another’s perspectives. They did note, however, a number of obstacles hindering good healthcare provision. The major themes that arose were: ‘autonomy and independence’, ‘organisational barriers’, and ‘professional expertise’. Participants generally noted that it is important to clarify differences in perspectives about good care between patients and healthcare professionals. Conclusion Effective primary care intervention for older patients requires mutual understanding of the expectations and goals of all parties involved. There are a number of important requirements, especially accessible patient information in the form of care plans; specialist training for nurses and GPs on complex care and multimorbidity; and training on discussing autonomy, goal setting, and shared care. Further improvement in health care for older people and its evaluation research should focus on these requirements. PMID:26212845

  12. Quality Tuberculosis Care in Indonesia: Using Patient Pathway Analysis to Optimize Public-Private Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surya, Asik; Setyaningsih, Budiarti; Suryani Nasution, Helmi; Gita Parwati, Cicilia; Yuzwar, Yullita E; Osberg, Mike; Hanson, Christy L; Hymoff, Aaron; Mingkwan, Pia; Makayova, Julia; Gebhard, Agnes; Waworuntu, Wiendra

    2017-11-06

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the fourth leading cause of death in Indonesia. In 2015, the World Health Organization estimated that nearly two-thirds of the TB patients in Indonesia had not been notified, and the status of their care remained unknown. As such, Indonesia is home to nearly 20% of the world's "missing" TB patients. Understanding where patients go for care may enable strategic planning of services to better reach them. A patient pathway analysis (PPA) was conducted to assess the alignment between patient care seeking and the availability of TB diagnostic and treatment services at the national and subnational level in Indonesia. The PPA results revealed that only 20% of patients encountered diagnostic capacity at the location where they first sought care. Most initial care seeking occurred in the private sector and case notification lagged behind diagnostic confirmation in the public sector. The PPA results emphasize the role that the private sector plays in TB patient care seeking and suggested a need for differentiated approaches, by province, to respond to variances in care-seeking patterns and the capacities of public and private providers. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  13. Trending Longitudinal Agreement between Parent and Child Perceptions of Quality of Life for Pediatric Palliative Care Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meaghann S. Weaver

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric palliative care studies often rely on proxy-reported instead of direct child-reported quality of life metrics. The purpose of this study was to longitudinally evaluate quality of life for pediatric patients receiving palliative care consultations and to compare patient-reported quality of life with parent perception of the child’s quality of life across wellness domains. The 23-item PedsQL™ V4.0 Measurement Model was utilized for ten child and parent dyads at time of initial palliative care consultation, Month 6, and Month 12 to assess for physical, emotional, social, and cognitive dimensions of quality of life as reported independently by the child and by the parent for the child. Findings were analyzed using Bland–Altman plots to compare observed differences to limits of agreement. This study revealed overall consistency between parent- and child-reported quality of life across domains. Physical health was noted to be in closest agreement. At the time of initial palliative care consult, children collectively scored their social quality of life higher than parental perception of the child’s social quality of life; whereas, emotional and cognitive quality of life domains were scored lower by children than by the parental report. At the one year survey time point, the physical, emotional, and social domains trended toward more positive patient perception than proxy perception with congruence between quality of life scores for the cognitive domain. Findings reveal the importance of eliciting a child report in addition to a parent report when measuring and longitudinally trending perceptions on quality of life.

  14. Patient safety and quality of care: How may clinical simulation contribute?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Jensen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The usability of health information technology (IT is increasingly recognized as critically important to the development of systems that ensure patient safety and quality of care. The substantial complexity of organizations, work practice and physical environments within the healthcare sector influences the development and application of health IT. When health IT is introduced in local clinical work practices, potential patient safety hazards and insufficient support of work practices need to be examined. Qualitative methods, such as clinical simulation, may be used to evaluate new technology in correlation with the clinical context and to study the interaction between users, technology and work practice. Compared with the “classic” methods, such as heuristic inspection and usability testing, clinical simulation takes the clinical context into account. Clinical simulation can be useful in many processes in the human-centred design cycle. In the requirement specification, clinical simulation can be useful to analyze user requirements and work practice as well to evaluate requirements. In the design of health IT, clinical simulation can be used to evaluate clinical information systems and serve as common ground to help to achieve a shared understanding between various communities of practice. In a public procurement process, a clinical simulation-based assessment can help give insight into different solutions and how they support work practice. Before organizational implementation, clinical simulation is a very suitable means, by which to assess an application in connection with work practice.

  15. The Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire measuring patients' experiences with quality of care after a total hip or knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delnoij Diana MJ

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dutch Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire (CQI Hip Knee was used to assess patients' experiences with and evaluations of quality of care after a total hip (THA or total knee arthroplasty (TKA. The aim of this study is to evaluate the construct validity and internal consistency reliability of this new instrument and to assess its ability to measure differences in quality of care between hospitals. Methods Survey data of 1,675 subjects who underwent a THA or TKA were used to evaluate the psychometric properties. Exploratory factor analyses were performed and item-total correlations and inter-factor correlations were calculated to assess the construct validity of the instrument. Reliability analyses included tests of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficients. Finally, multilevel analyses were performed to assess the ability of the instrument to discriminate between hospitals in quality of care. Results Exploratory factor analyses indicated that the survey consisted of 21 items measuring five aspects of care (i.e. communication with nurses, communication with doctors, communication with general practitioner, communication about new medication, and pain control. Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from 0.76 to 0.90 indicating good internal consistency. The survey's ability to discriminate between hospitals was partly supported by multilevel analysis. Two scales (i.e. communication with nurses and communication with doctors were able to measure differences between hospitals with respect to patients' experiences with quality of care. Logistic multilevel analyses indicated that hospitals explained part of the variation between patients in receiving information. Conclusion These findings suggest that the CQI Hip Knee is reliable and valid for use in Dutch health care. Health care providers or health plans can use this survey to measure patients' experiences with hospital care and to identify variations in care

  16. Improving the quality of nurse clinical documentation for chronic patients at primary care clinics: A multifaceted intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozayr H. Mahomed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deficiencies in record keeping practices have been reported at primary care level in the public health sector in South Africa. These deficiencies have the potential to negatively impact patient health outcomes as the break in information may hinder continuity of care. This disruption in information management has particular relevance for patients with chronic diseases. Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish if the implementation of a structured clinical record (SCR as an adjunct tool to the algorithmic guidelines for chronic disease management improved the quality of clinical records at primary care level. Method: A quasi-experimental study (before and after study with a comparison group was conducted across 30 primary health care clinics (PHCs located in three districts in South Africa. Twenty PHCs that received the intervention were selected as intervention clinics and 10 facilities were selected as comparison facilities. The lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS method was used to determine the number of records required to be reviewed per diagnostic condition per facility. Results: There was a a statistically significant increase in the percentage of clinical records achieving compliance to the minimum criteria from the baseline to six months post-intervention for both HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment and patients with non-communicable diseases (hypertension and diabetes. Conclusions: A multifaceted intervention using a SCR to supplement the educational outreach component (PC 101 training has demonstrated the potential for improving the quality of clinical records for patients with chronic diseases at primary care clinics in South Africa.

  17. Improving the quality of nurse clinical documentation for chronic patients at primary care clinics: A multifaceted intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Ozayr H; Naidoo, Salsohni; Asmall, Shaidah; Taylor, Myra

    2015-09-25

    Deficiencies in record keeping practices have been reported at primary care level in the public health sector in South Africa. These deficiencies have the potential to negatively impact patient health outcomes as the break in information may hinder continuity of care. This disruption in information management has particular relevance for patients with chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to establish if the implementation of a structured clinical record (SCR) as an adjunct tool to the algorithmic guidelines for chronic disease management improved the quality of clinical records at primary care level. A quasi-experimental study (before and after study with a comparison group) was conducted across 30 primary health care clinics (PHCs) located in three districts in South Africa. Twenty PHCs that received the intervention were selected as intervention clinics and 10 facilities were selected as comparison facilities. The lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) method was used to determine the number of records required to be reviewed per diagnostic condition per facility. There was a a statistically significant increase in the percentage of clinical records achieving compliance to the minimum criteria from the baseline to six months post-intervention for both HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment and patients with non-communicable diseases (hypertension and diabetes). A multifaceted intervention using a SCR to supplement the educational outreach component (PC 101 training) has demonstrated the potential for improving the quality of clinical records for patients with chronic diseases at primary care clinics in South Africa.

  18. Self-management intervention to improve self-care and quality of life in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Heng-Hsin; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chen, Kuei-Ying; Chang, Chien-Jung; Lin, Yu-Ping; Chou, Cheng-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Self-management intervention is a good method to improve self-care ability, as such, to promote quality of life. However, the research focused on self-management intervention in heart failure patients in Taiwan is very limited. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to test the effectiveness of self-management intervention in patients with heart failure in Taiwan and examine the relationship between self-care ability and quality of life. A quasi-experimental design was used in this study with convenience sampling. Of the 82 subjects participating in this study, 40 of them chose to join the experimental (self-management intervention plus usual care) and 42 of them chose to join control (usual care) group. Three questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were the demographic questionnaire, the self-care questionnaire (Self-Care of HF Index V 6), and the quality of life questionnaire (Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire). To examine the effectiveness of the intervention, self-care ability and quality of life were measured, using a pretest, 1- and 2-month follow-up assessment. Generalized estimation equations (GEE) were used to compare changes over time among groups for outcomes to ensure the effectiveness of the intervention. This study confirmed the effectiveness of the self-management intervention. The clinical provider should increase the awareness of the importance of self-management skills and self-care ability especially for heart failure patients. The designated disease-specific self-management patient book and individualize intervention should be dispensing and implementing. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Assessment of patient's experiences across the interface between primary and secondary care: Consumer Quality Index Continuum of Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, A.J.; Groenier, K.H.; Jong, de G.M.; Jong, de B.A.; Veen, van der W.J.; Dekker, J.; Waal, de M.W.M.; Schuling, J.

    2009-01-01

    0.4, except between the domains GP Approach and GP Referral. All domains clearly produced discriminating scores for groups with different characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: The Consumer Quality Index (CQ-index) Continuum of Care can be a useful instrument to assess aspects of the collaboration between

  20. Quality of Care for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Dubai: A HEDIS-Like Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelagh M. Szabo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. As little data are available on the quality of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM care in the Arabian Gulf States, we estimated the proportion of patients receiving recommended monitoring at the Dubai Hospital for T2DM over one year. Methods. Charts from 150 adults with T2DM were systematically sampled and quality of care was assessed during one calendar year, using a Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set- (HEDIS- like assessment. Screening for glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, blood pressure, retinopathy, and nephropathy was considered. Patients were classified based on their most recent test in the period, and predictors of receiving quality care were examined. Results. Mean age was 58 years (standard deviation (SD: 12.4 years and 33% were males. Over the year, 98% underwent HbA1c screening (50% had control and 28% displayed poor control; 91% underwent LDL screening (65% had control; 55% had blood pressure control; 30% had retinopathy screening; and 22% received attention for nephropathy. No individual characteristics examined predicted receiving quality care. Conclusion. Some guideline monitoring was conducted for most patients; and rates of monitoring for selected measures were comparable to benchmarks from the United States. Greater understanding of factors leading to high adherence would be useful for other areas of preventive care and other jurisdictions.

  1. Professional Quality of Life of Veterans Affairs Staff and Providers in a Patient-Centered Care Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Sara M; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the work environment prompted by the movement toward patient-centered care have the potential to improve occupational stress among health care workers by improving team-based work activities, collaboration, and employee-driven quality improvement. This study was conducted to examine professional quality of life among providers at patient-centered care pilot facilities. Surveys were conducted with 76 Veterans Affairs employees/providers at facilities piloting patient-centered care interventions, to assess demographics, workplace practices and views (team-based environment, employee voice, quality of communication, and turnover intention), and professional quality of life (compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress).Professional quality-of-life subscales were not related to employee position type, age, or gender. Employee voice measures were related to lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction. In addition, employees who were considering leaving their position showed higher burnout and lower compassion satisfaction scores. None of the work practices showed relationships with secondary traumatic stress.

  2. Health-related quality of life and health care use in cancer survivors compared with patients with chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heins, Marianne J; Korevaar, Joke C; Hopman, Petra E P C; Donker, Gé A; Schellevis, François G; Rijken, Mieke P M

    2016-03-15

    The number of cancer survivors is steadily increasing and these patients often experience long-lasting health problems. To make care for cancer survivors sustainable for the future, it would be relevant to put the effects of cancer in this phase into perspective. Therefore, the authors compared health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and health care use among cancer survivors with that of patients with chronic diseases. Patients diagnosed at age >18 years with a cancer with a 5-year survival rate > 20% and no distant metastases at the time of diagnosis and patients aged >18 years with physician-diagnosed somatic chronic diseases without cancer were sent a questionnaire. HRQOL was measured with the RAND-36, a measure of HRQOL. Self-reported health care use was measured for general practitioner care, specialist care, rehabilitative care, physical therapy, ambulatory mental health care, and occupational health care. A total of 601 cancer survivors and 1052 patients with chronic diseases without cancer were included in the current study. Multimorbidity was observed in 63% of the cancer survivors and 61% of the patients with chronic diseases. The HRQOL of the cancer survivors was significantly better than that of patients with chronic diseases after adjustment for age and sex. For the mental functioning subscale, no significant differences were found between the 2 groups. Cancer survivors were found to be less likely to have visited a general practitioner or cardiologist compared with patients with chronic diseases. When considering physical HRQOL and health care use, cancer survivors appear to fare better than the average patient with chronic diseases. No difference in mental functioning was observed in the current study. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  3. Quality indicators for colorectal cancer surgery and care according to patient-, tumor-, and hospital-related factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathoulin-Pélissier, Simone; Bécouarn, Yves; Belleannée, Geneviève; Pinon, Elodie; Jaffré, Anne; Coureau, Gaëlle; Auby, Dominique; Renaud-Salis, Jean-Louis; Rullier, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) care has improved considerably, particularly since the implementation of a quality of care program centered on national evidence-based guidelines. Formal quality assessment is however still needed. The aim of this research was to identify factors associated with practice variation in CRC patient care. CRC patients identified from all cancer centers in South-West France were included. We investigated variations in practices (from diagnosis to surgery), and compliance with recommended guidelines for colon and rectal cancer. We identified factors associated with three colon cancer practice variations potentially linked to better survival: examination of ≥12 lymph nodes (LN), non-use and use of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II and stage III patients, respectively. We included 1,206 patients, 825 (68%) with colon and 381 (32%) with rectal cancer, from 53 hospitals. Compliance was high for resection, pathology report, LN examination, and chemotherapy use for stage III patients. In colon cancer, 26% of stage II patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and 71% of stage III patients. 84% of stage US T3T4 rectal cancer patients received pre-operative radiotherapy. In colon cancer, factors associated with examination of ≥12 LNs were: lower ECOG score, advanced stage and larger hospital volume; factors negatively associated were: left sided tumor location and one hospital district. Use of chemotherapy in stage II patients was associated with younger age, advanced stage, emergency setting and care structure (private and location); whereas under-use in stage III patients was associated with advanced age, presence of comorbidities and private hospitals. Although some changes in practices may have occurred since this observational study, these findings represent the most recent report on practices in CRC in this region, and offer a useful methodological approach for assessing quality of care. Guideline compliance was high, although some organizational

  4. The association between experiences with patient-centred care and health-related quality of life in women with endometriosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apers, Silke; Dancet, Eline A. F.; Aarts, Johanna W. M.; Kluivers, Kirsten B.; D'Hooghe, Thomas M.; Nelen, Willianne L. D. M.

    2018-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, we investigated whether patient-centred endometriosis care (PCEC) is associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Dutch-speaking women with endometriosis, treated by laparoscopy in a university clinic between 2009 and 2010, were eligible (n = 194).

  5. The impact of clinicians' personality and their interpersonal behaviors on the quality of patient care: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerebach, Benjamin C. M.; Scheepers, Renée A.; van der Leeuw, Renée M.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2014-01-01

    To review systematically the impact of clinicians' personality and observed interpersonal behaviors on the quality of their patient care. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO from inception through January 2014, using both free text words and subject headings, without language restriction.

  6. The effect of generalist and specialist care on quality of life in asthma patients with and without allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Lotte; Nolte, Hendrik; Backer, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of asthma and rhinitis patients is often provided by both generalists (GPs) and specialists (SPs). Studies have shown differences in clinical outcomes of treatment between these settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of GP and SP care on health-related quality of life...

  7. Quality of life from the perspective of the palliative care patient in a resource-poor community in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen van Rensburg, Jacoba J M; Maree, Johanna E; van Belkum, Corrien

    2013-02-01

    Quality of life is an ill-defined term, as it means different things to different people. Quality of life has been well researched, especially with respect to people with cancer, but not necessarily from the perspective of the patient, and also, not in Third World, resource-poor countries. The objective of this study was to explore quality of life from the perspective of palliative care patients managed at a palliative care clinic serving a resource-poor community in Tshwane, South Africa. An exploratory, qualitative phenomenological study was conducted. The target population for this study was all patients managed at a palliative care clinic serving a resource-poor community in Tshwane. Self-report data were gathered by means of in-depth interviews. The data were analyzed using a template analysis style as well as content analysis using open coding. Data analysis was done concurrently with data gathering. Data saturation was reached after 10 interviews (n = 10). Three themes arose from the data: factors that had a positive influence on quality of life, factors that had a negative influence on quality of life, and experience of quality of life. Work played the most important role in quality of life whereas only one participant linked symptom control with quality of life. Experiencing symptoms, rejection, and stigmatization had a negative influence on quality of life. Friends and religion played a significant role and added to quality of life. Life was a daily struggle for survival. Poverty was so overwhelming that quality of life was primarily measured in terms of the ability to buy food and other basic commodities.

  8. Quality of care for elderly patients hospitalized for pneumonia in the United States, 2006 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan S; Nsa, Wato; Hausmann, Leslie R M; Trivedi, Amal N; Bratzler, Dale W; Auden, Dana; Mor, Maria K; Baus, Kristie; Larbi, Fiona M; Fine, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    Nearly every US acute care hospital reports publicly on adherence to recommended processes of care for patients hospitalized with pneumonia. However, it remains uncertain how much performance of these process measures has improved over time or whether performance is associated with superior patient outcomes. To describe trends in processes of care, mortality, and readmission for elderly patients hospitalized for pneumonia and to assess the independent associations between processes and outcomes of care. Retrospective cohort study conducted from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2010, at 4740 US acute care hospitals. The cohort included 1 818 979 cases of pneumonia in elderly (≥65 years), Medicare fee-for-service patients who were eligible for at least 1 of 7 pneumonia inpatient processes of care tracked by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Annual performance rates for 7 pneumonia processes of care and an all-or-none composite of these measures; and 30-day, all-cause mortality and hospital readmission, adjusted for patient and hospital characteristics. Adjusted annual performance rates for all 7 CMS processes of care (expressed in percentage points per year) increased significantly from 2006 to 2010, ranging from 1.02 for antibiotic initiation within 6 hours to 5.30 for influenza vaccination (P < .001). All 7 measures were performed in more than 92% of eligible cases in 2010. The all-or-none composite demonstrated the largest adjusted relative increase over time (6.87 percentage points per year; P < .001) and was achieved in 87.4% of cases in 2010. Adjusted annual mortality decreased by 0.09 percentage points per year (P < .001), driven primarily by decreasing mortality in the subgroup not treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) (-0.18 percentage points per year; P < .001). Adjusted annual readmission rates decreased significantly by 0.25 percentage points per year (P < .001). All 7 processes of care were independently

  9. Quasi-experimental evaluation of a multifaceted intervention to improve quality of end-of-life care and quality of dying for patients with advanced dementia in long-term care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreault, René; Arcand, Marcel; Misson, Lucie; Durand, Pierre J; Kroger, Edeltraut; Aubin, Michèle; Savoie, Maryse; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Bédard, Annick; Grégoire, Annie; Carmichael, Pierre-Hughes

    2018-03-01

    Improvement in the quality of end-of-life care for advanced dementia is increasingly recognized as a priority in palliative care. To evaluate the impact of a multidimensional intervention to improve quality of care and quality of dying in advanced dementia in long-term care facilities. Quasi-experimental study with the intervention taking place in two long-term care facilities versus usual care in two others over a 1-year period. The intervention had five components: (1) training program to physicians and nursing staff, (2) clinical monitoring of pain using an observational pain scale, (3) implementation of a regular mouth care routine, (4) early and systematic communication with families about end-of-life care issues with provision of an information booklet, and (5) involvement of a nurse facilitator to implement and monitor the intervention. Quality of care was assessed with the Family Perception of Care Scale. The Symptom Management for End-of-Life Care in Dementia and the Comfort Assessment in Dying scales were used to assess the quality of dying. A total of 193 residents with advanced dementia and their close family members were included (97 in the intervention group and 96 in the usual care group). The Family Perception of Care score was significantly higher in the intervention group than in the usual care group (157.3 vs 149.1; p = 0.04). The Comfort Assessment and Symptom Management scores were also significantly higher in the intervention group. Our multidimensional intervention in long-term care facilities for patients with terminal dementia resulted in improved quality of care and quality of dying when compared to usual care.

  10. The quality of palliative care for patients with cancer in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effendy, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, four aspects of advanced cancer care in Indonesia have been studied: (1) The identification of problems and needs of patients with advanced cancer in Indonesian hospitals, with a comparison to a comparable group of patients in the Netherlands. (2) Assessment whether the problems of

  11. Telegenetics use in presymptomatic genetic counselling : patient evaluations on satisfaction and quality of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Ellen; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V.; van Langen, Irene M.

    In recent years, online counselling has been introduced in clinical genetics to increase patients' access to care and to reduce time and cost for both patients and professionals. Most telegenetics reports so far evaluated online oncogenetic counselling at remote health centres in regions with large

  12. A disease management programme for patients with diabetes mellitus is associated with improved quality of care within existing budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuten, L M G; Vrijhoef, H J M; Landewé-Cleuren, S; Schaper, N; Van Merode, G G; Spreeuwenberg, C

    2007-10-01

    To assess the impact of a disease management programme for patients with diabetes mellitus (Type 1 and Type 2) on cost-effectiveness, quality of life and patient self-management. By organizing care in accordance with the principles of disease management, it is aimed to increase quality of care within existing budgets. Single-group, pre-post design with 2-year follow-up in 473 patients. Substantial significant improvements in glycaemic control, health-related quality of life (HRQL) and patient self-management were found. No significant changes were detected in total costs of care. The probability that the disease management programme is cost-effective compared with usual care amounts to 74%, expressed in an average saving of 117 per additional life year at 5% improved HRQL. Introduction of a disease management programme for patients with diabetes is associated with improved intermediate outcomes within existing budgets. Further research should focus on long-term cost-effectiveness, including diabetic complications and mortality, in a controlled setting or by using decision-analytic modelling techniques.

  13. Moving a step forward to promote patient safety and quality of care in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Iglesia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving safety and quality of care has always been at the heart of national, European and international policies. The premises of such concern have their roots in the times of the Greek physician Hippocrates of Cos, about the 4th century BC, with the directive primum non nocere (“first do no harm”. [...

  14. Assessment of quality of prescribing in patients of hypertension at primary and secondary health care facilities using the Prescription Quality Index (PQI) tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthar, Jalpa Vashishth; Patel, Varsha J

    2014-01-01

    To determine the quality of prescribing in hypertension in primary and secondary health care settings using the Prescription Quality Index (PQI) tool and to assess the reliability of this tool. An observational cross-sectional study was carried out for 6 months in order to assess quality of prescribing of antihypertensive drugs using Prescription Quality Index (PQI) at four primary (PHC) and two secondary (SHC) health care facilities. Patients attending these facilities for at least 3 months were included. Complete medical history and prescriptions received were noted. Total and criteria wise PQI scores were derived for each prescription. Prescriptions were categorized as poor (score of ≤31), medium (score 32-33) and high quality (score 34-43) based on PQI total score. Psychometric analysis using factor analysis was carried out to assess reliability and validity. Total 73 hypertensive patients were included. Mean age was 61.2 ± 11 years with 35 (48%) patients above 65 years of age. Total PQI score was 26 ± 11. There was a significant difference in PQI score between PHC and SHC (P hypertensive patients was poor, somewhat better in primary as compared to secondary health care facility. PQI is reliable for measuring prescribing quality in hypertension in Indian set up.

  15. Patients' quality of life and role of the ambulatory in after-surgery stoma care. A single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magistri, Paolo; Scordamaglia, Maria Rosa; Giulitti, Diego; Papaspyropoulos, Vassilios; Eleuteri, Edoardo; Coppola, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    The aim is to assess on which aspects of everyday-life the post surgery stoma-care ambulatory should physically and psychologically assist the patients. Seventy patients (33 male, 37 female, mean age 68 years) accepted to fill-in the Stoma-QoL questionnaire from January to December 2011. The questionnaire consists of 20 questions addressing different possible discomforts of everyday life. Our results demonstrate that patients with temporary ileostomy have a mean score of quality of life index of 63. Patients with ileostomy demonstrated a higher quality of life score compared to patients with colostomy. Our results confirmed that patients with ileostomy have a better perception of quality of life compared to patients with colostomy. Moreover, our data clearly show that patients are more concerned on stoma management compared to the hypothetical prejudice of society. The stoma care ambulatory have a crucial role, offering to the patient and his/her family an adequate psychological support, and teaching the management of the stoma and the pouch.

