WorldWideScience

Sample records for quality patient care

  1. Quality of pharmaceutical care in surgical patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica de Boer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgical patients are at risk for preventable adverse drug events (ADEs during hospitalization. Usually, preventable ADEs are measured as an outcome parameter of quality of pharmaceutical care. However, process measures such as QIs are more efficient to assess the quality of care and provide more information about potential quality improvements. OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of pharmaceutical care of medication-related processes in surgical wards with quality indicators, in order to detect targets for quality improvements. METHODS: For this observational cohort study, quality indicators were composed, validated, tested, and applied on a surgical cohort. Three surgical wards of an academic hospital in the Netherlands (Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam participated. Consecutive elective surgical patients with a hospital stay longer than 48 hours were included from April until June 2009. To assess the quality of pharmaceutical care, the set of quality indicators was applied to 252 medical records of surgical patients. RESULTS: Thirty-four quality indicators were composed and tested on acceptability and content- and face-validity. The selected 28 candidate quality indicators were tested for feasibility and 'sensitivity to change'. This resulted in a final set of 27 quality indicators, of which inter-rater agreements were calculated (kappa 0.92 for eligibility, 0.74 for pass-rate. The quality of pharmaceutical care was assessed in 252 surgical patients. Nearly half of the surgical patients passed the quality indicators for pharmaceutical care (overall pass rate 49.8%. Improvements should be predominantly targeted to medication care related processes in surgical patients with gastro-intestinal problems (domain pass rate 29.4%. CONCLUSIONS: This quality indicator set can be used to measure quality of pharmaceutical care and detect targets for quality improvements. With these results medication safety in surgical patients can be enhanced.

  2. Assessing the Quality of Diabetic Patients Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkis Vicente Sánchez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the actions of family doctors and nurses in this area is an indispensable requisite in order to achieve a comprehensive health care. Objective: to assess the quality of health care provided to diabetic patients by the family doctor in Abreus health area. Methods: a descriptive and observational study based on the application of tools to assess the performance of family doctors in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in the five family doctors consultation in Abreus health area from January to July 2011 was conducted. The five doctors working in these consultations, as well as the 172 diabetic patients were included in the study. At the same time, 172 randomly selected medical records were also revised. Through observation, the existence of some necessary material resources and the quality of their performance as well as the quality of medical records were evaluated. Patient criteria served to assess the quality of the health care provided. Results: scientific and technical training on diabetes mellitus has been insufficient; the necessary equipment for the appropriate care and monitoring of patients with diabetes is available; in 2.9% of medical records reviewed, interrogation appears in its complete form including the complete physical examination in 12 of them and the complete medical indications in 26. Conclusions: the quality of comprehensive medical care to diabetic patients included in the study is compromised. Doctors interviewed recognized the need to be trained in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes in order to improve their professional performance and enhance the quality of the health care provided to these patients.

  3. Experiencing health care service quality: through patients' eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembri, Sharon

    2015-02-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to consider health care service quality from the patients' perspective, specifically through the patient's eyes. A narrative analysis was performed on 300 patient stories. This rigorous analysis of patient stories is designed to identify and describe health care service quality through patients' eyes in an authentic and accurate, experiential manner. The findings show that there are variant and complex ways that patients experience health care service quality. Patient stories offer an authentic view of the complex ways that patients experience health care service quality. Narrative analysis is a useful tool to identify and describe how patients experience health care service quality. Patients experience health care service quality in complex and varying ways.

  4. Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_160885.html Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life Also increases chances of having end-of-life ... incurable cancer helps patients cope and improves their quality of life, a new study shows. It also leads to ...

  5. Patient satisfaction with quality of primary health care in Benghazi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-10-21

    Oct 21, 2010 ... concerted efforts to manage health care services and to regain the lost trust. ... Objectives: To assess patient satisfaction with quality of PHC assessed in terms of (a) customer profile, ... behavior; interaction effect; type and location of facility; place of ... of care at PHC level by (a) strengthening health admin-.

  6. [Perception of health care quality by patients with chronic conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couillerot-Peyrondet, A-L; Midy, F; Bruneau, C

    2011-02-01

    Patient opinion is becoming ever more important when considering healthcare quality and the reforms required to improve healthcare quality. The main aim of this study was to explore factors determining perceived healthcare quality among patients with chronic diseases. Data are drawn from the survey carried out in 2008 by the Commonwealth Fund, in partnership with the French Superior Health Authority (Haute Autorité de santé). The prospective telephone survey targeted adults in eight countries who had serious health problems (chronic or severe disease, declared poor state of health, hospital admission or major surgery). Of the 1202 French respondents, 851 had at least one diagnosed chronic disease. A multinomial logistic model was used to identify the relationship between perceived healthcare quality and patients' recent experience with the healthcare system. People with chronic disease in general perceived that healthcare quality was excellent (45%) or good (44%). Only 11% of respondents judged it to be average or poor. There was a hint of "could do better", for example when considering podology and ophthalmology follow-up in diabetes or the management of multiple medications. The explanatory model revealed a positive correlation between excellent perceived healthcare quality and a strong doctor-patient relationship, taking into account both the length of this relationship and the ability of the doctor to involve the patient at all stages of decision-making concerning therapeutic management. There was no major link between the perceived quality of care and objective care quality, the quality of procedures, the cost of care to the patient or how frequently patients access the healthcare system. The quality of the relationship between the patient and his/her doctor is a determining factor in the patient's judgement of the quality of healthcare he/she receives. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. High-quality chronic care delivery improves experiences of chronically ill patients receiving care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Objective. Investigate whether high-quality chronic care delivery improved the experiences of patients. Design. This study had a longitudinal design. Setting and Participants. We surveyed professionals and patients in 17 disease management programs targeting patients wi

  8. Care fragmentation, quality, and costs among chronically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Brigham R; Joynt, Karen E; Rebitzer, James B; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-05-01

    To assess the relationship between care fragmentation and both quality and costs of care for commercially insured, chronically ill patients. We used claims data from 2004 to 2008 for 506,376 chronically ill, privately insured enrollees of a large commercial insurance company to construct measures of fragmentation. We included patients in the sample if they had chronic conditions in any of the following categories: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma, arthritis, or migraine. We assigned each patient a fragmentation index based on the patterns of care of their primary care provider (PCP), with care patterns spread across a higher number of providers considered to be more fragmented. We used regression analysis to examine the relationship between fragmentation and both quality and cost outcomes. Patients of PCPs in the highest quartile of fragmentation had a higher chance of having a departure from clinical best practice (32.8%, vs 25.9% among patients of PCPs in the lowest quartile of fragmentation; P fragmentation had higher rates of preventable hospitalizations (9.1% in highest quartile vs 7.1% in lowest quartile; P fragmentation was associated with $4542 higher healthcare spending ($10,396 in the highest quartile vs $5854 in the lowest quartile; P fragmented care more often experience lapses in care quality and incur greater healthcare costs.

  9. Quality Measures for the Care of Patients with Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Lois E.; Hershner, Shelley; Loeding, Lauren D.; Maski, Kiran P.; Rifkin, Daniel I.; Selim, Bernardo; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2015-01-01

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Workgroup to develop quality measures for the care of patients with narcolepsy. Following a comprehensive literature search, 306 publications were found addressing quality care or measures. Strength of association was graded between proposed process measures and desired outcomes. Following the AASM process for quality measure development, we identified three outcomes (including one outcome measure) and seven process measures. The first desired outcome was to reduce excessive daytime sleepiness by employing two process measures: quantifying sleepiness and initiating treatment. The second outcome was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis by employing the two process measures: completing both a comprehensive sleep history and an objective sleep assessment. The third outcome was to reduce adverse events through three steps: ensuring treatment follow-up, documenting medical comorbidities, and documenting safety measures counseling. All narcolepsy measures described in this report were developed by the Narcolepsy Quality Measures Work-group and approved by the AASM Quality Measures Task Force and the AASM Board of Directors. The AASM recommends the use of these measures as part of quality improvement programs that will enhance the ability to improve care for patients with narcolepsy. Citation: Krahn LE, Hershner S, Loeding LD, Maski KP, Rifkin DI, Selim B, Watson NF. Quality measures for the care of patients with narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):335–355. PMID:25700880

  10. Do patients "like" good care? measuring hospital quality via Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timian, Alex; Rupcic, Sonia; Kachnowski, Stan; Luisi, Paloma

    2013-01-01

    With the growth of Facebook, public health researchers are exploring the platform's uses in health care. However, little research has examined the relationship between Facebook and traditional hospital quality measures. The authors conducted an exploratory quantitative analysis of hospitals' Facebook pages to assess whether Facebook "Likes" were associated with hospital quality and patient satisfaction. The 30-day mortality rates and patient recommendation rates were used to quantify hospital quality and patient satisfaction; these variables were correlated with Facebook data for 40 hospitals near New York, NY. The results showed that Facebook "Likes" have a strong negative association with 30-day mortality rates and are positively associated with patient recommendation. These exploratory findings suggest that the number of Facebook "Likes" for a hospital may serve as an indicator of hospital quality and patient satisfaction. These findings have implications for researchers and hospitals looking for a quick and widely available measure of these traditional indicators.

  11. Patient's experiences with quality of hospital care: the Dutch Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbe, J.H.; Brouwer, W.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients' feedback is of great importance in health care policy decisions. The Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire (CQI Cataract) was used to measure patients' experiences with quality of care after a cataract operation. This study aims to evaluate the reliability and the dimen

  12. Patients' experiences with quality of hospital care: The Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Stubbe; W. Brouwer (Wendy); D.M.J. Delnoij (Diana)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Patients' feedback is of great importance in health care policy decisions. The Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire (CQI Cataract) was used to measure patients' experiences with quality of care after a cataract operation. This study aims to evaluate the reliability a

  13. Assessing Quality of Care of Elderly Patients Using the ACOVE Quality Indicator Set: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askari, M.; Wierenga, P.C.; Eslami, S.; Medlock, S.; de Rooij, S.E.; Abu-Hanna, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Care of the elderly is recognized as an increasingly important segment of health care. The Assessing Care Of Vulnerable Elderly (ACOVE) quality indicators (QIs) were developed to assess and improve the care of elderly patients. Objectives: The purpose of this review is to summarize studi

  14. Patients' Evaluation of the Quality of Diabetes Care (PEQD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Snoek, Frank J

    2002-01-01

    analysis comprised principal component analyses, Cronbach's alpha, t tests, Pearson's correlation, and linear regression analyses. RESULTS: Results in the literature were used to develop the 14 items of the Patients' Evaluation of the Quality of Diabetes Care (PEQD) scale, assessing the most important...

  15. Improving quality of care among patients hospitalised with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette; Mainz, Jan; Svendsen, Marie Louise

    2015-01-01

    -based cohort study, we identified 14 228 patients admitted to psychiatric departments between 2004 and 2011 from The Danish Schizophrenia Registry. The registry systematically monitors the adherence to guideline recommended processes of care. RESULTS: The overall proportion of all relevant recommended...... processes of care increased from 64 to 76% between 2004 and 2011. The adherence to individual processes of care increased over time, including assessment of psychopathology using a diagnostic interview (relative risk (RR): 2.01, 95% CI: 1.51-2.68), contact with relatives (RR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.......27-1.62), psychoeducation (RR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.19-1.48), psychiatric aftercare (RR: 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01-1.11) and suicide risk assessment (RR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.21-1.42). CONCLUSIONS: Quality of care improved from 2004 to 2011 among patients hospitalised with schizophrenia in Denmark. DECLARATION OF INTEREST: None. COPYRIGHT...

  16. Global quality indicators for primary care Electronic Patient Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Etienne; Moreels, Sarah; Van Casteren, Viviane; Bossuyt, Nathalie; Goderis, Geert

    2013-01-01

    Electronic Patient Records can be interfaced with medical decision support systems and quality of care assessment tools. An easy way of measuring the quality of EPR data is therefore essential. This study identified a number of global quality indicators (tracers) that could be easily calculated and validated them by correlating them with the Sensitivity and Positive Predictive Value (PPV) of data extracted from the EPR. Sensitivity and PPV of automatically extracted data were calculated using a gold standard constructed using answers to questions GPs were asked at the end of each contact with a patient. These properties were measured for extracted diagnoses, drug prescriptions, and certain parameters. Tracers were defined as drug-disease pairs (e.g. insulin-diabetes) with the assumption that if the patient is taking the drug, then the patient is suffering from the disease. Four tracers were identified that could be used for the ResoPrim primary care research database, which includes data from 43 practices, 10,307 patients, and 13,372 contacts. Moderately positive correlations were found between the 4 tracers and between the tracers and the sensitivity of automatically extracted diagnoses. For some purposes, these results may support the potential use of tracers for monitoring the quality of information systems such as EPRs.

  17. Quality indicators for all dimensions of infertility care quality: consensus between professionals and patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dancet, E.A.; D'Hooghe, T.M.; Spiessens, C.; Sermeus, W.; Neubourg, D. De; Karel, N.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the relative importance of the six dimensions of quality of care according to different stakeholders and can a quality indicator set address all six quality dimensions and incorporate the views from professionals working in different disciplines and from patients? SUMMARY ANS

  18. Quality measures in neurology consult care for epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Morena Vicente, M A; Ballesteros Plaza, L; Martín García, H; Vidal Díaz, B; Anaya Caravaca, B; Pérez Martínez, D A

    2014-06-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most frequently observed diseases in neurology outpatient care. We analysed our hospital's implementation of the 8 epilepsy quality measures proposed by the American Academy of Neurology: documented seizure types and seizure frequency, aetiology of epilepsy or the epilepsy syndrome, review of EEG, MRI, or CT results, counselling about antiepileptic drug side effects, surgical therapy referral for intractable epilepsy, and counselling about epilepsy-specific safety issues and for women of childbearing age. In most cases, the first four quality measures were documented correctly. In 66% of the cases, doctors had asked about any adverse drug effects during every visit. Almost all patients with intractable epilepsy had been informed about surgical options or referred to a surgical centre of reference for an evaluation at some point, although referrals usually took place more than 3 years after the initial proposal. Safety issues had been explained to 37% of the patients and less than half of women of childbearing age with epilepsy had received counselling regarding contraception and pregnancy at least once a year. The care we provide is appropriate according to many of the quality measures, but we must deliver more counselling and information necessary for the care of epileptic patients in different stages of life. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Quality of care: compared perceptions of patient and prosthodontist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, B B; Razzoog, M E; Robinson, E

    1984-11-01

    The results suggest that, with the exception of retention, differences between patients' and prosthodontists' perceptions of treatment with complete dentures display greater variability with regard to function than to either esthetics or comfort. Although the literature has suggested that satisfying the esthetic concerns of the patient is likely to be a major hurdle in denture treatment success, this study suggests that occlusion, retention, and vertical dimension may be of more importance to effective communication. Misconceptions and unreal expectations should be dealt with early in the treatment program to avoid patient dissatisfaction. During the 1972 International Prosthodontic Workshop held in Ann Arbor, Michigan, the statement was made that patients were generally an unreliable guide as to the adequacy of their dentures, especially after wearing them for a period of time, and that further research to document the patient's reliability seemed unnecessary. This study has demonstrated that patients are quite reliable judges of many criteria related to dentures, provided channels for two-way communication are opened. With the ever greater economic stresses that force dentists to consider patients' concerns, perhaps it is increasingly the dentist's responsibility to better educate patients to evaluate all aspects of the quality of care they receive and encourage extensive two-way communication early in the treatment process. The adjusted quality assessment criteria used in the present study may be a useful instrument to use with patients prior to the initial interview in an effort to establish a better dentist-patient relationship.

  20. Assessing quality of care of elderly patients using the ACOVE quality indicator set: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Askari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Care of the elderly is recognized as an increasingly important segment of health care. The Assessing Care Of Vulnerable Elderly (ACOVE quality indicators (QIs were developed to assess and improve the care of elderly patients. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this review is to summarize studies that assess the quality of care using QIs from or based on ACOVE, in order to evaluate the state of quality of care for the reported conditions. METHODS: We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL for English-language studies indexed by February 2010. Articles were included if they used any ACOVE QIs, or adaptations thereof, for assessing the quality of care. Included studies were analyzed and relevant information was extracted. We summarized the results of these studies, and when possible generated an overall conclusion about the quality of care as measured by ACOVE for each condition, in various settings, and for each QI. RESULTS: Seventeen studies were included with 278 QIs (original, adapted or newly developed. The quality scores showed large variation between and within conditions. Only a few conditions showed a stable pass rate range over multiple studies. Overall, pass rates for dementia (interquartile range (IQR: 11%-35%, depression (IQR: 27%-41%, osteoporosis (IQR: 34%-43% and osteoarthritis (IQR: 29-41% were notably low. Medication management and use (range: 81%-90%, hearing loss (77%-79% and continuity of care (76%-80% scored higher than other conditions. Out of the 278 QIs, 141 (50% had mean pass rates below 50% and 121 QIs (44% had pass rates above 50%. Twenty-three percent of the QIs scored above 75%, and 16% scored below 25%. CONCLUSIONS: Quality of care per condition varies markedly across studies. Although there has been much effort in improving the care for elderly patients in the last years, the reported quality of care according to the ACOVE indicators is still relatively low.

  1. Structural violence and simplified paternalistic ideas of patient empowerment decreases health care access, quality & outcome for ethnic minority patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    Increasing complexity of health care organization, rapid hyperspecialization of medical care, lack of ’patient literacy’ and pressure on patients to take over responsibility, challenges political dreams of equal access to patient centered high quality secure care....

  2. Job satisfaction and perceptions of quality of patient care, collaboration and teamwork in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Yin; Ma, Jui-Chu; Chiu, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Lee, Pi-Hsia

    2009-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to compare levels of job satisfaction and perceptions of the quality of patient care, collaboration and teamwork among healthcare professionals in four acute care hospitals and to determine the factors associated with job satisfaction for physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals. Positive inter-professional relationships improve quality of patient care and staff job satisfaction. Understanding how healthcare professionals perceive their relationships with each other, and identifying factors that affect their job satisfaction and perceptions of the quality patient care, inform quality improvements. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted in four hospitals in Taiwan. Data were collected in 2007 and analysed using descriptive statistics, one-way anova with the Games-Howell post hoc test and stepwise regression analysis. The survey was completed by 1475 respondent, giving a response rate of 52.2% (180 physicians, 1019 nurses and 276 other healthcare professionals). Physicians were more satisfied with their jobs (F = 26.75, P collaborative relationships than did physicians or other healthcare professionals (F = 279.51, P collaborative relationships were the most important predictors of job satisfaction for healthcare providers. These findings provide important clues for improving interdisciplinary collaboration and ensuring quality patient care through good job satisfaction and teamwork among healthcare professionals in acute care hospitals.

  3. Creating a Patient-Centered Health Care Delivery System: A Systematic Review of Health Care Quality From the Patient Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Khaled; Nolan, Margaret B; Rajjo, Tamim; Shah, Nilay D; Prokop, Larry J; Varkey, Prathibha; Murad, Mohammad H

    2016-01-01

    Patient experience is one of key domains of value-based purchasing that can serve as a measure of quality and be used to improve the delivery of health services. The aims of this study are to explore patient perceptions of quality of health care and to understand how perceptions may differ by settings and condition. A systematic review of multiple databases was conducted for studies targeting patient perceptions of quality of care. Two reviewers screened and extracted data independently. Data synthesis was performed following a meta-narrative approach. A total of 36 studies were included that identified 10 quality dimensions perceived by patients: communication, access, shared decision making, provider knowledge and skills, physical environment, patient education, electronic medical record, pain control, discharge process, and preventive services. These dimensions can be used in planning and evaluating health care delivery. Future research should evaluate the effect of interventions targeting patient experience on patient outcomes.

  4. Quality Nursing Care for Hospitalized Patients with Advanced Illness: Concept Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Shigeko; Baggs, Judith G.; Knafl, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of nursing care as perceived by hospitalized patients with advanced illness has not been examined. A concept of quality nursing care for this population was developed by integrating the literature on constructs defining quality nursing care with empirical findings from interviews of 16 patients with advanced illness. Quality nursing care was characterized as competence and personal caring supported by professionalism and delivered with an appropriate demeanor. Although the attributes of competence, caring, professionalism, and demeanor were identified as common components of quality care across various patient populations, the caring domain increased in importance when patients with advanced illness perceived themselves as vulnerable. Assessment of quality nursing care for patients with advanced illness needs to include measures of patient perceptions of vulnerability. PMID:20572095

  5. Barriers to quality patient care in rural district hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna E. Eygelaar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently barriers exist in delivering quality health care. This study aimed to investigate such barriers in the eight rural district hospitals of the West Coast Winelands Region, three type A and five type B hospitals. A quantitative descriptive design was applied which included the total population of nursing staff (n = 340 working at the time of data collection. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed with a response rate of 82%.Reliability of the instrument was verified using the Cronbach alpha coefficient and a pilot study. The validity, specifically construct and content validity, were assured by means of an extensive literature review, pilot study and use of experts. Ethics approval was obtained from the relevant stakeholders.Results showed that 272 participants (97% disagreed that provision of staff was adequate, with staff above 40 years of age more likely to disagree (p = <0.01. A statistically significant association was shown between availability of doctors and staff not being able to cope with emergencies (p = <0.01. Most participants (n =212; 76% indicated that they were not receiving continuing education, with the registered nurses more likely to disagree (χ² test, p = 0.02. Participants in both hospital types A (n = 131; 82% and B (n = 108; 91% also disagreed that provision of equipment and consumables was adequate.The research showed that inadequacies relating to human resources, professional development, consumables and equipment influenced the quality of patient care. Urgent attention should be given to the problems identified to ensure quality of patient care in rural hospitals.

  6. [Primary care for diabetic patients: a quality improvement cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Martínez, A; Suárez-Beke, M P; Sánchez-Nicolás, J A; Lázaro-Aragues, P; de Jesús Jiménez-Vázquez, E; Huertas-de Mora, O

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and improve the quality of medical care provided to diabetic patients following the standards proposed by the American Diabetes Association. The study was conducted in three phases by analyzing data from the computerized clinical history of a sample of 340 patients. First phase (2010): cross-sectional, descriptive study which assessed the proportion of patients who met the standards related to the screening of diabetes, and goals of control and treatment. Subsequently, health professionals reviewed the results in order to promote the implementation of corrective action. Finally (2012), a new assessment with the same standards was performed. An increase in the number of patients treated with insulin (12.7% in 2010 and 20.2% in 2012) was observed (P < .01). There were also percentage increases in the number of patients who met the screening standards as regards analytical determinations: glycosylated hemoglobin (from 44.4% to 68.2%), lipid profile (47.6%-73.8%), creatinine (32.5% - 73.5%), and albumin-creatinine ratio (9.2%-24.4%) (P < .001). Only 6.4% (CI: 3.2- 9.8) of diabetic patients attained the composite target of glycosylated hemoglobin < 7%, blood pressure < 130/80 mmHg and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol < 100 mg/dl in 2012. This study shows that medical care has improved the goals related to analytical determinations and the number of insulin-treated diabetic type 2 patients. An optimal level was also maintained in metabolic control of diabetes, but there was still poor control of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. The patient as the pivot point for quality in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengnick-Hall, C A

    1995-01-01

    Health care enterprises make comprehensive and durable changes in people. This human-centered purpose defines the fundamental nature of quality in health care settings. Traditional perspectives of quality and familiar views of customer satisfaction are inadequate to manage the complex relationships between the health care delivery firm and its patients. Patients play four roles in health care systems that must be reflected when defining and measuring quality in these settings: patient as supplier, patient as product, patient as participant, and patient as recipient. This article presents a conceptual model of quality that incorporates these diverse patient roles. The strategic and managerial implications of the model are also discussed.

  8. Analysis of early accountable care organizations defines patient, structural, cost, and quality-of-care characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Arnold M; Jha, Ashish K; Orav, E John; Liebman, Daniel L; Audet, Anne-Marie J; Zezza, Mark A; Guterman, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) have attracted interest from many policy makers and clinical leaders because of their potential to improve the quality of care and reduce costs. Federal ACO programs for Medicare beneficiaries are now up and running, but little information is available about the baseline characteristics of early entrants. In this descriptive study we present data on the structural and market characteristics of these early ACOs and compare ACOs' patient populations, costs, and quality with those of their non-ACO counterparts at baseline. We found that ACO patients were more likely than non-ACO patients to be older than age eighty and had higher incomes. ACO patients were less likely than non-ACO patients to be black, covered by Medicaid, or disabled. The cost of care for ACO patients was slightly lower than that for non-ACO patients. Slightly fewer than half of the ACOs had a participating hospital. Hospitals that were in ACOs were more likely than non-ACO hospitals to be large, teaching, and not-for-profit, although there was little difference in their performance on quality metrics. Our findings can be useful in interpreting the early results from the federal ACO programs and in establishing a baseline to assess the programs' development.

  9. Care and Quality of Life in the Dying Phase: The contribution of the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Veerbeek (Laetitia)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis concerns the professional care and the quality of life for dying patients and their relatives in the hospital, the nursing home and the primary care setting. The effect of introducing the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP) on the content of care and the qualit

  10. Family physicians improve patient health care quality and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This issue exemplifies family physicians' ability to provide great care and to continuously improve. For example, beyond other specialty care, the care provided by family physicians is associated with improved melanoma diagnosis and outcomes and improved preventive services for those with a history of breast cancer. Electronic health records are providing new avenues to both assess outcomes and influence care. However, to truly reward quality care, simplistic and readily measurable items such as laboratory results or assessment of the provision of preventive services must be adjusted for risk. Health insurance influences classic preventive care services more than personal health behaviors. The care provided at federally qualified health centers throughout the nation is highly appreciated by the people they serve and is not plagued by the types of disparities in other settings.