  16. Using clinical supervision to improve the quality and safety of patient care: a response to Berwick and Francis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Jonathon

    2015-06-11

    After widely publicised investigations into excess patient deaths at Mid Staffordshire hospital the UK government commissioned reports from Robert Francis QC and Professor Don Berwick. Among their recommendations to improve the quality and safety of patient care were lifelong learning, professional support and 'just culture'. Clinical supervision is in an excellent position to support these activities but opportunities are in danger of being squeezed out by regulatory and managerial demands. Doctors who have completed their training are responsible for complex professional judgements for which narrative supervision is particularly helpful. With reference to the literature and my own practice I propose that all practicing clinicians should have regular clinical supervision. Clinical supervision has patient-safety and the quality of patient care as its primary purposes. After training is completed, doctors may practice for the rest of their career without any clinical supervision, the implication being that the difficulties dealt with in clinical supervision are no longer difficulties, or are better dealt with some other way. Clinical supervision is sufficiently flexible to be adapted to the needs of experienced clinicians as its forms can be varied, though its functions remain focused on patient safety, good quality clinical care and professional wellbeing. The evidence linking clinical supervision to the quality and safety of patient care reveals that supervision is most effective when its educational and supportive functions are separated from its managerial and evaluative functions. Among supervision's different forms, narrative-based-supervision is particularly useful as it has been developed for clinicians who have completed their training. It provides ways to explore the complexity of clinical judgements and encourages doctors to question one another's authority in a supportive culture. To be successful, supervision should also be professionally led and

  17. Quality of life assessment of patients with schizophrenic spectrum disorders from Psychosocial Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Fernandes Carpinteiro da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assessing the quality of life and the clinical and social-demographic factors associated in schizophrenic spectrum patients (ICD-10 F20-F29 attending CAPS at the programmatic area 3.0. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of schizophrenic spectrum patients who have been enrolled in 2008 in CAPS in programmatic area (AP 3 at Rio de Janeiro city, using MINIPLUS to assess schizophrenia spectrum disorder and use of psychoactive substances, Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS to assess psychiatric symptoms and Quality of Life Scale (QLS-BR to assess the quality of life. RESULTS: Seventy nine patients were included, of whom 74 (93.7% presented some impairment in quality of life. The most frequently affected area was occupational performance. Variables that showed a significant association with severe impairment of quality of life were: marital status, race, occupation, who patients lived with, homelessness, having children, previous psychiatric hospitalization, negative symptoms and symptoms designated as not applicable (being characterized by a lack of typical positive and negative symptoms. CONCLUSION: The knowledge of these factors should be crucial to implement health policies and psychosocial rehabilitation programs focused on improving the quality of life of these patients.

  18. Nurses' shift length and overtime working in 12 European countries: the association with perceived quality of care and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter; Dall'Ora, Chiara; Simon, Michael; Ball, Jane; Lindqvist, Rikard; Rafferty, Anne-Marie; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Tishelman, Carol; Aiken, Linda H

    2014-11-01

    Despite concerns as to whether nurses can perform reliably and effectively when working longer shifts, a pattern of two 12- to 13-hour shifts per day is becoming common in many hospitals to reduce shift to shift handovers, staffing overlap, and hence costs. To describe shift patterns of European nurses and investigate whether shift length and working beyond contracted hours (overtime) is associated with nurse-reported care quality, safety, and care left undone. Cross-sectional survey of 31,627 registered nurses in general medical/surgical units within 488 hospitals across 12 European countries. A total of 50% of nurses worked shifts of ≤ 8 hours, but 15% worked ≥ 12 hours. Typical shift length varied between countries and within some countries. Nurses working for ≥ 12 hours were more likely to report poor or failing patient safety [odds ratio (OR)=1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.13-1.76], poor/fair quality of care (OR=1.30; 95% CI, 1.10-1.53), and more care activities left undone (RR=1.13; 95% CI, 1.09-1.16). Working overtime was also associated with reports of poor or failing patient safety (OR=1.67; 95% CI, 1.51-1.86), poor/fair quality of care (OR=1.32; 95% CI, 1.23-1.42), and more care left undone (RR=1.29; 95% CI, 1.27-1.31). European registered nurses working shifts of ≥ 12 hours and those working overtime report lower quality and safety and more care left undone. Policies to adopt a 12-hour nursing shift pattern should proceed with caution. Use of overtime working to mitigate staffing shortages or increase flexibility may also incur additional risk to quality.

  19. Ability to Work among Patients with ESKD: Relevance of Quality Care Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutner, Nancy G; Zhang, Rebecca

    2017-08-07

    Enabling patient ability to work was a key rationale for enacting the United States (US) Medicare program that provides financial entitlement to renal replacement therapy for persons with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). However, fewer than half of working-age individuals in the US report the ability to work after starting maintenance hemodialysis (HD). Quality improvement is a well-established objective in oversight of the dialysis program, but a more patient-centered quality assessment approach is increasingly advocated. The ESKD Quality Incentive Program (QIP) initiated in 2012 emphasizes clinical performance indicators, but a newly-added measure requires the monitoring of patient depression-an issue that is important for work ability and employment. We investigated depression scores and four dialysis-specific QIP measures in relation to work ability reported by a multi-clinic cohort of 528 working-age maintenance HD patients. The prevalence of elevated depression scores was substantially higher among patients who said they were not able to work, while only one of the four dialysis-specific clinical measures differed for patients able/not able to work. Ability to work may be among patients' top priorities. As the parameters of quality assessment continue to evolve, increased attention to patient priorities might facilitate work ability and employment outcomes.

  20. The effect of education on the nursing care quality of patients who are under mechanical ventilation in ICU ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Geravandi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nurses have the most important role among health care workers (HCWs in each hospital (Aiken et al., 2008 [1]. Nurses education can lead to the improvement of nursing care If is implemented and designed based on nurses’ needs and proper principles (Aiken et al., 2008 [1]. Nowadays, increased quality of the treatment and increase the chances of survival of patients with acute respiratory failure are very important (Teixeira et al., 2013 [2]. Nursing care plan in ICU patients is one of the important elements in nursing care, and one of the main strategies is promotion of education level. Nurses due to longtime relationship with nursing staff in 24 hours and use of multiple roles of education have excellent position in evaluating educational needs and performing clinical educator roles. The effect of education on the nursing care quality of patients who were under mechanical ventilation (UMV in intensive care unit (ICU ward of Razi hospital is evaluated during 2015. The present study is descriptive-analytical and semi experimental research. Research statistical population included 30 nurses. In this paper, the effects of communication with the patient, correct suctioning, compliance of aseptic techniques, the correct discharge of tube cuff, chest physiotherapy, the correct change positions, health food gavage, prevent of foot drop, oral hygiene, the eyes hygiene and protect the cornea have been studied. After completion of the questionnaires by patients, the obtained coded data were fed into EXCEL. Reliability was confirmed with coefficient Alfa 0.86 and the result of software and techniques were entered to SPSS for statistics and analysis. Keywords: Education, Nurse, Intensive care unit, Mechanical ventilation, Nursing care, Iran

  1. Patient, carer and professional perspectives on barriers and facilitators to quality care in advanced heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Browne

    Full Text Available Those with advanced heart failure (HF experience high levels of morbidity and mortality, similar to common cancers. However, there remains evidence of inequity of access to palliative care services compared to people with cancer. This study examines patient, carer, and professional perspectives on current management of advanced HF and barriers and facilitators to improved care.Qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews and focus groups with advanced HF patients (n = 30, carers (n = 20, and professionals (n = 65. Data analysed using Normalisation Process Theory (NPT as the underpinning conceptual framework.Uncertainty is ubiquitous in accounts from advanced HF patients and their caregivers. This uncertainty relates to understanding of the implications of their diagnosis, appropriate treatments, and when and how to seek effective help. Health professionals agree this is a major problem but feel they lack knowledge, opportunities, or adequate support to improve the situation. Fragmented care with lack of coordination and poor communication makes life difficult. Poor understanding of the condition extends to the wider circle of carers and means that requests for help may not be perceived as legitimate, and those with advanced HF are not prioritised for social and financial supports. Patient and caregiver accounts of emergency care are uniformly poor. Managing polypharmacy and enduring concomitant side effects is a major burden, and the potential for rationalisation exists. This study has potential limitations because it was undertaken within a single geographical location within the United Kingdom.Little progress is being made to improve care experiences for those with advanced HF. Even in the terminal stages, patients and caregivers are heavily and unnecessarily burdened by health care services that are poorly coordinated and offer fragmented care. There is evidence that these poor experiences could be improved to a large extent by

  2. Care Management Medical Home Center Model: Preliminary Results of a Patient-Centered Approach to Improving Care Quality for Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Timothy F; Amofah, St Anthony; McCann, Shelia; Rivo, Julie; Varghese, Asha; James, Terisa; Rivo, Marc; Williams, Mark L

    2015-07-01

    This article presents preliminary findings of the impact of an innovative care management model for diabetic patients. The model was implemented by seven Federally Qualified Health Centers serving 10,000 diabetic patients in Miami-Dade County. A primary intervention of this model is a centralized care management team that makes previsit phone calls to diabetic patients who have scheduled appointments. These previsit phone calls optimize patient knowledge and self-management goals, and provide patient care coordinators with relevant clinical information to optimize the office visit and help to ensure completion of recommended diabetic preventive and chronic care services. Data suggest that following the implementation of this care management model, more diabetic patients are receiving regular care, and compliance with recommended tests and screenings has improved. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  3. The ecology of the patient visit: physical attractiveness, waiting times, and perceived quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Franklin; Douglass, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the attractiveness of the physical environment of healthcare facilities and patient perceptions of quality, service, and waiting time through systematic observations and patient satisfaction surveys at 7 outpatient practices at Weill Cornell Medical Center. Findings indicate positive correlations between more attractive environments and higher levels of perceived quality, satisfaction, staff interaction, and reduction of patient anxiety. The comparison of actual observed time and patients' perception of time showed that patients tend to overestimate shorter waiting times and underestimate longer waiting times in both the waiting area and the examination room. Further examinations of the way outpatient-practice environments impact patient and staff perceptions and how those perceptions impact behavior and medical outcomes are suggested.

  4. A correlational study of illness knowledge, self-care behaviors, and quality of life in elderly patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min-Hui; Wang, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yu-Yen; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Wang, Kai-Wei Katherine

    2014-06-01

    Patients with heart failure experience adverse physical symptoms that affect quality of life. The number of patients with heart failure in Taiwan has been growing in recent years. This article examines correlations among illness knowledge, self-care behaviors, and quality of life in elderly patients with heart failure. A cross-sectional research design using three questionnaires was adopted. The study was undertaken in an outpatient department of a teaching hospital in Taiwan from January to June 2008. Potential participants aged 65 years or older were selected by a physician based on several diagnostic findings of heart failure that included an International Classification of Diseases' code 4280 or 4289. Patients who were bedridden or had a prognosis of less than 6 months were excluded from consideration. One hundred forty-one patients with heart failure were recruited. Most participants were men (51.8%), older adults (49.6% older than 71 years old), and either educated to an elementary school level or illiterate (69.5%) and have New York Heart Association class II (61.0%). Participants had an average left ventricular ejection fraction of 41.1%. The illness knowledge of participants was poor (accuracy rate: 29.3%), and most were unaware of the significance of self-care. Illness knowledge correlated with both self-care behaviors (r = -.42, p r = -.22, p R = .22); and functional class, living independently, and age were identified as significant correlated factors of quality of life (R = .41). Participants in this study with higher self-reported self-care behaviors and quality of life were younger in age and had better illness knowledge. Furthermore, physical function and independence in daily living significantly affected quality of life. Care for patients with heart failure, particularly older adults, should focus on teaching these patients about heart failure illness and symptom management. Assisting elderly patients with heart failure to promote and maintain

  5. Impact of clinical registries on quality of patient care and clinical outcomes: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Md Emdadul Hoque

    Full Text Available Clinical quality registries (CQRs are playing an increasingly important role in improving health outcomes and reducing health care costs. CQRs are established with the purpose of monitoring quality of care, providing feedback, benchmarking performance, describing pattern of treatment, reducing variation and as a tool for conducting research.To synthesise the impact of clinical quality registries (CQRs as an 'intervention' on (I mortality/survival; (II measures of outcome that reflect a process or outcome of health care; (III health care utilisation; and (IV healthcare-related costs.The following electronic databases were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL and Google Scholar. In addition, a review of the grey literature and a reference check of citations and reference lists within articles was undertaken to identify relevant studies in English covering the period January 1980 to December 2016. The PRISMA-P methodology, checklist and standard search strategy using pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria and structured data extraction tools were used. Data on study design and methods, participant characteristics attributes of included registries and impact of the registry on outcome measures and/or processes of care were extracted.We identified 30102 abstracts from which 75 full text articles were assessed and finally 17 articles were selected for synthesis. Out of 17 studies, six focused on diabetes care, two on cardiac diseases, two on lung diseases and others on organ transplantations, rheumatoid arthritis, ulcer healing, surgical complications and kidney disease. The majority of studies were "before after" design (#11 followed by cohort design (#2, randomised controlled trial (#2, experimental non randomised study and one cross sectional comparison. The measures of impact of registries were multifarious and included change in processes of care, quality of care, treatment outcomes, adherence to guidelines and survival. Sixteen of 17

  6. One Year Survival and Quality of Life in Patients Successfully Discharged From Neuro Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Poursadeghfard

    2017-09-01

    Discussion: is lower in NICU survivors compared with general population; however, if patients' selection and out of hospital care are done appropriately and continuously, more patients can live independently or even come back to their work. Indeed, it is important to identify patients who benefit more from NICU during decision making for ICU admission. As a result, more efficient rehabilitation could be achieved in the future. However, our conclusions are only related to our ward and do not apply to the total population of critical neurology patients.

  7. A Multi-center Study on Improvement in Life Quality of Pediatric Patients with Asthma via Continuous Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ying; Cao, Junhua; Kan, Ruixue; Liu, Yuping; Zhao, Li; Hu, Ming; Zhang, Xuemei

    2017-11-01

    To analyze and summarize the effect of continuous care on the life quality and control of asthma of pediatric patients with asthma discharged from multiple hospitals. Retrospective analysis was carried out on 172 pediatric patients with asthma aged between 6 and 11 yr old randomly selected from those admitted to five hospitals between January 2014 and December 2015. Among these 172 patients, only 86 (intervention group) received the continuous care between January 2015 and December 2015, while the rest (control group) did not receive from January 2014 and December 2014. After the patients in the intervention group were discharged from the hospital, the ratio of practical forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) to the expected FEV1 at the 12 th month was (90.28±10.35)%, and the ratio of peak expiratory flow to the expected value was (84.24±3.43)%, respectively higher than those [(82.73±8.86)% and (75.80±4.67)%] in the control group. Regarding pediatric asthma quality of life questionnaire (PAQLQ) between the intervention group and the control group, the difference had statistical significance ( Z =-7.254, PContinuous care can improve the pediatric patient's pulmonary function and life quality, and effectively control the asthmatic symptoms.

  8. Are AMI patients with comorbid mental illness more likely to be admitted to hospitals with lower quality of AMI care?

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    Xueya Cai

    Full Text Available Older patients with comorbid mental illness are shown to receive less appropriate care for their medical conditions. This study analyzed Medicare patients hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (AMI and determined whether those with comorbid mental illness were more likely to present to hospitals with lower quality of AMI care.Retrospective analyses of Medicare claims in 2008. Hospital quality was measured using the five "Hospital Compare" process indicators (aspirin at admission/discharge, beta-blocker at admission/discharge, and angiotension-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotension receptor blocker for left ventricular dysfunction. Multinomial logit model determined the association of mental illness with admission to low-quality hospitals (rank of the composite process score 90(th percentile, compared to admissions to other hospitals with medium quality. Multivariate analyses further determined the effects of hospital type and mental diagnosis on outcomes.Among all AMI admissions to 2,845 hospitals, 41,044 out of 287,881 patients were diagnosed with mental illness. Mental illness predicted a higher likelihood of admission to low-quality hospitals (unadjusted rate 2.9% vs. 2.0%; adjusted odds ratio [OR]1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-1.34, p<0.01, and an equal likelihood to high-quality hospitals (unadjusted rate 9.8% vs. 10.3%; adjusted OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.93-1.01, p = 0.11. Both lower hospital quality and mental diagnosis predicted higher rates of 30-day readmission, 30-day mortality, and 1-year mortality.Among Medicare myocardial infarction patients, comorbid mental illness was associated with an increased risk for admission to lower-quality hospitals. Both lower hospital quality and mental illness predicted worse post-AMI outcomes.

  9. Racial and ethnic disparities in patient-provider communication, quality-of-care ratings, and patient activation among long-term cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Nynikka R A; Kent, Erin E; Forsythe, Laura P; Arora, Neeraj K; Rowland, Julia H; Aziz, Noreen M; Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Hamilton, Ann S; Weaver, Kathryn E

    2014-12-20

    We examined racial and ethnic disparities in patient-provider communication (PPC), perceived care quality, and patient activation among long-term cancer survivors. In 2005 to 2006, survivors of breast, prostate, colorectal, ovarian, and endometrial cancers completed a mailed survey on cancer follow-up care. African American, Asian/Pacific Islander (Asian), Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white (white) survivors who had seen a physician for follow-up care in the past 2 years (n = 1,196) composed the analytic sample. We conducted linear and logistic regression analyses to identify racial and ethnic differences in PPC (overall communication and medical test communication), perceived care quality, and patient activation in clinical care (self-efficacy in medical decisions and perceived control). We further examined the potential contribution of PPC to racial and ethnic differences in perceived care quality and patient activation. Compared with white survivors (mean score, 85.16), Hispanic (mean score, 79.95) and Asian (mean score, 76.55) survivors reported poorer overall communication (P = .04 and P Asian survivors (mean score, 79.97) reported poorer medical test communication (P = .001). Asian survivors were less likely to report high care quality (odds ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.30 to 0.72) and reported lower self-efficacy in medical decisions (mean score, 74.71; P Asian disparities remained significant. Asian survivors report poorer follow-up care communication and care quality. More research is needed to identify contributing factors beyond PPC, such as cultural influences and medical system factors. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Perception of quality of care in HIV/AIDS programmes among patients in a tertiary health care facility in Anambra State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwabueze, S A; Adogu, P O U; Ilika, A L; Asuzu, M C; Adinma, E D

    2011-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement is linked to the use of timely and useful feedback from clients in Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) care. HIV experts and care professionals agree that consumer involvement, such as patient satisfaction survey, is an essential part of HIV care and policy making today. The introduction ofAnti-Retroviral Treatment (ART) services in Nigeria has significantly impacted positively on the overall well being of People Living with HIV and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (PLWHA). However, there is little understanding of their satisfaction and perception of quality of care provided. Consequently, this study was carried out to assess patients' satisfaction with ambulatory HIV/AIDS care in a tertiary health facility in Anambra State. The study design is cross-sectional. A total of 150 patients from Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi were selected using systematic sampling technique from the daily AntiRetroviral (ARV) clinic register obtained from the medical records department of the centre. Data were collected using a structured interviewer-administered questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 13. The mean age of the respondents was 38.3 +/- 9.1. Majority (50.7%) of the patients was married, and most of them (74.7%) were semi-skilled workers. There was a statistically significant difference in the numbers of those who spent >240 naira for transportation to the clinic, compared to those who spent 30 minutes are significantly larger than the number that spent 750 naira than those who spend <750 naira on non-HIV related laboratory (20 versus 9) tests. PLWHAs in this facility were least satisfied with access to care, while they expressed greatest satisfaction with good patient care and quality of service by staff. The overall satisfaction score of the subjects was 4.04 +/- 0.33. HIV patients' overall satisfaction with the services provided to them was quite high. Therefore, there is need to sustain the current

  11. Assessment of patient's experiences across the interface between primary and secondary care : Consumer Quality Index Continuum of Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, A.J.; Groenier, K.H.; de Jong, G.M.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.; van der Veen, W.J.; Dekker, Janny; de Waal, M.W.M.; Schuling, J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Development and validation of a questionnaire that measures patients' experiences of collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and specialists. Methods: A questionnaire was developed using the method of the consumer quality index and validated in a cross-sectional study among a

  12. Creating patient value in glaucoma care: applying quality costing and care delivery value chain approaches--a five-year case study in the Rotterdam Eye Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korne, Dirk F; Sol, Kees; Custers, Thomas; van Sprundel, Esther; van Ineveld, B Martin; Lemij, Hans G; Klazinga, Niek S

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore in a specific hospital care process the applicability in practice of the theories of quality costing and value chains. In a retrospective case study an in-depth evaluation of the use of a quality cost model (QCM) and the applicability of Porter's care delivery value chain (CDVC) was performed in a specific care process: glaucoma care over the period 2001 to 2006 in the Rotterdam Eye Hospital in The Netherlands. The case study shows a reduction of costs per product by increasing the number of outpatient visits and surgery combined with a higher patient satisfaction. Reduction of costs of non-compliance by using the QCM is small, due to the absence of (external) financial incentives for both the hospital and individual physicians. For CDVC to be supportive to an integrated quality and cost management the notion "patient value" needs far more specification as mutually agreed on by the stakeholders involved and related reimbursement needs to depend on realised outcomes. The case study just focused on one specific care process in one hospital. To determine effects in other areas of health care, it is important to study the use and applicability of the QCM and the CDVC in other care processes and settings. QCM and a CDVC can be useful tools for hospital management to manage the outcomes on both quality and costs, but impact is dependent on the incentives in the context of the existing organisational and reimbursement system and asks for an agreed on operationalisation among the various stakeholders of the notion of patient value.

  13. Quality of life in patients with visual impairment in Ibadan: a clinical study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adigun, Kehinde; Oluleye, Tunji S; Ladipo, Modupe Ma; Olowookere, Samuel Anu

    2014-01-01

    Visual function is important for optimal orientation in functional and social life, and has an effect on physical and emotional well-being. Visual impairment, therefore, leads to restrictions in all aspects of daily living and is related to quality of life. The aim of this study was to provide information on the causes of visual impairment in patients presenting to their family physician, the spectrum of impairment, and its impact on quality of life for these patients. This descriptive cross-sectional study of 375 adult patients with ocular symptoms was performed in the general outpatient department of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, from July to September, 2009. After checking their presenting visual acuity, the patients were interviewed using the Vision-Related Quality of Life questionnaire to determine the impact of visual impairment on their quality of life. Ophthalmic examinations were performed to determine the causes of visual impairment. The results were analyzed using proportions and percentages. The main causes of visual impairment were cataracts (58.7%), refractive error (19.4%), and glaucoma (2.9%). Visual impairment was found to be associated with advancing age, low education, and unemployment (Pvisual function (64.2%) and social interaction (50.9%). Quality of life was found to be related to the degree of visual impairment, ie, blind patients reported poor quality of life (41.4%) when compared with those having low vision (8.6%) or near normal vision (2.4%, Pvisual impairment. Family physicians need to identify these visually impaired patients early and make timely referrals.

  14. Insights about health-related quality of life in cancer patients indicate demands for better pharmaceutical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nagwa A; Björnsdottir, Ingunn; Al Alwan, Ashraf S; Honore, Per Hartvig

    2014-08-01

    To highlight the health-related quality of life scale scores for Saudi patients with different types of cancer, to get understanding and foundation for improvements. To suggest suitable plans for quality of life improvement based on study outcome. The role of oncology pharmacy will be stressed. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at a tertiary regional hospital using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Attendees were patients diagnosed with any type of cancer and eligible for active anticancer treatment and/or palliative care. Quality of life was evaluated for 87 participants. Most of patients were aged between 51 and 60 years; and 50% had active treatment with chemotherapy. Patients seemed to perform well with respect to average scores in both the symptoms and the functional health status scales. The mean score for the global quality of life scale was 47.2 ± 27.1, while the range of mean scores for the five function subscales was 59.0 ± 27.1 to 81.6 ± 13.8, indicating average level of general wellbeing with above average to high level of functional health status, while >50% of the patients met the operational criterion having less severe symptoms. Outpatients generally had somewhat higher scores as compared to hospitalized patients. The general quality of life seemed satisfactory, but there is still need to improve care. Based on results from other studies, oncology pharmacists' roles are essential to improve quality of life through treatment counseling, follow-up on drug support therapy, stress on patient's education through specific programs, review and update the local guidelines, and conduct more research. © Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Saudi Arabia 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Effects of Aromatherapy on the Anxiety, Vital Signs, and Sleep Quality of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Patients in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Yeon Cho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, sleep, and blood pressure (BP of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI patients in an intensive care unit (ICU. Fifty-six patients with PCI in ICU were evenly allocated to either the aromatherapy or conventional nursing care. Aromatherapy essential oils were blended with lavender, roman chamomile, and neroli with a 6 : 2 : 0.5 ratio. Participants received 10 times treatment before PCI, and the same essential oils were inhaled another 10 times after PCI. Outcome measures patients' state anxiety, sleeping quality, and BP. An aromatherapy group showed significantly low anxiety (t=5.99, P<.001 and improving sleep quality (t=−3.65, P=.001 compared with conventional nursing intervention. The systolic BP of both groups did not show a significant difference by time or in a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F=4.63, P=.036. The diastolic BP did not show any significant difference by time or by a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F=6.93, P=.011. In conclusion, the aromatherapy effectively reduced the anxiety levels and increased the sleep quality of PCI patients admitted to the ICU. Aromatherapy may be used as an independent nursing intervention for reducing the anxiety levels and improving the sleep quality of PCI patients.

  16. Effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, vital signs, and sleep quality of percutaneous coronary intervention patients in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mi-Yeon; Min, Eun Sil; Hur, Myung-Haeng; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, sleep, and blood pressure (BP) of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients in an intensive care unit (ICU). Fifty-six patients with PCI in ICU were evenly allocated to either the aromatherapy or conventional nursing care. Aromatherapy essential oils were blended with lavender, roman chamomile, and neroli with a 6 : 2 : 0.5 ratio. Participants received 10 times treatment before PCI, and the same essential oils were inhaled another 10 times after PCI. Outcome measures patients' state anxiety, sleeping quality, and BP. An aromatherapy group showed significantly low anxiety (t = 5.99, P < .001) and improving sleep quality (t = -3.65, P = .001) compared with conventional nursing intervention. The systolic BP of both groups did not show a significant difference by time or in a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F = 4.63, P = .036). The diastolic BP did not show any significant difference by time or by a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F = 6.93, P = .011). In conclusion, the aromatherapy effectively reduced the anxiety levels and increased the sleep quality of PCI patients admitted to the ICU. Aromatherapy may be used as an independent nursing intervention for reducing the anxiety levels and improving the sleep quality of PCI patients.

  17. The Effect of Orem's Self-Care Model on Quality of Life in Patients with Migraine: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh Zarandi, Fatemeh; Raiesifar, Afsaneh; Ebadi, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Many aspects of the lives of migraineurs are commonly affected by the condition, including occupational affairs, social and family life, responsibilities and ultimately the quality of life. This study was designed to determine the effect of orem's self-care nursing model on quality of life in patients with a migraine. This study was carried out in Tehran, Iran. According to the pre-post design of the randomized clinical trial, 88 patients were selected. After obtaining approval from the ethics committee of the Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University's Research Deputy; Patients who signed the informed consent aged 20-55 years and without any more disease or disability affecting the quality of life were selected and randomly assigned to a group. Data collection tools were a demographic questionnaire, general health survey short form (SF36), and Orem cognition form and self-care checklist. Self-care model were held as four 30-45 minutes training sessions based on self-care deficit needs for the experimental group. The quality of life scores was measured in two stages, before and three months after intervention then were compared in both groups. Data were analyzed with statistical software SPSS and use of descriptive analysis tests, Chi-square, Mann-Whitney u and Wilcoxon. The final analysis was performed on 43 experimental and 40 controls. No significant difference was detected in the two groups in terms of demographic variables (P>0.05). All dimensions of quality of life including physical functioning, physical role limitation, body pain, general health, vitality, social functioning and emotional role limitation and mental health in the experimental group showed a significant increase after intervention compared to the control group (Pmodel improves function and overall quality of life and reduces the high cost of a migraine and migraine-related disability to individuals and society.

  18. Quality assured health care in certified breast centers and improvement of the prognosis of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Matthias W; Brucker, Cosima; Hanf, Volker; Rauh, Claudia; Bani, Mayada R; Knob, Stefanie; Petsch, Sabrina; Schick, Stefan; Fasching, Peter A; Hartmann, Arndt; Lux, Michael P; Häberle, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Increasing effort has been put in the implementation and certification of breast centers in order to establish standardized, quality assured health care for breast cancer patients. The aim of this analysis was to investigate whether patients treated in certified breast centers (CBC) have a favorable prognosis as compared to patients treated outside of certified breast treatment units. The data of 3,940 patients with invasive nonmetastatic breast cancer were analyzed with regard to differences in patient and tumor characteristics and crude overall survival according to diagnosis in or outside CBC in Middle Franconia, Germany. Patient, tumor, and follow-up data were obtained from the clinical cancer registry. Patients in CBC were younger, and had lower disease stages and lower grading. Independent of the effects of these variables on overall survival, being treated at a CBC added to the prediction of overall survival. Patients treated at a CBC had a hazard ratio of 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.52-0.93) in the adjusted Cox model. Independent from common prognostic factors, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer at a CBC improves the prognosis of patients. It can be hypothesized that this effect is mediated through quality assured health care provided by the certification process. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Changes in health-related quality of life and quality of care among terminally ill cancer patients and survival prediction: Multicenter prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Kyung; Lee, Woo Jin; Do, Young Rok; Lee, Keun Seok; Jung, Kyung Hae; Heo, Dae Seog; Kim, Sam Yong; Park, Sang Yoon; Jeong, Hyun Sik; Kang, Jung Hun; Kim, Si-Young; Park, Sook Ryun; Yun, Young Ho

    2015-08-01

    This study examined changes in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and quality of care (QoC) as perceived by terminally ill cancer patients and a stratified set of HRQoL or QoC factors that are most likely to influence survival at the end of life (EoL). We administered questionnaires to 619 consecutive patients immediately after they were diagnosed with terminal cancer by physicians at 11 university hospitals and at the National Cancer Center in Korea. Subjects were followed up over 161.2 person-years until their deaths. We measured HRQoL using the core 30-item European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire, and QoC using the Quality Care Questionnaire-End of Life (QCQ-EoL). We evaluated changes in HRQoL and QoC issues during the first three months after enrollment, performing sensitivity analysis by using data generated via four methods (complete case analysis, available case analysis, the last observation carried forward, and multiple imputation). Emotional and cognitive functioning decreased significantly over time, while dyspnea, constipation, and pain increased significantly. Dignity-conserving care, care by healthcare professionals, family relationships, and QCQ-EoL total score decreased significantly. Global QoL, appetite loss, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG-PS) scores were significantly associated with survival. Future standardization of palliative care should be focused on assessment of these deteriorated types of quality. Accurate estimates of the length of life remaining for terminally ill cancer patients by such EoL-enhancing factors as global QoL, appetite loss, and ECOG-PS are needed to help patients experience a dignified and comfortable death.

  20. The chronic care model and relationships to patient health status and health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dorothy Y; Glasgow, Russell E; Dickinson, L Miriam; Froshaug, Desireé B; Fernald, Douglas H; Balasubramanian, Bijal A; Green, Larry A

    2008-11-01

    The chronic care model (CCM) is a system-level framework used to guide quality improvement efforts in health care. However, little is known about its relationship to patient-level health measures. This study describes the implementation of the CCM as adapted for prevention and health behavior counseling in primary care practices, and examines relationships between the CCM and patient health measures, including general health status and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Baseline data from Round 2 of the Prescription for Health initiative (2005-2007) were used to assess CCM implementation in 57 practices located nationwide. Relationships between the CCM and three separate measures of health among 4735 patients were analyzed in 2007. A hierarchical generalized linear modeling approach to ordinal regression was used to estimate categories of general health status, unhealthy days, and activity-limiting days, adjusting for patient covariates and clustering effects. Outcome variances were significantly accounted for by differences in practice characteristics (pPractices that used individual or group planned visits were more likely to see patients in lower health categories across all measures (OR=0.74-0.81, pPractices that used patient registries, health promotion champions, evidence-based guidelines, publicly reported performance measures, and support for behavior change were associated with higher patient health levels (OR=1.28-1.98, ppractice's implementation of the CCM was significantly related to patient health status and HRQOL. Adapting the CCM for prevention may serve to reorient care delivery toward more proactive behavior change and improvements in patient health outcomes.

  1. Patient safety, satisfaction, and quality of hospital care: cross sectional surveys of nurses and patients in 12 countries in Europe and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Sermeus, Walter; Van den Heede, Koen; Sloane, Douglas M; Busse, Reinhard; McKee, Martin; Bruyneel, Luk; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Griffiths, Peter; Moreno-Casbas, Maria Teresa; Tishelman, Carol; Scott, Anne; Brzostek, Tomasz; Kinnunen, Juha; Schwendimann, Rene; Heinen, Maud; Zikos, Dimitris; Sjetne, Ingeborg Strømseng; Smith, Herbert L; Kutney-Lee, Ann

    2012-03-20

    To determine whether hospitals with a good organisation of care (such as improved nurse staffing and work environments) can affect patient care and nurse workforce stability in European countries. Cross sectional surveys of patients and nurses. Nurses were surveyed in general acute care hospitals (488 in 12 European countries; 617 in the United States); patients were surveyed in 210 European hospitals and 430 US hospitals. 33 659 nurses and 11 318 patients in Europe; 27 509 nurses and more than 120 000 patients in the US. Nurse outcomes (hospital staffing, work environments, burnout, dissatisfaction, intention to leave job in the next year, patient safety, quality of care), patient outcomes (satisfaction overall and with nursing care, willingness to recommend hospitals). The percentage of nurses reporting poor or fair quality of patient care varied substantially by country (from 11% (Ireland) to 47% (Greece)), as did rates for nurses who gave their hospital a poor or failing safety grade (4% (Switzerland) to 18% (Poland)). We found high rates of nurse burnout (10% (Netherlands) to 78% (Greece)), job dissatisfaction (11% (Netherlands) to 56% (Greece)), and intention to leave (14% (US) to 49% (Finland, Greece)). Patients' high ratings of their hospitals also varied considerably (35% (Spain) to 61% (Finland, Ireland)), as did rates of patients willing to recommend their hospital (53% (Greece) to 78% (Switzerland)). Improved work environments and reduced ratios of patients to nurses were associated with increased care quality and patient satisfaction. In European hospitals, after adjusting for hospital and nurse characteristics, nurses with better work environments were half as likely to report poor or fair care quality (adjusted odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.51 to 0.61) and give their hospitals poor or failing grades on patient safety (0.50, 0.44 to 0.56). Each additional patient per nurse increased the odds of nurses reporting poor or fair

  2. EFFECTS OF AROMATHERAPY MASSAGE ON THE SLEEP QUALITY AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF PATIENTS IN A SURGICAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özlü, Zeynep Karaman; Bilican, Pınar

    2017-01-01

    Surgical pain is experienced by inpatients with clinical, disease-related concerns, unknown encounters after surgery, quality of sleep, restrictions in position after surgery is known to be serious. The study was conducted to determine the effect of aromatherapy massage on quality of sleep and physiological parameters in surgical intensive care patients. This is an experimental study. The sample of this study consisted of 60 patients who were divided into two groups as experimental group and control group including 30 patients in each one. The participants were postoperative patients, absent complications, who were unconscious and extubated. A data collection form on personal characteristics of the patients, a registration form on their physical parameters and the Richards-Campbell Sleep Scale (RCSQ) were used to collect the data of the study. The Richards-Campbell Sleep Scale indicated that while the experimental group had a mean score of 53.80 ± 13.20, the control group had a mean score of 29.08 ± 9.71 and there was a statistically significant difference between mean scores of the groups. In a comparison of physiologic parameters, only diastolic blood pressure measuring between parameters in favor of an assembly as a statistically significant difference was detected. Results of the study showed that aromatherapy massage enhanced the sleep quality of patients in a surgical intensive care unit and resulted in some positive changes in their physiological parameters.

  3. Patient participation in quality pain management during an acute care admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTier, Lauren J; Botti, Mari; Duke, Maxine

    2014-04-01

    The objective of the study was to explore patient participation in the context of pain management during a hospital admission for a cardiac surgical intervention of patients with cardiovascular disease. This is a single-institution study, with a case-study design. The unit of analysis was a cardiothoracic ward of a major metropolitan, tertiary referral hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Multiple methods of data collection were used including preadmission and predischarge patient interviews (n=98), naturalistic observations (n=48), and focus group interviews (n=2). Patients' preference for participation in pain management was not always commensurate with their involvement in pain management. Patients displayed a greater understanding of their role in pain management in terms of reporting pain and the use of multimodal analgesics after surgery. The majority of patients, however, did not understand the importance of reporting pain to avoid complications. Patients had limited opportunity to participate in their pain management. On occasions in which clinicians did involve patients, the involvement appeared to be focused on reporting pain rather than treatment of pain. Patient participation in pain management during hospitalization is not optimal. This has implications for the quality of pain management patients receive. Higher engagement of patients in their pain management during hospitalization is required to ensure comfort, reduce potential for complications, and adequately prepare the patients to manage their pain following discharge from hospital.

  4. Length of home hospice care, family-perceived timing of referrals, perceived quality of care, and quality of death and dying in terminally ill cancer patients who died at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Akemi; Morita, Tatsuya; Kawagoe, Shohei; Shimizu, Megumi; Ozawa, Taketoshi; An, Emi; Kobayakawa, Makoto; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to clarify the length of home hospice care, family-perceived timing of referrals, and their effects on the family-perceived quality of care and quality of death and dying of terminally ill cancer patients who died at home and identify the determinants of perceived late referrals. A multicenter questionnaire survey was conducted involving 1,052 family members of cancer patients who died at home supported by 15 home-based hospice services throughout Japan. A total of 693 responses were analyzed (effective response rate, 66 %). Patients received home-based hospice care for a median of 35.0 days, and 8.0 % received home hospice care for less than 1 week. While 1.5 % of the families reported the timing of referrals as early, 42 % reported the timing as late or too late. The families of patients with a length of care of less than 4 weeks were more likely to regard the timing of referrals as late or too late. The patients of family members who regarded the timing of referrals as late or too late had a significantly lower perceived quality of care (effect size, 0.18; P = 0.039) and lower quality of death and dying (effect size, 0.15, P = 0.063). Independent determinants of higher likelihoods of perceived late referrals included: frequent visits to emergency departments, patient being unprepared for worsening condition, and patient having concerns about relationship with new doctor. Discharge nurse availability was independently associated with lower likelihoods of perceived late referrals. A significant number of bereaved families regarded the timing of referrals to home hospices as late, and the perceived timing was associated with the family-perceived quality of care and quality of death and dying. Systematic strategies to overcome the barriers related to perceived late referrals are necessary.

  5. Direct-to-consumer advertising: physicians' views of its effects on quality of care and the doctor-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; Lo, Bernard; Pollack, Lance; Donelan, Karen; Lee, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine physicians' views of the effects of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising (DTCA) on health service utilization, quality of care, and the doctor-patient relationship. Cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of US physicians to determine their perceptions of the effects of patients discussing information from DTCA on time efficiency; requests for specific interventions; health outcomes; and the doctor-patient relationship. Physicians reported that more than half (56%) of patients who discussed information from DTCA in a visit did so because they wanted a specific intervention, such as a test, change in medication, or specialist referral. The physician deemed 49% of these requests clinically inappropriate. Physicians filled 69% of requests they deemed clinically inappropriate; 39% of physicians perceived DTCA as damaging to the time efficiency of the visit, and 13% saw it as helpful. Thirty-three percent of physicians thought discussing DTCA had improved the doctor-patient relationship; 8% felt it had worsened it. The effect on the relationship was strongly associated with doing what the patient wanted. DTCA can have good and bad effects on quality of care, the doctor-patient relationship, and health service utilization. The benefits might be maximized, and the harms minimized, by increasing the accuracy of information in advertisements; enhancing physicians' communication and negotiation skills; and encouraging patients to respect physicians' clinical expertise.

  6. The art of communication: strategies to improve efficiency, quality of care and patient safety in the emergency department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    The practice of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) has been supported by wonderful advancements in diagnostic testing, particularly in medical imaging. One of the most remarkable has been CT, which has arguably become our most valuable diagnostic tool in the emergency department (ED). PEM specialists have grown increasingly aware of quality and safety concerns in the care of children in emergency medical settings, spurred in part by a rapid growth in ED utilization and significant overcrowding. In the midst of this comes the revelation that one of our most valued diagnostic tools might place our youngest patients at a significant risk for the development of fatal cancer. This article reinforces the fundamental importance of communication and teamwork as a means to promote patient care quality and safety in the ED, and it offers partnership strategies for PEM and pediatric radiology specialists to consider as they address these important concerns. (orig.)

  7. The art of communication: strategies to improve efficiency, quality of care and patient safety in the emergency department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, Steven E. [Northwestern University, Children' s Memorial Hospital, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The practice of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) has been supported by wonderful advancements in diagnostic testing, particularly in medical imaging. One of the most remarkable has been CT, which has arguably become our most valuable diagnostic tool in the emergency department (ED). PEM specialists have grown increasingly aware of quality and safety concerns in the care of children in emergency medical settings, spurred in part by a rapid growth in ED utilization and significant overcrowding. In the midst of this comes the revelation that one of our most valued diagnostic tools might place our youngest patients at a significant risk for the development of fatal cancer. This article reinforces the fundamental importance of communication and teamwork as a means to promote patient care quality and safety in the ED, and it offers partnership strategies for PEM and pediatric radiology specialists to consider as they address these important concerns. (orig.)

  8. [Quality assurance of take-over from in-patient to out-patient care: experiences in Lower Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frühwald, Stefan; Karner, Angelika; Seyringer, Michaela-Elena; Skribe, Teresa; Frottier, Patrick; Entenfellner, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Community mental health teams (CMHT) provide support for severely disabled, chronic mentally ill patients. In this study, referrals to CMHT by a psychiatric hospital in Lower Austria were analysed, as were the first few weeks of care for referred patients. Referrals to CMHT of a catchment area (pop 250.000) were analysed for 2002- 2006. In the first 6 months of each year, 124 to 189 patients were referred to CMHT. Between 2002 and 2006, the percentage of affective disorders (ICD-10: F3: 40.0 %), and substance use disorders (F1: 38.9 %) within the referrals diminished, as compared to patients suffering from schizophrenia (F2 initially 25.4 % of referrals vs. 49.7 %) and personality disorders (F6 initially 6.4 % of referrals vs. 22.4 %). In 30.7 % vs. 56.6 % of patients, CMHT workers managed to establish contact to patients after discharge from hospital. They actively sought contact with 39.9 to 74.6 % of referred patients (by means of telephone calls, letters, home visits, etc.). In 26.5 to 46.9 % of the referrals, continuous care was planned. This study emphasizes the advantage of specific referrals to CMHT, if care for severely disabled individuals is needed and should be provided. Furthermore, a description of outreach activities, which are intended to maintain contact with patients characterized by poor compliance, is presented. These activities are not yet part of routine care in German speaking countries.

  9. Factors influencing new graduate nurse burnout development, job satisfaction and patient care quality: a time-lagged study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boamah, Sheila A; Read, Emily A; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2017-05-01

    To test a hypothesized model linking new graduate nurses' perceptions of their manager's authentic leadership behaviours to structural empowerment, short-staffing and work-life interference and subsequent burnout, job satisfaction and patient care quality. Authentic leadership and structural empowerment have been shown to reduce early career burnout among nurses. Short-staffing and work-life interference are also linked to burnout and may help explain the impact of positive, empowering leadership on burnout, which in turn influences job satisfaction and patient care quality. A time-lagged study of Canadian new graduate nurses was conducted. At Time 1, surveys were sent to 3,743 nurses (November 2012-March 2013) and 1,020 were returned (27·3% response rate). At Time 2 (May-July 2014), 406 nurses who responded at Time 1 completed surveys (39·8% response rate). Descriptive analysis was conducted in SPSS. Structural equation modelling in Mplus was used to test the hypothesized model. The hypothesized model was supported. Authentic leadership had a significant positive effect on structural empowerment, which in turn decreased both short-staffing and work-life interference. Short-staffing and work-life imbalance subsequently resulted in nurse burnout, lower job satisfaction and lower patient care quality 1 year later. The findings suggest that short-staffing and work-life interference are important factors influencing new graduate nurse burnout. Developing nurse managers' authentic leadership behaviours and working with them to create and sustain empowering work environments may help reduce burnout, increase nurse job satisfaction and improve patient care quality. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries.

  11. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke Bilcke

    Full Text Available This is one of the first studies to (1 describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2 assess influential background characteristics, and (3 formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever, a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries.

  12. Restricted duty hours for surgeons and impact on residents quality of life, education, and patient care: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeifer Roman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work-hour limitations have been implemented by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME in July 2003 in order to minimize fatigue related medical adverse events. The effects of this regulation are still under intense debate. In this literature review, data of effects of limited work-hours on the quality of life, surgical education, and patient care was summarized, focusing on surgical subspecialities. Methods Studies that assessed the effects of the work-hour regulation published following the implementation of ACGME guidelines (2003 were searched using PubMed database. The following search modules were selected: work-hours, 80-hour work week, quality of life, work satisfaction, surgical education, residency training, patient care, continuity of care. Publications were included if they were completed in the United States and covered the subject of our review. Manuscrips were analysed to identify authors, year of publication, type of study, number of participants, and the main outcomes. Review Findings Twenty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. Studies demonstrate that the residents quality of life has improved. The effects on surgical education are still unclear due to inconsistency in studies. Furthermore, according to several objective studies there were no changes in mortality and morbidity following the implementation. Conclusion Further studies are necessary addressing the effects of surgical education and studying the objective methods to assess the technical skill and procedural competence of surgeons. In addition, patient surveys analysing their satisfaction and concerns can contribute to recent discussion, as well.

  13. Effectiveness of trauma team on medical resource utilization and quality of care for patients with major trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Jung; Yen, Shu-Ting; Huang, Shih-Fang; Hsu, Su-Chen; Ying, Jeremy C; Shan, Yan-Shen

    2017-07-24

    Trauma is one of the leading causes of death in Taiwan, and its medical expenditure escalated drastically. This study aimed to explore the effectiveness of trauma team, which was established in September 2010, on medical resource utilization and quality of care among major trauma patients. This was a retrospective study, using trauma registry data bank and inpatient medical service charge databases. Study subjects were major trauma patients admitted to a medical center in Tainan during 2009 and 2013, and was divided into case group (from January, 2011 to August, 2013) and comparison group (from January, 2009 to August, 2010). Significant reductions in several items of medical resource utilization were identified after the establishment of trauma team. In the sub-group of patients who survived to discharge, examination, radiology and operation charges declined significantly. The radiation and examination charges reduced significantly in the subcategories of ISS = 16 ~ 24 and ISS > 24 respectively. However, no significant effectiveness on quality of care was identified. The establishment of trauma team is effective in containing medical resource utilization. In order to verify the effectiveness on quality of care, extended time frame and extra study subjects are needed.

  14. Profiling quality of care for patients with chronic headache in three different German hospitals – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hager Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legal requirements for quality assurance in German rehabilitation hospitals include comparisons of providers. Objective is to describe and to compare outcome quality of care offered by three hospitals providing in-patient rehabilitative treatment exemplified for patients with chronic headache. Methods We performed a prospective three center observational study on patients suffering from chronic headache. Patients underwent interventions commonly used according to internal guidelines of the hospitals. Measurements were taken at three points in time (at admission, at discharge and 6 months after discharge. Indicators of outcome quality included pain intensity and frequency of pain, functional ability, depression, quality of life and health related behavior. Analyses of differences amongst the hospitals were adjusted by covariates due to case-mix situation. Results 306 patients from 3 hospitals were included in statistical analysis. Amongst the hospitals, patients differed significantly in age, education, diagnostic subgroups, beliefs, and with respect to some pain-related baseline values (covariates. Patients in all three hospitals benefited from intervention to a clinically relevant degree. At discharge from hospital, outcome quality differed significantly after adjustment according to case-mix only in terms of patients' global assessment of treatment results. Six months after discharge, the only detectable significant differences were for secondary outcomes like improved coping with stress or increased use of self-help. The profiles for satisfaction with the hospital stay showed clear differences amongst patients. Conclusion The results of this case study do not suggest a definite overall ranking of the three hospitals that were compared, but outcome profiles offer a multilayer platform of reliable information which might facilitate decision making.

  15. Perceptions of health care providers and patients on quality of care in maternal and neonatal health in fourteen Bangladesh government healthcare facilities: a mixed-method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farzana; Rahman, Aminur; Halim, Abdul; Eriksson, Charli; Rahman, Fazlur; Dalal, Koustuv

    2015-06-19

    Bangladesh has achieved remarkable progress in healthcare with a steady decline in maternal and under-5 child mortality rates in efforts to achieve Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. However, the mortality rates are still very high compared with high-income countries. The quality of healthcare needs improve to reduce mortality rates further. It is essential to investigate the current quality of healthcare before implementing any interventions. The study was conducted to explore the perception of healthcare providers about the quality of maternal and neonatal health (MNH) care. The study also investigated patient satisfaction with the MNH care received from district and sub-district hospitals. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in the study. Two district and 12 sub-district hospitals in Thakurgaon and Jamalpur in Bangladesh were the study settings. Fourteen group discussions and 56 in-depth interviews were conducted among the healthcare providers. Client exit interviews were conducted with 112 patients and their attendants from maternity, labor, and neonatal wards before being discharged from the hospitals. Eight physicians and four anthropologists collected data between November and December 2011 using pretested guidelines. The hospital staff identified several key factors that affected the quality of patient care: shortage of staff and logistics; lack of laboratory support; under use of patient-management protocols; a lack of training; and insufficient supervision. Doctors were unable to provide optimal care because of the high volume of patients. The exit interviews revealed that 85 % of respondents were satisfied with the hospital services received. Seven out of 14 respondents were satisfied with the cleanliness of the hospital facilities. More than half of the respondents were satisfied with the drugs they received. In half of the facilities, patients did not get an opportunity to ask the healthcare providers questions about their health

  16. Introducing eHealth and other innovative options into clinical genetic patient care in view of increased efficiency and maintenance of quality of care : Patients' and providers' perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Innovations in clinical genetics patient care This year some 40,000 patients will visit a clinical geneticist. This number is increasing because there are ever-expanding possibilities for DNA testing. Most patients are seen individually in an outpatient clinic. But partly because the healthcare

  17. Proportion of Brazilian diabetes patients that achieve treatment goals: implications for better quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Deise Regina; Thieme, Rubia Daniela; Reis, Walleri Christini Torelli; Pontarolo, Roberto; Correr, Cassyano Januário

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and its complications are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality, and caused approximately 5.1 million deaths worldwide in 2013. Early detection and treatment of diabetes complications can prevent their progression. This study compared the proportions of patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and T2DM, respectively) who achieved the goals of good clinical control. Adults and elderly patients with T1DM and T2DM at a public outpatient endocrinology service in Brazil were retrospectively evaluated between 2012 and 2013. Clinical and socio demographic data were obtained from medical records and evaluated in accordance with the Brazilian Diabetes Society Guidelines. Care process measures, outcomes indicators, and supporting process measures were evaluated. A total of 1031 records were analyzed: 29 and 71 % of patients had T1DM and T2DM, respectively. T2DM patients had significantly higher BMI than T1DM patients (overweight and obesity in 85.1 vs. 47.5 %, p achieved all targets, and 1.1 % did not achieve any. The achievement of goals of good clinical practice varies among the parameters evaluated. Almost no patients achieved all targets. Many patients are overweight and do not achieve targets for HbA1c, lipid profile, or blood pressure control.