  11. Patient Satisfaction with Hospital Inpatient Care: Effects of Trust, Medical Insurance and Perceived Quality of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qunhong; Liu, Chaojie; Jiao, Mingli; Hao, Yanhua; Han, Yuzhen; Gao, Lijun; Hao, Jiejing; Wang, Lan; Xu, Weilan; Ren, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Deteriorations in the patient-provider relationship in China have attracted increasing attention in the international community. This study aims to explore the role of trust in patient satisfaction with hospital inpatient care, and how patient-provider trust is shaped from the perspectives of both patients and providers. Methods We adopted a mixed methods approach comprising a multivariate logistic regression model using secondary data (1200 people with inpatient experiences over the past year) from the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS, 2013) in Heilongjiang Province to determine the associations between patient satisfaction and trust, financial burden and perceived quality of care, followed by in-depth interviews with 62 conveniently selected key informants (27 from health and 35 from non-health sectors). A thematic analysis established a conceptual framework to explain deteriorating patient-provider relationships. Findings About 24% of respondents reported being dissatisfied with hospital inpatient care. The logistic regression model indicated that patient satisfaction was positively associated with higher level of trust (OR = 14.995), lower levels of hospital medical expenditure (OR = 5.736–1.829 as compared with the highest quintile of hospital expenditure), good staff attitude (OR = 3.155) as well as good ward environment (OR = 2.361). But patient satisfaction was negatively associated with medical insurance for urban residents and other insurance status (OR = 0.215–0.357 as compared with medical insurance for urban employees). The qualitative analysis showed that patient trust—the most significant predictor of patient satisfaction—is shaped by perceived high quality of service delivery, empathic and caring interpersonal interactions, and a better designed medical insurance that provides stronger financial protection and enables more equitable access to health care. Conclusion At the core of high levels of patient dissatisfaction

  12. Loss of relational continuity of care in schizophrenia: associations with patient satisfaction and quality of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanatinia, Rahil; Cowan, Violet; Barnicot, Kirsten; Zalewska, Krysia; Shiers, David; Cooper, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Users of mental health service are concerned about changes in clinicians providing their care, but little is known about their impact. Aims To examine associations between changes in staff, and patient satisfaction and quality of care. Method A national cross-sectional survey of 3379 people aged 18 or over treated in secondary care for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Results Nearly 41.9% reported at least one change in their key worker during the previous 12 months and 10.5% reported multiple changes. Those reporting multiple changes were less satisfied with their treatment and less likely to report having a care plan, knowing how to obtain help when in a crisis or to have had recommended physical health assessments. Conclusions Frequent changes in staff providing care for people with psychosis are associated with poorer quality of care. Greater efforts need to be made to protect relational continuity of care for such patients. Declaration of interest M.J.C. was co-chair of the expert advisory group on the NICE quality standard on Service User Experience in Adult Mental Health. S.J.C. has previously been a member of the Health and Social Care Board Northern Ireland Formulary Committee. D.S. received a speaker’s fee from Janssen Cilag in 2011. He is a topic expert on NICE guideline for psychosis and schizophrenia in children and young people and a board member of National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27713834

  13. Improving the quality of care for patients with hypertension in Moshupa District, Botswana: Quality improvement cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Kande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are no prevalence studies on hypertension in Botswana, this condition is thought to be common and the quality of care to be poor.Aim: The aim of this project was to assess and improve the quality of primary care forhypertension.Setting: Moshupa clinic and catchment area, Botswana.Methods: Quality improvement cycle.Results: Two hundred participants were included in the audit. Sixty-eight per cent were women with a mean age of 55 years. In the baseline audit none of the target standards were met. During the re-audit six months later, six out of nine structural target standards, five out of 11 process target standards and one out of two outcome target standards were achieved. Statistically-significant improvement in performance (p < 0.05 was shown in 10 criteria although the target standard was not always met. In the re-audit, the target of achieving blood pressure control (< 140/90 in 70% of patients was achieved.Conclusion: The quality of care for hypertension was suboptimal in our setting. Simple interventions were designed and implemented to improve the quality of care. These interventions led to significant improvement in structural and process criteria. A corresponding significant improvement in the control of blood pressure was also seen.

  14. Quality of diabetes care in Dutch care groups: no differences between diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone R de Bruin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the relationship between presence and nature of co-morbidity and quality of care for diabetes patients enrolled in diabetes disease management programmes provided by care groups.Methods: We performed an observational study within eight Dutch diabetes care groups. Data from patient record systems of care groups and patient questionnaires were used to determine quality of care. Quality of care was measured as provision of the recommended diabetes care, patients’ achievement of recommended clinical outcomes and patients’ perception of coordination and integration of care.Results: 527 diabetes patients without and 1187 diabetes patients with co-morbidity were included. Of the co-morbid patients, 7.8% had concordant co-morbid conditions only, 63.8% had discordant co-morbid diseases only and 28.4% had both types of conditions. Hardly any differences were observed between patients with and without co-morbidity in terms of provided care, achievement of clinical outcomes and perceived coordination and integration of care.Conclusions: Our study implies that care groups are able to provide similar quality of diabetes care for diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity. Considering the expected developments regarding additional disease management programmes in care groups, it is of importance to monitor quality of care, including patient experiences, for all chronic diseases. It will then become clear whether accountable provider-led organisations such as care groups are able to ensure quality of care for the increasing number of patients with multiple chronic conditions.

  15. Enhancing Quality of Life for Patients with Special Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Michael J.

    Nursing home patients suffering from dementia had a desire for placement in a setting where their special needs could be addressed. This resulted in the creation of special nursing home units designed to meet patient needs. Recent reports have provided evidence that nursing home residents suffering from dementia who receive care on these special…

  16. Trends in quality of care among patients with incident heart failure in Denmark 2003-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Nakano; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of heart failure (HF) is complex and the prognosis remains serious. A range of strategies is used across health care systems to improve the quality of care for HF patients. We present results from a nationwide multidisciplinary initiative to monitor and improve the quality of care...

  17. Quality of care and mortality among patients with stroke - A nationwide follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeman, A.; Pedersen, Lars; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager;

    2008-01-01

    National Indicator Project, a quality improvement initiative with participation of all Danish hospital departments caring for patients with stroke, we identified 29,573 patients hospitalized with stroke between January 13, 2003 and October 31, 2005. Quality of care was measured in terms of 7 specific......-response relationship between the number of quality of care criteria met and mortality; the lowest mortality rate was found among patients whose care met all criteria compared with patients whose care failed to meet any criteria (ie, adjusted 30-day mortality rate ratios: 0.45, 95% confidence interval: 0.24-0.66). When......Background: The relationship between process and outcome measures among patients with stroke is unclear. Objectives: To examine the association between quality of care and mortality among patients with stroke in a nationwide population-based follow-up study. Methods: Using data from The Danish...

  18. Patients' satisfaction with the quality of nursing care provided: the Saudi experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, Mohammad A; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Al-Sayed, Mohammad M; Aboshaiqah, Ahmad E

    2013-12-01

    Patient's satisfaction has emerged as a central focus of health-care delivery during the last decades, and nursing care became one significant component of patient's satisfaction. The purpose of this study is to examine patients' satisfaction with quality of nursing care provided in Saudi Arabia. Cross-sectional descriptive correctional design was used to recruit 100 patients from one regional hospital in Saudi Arabia. Data collected using structured interview from patients related to six dimensions of nursing care. Patients had a high level of satisfaction with nursing care provided (86% agreement rate). Language (56% disagreement rate), discharge information (56% disagreement rate) and availability (20% disagreement rate) have been identified with the lowest rates of patients satisfaction. Nursing leaders and health-care administrators need to maintain quality nursing care and develop strategies for improving nursing care emphasizing language as barrier and strategies of information dissemination.

  19. Quality of care from the perspective of the cataract patient: QUOTE Cataract Questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, M.D.; Sixma, H.J.; Afman, H.; Hiddema, F.; Koopmans, S.A.; Borne, B. van den; Hendrikse, F.; Nuijts, R.M.M.A.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the potential of a questionnaire (QUOTE Cataract) to measure quality of care from the perspective of cataract patients in quality-assurance or improvement programs. SETTING: Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, University Hospital Groningen, Gr

  20. Quality of care from the perspective of the cataract patient - QUOTE Cataract Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, MD; Sixma, HJ; Afman, H; Hiddema, F; Koopmans, SA; van den Borne, B; Hendrikse, F; Nuijts, RMMA

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the potential of a questionnaire (QUOTE Cataract) to measure quality of care from the perspective of cataract patients in quality-assurance or improvement programs. Setting. Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, University Hospital Groningen, Gr

  1. Quality of care from the perspective of the cataract patient - QUOTE Cataract Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, MD; Sixma, HJ; Afman, H; Hiddema, F; Koopmans, SA; van den Borne, B; Hendrikse, F; Nuijts, RMMA

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the potential of a questionnaire (QUOTE Cataract) to measure quality of care from the perspective of cataract patients in quality-assurance or improvement programs. Setting. Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, University Hospital Groningen,

  2. Quality of care from the perspective of the cataract patient: QUOTE Cataract Questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, M.D.; Sixma, H.J.; Afman, H.; Hiddema, F.; Koopmans, S.A.; Borne, B. van den; Hendrikse, F.; Nuijts, R.M.M.A.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the potential of a questionnaire (QUOTE Cataract) to measure quality of care from the perspective of cataract patients in quality-assurance or improvement programs. SETTING: Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, University Hospital Groningen,

  3. Associations between perceived chronic care quality, perceived patient centeredness, and illness representations among persons with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joseph; Iyer, Neeraj N; Collins, William B

    2014-01-01

    Patient beliefs about their illness can motivate behaviors consistent with good disease management. Perceived high-quality chronic care would be expected to increase likelihood of having such beliefs. Associations between perceived quality of chronic care and illness representations, and associations between patient centeredness and illness representations were assessed among persons with diabetes. A mail survey of diabetic patients visiting a multispecialty physician network serving urban and suburban populations in a large midwestern city was conducted. The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care-5A questionnaire was used to assess perceived chronic care quality and patient centeredness. The Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire was used to assess illness representations. Of 500 mailed surveys, 89 completed surveys were returned. The sample consisted mostly of retirees (61%), Whites (81%), and women (60%). Higher perceived chronic care quality was associated with better disease understanding of diabetes (0.24, p = .05). Patients reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) indicated better disease understanding (-0.26, p = .04) and those reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) perceived less impact of illness (0.29, p = .02). Chronic care quality as defined in the Chronic Care Model and consistency of chronic care with patient expectations (patient centeredness) was associated with illness representations favorable for good self-care management.

  4. Patient safety measures in burn care: do National reporting systems accurately reflect quality of burn care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Samuel P; Robinson, Ellen F; Cooper, Claudette L; Klein, Matthew B; Gibran, Nicole S

    2010-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been placed on quality of care metrics and patient safety. Groups such as the University Health-System Consortium (UHC) collect and review patient safety data, monitor healthcare facilities, and often report data using mortality and complication rates as outcomes. The purpose of this study was to analyze the UHC database to determine if it differentiates quality of care across burn centers. We reviewed UHC clinical database (CDB) fields and available data from 2006 to 2008 for the burn product line. Based on the September 2008 American Burn Association (ABA) list of verified burn centers, we categorized centers as American Burn Association-verified burn centers, self-identified burn centers, and other centers that are not burn units but admit some burn patients. We compared total burn admissions, risk pool, complication rates, and mortality rates. Overall mortality was compared between the UHC and National Burn Repository. The UHC CDB provides fields for number of admissions, % intensive care unit admission, risk pool, length of stay, complication profiles, and mortality index. The overall numbers of burn patients in the database for the study period included 17,740 patients admitted to verified burn centers (mean 631 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years), 10,834 for self-identified burn centers (mean 437 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years), and 1,487 for other centers (mean 11.5 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years). Reported complication rates for verified burn centers (21.6%), self-identified burn centers (21.3%), and others (20%) were similar. Mortality rates were highest for self-identified burn centers (3.06%), less for verified centers (2.88%), and lowest for other centers (0.74%). However, these outcomes data may be misleading, because the risk pool criteria do not include burn-specific risk factors, and the inability to adjust for injury severity prevents rigorous comparison across centers. Databases such as the

  5. Quality assurance of radiotherapy in cancer treatment: toward improvement of patient safety and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    The process of radiotherapy (RT) is complex and involves understanding of the principles of medical physics, radiobiology, radiation safety, dosimetry, radiation treatment planning, simulation and interaction of radiation with other treatment modalities. Each step in the integrated process of RT needs quality control and quality assurance (QA) to prevent errors and to give high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. Recent advances in RT, including intensity-modulated and image-guided RT, focus on the need for a systematic RTQA program that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. It is necessary to develop more formal error mitigation and process analysis methods, such as failure mode and effect analysis, to focus available QA resources optimally on process components. External audit programs are also effective. The International Atomic Energy Agency has operated both an on-site and off-site postal dosimetry audit to improve practice and to assure the dose from RT equipment. Several countries have adopted a similar approach for national clinical auditing. In addition, clinical trial QA has a significant role in enhancing the quality of care. The Advanced Technology Consortium has pioneered the development of an infrastructure and QA method for advanced technology clinical trials, including credentialing and individual case review. These activities have an impact not only on the treatment received by patients enrolled in clinical trials, but also on the quality of treatment administered to all patients treated in each institution, and have been adopted globally; by the USA, Europe and Japan also.

  6. Patient mobility and health care quality when regions and patients differ in income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Kurt R; Levaggi, Rosella; Siciliani, Luigi; Straume, Odd Rune

    2016-12-01

    We study the effects of cross-border patient mobility on health care quality and welfare when income varies across and within regions. We use a Salop model with a high-, middle-, and low-income region. In each region, a policy maker chooses health care quality to maximise the utility of its residents when health care costs are financed by general income taxation. In equilibrium, regions with higher income offer better quality, which creates an incentive for patient mobility from lower- to higher-income regions. Assuming a prospective payment scheme based on DRG-pricing, we find that lower non-monetary (administrative) mobility costs have (i) no effect on quality or welfare in the high-income region; (ii) a negative effect on quality but a positive effect on welfare for the middle-income region; and (iii) ambiguous effects on quality and welfare for the low-income region. Lower monetary mobility costs (copayments) might reduce welfare in both the middle- and low-income region. Thus, health policies that stimulate cross-border patient mobility can be counterproductive when regions differ in income. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Health insurance and quality of care: Comparing perceptions of quality between insured and uninsured patients in Ghana's hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuosi, Aaron A; Domfeh, Kwame Ameyaw; Abor, Joshua Yindenaba; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward

    2016-05-12

    The introduction of health insurance in Ghana in 2003 has resulted in a tremendous increase in utilization of health services. However, concerns are being raised about the quality of patient care. Some of the concerns include long waiting times, verbal abuse of patients by health care providers, inadequate physical examination by doctors and discrimination of insured patients. The study compares perceptions of quality of care between insured and uninsured out-patients in selected hospitals in Ghana to determine whether there is any unequal treatment between insured and uninsured patients in terms of quality of care, as empirical and anecdotal evidence seem to suggest. A cross-sectional survey of 818 out-patients was conducted in 17 general hospitals from three regions of Ghana. These are the Upper East, Brong Ahafo and Central Regions. Convenience sampling was employed to select the patients in exit interviews. Descriptive statistics, including frequency distributions, means and standard deviations, were used to describe socio-economic and demographic characteristics of respondents. Factor analysis was used to determine distinct quality of care constructs; t-test statistic was used to test for differences in quality perceptions between the insured and uninsured patients; and regression analysis was used to test the association between health insurance and quality of care. Overall, there was no significant difference in perceptions of quality between insured and uninsured patients. However, there was a significant difference between insured and uninsured patients in respect of financial access to care. The major quality of care concern affecting all patients was the problem of inadequate resources, especially lack of doctors, lack of drugs and other basic supplies and equipment to work with. It was concluded that generally, insured and uninsured patients are not treated unequally, contrary to prevailing anecdotal and empirical evidence. On the contrary, quality of

  8. [Quality of life and mortality of patients in intensive care. Indices of quality of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, D; Galguera, F; Jam, M R; Vilar, S; Castella, X; Artigas, A

    1998-01-01

    At present there is no single practical standardized scale for measuring quality of life (QL). Any proposal should include the patient's physical impairment, level of independence, and subjective perception of happiness. We combined three previously published scales to define a quality of life index (QLI) that we propose as a standard quantitative instrument. The applicability and usefulness of QLI for the measurement of the level of deterioration of patients after admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) was examined. We prospectively evaluated QL before patient admission to determine if it influences mortality, as well as long-term changes in the QL and the factors conditioning te deterioration of patients released from the UCI as evaluated by QL indicators. To calculate QLI, we combined the Karnofsky scale, daily life activities index, and the perception of quality of life scale. The resulting percentage (QLI) was used to evaluate 536 patients after admission to the ICU and 6 and 12 months after release. QLI was compared with the severity of disease (Apache II), probability of death (MPM), diagnostic group, and socioeconomic variables. Using multivariate methods, four significant variables related with mortality were identified: Apache II--MPM, duration of the stay in the unit, age, and QLI. Our analysis of long-term deterioration showed that advanced age, high QLI before admission, and the patient's diagnostic group explained the degree of deterioration. QLI was a useful instrument for obtaining a quantitative estimate of the QL of critically ill patients.

  9. Common predictors of nurse-reported quality of care and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski; Djukic, Maja; Brewer, Carol S; Kovner, Christine T

    2017-03-03

    In the era of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, quality of care and patient safety in health care have never been more visible to patients or providers. Registered nurses (nurses) are key players not only in providing direct patient care but also in evaluating the quality and safety of care provided to patients and families. We had the opportunity to study a unique cohort of nurses to understand more about the common predictors of nurse-reported quality of care and patient safety across acute care settings. We analyzed cross-sectional survey data that were collected in 2015 from 731 nurses, as part of a national 10-year panel study of nurses. Variables selected for inclusion in regression analyses were chosen based on the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety model, which is composed of work system or structure, process, and outcomes. Our findings indicate that factors from three components of the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety model-Work System (person, environment, and organization) are predictive of quality of care and patient safety as reported by nurses. The main results from our multiple linear and logistic regression models suggest that significant predictors common to both quality and safety were job satisfaction and organizational constraints. In addition, unit type and procedural justice were associated with patient safety, whereas better nurse-physician relations were associated with quality of care. Increasing nurses' job satisfaction and reducing organizational constraints may be areas to focus on to improve quality of care and patient safety. Our results provide direction for hospitals and nurse managers as to how to allocate finite resources to achieve improvements in quality of care and patient safety alike.

  10. Patient reported outcome measures of quality of end-of-life care: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Tara; Cornally, Nicola; Molloy, William

    2017-02-01

    End-of-life (EoL) care(1) is increasingly used as a generic term in preference to palliative care or terminal care, particularly with reference to individuals with chronic disease, who are resident in community and long-term care (LTC) settings. This review evaluates studies based on patient reported outcome measures (PROMS) of quality of EoL care across all health-care settings. From 1041 citations, 12 studies were extracted by searches conducted in EBSCO, Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane, Open Grey and Google Scholar databases. At present, the evidence base for EoL care is founded on cancer care. This review highlights the paucity of studies that evaluate quality of EoL care for patients with chronic disease outside the established cancer-acute care paradigm, particularly in LTC. This review highlights the absence of any PROMs for the estimated 60% of patients in LTC with cognitive impairment. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are critical to understanding how EoL care services and practices affect patients' health and EoL experience. PROMs describe the quality of care from the patient's perspective and add balance to existing clinical or proxy-derived knowledge on the quality of care and services provided.

  11. Potential palliative care quality indicators in heart disease patients: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Atsushi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Hayashi, Akitoshi; Kawai, Fujimi; Niwa, Koichiro; Utsunomiya, Akemi; Kohsaka, Shun; Kohno, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Takayama, Morimasa; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2017-10-01

    In spite of the increasing interest in palliative care for heart disease, data on the detailed methods of palliative care and its efficacy specifically in heart disease are still lacking. A structured PubMed literature review revealed no quality indicators of palliative care in heart disease. Therefore, we performed a narrative overview of the potential quality indicators in heart disease by reviewing previous literature concerning quality indicators in cancer patients. We summarize seven potential categories of quality indicators in heart disease: (1) presence and availability of a palliative care unit, palliative care team, and outpatient palliative care; (2) human resources such as number of skilled staff; (3) infrastructure; (4) presence and frequency of documentation or family survey; (5) patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) data and disease-specific patient quality of life such as The Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ); (6) questionnaires and interviews about the quality of palliative care after death, including bereaved family surveys; and (7) admission-related outcomes such as place of death and intensive care unit length of stay. Although detailed measurements of palliative care quality have not been validated in heart disease, many indicators developed in cancer patients might also be applicable to heart disease. This new categorization might be useful to determine quality indicators in heart disease patients. Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An observational study of patient care outcomes sensitive to handover quality in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillibridge, Nichole; Botti, Mari; Wood, Beverley; Redley, Bernice

    2017-05-19

    To identify patient care outcome indicators sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover between the anaesthetist and the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit nurse. The relationship between interprofessional clinical handover when patients are transferred from the operating theatre to the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and patient outcomes of subsequent patient care delivery is not well understood. Naturalistic, exploratory descriptive design using observation. Observations of 31 patient journeys through Post-Anaesthetic Care Units across three public and private hospitals. Characteristics of interprofessional handover on arrival in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, the trajectory of patient care activities in Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and patient outcomes were observed. Of the 821 care activities observed across 31 "patient journeys" in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, observations (assessments and vital signs) (52.5 %), communication (15.8 %) and pain management (assessment of pain and analgesic administration) (10.3%) were most common. Examination of patterns in handover communications and subsequent trajectories of patient care activities revealed three patient trajectory typologies and two patient outcome indicators expected to be sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover communication in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit: pain on discharge from the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and timely response to clinical deterioration. An additional process indicator, seeking missing information, was also identified. Patient's pain on discharge from Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, escalation of care in response to early signs of deterioration and the need for nurses to seek out missing information to deliver care are indicators expected to be sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover communication in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit. Future research should test these indicators. Patient outcomes sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover on patient

  13. Development and Validation of Quality Criteria for Providing Patient- and Family-centered Injury Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jamie M; Burton, Rachael; Butler, Barb L; Dyer, Dianne; Evans, David C; Felteau, Melissa; Gruen, Russell L; Jaffe, Kenneth M; Kortbeek, John; Lang, Eddy; Lougheed, Val; Moore, Lynne; Narciso, Michelle; Oxland, Peter; Rivara, Frederick P; Roberts, Derek; Sarakbi, Diana; Vine, Karen; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the content validity of quality criteria for providing patient- and family-centered injury care. Quality criteria have been developed for clinical injury care, but not patient- and family-centered injury care. Using a modified Research AND Development Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Methodology, a panel of 16 patients, family members, injury and quality of care experts serially rated and revised criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care identified from patient and family focus groups. The criteria were then sent to 384 verified trauma centers in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand for evaluation. A total of 46 criteria were rated and revised by the panel over 4 rounds of review producing 14 criteria related to clinical care (n = 4; transitions of care, pain management, patient safety, provider competence), communication (n = 3; information for patients/families; communication of discharge plans to patients/families, communication between hospital and community providers), holistic care (n = 4; patient hygiene, kindness and respect, family access to patient, social and spiritual support) and end-of-life care (n = 3; decision making, end-of-life care, family follow-up). Medical directors, managers, or coordinators representing 254 trauma centers (66% response rate) rated 12 criteria to be important (95% of responses) for patient- and family-centered injury care. Fewer centers rated family access to the patient (80%) and family follow-up after patient death (65%) to be important criteria. Fourteen-candidate quality criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care were developed and shown to have content validity. These may be used to guide quality improvement practices.

  14. Service quality and patient experiences of ambulatory care in a specialized clinic vs. a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Regge, Melissa; De Groote, Hélène; Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul; Brugada, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    Health care organizations are constantly looking for ways to establish a differential advantage to attract customers. To this end, service quality has become an important differentiator in the strategy of health care organizations. In this study, we compared the service quality and patient experience in an ambulatory care setting of a physician-owned specialized facility with that of a general hospital. A comparative case study with a mixed method design was employed. Data were gathered through a survey on health service quality and patient experience, completed with observations, walkthroughs, and photographic material. Service quality and patient experiences are high in both the investigated health care facilities. A significant distinction can be made between the two facilities in terms of interpersonal quality (p = 0.001) and environmental quality (P ≤ 0.001), in favor of the medical center. The difference in environmental quality is also indicated by the scores given by participants who had been in both facilities. Qualitative analysis showed higher administrative quality in the medical center. Environmental quality and patient experience can predict the interpersonal quality; for environmental quality, interpersonal quality and age are significant predictors. Service quality and patient experiences are high in both facilities. The medical center has higher service quality for interpersonal and environmental service quality and is more process-centered.

  15. Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care Rationale:  Despite the fact that communication has become a core topic in health care, patients still experience the information provided...... as insufficient or incorrect and a lack of involvement. Objective:  To investigate whether adult orthopaedic patients' evaluation of the quality of care had improved after a communication skills training course for healthcare professionals. Design and methods:  The study was designed as an intervention study...... limitation. Response rates were comparable to those of other studies. Conclusion:  Patients show increased satisfaction with the quality of health care after professionals have attended a communication skills training course, even when implemented in an entire department. Practice implications:  We recommend...

  16. Quality of care and patient satisfaction: a review of measuring instruments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, C. van; Sixma, H.; Friele, R.D.; Kerssens, J.J.; Peters, L.

    1995-01-01

    Surveying the literature on the assessment of quality of care from the patient's perspective, the concept has often been operationalized as patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction has been a widely investigated subject in health care research, and dozens of measuring instruments were developed du

  17. Annotated Bibliography: Understanding Ambulatory Care Practices in the Context of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Maria F; Mehdi, Harshal; Nash, David B

    2016-11-01

    The ambulatory care setting is an increasingly important component of the patient safety conversation. Inpatient safety is the primary focus of the vast majority of safety research and interventions, but the ambulatory setting is actually where most medical care is administered. Recent attention has shifted toward examining ambulatory care in order to implement better health care quality and safety practices. This annotated bibliography was created to analyze and augment the current literature on ambulatory care practices with regard to patient safety and quality improvement. By providing a thorough examination of current practices, potential improvement strategies in ambulatory care health care settings can be suggested. A better understanding of the myriad factors that influence delivery of patient care will catalyze future health care system development and implementation in the ambulatory setting.