  18. Effect of self - care education on quality of life in patients with primary hypertension: comparing lecture and educational package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajani, Mohamad; Mirbagher Ajorpaz, Neda; Kafaei Atrian, Mahbube; Raofi, Zahra; Abedi, Fatemeh; Naeimi Vartoni, Sajad; Soleimani, Akbar

    2013-12-01

    Hypertension is a dangerous risk factor for public health. It profoundly affects the patients' quality of life. However, there is lack of agreement on the best method for self-care management in patients with hypertension. This study was conducted to compare the effect of lecture and educational pamphlets on quality of life (QOL) in patients with primary hypertension. A quasi-experimental study was performed on 90 patients with chronic primary hypertension referred to two outpatient clinics in Kashan city. Patients were randomly divided into three groups including lecture group, educational package group, and control group. The participants' quality of life was measured using the SF-36 questionnaire at the beginning of the study, and two months later. Data was analyzed using ANOVA and Chi-Square tests. No significant differences were observed between the three groups for demographics characteristics and QOL before the intervention except for marital status. Mean scores of QOL dimensions of the intervention groups were increased at the end of the study, except for the dimension of bodily pain. Tukey post-Hoc test showed that except for general health, the two intervention groups were not significantly different in other dimensions, and significant differences were observed between the control group and the two intervention groups (P educational package can both improve some dimensions of the QOL in patients with hypertension. However, as pamphlets are cheap and easy to use, this method may be used as an effective method for self-care education in health care settings in Iran, where the system is faced with nursing shortage.

  19. Assessment of quality of glycemic control in intensive care patients treated with an insulin infusion at a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Lyne; Ferguson, Jessica; Dubé, Anne-Isabelle; Nguyen, Patrick Viet-Quoc; Beauchesne, Marie-France; Boutin, Jean-Marie

    2014-04-01

    To describe the quality of glycemic control in patients in intensive care units (ICUs) treated with an intravenous (IV) insulin infusion at a teaching hospital. This retrospective study included patients admitted to the ICU and treated with an IV insulin infusion for at least 12 h between August 1 and November 30, 2011. Medical charts were reviewed. The primary quality indicator for glycemic control was the mean percent of blood glucose values per patient in the 6.1 to 8 mmol/L target range. A total of 351 patients were included; 61.5% of subjects had no known diabetes. Admissions were mainly for surgery (61.3%). The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 16.8±7.3. The mean percent of blood glucose values per patient in the 6.1 to 8 mmol/L range was 35% for all subjects and 26.2% for patients with diabetes. If a target of 6.1 to 10 mmol/L was considered, those values became 63% and 54.6%. At least 1 episode of hyperglycemia (>10 mmol/L), hypoglycemia (quality of glycemic control in patients in the ICU at our hospital needs to be improved. A new computerized IV insulin protocol is currently being tested. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effects of Aromatherapy on Intensive Care Unit Patients' Stress and Sleep Quality: A Nonrandomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Hee; Lee, Mi-Young

    2017-01-01

    Background Stress has both physiological and psychological effects and can negatively impact patients' treatment and recovery. We examined whether the aromatherapy alleviated patients' stress and improved their sleep quality and provided data that can be utilized in clinical settings. Methods This was a nonrandomised controlled experimental study. Participants included lucid adult patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit and had spent more than two nights there. The experimental treatment required participants to engage in deep breathing with essential oils as part of the aromatherapy. The control group was instructed to go to sleep without receiving the lavender aroma oil. Results The experimental group and control group showed a significant difference in perceived stress (F = 60.11, p aromatherapy alleviated stress and improved sleep quality in intensive care unit patients after 2 days of the experimental treatment. These results demonstrate that aromatherapy affects stress and sleep quality, thus indicating its value in nursing interventions. This trial is registered with KCT0002344. PMID:29375641

  1. Lay health educators within primary care practices to improve cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients: challenges in quality improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofters AK

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AK Lofters,1–4 M Vahabi,5 V Prakash,6 L Banerjee,7 P Bansal,8 S Goel,7,8 S Dunn1,2,9 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, 2Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, 4Centre for Urban Health Solutions, St Michael’s Hospital, 5Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, 6Screening Saves Lives Program, Canadian Cancer Society, Mississauga, 7Wise Elephant Family Health Team, Brampton, 8Mississauga Halton Central West Regional Cancer Program, Mississauga, 9Women’s College Research Institute, Women’s College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: Cancer screening uptake is known to be low among South Asian residents of Ontario. The objective of this pilot study was to determine if lay health educators embedded within the practices of primary care providers could improve willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients taking a quality improvement approach.Materials and methods: Participating physicians selected quality improvement initiatives to use within their offices that they felt could increase willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake. They implemented initiatives, adapting as necessary, for six months.Results: Four primary care physicians participated in the study. All approximated that at least 60% of their patients were of South Asian ethnicity. All physicians chose to work with a preexisting lay health educator program geared toward South Asians. Health ambassadors spoke to patients in the office and telephoned patients. For all physicians, ~60% of South Asian patients who were overdue for cancer screening and who spoke directly to health ambassadors stated they were willing to be screened. One physician was able to track actual screening among contacted patients and found that screening uptake was relatively high: from 29.2% (colorectal cancer to 44.6% (breast cancer of patients came in for screening

  2. Financial Toxicity among Patients with Bladder Cancer: Reasons for Delay in Care and Effect on Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilla-Lennon, Marianne M; Choi, Seul Ki; Deal, Allison M; Bensen, Jeannette T; Narang, Gopal; Filippou, Pauline; McCormick, Benjamin; Pruthi, Raj; Wallen, Eric; Tan, Hung-Jui; Woods, Michael; Nielsen, Matthew; Smith, Angela

    2018-05-01

    Costly surveillance and treatment of bladder cancer can lead to financial toxicity, a treatment related financial burden. Our objective was to define the prevalence of financial toxicity among patients with bladder cancer and identify delays in care and its effect on health related quality of life. We identified patients with bladder cancer in the University of North Carolina Health Registry/Cancer Survivorship Cohort. Financial toxicity was defined as agreement with having "to pay more for medical care than you can afford." Health related quality of life was measured using general and cancer specific validated questionnaires. Statistical analyses were performed using the Fisher exact test and the Student t-test. A total of 138 patients with bladder cancer were evaluated. Median age was 66.9 years, 75% of the patients were male and 89% were white. Of the participants 33 (24%) endorsed financial toxicity. Participants who were younger (p = 0.02), black (p = 0.01), reported less than a college degree (p = 0.01) and had noninvasive disease (p = 0.04) were more likely to report financial toxicity. On multivariable analysis only age was a significant predictor of financial toxicity. Patients who endorsed financial toxicity were more likely to report delaying care (39% vs 23%, p = 0.07) due to the inability to take time off work or afford general expenses. On general health related quality of life questionnaires patients with financial toxicity reported worse physical and mental health (p = 0.03 and life (p = 0.01), physical well-being (p = 0.01) and functional well-being (p = 0.05). Financial toxicity is a major concern among patients with bladder cancer. Younger patients were more likely to experience financial toxicity. Those who endorsed financial toxicity experienced delays in care and poorer health related quality of life, suggesting that treatment costs should have an important role in medical decision making. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association

  3. Interface flow process audit: using the patient's career as a tracer of quality of care and of system organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Unger

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This case study aims to demonstrate the method's feasibility and capacity to improve quality of care. Several drawbacks attached to tracer condition and selected procedure audits oblige clinicians to rely on external evaluators. Interface flow process audit is an alternative method, which also favours integration of health care across institutions divide. Methods: An action research study was carried out to test the feasibility of interface flow process audit and its impact on quality improvement. An anonymous questionnaire was carried out to assess the participants' perception of the process. Results: In this study, interface flow process audit brought together general practitioners and hospital doctors to analyse the co-ordination of their activities across the primary-secondary interface. Human factors and organisational characteristics had a clear influence on implementation of the solutions. In general, the participants confirmed that the interface flow process audit helped them to analyse the quality of case management both at primary and secondary care level. Conclusions: The interface flow process audit appears a useful method for regular in-service self-evaluation. Its practice enabled to address a wide scope of clinical, managerial and economical problems. Bridging the primary-secondary care gap, interface flow process audit's focus on the patient's career combined with the broad scope of problems that can be analysed are particularly powerful features. The methodology would benefit from an evaluation of its practice on larger scale.

  4. Quality of Care of Nursing from Brain Death Patient in ICU Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Toktam Masoumian Hoseini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, Intensive Care Unit (ICU nurses play a significant and key role in the care of brain dead patients and their families, therefore their Practice extremely important to the success of organ donation. To assess ICU nurse's practice in relation to nurse's role in the organ donation process from brain dead patients in Iran. Materials and Methods:In a cross-sectional analytical study 90 ICU nurses in Ghaem and Imam Reza Hospitals in Mashhad through stratified random sampling allocation method were selected. Data collection tools included a questionnaire on demographic information, factors influencing nurse's practice during the organ donation process and surveying "nurse's practice in relation to their roles in the organ donation process." Results: 90 nurses participated in this study. (70.0% of the research subjects had spoken with their own families about organ donation, and (20.0% had organ donation cards. Practice scores were calculated on a scale of 100. The mean score of nurses' practice was (6.04± 3.66. 96.7% of nurses’ weak practice in terms of their roles in the organ donation process. Conclusion: As a result, they do not have adequate practice regard nurse's role in organ donation process and in relation to brain death patient and their families. Therefore it is suggested to include nursing courses in the organ donation process and organ transplantation as well as educational programs to acquaint nurses with their roles in the process to improve their practice by different training methods.

  5. Implementation of the patient-centered medical home in the Veterans Health Administration: associations with patient satisfaction, quality of care, staff burnout, and hospital and emergency department use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karin M; Helfrich, Christian; Sun, Haili; Hebert, Paul L; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Dolan, Emily; Taylor, Leslie; Wong, Edwin; Maynard, Charles; Hernandez, Susan E; Sanders, William; Randall, Ian; Curtis, Idamay; Schectman, Gordon; Stark, Richard; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) began implementing the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model. The Patient Aligned Care Team (PACT) initiative aims to improve health outcomes through team-based care, improved access, and care management. To track progress and evaluate outcomes at all VHA primary care clinics, we developed and validated a method to assess PCMH implementation. To create an index that measures the extent of PCMH implementation, describe variation in implementation, and examine the association between the implementation index and key outcomes. We conducted an observational study using data on more than 5.6 million veterans who received care at 913 VHA hospital-based and community-based primary care clinics and 5404 primary care staff from (1) VHA clinical and administrative databases, (2) a national patient survey administered to a weighted random sample of veterans who received outpatient care from June 1 to December 31, 2012, and (3) a survey of all VHA primary care staff in June 2012. Composite scores were constructed for 8 core domains of PACT: access, continuity, care coordination, comprehensiveness, self-management support, patient-centered care and communication, shared decision making, and team-based care. Patient satisfaction, rates of hospitalization and emergency department use, quality of care, and staff burnout. Fifty-three items were included in the PACT Implementation Progress Index (Pi2). Compared with the 87 clinics in the lowest decile of the Pi2, the 77 sites in the top decile exhibited significantly higher patient satisfaction (9.33 vs 7.53; P hospitalization rates for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (4.42 vs 3.68 quarterly admissions for veterans 65 years or older per 1000 patients; P < .001), and lower emergency department use (188 vs 245 visits per 1000 patients; P < .001). The extent of PCMH implementation, as measured by the Pi2, was highly associated with important outcomes for both

  6. Quality of care in patients with psoriasis: an initial clinical study of an international disease management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korte, J; Van Onselen, J; Kownacki, S; Sprangers, M A G; Bos, J D

    2005-01-01

    Patients with psoriasis have to cope with their disease for many years or even throughout their entire life. To provide optimal care, a disease management programme was developed. This programme consisted of disease education, disease management training, and psychological support, together with topical treatment. To test a disease management programme in dermatological practice, to assess patients' satisfaction with this programme, and adherence to topical treatment. Additionally, disease severity and quality of life were assessed. An initial clinical investigation was conducted in 10 European treatment centres. A total of 330 patients were included. Patient satisfaction, adherence, disease severity and quality of life were measured with study-specific and standardized self-report questionnaires. Patients reported a high degree of satisfaction with the programme, and a high degree of adherence to topical treatment. Disease severity and quality of life significantly improved. The programme was well received by the participating professionals. The disease management programme was found to be a useful tool in the management of psoriasis, providing patients with relief from the burden of psoriasis in everyday life. A full-scale evaluation is recommended.

  7. Quality of Care of Hospitalized Infective Endocarditis Patients: Report from a Tertiary Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashef, Mohammad Amin; Friderici, Jennifer; Hernandez-Montfort, Jaime; Atreya, Auras R; Lindenauer, Peter; Lagu, Tara

    2017-06-01

    There have been no recent studies describing the management and outcomes of patients with infective endocarditis (IE). We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult patients admitted to a tertiary medical center from 2007 to 2011 with a Duke criteria consistent discharge diagnosis of IE. We examined concordance with guideline recommendations. Outcomes included embolic events, inhospital and 1-year mortality, length of stay (LOS) and cardiac surgery. We used descriptive statistics to describe the cohort and Fisher exact and unpaired t tests to compare native valve endocarditis (NVE) with prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE). Of 170 patients, definite IE was present in 135 (79.4%) and possible IE in 35 (20.6%); 74.7% had NVE, and 25.3% had PVE. Mean ± standard deviation age was 60.0 ± 17.9 years. Comparing PVE to NVE, patients with PVE were less likely to have embolic events (14.0% vs. 32.3%; P = 0.03), had shorter LOS (median 12.0 days vs. 14.0 days; P = 0.047), but they did not show a statistically significant difference in inhospital mortality (20.9% vs. 12.6%; P = 0.21). Of 170, patients 27.6% (n = 47) underwent valve surgery. Most patients received timely blood cultures and antibiotics. Guideline-recommended consults were underused, with 86.5%, 54.1%, and 47.1% of patients receiving infectious disease, cardiac surgery, and cardiology consultation, respectively. As the number of consultations increased (from 0 to 3), we observed a nonsignificant trend toward reduction in 6-month readmission and 12-month mortality. IE remains a disease with significant morbidity and mortality. There are gaps in the care of IE patients, most notably underuse of specialty consultation. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:414-420. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  8. [Quality in diabetes mellitus control in Primary Care Units in Mexico. A study of the perspectives of the patient's family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos García, María Isabel; López Ramón, Concepción; Morales García, Manuel Higinio; Priego Álvarez, Heberto Romeo; Garrido Pérez, Silvia María Guadalupe; Cargill Foster, Nelly Ruth

    2017-01-01

    To identify the perspectives of the patient's family in the quality of diabetes mellitus control. Qualitative methodology of exploratory design, oriented towards health services research, conducted in 2014 using non-probability sampling. Primary Care Units mainly situated in the state of Tabasco, Mexico. 42 family members were selected, who agreed to participate voluntarily in the study. Six focus groups were set up; interview guides and group dynamics were employed. The information was documented, saturated and categorised; the most representative discourses were used, and conclusions reached. The results show a highly critical position of the families as regards the patient, some of which appear justified, and others have a cultural, historical, and to some extent, an ignorance connotation. They have also commented on the health care and the role that patients and families can play, in both cases, also expressed critically. The family perspectives reveal what they think and feel about diabetes mellitus. It is important to note their lack of support and the content of their expressions due to lack of knowledge of the disease. Their discourses are critical, mythical, and with false beliefs of the fear of being future carriers of the disease. They feel sorry for the patient but they resist taking care of them, and do not want a life with diabetes. The family is the closest support for patients and an invaluable human resource for health services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Variations in patient safety climate and perceived quality of collaboration between professions in out-of-hours care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemenc-Ketis Z

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Zalika Klemenc-Ketis,1–3 Ellen Tveter Deilkås,4 Dag Hofoss,5 Gunnar Tschudi Bondevik6,7 1Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Maribor, Maribor, 2Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, 3Community Health Centre Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia; 4Health Services Research Unit, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, 5Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, 6Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, 7National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway Purpose: To get an overview of health care workers perceptions of patient safety climates and the quality of collaboration in Slovenian out-of-hours health care (OOHC between professional groups.Materials and methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out in all (60 Slovenian OOHC clinics; 37 (61.7% agreed to participate with 438 employees. The questionnaire consisted of the Slovenian version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire – Ambulatory Version (SAQ-AV. Results: The study sample consisted of 175 (70.0% physicians, nurse practitioners, and practice nurses. Practice nurses reported the highest patient safety climate scores in all dimensions. Total mean (standard deviation SAQ-AV score was 60.9±15.2. Scores for quality of collaboration between different professional groups were high. The highest mean scores were reported by nurse practitioners on collaboration with practice nurses (4.4±0.6. The lowest mean scores were reported by practice nurses on collaboration with nurse practitioners (3.8±0.9.Conclusion: Due to large variations in Slovenian OOHC clinics with regard to how health care workers from different professional backgrounds perceive safety culture, more attention should be devoted to improving the team collaboration in OOHC. A clearer description of professional team roles should be provided. Keywords

  10. The patient experience: measuring the quality of care in the Defence Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Neale; Lamb, D

    2014-06-01

    Healthcare provided by the Defence Medical Services (DMS) is acknowledged to be of a high standard but patients' experiences of it has not been measured and collated in a consistent and meaningful way, which has limited strategic quality improvement initiatives. Responsibility for implementing and delivering a programme of healthcare governance and assurance for the DMS rests with the Inspector General (IG). An important aspect of this role is to nurture a culture of continuous improvement in the DMS and under this leadership the IG team has prioritised a number of projects to address this. The project to improve patient experience data capture was prioritised in the work schedule as it incorporated initiatives that would lead to improved quality in DMS healthcare, information exploitation and ultimately patient safety. This is the first in a series of articles that will document this important work and describe the methodological considerations associated with the initial questionnaire design, collaboration with NHS partners, the pilot study and progress towards the introduction of the definitive DMS tool later this year. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Multimedia Campaign Enhances Orthopaedic Patient Perceptions of Health Care Quality: A Prospective Analysis of Effect at a Military Treatment Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheean, Andrew J; Foster, James N; Aden, James K; Tubb, Creighton C; Johnson, Anthony E; Stinner, Daniel J

    2017-07-01

    The importance of patient satisfaction as a measure of quality has grown with initiatives intended to enhance demand for services, refocus reimbursement paradigms, encourage health care efficiencies, and ultimately improve clinical outcomes. The purpose of our performance improvement project was to (1) characterize the effect of a two-pronged multimedia initiative on patient perceptions of health care quality and satisfaction as assessed by the Army Provider Level Satisfaction Survey (APLSS) and (2) assess for differences in APLSS scores between the surgeons that did and did not participate in the program. Baseline APLSS data for our Department of Orthopaedic Surgery were collected and subsequently compared to APLSS results 3 months after the implementation of a department-wide multimedia campaign. The multimedia initiative consisted of two concurrently implemented interventions to the orthopaedic surgery outpatient clinics. One intervention involved placing large-framed posters about the orthopaedic clinic waiting areas on which were written, "We helped write the book," and included pictures of various orthopaedic textbooks of which attending surgeons and/or residents had contributed to as authors. The other intervention provided patients with surgeon "face sheets" upon arrival to their clinic appointments. These sheets included a picture of their attending surgeon, contact information for the surgeon's nurse care coordinator, and a brief biographical sketch of the surgeon's training, clinical interests and expertise, and other information at each surgeon's discretion. Among APLSS survey results for the orthopaedic surgery clinic including all surgeons, significant increases were observed between baseline data and 3-month data for Top 1 and Top 2 responses to the questions, "How satisfied do you feel about your visit?" and "Did your surgeon listen to you carefully about your concerns and questions?" (p = 0.003 and p = 0.004, respectively). The implementation of a

  12. Laboratory diagnosis of the rare anaemias: external quality assessment benefits patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara De La Salle

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in the 1960s, external quality assessment has developed to become an essential component of the quality management system of the diagnostic laboratory. External quality assessment provides a long term, retrospective view of laboratory performance, demonstrating the competence of the laboratory to others. The ENERCA project (the European Network for Rare and Congenital Anaemias has established a list of core laboratory tests that are used in the diagnosis of rare and congenital anaemias, which has been used as the basis for questionnaires to laboratories, to establish the use and quality assurance of diagnostic testing in the congenital and rare anaemias, and to European EQA providers for services in this key area. In general, the provision of EQA for rare and congenital anaemias is widely variable with little provision for the very rare disorders. For the more common congenital anaemias, such as the haemoglobinopathies and thalassaemias, provision is better but there is variation in aspects of the scheme design, especially the frequency of distribution. Where laboratories did not take part in EQA for individual tests, or there was no EQA available, a desire to participate was expressed in 66% (102/154 of cases. The provision of external quality assessment (EQA services for rare disorders is a challenge. For many of these conditions, the number of patients in any one member state is very small with only a few laboratories providing diagnostic testing. In these cases, the development of pan-European or cross-border EQA may be the only means by which standardisation of methods and results can be achieved. An EQA survey of 243 laboratories for performance in Hb A2 quantification showed encouraging results in that there was a clear differentiation in the results from a beta Thalassaemia carrier and an individual with no evidence of Thalassaemia; however, a bias was observed between different methods of measurement.

  13. Using Baldrige Performance Excellence Program Approaches in the Pursuit of Radiation Oncology Quality Care, Patient Satisfaction, and Workforce Commitment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternick, Edward S., E-mail: esternick@lifespan.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital/Brown Alpert Medical School, Providence, RI (United States)

    2011-06-20

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies.

  14. Using Baldrige Performance Excellence Program Approaches in the Pursuit of Radiation Oncology Quality Care, Patient Satisfaction, and Workforce Commitment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternick, Edward S.

    2011-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies.

  15. Using baldrige performance excellence program approaches in the pursuit of radiation oncology quality care, patient satisfaction, and workforce commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternick, Edward S

    2011-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies.

  16. Using Baldrige Performance Excellence Program Approaches in the Pursuit of Radiation Oncology Quality Care, Patient Satisfaction and Workforce Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward eSternick

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance U.S. business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice’s operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies.