  18. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campmans-Kuijpers MJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marjo JE Campmans-Kuijpers,1 Lidwien C Lemmens,2 Caroline A Baan,2 Guy EHM Rutten1 1Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, 2Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Utrecht, the Netherlands Background: More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention.Methods: This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100% was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non parametric tests.Results: Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002, and on its subdomains “access to

  19. Nurse qualifications and perceptions of patient safety and quality of care in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blignaut, Alwiena J; Coetzee, Siedine K; Klopper, Hester C

    2014-06-01

    A plethora of research links professional nurses' qualifications to patient outcomes. Also, research has shown that reports by nurses on the quality of care correspond with process or outcome measures of quality in a hospital. New to the debate is whether professional nurses' qualifications impact on their perceptions of patient safety and quality of care. This research aims to investigate professional nurses' perceptions of patient safety and quality of care in South Africa, and the relationship between these perceptions and professional nurses' qualifications. A cross-sectional survey of 1117 professional nurses from medical and surgical units of 55 private and 7 public hospitals was conducted. Significant problems with regard to nurse-perceived patient safety and quality of care were identified, while adverse incidents in patients and professional nurses were underreported. Qualifications had no correlation with perceptions of patient safety and quality of care, although perceptions may serve as a valid indicator of patient outcomes. Creating an organizational culture that is committed to patient safety and encourages the sharing of adverse incidents will contribute to patient safety and quality of care in hospitals. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Improving stroke care: Quality of care and health education in patients with a stroke or transient ischemic attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Maasland (Lisette)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the applicability of results of clinical trials of stroke and TIA patients in everyday practice and on measurement of quality of stroke care. A third aim is to further expand an underexposed aspect of stroke care, namely health education in stroke patients. Chapter

  1. Improving stroke care: Quality of care and health education in patients with a stroke or transient ischemic attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Maasland (Lisette)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the applicability of results of clinical trials of stroke and TIA patients in everyday practice and on measurement of quality of stroke care. A third aim is to further expand an underexposed aspect of stroke care, namely health education in stroke patients. Chapter

  2. Relation Between Quality-of-Care Indicators for Diabetes and Patient Outcomes : A Systematic Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sidorenkov, Grigory; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Bilo, Henk; Denig, Petra

    The authors conducted a systematic literature review to assess whether quality indicators for diabetes care are related to patient outcomes. Twenty-four studies were included that formally tested this relationship. Quality indicators focusing on structure or processes of care were included.

  3. Relation Between Quality-of-Care Indicators for Diabetes and Patient Outcomes : A Systematic Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sidorenkov, Grigory; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Bilo, Henk; Denig, Petra

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a systematic literature review to assess whether quality indicators for diabetes care are related to patient outcomes. Twenty-four studies were included that formally tested this relationship. Quality indicators focusing on structure or processes of care were included. Descript

  4. Determinants of Quality of Life in Primary Care Patients with Diabetes: Implications for Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat; Gross, Revital; Tabenkin, Hava; Porath, Avi; Heymann, Anthony; Porter, Boaz

    2008-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional design of 400 primary care patients with diabetes, the authors evaluated demographics, health status, subjective health and mental health, health behaviors, health beliefs, knowledge of diabetes treatment, satisfaction with medical care, and quality of medical care as potential predictors of QoL and QoL in the hypothetical…

  5. The patient's perspective of the quality of breast cancer care: the developement of an instrument to measure quality of care through focus groups and concept mapping with breast cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M. de; Scholte, R.W.; Sixma, H.J.; Weijden, T. van der; Spijkers, K.F.; Velde, C.J.H. van de; Roukema, J.A.; Ent, F.W. van der; Bell, A.V.R.J.; Meyenfeldt, M.F. von

    2007-01-01

    Quality of care is often described by professionals. However, in this study breast cancer patients participated in developing an instrument that reflects quality of care from the patient's perspective. Through focus groups and concept mapping patients' ideas on determinants of good quality of care w

  6. Relationship Between Patients' Perceptions of Care Quality and Health Care Errors in 11 Countries: A Secondary Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapie, Ana L; Slack, Marion; Malone, Daniel C; MacKinnon, Neil J; Warholak, Terri L

    2016-01-01

    Patients may be the most reliable reporters of some aspects of the health care process; their perspectives should be considered when pursuing changes to improve patient safety. The authors evaluated the association between patients' perceived health care quality and self-reported medical, medication, and laboratory errors in a multinational sample. The analysis was conducted using the 2010 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey, a multinational consumer survey conducted in 11 countries. Quality of care was measured by a multifaceted construct developed using Rasch techniques. After adjusting for potentially important confounding variables, an increase in respondents' perceptions of care coordination decreased the odds of self-reporting medical errors, medication errors, and laboratory errors (P < .001). As health care stakeholders continue to search for initiatives that improve care experiences and outcomes, this study's results emphasize the importance of guaranteeing integrated care.

  7. Patients' perceptions of service quality dimensions: an empirical examination of health care in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemes, M D; Ozanne, L K; Laurensen, W L

    2001-01-01

    The 1984 liberalization of the New Zealand economy has resulted in a health care sector that has become very competitive (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). The private sector is now able to supply health care services and, as a result, a greater value is being placed on patient satisfaction (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). However, despite the increasing focus on customer satisfaction, research into health care patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality is scarce. This can be problematic, as quality of care is an essential issue in the strategic marketing of health care services (Turner and Pol, 1995). This study takes a step towards addressing this deficiency by identifying patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality in health care. The findings of this study are based on the empirical analysis of a sample of 389 respondents interviewed by telephone. The findings indicate that the service quality dimensions identified in this health care specific study differ in number and dimensional structure from the widely adopted service quality dimensions first identified by Parasuraman, Berry and Zeithaml (1988): reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy and tangibles. The service quality dimensions identified in this study were: reliability, tangibles, assurance, empathy, food, access, outcome, admission, discharge and responsiveness. In addition, health care patients perceive the service quality dimensions relating to the core product in health care delivery (for example, outcome and reliability) as more important than the service quality dimensions relating to the peripheral product in health care delivery (for example, food, access and tangibles). Finally, the results of this study suggest that patients with different geographic, demographic, and behavioristic characteristics have different needs and wants during health care delivery and therefore perceive different service quality dimensions as important.

  8. Quality of Care in the Psychiatric Setting : Perspectives of the Patient, Next of Kin and Care staff

    OpenAIRE

    Schröder, Agneta

    2006-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to describe quality of care from different perspectives in the psychiatric setting, to develop an instrument for measuring quality of care from the in-patient perspective and to use this instrument empirically. A qualitative descriptive design involving a phenomenographic analysis was used in Studies I, III and IV, and a descriptive and comparative design with statistical analysis in Study II. In Study I, 20 patients were interviewed. The results showed that...

  9. Palliative Care: Increasing the quality of life for patients and families… | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Palliative Care Palliative Care: Increasing the quality of life for patients and families… Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Palliative Care: Conversations Matter™ for Sick Children "Palliative Care: Conversations ...

  10. Venous leg ulcer patient priorities and quality of care: results of a survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica Linda; Mainz, Jan; Sorensen, Lars Tue

    2004-01-01

    -sectional study to assess the quality of and assign priority to 28 aspects of medical technical, interpersonal, and organizational care. The response rate to the mailed questionnaire and follow-up telephone survey was 80%. Almost half (46%) of patients (median age 76 years, range 30 to 92) had an ulcer history...... of >5 years. Seventy-three patients (91%) were satisfied with the overall quality of care. A linear relationship was observed between average assessment score and the relative importance of the quality aspects studied. The quality of medical technical care and empathy aspects of interpersonal care...... received the most positive assessments and were given highest priority. Next in importance were the quality and coherence of information provided and cooperation between different healthcare sectors. Organizational aspects of care were less positively assessed and received lower priority ratings. Venous...

  11. Educational background of nurses and their perceptions of the quality and safety of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Reece P; Pretorius, Ronel; Klopper, Hester

    2015-04-30

    International health systems research confirms the critical role that nurses play in ensuring the delivery of high quality patient care and subsequent patient safety. It is therefore important that the education of nurses should prepare them for the provision of safe care of a high quality. The South African healthcare system is made up of public and private hospitals that employ various categories of nurses. The perceptions of the various categories of nurses with reference to quality of care and patient safety are unknown in South Africa (SA). To determine the relationship between the educational background of nurses and their perceptions of quality of care and patient safety in private surgical units in SA. A descriptive correlational design was used. A questionnaire was used for data collection, after which hierarchical linear modelling was utilised to determine the relationships amongst the variables. Both the registered- and enrolled nurses seemed satisfied with the quality of care and patient safety in the units were they work. Enrolled nurses (ENs) indicated that current efforts to prevent errors are adequate, whilst the registered nurses (RNs) obtained high scores in reporting incidents in surgical wards. From the results it was evident that perceptions of RNs and ENs related to the quality of care and patient safety differed. There seemed to be a statistically-significant difference between RNs and ENs perceptions of the prevention of errors in the unit, losing patient information between shifts and patient incidents related to medication errors, pressure ulcers and falls with injury.

  12. Involving patients in care decisions improves satisfaction: an outcomes-based quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Ellen W

    2004-05-01

    A home care agency used quality improvement processes to improve patient satisfaction survey ratings. The focus was on involving patients in decisions about their care. A multidisciplinary team developed creative strategies to increase staff awareness and enhance customer service skills, which had dramatic results.

  13. Quality of Care and Outcomes of Heart Failure Among Patients With Schizophrenia in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Mette; Mainz, Jan; Egstrup, Kenneth; Johnsen, Søren P

    2017-09-15

    Research on the association between schizophrenia and the quality of care and clinical outcomes of heart failure (HF) remains sparse. This nationwide study compared the quality of care and clinical outcomes of HF among Danish patients with and without schizophrenia. In a population-based cohort study, we identified 36,718 patients with incident HF with hospital contacts, including 108 with schizophrenia, using Danish registries between 2004 and 2013. High quality of HF care was defined as receiving ≥ 80% guideline-recommended process-performance measures of care. Potential predictors of HF care among patients with schizophrenia included patient-specific factors (age, gender, Global Assessment of Functioning [GAF] score, alcohol or drug abuse, duration of schizophrenia); provider-specific factors (quality of schizophrenia care); and system-specific factors (patient-volume defined as hospital departments and clinics yearly average patient-volume of patients with incident HF). Clinical outcomes included 4-week all-cause readmission and 1-year all-cause mortality after a first-time hospital contact with incident HF. Results showed that compared with patients with incident HF who have no schizophrenia, patients with incident HF who have schizophrenia had a lower chance of receiving high-quality HF care (relative risk 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.48 to 0.91). A high GAF score was associated with a higher chance of receiving high-quality HF care among patients with incident HF who have schizophrenia. Patients with incident HF who have schizophrenia had a higher risk of 1-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 2.83, 95% confidence interval 1.59 to 5.04), but not a higher risk of readmission than patients with incident HF who have no schizophrenia. In conclusion, efforts are warranted to reduce the high mortality among patients with incident HF who have schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The quality of care of diabetic patients in rural Malawi: A case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    posters. Conclusion. Quality of diabetes care provided to diabetic patients attended to Mangochi ... health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of ..... Knowledge about diabetes and staff training. Mangochi District has ...

  15. The Effect of Horticultural Therapy on the Quality of Life of Palliative Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Claudia Kam-Yuk; Lau, Carmen Ka-Yan; Kan, Wai Yin; Lam, Wai Man; Fung, Connie Yuen Yee

    2017-01-27

    Palliative care patients experienced a variety of needs and perceived their quality of life as being only fair. This study adopted a single group repeated-measure design to investigate the effect of horticultural therapy on the quality of life of palliative care patients using the Quality of Life Concern in End of Life Questionnaire. Significant differences in the domains of "existential distress" and "health care concern" were observed immediately post-intervention and at four weeks post-intervention, respectively. No other significant differences were seen in the other domains or in the total mean score of the outcome measure.

  16. Effects of Primary Care Team Social Networks on Quality of Care and Costs for Patients With Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Marlon P.; Gilchrist, Valerie J.; Fleming, Michael F.; Zakletskaia, Larissa I.; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Beasley, John W.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. Primary care teams can be best suited to improve quality of care and lower costs for patients with cardiovascular disease. This study evaluates the associations between primary care team communication, interaction, and coordination (ie, social networks); quality of care; and costs for patients with cardiovascular disease. METHODS Using a sociometric survey, 155 health professionals from 31 teams at 6 primary care clinics identified with whom they interact daily about patient care. Social network analysis calculated variables of density and centralization representing team interaction structures. Three-level hierarchical modeling evaluated the link between team network density, centralization, and number of patients with a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease for controlled blood pressure and cholesterol, counts of urgent care visits, emergency department visits, hospital days, and medical care costs in the previous 12 months. RESULTS Teams with dense interactions among all team members were associated with fewer hospital days (rate ratio [RR] = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50–0.77) and lower medical care costs (−$556; 95% CI, −$781 to −$331) for patients with cardiovascular disease. Conversely, teams with interactions revolving around a few central individuals were associated with increased hospital days (RR = 1.45; 95% CI, 1.09–1.94) and greater costs ($506; 95% CI, $202–$810). Team-shared vision about goals and expectations mediated the relationship between social network structures and patient quality of care outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Primary care teams that are more interconnected and less centralized and that have a shared team vision are better positioned to deliver high-quality cardiovascular disease care at a lower cost. PMID:25755035

  17. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo JE; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Baan, Caroline A; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2016-01-01

    Background More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention. Methods This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100%) was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non) parametric tests. Results Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002), and on its subdomains “access to medical files” (from 42.0% to 49.4%), and “safeguarding patients’ interests” (from 58.1% to 66.2%). Outpatient clinics, which scored higher at baseline (66.7%) than care groups, did not improve on patient-centeredness (65.6%: P=0.54) or its subdomains. “Formal patient involvement” remained low in both care groups (23.2%) and

  18. The quality of care delivered to patients within the same hospital varies by insurance type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Christine S; Gaskin, Darrell J; Roberts, Eric T

    2013-10-01

    In attempting to explain why hospitals vary in the quality of care delivered to patients, a considerable body of health policy research points to differences in hospital characteristics such as ownership, safety-net status, and geographic location as the most important contributing factors. This article examines the extent to which a patient's type or lack of insurance may also play a role in determining the quality of care received at any given hospital. We compared within-hospital quality, as measured by risk-adjusted mortality rates, for patients according to their insurance status. We examined the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's innovative Inpatient Quality Indicators and pooled 2006-08 State Inpatient Database records from eleven states. We found that privately insured patients had lower risk-adjusted mortality rates than did Medicare enrollees for twelve out of fifteen quality measures examined. To a lesser extent, privately insured patients also had lower risk-adjusted mortality rates than those in other payer groups. Medicare patients appeared particularly vulnerable to receiving inferior care. These findings suggest that to help reduce care disparities, public payers and hospitals should measure care quality for different insurance groups and monitor differences in treatment practices within hospitals.

  19. Creating patient value in glaucoma care : applying quality costing and care delivery value chain approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F. de Korne (Dirk); J.C.A. Sol (Kees); T. Custers (Thomas); E. van Sprundel (Esther); B.M. van Ineveld (Martin); H.G. Lemij (Hans); N.S. Klazinga (Niek)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore in a specific hospital care process the applicability in practice of the theories of quality costing and value chains. Design/methodology/approach: In a retrospective case study an in-depth evaluation of the use of a quality cost model (QC

  20. Creating patient value in glaucoma care : applying quality costing and care delivery value chain approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F. de Korne (Dirk); J.C.A. Sol (Kees); T. Custers (Thomas); E. van Sprundel (Esther); B.M. van Ineveld (Martin); H.G. Lemij (Hans); N.S. Klazinga (Niek)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore in a specific hospital care process the applicability in practice of the theories of quality costing and value chains. Design/methodology/approach: In a retrospective case study an in-depth evaluation of the use of a quality cost model

  1. Measuring the quality of patient-centered care: why patient-reported measures are critical to reliable assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzelepis F

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Flora Tzelepis, Robert W Sanson-Fisher, Alison C Zucca, Elizabeth A FradgleyPriority Research Centre for Health Behaviour, University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaPurpose: The Institute of Medicine (IOM identified patient-centeredness as crucial to quality health care. The IOM endorsed six patient-centeredness dimensions that stipulated that care must be: respectful to patients’ values, preferences, and expressed needs; coordinated and integrated; provide information, communication, and education; ensure physical comfort; provide emotional support; and involve family and friends. Patient-reported measures examine the patient’s perspective and are essential to the accurate assessment of patient-centered care. This article’s objectives are to: 1 use the six IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimensions as a framework to outline why patient-reported measures are crucial to the reliable measurement of patient-centered care; and 2 to identify existing patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centered care dimension.Methods: For each IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimension, the published literature was searched to highlight the essential role of patients in assessing patient-centered care and informing quality improvement efforts. Existing literature was also searched to identify examples of patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centeredness dimension.Conclusion: Patient-reported measures are arguably the best way to measure patient-centeredness. For instance, patients are best positioned to determine whether care aligns with patient values, preferences, and needs and the Measure of Patient Preferences is an example of a patient-reported measure that does so. Furthermore, only the patient knows whether they received the level of information desired, and if information was understood and can be recalled. Patient-reported measures that examine information provision include

  2. Quality of care in the intensive care unit from the perspective of patient's relatives: development and psychometric evaluation of the consumer quality index 'R-ICU'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensen, Ans; van Mol, Margo M; Menheere, Ilse; Nijkamp, Marjan D; Verhoogt, Ellen; Maris, Bea; Manders, Willeke; Vloet, Lilian; Verharen, Lisbeth

    2017-01-24

    The quality standards of the Dutch Society of Intensive Care require monitoring of the satisfaction of patient's relatives with respect to care. Currently, no suitable instrument is available in the Netherlands to measure this. This study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the questionnaire-based Consumer Quality Index 'Relatives in Intensive Care Unit' (CQI 'R-ICU'). The CQI 'R-ICU' measures the perceived quality of care from the perspective of patients' relatives, and identifies aspects of care that need improvement. The CQI 'R-ICU' was developed using a mixed method design. Items were based on quality of care aspects from earlier studies and from focus group interviews with patients' relatives. The time period for the data collection of the psychometric evaluation was from October 2011 until July 2012. Relatives of adult intensive care patients in one university hospital and five general hospitals in the Netherlands were approached to participate. Psychometric evaluation included item analysis, inter-item analysis, and factor analysis. Twelve aspects were noted as being indicators of quality of care, and were subsequently selected for the questionnaire's vocabulary. The response rate of patients' relatives was 81% (n = 455). Quality of care was represented by two clusters, each showing a high reliability: 'Communication' (α = .80) and 'Participation' (α = .84). Relatives ranked the following aspects for quality of care as most important: no conflicting information, information from doctors and nurses is comprehensive, and health professionals take patients' relatives seriously. The least important care aspects were: need for contact with peers, nuisance, and contact with a spiritual counsellor. Aspects that needed the most urgent improvement (highest quality improvement scores) were: information about how relatives can contribute to the care of the patient, information about the use of meal-facilities in the hospital, and

  3. Patients' Perceptions of Nursing Home Stress Related to Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Shayna; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined whether newly admitted nursing home patients' anticipated stresses of institutional care would relate to their experiences of stress one and three months later, and whether patients' experiences of stress would correspond to independent judgments of the quality of the nursing homes. Patients experienced the kinds of stresses they…

  4. Symptom burden, quality of life, advance care planning and the potential value of palliative care in severely ill haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D; Carmody, Sharon S; Bruns, Frank J; Rotondi, Armando J; Cohen, Lewis M; Zeidel, Mark L; Arnold, Robert M

    2003-07-01

    There has been little research on the potential value of palliative care for dialysis patients. In this pilot study, we sought (i) to identify symptom burden, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and advance directives in extremely ill haemodialysis patients to determine their suitability for palliative care and (ii) to determine the acceptability of palliative care to patients and nephrologists. Nineteen haemodialysis patients with modified Charlson co-morbidity scores of > or =8 were recruited. Each completed surveys to assess symptom burden, HRQoL and prior advance care planning. Palliative care specialists then visited patients twice and generated recommendations. Patients again completed the surveys, and dialysis charts were reviewed to assess nephrologists' (i) compliance with recommendations and (ii) documentation of symptoms reported by patients on the symptom assessment survey. Patients and nephrologists then completed surveys assessing their satisfaction with palliative care. Patients reported 10.5 symptoms, 40% of which were noted by nephrologists in patients' charts. HRQoL was significantly impaired. Thirty-two percent of patients had living wills. No differences were observed in symptoms, HRQoL or number of patients establishing advance directives as a result of the intervention. Sixty-eight percent of patients and 76% of nephrologists rated the intervention worthwhile. Extremely ill dialysis patients have marked symptom burden, considerably impaired HRQoL and frequently lack advance directives, making them appropriate candidates for palliative care. Patients and nephrologists perceive palliative care favourably despite its lack of effect in this study. A more sustained palliative care intervention with a larger sample size should be attempted to determine its effect on the care of this population.

  5. Quality-of-care initiative in patients treated surgically for perforated peptic ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M H; Larsson, H J; Rosenstock, S;

    2013-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity are considerable after treatment for perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). Since 2003, a Danish nationwide quality-of-care (QOC) improvement initiative has focused on reducing preoperative delay, and improving perioperative monitoring and care for patients with PPU. The present...

  6. Improving the quality of care of the critically ill patient: Implementing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-11-19

    Nov 19, 2007 ... has become a real challenge. ... cause harm'.3 Evidence-based practice requires the ... learning how to deliver existing effective therapies'.5 ... stretched and the health care system fragmented. ... the pursuit of quality patient care over time, but they .... Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis (unless.

  7. Association between quality of life of demented patients and professional knowledge of care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazui, Hiroaki; Harada, Kazuyoshi; Eguchi, Yoko S; Tokunaga, Hiromasa; Endo, Hidetoshi; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2008-03-01

    Professional knowledge about dementia and care methods is necessary for the appropriate care of demented people. In this study, the quality of life of 91 demented people staying at 12 care institutions was evaluated with the Quality of Life Questionnaire for Dementia (QOL-D). The amount of professional knowledge was evaluated in 140 staff members who took care of the patients using the professional knowledge test (PKT), and the mean PKT score was calculated for each institution (professional knowledge of institution). A positive significant correlation was observed between the QOL-D score and the professional knowledge of institution. The correlation remained significant when age, sex, and severity of dementia of demented patients were partialled out. This result indicated that the quality of life of demented people was better at institutions with staff members having more professional knowledge, indicating the importance of education of staff members and the possibility that such education improves the quality of life of the demented people.

  8. Nursing work environment, patient safety and quality of care in pediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Daniela Fernanda Dos Santos; Guirardello, Edinêis de Brito

    2016-06-01

    Objectives To describe the characteristics of the nursing work environment, safety attitudes, quality of care, measured by the nursing staff of the pediatric units, as well as to analyze the evolution of quality of care and hospital indicators. Methods Descriptive study with 136 nursing professionals at a paediatric hospital, conducted through personal and professional characterization form, Nursing Work Index - Revised, Safety Attitudes Questionnaire - Short Form 2006 and quality indicators. Results The professionals perceive the environment as favourable to professional practice, and consider good quality care that is also observed by reducing the incidence of adverse events and decreased length of stay. The domain job satisfaction was considered favourable to patient safety. Conclusions The work environment is favourable to nursing practice, the professionals nursing approve the quality of care and the indicators tended reducing adverse events and length of stay.

  9. Satisfied doctors ... satisfied patients?: the relationship between patient-, GP-and practice characteristics and the quality of care ratings of patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sixma, H.J.; Spreeuwenberg, P.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Quality of care from the patients’ perspective can be seen as a key element of health care policy and the management of health care services. Aim: The aims of this paper are twofold. 1) To look at differences in the quality of care ratings of GP patients. 2) To explore the relationship b

  10. Satisfaction with Quality of Care Received by Patients without ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Departments of Family Medicine, 1Community Medicine, 2Public Health Technology, Federal University of Technology, ... without national health insurance (NHI) attending a primary care clinic in a .... of the hospital for the study included medical records, nursing ..... scheme: The dawn of a new era in health care financing in.

  11. Availability and quality of specialized ophthalmologic medical care: assessment by patients living in rural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Seraphimov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of restricted availability and quality of ophthalmologic medical care remains one of the main ones in the national healthcare. The article gives a comparative analysis of the opinions of rural residents of Leningrad region are in need of surgical treatment for ophthalmologic diseases, availability and quality of specialized medical care. A questionnaire was developed based on the methodology proposed by the Federal compulsory medical insurance Fund, through formal interviews of respondents of patients who received specialized ophthalmologic medical care in Leningrad region before opening of eye care hospitals for surgical treatment of cataract and glaucoma (148 patients and afterwards (320 patients. The results show that almost all patients who received treatment after the modernization of ophthalmologic offices are satisfied with the quality of medical care (completely satisfied – 91,3 %, quite satisfied – 7,6 %, which is significantly higher than the figures obtained in the survey of the patients before creation of specialized departments (t=3,6, p<0.05. Availability of medical care before reequipment of ophthalmologic departments in hospitals satisfied 62.8 % of respondents, and after the organization of activities of eye care hospitals – 75, 3 % (t=2,8, p<0.05. However, despite the new form of organization of medical aid, 27.5 % of the respondents are still not satisfied with its transport accessibility. Thus, patients receiving operative treatment of cataract are generally satisfied with the availability and quality of their medical services. Higher ratings of availability and quality of specialized eye medical care were received after opening of eye care hospitals for surgical treatment of cataract and glaucoma in Leningrad region.

  12. Venous leg ulcer patient priorities and quality of care: results of a survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica Linda; Mainz, Jan; Sorensen, Lars Tue

    2004-01-01

    received the most positive assessments and were given highest priority. Next in importance were the quality and coherence of information provided and cooperation between different healthcare sectors. Organizational aspects of care were less positively assessed and received lower priority ratings. Venous...... leg ulcer care, as provided in a multidisciplinary wound healing center, was assessed as satisfactory by patients, but areas for improvement - notably, cooperation between healthcare sectors and continuity of care - were observed....

  13. Impact of weight bias and stigma on quality of care and outcomes for patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, S M; Burgess, D J; Yeazel, M W; Hellerstedt, W L; Griffin, J M; van Ryn, M

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to critically review the empirical evidence from all relevant disciplines regarding obesity stigma in order to (i) determine the implications of obesity stigma for healthcare providers and their patients with obesity and (ii) identify strategies to improve care for patients with obesity. We conducted a search of Medline and PsychInfo for all peer-reviewed papers presenting original empirical data relevant to stigma, bias, discrimination, prejudice and medical care. We then performed a narrative review of the existing empirical evidence regarding the impact of obesity stigma and weight bias for healthcare quality and outcomes. Many healthcare providers hold strong negative attitudes and stereotypes about people with obesity. There is considerable evidence that such attitudes influence person-perceptions, judgment, interpersonal behaviour and decision-making. These attitudes may impact the care they provide. Experiences of or expectations for poor treatment may cause stress and avoidance of care, mistrust of doctors and poor adherence among patients with obesity. Stigma can reduce the quality of care for patients with obesity despite the best intentions of healthcare providers to provide high-quality care. There are several potential intervention strategies that may reduce the impact of obesity stigma on quality of care.

  14. Effect of home care service on the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Demet; Terzioglu, Fusun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to determine the effect of home care service on the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer. This randomized case control study was carried out in a womans hospital between September 2011 and February 2012. Women undergoing gynecological cancer treatment were separated into intervention and control groups, of 35 patients each. The intervention group was provided with nursing care service through hospital and home visits (1st, 12th weeks) within the framework of a specifically developed nursing care plan. The control group was monitored without any intervention through the hospital routine protocols (1st, 12th weeks). Data were collected using An Interview Form, Home Visit Monitoring Form and Quality of Life Scale/Cancer Survivors. Effects of home care service on the quality of life in gynecological cancer patients were investigated using chi-square tests, McNemar's test, independent t-test and ANOVA. This study found that the intervention group receiving home care service had a moderately high quality of life (average mean: 6.01±0.64), while the control group had comparatively lower quality (average mean: 4.35±0.79) within the 12 week post- discharge period (pservices to be efficient in improving the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer.

  15. Quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care and in outpatient treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihanović, Mate; Restek-Petrović, Branka; Bogović, Anamarija; Ivezić, Ena; Bodor, Davor; Požgain, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The Sveti Ivan Psychiatric Hospital in Zagreb, Croatia, offers foster home care treatment that includes pharmacotherapy, group psychodynamic psychotherapy, family therapy, and work and occupational therapy. The aim of this study is to compare the health-related quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care with that of patients in standard outpatient treatment. The sample consisted of 44 patients with schizophrenia who, upon discharge from the hospital, were included in foster home care treatment and a comparative group of 50 patients who returned to their families and continued receiving outpatient treatment. All patients completed the Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire on the day they completed hospital treatment, 6 months later, and 1 year after they participated in the study. The research also included data on the number of hospitalizations for both groups of patients. Though directly upon discharge from the hospital, patients who entered foster home care treatment assessed their health-related quality of life as poorer than patients who returned to their families, their assessments significantly improved over time. After 6 months of treatment, these patients even achieved better results in several dimensions than did patients in the outpatient program, and they also had fewer hospitalizations. These effects remained the same at the follow-up 1 year after the inclusion in the study. Notwithstanding the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that treatment in foster home care is associated with an improvement in the quality of life of patients with schizophrenia, but the same was not observed for the patients in standard outpatient treatment. We hope that these findings will contribute to an improved understanding of the influence of psychosocial factors on the functioning of patients and the development of more effective therapeutic methods aimed at improving the patients' quality of life.

  16. Describing clinical faculty experiences with patient safety and quality care in acute care settings: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roney, Linda; Sumpio, Catherine; Beauvais, Audrey M; O'Shea, Eileen R

    2017-02-01

    A major safety initiative in acute care settings across the United States has been to transform hospitals into High Reliability Organizations. The initiative requires developing cognitive awareness, best practices, and infrastructure so that all healthcare providers including clinical faculty are accountable to deliver quality and safe care. To describe the experience of baccalaureate clinical nursing faculty concerning safety and near miss events, in acute care hospital settings. A mixed method approach was used to conduct the pilot study. Nurse faculty (n=18) completed study surveys from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to track patient safety concerns: Incidents; Near misses; or Unsafe conditions, during one academic semester, within 9 different acute care hospitals. Additionally, seven nurse faculty participated in end of the semester focus groups to discuss the semester long experience. Clinical faculty identified a total of 24 patient occurrences: 15 Incidents, 1 Near miss event, and 8 Unsafe conditions. Focus group participants (n=7) described benefits and challenges experienced by nursing clinical faculty and students in relation to the culture of safety in acute care hospital settings. Six themes resulted from the content analysis. Utilizing nursing clinical faculty and students may add significant value to promoting patient safety and the delivery of quality care, within acute care hospital settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Impact of Person-Organization Fit on Nurse Job Satisfaction and Patient Care Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risman, K L; Erickson, Rebecca J; Diefendorff, James M

    2016-08-01

    In the current healthcare context, large health care organizations may increasingly emphasize profit, biomedicine, efficiency, and customer service in the delivery of care. This orientation toward nursing work by large organizations may be perceived by nurses as incompatible with professional caring. Ordinary Least Squares regression was used to explore the impact of person-organization fit (i.e., value congruence between self and employing organization) on nurses' general job satisfaction and quality of patient care (n=753). Nurses' perceived person-organization fit is a significant predictor of general job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The implications of our findings are discussed and recommendations for nursing leaders and future research are made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. How nurses and their work environment affect patient experiences of the quality of care: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieft, R.A.M.M.; Brouwer, B.B.J.M. de; Francke, A.L.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare organisations monitor patient experiences in order to evaluate and improve the quality of care. Because nurses spend a lot of time with patients, they have a major impact on patient experiences. To improve patient experiences of the quality of care, nurses need to know what

  19. How nurses and their work environment affect patient experiences of the quality of care: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieft, R.A.M.M.; Brouwer, B.B.J.M. de; Francke, A.L.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare organisations monitor patient experiences in order to evaluate and improve the quality of care. Because nurses spend a lot of time with patients, they have a major impact on patient experiences. To improve patient experiences of the quality of care, nurses need to know what fa

  20. How nurses and their work environment affect patient experiences of the quality of care : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieft, R.A.M.M.; Brouwer, B.J.M.; Francke, A.L.; Delnoij, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare organisations monitor patient experiences in order to evaluate and improve the quality of care. Because nurses spend a lot of time with patients, they have a major impact on patient experiences. To improve patient experiences of the quality of care, nurses need to know what fac

  1. Multidisciplinary primary care teams: effects on the quality of clinician-patient interactions and organizational features of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Hector P; Rogers, William H; Marshall, Richard E; Safran, Dana Gelb

    2007-01-01

    Multidisciplinary teams may hold promise for improving primary care quality. This study examined the influence of multidisciplinary teams on patients' assessments of primary care, including access, integration, and clinician-patient interaction quality. From January 2004 through March 2005, a large multispecialty practice in Massachusetts obtained data monthly from patients of 145 primary care physicians using a well-validated patient questionnaire. The analytic sample included respondents with at least 2 primary care visits over the study period (n=14,835). For each respondent, administrative data were used to compute visit continuity over the study period and to classify each primary care visit as PCP, on-team, or off-team. Multivariate regression modeled the relationship of visit continuity to each primary care measure. Approximately one-third of patients (35%) saw only their PCP; 15% had only PCP and "on-team" visits; 9% had a mix of PCP, on-, and off-team visits; and 41% had only "off-team" visits when not seeing their PCP. Greater PCP continuity was associated with more favorable scores on nearly all measures (P<0.001). An exception was patients' assessments of teams, which were better when on- versus off-team visits occurred (P<0.01). For other measures, the decrements associated with discontinuity were the same irrespective of whether discontinuities involved on- or off-team visits. The finding that PCP visit discontinuities are associated with more negative care experiences, irrespective of whether discontinuities involve on- or off-team visits, highlights the challenges of incorporating teams into primary care in ways that patients experience as value-added rather than disruptive to primary care relationships.

  2. Evaluating the link between human resource management decisions and patient satisfaction with quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppel, Eva-Maria; Winter, Vera; Schreyögg, Jonas

    Patient satisfaction with quality of care is becoming increasingly important in the competitive hospital market. Simultaneously, the growing shortage of clinical staff poses a considerable challenge to ensuring a high quality of care. In this context, a question emerges regarding whether and how human resource management (HRM) might serve as a means to reduce staff shortage problems and to increase patient satisfaction. Although considerable efforts have been devoted to understanding the concepts of patient satisfaction and HRM, little is known about the interrelationships between these concepts or about the link between staff shortage problems and patients' satisfaction with quality of care. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between strategic human resource management (SHRM), staff shortage problems, and patients' satisfaction with care. Furthermore, we analyze how the HRM decision to fill short-term vacancies through temporary staffing affects patient satisfaction. We differentiate between physicians and nurses. We develop and empirically test a theoretical model. The data (n = 165) are derived from a survey on SHRM that was sent to 732 German hospitals and from a survey on patient satisfaction that comprises 436,848 patient satisfaction ratings. We use a structural equation modeling approach to test the model. The results indicate that SHRM significantly reduces staff shortage problems for both occupational groups. Having fewer physician shortage problems is significantly associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction, whereas this effect is not significant for nurses. Furthermore, the use of temporary staffing considerably reduces patients' satisfaction with care. Hospital managers are advised to consider the effects of HRM decisions on patients' satisfaction with care. In particular, investments in SHRM targeted at physicians have significantly positive effects on patient satisfaction, whereas the temporary staffing of physicians

  3. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world.In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care.I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  4. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world. In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care. I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  5. Quality of care and interhospital collaboration: a study of patient transfers in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomi, Alessandro; Mascia, Daniele; Vu, Duy Quang; Pallotti, Francesca; Conaldi, Guido; Iwashyna, Theodore J

    2014-05-01

    We examine the dynamics of patient-sharing relations within an Italian regional community of 35 hospitals serving approximately 1,300,000 people. We test whether interorganizational relations provide individual patients access to higher quality providers of care. We reconstruct the complete temporal sequence of the 3461 consecutive interhospital patient-sharing events observed between each pair of hospitals in the community during 2005-2008. We distinguish between transfers occurring between and within different medical specialties. We estimate newly derived models for relational event sequences that allow us to control for the most common forms of network-like dependencies that are known to characterize collaborative relations between hospitals. We use 45-day risk-adjusted readmission rate as a proxy for hospital quality. After controls (eg, geographical distance, size, and the existence of prior collaborative relations), we find that patients flow from less to more capable hospitals. We show that this result holds for patient being shared both between as well as within medical specialties. Nonetheless there are strong and persistent other organizational and relational effects driving transfers. Decentralized patient-sharing decisions taken by the 35 hospitals give rise to a system of collaborative interorganizational arrangements that allow the patient to access hospitals delivering a higher quality of care. This result is relevant for health care policy because it suggests that collaborative relations between hospitals may produce desirable outcomes both for individual patients, and for regional health care systems.

  6. Impact of physician specialty on quality care for patients hospitalized with decompensated cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Lim

    Full Text Available Decompensated cirrhosis is a common precipitant for hospitalization, and there is limited information concerning factors that influence the delivery of quality care in cirrhotic inpatients. We sought to determine the relation between physician specialty and inpatient quality care for decompensated cirrhosis.We reviewed 247 hospital admissions for decompensated cirrhosis, managed by hospitalists or intensivists, between 2009 and 2013. The primary outcome was quality care delivery, defined as adherence to all evidence-based specialty society practice guidelines pertaining to each specific complication of cirrhosis. Secondary outcomes included new complications, length-of-stay, and in-hospital death.Overall, 147 admissions (59.5% received quality care. Quality care was given more commonly by intensivists, compared with hospitalists (71.7% vs. 53.1%, P = .006, and specifically for gastrointestinal bleeding (72% vs. 45.8%, P = .03 and hepatic encephalopathy (100% vs. 63%, P = .005. Involvement of gastroenterology consultation was also more common in admissions in which quality care was administered (68.7% vs. 54.0%, P = .023. Timely diagnostic paracentesis was associated with reduced new complications in admissions for refractory ascites (9.5% vs. 46.6%, P = .02, and reduced length-of-stay in admissions for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (5 days vs. 13 days, P = .02.Adherence to quality indicators for decompensated cirrhosis is suboptimal among hospitalized patients. Although quality care adherence appears to be higher among cirrhotic patients managed by intensivists than by hospitalists, opportunities for improvement exist in both groups. Rational and cost-effective strategies should be sought to achieve this end.

  7. Quality of care for patients with non-communicable diseases in the Dedza District, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Wood

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Malawi, non-communicable diseases (NCDs are thought to cause 28% of deaths in adults. The aim of this study was to establish the extent of primary care morbidity related to NCDs, as well as to audit the quality of care, in the primary care setting of Dedza District, central Malawi.Methods: This study was a baseline audit using clinic registers and a questionnaire survey of senior health workers at 5 clinics, focusing on care for hypertension, diabetes, asthma and epilepsy.Results: A total of 82 581 consultations were recorded, of which 2489 (3.0% were for the selected NCDs. Only 5 out of 32 structural criteria were met at all 5 clinics and 9 out of 29process criteria were never performed at any clinic. The only process criteria performed at all five clinics was measurement of blood pressure. The staff’s knowledge on NCDs was basic and the main barriers to providing quality care were lack of medication and essential equipment, inadequate knowledge and guidelines, fee-for-service at two clinics, geographic inaccessibility and lack of confidence in the primary health care system by patients.Conclusion: Primary care morbidity from NCDs is currently low, although other studies suggest a significant burden of disease. This most likely represents a lack of utilisation, recognition, diagnosis and ability to manage patients with NCDs. Quality of care is poor due to a lack of essential resources, guidelines, and training.

  8. The moral imperative of designating patient safety and quality care as a national nursing research priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, research studies conducted respectively in the USA, UK and Australia have found that between 4 and 16.6 per cent of patients suffer from some kind of harm (including permanent disability and death) as a result of human errors and adverse events while in hospital. It has been further estimated that approximately 50 per cent of these human errors/adverse events resulting in harm could have been prevented. In response to the significant financial, social, and political implications of these figures, a range of processes have been put in place in an attempt to improve patient safety and quality care in Australia. Nonetheless, it is evident that more can be done to improve the status quo. One process that warrants consideration is that of peak health professional groups and organisations providing active leadership in the promotion of patient safety, such as by making a visible and recognisable commitment to patient safety as a strategic research priority area. In this paper it is contended that, given the moral importance of patient safety and quality care in nursing and related health care domains, the inseparable link between nursing practice and patient safety, and the central role that research has to play in driving safety improvements in these domains, it is morally imperative that the nursing profession gives sustained and focussed public attention to patient safety and quality care as a national research priority.

  9. Quality of nursing care and satisfaction of patients attended at a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Santana de Freitas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: assess the quality of nursing care, the patients' satisfaction and the correlation between both.METHOD: cross-sectional study, involving 275 patients hospitalized at a teaching hospital in the Central-West of Brazil. The data were collected through the simultaneous application of three instruments. Next, they were included in an electronic database and analyzed in function of the positivity, median value and Spearman's correlation coefficients.RESULTS: among the nursing care assessed, only two were considered safe - hygiene and physical comfort; nutrition and hydration - while the remainder were classified as poor. Nevertheless, the patients were satisfied with the care received in the domains assessed: technical-professional, confidence and educational. This can be justified by the weak to moderate correlation that was observed among these variables.CONCLUSION: Despite the quality deficit, the patients' satisfaction level with the nursing care received was high. These results indicate that the institution needs to center its objectives on a continuing evaluation system of the care quality, aiming to attend to the patients' expectations.

  10. Determining the quality and effectiveness of surgical spine care: patient satisfaction is not a valid proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godil, Saniya S; Parker, Scott L; Zuckerman, Scott L; Mendenhall, Stephen K; Devin, Clinton J; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J

    2013-09-01

    Given the unsustainable costs of the US health-care system, health-care purchasers, payers, and hospital systems are adopting the concept of value-based purchasing by shifting care away from low-quality providers or hospitals. Legislation now allows public reporting of these quality rankings. True measures of quality, such as surgical morbidity and validated questionnaires of effectiveness, are burdensome and costly to collect. Hence, patients' satisfaction with care has emerged as a commonly used metric as a proxy for quality because of its feasibility of collection. However, patient satisfaction metrics have yet to be validated as a measure of overall quality of surgical spine care. We set out to determine whether patient satisfaction is a valid measure of safety and effectiveness of care in a prospective longitudinal spine registry. Prospective longitudinal cohort study. All patients undergoing elective spine surgery for degenerative conditions over a 6-month period at a single medical center. Patient-reported outcome instruments (numeric rating scale [NRS], Oswestry disability index [ODI], neck disability index [NDI], short-form 12-item survey [SF-12], Euro-Qol-5D [EQ-5D], Zung depression scale, and Modified Somatic Perception Questionnaire [MSPQ] anxiety scale), return to work, patient satisfaction with outcome, and patient satisfaction with provider care. All patients undergoing elective spine surgery for degenerative conditions over a 6-month period at a single medical center were enrolled into a prospective longitudinal registry. Data collected on all patients included demographics, disease characteristics, treatment variables, readmissions/reoperations, and all 90-day surgical morbidity. Patient-reported outcome instruments (NRS, ODI, NDI, SF-12, EQ-5D, Zung depression scale, and MSPQ anxiety scale), return to work, patient satisfaction with outcome, and patient satisfaction with provider care were recorded at baseline and 3 months after treatment

  11. Improving the quality of discharge care for the homeless: a patient-centered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greysen, S Ryan; Allen, Rebecca; Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Lucas, Georgina I; Wang, Emily A

    2013-05-01

    Homeless patients are at risk for low-quality discharge care, yet there are limited patient-centered data to guide improvement. We explored relationships between assessment of housing status by hospital staff and quality of discharge care using quantitative and qualitative data from interviews and chart reviews with 98 homeless patients: 80% male, mean homelessness 2.8 years, mean age 44. Patient-reported performance of discharge care varied substantially across seven domains from 16-75% and chart review documented lower performance than patient report. Over half (56%) were not asked about their housing status and multivariable logistic regression showed assessment of housing status was independently associated with higher performance in five domains: discussions about cost of medications, physical activity levels, diet, transportation, and mental health follow-up. Qualitative data revealed patient concerns about stigmatization from disclosure of housing status. Our findings suggest that addressing housing status in acute care settings while avoiding stigmatization may improve discharge care for homeless patients.

  12. Evaluation of Quality of Life and Care Needs of Turkish Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Neslisah

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study explored the quality of life and care needs of Turkish patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study sample consisted of 100 hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Their quality of life was assessed using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant Scale. The mean patient age was 44.99 ± 13.92 years. Changes in sexual functions, loss of hair, loss of taste, loss of appetite, and sleep disturbances were the most common symptoms. The quality of life of transplant patients was moderately affected; the functional well-being and social/family well-being subscales were the most adversely and least negatively affected (12.13 ± 6.88) dimensions, respectively. Being female, being between 50 and 59 years of age, being single, having a chronic disease, and having a history of hospitalization were associated with lower quality of life scores. Interventions to improve functional status, physical well-being, and emotional status of patients during the transplantation process may help patients cope with treatment-related impairments more effectively. Frequent screening and management of patient symptoms in order to help patients adapt to life following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are crucial for meeting care needs and developing strategies to improve their quality of life. PMID:28116155

  13. Evaluation of Quality of Life and Care Needs of Turkish Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslisah Yasar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive study explored the quality of life and care needs of Turkish patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study sample consisted of 100 hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Their quality of life was assessed using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant Scale. The mean patient age was 44.99 ± 13.92 years. Changes in sexual functions, loss of hair, loss of taste, loss of appetite, and sleep disturbances were the most common symptoms. The quality of life of transplant patients was moderately affected; the functional well-being and social/family well-being subscales were the most adversely and least negatively affected (12.13 ± 6.88 dimensions, respectively. Being female, being between 50 and 59 years of age, being single, having a chronic disease, and having a history of hospitalization were associated with lower quality of life scores. Interventions to improve functional status, physical well-being, and emotional status of patients during the transplantation process may help patients cope with treatment-related impairments more effectively. Frequent screening and management of patient symptoms in order to help patients adapt to life following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are crucial for meeting care needs and developing strategies to improve their quality of life.

  14. Patient safety and quality of care in developing countries in Southeast Asia: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Reema; Cohen, Adrienne Wai Seung; Walton, Merrilyn

    2015-08-01

    To establish current knowledge of patient safety and quality of care in developing countries in Southeast Asia, current interventions and the knowledge gaps. Systematic review and narrative synthesis. Key words, synonyms and subject headings were used to search seven electronic databases in addition to manual searching of relevant journals. Titles and abstracts of publications between 1990 and 2014 were screened by two reviewers and checked by a third. Full text articles were screened against the eligibility criteria. Data on design, methods and key findings were extracted and synthesized. Four inter-related safety and quality concerns were evident from 33 publications: (i) the risk of patient infection in healthcare delivery, (ii) medications errors/use, (iii) the quality and provision of maternal and perinatal care and (iv) the quality of healthcare provision overall. Large-scale prevalence studies are needed to identify the full range of safety and quality problems in developing countries in Southeast Asia. Sharing lessons learnt from extensive quality and safety work conducted in industrialized nations may contribute to significant improvements. Yet the applicability of interventions utilized in developed countries to the political and social context in this region must be considered. Strategies to facilitate the collection of robust safety and quality data in the context of limited resources and the local context in each country are needed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  15. Improving patient care through student leadership in team quality improvement projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschannen, Dana; Aebersold, Michelle; Kocan, Mary Jo; Lundy, Francene; Potempa, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    In partnership with a major medical center, senior-level nursing students completed a root cause analysis and implementation plan to address a unit-specific quality issue. To evaluate the project, unit leaders were asked their perceptions of the value of the projects and impact on patient care, as well as to provide exemplars depicting how the student root cause analysis work resulted in improved patient outcome and/or unit processes. Liaisons noted benefits of having an RCA team, with positive impact on patient outcomes and care processes.

  16. Satisfaction of osteoarthritis patients with provided care is not related to the disease-specific quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemann, T.J.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Szecsenyi, J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) has a high prevalence in primary care. Patient satisfaction is an important indicator for the quality of care provided to OA patients. Little is known about satisfaction of patients with this condition in a primary care setting in Germany. The aim of the study was to

  17. Spanish-speaking patients perceive high quality care in resident continuity practices: a CORNET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Scott D; Parra-Roide, Lilia; Hobson, Wendy L; Garfunkel, Lynn C; Serwint, Janet R

    2009-04-01

    Prior research has demonstrated that limited English proficiency in Hispanic patients is associated with adverse health outcomes. The authors sought to compare the perception of primary care in resident practices between Spanish-speaking and English-speaking parents using a previously validated tool, the Parents' Perception of Primary Care. Using survey results from 19 CORNET sites nationwide, they compared mean scores for each primary care domain and the full scale between the groups using Student's t test. Multiple linear regression models compared outcomes controlling for demographic variables. Of the 2122 analyzable surveys, 490 (23%) were completed in Spanish and 1632 (77%) in English. The mean scores for each domain and the total scale were not statistically different between the 2 groups. After adjustment, Spanish-speaking parents rated communication significantly higher. Resident clinics may use systems to provide high quality care to Spanish-speaking patients, which may help other sites improve care.

  18. The quality of care of diabetic patients in rural Malawi: A case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality of diabetes care provided to diabetic patients attended to Mangochi hospital was ... surveillance measures to monitor progress and check for the development of ... The diabetes clinic was run by a nurse and a clinician at the time of our ...

  19. Patient safety and quality of care: how may clinical simulation contribute?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    The usability of health information technology (IT) is increasingly recognized as critically important to the development of systems that ensure patient safety and quality of care. The substantial complexity of organizations, work practice and physical environments within the healthcare sector in...

  20. Identification of patient's requirements in quality management system in health care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaźmierczak, Daniel; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta

    2011-12-16

    To present the solutions implemented in health care institution in the context of identification of patient's requirements, and evaluation of the level of patients' satisfaction in accordance with the requirements of ISO norm 9001:2008 based on the experience of GPCC. The fundamental mechanisms behind the free market, such as competition, start applying also to the public health sector. Health service providers are gradually realising that patients are actual clients of health care institutions, with physicians, nurses, supporting personnel, registration officers and other staff responding to patients demand for medical and auxiliary services (e.g. exam registration, provision of information). PN-EN ISO 9001:2009 "Quality Management Systems. Requirements", relevant literature and documentation of quality management system from the GPCC. The review of relevant literature and legal requirements; interpretation of provisions in relation to the functioning of health care institutions. Model of identification of patient's requirements and satisfaction in accordance with the requirements of ISO 9001:2008 has been elaborated and implemented in the GPCC. The identification of patient's requirements is much more complicated than evaluating the same parameters in manufacturing companies. In the context of medical services one should be aware of the subjectivity of patient's feelings, the psycho-social status and the general state of health during his or her treatment. Therefore, the identification of patient's requirements and satisfaction must be carefully thought out, implemented and regularly improved.

  1. Quality of internal communication in health care and the professional-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March Cerdá, Joan Carles; Prieto Rodríguez, María Angeles; Pérez Corral, Olivia; Lorenzo, Sergio Minué; Danet, Alina

    2010-01-01

    A study was undertaken for the purpose of describing internal communication and the professional-patient relationship and to establish a descriptive model of the interaction between these 2 variables. A nationwide survey was carried out in primary care and specialist care centers in Spain. A simple random sampling method was used with 1183 health care professionals. The data collection instrument was a Likert questionnaire that recorded information on the perceived quality of internal communication (0-100 scale), professional-patient relationships (0-100 scale), and sociodemographic variables. The results were analyzed using SPSS 15.0, performing mean comparisons and a suitable linear regression model.The total average of the quality of internal communication was 53.79 points, and that of the professional-patient relationships was 74.17 points. Sex made no statistically significant difference. Age shows that the older the participant, the better his/her opinion of internal communication and professional-patient relationships. Nursing staff had the highest opinion of internal communication and professional-patient relationships. The association between internal communication and professional-patient relationship was positive (R = 0.45).It was concluded that continuous exchange of information among health care professionals, together with learning and shared decision making or a positive emotional climate, is an element that will consolidate good professional-patient relationships and ensure patient satisfaction.

  2. Clozapine prescription and quality of life in Chinese patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, C-L; Cai, M-Y; Ma, X-R; Zang, Y; Jia, F-J; Lin, Y-Q; Chiu, H F K; Ungvari, G S; Ng, C H; Zhong, B-L; Cao, X-L; Li, Y; Shinfuku, N; Xiang, Y-T

    2015-09-01

    Clozapine is frequently used to treat schizophrenia in China. Maintenance treatment for clinically stable patients with schizophrenia is usually provided by Chinese primary care physicians, but no study has investigated the frequency of its use prescribed by primary care physicians. This study described the frequency, demographic and clinical characteristics of clozapine treatment and its impact on insight and quality of life (QOL) of patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China. A total of 623 patients with schizophrenia treated in 22 primary care services in Guangzhou, China in 2013 formed the study sample. Patients' socio-demographic and clinical characteristics including psychopathology, medication side effects and QOL were recorded using a standardized protocol and data collection. The frequency of clozapine prescription was 35.6% with a mean daily dose of 127.7±88.2 mg. There were no significant differences between the patients with and without clozapine in either of the QOL domains after controlling the confounding factors. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that patients on clozapine had younger age of onset, more hospitalizations, more severe extrapyramidal side effects, but better insight and fewer prescriptions of first generation antipsychotics. Clozapine use was found to be common and associated with better insight in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China. Further examination of the rationale and appropriateness of clozapine in primary care in China is warranted. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Pre-hospital care-seeking in patients with acute myocardial infarction and subsequent quality of care in Beijing infarction an subsequent quality care in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Li; YAN Hong-bing; HU Da-yi; YANG Jin-gang; SUN Yi-hong

    2010-01-01

    Background Cumulative evidence demonstrates that primary percutaneous coronary intervention(PCI)is a mperfusion strategy for ST-elevation myocardial Infarction(STEMI).This study was undertaken to evaluate the pre-hospital care-seeking pathway and subsequent care quality in patients with STEMI in the Beijing health care system,which offers patients a choice between seeking care in a small community hospital(SH group)or a large hospital(LH group).Methods Between January 1 and December 31,2006, a cross-sectional and multicenter survey was conducted in 11 hospitals qualified as tertiary centers in Beijing and included consecutive patients with STEMI admitted within 24 hours after onset of symptoms.Results Among the 566 patients interviewed,28.3%first arnved at a small community hospitaI and were transferred to large hospitals with the ability to perform primary PCI.The median total pre-hospital delay in the SH group(n=160)was significantly longer than in the LH group(n=406)(225 vs.120 minutes,P<0.001).Multivariate analysis showed that interpreting symptoms to non-cardiac origin(OR,1.996;95%CI: 1.264-3.155),absence of history of myocardial infarction(OR,1.595;95%CI:1.086-3.347),non-health insuranca coverage(OR,1.931;95%Cl:1.079-3.012)and absence of sense of impending doom (OR,4.367;95%CI:1.279-1 4.925) were independent predictors for choosing small hospitals.After adjusting for demographics and medical history,patients in the SH group were 1.698 times(95% CI: 1.1 82-3.661) less likely to receive primary PCI compared with those in the LH group. Conclusions Above one fourth of the STEMI patients in Beijing experienced inter-hospital transfer.Factors including symptoms interpretation,symptoms,history of myocardial infarcUon,and insurance coverage were associated with the patients'pre-hospital care-seeking pathway.The patients who were transferred had longer pre-hospital delays and were less Iikely to receive primary PCI.