  17. Developing Flanagan's critical incident technique to elicit indicators of high and low quality nursing care from patients and their nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, I J; Redfern, S J; Tomalin, D A; Oliver, S

    1992-05-01

    This paper discusses a development of Flanagan's critical incident technique (CIT) to elicit indicators of high and low quality nursing from patients and their nurses on medical, surgical and elderly care wards. Stages in undertaking the CIT are identified and presuppositions held by most researchers about the nature of the technique are identified. The paper describes how the authors moved to a different set of presuppositions during the course of the study. Preliminary analysis of interview transcripts revealed that critical incidents need not always be demarcated scenes with a clear beginning and end, but may arise from respondents summarizing their overall experience within their description of one incident. Characteristically respondents were unable to give a detailed account of such incidents but validity may be established by the fact that respondents appear to recount what actually happened as they saw it, and what they said was clearly important to them. The researchers found that the most appropriate basic unit of analysis was not the incident itself but 'happenings' revealed by incidents that are 'critical' by virtue of being important to respondents with respect to the quality of nursing care. The importance of CIT researchers achieving an understanding of the 'meaning' of critical happenings to respondents is emphasized. Analysis of the interview transcripts is facilitated by the use of INGRES, a relational database computer program which should enable a 'personal theory' of quality nursing for each respondent, both patients and nurses, to be described. The study suggests that the CIT is a flexible technique which may be adapted to meet the demands of nursing research. If carefully applied, the CIT seems capable of capitalizing on respondents' own stories and avoids the loss of information which occurs when complex narratives are reduced to simple descriptive categories. Patients and nurses have unique perspectives on nursing and their views are of

  18. Community health centers and primary care access and quality for chronically-ill patients - a case-comparison study of urban Guangdong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Leiyu; Lee, De-Chih; Liang, Hailun; Zhang, Luwen; Makinen, Marty; Blanchet, Nathan; Kidane, Ruth; Lindelow, Magnus; Wang, Hong; Wu, Shaolong

    2015-11-30

    Reform of the health care system in urban areas of China has prompted concerns about the utilization of Community Health Centers (CHC). This study examined which of the dominant primary care delivery models, i.e., the public CHC model, the 'gate-keeper' CHC model, or the hospital-owned CHC models, was most effective in enhancing access to and quality of care for patients with chronic illness. The case-comparison design was used to study nine health care organizations in Guangzhou, Dongguan, and Shenzhen cities within Guangdong province, China. 560 patients aged 50 or over with hypertension or diabetes who visited either CHCs or hospitals in these three cities were surveyed by using face-to-face interviews. Bivariate analyses were performed to compare quality and value of care indicators among subjects from the three cities. Multivariate analyses were used to assess the association between type of primary care delivery and quality as well as value of chronic care after controlling for patients' demographic and health status characteristics. Patients from all three cities chose their current health care providers primarily out of concern for quality of care (both provider expertise and adequate medical equipment), patient-centered care, and insurance plan requirement. Compared with patients from Guangzhou, those from Dongguan performed significantly better on most quality and value of care indicators. Most of these indicators remained significantly better even after controlling for patients' demographic and health status characteristics. The Shenzhen model (hospital-owned and -managed CHC) was generally effective in enhancing accessibility and continuity. However, coordination suffered due to seemingly duplicating primary care outpatients at the hospital setting. Significant associations between types of health care facilities and quality of care were also observed such that patients from CHCs were more likely to be satisfied with traveling time and follow-up care by

  19. The extent, quality and impact of patient and public involvement in primary care research: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Steven; McLachlan, Sarah; Jowett, Sue; Kinghorn, Philip; Gill, Paramjit; Higginbottom, Adele; Rhodes, Carol; Stevenson, Fiona; Jinks, Clare

    2018-01-01

    In the UK, more patients go to primary care than other parts of the health service. Therefore it is important for research into primary care to include the insights and views of people who receive these services. To explore the extent, quality and impact of patient and public involvement (PPI) in primary care research, we examined documents of 200 projects and surveyed 191 researchers.We found that about half of studies included PPI to develop research ideas and during the study itself. Common activities included designing study materials, advising on methods, and managing the research. Some studies did not undertake the PPI activities initially planned and funded for. PPI varied by study design, health condition and study population. We found pockets of good practice: having a PPI budget, supporting PPI contributors, and PPI informing recruitment issues. However, good practice was lacking in other areas. Few projects offered PPI contributors training, used PPI to develop information for participants about study progress and included PPI to advise on publishing findings.Researchers reported beneficial impacts of PPI. Most impact was reported when the approach to PPI included more indicators of good practice. The main cost of PPI for researchers was their time. Many reported difficulties providing information about PPI.In partnership with PPI contributors, we have used these findings to develop:a new Cost and Consequences Framework for PPI highlighting financial and non-financial costs, benefits and harms of PPIFifteen co-produced recommendations to improve the practice and delivery of PPI. Background: To improve the lives of patients in primary care requires the involvement of service users in primary care research. We aimed to explore the extent, quality and impact of patient and public involvement (PPI) in primary care research. Methods: We extracted information about PPI from grant applications, reports and an electronic survey of researchers of studies funded

  20. Quality of life and need for care in patients with an ostomy: a survey of 2647 patients of the Berlin OStomy-Study (BOSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braumann, Chris; Müller, Verena; Knies, Moritz; Aufmesser, Birgit; Schwenk, Wolfgang; Koplin, Gerold

    2016-12-01

    Although ostomies are sometimes necessary, it is unclear which type of ostomy is advantageous for quality of life (QoL). In an observational study of 2647 patients, QoL after colostomy (CS) and small bowel stoma (SBS) formation was evaluated. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)-QLQ-C30 and CR-38 questionnaires were used. Patient characteristics, retrospective information about the ostomy and previous treatments, and current stoma-related complications were recorded. All questionnaires were distributed and collected by stoma therapists at the homecare company PubliCare®. In all, 1790 patients had a CS, and 756 had an SBS. The mean Global Health Score (mGHS-a general QoL indicator) was 52.33 in CS and 49.40 in SBS patients (p = 0.004), but the effect size (Cohen's d) was 0.1. In SBS patients, all functional scores were lower and most of the symptom scores were higher. QoL differed significantly for CS and SBS patients, but the effect size was marginal. The care of certain patient groups, particularly (female) patients who receive emergency surgeries, must be improved. More professional education and guidance are necessary for a larger proportion of patients. This survey provided reference data for quality of life in patients with an ostomy.

  1. A systematic review of human factors and ergonomics (HFE)-based healthcare system redesign for quality of care and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Anping; Carayon, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare systems need to be redesigned to provide care that is safe, effective and efficient, and meets the multiple needs of patients. This systematic review examines how human factors and ergonomics (HFE) is applied to redesign healthcare work systems and processes and improve quality and safety of care. We identified 12 projects representing 23 studies and addressing different physical, cognitive and organisational HFE issues in a variety of healthcare systems and care settings. Some evidence exists for the effectiveness of HFE-based healthcare system redesign in improving process and outcome measures of quality and safety of care. We assessed risk of bias in 16 studies reporting the impact of HFE-based healthcare system redesign and found varying quality across studies. Future research should further assess the impact of HFE on quality and safety of care, and clearly define the mechanisms by which HFE-based system redesign can improve quality and safety of care.

  2. [Quality management in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Braun, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to extern quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system.

  3. Quality of life, psychological burden, needs, and satisfaction during specialized inpatient palliative care in family caregivers of advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Anneke; Ascherfeld, Lilian; Marx, Gabriella; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Bergelt, Corinna; Oechsle, Karin

    2017-05-10

    This pilot study aimed to investigate quality of life, psychological burden, unmet needs, and care satisfaction in family caregivers of advanced cancer patients (FCs) during specialized inpatient palliative care (SIPC) and to test feasibility and acceptance of the questionnaire survey. During a period of 12 weeks, FCs were recruited consecutively within 72 h after the patient's admission. They completed validated scales on several outcomes: quality of life (SF-8), distress (DT), anxiety (GAD-7), depression (PHQ-9), supportive needs (FIN), palliative care outcome (POS), and satisfaction with care (FAMCARE-2). We used non-parametric tests, t-tests and correlation analyses to address our research questions. FCs showed high study commitment: 74 FCs were asked to participate whereof 54 (73%) agreed and 51 (69%) returned the questionnaire. Except for "bodily pain", FCs' quality of life (SF-8) was impaired in all subscales. Most FCs (96%) reported clinically significant own distress (DT), with sadness, sorrows and exhaustion being the most distressing problems (80-83%). Moderate to severe anxiety (GAD-7) and depression (PHQ-9) were prevalent in 43% and 41% of FCs, respectively. FCs scored a mean number of 16.3 of 20 needs (FIN) as very or extremely important (SD 3.3), 20% of needs were unmet in >50% of FCs. The mean POS score assessed by FCs was 16.6 (SD 5.0) and satisfaction (FAMCARE-2) was high (73.4; SD 8.3). This pilot study demonstrated feasibility of the questionnaire survey and showed relevant psychosocial burden and unmet needs in FCs during SIPC. However, FCs' satisfaction with SIPC seemed to be high. A current multicenter study evaluates these findings longitudinally in a large cohort of FCs.

  4. Benefit or Harm? A study on impact of collusion on the quality of life among palliative care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Victor

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, roughly one-half of patients undergoing cancer treatment are unaware of their diagnosis or treatment. The intention of this study is to determine the prevalence of collusion and its influence on quality of life (QOL among patients in palliative care settings. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 palliative care patients to assess the extent of knowledge about their diagnosis and prognosis. The caretakers and the treating doctors were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire to assess if diagnosis was revealed to a patient. QOL of the patients was assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL Questionnaire-C30 questionnaire. Results: The prevalence of collusion was 37%, i.e., in more than one-third of the palliative care patients; caregivers restrained doctors from disclosing the diagnosis. The prevalence of collusion was less among patients with higher educational qualification (P = 0.027 and professionals (P = 0.025. Collusion was not associated with gender, type of family, place of residence, and socioeconomic status (SES. In multivariate regression, collusion (odds ratio = 10.53 was independently associated with poor QOL when adjusted for age, gender, place of residence, religion, educational status, family type, and SES. Conclusion: Collusion is fairly prevalent and it worsens the QOL among cancer patients. Since the main driver for collusion is the strong desire among caregivers to protect the physical and psychological well-being, the findings of the study could motivate the caregiver for a more open and honest communication.

  5. Long-term outcome of elderly patients requiring intensive care admission for abdominal pathologies: survival and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlani, P; Chenaud, C; Mariotti, N; Ricou, B

    2007-05-01

    Medical developments have allowed the management of patients aged over 70 years with severe abdominal pathologies requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission. These patients require enhanced life support and present a high ICU mortality. We investigated the outcome and quality of life (QOL) of elderly patients 2 years after their ICU stay for abdominal pathologies. Patients aged 70 years or over with abdominal pathologies, admitted to our ICU over a period of 2 years, were included. Two years following their ICU stay, a letter informed the patients about the present study. Consent to participate was obtained by telephone. QOL was assessed by the Euro-QOL and Short Form-36 questionnaires. Other patient-centered outcomes were evaluated. Overall, 2780 patients were admitted to the ICU during the study period; 141 (5%) patients were eligible; 112 of the 141 (79%) survived their ICU stay, 95 (67%) survived their hospital stay and 52 (37%) were alive 2 years after their ICU stay; 36 of the 52 survivors (69%) answered the questionnaire. Their QOL 2 years after their ICU stay was decreased in comparison with an age-matched population. Eighty-one per cent of patients lived at home and 57% were totally independent. They perceived their ICU stay as positive and 75% stated that they would agree to go through intensive care again. Factors associated with 2-year survival were the absence of co-morbidity, absence of malignancy and a lower Simplified Acute Physiology II score on ICU admission. A high mortality rate and a decrease in QOL were observed in elderly patients with severe abdominal pathologies. Nonetheless, these patients were able to adapt well to their physical disabilities.

  6. Home visits as part of a new care pathway (iAID) to improve quality of care and quality of life in ostomy patients: a cluster-randomized stepped-wedge trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sier, M. F.; Oostenbroek, R. J.; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.; Veldink, G. J.; Bemelman, W. A.; Pronk, A.; Spillenaar-Bilgen, E. J.; Kelder, W.; Hoff, C.; Ubbink, D. T.; Havenga, K.; Veltkamp, S. C.; T Dekker, J. W.; Boerma, D.; Eijsbouts, Q. A. J.; Lamme, B.; Vuylsteke, R. J. C. L. M.; Tobon Morales, R. E.; van Tets, W. F.

    2017-01-01

    Aim Morbidity in patients with an ostomy is high. A new care pathway, including perioperative home visits by enterostomal therapists, was studied to assess whether more elaborate education and closer guidance could reduce stoma-related complications and improve quality of life (QoL), at acceptable

  7. [Web-based electronic patient record as an instrument for quality assurance within an integrated care concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, A; Jünemann, A G M; Prokosch, H-U; Beyer, A; Ganslandt, T; Grolik, R; Klein, A; Mrosek, A; Michelson, G; Kruse, F E

    2009-03-01

    A prerequisite for integrated care programmes is the implementation of a communication network meeting quality assurance standards. Against this background the main objective of the integrated care project between the University Eye Hospital Erlangen and the health insurance company AOK Bayern was to evaluate the potential and the acceptance of a web-based electronic patient record in the context of cataract and retinal surgery. Standardised modules for capturing pre-, intra- and post-operative data on the basis of clinical pathway guidelines for cataract- and retinal surgery have been developed. There are 6 data sets recorded per patient (1 pre-operative, 1 operative, 4-6 post-operative). For data collection, a web-based communication system (Soarian Integrated Care) has been chosen which meets the high requirements in data security, as well as being easy to handle. This teleconsultation system and the embedded electronic patient record are independent of the software used by respective offices and hospitals. Data transmission and storage were carried out in real-time. At present, 101 private ophthalmologists are taking part in the IGV contract with the University Eye Hospital Erlangen. This corresponds to 52% of all private ophthalmologists in the region. During the period from January 1st 2006 to December 31st 2006, 1844 patients were entered. Complete documentation was achieved in 1390 (75%) of all surgical procedures. For evaluation of this data, a multidimensional report and analysis tool (Cognos) was used. The deviation from target refraction as one quality indicator was in the mean 0.09 diopter. The web-based patient record used in this project was highly accepted by the private ophthalmologists. However there are still general concerns against the exchange of medical data via the internet. Nevertheless, the web-based patient record is an essential tool for a functional integration between the ambulatory and stationary health-care units. In addition to the

  8. Quality of care in patients with atrial fibrillation in primary care: a cross-sectional study comparing clinical and claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Rebekka; Chenot, Jean-François; Angelow, Aniela

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia with increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. Oral anticoagulation (OAC) reduces stroke risk by up to 68%. The aim of our study was to evaluate quality of care in patients with AF in a primary health care setting with a focus on physician guideline adherence for OAC prescription and heart rate- and rhythm management. In a second step we aimed to compare OAC rates based on primary care data with rates based on claims data. Methods: We included all GP practices in the region Vorpommern-Greifswald, Germany, which were willing to participate (N=29/182, response rate 16%). Claims data was derived from the regional association of statutory health insurance physicians. Patients with a documented AF diagnosis (ICD-10-GM-Code ICD I48.-) from 07/2011-06/2012 were identified using electronic medical records (EMR) and claims data. Stroke and bleeding risk were calculated using the CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc and HAS-BLED scores. We calculated crude treatment rates for OAC, rate and rhythm control medications and adjusted OAC treatment rates based on practice and claims data. Adjusted rates were calculated including the CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc and HAS-BLED scores and individual factors affecting guideline based treatment. Results: We identified 927 patients based on EMR and 1,247 patients based on claims data. The crude total OAC treatment rate was 69% based on EMR and 61% based on claims data. The adjusted OAC treatment rates were 90% for patients based on EMR and 63% based on claims data. 82% of the AF patients received a treatment for rate control and 12% a treatment for rhythm control. The most common reasons for non-prescription of OAC were an increased risk of falling, dementia and increased bleeding risk. Conclusion: Our results suggest that a high rate of AF patients receive a drug therapy according to guidelines. There is a large difference between crude and adjusted OAC treatment rates. This is due to individual

  9. Older people's perceptions of quality of care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sixma, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: User views on quality of care are generally assessed by patients satisfaction questionnaires. However, doubts have been cast on the validity and reliability of such instruments. Aim of this paper are: (1) to describe the development of a new instrument measuring quality of care from the

  10. Predictors of image quality of coronary computed tomography in the acute care setting of patients with chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberg, Fabian; Abbara, Suhny; Schlett, Christopher L.; Cury, Ricardo C.; Truong, Quynh A.; Rogers, Ian S. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Nagurney, John T. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Brady, Thomas J. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: uhoffmann@partners.org

    2010-04-15

    Objective: We aimed to determine predictors of image quality in consecutive patients who underwent coronary computed tomography (CT) for the evaluation of acute chest pain. Method and materials: We prospectively enrolled patients who presented with chest pain to the emergency department. All subjects underwent contrast-enhanced 64-slice coronary multi-detector CT. Two experienced readers determined overall image quality on a per-patient basis and the prevalence and characteristics of non-evaluable coronary segments on a per-segment basis. Results: Among 378 subjects (143 women, age: 52.9 {+-} 11.8 years), 345 (91%) had acceptable overall image quality, while 33 (9%) had poor image quality or were unreadable. In adjusted analysis, patients with diabetes, hypertension and a higher heart rate during the scan were more likely to have exams graded as poor or unreadable (odds ratio [OR]: 2.94, p = 0.02; OR: 2.62, p = 0.03; OR: 1.43, p = 0.02; respectively). Of 6253 coronary segments, 257 (4%) were non-evaluable, most due to severe calcification in combination with motion (35%). The presence of non-evaluable coronary segments was associated with age (OR: 1.08 annually, 95%-confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.12, p < 0.001), baseline heart rate (OR: 1.35 per 10 beats/min, 95%-CI: 1.11-1.67, p = 0.003), diabetes, hypertension, and history of coronary artery disease (OR: 4.43, 95%-CI: 1.93-10.17, p < 0.001; OR: 2.27, 95-CI: 1.01-4.73, p = 0.03; OR: 5.12, 95%-CI: 2.0-13.06, p < 0.001; respectively). Conclusion: Coronary CT permits acceptable image quality in more than 90% of patients with chest pain. Patients with multiple risk factors are more likely to have impaired image quality or non-evaluable coronary segments. These patients may require careful patient preparation and optimization of CT scanning protocols.

  11. Recorded quality of primary care for patients with diabetes in England before and after the introduction of a financial incentive scheme: a longitudinal observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Reeves, David; Valderas, Jose M; Campbell, Stephen; Doran, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The UK's Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) was introduced in 2004/5, linking remuneration for general practices to recorded quality of care for chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. We assessed the effect of the incentives on recorded quality of care for diabetes patients and its variation by patient and practice characteristics. Using the General Practice Research Database we selected a stratified sample of 148 English general practices in England, contributing data from 2000/1 to 2006/7, and obtained a random sample of 653,500 patients in which 23,920 diabetes patients identified. We quantified annually recorded quality of care at the patient-level, as measured by the 17 QOF diabetes indicators, in a composite score and analysed it longitudinally using an Interrupted Time Series design. Recorded quality of care improved for all subgroups in the pre-incentive period. In the first year of the incentives, composite quality improved over-and-above this pre-incentive trend by 14.2% (13.7-14.6%). By the third year the improvement above trend was smaller, but still statistically significant, at 7.3% (6.7-8.0%). After 3 years of the incentives, recorded levels of care varied significantly for patient gender, age, years of previous care, number of co-morbid conditions and practice diabetes prevalence. The introduction of financial incentives was associated with improvements in the recorded quality of diabetes care in the first year. These improvements included some measures of disease control, but most captured only documentation of recommended aspects of clinical assessment, not patient management or outcomes of care. Improvements in subsequent years were more modest. Variation in care between population groups diminished under the incentives, but remained substantial in some cases.

  12. Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY): impact of an eye health education program on patient knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Lindsay A; Huisingh, Carrie E; McGwin, Gerald; Mennemeyer, Stephen T; Bregantini, Mary; Patel, Nita; Saaddine, Jinan; Crews, John E; Girkin, Christopher A; Owsley, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of the education program of the Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY) telemedicine program on at-risk patients' knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care as well as to assess patient satisfaction with EQUALITY. New or existing patients presenting for a comprehensive eye exam (CEE) at one of two retail-based primary eye clinics were enrolled based on ≥1 of the following at-risk criteria for glaucoma: African Americans ≥40 years of age, Whites ≥50 years of age, diabetes, family history of glaucoma, and/or preexisting diagnosis of glaucoma. A total of 651 patients were enrolled. A questionnaire was administered prior to the patients' CEE and prior to the patients receiving any of the evidence-based eye health education program; a follow-up questionnaire was administered 2-4 weeks later by phone. Baseline and follow-up patient responses regarding knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care were compared using McNemar's test. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association of patient-level characteristics with improvement in knowledge and attitudes. Overall patient satisfaction was summarized. At follow-up, all patient responses in the knowledge and attitude domains significantly improved from baseline (P≤0.01 for all questions). Those who were unemployed (odds ratio =0.63, 95% confidence interval =0.42-0.95, P=0.026) or had lower education (odds ratio =0.55, 95% confidence interval =0.29-1.02, P=0.058) were less likely to improve their knowledge after adjusting for age, sex, race, and prior glaucoma diagnosis. This association was attenuated after further adjustment for other patient-level characteristics. Ninety-eight percent (n=501) of patients reported being likely to have a CEE within the next 2 years, whereas 63% (n=326) had a CEE in the previous 2 years. Patient satisfaction with EQUALITY was high (99%). Improved knowledge about glaucoma and a high intent to

  13. Examination of the Perception and Experiences of the Patients in the Emergency Departments of Imam Khomeini and Shariati Hospitals Regarding the Quality of Care Provided by the Health Care System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaye Fakharian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergency department (ED is considered to act as a gate keeper of treatment for patients. Thereby, EDs must achieve customer satisfaction by providing quality services. Patient satisfaction and experiences are important parts of health care quality, but patient expectations are seldom included in quality assessments. Materials and Methods: The objective of this study was to identify patient’s perception of quality of care are given by care system at ED in Imam Khomeini and Shariaty Hospital. A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews from 45 patients hospitalized at different ward from emergency department. The method proposed by Colizzi was used for data analysis. Results: The finding of this study revealed that patient experience were five main category: patient satisfaction, dissatisfaction, interpretation, attendant role and advices. Each of these group included five subcategories included: environment, medical staff, hospital management, information and education factor, patient rights. Therefore, all factors in subgroups are effective in satisfaction or dissatisfaction and others. Response to these patient need and expectation are almost easy and practicable and our finding of this study can help health and emergency care provider for doing that and improvement of quality of care. Conclusion: Identifying areas for quality improvement are important, to know where to take action. These finding may facilitate this work and improve patients perception of quality of care at emergency department. The use of a these data can also provide a research-based instrument for future studies.

  14. From patient care to research: a validation study examining the factors contributing to data quality in a primary care electronic medical record database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Nathan; Halas, Gayle; Peeler, William; Casaclang, Natalie; Williamson, Tyler; Katz, Alan

    2015-02-05

    Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) are increasingly used in the provision of primary care and have been compiled into databases which can be utilized for surveillance, research and informing practice. The primary purpose of these records is for the provision of individual patient care; validation and examination of underlying limitations is crucial for use for research and data quality improvement. This study examines and describes the validity of chronic disease case definition algorithms and factors affecting data quality in a primary care EMR database. A retrospective chart audit of an age stratified random sample was used to validate and examine diagnostic algorithms applied to EMR data from the Manitoba Primary Care Research Network (MaPCReN), part of the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN). The presence of diabetes, hypertension, depression, osteoarthritis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was determined by review of the medical record and compared to algorithm identified cases to identify discrepancies and describe the underlying contributing factors. The algorithm for diabetes had high sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) with all scores being over 90%. Specificities of the algorithms were greater than 90% for all conditions except for hypertension at 79.2%. The largest deficits in algorithm performance included poor PPV for COPD at 36.7% and limited sensitivity for COPD, depression and osteoarthritis at 72.0%, 73.3% and 63.2% respectively. Main sources of discrepancy included missing coding, alternative coding, inappropriate diagnosis detection based on medications used for alternate indications, inappropriate exclusion due to comorbidity and loss of data. Comparison to medical chart review shows that at MaPCReN the CPCSSN case finding algorithms are valid with a few limitations. This study provides the basis for the validated data to be utilized for research and informs users of its

  15. Patients' experiences of the quality of long-term care among the elderly: comparing scores over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuidgeest Marloes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Every two years, long-term care organizations for the elderly are obliged to evaluate and publish the experiences of residents, representatives of psychogeriatric patients, and/or assisted-living clients with regard to quality of care. Our hypotheses are that publication of this quality information leads to improved performance, and that organizations with substandard performance will improve more than those whose performance is relatively good. Methods The analyses included organizational units that measured experiences twice between 2007 (t0 and 2009 (t1. Experiences with quality of care were measured with Consumer Quality Index (CQI questionnaires. Besides descriptive analyses (i.e. mean, 5th and 95th percentile, and 90% central range of the 19 CQI indicators and change scores of these indicators were calculated. Differences across five performance groups (ranging from 'worst' to 'best' were tested using an ANOVA test and effect sizes were measured with omega squared (ω2. Results At t0 experiences of residents, representatives, and assisted-living clients were positive on all indicators. Nevertheless, most CQI indicators had improved scores (up to 0.37 change score at t1. Only three indicators showed a minor decline (up to -0.08 change score. Change scores varied between indicators and questionnaires, e.g. they were more profound for the face-to-face interview questionnaire for residents in nursing homes than for the other two mail questionnaires (0.15 vs. 0.05 and 0.04, respectively, possibly due to more variation between nursing homes on the first measurement, perhaps indicating more potential for improvement. A negative relationship was found between prior performance and change, particularly with respect to the experiences of residents (ω2 = 0.16 and assisted-living clients (ω2 = 0.15. However, the relation between prior performance and improvement could also be demonstrated with respect to the experiences reported

  16. Stakeholder Perspectives on the Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care (OPTIMISTIC) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersek, Mary; Hickman, Susan E; Thomas, Anne C; Bernard, Brittany; Unroe, Kathleen T

    2017-10-17

    The need to reduce burdensome and costly hospitalizations of frail nursing home residents is well documented. The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care (OPTIMISTIC) project achieved this reduction through a multicomponent collaborative care model. We conducted an implementation-focused project evaluation to describe stakeholders' perspectives on (a) the most and least effective components of the intervention; (b) barriers to implementation; and (c) program features that promoted its adoption. Nineteen nursing homes participated in OPTIMISTIC. We conducted semistructured, qualitative interviews with 63 stakeholders: 23 nursing home staff and leaders, 4 primary care providers, 10 family members, and 26 OPTIMISTIC clinical staff. We used directed content analysis to analyze the data. We found universal endorsement of the value of in-depth advance care planning (ACP) discussions in reducing hospitalizations and improving care. Similarly, all stakeholder groups emphasized that nursing home access to specially trained, project registered nurses (RNs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) with time to focus on ACP, comprehensive resident assessment, and staff education was particularly valuable in identifying residents' goals for care. Challenges to implementation included inadequately trained facility staff and resistance to changing practice. In addition, the program sometimes failed to communicate its goals and activities clearly, leaving facilities uncertain about the OPTIMISTIC clinical staff's roles in the facilities. These findings are important for dissemination efforts related to the OPTIMISTIC care model and may be applicable to other innovations in nursing homes. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. Predictors of posttraumatic stress and quality of life in family members of chronically critically ill patients after intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermann, Gloria-Beatrice; Weidner, Kerstin; Strauß, Bernhard; Rosendahl, Jenny; Petrowski, Katja

    2016-12-01

    Prolonged mechanical ventilation for acute medical conditions increases the risk of chronic critical illness (CCI). Close family members are confronted with the life-threatening condition of the CCI patients and are prone to develop posttraumatic stress disorder affecting their health-related quality of life (HRQL). Main aim of the present study was to investigate patient- and family-related risk factors for posttraumatic stress and decreased HRQL in family members of CCI patients. In a cross-sectional design nested within a prospective longitudinal cohort study, posttraumatic stress symptoms and quality of life were assessed in family members of CCI patients (n = 83, aged between 18 and 72 years) up to 6 months after transfer from ICU at acute care hospital to post-acute rehabilitation. Patients admitted a large rehabilitation hospital for ventilator weaning. The Posttraumatic Stress Scale-10 and the Euro-Quality of life-5D-3L were applied in both patients and their family members via telephone interview. A significant proportion of CCI patients and their family members (14.5 and 15.7 %, respectively) showed clinically relevant scores of posttraumatic stress. Both CCI patients and family members reported poorer HRQL than a normative sample. Factors independently associated with posttraumatic stress in family members were the time following ICU discharge (β = .256, 95 % confidence interval .053-.470) and the patients' diagnosis of PTSD (β = .264, 95 % confidence interval .045-.453). Perceived satisfaction with the relationship turned out to be a protective factor for posttraumatic stress in family members of CCI patients (β = -.231, 95 % confidence interval -.423 to -.015). Regarding HRQL in family members, patients' acute posttraumatic stress at ICU (β = -.290, 95 % confidence interval -.360 to -.088) and their own posttraumatic stress 3 to 6 months post-transfer (β = -.622, 95 % confidence interval -.640 to -.358) turned out to be

  18. Patient Decision Aids Improve Decision Quality and Patient Experience and Reduce Surgical Rates in Routine Orthopaedic Care: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepucha, Karen; Atlas, Steven J; Chang, Yuchiao; Dorrwachter, Janet; Freiberg, Andrew; Mangla, Mahima; Rubash, Harry E; Simmons, Leigh H; Cha, Thomas

    2017-08-02

    Patient decision aids are effective in randomized controlled trials, yet little is known about their impact in routine care. The purpose of this study was to examine whether decision aids increase shared decision-making when used in routine care. A prospective study was designed to evaluate the impact of a quality improvement project to increase the use of decision aids for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis, lumbar disc herniation, or lumbar spinal stenosis. A usual care cohort was enrolled before the quality improvement project and an intervention cohort was enrolled after the project. Participants were surveyed 1 week after a specialist visit, and surgical status was collected at 6 months. Regression analyses adjusted for clustering of patients within clinicians and examined the impact on knowledge, patient reports of shared decision-making in the visit, and surgical rates. With 550 surveys, the study had 80% to 90% power to detect a difference in these key outcomes. The response rates to the 1-week survey were 70.6% (324 of 459) for the usual care cohort and 70.2% (328 of 467) for the intervention cohort. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in any patient characteristic between the 2 cohorts. More patients received decision aids in the intervention cohort at 63.6% compared with the usual care cohort at 27.3% (p = 0.007). Decision aid use was associated with higher knowledge scores, with a mean difference of 18.7 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 11.4 to 26.1 points; p < 0.001) for the usual care cohort and 15.3 points (95% CI, 7.5 to 23.0 points; p = 0.002) for the intervention cohort. Patients reported more shared decision-making (p = 0.009) in the visit with their surgeon in the intervention cohort, with a mean Shared Decision-Making Process score (and standard deviation) of 66.9 ± 27.5 points, compared with the usual care cohort at 62.5 ± 28.6 points. The majority of patients received their preferred treatment, and this did not differ

  19. Supportive care needs and psychological distress and/or quality of life in ambulatory advanced colorectal cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Nobuhiro; Takiguchi, Shuji; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Okuyama, Toru; Nakaguchi, Tomohiro; Kubota, Yosuke; Ito, Yoshinori; Sugano, Koji; Wada, Makoto; Akechi, Tatsuo

    2017-12-01

    Although currently many advanced colorectal cancer patients continuously receive chemotherapy, there are very few findings with regard to the supportive care needs of such patients. The purposes of this study were to investigate the patients' perceived needs and the association with psychological distress and/or quality of life, and to clarify the characteristics of patients with a high degree of unmet needs. Ambulatory colorectal cancer patients who were receiving chemotherapy were asked to complete the Short-Form Supportive Care Needs Survey questionnaire, which covers five domains of need (health system and information, psychological, physical, care and support, and sexuality needs), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire. Complete data were available for 100 patients. Almost all of the top 10 most common unmet needs belonged to the psychological domain. The patients' total needs were significantly associated with both psychological distress (r = 0.65, P quality of life (r = -0.38, P patients' needs and psychological distress and/or quality of life suggest that interventions that respond to patients' needs may be one possible strategy for ameliorating psychological distress and enhancing quality of life. Female patients' needs should be evaluated more carefully. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. High Quality of Diabetes Care Based Upon Individualised Treatment Goals - A Cross Sectional Study in 4784 Patients in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloos, C; Müller, N; Hartmann, P; Lehmann, T; Sämann, A; Roth, J; Wolf, G; Müller, U A

    2016-05-01

    Recent guidelines recommend an individualized approach towards patients with diabetes mellitus. Data of a programme dealing with quality of diabetes care, "Diabetes TÜV" of the Deutsche BKK was reappraised in the light of recent evidence applying these recommendations. Data originates from a population-based study in primary diabetes care in Germany. Patients with diabetes mellitus insured by the Deutsche BKK were invited to participate. From 2000 to 2004 data of 4 784 patients participated. Double or multiple visits were not included. HbA1c was analysed in 0.5% categories and in age groups below and above 70 years. HbA1c was DCCT adjusted. A total of 368 patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) (42% women, HbA1c 54 mmol/mol (7.1%), BP 136/79 mmHg) and 4 416 patients with diabetes type 2 (DM2) (44% women, HbA1c 48.6 mmol/mol (6.6%), BP 142/81 mmHg) were included.). An HbA1c of 53 mmol/mol (7%) or less was found in 70%, less than 64 mmol/mol (8%) in 87% of all patients, and higher than 86 mmol/mol (10%) in 2.8%. The detailed analysis shows that an HbA1c of  70 years 144 mmHg/diastolic BP:  70 years 80 mmHg). Using WHO grading, BP is mainly mildly elevated (grade 1: 41% (n=1942); grade 2, 17% (n=820) grade 3 6% (n=281). In 10 patients (0.2%) HbA1c above 86 mmol/mol (10.0%) coincides with a BP WHO grade 3. In recent years new evidence is available regarding treatment targets. The reappraisal of a cross sectional study of a quality assurance programme of a German health insurance in a differentiated way demonstrates that more than 2/3 of the people with diabetes mellitus meet their specific goals. Only very few patients are at imminent risk due to bad glycaemic control and high blood pressure. Old patients may be at risk of overtreatment. Strategies aiming at adapting pharmacological interventions in older patients must be conceived. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Integration of quality assurance activities into a computerized patient data management system in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, C; Mossel, P; Haimet, S; King, T C

    1990-11-01

    A prototype computer-based patient data management system (PDMS) was developed for a surgery-anesthesiology intensive care unit (ICU) to reduce the time and staff needed to implement quality assurance (QA) functions. Goals of the system were to make QA functions routine and minimally intrusive to the daily operation of the ICU. PDMS collects general data (eg, admissions and discharges, lengths of stay, and bed utilization rates) and specialized data (eg, specific indicators) unique to the ICU and performs prospective monitoring for the occurrence of specific events (occurrence screening) and retrospective examinations of patient records (targeted reviews). Preliminary results suggest that PDMS facilitates the acquisition and analysis of QA data and reduces the time needed to acquire these data. Research to validate these claims and efforts to improve and expand the prototype system with a permanent production system are in progress.

  2. SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry - a tool for improving the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of dementia patients in clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Religa

    Full Text Available The Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem was developed with the aim to improve the quality of diagnostic work-up, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden.SveDem is an internet based quality registry where several indicators can be followed over time. It includes information about the diagnostic work-up, medical treatment and community support (www.svedem.se. The patients are diagnosed and followed-up yearly in specialist units, primary care centres or in nursing homes.The database was initiated in May 2007 and covers almost all of Sweden. There were 28 722 patients registered with a mean age of 79.3 years during 2007-2012. Each participating unit obtains continuous online statistics from its own registrations and they can be compared with regional and national data. A report from SveDem is published yearly to inform medical and care professionals as well as political and administrative decision-makers about the current quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden.SveDem provides knowledge about current dementia care in Sweden and serves as a framework for ensuring the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care across the country. It also reflects changes in quality dementia care over time. Data from SveDem can be used to further develop the national guidelines for dementia and to generate new research hypotheses.

  3. Time, timing, talking and training: findings from an exploratory action research study to improve quality of end of life care for minority ethnic kidney patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Emma; Randhawa, Gurch; Brown, Edwina; Da Silva Gane, Maria; Stoves, John; Warwick, Graham; Mir, Tahira; Magee, Regina; Sharman, Sue; Farrington, Ken

    2017-06-01

    Background. With an ageing and increasingly diverse population at risk from rising levels of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, including kidney complications, there is a need to provide quality care at all stages in the care pathway including at the end of life and to all patients. Aim . This study purposively explored South Asian patients' experiences of kidney end of life care to understand how services can be delivered in a way that meets diverse patient needs. Methods. Within an action research design 14 focus groups (45 care providers) of kidney care providers discussed the recruitment and analysis of individual interviews with 16 South Asian kidney patients (eight men, eight women). Emergent themes from the focus groups were analysed thematically. The research took place at four UK centres providing kidney care to diverse populations: West London, Luton, Leicester and Bradford. Results. Key themes related to time and the timing of discussions about end of life care and the factors that place limitations on patients and providers in talking about end of life care. Lack of time and confidence of nurses in areas of kidney care, individual attitudes and workforce composition influence whether and how patients have access to end of life care through kidney services. Conclusion. Training, team work and time to discuss overarching issues (including timing and communication about end of life) with colleagues could support service providers to facilitate access and delivery of end of life care to this group of patients.

  4. Quality assessment of information about medications in primary care electronic patient record (EPR systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pous

    2010-06-01

    Conclusions This project highlighted the poor quality of drug information provided by these EPR programmes. The ten-item tool seems suitable for assessing their quality. Based on this analysis, we have proposed a set of ten quality standards for prescribing software.

  5. Nursing skill mix in European hospitals: cross-sectional study of the association with mortality, patient ratings, and quality of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Bruyneel, Luk; McHugh, Matthew; Maier, Claudia B; Moreno-Casbas, Teresa; Ball, Jane E; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Sermeus, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the association of hospital nursing skill mix with patient mortality, patient ratings of their care and indicators of quality of care. Design Cross-sectional patient discharge data, hospital characteristics and nurse and patient survey data were merged and analysed using generalised estimating equations (GEE) and logistic regression models. Setting Adult acute care hospitals in Belgium, England, Finland, Ireland, Spain and Switzerland. Participants Survey data were collected from 13 077 nurses in 243 hospitals, and 18 828 patients in 182 of the same hospitals in the six countries. Discharge data were obtained for 275 519 surgical patients in 188 of these hospitals. Main outcome measures Patient mortality, patient ratings of care, care quality, patient safety, adverse events and nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction. Results Richer nurse skill mix (eg, every 10-point increase in the percentage of professional nurses among all nursing personnel) was associated with lower odds of mortality (OR=0.89), lower odds of low hospital ratings from patients (OR=0.90) and lower odds of reports of poor quality (OR=0.89), poor safety grades (OR=0.85) and other poor outcomes (0.80nurses is associated with an 11% increase in the odds of death. In our hospital sample, there were an average of six caregivers for every 25 patients, four of whom were professional nurses. Substituting one nurse assistant for a professional nurse for every 25 patients is associated with a 21% increase in the odds of dying. Conclusions A bedside care workforce with a greater proportion of professional nurses is associated with better outcomes for patients and nurses. Reducing nursing skill mix by adding nursing associates and other categories of assistive nursing personnel without professional nurse qualifications may contribute to preventable deaths, erode quality and safety of hospital care and contribute to hospital nurse shortages. PMID:28626086

  6. For all the right reasons. Approaching CPOE from a patient safety and care quality perspective is the first critical step toward success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagland, Mark

    2009-09-01

    True CPOE success is about facilitating improved patient safety, care quality, and efficiency in a multidisciplinar environment, and on an ongoing basis. CPOE implementation forces clinician leaders to examine and rework long-ingrained care delivery processes, especially as they build or adapt order sets. The likelihood that CPOE will be a requirement of meaningful use could compel a rapid acceleration in implementation.

  7. Too few staff, too many patients: a qualitative study of the impact on obstetric care providers and on quality of care in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Susan; Kamwendo, Francis; Chipeta, Effie; Chimwaza, Wanangwa; de Pinho, Helen; McAuliffe, Eilish

    2015-03-21

    Shortages of staff have a significant and negative impact on maternal outcomes in low-income countries, but the impact on obstetric care providers in these contexts is less well documented. Despite the government of Malawi's efforts to increase the number of human resources for health, maternal mortality rates remain persistently high. Health workers' perceptions of insufficient staff or time to carry out their work can predict key variables concerning motivation and attrition, while the resulting sub-standard care and poor attitudes towards women dissuade women from facility-based delivery. Understanding the situation from the health worker perspective can inform policy options that may contribute to a better working environment for staff and improved quality of care for Malawi's women. A qualitative research design, using critical incident interviews, was used to generate a deep and textured understanding of participants' experiences. Eligible participants had performed at least one of the emergency obstetric care signal functions (a) in the previous three months and had experienced a demotivating critical incident within the same timeframe. Data were analysed using NVivo software. Eighty-four interviews were conducted. Concerns about staff shortages and workload were key factors for over 40% of staff who stated their intention to leave their current post and for nearly two-thirds of the remaining health workers who were interviewed. The main themes emerging were: too few staff, too many patients; lack of clinical officers/doctors; inadequate obstetric skills; undermining performance and professionalism; and physical and psychological consequences for staff. Underlying factors were inflexible scheduling and staff allocations that made it impossible to deliver quality care. This study revealed the difficult circumstances under which maternity staff are operating and the professional and emotional toll this exacts. Systems failures and inadequate human resource

  8. Development and application of the informational and communication technologies in quality standards of health care management for patients with arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smііanov, V; Smiianova, O; Tarasenko, S

    2014-01-01

    Mobile health technologies improve the quality of health care service. The information and communication technology is developed and applied to remind patients with arterial hypertension to follow medical recommendations. The feedback system from general practitioners was developed (the reminder system for patients sending the feedbacks). It helped to supervise follow-up patients online. Suggested system provides for forming the database for summarized analysis of online survey of the patients, who receive medical care at health care institution, to take managerial decisions concerning the improvements of medical services quality. Evaluation of efficiency of the applied technology assured that the number of patients, who checked regularly his/her arterial pressure, increased by 31.00%. The number of patients, who visited doctors for preventive purpose two or more times during given year, rose by 18.24%. The number of patients with target pressure grew by 24.51% and composed 38.55±4.26%.

  9. The health-related quality of life of Chinese patients with lower urinary tract symptoms in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Edmond P H; Lam, Cindy L K; Chin, Weng-Yee

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of Chinese primary care patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Five hundred and nineteen primary care subjects with LUTS completed a structured questionnaire containing the International Prostate Symptom Score, the adapted Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7, the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form, the Chinese (HK) SF-12 Health Survey Version 2 (SF-12 v2) and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21. LUTS patients had poorer HRQOL for the General Health and the Vitality domains and lower Physical Component Summary scores, but better HRQOL for the Role Emotion domain than the adjusted Hong Kong population norms. Clinical factors associated with poorer HRQOL measured by the SF-12 v2 included having more severe LUTS and having more severe depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms. Socio-demographic factors associated with poorer SF-12 v2 were consistent with those found in the general populations. Clinical and socio-demographic factors associated with poorer HRQOL assessed by condition-specific measures included having more severe LUTS (excluding intermittency and straining), the presence of mixed urinary incontinence, having more severe anxiety and stress symptoms, younger age, being not married, being in employment and having a lower household income. LUTS had substantial negative impact on patients' overall health perception and global well-being in Chinese population. A decline in HRQOL might be a key determinant for Chinese patients with LUTS to seek treatment. Patients with nocturia, frequency, urgency or mixed urinary incontinence and younger patients deserve more treatment attention because they appear to have poorer HRQOL.

  10. Caring for Latino patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckett, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Latinos comprise nearly 16 percent of the U.S. population, and this proportion is anticipated to increase to 30 percent by 2050. Latinos are a diverse ethnic group that includes many different cultures, races, and nationalities. Barriers to care have resulted in striking disparities in quality of health care for these patients. These barriers include language, lack of insurance, different cultural beliefs, and in some cases, illegal immigration status, mistrust, and illiteracy. The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services address these concerns with recommendations for culturally competent care, language services, and organizational support. Latinos have disproportionately higher rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Other health problems include stress, neurocysticercosis, and tuberculosis. It is important to explore the use of alternative therapies and belief in traditional folk illnesses, recognizing that health beliefs are dependent on education, socioeconomic status, and degree of acculturation. Many-but not all-folk and herbal treatments can be safely accommodated with conventional therapy. Physicians must be sensitive to Latino cultural values of simpatia (kindness), personalismo (relationship), respeto (respect), and modestia (modesty). The LEARN technique can facilitate cross-cultural interviews. Some cultural barriers may be overcome by using the "teach back" technique to ensure that directions are correctly understood and by creating a welcoming health care environment for Latino patients.

  11. Closing the patient experience chasm: A two-level validation of the Consumer Quality Index Inpatient Hospital Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smirnova, A.; Lombarts, K.; Arah, O.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evaluation of patients' health care experiences is central to measuring patient-centred care. However, different instruments tend to be used at the hospital or departmental level but rarely both, leading to a lack of standardization of patient experience measures. OBJECTIVE: To validate

  12. Closing the patient experience chasm: A two-level validation of the Consumer Quality Index Inpatient Hospital Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smirnova, Alina; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundEvaluation of patients' health care experiences is central to measuring patient-centred care. However, different instruments tend to be used at the hospital or departmental level but rarely both, leading to a lack of standardization of patient experience measures. ObjectiveTo validate the

  13. Quality Improvement in Athletic Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Sauers, Andrea D; Sauers, Eric L; Valier, Alison R Snyder

    2017-11-01

    Quality improvement (QI) is a health care concept that ensures patients receive high-quality (safe, timely, effective, efficient, equitable, patient-centered) and affordable care. Despite its importance, the application of QI in athletic health care has been limited.   To describe the need for and define QI in health care, to describe how to measure quality in health care, and to present a QI case in athletic training.   As the athletic training profession continues to grow, a widespread engagement in QI efforts is necessary to establish the value of athletic training services for the patients that we serve. A review of the importance of QI in health care, historical perspectives of QI, tools to drive QI efforts, and examples of common QI initiatives is presented to assist clinicians in better understanding the value of QI for advancing athletic health care and the profession. Clinical and Research Advantages:  By engaging clinicians in strategies to measure outcomes and improve their patient care services, QI practice can help athletic trainers provide high-quality and affordable care to patients.

  14. The PAMINO-project: evaluating a primary care-based educational program to improve the quality of life of palliative patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engeser Peter

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The care of palliative patients challenges the health care system in both quantity and quality. Especially the role of primary care givers needs to be strengthened to provide them with the knowledge and the confidence of applying an appropriate end-of-life care to palliative patients. To improve health care services for palliative patients in primary care, interested physicians in and around Heidelberg, Germany, are enabled to participate in the community-based program 'Palliative Medical Initiative North Baden (PAMINO' to improve their knowledge in dealing with palliative patients. The impact of this program on patients' health and quality of life remains to be evaluated. Methods/Design The evaluation of PAMINO is a non-randomized, controlled study. Out of the group of primary care physicians who took part in the PAMINO program, a sample of 45 physicians and their palliative patients will be compared to a sample of palliative patients of 45 physicians who did not take part in the program. Every four weeks for 6 months or until death, patients, physicians, and the patients' family caregivers in both groups answer questions to therapy strategies, quality of life (QLQ-C15-PAL, POS, pain (VAS, and burden for family caregivers (BSFC. The inclusion of physicians and patients in the study starts in March 2007. Discussion Although participating physicians value the increase in knowledge they receive from PAMINO, the effects on patients remain unclear. If the evaluation reveals a clear benefit for patients' quality of life, a larger-scale implementation of the program is considered. Trial registration: The study was registered at ‘current controlled trials (CCT’, registration number: ISRCTN78021852.

  15. Home visits as part of a new care pathway (iAID) to improve quality of care and quality of life in ostomy patients: a cluster-randomized stepped-wedge trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sier, M F; Oostenbroek, R J; Dijkgraaf, M G W; Veldink, G J; Bemelman, W A; Pronk, A; Spillenaar-Bilgen, E J; Kelder, W; Hoff, C; Ubbink, D T

    2017-08-01

    Morbidity in patients with an ostomy is high. A new care pathway, including perioperative home visits by enterostomal therapists, was studied to assess whether more elaborate education and closer guidance could reduce stoma-related complications and improve quality of life (QoL), at acceptable cost. Patients requiring an ileostomy or colostomy, for any inflammatory or malignant bowel disease, were included in a 15-centre cluster-randomized 'stepped-wedge' study. Primary outcomes were stoma-related complications and QoL, measured using the Stoma-QOL, 3 months after surgery. Secondary outcomes included costs of care. The standard pathway (SP) was followed by 113 patients and the new pathway (NP) by 105 patients. Although the overall number of stoma-related complications was similar in both groups (SP 156, NP 150), the proportion of patients experiencing one or more stoma-related complications was significantly higher in the NP (72% vs 84%, risk difference 12%; 95% CI: 0.3-23.3%). Although in the NP more patients had stoma-related complications, QoL scores were significantly better (P improved quality of care and life, against similar costs. Based on these results the NP, including perioperative home visits by an enterostomal therapist, can be recommended. Colorectal Disease © 2017 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. Systems analysis of clinical incidents as a basis for improvement the quality of medical care delivered to patients with arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Posnenkova O.M.; Kiselev A.R.; Popova Y.V.; Volkova E.N.; Gridnev V.I.

    2014-01-01

    Background — Systems analysis of clinical incidents – is a relatively novel approach to medical care quality improvement. Its basis is studying of healthcare system with use of modeling. The purpose of the present work was to compare the potential value of different modeling methods, which implemented in systems analysis of clinical incidents, and form the basis for improvement the quality of medical care delivered to patients with arterial hypertension (AH). Material and Methods — Thre...

  17. Feeling Heard & Understood in the Hospital Environment: Benchmarking Communication Quality Among Patients with Advanced Cancer Before and After Palliative Care Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Luke T; Saeed, Fahad; Ladwig, Susan; Norton, Sally A; Anderson, Wendy; Alexander, Stewart C; Gramling, Robert

    2018-05-02

    Maximizing value in palliative care requires continued development and standardization of communication quality indicators. To describe the basic epidemiology of a newly-adopted patient-centered communication quality indicator for hospitalized palliative care patie9nts with advanced cancer. Cross-sectional analysis of 207 advanced cancer patients who received palliative care consultation at two medical centers in the United States. Participants completed the Heard & Understood quality indicator immediately before and the day following the initial palliative care consultation: "Over the past two days ["24 hours" for the post-consultation version], how much have you felt heard and understood by the doctors, nurses and hospital staff? Completely/Quite a Bit/Moderately/Slightly/Not at All". We categorized "Completely" as indicating ideal quality. Approximately one-third indicated ideal Heard & Understood quality before palliative care consultation. Age, financial security, emotional distress, preferences for comfort-longevity tradeoffs at end-of-life, and prognosis expectations were associated with pre-consultation quality. Among those with less-than-ideal quality at baseline, 56% rated feeling more Heard & Understood the day following palliative care consultation. The greatest pre-post improvement was among people who had unformed end-of-life treatment preferences or who reported having "no idea" about their prognosis at baseline. Most patients felt incompletely heard and understood at the time of referral to palliative care consultation and more than half improved following consultation. Feeling heard and understood is an important quality indicator sensitive to interventions to improve care and key variations in the patient experience. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Laboratory diagnosis of the rare anaemias: external quality assessment benefits patient care

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara De La Salle; Andrea Mosca; Renata Paleari; Vasileios Rapanakis; Keith Hyde

    2013-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1960s, external quality assessment has developed to become an essential component of the quality management system of the diagnostic laboratory. External quality assessment provides a long term, retrospective view of laboratory performance, demonstrating the competence of the laboratory to others. The ENERCA project (the European Network for Rare and Congenital Anaemias) has established a list of core laboratory tests that are used in the diagnosis of rare and co...