  4. Quality of outpatient care provided to diabetic patients. A health maintenance organization experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, A L; Legorreta, A P; Ossorio, R C; Davidson, M B

    1996-06-01

    To document the quality of diabetes care provided to patients in a large health maintenance organization (HMO) from 1 January 1993 to 1 January 1994 and compare it to the standards of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). To meet a Health Plan and Employer Data Information Set (HEDIS) requirement, a major HMO in California identified 14,539 members with diabetes and randomly selected 384 individuals for review. Charts were available on 353 of these patients, and after obtaining the information for the HEDIS review, additional information was extracted from the charts by an outside chart reviewer. This data set was used for an analysis of the quality of diabetic care provided by the participating medical groups to these HMO members during 1 year. Documentation of follow-up and measures of glycemic and lipid control was examined both for absolute values and for the frequency of measurement over the year. These results were compared to the ADA standards of care. Although patients averaged 4.5 visits to their primary care physicians (PCPs) over the year, 21% had one or fewer visits per year. Glycated hemoglobin levels were not documented in 56% of patients (ADA recommends two to four measurements per year), and of those with a glycated hemoglobin level measured. 39% had at least one value > or = 10%. Fasting plasma glucose concentrations were not documented in 65% of patients (four to six per year recommended). Foot exams (which should be performed at each regular visit) were not documented for 94% of patients. Urine protein measurements were not performed in 52% of patients. Additionally, many patients had elevated and untreated lipid abnormalities. In spite of the frequency of PCP visits during the year for many of these patients, diabetes management was inadequate. This lack of adequate preventive care will lead to an increased risk of the development of the acute and chronic complications of diabetes, creating an even greater future burden on the health care

  5. How wide is the gap in defining quality care? Comparison of patient and nurse perceptions of important aspects of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W B; Minnick, A F; Marcantonio, R

    1996-05-01

    The authors determine the importance that patients, nurses, and nurse managers place on aspects of care and measure nurses' care values based on their perceptions of their patients and nurse manager care values and their desire to meet these care expectations. The literature has documented gaps in how nurses and patients define quality and value specific care aspects, but little is known about the situation in the current continuous quality improvement and patient-centered care environment, which emphasizes a customer focus. Misunderstanding patients' values and expectations may impede service improvement. Information about any existing gaps could help managers begin to devise patient satisfaction improvement strategies. Two thousand fifty-one medical-surgical patients, 1264 staff members, and 97 nurse managers from 17 randomly selected hospitals participated in study activities related to selected aspects of patient care. Trained interviewers surveyed patients by telephone within 26 days of discharge using a pretested instrument. Staff members and managers completed a coordinated written tool. Descriptive and correlational statistics were used in individual and unit-level analyses. Staff members perceive correctly that patients value differently various aspects of care but do not agree with their managers on patients' value of aspects of care. Unit staff members' and managers' beliefs regarding patients' care values did not match those of their patients (-14 to 0.11 and -0.01 to 0.06 zero order correlations, respectively). A unit's errors in defining patients' values may be self-reinforcing. Strategies to reorient personnel, including adoption of those suggested by the diffusion of innovation literature, may help bridge the gap and change practice.

  6. Determinants of quality of life in elderly patients of a psychosocial care center in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottan, Gabriela; Morais, Eliane Pinheiro de; Schneider, Jacó Fernando; Trentini, Clarissa; Heldt, Elizeth

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the sociodemographic, clinical, and functional determinants of quality of life in elderly (older than 60 years) patients from a Psychosocial Care Center. The sample was randomly selected patients undergoing treatment at the center during the study period. Quality of life was assessed using the brief version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment (WHOQOL-BREF) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment for older adults (WHOQOL-OLD). A total of 50 elderly individuals with a mean age of 67.5 (SD = 5.72) years were included in the study. A hierarchical linear regression showed that clinical characteristics, such as severe symptoms of depression and a higher number of comorbidities, were related to lower quality of life. Better functional capacity and more frequent visits to the center were determinants of higher quality of life. These findings underscore the importance of assessing quality of life and of taking this variable into account when planning health interventions for elderly patients at a Psychosocial Care Center.

  7. Harnessing implementation science to improve care quality and patient safety: a systematic review of targeted literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Marks, Danielle; Taylor, Natalie

    2014-06-01

    Getting greater levels of evidence into practice is a key problem for health systems, compounded by the volume of research produced. Implementation science aims to improve the adoption and spread of research evidence. A linked problem is how to enhance quality of care and patient safety based on evidence when care settings are complex adaptive systems. Our research question was: according to the implementation science literature, which common implementation factors are associated with improving the quality and safety of care for patients? We conducted a targeted search of key journals to examine implementation science in the quality and safety domain applying PRISMA procedures. Fifty-seven out of 466 references retrieved were considered relevant following the application of exclusion criteria. Included articles were subjected to content analysis. Three reviewers extracted and documented key characteristics of the papers. Grounded theory was used to distil key features of the literature to derive emergent success factors. Eight success factors of implementation emerged: preparing for change, capacity for implementation-people, capacity for implementation-setting, types of implementation, resources, leverage, desirable implementation enabling features, and sustainability. Obstacles in implementation are the mirror image of these: for example, when people fail to prepare, have insufficient capacity for implementation or when the setting is resistant to change, then care quality is at risk, and patient safety can be compromised. This review of key studies in the quality and safety literature discusses the current state-of-play of implementation science applied to these domains. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  8. Quality of life during chemotherapy and satisfaction with nursing care in Turkish breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Z; Durna, Z; Akin, S

    2014-09-01

    This descriptive cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate quality of life for breast cancer patients (n = 105) undergoing chemotherapy, and to assess their satisfaction with nursing care. It also explored relationships between quality of life, satisfaction with nursing care, and demographic and disease-related characteristics. Ethics approval for this study was provided. The research was carried out between October 2011 and June 2012. Quality of life and satisfaction with nursing care were assessed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General Scale, the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale and the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scale. We found that emotional well-being was the area most negatively affected, with patients reporting being afraid of death, feeling sad and being worried about their health. Patients were overall quite satisfied with the nursing care they received at the hospital. We found a positive correlation between total scores on the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scale and social and family well-being scores. Breast cancer patients have fears and concerns about their health and need support during chemotherapy for coping with negative changes in their emotional well-being, physical and functional well-being.

  9. Health related quality of life and care dependency among elderly hospital patients: an international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Ate; Hakverdioğlu, Gülendam; Muszalik, Marta; Andela, Richtsje; Korhan, Esra Akın; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    Many countries in Europe and the world have to cope with an aging population. Although health policy in many countries aims at increasing disability-free life expectancy, elderly patients represent a significant proportion of all patients admitted to different hospital departments. The aim of the research was to investigate the relationship between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the care dependency status among elderly hospital patients. In 2012, a descriptive survey was administered to a convenience sample of 325 elderly hospital patients (> 60 years) from The Netherlands (N = 125), from Poland (N = 100), and from Turkey (N = 100). We employed the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) Measurement System and the Care Dependency Scale. FACIT is a collection of HRQOL questionnaires that assess multidimensional health status in people with various chronic illnesses. From demographic variables, gender (female) (r = -0.13, p Poland and Turkey) and functional wellbeing (The Netherlands) are significantly associated with the decrease in care dependency status. Thus, the FACIT variables are the most powerful indicators for care dependency. The study provides healthcare professionals insight into improvement of quality of care in all three countries.

  10. Patient quality of life in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions program: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faucher J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Joshua Faucher,1 Jordan Rosedahl,2 Dawn Finnie,3 Amy Glasgow,3 Paul Takahashi4 1Mayo Medical School, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 2Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Science Research, Mayo Clinic, 3Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, 4Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Background: Transitional care programs are common interventions aimed at reducing medical complications and associated readmissions for patients recently discharged from the hospital. While organizations strive to reduce readmissions, another important related metric is patient quality of life (QoL. Aims: To compare the relationship between QoL in patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions (MCCT program versus usual care, and to determine if QoL changed in MCCT participants between baseline and 1-year follow-up. Methods: A baseline survey was mailed to MCCT enrollees in March 2013. Those who completed a baseline survey were sent a follow-up survey 1 year later. A cross-sectional survey of usual care participants was mailed in November 2013. We included in our analysis 199 participants (83 in the MCCT and 116 in usual care aged over 60 years with multiple comorbidities and receiving primary care. Primary outcomes were self-rated QoL; secondary outcomes included self-reported general, physical, and mental health. Intra- and intergroup comparisons of patients were evaluated using Pearson’s chi-squared analysis. Results: MCCT participants had more comorbidities and higher elder risk assessment scores than those receiving usual care. At baseline, 74% of MCCT participants reported responses of good-to-excellent QoL compared to 64% after 1 year (P=0.16. Between MCCT and usual care, there was no significant difference in self-reported QoL (P=0.21. Between baseline and follow-up in MCCT patients, and compared to usual care, there were no significant

  11. Effect of implementation of Quiet Time Protocol on sleep quality of patients in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamanzari Hamid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Sleep disorder is considered as one of the major challenges in the Intensive Care Unit. Psychological and physical factors of environment are involved in its development. The adjustment of these factors to meet this need is essential. The current study was conducted to determine the effect of implementation of  Quiet Time Protocol on sleep quality of patients in intensive care unit. Materials and Method: In this clinical trial study, study population was the hospitalized patients in surgical intensive care unit of Ghaem Hospital of Mashhad in 2013. 60 patients were selected by convenience sampling and then were assigned into intervention and control groups.  The quiet time protocol was implemented in intervention group for 3 consecutive nights from 7pm to 5 am. The data were gathered through made-researcher questionnaire about sleep quality in the first, second and third nights. Data analysis was done through Fisher's exact test, chi-square, independent T-test, repeated measures ANOVA in SPSS21. Results: The mean score of sleep quality in effectiveness aspect in intervention group was higher than the control group in all three nights (p<0.001. This mean in sleep disorders aspect after the intervention in intervention group was significantly reduced in the first (p=0.002 the second and third nights (p<0.001 in compare with control group. Conclusion: According to the results, implementation of quiet time protocol is effective on improving the sleep quality of patients in surgical intensive care unit. Nurses can use this protocol to improve the quality of sleep in patients.

  12. Assessing decision quality in patient-centred care requires a preference-sensitive measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Cunich, Michelle; Salkeld, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    A theory-based instrument for measuring the quality of decisions made using any form of decision technology, including both decision-aided and unaided clinical consultations is required to enable person- and patient-centred care and to respond positively to individual heterogeneity in the value...... and preference-sensitive instrument, can constitute a key patient-reported measure of the quality of the decision-making process. It can provide the basis for future decision improvement, especially when the clinician (or other stakeholders) completes the equivalent instrument and the extent and nature...

  13. Quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care and in outpatient treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihanović M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mate Mihanović,1,2 Branka Restek-Petrović,1,2 Anamarija Bogović,1 Ena Ivezić,1 Davor Bodor,1 Ivan Požgain3 1Psychiatric Hospital “Sveti Ivan”, Zagreb, 2Faculty of Medicine Osijek, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, 3Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Center Osijek, Osijek, Croatia Background: The Sveti Ivan Psychiatric Hospital in Zagreb, Croatia, offers foster home care treatment that includes pharmacotherapy, group psychodynamic psychotherapy, family therapy, and work and occupational therapy. The aim of this study is to compare the health-related quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care with that of patients in standard outpatient treatment. Methods: The sample consisted of 44 patients with schizophrenia who, upon discharge from the hospital, were included in foster home care treatment and a comparative group of 50 patients who returned to their families and continued receiving outpatient treatment. All patients completed the Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire on the day they completed hospital treatment, 6 months later, and 1 year after they participated in the study. The research also included data on the number of hospitalizations for both groups of patients. Results: Though directly upon discharge from the hospital, patients who entered foster home care treatment assessed their health-related quality of life as poorer than patients who returned to their families, their assessments significantly improved over time. After 6 months of treatment, these patients even achieved better results in several dimensions than did patients in the outpatient program, and they also had fewer hospitalizations. These effects remained the same at the follow-up 1 year after the inclusion in the study. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that treatment in foster home care is associated with an improvement in the quality of life of patients

  14. Impact of Information Technology, Clinical Resource Constraints, and Patient-Centered Practice Characteristics on Quality of Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JongDeuk Baek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Factors in the practice environment, such as health information technology (IT infrastructure, availability of other clinical resources, and financial incentives, may influence whether practices are able to successfully implement the patient-centered medical home (PCMH model and realize its benefits. This study investigates the impacts of those PCMH-related elements on primary care physicians’ perception of quality of care. Methods: A multiple logistic regression model was estimated using the 2004 to 2005 CTS Physician Survey, a national sample of salaried primary care physicians (n = 1733. Results: The patient-centered practice environment and availability of clinical resources increased physicians’ perceived quality of care. Although IT use for clinical information access did enhance physicians’ ability to provide high quality of care, a similar positive impact of IT use was not found for e-prescribing or the exchange of clinical patient information. Lack of resources was negatively associated with physician perception of quality of care. Conclusion: Since health IT is an important foundation of PCMH, patient-centered practices are more likely to have health IT in place to support care delivery. However, despite its potential to enhance delivery of primary care, simply making health IT available does not necessarily translate into physicians’ perceptions that it enhances the quality of care they provide. It is critical for health-care managers and policy makers to ensure that primary care physicians fully recognize and embrace the use of new technology to improve both the quality of care provided and the patient outcomes.

  15. Quality of primary health care and autonomous motivation for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Koponen, Anne M; Nina Simonsen; Sakari Suominen

    2017-01-01

    This study showed, in line with self-determination theory, that of the six central quality dimensions of primary health care (access to care, continuity of care, diabetes counseling, autonomy support from one’s physician, trust, patient-centered care), autonomy support from one’s physician was most strongly associated with autonomous motivation (self-regulation) for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 2866). However, overall support for diabetes care re...

  16. Quality of Care for Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction. Cienfuegos 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda María Delgado Acosta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: is a priority of the National Health System providing quality care to patients with acute myocardial infarction. Objective: to assess medical care to patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted to the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital in Cienfuegos in June 2013 to compare the results with previous assessments. Methods: a research on health systems and services was conducted. The variables used were related to the structure (human and material resources, processes (compliance with established care protocols and results (topography of infarction, hospital stay and impact on mortality. A questionnaire was applied to 20 patients admitted with the diagnosis of acute infarction during the study period. An observation guide was also used. Data were processed using the SPSS 15.0 program and expressed in absolute values and percentages. Results: male patients predominated in the series studied and the most common risk factors were hypertension in 50 % of cases, smoking in 45 % and diabetes mellitus in 25 %. Difficulties with medical and nursing staffing were detected in the emergency department and cardiology ward, respectively. There were difficulties in the use of beta blockers and aspirin in prehospital care, especially in patients with non- ST- segment elevation acute coronary syndromes. Early arrival at the medical services led to greater opportunity to perform a thrombolysis. There were no deaths. Conclusions: although results we better in comparison with the assessment of 2011, there are still gaps in care provided to these patients.

  17. Perception of quality of care: comparison of the views of patients' with lung cancer and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henoch, Ingela; Lövgren, Malin; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Tishelman, Carol

    2012-02-01

    To explore potential differences within dyads of patients' with lung cancer and family members' judgment of different aspects of quality of care and relationships between quality of care and personal and health-related characteristics. High quality of care is important for acceptable quality of life in patients in palliative care. If patients are unable to participate in quality of care assessments or decision-making, family members might often act as proxies, despite the complicated nature of their own situation. Cross-sectional survey design. A patient and family member version of the abbreviated questionnaire Quality from Patients' Perspective, with additional items about perceived health and opinions about care, was mailed to members of the Swedish lung cancer Patient Organisation. Wilcoxon's signed rank test was used to identify potential differences within 51 patient-family member dyads' quality of care ratings. Relationships between Quality from Patients' Perspective dimensions and demographic and health-related variables were examined with Spearman's correlations. Patient-family member dyads had high levels of agreement in ratings of perceived reality of quality of care. Family members generally rated the subjective importance of individual items higher than did the patient in the dyad, with significant difference in the dimension 'socio-cultural approach'. Older patients were found to rate the physical-technical conditions higher than younger patients, in relation to perceived reality but not subjective importance. Women family members were found to rate the subjective importance of medical-technical competence, identity-oriented approach and socio-cultural approach significantly higher than men did. Patients with lung cancer and their family members agree in ratings of the perceived reality, but they differ more in ratings of the subjective importance of quality of care. When patients are unable to communicate their preferences, family members' opinions

  18. A brief Patient-Reported Outcomes Quality of Life (PROQOL instrument to improve patient care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Ridgeway

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jeff Sloan and colleagues describe the development of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Quality of Life (PROQOL instrument, which captures and stores patient-recorded outcomes in the medical record for patients with diabetes. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  19. Linking Six Sigma to simulation: a new roadmap to improve the quality of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Giovanni; Costa, Antonio; Fichera, Sergio; Tringali, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Improving the quality of patient care is a challenge that calls for a multidisciplinary approach, embedding a broad spectrum of knowledge and involving healthcare professionals from diverse backgrounds. The purpose of this paper is to present an innovative approach that implements discrete-event simulation (DES) as a decision-supporting tool in the management of Six Sigma quality improvement projects. A roadmap is designed to assist quality practitioners and health care professionals in the design and successful implementation of simulation models within the define-measure-analyse-design-verify (DMADV) or define-measure-analyse-improve-control (DMAIC) Six Sigma procedures. A case regarding the reorganisation of the flow of emergency patients affected by vertigo symptoms was developed in a large town hospital as a preliminary test of the roadmap. The positive feedback from professionals carrying out the project looks promising and encourages further roadmap testing in other clinical settings. The roadmap is a structured procedure that people involved in quality improvement can implement to manage projects based on the analysis and comparison of alternative scenarios. The role of Six Sigma philosophy in improvement of the quality of healthcare services is recognised both by researchers and by quality practitioners; discrete-event simulation models are commonly used to improve the key performance measures of patient care delivery. The two approaches are seldom referenced and implemented together; however, they could be successfully integrated to carry out quality improvement programs. This paper proposes an innovative approach to bridge the gap and enrich the Six Sigma toolbox of quality improvement procedures with DES.

  20. Patient satisfaction analysis on service quality of dental health care based on empathy and responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, Fellani Danasra; Sudjana, Grita; Oesman, Yevis Marty

    2011-01-01

    Background: Transformation of health care is underway from sellers’ market to consumers’ market, where the satisfaction of the patients’ need is a primary concern while defining the service quality. Hence, commitment to provide a high-quality service and achieving patients’ satisfaction becomes an important issue for dental health care provider. The aim of this research is to investigate the quality of dental health care service based on empathy and responsiveness aspects. Methods: A total of 90 questionnaires were completed by the dental patients who came to dental polyclinic located in Government Hospital, West Java, Indonesia. The questionnaire was concerned on two dimensions of service quality model, i.e. empathy and responsiveness. The obtained data were analyzed using inferential statistics (t test) and also descriptive statistics with importance–performance analysis. Results: All the attributes tested by t test showed that perception and expectation differed significantly, except for responsiveness, i.e. ability of dental assistants in assisting the dentist (t test 0.505dentist (t test 4.700). Conclusion: It can be inferred from IPA that priority should be given to dentist's communication and dental assistant's knowledge toward patient's needs to enhance the service quality. PMID:22135687

  1. Editorial: Advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve the quality and safety of patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Borycki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal is dedicated to describing “Advances in Healthcare Provider and Patient Training to Improve the Quality and Safety of Patient Care.” Patient safety is an important and fundamental requirement of ensuring the quality of patient care. Training and education has been identified as a key to improving healthcare provider patient safety competencies especially when working with new technologies such as electronic health records and mobile health applications. Such technologies can be harnessed to improve patient safety; however, if not used properly they can negatively impact on patient safety. In this issue we focus on advances in training that can improve patient safety and the optimal use of new technologies in healthcare. For example, use of clinical simulations and online computer based training can be employed both to facilitate learning about new clinical discoveries as well as to integrate technology into day to day healthcare practices. In this issue we are publishing papers that describe advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve patient safety as it relates to the use of educational technologies, health information technology and on-line health resources. In addition, in the special issue we describe new approaches to training and patient safety including, online communities, clinical simulations, on-the-job training, computer based training and health information systems that educate about and support safer patient care in real-time (i.e. when health professionals are providing care to patients. These educational and technological initiatives can be aimed at health professionals (i.e. students and those who are currently working in the field. The outcomes of this work are significant as they lead to safer care for patients and their family members. The issue has both theoretical and applied papers that describe advances in patient

  2. Antipsychotic polypharmacy and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Cai-Lan; Ma, Xin-Rong; Zang, Yu; Jia, Fu-Jun; Lin, Yong-Qiang; Chiu, Helen F K; Ungvari, Gabor S; Ng, Chee H; Zhong, Bao-Liang; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Li, Yan; Cai, Mei-Ying; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-01-01

    In China, maintenance treatment for clinically stable patients with schizophrenia is usually provided by primary care physicians, but their prescribing patterns have not been studied. This study examined the frequency as well as demographic and clinical correlates of antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP) and its impact on quality of life (QOL) in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China. A total of 623 community-dwelling patients from 18 randomly selected primary care services were interviewed. Patients' socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, including number of hospitalizations, antipsychotic drug-induced side effects, and QOL were recorded using a standardized protocol and data collection procedure. The rate of APP prescription was 31% (193/623). Of the patients on APP, 89.6% received 2 antipsychotics, 10.4% received 3 or more antipsychotics. Clozapine (35.6%) was the most commonly prescribed second generation antipsychotic (SGA), while perphenazine (17.8%) was the most commonly prescribed first generation antipsychotic (FGA). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that patients on APP were more likely to receive SGAs and anticholinergics, had fewer hospitalizations, younger age of onset, and higher doses of antipsychotics. There were no significant differences between the two groups in any of the QOL domains. Approximately a third of Chinese patients with schizophrenia in primary care receive APP. Further examination of the rationale and appropriateness of APP and its alternatives is warranted.

  3. ‌Effect of Orems self care theory on quality of life in patients with CVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hamid Momeni

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available One of disorder with destroyed of function and perception of body’s structure is cerebrovascular accident (CVA. By current statistical results, CVA is the third agents of death. Self care is the one section of rehabilitation in patients with CVA. By nurse’s support, the patient will performance self care and he will acquire feeling self- respect. Materials and Methods: This quasi experimental research was carried out on 42 CVA patients. Data collection instrument was SS- QOL questionnaire. First QOL indicator was measured by SS- QOL questionnaire. In experimental group self care program was instructed. After 5 weeks, patient’s QOL in two groups were measured again by the same questionnaire. T test, Chi Square and Willcaxon test was used to data analysis. Results: A significant difference was observed between QOL score before and after self care program in experimental group (p≥0.001, as well as a significant difference was seen between QOL score in experimental and control groups (p≥0.00128. Conclusion: Findings of this research showed that education of self care to patients by nurses in hospital or home can increase quality of life in the patients with CVA.

  4. Quality indicators for patient safety in primary care. A review and Delphi-survey by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigola-Capell, Eva; Pareja-Rossell, Clara; Gens-Barber, Montse; Oliva-Oliva, Glòria; Alava-Cano, Fernando; Wensing, Michel; Davins-Miralles, Josep

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Quality indicators are measured aspects of healthcare, reflecting the performance of a healthcare provider or healthcare system. They have a crucial role in programmes to assess and improve healthcare. Many performance measures for primary care have been developed. Only the Catalan model for patient safety in primary care identifies key domains of patient safety in primary care. Objective: To present an international framework for patient safety indicators in primary care. Methods: Literature review and online Delphi-survey, starting from the Catalan model. Results: A set of 30 topics is presented, identified by an international panel and organized according to the Catalan model for patient safety in primary care. Most topic areas referred to specific clinical processes; additional topics were leadership, people management, partnership and resources. Conclusion: The framework can be used to organize indicator development and guide further work in the field. PMID:26339833

  5. Risk Selection Threatens Quality Of Care For Certain Patients: Lessons From Europe's Health Insurance Exchanges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Wynand P M M; van Kleef, Richard C; van Vliet, Rene C J A

    2015-10-01

    Experience in European health insurance exchanges indicates that even with the best risk-adjustment formulas, insurers have substantial incentives to engage in risk selection. The potentially most worrisome form of risk selection is skimping on the quality of care for underpriced high-cost patients--that is, patients for whom insurers are compensated at a rate lower than the predicted health care expenses of these patients. In this article we draw lessons for the United States from twenty years of experience with health insurance exchanges in Europe, where risk selection is a serious problem. Mistakes by European legislators and inadequate evaluation criteria for risk selection incentives are discussed, as well as strategies to reduce risk selection and the complex trade-off among selection (through quality skimping), efficiency, and affordability. Recommended improvements to the risk-adjustment process in the United States include considering the adoption of risk adjusters used in Europe, investing in the collection of data, using a permanent form of risk sharing, and replacing the current premium "band" restrictions with more flexible restrictions. Policy makers need to understand the complexities of regulating competitive health insurance markets and to prevent risk selection that threatens the provision of good-quality care for underpriced high-cost patients. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  6. Quality management in nuclear medicine for better patient care: the IAEA program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Kashyap, Ravi; Pascual, Thomas; Paez, Diana; Nunez-Miller, Rodolfo

    2013-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency promotes the practice of nuclear medicine among its Member States with a focus on quality and safety. It considers quality culture as a part of the educational process and as a tool to reduce heterogeneity in the practice of nuclear medicine, and in turn, patient care. Sensitization about quality is incorporated in all its delivery mechanisms. The Agency has developed a structured peer-review process called quality management (QM) audits in nuclear medicine practices to help nuclear medicine facilities improve their quality through this voluntary comprehensive audit process. The process is multidisciplinary, covering all aspects of nuclear medicine practice with a focus on the patient. It complements other QM and accreditation approaches developed by professional societies or accreditation agencies. The Agency is committed to propagate its utility and assist in the implementation process. Similar auditing programs for practice in diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy, called QUADRIL and QUATRO, respectively, are also in place. Necessary amendments in the auditing process and content are incorporated based on technological and practice changes with time. The reader will become familiar with the approach of the Agency on QM in nuclear medicine and its implementation process to improve patient care.