  19. The quality of health care and patient satisfaction: an exploratory investigation of the 5Qs model at some Egyptian and Jordanian medical clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zineldin, Mosad

    2006-01-01

    To examine the major factors affecting patients' perception of cumulative satisfaction and to address the question whether patients in Egypt and Jordan evaluate quality of health care similarly or differently. A conceptual model including behavioural dimensions of patient-physician relationships and patient satisfaction has been developed. As the empirical research setting, this study concerns three hospitals in Egypt and Jordan. The survey instrument in a questionnaire form was designed to achieve the research objectives. A total of 48 items (attributes) of the newly developed five quality dimensions were identified to be the most relevant. A total of 224 complete and usable questionnaires were received from the in-patients. Hospital C has above-average total and dimensional qualities and patients are the most satisfied in accordance with all dimensions of services. Hospitals A and B have under-average total qualities as the majority of patients are not satisfied with services. Comparing hospitals A and B, in the majority of dimensions (with the exception of Q5), the quality in hospital B is higher than in hospital A. Patients' satisfaction with different service quality dimensions is correlated with their willingness to recommend the hospital to others. A cure to improve the quality for health-care services can be an application of total relationship management and the 5Qs model together with customer orientation strategy. The result can be used by the hospitals to reengineer and redesign creatively their quality management processes and the future direction of their more effective health-care quality strategies. In this research a study is described involving a new instrument and a new method which assure a reasonable level of relevance, validity and reliability, while being explicitly change-oriented. This study argues that a patient's satisfaction is a cumulative construct, summing satisfaction with five different qualities (5Qs) of the hospital: quality of

  20. Comprehensive and subacute care interventions improve health-related quality of life for older patients after surgery for hip fracture: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Yea-Ing L; Liang, Jersey; Tseng, Ming-Yueh; Li, Hsiao-Juan; Wu, Chi-Chuan; Cheng, Huey-Shinn; Chou, Shih-Wei; Chen, Ching-Yen; Yang, Ching-Tzu

    2013-08-01

    Elderly patients with hip fracture have been found to benefit from subacute care interventions that usually comprise usual care with added geriatric intervention, early rehabilitation, and supported discharge. However, no studies were found on the effects of combining subacute care and health-maintenance interventions on health outcomes for elders with hip fracture. To compare the effects of an interdisciplinary comprehensive care programme with those of subacute care and usual care programmes on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for elderly patients with hip fracture. Randomised controlled trial. A 3000-bed medical centre in northern Taiwan. Patients with hip fracture (N=299) were randomised into three groups: subacute care (n=101), comprehensive care (n=99), and usual care (n=99). Subacute care included geriatric consultation, continuous rehabilitation, and discharge planning. Comprehensive care consisted of subacute care plus health-maintenance interventions to manage depressive symptoms, manage malnutrition, and prevent falls. Usual care included only 1-2 in-hospital rehabilitation sessions, discharge planning without environmental assessment, no geriatric consultation, and no in-home rehabilitation. HRQoL was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 Taiwan version at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after discharge. Participants in the comprehensive care group improved more in physical function, role physical, general health and mental health than those in the usual care group. The subacute care group had greater improvement in physical function, role physical, vitality, and social function than the usual care group. The intervention effects for both comprehensive and subacute care increased over time, specifically from 6 months after hip fracture onward, and reached a maximum at 12 months following discharge. Both comprehensive care and subacute care programmes may improve health outcomes of elders with hip fracture. Our results may provide a

  1. Assessment of quality of care in an oncology institute using information on patients' satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brédart, A.; Razavi, D.; Robertson, C.; Didier, F.; Scaffidi, E.; Fonzo, D.; Autier, P.; de Haes, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility of conducting a patient satisfaction survey in the oncology hospital setting, using a multidimensional patient satisfaction questionnaire to be completed at home. METHODS: Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected for 133 consecutive patients. Patients

  2. The quality of care of diabetic patients in rural Malawi: A case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetes mellitus is a global public health problem. In Malawi ... Information Education and Communication messages ... health education, foot care and screening for signs of neuropathy .... knowledge about the recommended diabetes diet.

  3. The Customer Quality of Delivered Care to Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Tabriz City, Iran, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose: Customer quality (CQ refers to knowledge, attitude, and skills of service-user in treatment process and this study aims to assess it in delivered care to patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in Tabriz city, Iran, 2012. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional investigation in which the target population includes 94 patients with IBD, who had medical care files in Imam Reza Hospital and Tabriz Golgasht Specialized Clinic. A 19-question inventory is the tool for data collection that its validity was approve by 10 experts and its reliability was examined and verified by conducting a pilot study and with calculation of internal consistency (α = 0.78. SPSS software was employed to analyze data. Results: The mean score of the variable of CQ was derived (70.63 ± 9.67 in patients with IBD disease. All participants had acquired the scores of self-management at the first phase. However, at last 11.7% of them had reported the highest scores in variable of CQ and they could continue their own medical care trend under variable conditions like stress and financial problems. Similarly, there was a significant relationship among CQ with an educational degree in the participants (P = 0.050 so that as the educational level was higher, the score of CQ was also increased. Conclusion: The acquired results signify that CQ is relatively acceptable in the studied population but major problems are visible in some areas, and this may imply the necessity for consideration by healthcare directors.

  4. Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY: impact of an eye health education program on patient knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodes LA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay A Rhodes,1 Carrie E Huisingh,1 Gerald McGwin Jr,1,2 Stephen T Mennemeyer,3 Mary Bregantini,4 Nita Patel,4 Jinan Saaddine,5 John E Crews,5 Christopher A Girkin,1 Cynthia Owsley11Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, 2Department of Epidemiology, 3Department of Health Care Organization and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, 4Prevent Blindness, Chicago, IL, USA; 5Vision Health Initiative, Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USAPurpose: To assess the impact of the education program of the Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY telemedicine program on at-risk patients’ knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care as well as to assess patient satisfaction with EQUALITY.Patients and methods: New or existing patients presenting for a comprehensive eye exam (CEE at one of two retail-based primary eye clinics were enrolled based on ≥1 of the following at-risk criteria for glaucoma: African Americans ≥40 years of age, Whites ≥50 years of age, diabetes, family history of glaucoma, and/or preexisting diagnosis of glaucoma. A total of 651 patients were enrolled. A questionnaire was administered prior to the patients’ CEE and prior to the patients receiving any of the evidence-based eye health education program; a follow-up questionnaire was administered 2–4 weeks later by phone. Baseline and follow-up patient responses regarding knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care were compared using McNemar’s test. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association of patient-level characteristics with improvement in knowledge and attitudes. Overall patient satisfaction was summarized.Results: At follow-up, all patient responses in the knowledge and attitude domains significantly improved from baseline (P≤0.01 for all questions. Those who were unemployed (odds

  5. Evaluation of patients' attitudes to their care during oral and maxillofacial surgical outpatient consultations: the importance of waiting times and quality of interaction between patient and doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimovska, E O F; Sharma, S; Trebble, T M

    2016-06-01

    Knowing what patients think about their care is fundamental to the provision of an effective, quality service, and it can help to direct change and reduce costs. Much of the work in oral and maxillofacial departments concerns the treatment of outpatients, but as little is known about what they think about their care, we aimed to find out which aspects were associated with satisfaction. Consecutive patients (n=244) who attended the oral and maxillofacial outpatient department at Southampton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust over a 7-day period were given a questionnaire to complete before and after their consultation. It included questions with Likert scale responses on environmental, procedural, and interactive aspects of the visit, and a 16-point scale to rank their priorities. A total of 187 patients (77%) completed the questionnaires. No association was found between expected (p=0.93) or actual (p=0.41) waiting times, and 90% of patients were satisfied with their visit. Seeing the doctor, having confidence in the treatment plan, being listened to, and the ability of the doctor to recognise their personal needs, were ranked as important. Environmental and procedural aspects were considered the least important. These findings may be of value in the development of services to improve patient-centred care. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A cluster randomized trial of standard quality improvement versus patient-centered interventions to enhance depression care for African Americans in the primary care setting: study protocol NCT00243425

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghods Bri K

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies document disparities in access to care and quality of care for depression for African Americans. Research suggests that patient attitudes and clinician communication behaviors may contribute to these disparities. Evidence links patient-centered care to improvements in mental health outcomes; therefore, quality improvement interventions that enhance this dimension of care are promising strategies to improve treatment and outcomes of depression among African Americans. This paper describes the design of the BRIDGE (Blacks Receiving Interventions for Depression and Gaining Empowerment Study. The goal of the study is to compare the effectiveness of two interventions for African-American patients with depression--a standard quality improvement program and a patient-centered quality improvement program. The main hypothesis is that patients in the patient-centered group will have a greater reduction in their depression symptoms, higher rates of depression remission, and greater improvements in mental health functioning at six, twelve, and eighteen months than patients in the standard group. The study also examines patient ratings of care and receipt of guideline-concordant treatment for depression. Methods/Design A total of 36 primary care clinicians and 132 of their African-American patients with major depressive disorder were recruited into a cluster randomized trial. The study uses intent-to-treat analyses to compare the effectiveness of standard quality improvement interventions (academic detailing about depression guidelines for clinicians and disease-oriented care management for their patients and patient-centered quality improvement interventions (communication skills training to enhance participatory decision-making for clinicians and care management focused on explanatory models, socio-cultural barriers, and treatment preferences for their patients for improving outcomes over 12 months of follow

  7. Quality of care for patients with type 2 diabetes in general practice according to patients' ethnic background: a cross-sectional study from Oslo, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkeland Kåre

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent decades immigration to Norway from Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe has increased rapidly. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of care for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients from these ethnic minority groups compared with the care received by Norwegians. Methods In 2006, electronic medical record data were screened at 11 practices (49 GPs; 58857 patients. 1653 T2DM patients cared for in general practice were identified. Ethnicity was defined as self-reported country of birth. Chi-squared tests, one-way ANOVAs, multiple regression, linear mixed effect models and generalized linear mixed models were used. Results Diabetes was diagnosed at a younger age in patients from the ethnic minority groups (South Asians (SA: mean age 44.9 years, Middle East/North Africa (MENA: 47.2 years, East Asians (EA: 52.0 years, others: 49.0 years compared with Norwegians (59.7 years, p 85% of patients in all groups with minor differences between minority groups and Norwegians. A greater proportion of the minority groups were prescribed hypoglycaemic medications compared with Norwegians (≥79% vs. 72%, p 9% was higher in minority groups (SA: 19.6%, MENA: 18.9% vs. Norwegians: 5.6%, p Conclusions Mean age at the time of diagnosis of T2DM was 8-15 years younger in minority groups compared with Norwegians. Recording of important processes of care measures is high in all groups. Only one in four of most patient groups achieved all four treatment targets and prescribing habits may be sub-optimal. Patients from minority groups have worse glycaemic control than Norwegians which implies that it might be necessary to improve the guidelines to meet the needs of specific ethnic groups.

  8. Patient-centered care: an opportunity to accomplish the "Three Aims" of the National Quality Strategy in the Medicare ESRD program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, Ann M; Armistead, Nancy; Schrag, Wendy L Funk; Diamond, Louis; Moss, Alvin H

    2014-12-05

    In light of mounting federal government debt and levels of Medicare spending that are widely viewed as unsustainable, commentators have called for a transformation of the United States health care system to deliver better care at lower costs. This article presents the priorities of the Coalition for Supportive Care of Kidney Patients for how clinicians might achieve this transformation for patients with advanced CKD and their families. The authors suspect that much of the high-intensity, high-cost care currently delivered to patients with advanced kidney disease may be unwanted and that the "Three Aims" put forth by the National Quality Strategy of better care for the individual, better health for populations, and reduced health care costs may be within reach for patients with CKD and ESRD. This work describes the coalition's vision for a more patient-centered approach to the care of patients with kidney disease and argues for more concerted efforts to align their treatments with their goals, values, and preferences. Key priorities to achieve this vision include using improved prognostic models and decision science to help patients, their families, and their providers better understand what to expect in the future; engaging patients and their families in shared decision-making before the initiation of dialysis and during the course of dialysis treatment; and tailoring treatment strategies throughout the continuum of their care to address what matters most to individual patients. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  9. How Do Patients Perceive and Expect Quality of Surgery, Diagnostics, and Emergency Services in Tertiary Care Hospitals? An Evidence of Gap Analysis From Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Iram; Humayun, Ayesha; Anwar, Muhammad Imran; Iftikhar, Adil; Aslam, Muhammad; Shafiq, Muhammad

    2017-07-01

    Service quality is one of the important gears to appraise services and determine the gray areas that need improvement. In countries with a resource-poor health system, the first step of measuring quality is yet to be taken. This study seeks to inform policy makers in developing contextual service quality models by identifying service quality gaps in tertiary care teaching hospitals using patients' perspective. A cross-sectional study was performed using multistage cluster sampling, and a modified version of the SERVQUAL (SERV-service, QUAL-quality) instrument was administered to determine patient's expectations and perceptions. A total of 817 completed questionnaires were obtained from patients and/or their attendants using convenience sampling. Data analysis revealed statistically significant negative quality gaps between expectations and perceptions of tangibility, reliability, empathy, assurance, responsiveness, and communication. The difference in mean expectation and perception for responsiveness across the sexes was significant ( p quality were independent of sex. Educational status showed significant difference in expectation and perception in responsiveness ( p quality: p quality of hospitals. Tertiary care hospitals failed to meet patients' expectations in all major areas of service quality, posing a question of how hospitals implement and evaluate their quality assurance policy.

  10. Ethnic differences in mortality, end-stage complications, and quality of care among diabetic patients: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Lanting (Loes); I.M.A. Joung (Inez); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); A.H. Bootsma (Aart)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To determine the influence of ethnic differences in diabetes care on inequalities in mortality and prevalence of end-stage complications among diabetic patients. The following questions were examined: 1) Are there ethnic differences among diabetic patients

  11. A longitudinal study to identify the influence of quality of chronic care delivery on productive interactions between patients and (teams of) healthcare professionals within disease management programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-09-19

    The chronic care model is an increasingly used approach to improve the quality of care through system changes in care delivery. While theoretically these system changes are expected to increase productive patient-professional interaction empirical evidence is lacking. This study aims to identify the influence of quality of care on productive patient-professional interaction. Longitudinal study in 18 Dutch regions. Questionnaires were sent to all 5076 patients participating in 18 Disease Management Programmes (DMPs) in 2010 (2676 (53%) respondents). One year later (T1), 4693 patients still participating in the DMPs received a questionnaire (2191 (47%) respondents) and 2 years later (in 2012; T2) 1722 patients responded (out of 4350; 40% response). DMPs Patients' perceptions of the productivity of interactions (measured as relational coordination/coproduction of care) with professionals. Patients were asked about communication dimensions (frequent, accurate, and problem-solving communication) and relationship dimensions (shared goals and mutual respect). After controlling for background characteristics these results clearly show that quality of chronic care (T0), first-year changes in quality of chronic care (T1-T0) and second-year changes in quality of chronic care (T2-T1) predicted productive interactions between patients and professionals at T2 (all at p≤0.001). Furthermore, we found a negative relationship between lower educational level and productive interactions between patients and professionals 2 years later. We can conclude that successfully dealing with the consequences of chronic illnesses requires proactive patients who are able to make productive decisions together with their healthcare providers. Since patients and professionals share responsibility for management of the chronic illness, they must also share control of interactions and decisions. The importance of patient-centeredness is growing and this study reports a first example of how quality

  12. Do low-income coronary artery bypass surgery patients have equal opportunity to access excellent quality of care and enjoy good outcome in Taiwan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tsung-Hsien; Hou, Yu-Chang; Chung, Kuo-Piao

    2014-09-10

    Equity is an important issue in the healthcare research field. Many studies have focused on the relationship between patient characteristics and outcomes of care. These studies, however, have seldom examined whether patients' characteristics affected their access to quality healthcare, which further affected the care outcome. The purposes of this study were to determine whether low-income coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) patients receive healthcare services with poorer quality, and if such differences in treatment result in different outcomes. A retrospective multilevel study design was conducted using claims data from Taiwan's universal health insurance scheme for 2005-2008. Patients who underwent their CABG surgery between 2006 and 2008 were included in this study. CABG patients who were under 18 years of age or had unknown gender or insured classifications were excluded. Hospital and surgeon's performance indicators in the previous one year were used to evaluate the level of quality via k-means clustering algorithm. Baron and Kenny's procedures for mediation effect were conducted to explore the relationship among patient's income, quality of CABG care, and inpatient mortality. A total of 10,320 patients were included in the study. The results showed that 5.65% of the low-income patients received excellent quality of care, which was lower than that of patients not in the low-income group (5.65% vs.11.48%). The mortality rate of low-income patients (12.10%) was also higher than patients not in the low-income group (5.25%). Also, the mortality of patients who received excellent care was half as low as patients receiving non-excellent care (2.63% vs. 5.68%). Finally, after the procedure of mediation effect testing, the results showed that the relationship between patient income level and CABG mortality was partially mediated by patterns of quality of care. The results of the current study implied that worse outcome in low-income CABG patients might be

  13. Paediatric in-patient care in a conflict-torn region of Somalia: are hospital outcomes of acceptable quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, R.; Hinderaker, S. G.; Khogali, M.; Manzi, M.; van Griensven, J.; Ayada, L.; Jemmy, J. P.; Maalim, A.; Amin, H.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: A district hospital in conflict-torn Somalia. Objective: To report on in-patient paediatric morbidity, case fatality and exit outcomes as indicators of quality of care. Design: Cross-sectional study. Results: Of 6211 children, lower respiratory tract infections (48%) and severe acute malnutrition (16%) were the leading reasons for admission. The highest case-fatality rate was for meningitis (20%). Adverse outcomes occurred in 378 (6%) children, including 205 (3.3%) deaths; 173 (2.8%) absconded. Conclusion: Hospital exit outcomes are good even in conflict-torn Somalia, and should boost efforts to ensure that such populations are not left out in the quest to achieve universal health coverage. PMID:26393014

  14. Health-Related Quality of Life in Primary Care: Which Aspects Matter in Multimorbid Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Community Setting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Kamradt

    Full Text Available Knowledge about predictors of health-related quality of life for multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care could help to improve quality and patient-centeredness of care in this specific group of patients. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of several patient characteristics on health-related quality of life of multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a community setting.A cross-sectional study with 32 primary care practice teams in Mannheim, Germany, and randomly selected multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N = 495 was conducted. In order to analyze associations of various patient characteristics with health-related quality of life (EQ-5D index a multilevel analysis was applied.After excluding patients with missing data, the cohort consisted of 404 eligible patients. The final multilevel model highlighted six out of 14 explanatory patient variables which were significantly associated with health-related quality of life: female gender (r = -0.0494; p = .0261, school education of nine years or less (r = -0.0609; p = .0006, (physical mobility restrictions (r = -0.1074; p = .0003, presence of chronic pain (r = -0.0916; p = .0004, diabetes-related distress (r = -0.0133; p < .0001, and BMI (r = -0.0047; p = .0045.The findings of this study suggest that increased diabetes-related distress, chronic pain, restrictions in (physical mobility, female gender, as well as lower education and, increased BMI have a noteworthy impact on health-related quality of life in multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus seen in primary care practices in a community setting. The highlighted aspects should gain much more attention when treating multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  15. Health-Related Quality of Life in Primary Care: Which Aspects Matter in Multimorbid Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Community Setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamradt, Martina; Krisam, Johannes; Kiel, Marion; Qreini, Markus; Besier, Werner; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ose, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge about predictors of health-related quality of life for multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care could help to improve quality and patient-centeredness of care in this specific group of patients. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of several patient characteristics on health-related quality of life of multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a community setting. A cross-sectional study with 32 primary care practice teams in Mannheim, Germany, and randomly selected multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N = 495) was conducted. In order to analyze associations of various patient characteristics with health-related quality of life (EQ-5D index) a multilevel analysis was applied. After excluding patients with missing data, the cohort consisted of 404 eligible patients. The final multilevel model highlighted six out of 14 explanatory patient variables which were significantly associated with health-related quality of life: female gender (r = -0.0494; p = .0261), school education of nine years or less (r = -0.0609; p = .0006), (physical) mobility restrictions (r = -0.1074; p = .0003), presence of chronic pain (r = -0.0916; p = .0004), diabetes-related distress (r = -0.0133; p diabetes-related distress, chronic pain, restrictions in (physical) mobility, female gender, as well as lower education and, increased BMI have a noteworthy impact on health-related quality of life in multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus seen in primary care practices in a community setting. The highlighted aspects should gain much more attention when treating multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  16. Improving quality of tuberculosis care in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Madhukar; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Hopewell, Phil

    2014-01-01

    In India, the quality of care that tuberculosis (TB) patients receive varies considerably and is often not in accordance with the national and international standards. In this article, we provide an overview of the third (latest) edition of the International Standards of Tuberculosis Care (ISTC). These standards are supported by the existing World Health Organization guidelines and policy statements pertaining to TB care and have been endorsed by a number of international organizations. We call upon all health care providers in the country to practice TB care that is consistent with these standards, as well as the upcoming Standards for TB Care in India (STCI).

  17. Living with diabetes: quality of care and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Isla Pera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilar Isla PeraDepartment of Public Health Nursing, Mental and Mother and Child Health, University of Barcelona, SpainBackground: The aim of this research was to characterize the experience of living with diabetes mellitus (DM and identify patients’ opinions of the quality of care received and the results of interventions.Methods: A descriptive, exploratory evaluation study using qualitative methodology was performed. Participants consisted of 40 adult patients diagnosed with DM and followed up in a public hospital in Barcelona, Spain. A semistructured interview and a focus group were used and a thematic content analysis was performed.Results: Patients described DM as a disease that is difficult to control and that provokes lifestyle changes requiring effort and sacrifice. Insulin treatment increased the perception of disease severity. The most frequent and dreaded complication was hypoglycemia. The main problems perceived by patients affecting the quality of care were related to a disease-centered medical approach, lack of information, limited participation in decision-making, and the administrative and bureaucratic problems of the health care system.Conclusion: The bureaucratic circuits of the health care system impair patients’ quality of life and perceived quality of care. Health professionals should foster patient participation in decision-making. However, this requires not only training and appropriate attitudes, but also adequate staffing and materials.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, health care quality, quality of life, qualitative research

  18. Long-term outcome and quality of life of patients treated in surgical intensive care: a comparison between sepsis and trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Korošec Jagodič, Helena; Jagodič, Klemen; Podbregar, Matej

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Our aim was to determine long-term survival and quality of life of patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit (ICU) because of sepsis or trauma. Methods This was an observational study conducted in an 11-bed, closed surgical ICU at a 860-bed teaching general hospital over a 1-year period (January 2003 to December 2003). Patients were divided into two groups according to admission diagnoses: group 1 included patients with sepsis; and group 2 included patients with trauma ...

  19. What are patient factors associated with the quality of diabetes care?: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko Ki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently there has been a growing interest in healthcare quality control in Korea. We examined the association between patient factors and quality indicators of diabetic care among Korean adults with diabetes. Methods We obtained a sample of 335 adults aged 20 or older diagnosed with diabetes from the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Patient factors were divided into two categories: socioeconomic position and health-related factors. Quality indicators for diabetes care were defined as receiving preventive care services for diabetes complications (e.g., fundus examination, microalbuminuria examination, diabetes education and diabetes-related clinical outcomes (e.g., HbA1c, blood pressure, LDL-cholesterol. We performed multiple logistic regression analyses for each quality indicator. Results We found that people with lower education levels or shorter duration of diabetes illness were less likely to receive preventive care services for diabetes complications. Women or people with longer duration of diabetes were less likely to reach the glycemic target. Obese diabetic patients were less likely to accomplish adequate control of blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol. Conclusions Several factors of patients with diabetes, such as education level, duration of illness, gender, and obesity grade are associated with the quality of diabetes care. These findings can help inform policy makers about subpopulations at risk in developing a public health strategy in the future.

  20. The quality of care of diabetic patients in rural Malawi: A case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    using a questionnaire from a sample of 75 diabetic patients (children and adults) who ..... few patients reported to be offered a urine test every visit. 18.7% (n=14). ... At the main pharmacy at the district hospital the storage conditions were ...

  1. Patient satisfaction and perceived quality of care: evidence from a cross-sectional national exit survey of HIV and non-HIV service users in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansereau, Emily; Masiye, Felix; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Masters, Samuel H; Burstein, Roy; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-12-30

    To examine the associations between perceived quality of care and patient satisfaction among HIV and non-HIV patients in Zambia. Patient exit survey conducted at 104 primary, secondary and tertiary health clinics across 16 Zambian districts. 2789 exiting patients. Five dimensions of perceived quality of care (health personnel practice and conduct, adequacy of resources and services, healthcare delivery, accessibility of care, and cost of care). Respondent, visit-related, and facility characteristics. Patient satisfaction measured on a 1-10 scale. Indices of perceived quality of care were modelled using principal component analysis. Statistical associations between perceived quality of care and patient satisfaction were examined using random-effect ordered logistic regression models, adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, visit and facility characteristics. Average satisfaction was 6.9 on a 10-point scale for non-HIV services and 7.3 for HIV services. Favourable perceptions of health personnel conduct were associated with higher odds of overall satisfaction for non-HIV (OR=3.53, 95% CI 2.34 to 5.33) and HIV (OR=11.00, 95% CI 3.97 to 30.51) visits. Better perceptions of resources and services were also associated with higher odds of satisfaction for both non-HIV (OR=1.66, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.55) and HIV (OR=4.68, 95% CI 1.81 to 12.10) visits. Two additional dimensions of perceived quality of care--healthcare delivery and accessibility of care--were positively associated with higher satisfaction for non-HIV patients. The odds of overall satisfaction were lower in rural facilities for non-HIV patients (OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.48 to 0.99) and HIV patients (OR=0.26, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.41). For non-HIV patients, the odds of satisfaction were greater in hospitals compared with health centres/posts (OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.27 to 2.48) and lower at publicly-managed facilities (OR=0.41, 95% CI=0.27 to 0.64). Perceived quality of care is an important driver of patient satisfaction with

  2. A review of quality of care for patients living with diabetes at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If processes are not conducted, it is impossible to measure whether outcomes are favorable or not such as in the case of HbA1c < 7%. Conclusion: Quality assurance has to become a systematic part of diabetes service provision, with continuous encouragement of staff and strong leadership from hospital management, ...