  7. Optimizing Quality of Care and Patient Safety in Malaysia: The Current Global Initiatives, Gaps and Suggested Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrar, Mu'taman; Abdul Rahman, Hamzah; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-10-20

    Demand for health care service has significantly increased, while the quality of healthcare and patient safety has become national and international priorities. This paper aims to identify the gaps and the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. Review of the current literature. Highly cited articles were used as the basis to retrieve and review the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety. The country health plan of Ministry of Health (MOH) Malaysia and the MOH Malaysia Annual Reports were reviewed. The MOH has set four strategies for optimizing quality and sustaining quality of life. The 10th Malaysia Health Plan promotes the theme "1 Care for 1 Malaysia" in order to sustain the quality of care. Despite of these efforts, the total number of complaints received by the medico-legal section of the MOH Malaysia is increasing. The current global initiatives indicted that quality performance generally belong to three main categories: patient; staffing; and working environment related factors. There is no single intervention for optimizing quality of care to maintain patient safety. Multidimensional efforts and interventions are recommended in order to optimize the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia.

  8. How patient-centred care relates to patients' quality of life and distress: a study in 427 women experiencing infertility.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, J.W.M.; Huppelschoten, A.G.; Empel, I.W.H. van; Boivin, J.; Verhaak, C.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent patients' experiences with fertility care are associated with their quality of life (QoL), and levels of anxiety and depression. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional questionnaire study within 29 Dutch fertility clinics, includin

  9. Patient quality of life in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions program: a survey study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, Joshua; Rosedahl, Jordan; Finnie, Dawn; Glasgow, Amy; Takahashi, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Transitional care programs are common interventions aimed at reducing medical complications and associated readmissions for patients recently discharged from the hospital. While organizations strive to reduce readmissions, another important related metric is patient quality of life (QoL). Aims To compare the relationship between QoL in patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions (MCCT) program versus usual care, and to determine if QoL changed in MCCT participants between baseline and 1-year follow-up. Methods A baseline survey was mailed to MCCT enrollees in March 2013. Those who completed a baseline survey were sent a follow-up survey 1 year later. A cross-sectional survey of usual care participants was mailed in November 2013. We included in our analysis 199 participants (83 in the MCCT and 116 in usual care) aged over 60 years with multiple comorbidities and receiving primary care. Primary outcomes were self-rated QoL; secondary outcomes included self-reported general, physical, and mental health. Intra- and intergroup comparisons of patients were evaluated using Pearson’s chi-squared analysis. Results MCCT participants had more comorbidities and higher elder risk assessment scores than those receiving usual care. At baseline, 74% of MCCT participants reported responses of good-to-excellent QoL compared to 64% after 1 year (P=0.16). Between MCCT and usual care, there was no significant difference in self-reported QoL (P=0.21). Between baseline and follow-up in MCCT patients, and compared to usual care, there were no significant differences in self-reported general, physical, or mental health. Conclusion We detected no difference over time in QoL between MCCT patients and those receiving usual care, and a nonsignificant QoL decline in MCCT participants after 1 year. Progression of chronic disease may overwhelm any QoL improvement attributable to the MCCT intervention. The MCCT interventions may blunt expected declines in QoL, producing

  10. The quality of care delivered to Parkinson's disease patients in the U.S. Pacific Northwest Veterans Health System

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common chronic neurological disorder of the elderly. Despite the fact that a comprehensive review of general health care in the United States showed that the quality of care delivered to patients usually falls below professional standards, there is limited data on the quality of care for patients with PD. Methods Using the administrative database, the Pacific Northwest Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Data Warehouse, a popula...

  11. Personal values and individual quality of life in palliative care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegg, Martin J; Wasner, Maria; Neudert, Christian; Borasio, Gian Domenico

    2005-08-01

    To evaluate the relationship between personal values and individual quality of life (iQoL) in palliative care patients, 75 patients with advanced cancer or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) were asked to complete a self-report questionnaire concerning personal values and a semi-structured interview on their iQoL. Sixty-four patients took part in the study (56% cancer, 44% ALS). The most important personal values were benevolence, self-direction, and universalism, whereas power, achievement, and stimulation were the least important. Self-transcendence values were higher than self-enhancement values in all patients. Compared with healthy adults, palliative care patients scored significantly higher in benevolence and lower in self-enhancement values. Conservation values (security, conformity, tradition) were correlated with higher levels of iQoL (P=0.03). There were no significant differences between ALS and cancer patients. These data suggest that conservation values protect the patients' iQoL in the palliative care situation. The observed shift towards self-transcendence values may be related to coping processes of terminally ill patients. The relationship between self-transcendence values and iQoL should be further investigated.

  12. Quality of primary health care and autonomous motivation for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Koponen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study showed, in line with self-determination theory, that of the six central quality dimensions of primary health care (access to care, continuity of care, diabetes counseling, autonomy support from one’s physician, trust, patient-centered care, autonomy support from one’s physician was most strongly associated with autonomous motivation (self-regulation for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes ( n  = 2866. However, overall support for diabetes care received from friends, family members, other patients with diabetes, and health care professionals may even play a greater role.

  13. Implementation of a quality care management system for patients with arthritis of the hip and knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, Christine R; Graves, Stephen E; Mercer, Graham E; Osborne, Richard H

    2013-02-01

    The Orthopaedic Unit of the Repatriation General Hospital (RGH) in Adelaide, South Australia has implemented a quality care management system for patients with arthritis of the hip and knee. The system not only optimises conservative management but ensures that joint replacement surgery is undertaken in an appropriate and timely manner. This new service model addresses identified barriers to service access and provides a comprehensive, coordinated strategy for patient management. Over 4 years the model has reduced waiting times for initial outpatient assessment from 8 to 3 months and surgery from 18 to 8 months, while decreasing length of stay from 6.3 to 5.3 days for hips and 5.8 to 5.3 days for knees. The service reforms have been accompanied by positive feedback from patients and referring general practitioners in relation to the improved coordination of care and enhanced efficiency in service delivery.

  14. The quality of radiation care: the results of focus group interviews and concept mapping to explore the patient's perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, J.L.; Sixma, H.; Triest, B. van; Keus, R.B.; Hendriks, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: In this study, we explore the quality aspects of radiation care from the patient’s perspective in order to develop a draft Consumer Quality Index (CQI) Radiation Care instrument. Materials and methods: Four focus group discussions with (former) cancer patients were held to ex

  15. Patient-reported Communication Quality and Perceived Discrimination in Maternity Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasio, Laura; Kozhimannil, Katy B

    2015-10-01

    High-quality communication and a positive patient-provider relationship are aspects of patient-centered care, a crucial component of quality. We assessed racial/ethnic disparities in patient-reported communication problems and perceived discrimination in maternity care among women nationally and measured racial/ethnic variation in the correlates of these outcomes. Data for this analysis came from the Listening to Mothers III survey, a national sample of women who gave birth to a singleton baby in a US hospital in 2011-2012. Outcomes were reluctance to ask questions and barriers to open discussion in prenatal care, and perceived discrimination during the birth hospitalization, assessed using multinomial and logistic regression. We also estimated models stratified by race/ethnicity. Over 40% of women reported communication problems in prenatal care, and 24% perceived discrimination during their hospitalization for birth. Having hypertension or diabetes was associated with higher levels of reluctance to ask questions and higher odds of reporting each type of perceived discrimination. Black and Hispanic (vs. white) women had higher odds of perceived discrimination due to race/ethnicity. Higher education was associated with more reported communication problems among black women only. Although having diabetes was associated with perceptions of discrimination among all women, associations were stronger for black women. Race/ethnicity was associated with perceived racial discrimination, but diabetes and hypertension were consistent predictors of communication problems and perceptions of discrimination. Efforts to improve communication and reduce perceived discrimination are an important area of focus for improving patient-centered care in maternity services.

  16. Patient satisfaction with quality of primary health care in Benghazi, Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asharaf Abdul Salam

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Libyan National Health System (LNHS is debated for the paradox of its performance versus impact. It has poor performance, but the national health statistics are good and competitive. There are concerted efforts to manage health care services and to regain the lost trust. A primary health care (PHC system that focuses on preventive and promotive care is the core focus of LNHS efforts. Objectives: To assess patient satisfaction with quality of PHC assessed in terms of (a customer profile, (b patient satisfaction, and (c health care-seeking behavior. Methodology: A sample of nine health centers and seven polyclinics from various locations in Benghazi, Libya were selected for gathering information by structured face-to-face interviews. A total of 310 beneficiaries were interviewed by using an Arabic translation of the Charleston Psychiatric Outpatient Satisfaction Scale. Results: The beneficiaries appear to be quite satisfied with the quality of services. Geographical zone, marital status of beneficiary, and type of facility are satisfaction-related factors. There are preferences for facilities located within the City Centre over those located elsewhere. There is also an interaction effect of the geographical zone and the type of facility in creating differences in satisfaction. Conclusions: A customer-friendly facility concept that emphasizes reception, physician interaction, and cordiality shall add value. Polyclinics require more attention as does the Al Slawy area. A few utility services might also be considered.

  17. Measuring patient-perceived quality of care in US hospitals using Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Jared B; Brownstein, John S; Tuli, Gaurav; Runels, Tessa; Broecker, Katherine; Nsoesie, Elaine O; McIver, David J; Rozenblum, Ronen; Wright, Adam; Bourgeois, Florence T; Greaves, Felix

    2016-06-01

    Patients routinely use Twitter to share feedback about their experience receiving healthcare. Identifying and analysing the content of posts sent to hospitals may provide a novel real-time measure of quality, supplementing traditional, survey-based approaches. To assess the use of Twitter as a supplemental data stream for measuring patient-perceived quality of care in US hospitals and compare patient sentiments about hospitals with established quality measures. 404 065 tweets directed to 2349 US hospitals over a 1-year period were classified as having to do with patient experience using a machine learning approach. Sentiment was calculated for these tweets using natural language processing. 11 602 tweets were manually categorised into patient experience topics. Finally, hospitals with ≥50 patient experience tweets were surveyed to understand how they use Twitter to interact with patients. Roughly half of the hospitals in the US have a presence on Twitter. Of the tweets directed toward these hospitals, 34 725 (9.4%) were related to patient experience and covered diverse topics. Analyses limited to hospitals with ≥50 patient experience tweets revealed that they were more active on Twitter, more likely to be below the national median of Medicare patients (p<0.001) and above the national median for nurse/patient ratio (p=0.006), and to be a non-profit hospital (p<0.001). After adjusting for hospital characteristics, we found that Twitter sentiment was not associated with Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) ratings (but having a Twitter account was), although there was a weak association with 30-day hospital readmission rates (p=0.003). Tweets describing patient experiences in hospitals cover a wide range of patient care aspects and can be identified using automated approaches. These tweets represent a potentially untapped indicator of quality and may be valuable to patients, researchers, policy makers and hospital

  18. Quality of care in elder emergency department patients with pneumonia: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Daniel R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goals of the study were to assess the relationship between age and processes of care in emergency department (ED patients admitted with pneumonia and to identify independent predictors of failure to meet recommended quality care measures. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of a pre-existing database undertaken at a university hospital ED in the Midwest. ED patients ≥18 years of age requiring admission for pneumonia, with no documented use of antibiotics in the 24 hours prior to ED presentation were included. Compliance with Pneumonia National Quality Measures was assessed including ED antibiotic administration, antibiotics within 4 hours, oxygenation assessment, and obtaining of blood cultures. Odds ratios were calculated for elders and non-elders. Logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of process failure. Results One thousand, three hundred seventy patients met inclusion criteria, of which 560 were aged ≥65 years. In multiple variable logistic regression analysis, age ≥65 years was independently associated with receiving antibiotics in the ED (odds ratio [OR] = 2.03, 95% CI 1.28–3.21 and assessment of oxygenation (OR = 2.10, 95% CI, 1.18–3.32. Age had no significant impact on odds of receiving antibiotics within four hours of presentation (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.84–1.43 or having blood cultures drawn (OR 1.02, 95%CI 0.78–1.32. Certain other patient characteristics were also independently associated with process failure. Conclusion Elderly patients admitted from the ED with pneumonia are more likely to receive antibiotics while in the ED and to have oxygenation assessed in the ED than younger patients. The independent association of certain patient characteristics with process failure provides an opportunity to further increase compliance with recommended quality measures in admitted patients diagnosed with pneumonia.

  19. Impact of nursing care in Australian general practice on the quality of care: A pilot of the Patient Enablement and Satisfaction Survey (PESS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desborough, J.; Phillips, C.; Banfield, M.; Bagheri, N.; Mills, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nursing roles in general practice have undergone significant expansion, but as yet there are few tools to measure the quality of nursing care in general practice. This study piloted the Patient Enablement and Satisfaction Survey (PESS) to evaluate two aspects of quality of care in this s

  20. Quality management: patients reflections on health care at outpatient clinic of internal medicine department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubičić, Neven; Boban, Marko; Gaćina, Petar; Adzija, Jasminka; Benceković, Zeljka; Rajković, Ana

    2009-06-01

    Middle and older age group relative share in the community permanently grows. Those are commonly burdened with several chronic health conditions or elevated incidence of acute ones and in more frequent need for consulting health services. In the era of modern technical medicine, it is important to increase quality of services particularly patients orientated. Department of Internal Medicine developed questionnaire to assess reflections on medical care from the receiver of medical services point of view. Sample was formed from individuals that visited outpatient triage Unit (OTU) and voluntary enrolled, during period April 1-August 31, 2008 for any medical reason. Study population structure had similarly equally of both genders, socio-economical background, and was in age range 18-87. Questionnaire was developed by team of experienced personnel covering satisfaction on received medical care. There were 279 returned formulary in a sample of 6700 patients (4.18%). Patients visited OTU chiefly on behalf medical condition secondary to address of residency, followed by personal choice, on advice given by general practitioner, by emergency transportation services, or just due to earlier experiences. Regarding provided medical care extent, 4/5 of patients were examined in lesser than 2 hours, while total workup lasted mostly for 2-4, followed by over four. Over half of patients were moderate toward highly satisfied with provided medical information, personnel communication style and general reflection on all services while being in the Department premises. Astonishing proportion of patients (93%) was satisfied with positive personnel communication. Integration of patients' self-perceived reports about medical services in organizing process is inevitable for augmenting content and at the same time valuable for developing overall quality of treatment. Communication excellence is of premier importance and unavoidable for giving additional positive effect to remain health

  1. Quality of life and religious-spiritual coping in palliative cancer care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Ticiane Dionizio de Sousa; Meneguin, Silmara; Ferreira, Maria de Lourdes da Silva; Miot, Helio Amante

    2017-07-10

    to compare the quality of life and religious-spiritual coping of palliative cancer care patients with a group of healthy participants; assess whether the perceived quality of life is associated with the religious-spiritual coping strategies; identify the clinical and sociodemographic variables related to quality of life and religious-spiritual coping. cross-sectional study involving 96 palliative outpatient care patient at a public hospital in the interior of the state of São Paulo and 96 healthy volunteers, using a sociodemographic questionnaire, the McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Brief Religious-Spiritual Coping scale. 192 participants were interviewed who presented good quality of life and high use of Religious-Spiritual Coping. Greater use of negative Religious-Spiritual Coping was found in Group A, as well as lesser physical and psychological wellbeing and quality of life. An association was observed between quality of life scores and Religious-Spiritual Coping (pbienestar físico, psicológico y de calidad de vida. Fue observada asociación entre los scores de calidad de vida y Coping Religioso-Espiritual (p<0,01) en ambos grupos. Sexo masculino, religión católica y score de Coping Religioso-Espiritual-Breve influenciaron de manera independiente los scores de calidad de vida (p<0,01). ambos grupos presentaron altas puntuaciones de calidad de vida y de Coping Espiritual-Religioso. Participantes do sexo masculino, practicantes de religión católica y con mayores scores de Coping Espiritual-Religioso presentaron mejor percepción de calidad de vida, sugiriendo la posibilidad de estimular esa estrategia de enfrentamiento en pacientes bajo cuidados paliativos.

  2. Delivering quality improvements in patient care: the application of the Leicester Model of interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, A; Anderson, E S

    2012-01-01

    This paper places the importance of evidence-based models of interprofessional education (IPE) within the context of a changing National Health Service (NHS). The coalition government has placed integrated care at the heart of its vision for England's health system. Its principles are to put patients at the centre of the NHS, empower clinicians to lead commissioning and change the emphasis of measurement to quality clinical outcomes. As a result, NHS services are being increasingly tendered along evidence-based care pathways and commissioners are introducing payment by results tariffs, requiring providers to achieve quality outcomes as a requirement of full payment. We argue that in preparing the health and social care workforce for outcome-based practice, the development of technical skills should be complemented with skills for effective teamworking and collaborative practice. This paper shares the achievements of the Leicester Model of IPE which is underpinned by theoretical models of learning and implemented entirely in clinical practice; mixed research methods demonstrate that its learning potential is as relevant today as when it was first implemented in 1996. Our extensive research evidence demonstrates that students and healthcare professionals undertaking these programmes are enabled to perceive care pathways from service and providers perspectives; they gain valuable insights into how teams balance task- and patient-related issues, offer clarity about the team's effectiveness and gain new insights into collaborative opportunities to address patients' needs. We demonstrate that models such as ours offer evidence-based solutions which will support the achievement of quality outcomes for service providers, many of whom are reviewing their business plans to address the financial implications of payment by results. The current NHS reforms provide a hugely important lever in which IPE can come of age - in return we need to ensure that our NHS colleagues are

  3. Quality Measures for the Care of Adult Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotti, Lynn Marie; Goldstein, Cathy A.; Harrod, Christopher G.; Koo, Brian B.; Sharon, Denise; Zak, Rochelle; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned several Workgroups to develop quality measures for the care of patients with common sleep disorders, including adults with restless legs syndrome (RLS). Using the AASM process for quality measure development, the RLS Work-group developed three target outcomes for RLS management, including improving the accuracy of diagnosis, reducing symptom severity, and minimizing treatment complications. Seven processes were developed to support these outcomes. To achieve the outcome of improving accuracy of diagnosis, the use of accepted diagnostic criteria and assessment of iron stores are recommended. To realize the outcome of decreasing symptom severity, routine assessment of severity and provision of evidence-based treatment are recommended. To support the outcome of minimizing treatment complications, counseling about potential side effects and assessing for augmentation and impulse control disorders, when indicated, are recommended. Further research is needed to validate optimal practice processes to achieve best outcomes in adult patients with RLS. Citation: Trotti LM, Goldstein CA, Harrod CG, Koo BB, Sharon D, Zak R, Chervin RD. Quality measures for the care of adult patients with restless legs syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):293–310. PMID:25700882

  4. Relationship among health-related quality of life, depression and awareness of home care services in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Ülkü; Bayrak Kahraman, Burcu; Kaynak, İlknur; Görgülü, Ümit

    2016-11-01

    The present descriptive study was carried out to determine the relationship between health-related quality of life, depression and awareness of home care services among elderly patients. Patients aged 65 years or older staying at the surgery and internal medicine clinics were included in the study. The "Patient Introduction Form," "Short Form-36 Quality of Life Questionnaire" and "Geriatric Depression Scale" were utilized in the collection of data. In the present study, it was determined that only approximately half of elderly patients (54.9%) knew the concept of home care, most of them had not previously received home care and requested home care related to medical care. The mean scores were lower in some areas of the quality of life questionnaire in some factors that could influence home care awareness. These factors were determined as: female sex, history of falling, chronic illness, functionally, moderately or severely dependent, no previous receipt of home care and wishing to receive home care. The home care requirement of elderly patients can be influenced by many physiological, psychological and social factors that can affect their quality of life. Thus, it is of utmost importance that medical professionals evaluate the quality of life of elderly individuals and its influencing factors. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 1211-1219. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Quality of anticoagulation control among patients with atrial fibrillation: An experience of a tertiary care center in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Alyousif

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Quality of anticoagulation in patients with AF receiving medical care in a tertiary care hospital was suboptimal, with nearly 40% of the time spent outside the therapeutic range. Methods to improve anticoagulation control among patients with AF should be implemented.

  6. The quality and economic impact of disruptive behaviors on clinical outcomes of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Alan H

    2011-01-01

    Disruptive behaviors have been shown to have a negative impact on work relationships, team collaboration, communication efficiency, and process flow, all of which can adversely affect patient safety and quality of care. Despite the growing recognition of the damage that can be done, there are still pockets of resistance to taking action to address the issue head-on. Given the new call to action from the Joint Commission accreditation standard and the growing public accountability for patient safety, organizations need to recognize the full impact of disruptive behaviors and implement appropriate policies, procedures, and educational programs to raise levels of awareness regarding the seriousness of the issue, hold individuals accountable for their behavior, and provide training and support not only to reduce the incidence and consequences of disruptive events but also to improve efficiency of communication and team collaboration in an effort to improve outcomes of care.

  7. Health related quality of life in Critically ill Patients A study of health related quality of life in critically ill patients admitted on the Intensive Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.M. Hofhuis (José)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHealth related quality of life (HRQOL) is a relevant outcome measure for patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Long term outcome for physical and psychological factors, functional status and social interactions are becoming more and more important both for doctors and nurse

  8. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Gvozdanovi_

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on the enterprise information systems that will aim to support end-to-end business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: (1 to provide efficient healthcare-related data management in support of decision-making processes; (2 to support a continuous process of healthcare resource spending optimisation. The first project is the Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS on the primary care level; this encompasses the integration of all primary point-of-care facilities and subjects with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Croatian National Institute of Public Health. In years to come, IHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of health care (that is, hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories into a single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of Croatian public healthcare system strategy aims and goals, and focuses on properties and characteristics of the primary care project implementation that started in 2003; it achieved a major milestone in early 2007 - the official grand opening of the project with 350 GPs already fully connected to the integrated healthcare information infrastructure based on the IHCIS solution.

  9. Clinical informatics to improve quality of care: a population-based system for patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Chaudhry

    2009-06-01

    Conclusions A clinical informatics system, used to deliver proactive, co-ordinated care to a population of patients with diabetes mellitus, can improve process and also quality outcome measures. Larger studies are needed to confirm these early findings.

  10. The Impact of Patient-Centered Medical Homes on Quality of Care and Medication Adherence in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, JaeJin

    2016-11-01

    Current evidence suggests that patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) potentially increase overall quality of disease management, including preventive care. However, there are mixed findings regarding quality of diabetes care, and little evidence exists with respect to the effect of PCMHs on medication adherence in patients with diabetes. To investigate associations between PCMHs and process measures of diabetes care, as well as adherence to oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) in patients with diabetes in a nationally representative U.S. Using the 2009-2013 longitudinal data files from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, adult diabetes patients were identified. Patients whose usual sources of care have all PCMH features at baseline (i.e., enhanced access after hours and online, shared decision making, and enhanced patient engagement) were categorized as the PCMH group, which was compared with patients without PCMH features. Process measures of diabetes care included ≥ 2 hemoglobin A1c tests and ≥ 1 cholesterol test, foot examination, dilated eye examination, and flu vaccination during 1 year of follow-up. Medication possession ratio (MPR) during follow-up was calculated for patients with OHAs without any insulin use, with MPR ≥ 80% considered to be adherent to OHAs. Univariate and multivariate regression models considering sampling strata and weights were used to examine the association between the PCMH and study outcomes. A total of 3,334 patients with diabetes was identified, representing 61 million U.S. lives. The mean (SE) age was 61.6 (0.3) years, and 52.4% of patients were female. The mean (SE) years of having diabetes was 12.0 (0.2) years. Approximately 11.4% of the patients were categorized as the PCMH group at baseline, and only 3.6% of those patients remained in the PCMH group for 2 years. Of the diabetic patients identified, only 26.9% met all of the diabetes care process measure criteria defined in this study. A higher proportion of patients met

  11. 78 FR 69418 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans, Quality Rating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... Care Act; Standards Related to Essential Health Benefits, Actuarial Value, and Accreditation; Final... state-of-science for measuring health care quality, science and technology do not yet allow us to...

  12. Better experiences with quality of care predict well-being of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Murray Cramm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to (1 identify improvements in care quality and well-being of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the Netherlands and (2 investigate the longitudinal relationship between these factors. Methods: This longitudinal study was conducted among patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease enrolled in the Kennemer Lucht care programme in the Netherlands. Biomarker data (lung capacity were collected at patients’ health care practices in 2012. Complete case analysis was conducted, and the multiple imputation technique allowed us to report pooled results from imputed datasets. Results: Surveys were filled out by 548/1303 (42% patients at T0 (2012 and 569/996 (57% remaining participants at T1. Quality of care improved significantly (p < 0.05. Analyses adjusted for well-being at T0, age, educational level, marital status, gender, lung function and health behaviours showed that patients’ assessments of the quality of chronic care delivery at T0 (p < 0.01 and changes therein (p < 0.001 predicted patients’ well-being at T1. Conclusion: These results clearly show that the quality of care and changes therein are important for the well-being of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the primary care setting. Practice implications: To improve quality of care for chronically ill patients, multicomponent interventions may be needed.

  13. Care articulation by the Family Physician: improvement in the quality of life in terminal patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Filipe Cavadas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: According to the definition of the role of the Family Physician (FP presented in the statement of the European Wonca 2002, one of her/his features is the ability of coordination of care, and management of the interface with other specialties. However, there are serious problems of coordination between the levels of assistance, as showed by the discontinuity of care when patients are hospitalized. With the aim of raising awareness and analyze a particular case of interface between the Primary Health Care (PHC and Hospital, and how important is the success of a good collaboration, this case is reported. Description of case: Male, 50 years old, caucasian race, inserted into a nuclear family in the stage VI Duvall’s cycle. A gastric adenocarcinoma by his FP was diagnosed at 49 years old. The patient was referenced to urgent consultation of general surgery. With various surgical complications he had a long internment. A poorly differentiated and infiltrating gastric carcinoma at the stage T3 N1 Mx, with poor prognosis, was confirmed. There was serious lack of interface and gaps in information between the hospital and the PHC. There was a bad care of the patient, with worsening of his condition. At the insistence of the FP, the articulation becomes effective and there was improved in quality of care and of the general condition of the patient. Conclusion: A proper interface and coordination of care contributed to better quality of life and satisfaction of patients, with positive repercussions for their families, to health professionals involved and to the National Health Service. The completion of the FP core competencies will only be possible when his/her proper function will be recognized and known by all the other health professionals.Note: The speciality physician denomination changes according to the country; in Brazil, it receives the name of Medicina de Família e Comunidade. In Portugal, country of the author of this paper

  14. The health mediators-qualified interpreters contributing to health care quality among Romanian Roma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Gabriel; Gramma, Rodica; Enache, Angela; Pârvu, Andrada; Moisa, Ştefana Maria; Dumitraş, Silvia; Ioan, Beatrice

    2013-11-01

    In order to assure optimal care of patients with chronic illnesses, it is necessary to take into account the cultural factors that may influence health-related behaviors, health practices, and health-seeking behavior. Despite the increasing number of Romanian Roma, research regarding their beliefs and practices related to healthcare is rather poor. The aim of this paper is to present empirical evidence of specificities in the practice of healthcare among Romanian Roma patients and their caregivers. Using a qualitative exploratory descriptive design, this study is based on data gathered through three focus groups with 30 health mediators in the counties of Iasi and Cluj (Romania). We identified various barriers to access to healthcare for Roma patients: lack of financial resources and health insurance coverage, lack of cognitive resources or lack of personal hygiene, but also important cultural issues, such as the shame of being ill, family function, disclosure of disease-related information, patient's autonomy, attitudes towards illness and health practices, that should be considered in order to create a culturally sensitive environment in Romanian medical facilities:… The role of the health mediators within the context of cultural diversity is also discussed, as cultural brokers contributing to health care quality among Romanian Roma patients Bridging cultural differences may improve patient-healthcare provider relationships, but may have limited impact in reducing ethnic disparities, unless coupled with efforts of Roma communities to get involved in creating and implementing health policies.

  15. Patient-Centered Dialysis Care: Depression, Pain, and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable advancements have been made in the provision of chronic dialysis therapy since its inception decades ago. A series of studies inform current dialysis dosing recommendations, while advancements in strategies to treat mineral and bone disease, acid-base and electrolyte disturbances, and anemia have facilitated the management of these well-recognized complications of ESRD. The collective result has been a model of chronic dialysis care focused principally on the achievement of metabolic and dialysis-related targets. In fact, guidelines such as the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative put forth by the National Kidney Foundation recommend metrics that characterize successful dialysis care, including the attainment of specific solute clearance targets; maintenance of hemoglobin, calcium, phosphorous, and parathyroid hormone levels within target ranges; and the preferred use of primary arteriovenous fistulae for vascular access. This focus on serologic and dialysis-specific outcomes has helped renal providers manage the biochemical effects related to the loss of kidney function and has reduced ESRD-related morbidity and mortality. Yet, absent from this model of care is an emphasis on the treatment of bothersome symptoms and the impact of such treatment on quality of life (QOL). Among the many symptoms that affect patients on chronic dialysis, depression and pain are particularly common, strongly associated with decrements in QOL, and potentially treatable. This review discusses key research findings and unanswered questions pertaining to the prevalence, significance, and treatment of depression and pain and the effect of such treatment on QOL in patients dependent on chronic dialysis, with the broad goal of incorporating symptom management strategies into a paradigm of patient-centered dialysis care. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Impact of healthcare informatics on quality of patient care and health services

    CERN Document Server

    Srinivasan Sridhar, Divya

    2013-01-01

    Recent healthcare reform and its provisions have pushed health information technology (HIT) into the forefront. Higher life expectancies, fewer medical errors, lower costs, and improved transparency are all possible through HIT. Taking an integrated approach, Impact of Healthcare Informatics on Quality of Patient Care and Health Services examines the various types of organizations, including nonprofit hospitals, for-profit hospitals, community health centers, and government hospitals. By doing so, it provides you with a comparative perspective of how different organizations adapt and use the t

  17. Horizontal Violence and the Quality and Safety of Patient Care: A Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Purpora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years, nurses in international clinical and academic settings have voiced concern about horizontal violence among nurses and its consequences. However, no known framework exists to guide research on the topic to explain these consequences. This paper presents a conceptual model that was developed from four theories to illustrate how the quality and safety of patient care could be affected by horizontal violence. Research is needed to validate the new model and to gather empirical evidence of the consequences of horizontal violence on which to base recommendations for future research, education, and practice.

  18. Patients' experiences with continuum of care across hospitals. A multilevel analysis of Consumer Quality Index Continuum of Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Berendsen, Annette J.

    Objective: Communication between professionals is essential because it contributes to an optimal continuum of care. Whether patients experience adequate continuum of care is uncertain. To address this, a questionnaire was developed to elucidate this care process from a patients' perspective. In this

  19. Quality of Cancer Care Among Foreign-Born and US-Born Patients With Lung or Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Smith; He, Yulei; Ayanian, John Z.

    2010-01-01

      BACKGROUND: Disparities in care have been documented for foreign-born cancer patients in the United States. However, few data are available regarding patients with lung and colorectal cancer. In the current study, the authors assessed whether patient-reported quality and receipt of recommended...... and radiotherapy for stage II/III rectal cancer (AOR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.12-0.99). Rates of other treatments did not differ significantly by nativity. CONCLUSIONS: Foreign-born cancer patients reported lower quality of care and were less likely to receive some cancer therapies than patients born in the Unites States...

  20. Intergroup communication between hospital doctors: implications for quality of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, David G; Watson, Bernadette M; Gallois, Cindy; Ward, Michael; Leggett, Barbara A

    2009-12-01

    Hospitals involve a complex socio-technical health system, where communication failures influence the quality of patient care. Research indicates the importance of social identity and intergroup relationships articulated through power, control, status and competition. This study focused on interspecialty communication among doctors for patients requiring the involvement of multiple specialist departments. The paper reports on an interview study in Australia, framed by social identity and communication accommodation theories of doctors' experiences of managing such patients, to explore the impact of communication. Interviews were undertaken with 45 doctors working in a large metropolitan hospital, and were analysed using Leximancer (text mining software) and interpretation of major themes. Findings indicated that intergroup conflict is a central influence on communication. Contested responsibilities emerged from a model of care driven by single-specialty ownership of the patient, with doctors allowed to evade responsibility for patients over whom they had no sense of ownership. Counter-accommodative communication, particularly involving interpersonal control, appeared as important for reinforcing social identity and winning conflicts. Strategies to resolve intergroup conflict must address structural issues generating an intergroup climate and evoke interpersonal salience to moderate their effect.

  1. Quality of Care for Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases: Data for Accreditation Plan in Primary Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    There are scarce reports in the literature on factors affecting the assessment of the quality of care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Such information is relevant in the accreditation process on implementing the healthcare. The study group consisted of 133 adult patients with chronic respiratory diseases and 125 adult patients with chronic non-respiratory diseases. In the present study, the level of satisfaction from healthcare provided by the primary healthcare unit, disease acceptance, quality of life, health behaviors, and met needs were examined, as well as associations between variables with the use of correspondence analysis. The results are that in patients with chronic respiratory diseases an increase in satisfaction depends on the improvement of well-being in the mental sphere. The lack of problems with obtaining a referral to a specialist and a higher level of fulfilled needs also have a positive effect. Additionally, low levels of satisfaction should be expected in those patients with chronic respiratory diseases who wait for an appointment in front of the office for a long time, report problems with obtaining a referral to additional tests, present a low level of health behaviors, and have a low index of benefits.

  2. Cohorting Dengue Patients Improves the Quality of Care and Clinical Outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy C S Lum

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of dengue among adults in Malaysia and other countries has important implications for health services. Before 2004, in order to cope with the surge in adult dengue admissions, each of the six medical wards in a university hospital took turns daily to admit and manage patients with dengue. Despite regular in-house training, the implementation of the WHO 1997 dengue case management guidelines by the multiple medical teams was piecemeal and resulted in high variability of care. A restructuring of adult dengue inpatient service in 2004 resulted in all patients being admitted to one ward under the care of the infectious disease unit. Hospital and Intensive Care Unit admission criteria, discharge criteria and clinical laboratory testing were maintained unchanged throughout the study period.To evaluate the impact of cohorting adult dengue patients on the quality of care and the clinical outcome in a university hospital in Malaysia.A pre (2003 and post-intervention (2005-6 retrospective study was undertaken.Cohorting all dengue patients under the care of the Infectious Disease team in a designated ward in 2004.The number of patients enrolled was 352 in 2003, 785 in 2005 and 1158 in 2006. The evaluation and detection of haemorrhage remained high (>90% and unchanged throughout the study period. The evaluation of plasma leakage increased from 35.4% pre-intervention to 78.8% post-intervention (p = <0.001 while its detection increased from 11.4% to 41.6% (p = <0.001. Examination for peripheral perfusion was undertaken in only 13.1% of patients pre-intervention, with a significant increase post-intervention, 18.6% and 34.2% respectively, p = <0.001. Pre-intervention, more patients had hypotension (21.5% than detected peripheral hypoperfusion (11.4%, indicating that clinicians recognised shock only when patients developed hypotension. In contrast, post-intervention, clinicians recognised peripheral hypoperfusion as an early sign of

  3. Private ownership of primary care providers associated with patient perceived quality of care: A comparative cross-sectional survey in three big Chinese cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaolin; Yin, Jia; Wong, Samuel Y S; Griffiths, Sian M; Zou, Guanyang; Shi, Leiyu

    2017-01-01

    Ownership of primary care providers varies in different cities in China. Shanghai represented the full public ownership model of primary providers; Shenzhen had public-owned but private-operated providers; and Hong Kong represented the full private ownership. The study aims to assess the association of primary care ownership and patient perceived quality of care in 3 Chinese megacities.We conducted multistage stratified random surveys in 2013 in the 3 cities. Quality scores of primary care were measured using the validated primary care assessment tools. Multivariate linear regression models were used to compare quality scores after controlling potential confounders of patient demographic, socioeconomic, and healthcare utilization factors.Overall, 797 primary care users in Shanghai, 802 in Shenzhen, and 1325 in Hong Kong participated in the study. The mean total quality scores were reported the highest in Shanghai (28.39), followed by Shenzhen (25.82) and then Hong Kong (25.21) (P quality and less equitable care distribution. In China, it suggests that it may be beneficial to promote public-owned and nonprofit providers. Promoting privatization in primary care may be at the cost of quality and equity of primary care.

  4. Prescription for antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Buregyeya, Esther; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety in the p......OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety......, available antibiotics, knowledge on treatment of pneumonia in children aged antibiotic. RESULTS: A total of 170 registered drug shops were surveyed between August and October 2014. The majority of drug shops, 93.......5% were prescribing antibiotics, especially amoxicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (septrin). The professional qualification of a provider was significantly associated with this practice, p=0.04; where lower cadre staff (nursing assistants and enrolled nurses) overprescribed antibiotics. A third...

  5. Quality improvement by implementing an integrated oncological care pathway for breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeve, J.; de Munck, L.; Otter, Renee; de Vries, J.; Siesling, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim: In cancer care, more and more systemized approaches such as care pathways are used to reduce variation, reduce waiting- and throughput times and to improve quality of care. The aim of this study was to determine whether the implementation of a multidisciplinary breast cancer path

  6. Quality improvement by implementing an integrated oncological care pathway for breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, van J.; Munck, de L.; Otter, R.; Vries, de J.; Siesling, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim In cancer care, more and more systemized approaches such as care pathways are used to reduce variation, reduce waiting- and throughput times and to improve quality of care. The aim of this study was to determine whether the implementation of a multidisciplinary breast cancer pathw

  7. Improving fertility care. The role of guidelines, quality indicators and patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines can help improve the quality of care, and decrease variation in delivered care between settings. However, as guidelines do not implement themselves, efforts should be made to improve current guideline implementation. For clinical fertility care, we performed a large mult

  8. Quality of life and use of health care resources among patients with chronic depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villoro R

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Renata Villoro,1 María Merino,1 Alvaro Hidalgo-Vega,2 1Department of Health Economics, Instituto Max Weber, Madrid, 2Department of Economics and Finance, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo, Spain Purpose: This study estimates the health-related quality of life and the health care resource utilization of patients diagnosed with chronic depression (CD in Spain. Patients and methods: We used the Spanish National Health Survey 2011–2012, a cross-sectional survey representative at the national level, that selects people aged between 18 and 64 years (n=14,691. We estimated utility indices through the EuroQol five-dimensional descriptive system questionnaire included in the survey. We calculated percentage use of health care resources (medical visits, hospitalizations, emergency services, and drug consumption and average number of resources used when available. A systematic comparison was made between people diagnosed with CD and other chronic conditions (OCCs. The chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test, and Kruskal–Wallis test were used to determine the statistical significance of differences between comparison groups. Multivariate analyses (Poisson regression, logistic regression, and linear regression were also carried out to assess the relationship between quality of life and consumption of health care resources. Results: Approximately, 6.1% of the subjects aged between 18 and 64 years were diagnosed with CD (average age 48.3±11 years, 71.7% females. After controlling for age, sex, and total number of comorbidities, a diagnosis of CD reduced utility scores by 0.09 (P<0.05 vs OCCs, and increased the average number of hospitalizations by 15%, the average number of days at hospital by 51%, and the average number of visits to emergency services by 15% (P<0.05. CD also increased the average number of visits to secondary care by 14% and visits to general practitioners by 4%. People with CD had a higher probability of consuming drugs than

  9. Association between obesity, quality of life, physical activity and health service utilization in primary care patients with osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemann, T.J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Herman, K.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of obesity with quality of life, health service utilization and physical activity in a large sample of primary care patients with osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Data were retrieved from the PraxArt project, representing a cohort of 1021 primary care pati

  10. Better Patient Care At High-Quality Hospitals May Save Medicare Money And Bolster Episode-Based Payment Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Thomas C; Greaves, Felix; Zheng, Jie; Orav, E John; Zinner, Michael J; Jha, Ashish K

    2016-09-01

    US policy makers are making efforts to simultaneously improve the quality of and reduce spending on health care through alternative payment models such as bundled payment. Bundled payment models are predicated on the theory that aligning financial incentives for all providers across an episode of care will lower health care spending while improving quality. Whether this is true remains unknown. Using national Medicare fee-for-service claims for the period 2011-12 and data on hospital quality, we evaluated how thirty- and ninety-day episode-based spending were related to two validated measures of surgical quality-patient satisfaction and surgical mortality. We found that patients who had major surgery at high-quality hospitals cost Medicare less than those who had surgery at low-quality institutions, for both thirty- and ninety-day periods. The difference in Medicare spending between low- and high-quality hospitals was driven primarily by postacute care, which accounted for 59.5 percent of the difference in thirty-day episode spending, and readmissions, which accounted for 19.9 percent. These findings suggest that efforts to achieve value through bundled payment should focus on improving care at low-quality hospitals and reducing unnecessary use of postacute care. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  11. Does a "continuous care model" affect the quality of life of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmjoee, Nasrin; Ebadi, Abbas; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Hosseini, Marziyeh

    2017-03-01

    The physical and mental needs of patients with coronary heart disease are affected by both the disease and the heart surgery in different ways. Such diverse needs require different approaches. A continuous care model, which involves orientation, sensitization, control, and evaluation, may favorably influence patient outcomes following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We were interested to ascertain whether a continuous care model might lead to improved quality of life, compared with a routine care model, in patients undergoing CABG. A total of 66 patients scheduled for CABG were identified and randomized to receive either continuous care (based on the continuous care model) or routine postoperative management for 2 months. The subjects' quality of life and its physical and mental dimensions were measured by the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey. Each dimension was scored between 0 and 100, and higher scores indicated better quality of life. One and 2 months after the intervention, the scores of quality of life and its two dimensions were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group (P care model can promote health-related quality of life in patients after CABG.

  12. Caring for the patient, caring for the record: an ethnographic study of 'back office' work in upholding quality of care in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglehurst, Deborah; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2015-04-23

    The quality of information recorded about patient care is considered key to improving the overall quality, safety and efficiency of patient care. Assigning codes to patients' records is an important aspect of this documentation. Current interest in large datasets in which individual patient data are collated (e.g. proposed NHS care.data project) pays little attention to the details of how 'data' get onto the record. This paper explores the work of summarising and coding records, focusing on 'back office' practices, identifying contributors and barriers to quality of care. Ethnographic observation (187 hours) of clinical, management and administrative staff in two UK general practices with contrasting organisational characteristics. This involved observation of working practices, including shadowing, recording detailed field notes, naturalistic interviews and analysis of key documents relating to summarising and coding. Ethnographic analysis drew on key sensitizing concepts to build a 'thick description' of coding practices, drawing these together in a narrative synthesis. Coding and summarising electronic patient records is complex work. It depends crucially on nuanced judgements made by administrators who combine their understanding of: clinical diagnostics; classification systems; how healthcare is organised; particular working practices of individual colleagues; current health policy. Working with imperfect classification systems, diagnostic uncertainty and a range of local practical constraints, they manage a moral tension between their idealised aspiration of a 'gold standard' record and a pragmatic recognition that this is rarely achievable in practice. Adopting a range of practical workarounds, administrators position themselves as both formally accountable to their employers (general practitioners), and informally accountability to individual patients, in a coding process which is shaped not only by the 'facts' of the case, but by ongoing working

  13. Application of Colostomy Patient Care Quality Care%结肠造口患者护理中优质护理的应用探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛芳苑

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨延续护理在结肠造口患者护理中的效果。方法选取我院2010年1月~2015年1月收治的结肠造口患者共50例,随机分为观察组以及对照组各25例,对照组给予围术期常规护理,观察组给予优质护理,观察两组患者的自我护理质量以及生活质量。结果观察组患者自我护理能力和生活质量均优于对照组,两者相比差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论结肠造口患者应用优质护理有着良好的临床效果,能够提高患者的自我护理质量以及生活质质量。%Objective To investigate the effect of extended care colostomy patient nursing.Methods January 2010 ~ January 2015 ,colostomy patients admitted in a total of 50 cases were randomly divided into two groups and the control group, with 25 patients in the control group were given routine perioperative care, observation group was given high-quality care , were observed in patients with self-care quality and quality of life.Results The patient self-care ability and quality of life than the control group, both statisticaly significant difference compared (P<0.05).Conclusion Colostomy patients treated with high-quality care with good clinical results, to improve the quality of patient self-care and quality of life quality.

  14. Patient-centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1).

  15. Service Quality Of Diagnostic Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology In A Tertiary Care Hospital Of Lahore (Process Measure As Patient's Perspective).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Zainab; Usmani, Rabia Arshed; Rizvi, Amna; Wazir, Salim; Zahra, Taskeen; Rasool, Hafza

    2017-01-01

    Quality of any service is the most important aspect for the manufacturer as well as the consumer. The primary objective of any nation's health system is to provide supreme quality health care services to its patients. The objective of this study was to assess the quality of diagnostic fine needle aspiration cytology service in a tertiary care hospital. As Patient's perspectives provide valuable information on quality of process, therefore, patient's perception in terms of satisfaction with the service was measured. In this cross sectional analytical study, 291 patients undergoing fine needle aspiration cytology in Mayo Hospital were selected by systematic sampling technique. Information regarding satisfaction of patients with four dimensions of service quality process, namely "procedure, sterilization, conduct and competency of doctor" was collected through interview on questionnaire. The questionnaire was developed on SERVQUAL model, a measurement tool, for quality assessment of services provided to patients. All items were assessed on 2- point likert scale (0=dissatisfied, 1=satisfied). Frequencies and percentages of satisfied and dissatisfied patients were recorded for each item and all items in each dimension were scored. If the percentage of sum of all item scores of a dimension was ≥60, the dimension was 'good quality'. Whereas quality' dimension. Data was analysed using epi-info-3.5.1. Fisher test was applied to check statistical significance. (p-value service quality process, Procedure (48.8%), Sterilization (51.5%) and practitioner conduct (50.9%) were perceived as 'poor' by the patients. Only practitioner competency (67.4%) was perceived as 'good'. Comparison of dimensions of service quality scoring with overall level of patient satisfaction revealed that all 4 dimensions were significantly related to patient dissatisfaction (pservice quality of therapeutic and diagnostic procedures in public hospitals should be routinely monitored from the patients

  16. The quality of care delivered to Parkinson's disease patients in the U.S. Pacific Northwest Veterans Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Eric

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common chronic neurological disorder of the elderly. Despite the fact that a comprehensive review of general health care in the United States showed that the quality of care delivered to patients usually falls below professional standards, there is limited data on the quality of care for patients with PD. Methods Using the administrative database, the Pacific Northwest Veterans Health Administration (VHA Data Warehouse, a population of PD patients with encounters from 10/1/98-12/31/04 were identified. A random sample of 350 patient charts underwent further review for diagnostic evaluation. All patients whose records revealed a physician diagnosis of definite or possible Idiopathic Parkinson's (IPD disease (n = 150 were included in a medical chart review to evaluate adherence to five evidence-based quality of care indicators. Results For those care indicators with good inter-rater reliability, 16.6% of care received by PD patients was adherent for annual depression screening, 23.4% of care was adherent for annual fall screening and, 67.3% of care was adherent for management of urinary incontinence. Patients receiving specialty care were more likely to be adherent with fall screening than those not receiving specialty care OR = 2.3, 95%CI = 1.2–4.2, but less likely to be adherent with management of urinary incontinence, OR = 0.3, 95%CI = 0.1–0.8. Patients receiving care outside the VA system were more likely to be adherent with depression screening OR = 2.4, 95%CI = >1.0–5.5 and fall screening OR = 2.2, 95%CI = 1.1–4.4. Conclusion We found very low rates of adherence for annual screening for depression and falls for PD patients but reasonable adherence rates for management of urinary incontinence. Interestingly, receiving concurrent specialty care did not necessarily result in higher adherence for all care indicators suggesting some coordination and role responsibility

  17. Improving the quality of palliative care for ambulatory patients with lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Plessen, Christian; Aslaksen, Aslak

    2005-01-01

    PROBLEM: Most patients with advanced lung cancer currently receive much of their health care, including chemotherapy, as outpatients. Patients have to deal with the complex and time consuming logistics of ambulatory cancer care. At the same time, members of staff often waste considerable time......; satisfaction among patients. STRATEGIES FOR CHANGE: Rescheduled patients' appointments, automated retrieval of blood test results, systematic reporting in patients' files, design of an information leaflet, and refurnishing of the waiting area at the clinic. EFFECTS OF CHANGE: Interventions resulted...

  18. Impact of nutritional status on the quality of life of advanced cancer patients in hospice home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmoradi, Negar; Kandiah, Mirnalini; Peng, Loh Su

    2009-01-01

    Cancer patients frequently experience malnutrition and this is an important factor in impaired quality of life. This cross-sectional study examined the association between global quality of life and its various subscales with nutritional status among 61 (33 females and 28 males) advanced cancer patients cared for by selected hospices in peninsular Malaysia. The Patient Generated-Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) and the Hospice Quality of Life Index (HQLI) were used to assess nutritional status and quality of life, respectively. Nine (14.7%) patients were well-nourished, 32 (52.5%) were moderately or suspected of being malnourished while 20 (32.8%) of them were severely malnourished. The total HQLI mean score for these patients was 189.9-/+51.7, with possible scores ranging from 0 to 280. The most problem areas in these patients were in the domain of functional well-being and the least problems were found in the social/spiritual domain. PG-SGA scores significantly correlated with total quality of life scores (r2= 0.38, pnutritional status exhibited a lower quality of life. Advanced cancer patients with poor nutritional status have a diminished quality of life. These findings suggest that there is a need for a comprehensive nutritional intervention for improving nutritional status and quality of life in terminally ill cancer patients under hospice care.

  19. Nurse health-related quality of life: associations with patient and ward characteristics in Japanese general acute care wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Yumiko; Yonekura, Yuki; Fukahori, Hiroki

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the factors affecting nurse health-related quality of life (HRQOL) by considering the patient characteristics and ward characteristics. Nurse health-related quality of life is an important health outcome, and should be promoted for quality nursing care. This cross-sectional study was conducted on nurses who work in general acute care wards in three university hospitals in metropolitan Japan. Multilevel analysis was conducted to investigate possible factors related to nurse health-related quality of life. Nurses who worked at a ward had a significantly lower physical health score (β = -0.13, P characteristics. Further large-scale studies are needed in order to investigate the effect of hospital characteristics on nurse health-related quality of life. Increasing the number of nurses' aides and delegating assistance with ADL to them could support nurse health-related quality of life in the acute care setting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Using a multi-method, user centred, prospective hazard analysis to assess care quality and patient safety in a care pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escoto Kamisha

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care pathways can be complex, often involving multiple care providers and as such are recognised as containing multiple opportunities for error. Prospective hazard analysis methods may be useful for evaluating care provided across primary and secondary care pathway boundaries. These methods take into account the views of users (staff and patients when determining where potential hazards may lie. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of prospective hazard analysis methods when assessing quality and safety in care pathways that lie across primary and secondary care boundaries. Methods Development of a process map of the care pathway for patients entering into a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD supported discharge programme. Triangulation of information from: care process mapping, semi-structured interviews with COPD patients, semi-structured interviews with COPD staff, two round modified Delphi study and review of prioritised quality and safety challenges by health care staff. Results Interview themes emerged under the headings of quality of care and patient safety. Quality and safety concerns were mostly raised in relation to communication, for example, communication with other hospital teams. The three highest ranked safety concerns from the modified Delphi review were: difficulties in accessing hospital records, information transfer to primary care and failure to communicate medication changes to primary care. Conclusion This study has demonstrated the feasibility of using mixed methods to review the quality and safety of care in a care pathway. By using multiple research methods it was possible to get a clear picture of service quality variations and also to demonstrate which points in the care pathway had real potential for patient safety incidents or system failures to occur. By using these methods to analyse one condition specific care pathway it was possible to uncover a number of hospital

  1. The relationship between quality of care and self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional survey in primary care in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Yolanda; Campbell, Stephen M; Hann, Mark; Bower, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Achieving glycaemic control in diabetes reduces complications and improves outcomes. Glycaemic control requires both good quality clinical care and effective self-management support. However, the relationship between these factors in routine clinical practice is unclear. To evaluate baseline levels of self-management and clinical quality of care in patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care in Mexico and to explore relationships between measures of self-management and clinical quality of care. The sample consisted of adults (N=205) diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for over a year and registered at one of five practices in the Mexican Institute of Social Security in Aguascalientes. Self-management and quality of care were measured using medical record review and interviews, including validated measures of diabetes knowledge, self-care behaviours, self-efficacy, treatment intensification, continuity of care, doctor-patient communication, and patient satisfaction with diabetes care. HbA1c and cholesterol tests were taken. There were few associations between measures of self-management, and between measures of the quality of clinical care. 'Strong' knowledge about medical prescription was associated with higher diabetes knowledge (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.32). Diabetes self-efficacy was associated with self-care behaviours (OR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.26 to 1.81). Patient-doctor communication was associated with continuity of care (Chi-squared = 11.03, P <0.05), with patient satisfaction (β = 6.17, 95% CI 4.47 to 7.93) and with diabetes self-efficacy (β = 0.70, 95% CI 0.19 to 1.20, P <0.01). Patient satisfaction was associated with continuity of care (F = 7.82, P <0.001). The associations between measures of self-management and quality of care were modest. Patients who were achieving high levels of one aspect of care were not necessarily receiving high levels of the other. This indicates that different factors are likely to be driving each aspect of care and highlights

  2. The Veterans Health Administration: quality, value, accountability, and information as transforming strategies for patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, Johnathan B; Kolodner, Robert M; Roswell, Robert H

    2005-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration is the United States' largest integrated health system. Once disparaged as a bureaucracy providing mediocre care, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) reinvented itself during the past decade through a policy shift mandating structural and organizational change, rationalization of resource allocation, explicit measurement and accountability for quality and value, and development of an information infrastructure supporting the needs of patients, clinicians, and administrators. Today, the VA is recognized for leadership in clinical informatics and performance improvement, cares for more patients with proportionally fewer resources, and sets national benchmarks in patient satisfaction and for 18 indicators of quality in disease prevention and treatment.