  3. Clinicians' perspectives on patient satisfaction in adult congenital heart disease clinics--a dimension of health care quality whose time has come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenblum, Ronen; Gianola, Ann; Ionescu-Ittu, Raluca; Verstappen, Amy; Landzberg, Michael; Gurvitz, Michelle; Jenkins, Kathy; Bates, David W; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered care and patient satisfaction represent key dimensions of health care quality. This is relevant for the growing number of patients with life-long conditions. In the present study, our goal was to examine clinicians' attitudes and behavior with respect to patient satisfaction in adult congenital heart disease outpatient clinics. A 34-question survey was developed to assess adult congenital heart disease clinicians' awareness, attitudes, and behavior relative to patient satisfaction and administered in-person or online to clinicians from the largely U.S.-based Adult Congenital Heart Association's database of adult congenital heart disease health care providers. Overall, 267 questionnaires were filled out: 108 were collected in person (79% response rate) and 159 online (17.5% response rate). Responses were received from physicians (161); nurses (73); physician assistants (20); and others (13). Although 85% of clinicians believed it was important to inquire about patient satisfaction, only 28% reported routinely inquiring about this dimension of care. Only 34% claimed they had adequate training to cope with varying levels of patient satisfaction, 44% stated that their department utilized patient satisfaction surveys, and 37% received feedback from the hospital management in the preceding 12 months. In multivariate analyses, clinicians that received feedback from the hospital management and had adequate training were more likely to inquire about patient satisfaction. Although patient satisfaction is perceived as an important dimension of quality care by adult congenital heart disease clinicians, most of them reported insufficient institutional support to achieve this. Our findings suggest that clinicians would benefit from health care organizations engaging them in the delivery of this dimension of health care quality. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. "Patient care in radiology"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro Brask, Kirsten; Birkelund, Regner

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to research how the staff experience care expressed during the brief encounter with the patients in a diagnostic imaging department. This was a qualitative study with a phenomenological and hermeneutical frame of reference. The data were collected using field observation...... was electronically forwarded. And, care expressed in between was perceived as care in the traditional sense and termed as “patient care in radiology.”...

  5. Quality of anticoagulation therapy in neurological patients in a tertiary care hospital in north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat Singh

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: It may be concluded that stable therapeutic INR is difficult to maintain in neurological patients. Optimal modification of diet, drug and dose of oral anticoagulant may help in stabilization of INR.

  6. Development and Monitoring the Key Performance Indicators of the Quality of Care for Patients with Cleft Lips/Palates at Srinagarind Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongkhonthawornchai, Siriporn; Pradubwong, Suteera; Augsornwan, Darawan; Pathumwiwatana, Pornpen; Sroyhin, Waranya; Pongpagatip, Sumalee; Wongkham, Jamras; Wachirapakorn, Jantira; Lao-unka, Kesorn; Mucnamporn, Tippawan; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp

    2015-08-01

    Congenital deformities, such as cleft lips and/or cleft palates (CLP), have high incidences in the Northeast of Thailand. These birth defects can affect patient's quality of life. CLP patients need crucial and long-term treatments by a multidisciplinary team starting from prenatal stage to late adulthood. Patients and their families should involve in their own care, and their care objectives should correspond with healthcare providers. Besides the clinical outcome of interdisciplinary team, key performance indicators (KPIs) need to be developed in the hospital service unit in order to improve quality of care and treatment outcomes. 1) to establish KPIs in hospital service units, and 2) to develop the information system to collect, analysis and improve the quality of CLP care. A nurse coordinator was appointed in the Tawanchai Center to coordinate care. The three periods were conducted for the nurse coordinator to work with nine service units in Srinagarind Hospital for consensus on both qualitative and quantitative data to be used as service unit quality measurement. Thirty one KPIs from nine service units were established, collected and analyzed during a four-month period in 2014. The 20 KPIs achieved the unit targets. Two PKIs of the rates of complication with anesthesia during/after surgery in the first 24 hours and the rates of patient/caregiver's satisfaction in acquiring information from the officer were improving. There were 11 KPIs that did not achieve the targets. The coordinator nurse of the Tawanchai Center discussed with the service unit for the cause and how to improve the outcome. The monitoring KPIs will lead to improvement of outcome for better patient quality as well as benchmarking with other hospitals of Cleft Center. The KPIs from hospital service units with the monitoring and analysis of information by the nurse coordinator will enhance and lead to improvement of the quality of the patients and family centered care process.

  7. A review of national policies and strategies to improve quality of health care and patient safety: a case study from Lebanon and Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jardali, Fadi; Fadlallah, Racha

    2017-08-16

    Improving quality of care and patient safety practices can strengthen health care delivery systems, improve health sector performance, and accelerate attainment of health-related Sustainability Development Goals. Although quality improvement is now prominent on the health policy agendas of governments in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), including countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR), progress to date has not been optimal. The objective of this study is to comprehensively review existing quality improvement and patient safety policies and strategies in two selected countries of the EMR (Lebanon and Jordan) to determine the extent to which these have been institutionalized within existing health systems. We used a mixed methods approach that combined documentation review, stakeholder surveys and key informant interviews. Existing quality improvement and patient safety initiatives were assessed across five components of an analytical framework for assessing health care quality and patient safety: health systems context; national policies and legislation; organizations and institutions; methods, techniques and tools; and health care infrastructure and resources. Both Lebanon and Jordan have made important progress in terms of increased attention to quality and accreditation in national health plans and strategies, licensing requirements for health care professionals and organizations (albeit to varying extents), and investments in health information systems. A key deficiency in both countries is the absence of an explicit national policy for quality improvement and patient safety across the health system. Instead, there is a spread of several (disjointed) pieces of legal measures and national plans leading to fragmentation and lack of clear articulation of responsibilities across the entire continuum of care. Moreover, both countries lack national sets of standardized and applicable quality indicators for performance measurement and benchmarking

  8. Influence of quality of care and individual patient characteristics on quality of life and return to work in survivors of the acute respiratory distress syndrome: protocol for a prospective, observational, multi-centre patient cohort study (DACAPO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Susanne; Dodoo-Schittko, Frank; Blecha, Sebastian; Sebök, Philipp; Thomann-Hackner, Kathrin; Quintel, Michael; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Bein, Thomas; Apfelbacher, Christian

    2015-12-17

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and return to work are important outcomes in critical care medicine, reaching beyond mortality. Little is known on factors predictive of HRQoL and return to work in critical illness, including the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and no evidence exists on the role of quality of care (QoC) for outcomes in survivors of ARDS. It is the aim of the DACAPO study ("Surviving ARDS: the influence of QoC and individual patient characteristics on quality of life") to investigate the role of QoC and individual patient characteristics on quality of life and return to work. A prospective, observational, multi-centre patient cohort study will be performed in Germany, using hospitals from the "ARDS Network Germany" as the main recruiting centres. It is envisaged to recruit 2400 patients into the DACAPO study and to analyse a study population of 1500 survivors. They will be followed up until 12 months after discharge from hospital. QoC will be assessed as process quality, structural quality and volume at the institutional level. The main outcomes (HRQoL and return to work) will be assessed by self-report questionnaires. Further data collection includes general medical and ARDS-related characteristics of patients as well as sociodemographic and psycho-social parameters. Multilevel hierarchical modelling will be performed to analyse the effects of QoC and individual patient characteristics on outcomes, taking the cluster structure of the data into account. By obtaining comprehensive data at patient and hospital level using a prospective multi-centre design, the DACAPO-study is the first study investigating the influence of QoC on individual outcomes of ARDS survivors.

  9. Quality Assessment in the Primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem Ak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available -Quality Assessment in the Primary care Dear Editor; I have read the article titled as “Implementation of Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS at Primary Health Centre Durvesh” with great interest. Shrivastava et all concluded that assessment mechanism for the achievement of objectives for the suggested RKS model was not successful (1. Hereby I would like to emphasize the importance of quality assessment (QA especially in the era of newly established primary care implementations in our country. Promotion of quality has been fundamental part of primary care health services. Nevertheless variations in quality of care exist even in the developed countries. Accomplishment of quality in the primary care has some barriers like administration and directorial factors, absence of evidence-based medicine practice lack of continuous medical education. Quality of health care is no doubt multifaceted model that covers all components of health structures and processes of care. Quality in the primary care set up includes patient physician relationship, immunization, maternal, adolescent, adult and geriatric health care, referral, non-communicable disease management and prescribing (2. Most countries are recently beginning the implementation of quality assessments in all walks of healthcare. Organizations like European society for quality and safety in family practice (EQuiP endeavor to accomplish quality by collaboration. There are reported developments and experiments related to the methodology, processes and outcomes of quality assessments of health care. Quality assessments will not only contribute the accomplishment of the program / project but also detect the areas where obstacles also exist. In order to speed up the adoption of QA and to circumvent the occurrence of mistakes, health policy makers and family physicians from different parts of the world should share their experiences. Consensus on quality in preventive medicine implementations can help to yield

  10. The medical student as a patient: attitudes towards involvement in the quality and safety of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rachel E; Joshi, Devavrata; Patel, Krishan; Briggs, M; Vincent, Charles A

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, factors that affect patients' willingness and ability to participate in safety-relevant behaviours have been investigated. However, how trained healthcare professionals or medical students would feel participating in safety-relevant behaviours as a patient in hospital remains largely unexplored. To investigate medical students' willingness to participate in behaviours related to the quality and safety of their health care. A cross-sectional exploratory study using a survey that addressed willingness to participate in different behaviours recommended by current patient safety initiatives. Three types of interactional behaviours (asking factual or challenging questions, notifying doctors or nurses of errors/problems) and three non-interactional behaviours (choosing a hospital based on the safety record, bringing medicines and a list of allergies into hospital, and reporting an error to a national reporting system) were assessed. One hundred and seventy-nine medical students from an inner city London teaching hospital participated in the study. Students' willingness to participate was affected (P interactional behaviours) whether the patient was engaging in the specific action with a doctor or nurse. Students were least willing to ask 'challenging' questions to doctors and nurses and to report errors to a national reporting system. Doctors' and nurses' encouragement appeared to increase self-reported willingness to participate in behaviours where baseline willingness was low. Similar to research on lay patient populations; medical students do not view involvement in safety-related behaviours equally. Interventions should be tailored at encouraging students to participate in behaviours they are less inclined to take on an active role in. Future research is required to examine students' motivations for participation in this important but heavily under-researched area. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effects of a supportive educational nursing care programme on fatigue and quality of life in patients with heart failure: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Chieh; Huang, Jin-Long; Ho, Wen-Chao; Chiou, Ai-Fu

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue is a common symptom in patients with heart failure that is easy to ignore. In addition, fatigue may affect patients' physical function and psychosocial conditions that can impair their quality of life. An effective nursing care programme is required to alleviate patients' fatigue and improve their quality of life. To investigate the effects of a supportive educational nursing care programme on fatigue and quality of life in patients with heart failure. A randomised controlled trial design was used. Ninety-two patients with heart failure were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n=47) or a control group (n=45). The patients in the intervention group participated in 12 weeks of a supportive educational nursing care programme including fatigue assessment, education, coaching self-care and evaluation. The intervention was conducted by a cardiac nurse during four face-to-face interviews and three follow-up telephone interviews. Fatigue and quality of life were assessed at the baseline and 4 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 weeks after enrollment in both groups. The participants in the intervention group exhibited a significant decrease in the level of fatigue after 12 weeks, whereas those in the control group exhibited no significant changes. Compared with the control group, the intervention group exhibited a significantly greater decrease in the level of fatigue and significantly greater improvement in quality of life after 12 weeks of intervention. The supportive educational nursing care programme was recommended to alleviate fatigue and improve quality of life in patients with heart failure. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  12. A Structured Approach to End-of-Life Decision Making Improves Quality of Care for Patients With Terminal Illness in a Teaching Hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Ama Kyerewaa; Johnson McGee, Summer; Opare-Lokko, Edwina Addo; Gyakobo, Mawuli Kotope

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether a structured approach to end-of-life decision-making directed by a compassionate interdisciplinary team would improve the quality of care for patients with terminal illness in a teaching hospital in Ghana. A retrospective analysis was done for 20 patients who consented to participate in the structured approach to end-of-life decision-making. Twenty patients whose care did not follow the structured approach were selected as controls. Outcome measures were nociceptive pain control, completing relationships, and emotional response towards dying. These measures were statistically superior in the study group compared to the control group. A structured approach to end-of-life decision-making significantly improves the quality of care for patients with terminal illness in the domains of pain control, completing relationships and emotional responses towards dying. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Nurses' Experiences of End-of-life Care in Long-term Care Hospitals in Japan: Balancing Improving the Quality of Life and Sustaining the Lives of Patients Dying at Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Odachi, RN, MA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Purpose: In Japan, about 80% of deaths occur in hospitals, especially long-term care beds. The purpose of this study was to clarify the nursing practices used for such older patients at the end-of-life stage in long-termcare wards via the modified grounded theory approach (M-GTA. Methods: Data were obtained through semi-structured interviews of nineteen nurses working in cooperating long-term care wards, acute care wards, or hospice services (to allow for constant comparison between these types of wards in western Japan in 2014. We analyzed the transcribed data using M-GTA. Results: The core category that emerged from the analysis was “Balancing enhancement of patients' daily life quality and life-sustaining care in the face of uncertainty about the patients' character.” Eleven categories emerged, such as Seeking older patients' character with their family, Supporting families' decision making, Rebuilding patients' daily life in the ward, and Sustaining patients' life span through medical care. Conclusions: Nurses experienced uncertainty about the care needs of older patients, the ethical problems of Enhancing the patients' QOL by using risky care, and the evaluation criteria used to judge their own nursing care after the patients' death. All nurses had the goal of ensuring a natural death for all patients. Nurses' acceptance and evaluation of their own care was critically influenced by the patient's family's responses to their care after patients' death. Further research is necessary to develop evaluation criteria and educational programs for end-of-life nursing care of older adults. Keywords: terminal care, aged, long-term care, qualitative research

  14. Creating patient value in glaucoma care: applying quality costing and care delivery value chain approaches--a five-year case study in the Rotterdam Eye Hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korne, Dirk F.; Sol, Kees; Custers, Thomas; van Sprundel, Esther; van Ineveld, B. Martin; Lemij, Hans G.; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to explore in a specific hospital care process the applicability in practice of the theories of quality costing and value chains. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: In a retrospective case study an in-depth evaluation of the use of a quality cost model (QCM) and the

  15. Automated medical resident rotation and shift scheduling to ensure quality resident education and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Hannah K; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-03-01

    At academic teaching hospitals around the country, the majority of clinical care is provided by resident physicians. During their training, medical residents often rotate through various hospitals and/or medical services to maximize their education. Depending on the size of the training program, manually constructing such a rotation schedule can be cumbersome and time consuming. Further, rules governing allowable duty hours for residents have grown more restrictive in recent years (ACGME 2011), making day-to-day shift scheduling of residents more difficult (Connors et al., J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 137:710-713, 2009; McCoy et al., May Clin Proc 86(3):192, 2011; Willis et al., J Surg Edu 66(4):216-221, 2009). These rules limit lengths of duty periods, allowable duty hours in a week, and rest periods, to name a few. In this paper, we present two integer programming models (IPs) with the goals of (1) creating feasible assignments of residents to rotations over a one-year period, and (2) constructing night and weekend call-shift schedules for the individual rotations. These models capture various duty-hour rules and constraints, provide the ability to test multiple what-if scenarios, and largely automate the process of schedule generation, solving these scheduling problems more effectively and efficiently compared to manual methods. Applying our models on data from a surgical residency program, we highlight the infeasibilities created by increased duty-hour restrictions placed on residents in conjunction with current scheduling paradigms.

  16. [Improvement in health care quality for patients from the thoracic/chest pain unit in a regional hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano Ortega, M A; Romero de Castilla, R J; Rus Mansilla, C; Cortez Quiroga, G A; Bayona Gómez, A J; Duran Torralba, M C

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of an improvement cycle in patients suffering thoracic/chest pain in hospital emergencies, especially in those who could benefit from the early Bruce Treadmill Test. A multidisciplinary group care protocol was designed, which identified improvement opportunities and gave priority to the fact that «an early Bruce Treadmill Test was carried out on fewer occasions than recommended». Causes were analysed (Ishikawa diagram) and six quality criteria were defined. These criteria were evaluated in a random sample of 30 patients out of the total of 180 who used the ergometer at the Hospital in the first six months of 2007, as well as questionnaire for the doctors. Corrective measures were introduced: circulation, accessibility through intranet and explicit information for new employees (doctors). The second evaluation was carried out during the first six-months of 2008 using another random sample of 30 patients from a total of 120. In the first evaluation, the classification of the risk according to the protocol was very low (100% non-compliance) and patients whose admission to the Chest Pain Unit was recommended and an early Bruce Treadmill Test (74% criteria failure) were referred to cardiology clinics. After implementation of the corrective measures, we obtain a general improvement in all the criteria, but very significant from the previous ones, with non-compliances being reduced to 17% in classification and to the 23% in referrals. The structured cycle has helped resolve the priority problem in the short-term. The adopted measures have mainly been organisational, dependent on the professionals involved, and at a very low cost. Simple but organised methodological approaches should be taken into account before the incorporation of higher cost technologies. Copyright © 2010 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of Cancer-Related Fatigue, Pain, and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients at Palliative Care Team Referral: A Multicenter Observational Study (JORTC PAL-09).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Satoru; Kawaguchi, Takashi; Tokoro, Akihiro; Yamada, Kimito; Kanai, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Yoshinobu; Kashiwaya, Yuko; Okuma, Kae; Inada, Shuji; Ariyoshi, Keisuke; Miyaji, Tempei; Azuma, Kanako; Ishiki, Hiroto; Unezaki, Sakae; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue greatly influences quality of life in cancer patients; however, no specific treatments have been established for cancer-related fatigue, and at present, no medication has been approved in Japan. Systematic research using patient-reported outcome to examine symptoms, particularly fatigue, has not been conducted in palliative care settings in Japan. The objective was to evaluate fatigue, pain, and quality of life in cancer patients at the point of intervention by palliative care teams. Patients who were referred to palliative care teams at three institutions and met the inclusion criteria were invited to complete the Brief Fatigue Inventory, Brief Pain Inventory, and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative. Of 183 patients recruited, the majority (85.8%) were diagnosed with recurrence or metastasis. The largest group (42.6%) comprised lung cancer patients, of whom 67.2% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status of 0-1. The mean value for global health status/quality of life was 41.4, and the highest mean European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative symptom item score was for pain (51.0). The mean global fatigue score was 4.1, and 9.8%, 30.6%, 38.7%, and 20.8% of patients' fatigue severity was classified as none (score 0), mild (1-3), moderate (4-6), and severe (7-10), respectively. Cancer-related fatigue, considered to occur more frequently in cancer patients, was successfully assessed using patient-reported outcomes with the Brief Fatigue Inventory for the first time in Japan. Results suggested that fatigue is potentially as problematic as pain, which is the main reason for palliative care.

  18. Does a competitive voucher program for adolescents improve the quality of reproductive health care? A simulated patient study in Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorter Anna C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about how sexual and reproductive (SRH health can be made accessible and appropriate to adolescents. This study evaluates the impact and sustainability of a competitive voucher program on the quality of SRH care for poor and underserved female adolescents and the usefulness of the simulated patient (SP method for such evaluation. Methods 28,711 vouchers were distributed to adolescents in disadvantaged areas of Managua that gave free-of-charge access to SRH care in 4 public, 10 non-governmental and 5 private clinics. Providers received training and guidelines, treatment protocols, and financial incentives for each adolescent attended. All clinics were visited by female adolescent SPs requesting contraception. SPs were sent one week before, during (with voucher and one month after the intervention. After each consultation they were interviewed with a standardized questionnaire. Twenty-one criteria were scored and grouped into four categories. Clinics' scores were compared using non-parametric statistical methods (paired design: before-during and before-after. Also the influence of doctors' characteristics was tested using non-parametric statistical methods. Results Some aspects of service quality improved during the voucher program. Before the program started 8 of the 16 SPs returned 'empty handed', although all were eligible contraceptive users. During the program 16/17 left with a contraceptive method (p = 0.01. Furthermore, more SPs were involved in the contraceptive method choice (13/17 vs.5/16, p = 0.02. Shared decision-making on contraceptive method as well as condom promotion had significantly increased after the program ended. Female doctors had best scores before- during and after the intervention. The improvements were more pronounced among male doctors and doctors older than 40, though these improvements did not sustain after the program ended. Conclusion This study illustrates provider

  19. Quality of life and self-care in elderly patients with cardiovascular diseases: The effect of a Traditional Chinese Medicine health educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Qin; Jiang, An-Li; Chen, San-Mei; Li, Hui; Xing, Hai-Yan; Wang, Fang

    2017-12-01

    To explore the effects of a Traditional Chinese Medicine health educational intervention on the quality of life and self-care agency of elderly patients living with chronic cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The secondary prevention and treatment for chronic cardiovascular disease emphasize the importance of lifestyle modification. However, behavior-changing is difficult and individual choices are influenced by broader environmental factors. The lifestyle intervention for the purpose of self-care enhancing should be considered the driving force from the cultural element. The study was conducted from April 2014 to October 2014. Ninety-eight community dwelling individuals with chronic cardiovascular disease were recruited from Shaoxing and randomized. 48 participants were in the intervention group with a 6-month Traditional Chinese Medicine health education and 50 participants were in the control group with routine care. The main measurements included health-related quality of life and self-care agency, which was assessed by the Short Form-36 Chinese version and the Exercise of Self-Care Agency Scale respectively, and were measured at the baseline and post intervention (6months after baseline). After 6months of intervention, the quality of life and self-care agency in the intervention group were significantly improved. The traditional Chinese medicine health education is an effective method for promoting quality of life and self-care agency in cardiovascular disease patients. It could be applied as adjunctive care for cardiovascular disease patients self-care supporting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantitative comparison of measurements of urgent care service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong; Prybutok, Victor; Prybutok, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Service quality and patient satisfaction are essential to health care organization success. Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry introduced SERVQUAL, a prominent service quality measure not yet applied to urgent care. We develop an instrument to measure perceived service quality and identify the determinants of patient satisfaction/ behavioral intentions. We examine the relationships among perceived service quality, patient satisfaction and behavioral intentions, and demonstrate that urgent care service quality is not equivalent using measures of perceptions only, differences of expectations minus perceptions, ratio of perceptions to expectations, and the log of the ratio. Perceptions provide the best measure of urgent care service quality.

  1. The association between self-care and quality of life in hypertensive patients: findings from the Azar cohort study in the North West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryamalsadat Kazemi Shishavan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension affects the quality of life of patients and their caregivers. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and self-care behaviors and health-related quality of life (HRQOL among hypertensive people Methods: All people aged 35 years and older with hypertension were invited to participate in this study. Information on self-care behavior for hypertension (H-scale, and health-related quality of life (WHOHRQOL-BRFF were completed by trained interviewer. Data analysis was done using SPSS 16.Results: The median age of hypertensive patients was 62.5(25th to 75th percentile: 55 to 72 years, the correlation between quality of life and overall self-care scores was not significant(r =-0.048, P =0.520. Physical activity was the only significant predictor for quality of life,showing that the quality of life of hypertensive people increased by 3.371 units per day of being physically active in the cohort study (β =0.223, P<0.01. The only significant predictor of quality of life among the elderly was medication use (β =-0.572, P<0.001. Quality of life of participants decreased 3.456 units per day as a result of medication adherence Conclusion: No association was observed between self-care and HRQOL total score in hypertensive patients in the study. Among the self-care domains, only medication adherence and physical activity had significant association with social health. There was a reverse association between smoking and HRQOL.

  2. Attributes of patient-centered primary care associated with the public perception of good healthcare quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Guanais, Frederico C; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Canning, David; Macinko, James; Reich, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated primary care attributes of patient-centered care associated with the public perception of good quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador. We conducted a secondary data analysis of a Latin American survey on public perceptions and experiences with healthcare systems. The primary care attributes examined were access, coordination, provider-patient communication, provision of health-related information and emotional support. A double-weighted multiple Poisson regression with robust variance model was performed. The study included between 1500 and 1503 adults in each country. The results identified four significant gaps in the provision of primary care: not all respondents had a regular place of care or a regular primary care doctor (Brazil 35.7%, Colombia 28.4%, Mexico 22% and El Salvador 45.4%). The communication with the primary care clinic was difficult (Brazil 44.2%, Colombia 41.3%, Mexico 45.1% and El Salvador 56.7%). There was a lack of coordination of care (Brazil 78.4%, Colombia 52.3%, Mexico 48% and El Salvador 55.9%). Also, there was a lack of information about healthy diet (Brazil 21.7%, Colombia 32.9%, Mexico 16.9% and El Salvador 20.8%). The public's perception of good quality was variable (Brazil 67%, Colombia 71.1%, Mexico 79.6% and El Salvador 79.5%). The primary care attributes associated with the perception of good quality were a primary care provider 'who knows relevant information about a patient's medical history', 'solves most of the health problems', 'spends enough time with the patient', 'coordinates healthcare' and a 'primary care clinic that is easy to communicate with'. In conclusion, the public has a positive perception of the quality of primary care, although it has unfulfilled expectations; further efforts are necessary to improve the provision of patient-centered primary care services in these four Latin American countries. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  3. Patient care in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography

  4. Electronic symptom reporting between patient and provider for improved health care service quality: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. part 2: methodological quality and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Monika Alise; Berntsen, Gro K Rosvold; Schuster, Tibor; Henriksen, Eva; Horsch, Alexander

    2012-10-03

    We conducted in two parts a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on electronic symptom reporting between patients and providers to improve health care service quality. Part 1 reviewed the typology of patient groups, health service innovations, and research targets. Four innovation categories were identified: consultation support, monitoring with clinician support, self-management with clinician support, and therapy. To assess the methodological quality of the RCTs, and summarize effects and benefits from the methodologically best studies. We searched Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and IEEE Xplore for original studies presented in English-language articles between 1990 and November 2011. Risk of bias and feasibility were judged according to the Cochrane recommendation, and theoretical evidence and preclinical testing were evaluated according to the Framework for Design and Evaluation of Complex Interventions to Improve Health. Three authors assessed the risk of bias and two author