  3. QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN HEALTH CARE - CONTRIBUTING TO PATIENT SAFETY AND EFFICIENCY OF BUSINESS OPERATION

    OpenAIRE

    Nevenka Kovac

    2014-01-01

    In order to ensure efficient and effective health care, of equal high quality and accessibility, at all the levels of healthcare and across the entire Croatian territory, all operators in health services are required to establish, develop and maintain a system for assuring and improving the quality in healthcare. Legal requirement to introduce quality management systems into healthcare institutions notwithstanding, a quality management system is equally important in regard to the provision of...

  4. The arduous and challenging journey of improving patient safety and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther

    2013-12-01

    The 20th century has seen dramatic improvements in quality, efficiency, and productivity of the industrial, manufacturing, and selected service sectors through the redesign of the management and production processes. Moreover, the health care sector, plagued by overuse, underuse, and misuse of care remained a laggard in adopting needed changes to improve quality, effectiveness, and delivery. The change agent may have been the 2001 report by the Institute of Medicine, which shocked the collective conscience of the industry with the revelation of the alarming statistics of death owing to preventable medical errors. A variety of methodologies have since been adopted by the health care sector with mixed successes. However, scant attention has been given to the historical significance of Florence Nightingale pioneering quality management in nursing care over a century ago with her use of statistics to influence health care decisions, to enhance quality care delivery, and to improve facility design. This article addresses the abstract concept of quality, its illusive nature, and multidimensionality from different perspectives in health utilization and delivery. It presents a survey of the various quality management theories and models and their variance, which have attracted the attention of the health sectors as potential saviors of the beleaguered health industry afflicted by the quality crisis. Copyright © 2013 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Preventing physician quality of life from impinging on patient quality of care:Weakening the weekend effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marc D Basson

    2007-01-01

    Imprecise or delayed care can reflect many factors,including straightforward difficulties in physician judgment and false negative tests. However, the movement toward decreasing physician work hours also leads to delays in care caused by inadequate staffing or inadequate communication between staffing, which must be addressed if quality of care is to remain high.The demonstration of delays in the management of anastomotic leaks over weekends or in association with false positive radiologic studies exemplifies this challenge.

  6. Quality of care from the perspective of the cataract patient : the reliability and validity of the QUOTE-Cataract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, MD; Sixma, HJM; Afman, H; Hiddema, F; Koopmans, SA; van den Borne, B; Hendrikse, F; Nuijts, RMMA

    2002-01-01

    Background/aims: To assess reliability and validity of the QUOTE-cataract, a questionnaire that measures the quality of care from the perspective of cataract patients. Methods: The QUOTE-cataract was tested in a multicentre study among 540 cataract patients in three different hospitals. Reliability

  7. Quality of care from the perspective of the cataract patient: the reliability and validity of the QUOTE-Cataract.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, M.D.; Sixma, H.J.M.; Afman, H.; Hiddema, F.; Koopmans, S.A.; Borne, B. van den

    2002-01-01

    Background/aims: To assess reliability and validity of the QUOTE-Cataract, a questionnaire that measures the quality of care from the perspective of cataract patients. Methods: The QUOTE-Cataract was tested in a multicentre study among 540 cataract patients in three different hospitals. Reliability

  8. Primary care team communication networks, team climate, quality of care, and medical costs for patients with diabetes: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Marlon P.; Agneessens, Filip; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Zakletskaia, Larissa I.; Kamnetz, Sandra A.; Gilchrist, Valerie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary care teams play an important role in providing the best quality of care to patients with diabetes. Little evidence is available on how team communication networks and team climate contribute to high quality diabetes care. Objective To determine whether primary care team communication and team climate are associated with health outcomes, health care utilization, and associated costs for patients with diabetes. Methods A cross-sectional survey of primary care team members collected information on frequency of communication with other care team members about patient care and on team climate. Patient outcomes (glycemic, cholesterol, and blood pressure control, urgent care visits, emergency department visits, hospital visit days, medical costs) in the past 12 months for team diabetes patient panels were extracted from the electronic health record. The data were analyzed using nested (clinic/team/patient) generalized linear mixed modeling. Participants 155 health professionals at 6 U.S. primary care clinics participated from May through December 2013. Results Primary care teams with a greater number of daily face-to-face communication ties among team members were associated with 52% (Rate Ratio=0.48, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.94) fewer hospital days and US$1220 (95% CI: -US$2416, -US$24) lower health-care costs per team diabetes patient in the past 12 months. In contrast, for each additional registered nurse (RN) who reported frequent daily face-to-face communication about patient care with the primary care practitioner (PCP), team diabetes patients had less-controlled HbA1c (Odds Ratio=0.83, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99), increased hospital days (RR=1.57, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.03), and higher healthcare costs (β=US$877, 95% CI: US$42, US$1713). Shared team vision, a measure of team climate, significantly mediated the relationship between team communication and patient outcomes. Conclusions Primary care teams which relied on frequent daily face-to-face communication among more

  9. Nurse occupational burnout and patient-rated quality of care: The boundary conditions of emotional intelligence and demographic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Minston; Shih, Chih-Ting; Hsu, Shu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Most previous studies on the relationship between occupational burnout and the quality of care among nurses have used self-reported data on the quality of care from nurses, thus rendering evaluating the relationship between burnout and the quality of care difficult. Hospitals increasingly hire contract nurses and high turnover rates remain a concern. Little is known about whether nurses' emotional intelligence and demographic factors such as contract status, tenure, and marital status affect the quality of care when burnout occurs. This study investigated the relationship between burnout and patient-rated quality of care and investigated the moderating role of emotional intelligence and demographic variables. Hierarchical moderated regression was used to analyze 98 sets of paired data obtained from nurses and their patients at a teaching hospital in northern Taiwan. The results suggest that occupational burnout has a less unfavorable effect on the quality of care from permanent, married, and senior nurses. Nursing management should pay particular attention to retaining permanent, married, and senior nurses. To ensure a sustainable nursing workforce in the future, newly graduated registered nurses should have access to permanent positions and opportunities for long-term professional development. In addition, married nurses should be provided with flexible work-family arrangements to ensure their satisfaction in the nursing profession. © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  10. Tube feeding in dementia: how incentives undermine health care quality and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Thomas E; Christmas, Colleen; Leff, Bruce A

    2007-05-01

    For nursing home residents with advanced dementia, very little evidence is available to show clinical benefit from enteral tube feeding. Although no randomized clinical trials have been done, considerable evidence from studies of weaker design strongly suggest that tube feeding does not reduce the risks of death, aspiration pneumonia, pressure ulcers, other infections, or poor functional outcome. Nationally, however, utilization is high and highly variable. System-wide incentives favor use of tube feeding, and may influence substitute decision-makers, bedside clinicians, gastroenterologists, and administrators regardless of patient preferences or putative medical indications. Underlying the widespread use of this marginally effective therapy is a basic misunderstanding about malnutrition and about aspiration pneumonia. The face value of tube feeding is strong indeed. In addition to the general faith in intervention, the impulse to "do something" when things are going poorly, financial incentives favor tube feeding for gastroenterologists, hospitals, and nursing homes. The desire to avoid regulatory sanctions, bad publicity, and liability exposure creates a further incentive for nursing homes to provide tube feeding. Rational, evidence-based use of tube feeding in advanced dementia will depend fundamentally on improved education. Reimbursement schemes require significant modification to limit the irrational use of tube feeding. Nursing home regulations based more securely on scientific evidence would likely reduce nonbeneficial tube feeding, as would evidence-based tort reform. Quality improvement initiatives could create positive incentives. Realigning incentives in these ways could, we believe, improve the quality of care, quality of life, and safety of these vulnerable individuals, likely with reduced costs of care.

  11. What is Good Quality of Health Care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magne Nylenna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A diversity of definitions of quality exists, that frequently contain aspects of complexity, relativity and subjectivity. This paper provides an overview of key components in the quality debate within health care, including different perspectives and dimensions of the quality of care. Definitions of the quality of health care reflect the characteristics of health services, and are useful for measurements and quality improvement. Over time the patient perspective of quality has gotten increasing weight, and in quality improvement there has been a shift from individual responsibility for doctors and health care personnel to systems thinking. We argue that the quality approach in health care should be more standardized and that health care-specific definitions of quality should be used when the relationship between physician professionalism and quality is investigated.Keywords: quality, health care, systems thinking, patient perspective, outcome, indicator, measurement, improvement.

  12. The Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire measuring patients' experience with quality of care after a total hip or knee arthroplasty.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbe, J.H.; Gelsema, T.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The Dutch Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire (CQI Hip Knee) was used to assess patients' experiences with and evaluations of quality of care after a total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aim of this study is to evaluate the construct validity and internal consi

  13. Effect of Applying Self-Care Orem Model on Quality of Life in the Patient under Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleyman Naroie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the development of chronic diseases including chronic renal failure, quality of life for these patients is often lower than normal. This study was designed to use Orem self care framework and it impact on quality of life in patients treated with hemodialysis was designed and executed.Materials and Method: Quasi-experimental research present study, sampling method on 35 hemodialysis patients who referred to were Khatam hospital Hemodialysis unit in Zahedan themerin 1389. Data collection included demographic information, health status forms of Orem-based model and the standard measure of quality of life instrument SF-36 was QOL Scores recorded as pre-test and then revied wase the plemouted questionnaire after completetion without health status, training needs and educational needs during the four individual half an hour sessions month.After two months of the last session of the quality of life questionnaire completion and data analyzed SPSS-16 software using Martvsyfy paired T test, Pearson correlation and ANOVA were analyzed. Resulst: After applying all aspects of self care model for quality of life was significantly enhanced (p<0.005. Also, mean total quality of life prior to the 90.46% 65.56% after applying self care model promoting Vtfavt found significantly (p<0.001.Conclusion: Results indicated a positive impact Orem self care framework is. Therefore, a program based on training needs, can indicate chronic and progressive course of disease patterns, the importance of self care that stows permanent drift

  14. Quality of care for patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 in ‘model practices’ in Slovenia – first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petek Davorina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A new organisation at the primary level, called model practices, introduces a 0.5 full-time equivalent nurse practitioner as a regular member of the team. Nurse practitioners are in charge of registers of chronic patients, and implement an active approach into medical care. Selected quality indicators define the quality of management. The majority of studies confirm the effectiveness of the extended team in the quality of care, which is similar or improved when compared to care performed by the physician alone. The aim of the study is to compare the quality of management of patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 before and after the introduction of model practices.

  15. Linking nurses' perceptions of patient care quality to job satisfaction: the role of authentic leadership and empowering professional practice environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Fida, Roberta

    2015-05-01

    A model linking authentic leadership, structural empowerment, and supportive professional practice environments to nurses' perceptions of patient care quality and job satisfaction was tested. Positive work environment characteristics are important for nurses' perceptions of patient care quality and job satisfaction (significant factors for retention). Few studies have examined the mechanism by which these characteristics operate to influence perceptions of patient care quality or job satisfaction. A cross-sectional provincial survey of 723 Canadian nurses was used to test the hypothesized models using structural equation modeling. The model was an acceptable fit and all paths were significant. Authentic leadership had a positive effect on structural empowerment, which had a positive effect on perceived support for professional practice and a negative effect on nurses' perceptions that inadequate unit staffing prevented them from providing high-quality patient care. These workplace conditions predicted job satisfaction. Authentic leaders play an important role in creating empowering professional practice environments that foster high-quality care and job satisfaction.

  16. Effect of the medical insurance on the quality of care for Chinese patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rong; Bao, Han; Su, Shaofei; Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Meiqi; Liu, Meina

    2016-12-01

    To assess the effect of medical insurance on the quality of care for patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Seven quality indicators were used to assess the association between medical insurance and quality of care. Statistical analyses were conducted using multilevel logistic models for the total population and the subpopulation stratified by sex and age. In total, 1862 CHF patients who were admitted in 20 tertiary hospitals between 1 January 2009 and 31 October 2010. Of 1862 patients, 53.8% patients had basic medical insurance and 26.9% patients paid the hospital costs by themselves. After adjusting for confounding factors, patients with New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS) were more likely to receive warfarin (odds ratios [OR], 3.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-13.99; P = 0.038), but less likely to receive aldosterone receptor antagonist (OR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.08-0.56; P = 0.002) than patients without any medical insurance. Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) and NRCMS were associated with more use of discharge instructions ([OR, 3.54; 95% CI, 2.44-5.13; P insurance (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.06-2.98; P = 0.029). UEBMI and NRCMS could increase the adherence to quality indicators of CHF to some extent. Improving the medical insurance system is expected to achieve equality in medical security and improve the quality of care for CHF patients.

  17. General practitioner attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy: an examination of clustering within practices and prediction of patient-rated quality of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thapar Ajay K

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is wide variation in the quality of care provided by primary care practices to individuals with chronic illnesses. Individual doctor attitudes and interest have been demonstrated to influence patient outcomes in some instances. Given the trend towards larger practices and part-time working, continuity of care is likely to fall and thus practice-based rather than individual general practitioner attributes and attitudes are likely to become increasingly important. The aim in this paper was to examine the extent to which individual general practitioner (G.P. attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy cluster within practices and predict patient-rated quality of care. Methods The sample consisted of 1255 people with active epilepsy (a recent seizure or on anti-convulsant medication for epilepsy and 199 GPs from 82 general practices. Measures of GP attitudes (a 17-item GP attitudes questionnaire and patient-rated quality of epilepsy care were obtained. 1210 individuals completed initial questionnaires and 975 patients filled in final questionnaires one year later. Responses were achieved from 64 practices (83% of total and 115 GPs (60% of total. Results 2 main factors were found to underlie GP attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy and these demonstrated clustering within practices "epilepsy viewed as a primary care responsibility" (Eigenvalue 3.98, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC 0.40, and "medication skills"(Eigenvalue 2.74, ICC 0.35. GP-rated scores on "epilepsy care being a primary care responsibility" were a significant predictor of patient-rated quality of GP care (p = 0.031. Other contributory factors were seizure frequency (p = 0.044, and patient-rated "shared decision making" (p = 0.022. Conclusion Specific general practitioner attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy cluster within practices and are significantly associated with patient-rated quality of epilepsy care. It is important to take

  18. A comparison of the quality of care in accident and emergency departments in England and the Netherlands as experienced by patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Nanne; Seccombe, Ian J.; Sturms, Leontien M.; Stellato, Rebecca; Schrijvers, Augustinus J P; van Stel, Henk F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Measuring patients' experiences to determine health-care performance and quality of care from their perspective can provide valuable evidence for international improvements in the quality of care. We compare patients' experiences in Accident & Emergency departments (A&E) in England and t

  19. The impact of facility relocation on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Eirini; Degl' Innocenti, Alessio; Kullgren, Anette; Wijk, Helle

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, large groups of forensic psychiatric patients have been relocated into new medium- and maximum-security forensic psychiatric facilities in Sweden, where a psychosocial care approach is embedded. From this perspective and on the assumption that physical structures affect the therapeutic environment, a prospective longitudinal study was designed to investigate the impact of the facility relocation of three forensic psychiatric hospitals on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care. Participants were patients over 18 years of age sentenced to compulsory forensic psychiatric treatment. Data were obtained by validated questionnaires. Overall, 58 patients (78%) answered the questionnaires at baseline with a total of 25 patients (34%) completing follow-up 1 at six months and 11 patients (15%) completing follow-up 2, one year after relocation. Approximately two-thirds of the participants at all time-points were men and their age range varied from 18 to 69. The results of this study showed that poor physical environment features can have a severe impact on care quality and can reduce the possibilities for person-centered care. Furthermore, the study provides evidence that the patients' perceptions of person-centered care in forensic psychiatric clinics are highly susceptible to factors in the physical and psychosocial environment. Future work will explore the staff's perception of ward atmosphere and the possibilities to adapt a person-centered approach in forensic psychiatric care after facility relocation.

  20. "It's a big part of our lives": A qualitative study defining quality of hepatitis C care from the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunings, Paulien; Klar, Salman; Butt, Gail; Nijkamp, Marjan D; Buxton, Jane A

    2013-01-01

    Nurses play a key role in the ongoing treatment and management of chronic conditions such as Hepatitis C. Their skills in counseling, education, and as liaisons between patients, support services, and other healthcare providers make them crucial in the management of patients with Hepatitis C. Qualitative methods were used to explore and describe quality-of-care perspectives of patients receiving care in viral hepatitis clinics. Data were collected through focus group interviews at three hepatitis prevention and care demonstration projects located in underserved rural and small urban areas in British Columbia, Canada. Key themes were identified and used to construct a "Hepatitis C care model" and generate quality-of-care statements. These statements were then rated by another group of participants with Hepatitis C, using concept mapping. Most themes identified by the participants in focus groups (n = 21) related to care provision processes (autonomy, communication, education/information, continuity of care, professional competence, and support) rather than structure or outcomes of care. Concept-mapping participants (n = 20) rated communication as the key theme. Participants also highlighted the supportive role nurses played. Hepatitis C programming can be improved by leveraging nurses' strengths within multidisciplinary teams to address patient's concerns about process and communication issues.

  1. Developing Indicators of Service Quality Provided for Cardiovascular Patients Hospitalized in Cardiac Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Azami-Aghdash

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are among the most prevalent chronic diseases leading to high degrees of mortality and morbidity worldwide and in Iran. The aim of the current study was to determine and develop appropriate indicators for evaluating provided service quality for cardiovascular patients admitted to Cardiac Care Units (CCU in Iran. Methods: In order to determine the indicators for evaluating provided service quality, a four-stage process including reviewing systematic review articles in premier bibliographic databases, interview, performing two rounds of Delphi technique, and holding experts panel by attendance of experts in different fields was adopted. Finally, after recognizing relevant indicators in resources, these indicators were finalized during various stages using ideas of 27 experts in different fields. Results: Among 2800 found articles in the text reviewing phase, 21 articles, which had completely mentioned relevant indicators, were studied and 48 related indicators were extracted. After two interviews with a cardiologist and an epidemiologist, 32 items of the indicators were omitted and replaced by 27 indicators coping with the conditions of Iranian hospitals. Finally, 43 indicators were added into the Delphi phase and after 2 rounds of Delphi with 18 specialists, 7 cases were excluded due to their low scores of applicability. In the experts’ panel stage, 6 items were also omitted and 10 new indicators were developed to replace them. Eventually, 40 indicators were finalized. Conclusion: In this study, some proper indicators for evaluating provided service quality for CCU admissions in Iran were determined. Considering the informative richness of these indicators, they can be used by managers, policy makers, health service providers, and also insurance agencies in order to improve the quality of services, decisions, and policies.

  2. The quality of nursing care regarding personal hygiene of patients admitted to a selected hospital in the Kavango region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. van Dyk

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the quality of nursing care regarding personal hygiene of patients admitted to a hospital in the Kavango region of Namibia. The study was prompted by repeated media reports over the radio. Commentators and listeners expressed concern over the seeming lack of adequate hygienic measures, specifically with regard to patient care. To objectively quantify and describe the extent ot this problem, a single objective was stated, namely to measure the quality of nursing care with regard to patient hygiene. A descriptive survey design was chosen to explore and describe the problem. A check-list was developed to observe thirty patients (the total population over a period of one week.

  3. Nurse staffing level and overtime associated with patient safety, quality of care, and care left undone in hospitals: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunhee; Lee, Nam-Ju; Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Sinhye; Lee, Kyongeun; Park, Kwang-Ok; Sung, Young Hee

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the association of nurse staffing and overtime with nurse-perceived patient safety, nurse-perceived quality of care, and care left undone. A cross-sectional survey. A total of 65 hospitals were selected from all of the acute hospitals (n=295) with 100 or more beds in South Korea by using a stratified random sampling method based on region and number of beds, and 60 hospitals participated in the study. All RNs working on the date of data collection in units randomly selected from the list of units in each hospital were invited to participate. The analyses in this study included only bedside RNs (n=3037) and hospitals (n=51) with responses from at least 10 bedside RNs. We collected data on nurse staffing level, overtime, nurse-perceived patient safety, nurse-perceived quality of care, nurse-reported care left undone, and nurse characteristics through a nurse survey. Facility data from the Health Insurance Review Agency (HIRA) were used to collect hospital characteristics. Multilevel logistic regression models considering that nurses are clustered in hospitals were used to analyze the effects of hospital nurse staffing and overtime on patient safety, quality of care, and care left undone. A higher number of patients per RN was significantly associated with higher odds of reporting poor/failing patient safety (OR=1.02, 95% CI=1.004-1.03) and poor/fair quality of care (OR=1.02, 95% CI=1.01-1.04), and of having care left undone due to lack of time (OR=1.03, 95% CI=1.01-1.05). Compared with RNs who did not work overtime, RNs working overtime reported an 88% increase in failing or poor patient safety (OR=1.88, 95% CI=1.40-2.52), a 45% increase in fair or poor quality of nursing care (OR=1.45, 95% CI=1.17-1.80), and an 86% increase in care left undone (OR=1.86, 95% CI=1.48-2.35). Our findings suggest that ensuring appropriate nurse staffing and working hours is important to improve the quality and safety of care and to reduce care

  4. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppert W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wojciech Leppert,1 Mikolaj Majkowicz,2 Maria Forycka,1 Eleonora Mess,3 Agata Zdun-Ryzewska2 1Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Quality of Life Research, Gdansk Medical University, Gdansk, Poland; 3Palliative Care Nursing Department, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Aim of the study: To assess quality of life (QoL in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU, and at a day care center (DCC. Patients and methods: QoL was assessed in advanced cancer patients at baseline and after 7 days of symptomatic treatment using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative Care (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS, and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS scale. Results: A total of 129 patients completed the study, with 51 patients treated at home, 51 patients treated at the PCU, and 27 patients at DCC. In the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, improvement in functional and symptom scales was observed except in physical functioning and fatigue levels; patients at DCC had a better physical functioning, global QoL, appetite, and fatigue levels. In the ESAS, improvement in all items was found except for drowsiness levels, which was stable in patients treated at DCC and deteriorated in home and PCU patients. Higher activity, better appetite and well-being, and less drowsiness were observed in patients treated at DCC. KPS was better in DCC patients compared to those treated at home and at the PCU; the latter group deteriorated. Conclusions: QoL improved in all patient groups, with better results in DCC patients and similar scores in those staying at home and at the PCU. Along with clinical assessment, baseline age, KPS, physical and emotional functioning may be considered when assigning patients to care at a DCC, PCU, or at home. Keywords: oncology, patient care

  5. QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIASIS AT A TERTIARY CARE TEACHING HOSPITAL and ndash;A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preksha A Barot

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis is linked with social stigmatization, pain, discomfort, physical disability and psychological distress. It has a significant negative impact on quality of life. Since there is paucity of the data related to quality of life assessment in Indian psoriatic patients, this study was an earnest attempt in this direction The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of psoriasis on the quality of life in patients with psoriasis. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out in 60 patients at Dermatology outpatient department of a tertiary care teaching hospital. The quality of life assessment was done by DLQI questionnaire in patients above the age of 16 years. Results: The Health related Quality of Life was assessed by DLQI questionnaire in 60 patients at Dermatology outpatient department. The M: F ratio was 2.16:1. The mean DLQI score was 8.95 +/- 8.48 (Mean +/- SD and 66.7% of the patients had moderate to extremely large impact on the quality of life. Highest DLQI Mean score 15.21 was noted in younger (20-29 yrs age group. Conclusion: Psoriasis is chronic recurring disease and has significant negative impact on patients quality of life. These findings provide significant new insights into factors that affect the life quality of patients with psoriasis. [Natl J Med Res 2015; 5(2.000: 93-97

  6. Barriers to accessing quality health care for cancer patients: a survey of members of the association of oncology social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Mary Ann; Zebrack, Brad; Walsh, Katherine; Maramaldi, Peter; Lim, Jung-Won; Smolinski, Kathryn M; Lawson, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The present article reports data from a cross-sectional survey of members of the Association of Oncology Social Work (AOSW) completed in May 2006. The purpose of the survey was to gather information on AOSW members' practice roles, the clients they serve, and their views on barriers cancer patients face in obtaining quality cancer care. The survey instrument was a self-administered 18-page survey disseminated online and by U.S. mail to members who did not provide e-mail addresses. The response rate to the survey was 62.3% (622/999). Reported barriers to quality cancer care are presented here in three categories: health system, social/environmental, and individual-level barriers. The majority of respondents reported health system barriers, specifically inadequate health insurance, as the major barrier to accessing quality health care for cancer patients. Among social/environmental barriers, inability to pay for treatment-related expenses was the major barrier. Among individual-level barriers, patients' fears and distress were the major barriers. The conclusions from this survey point to the critical role of oncology social workers in assisting cancer patients in overcoming the barriers to quality care and achieving optimum quality of life.

  7. The Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire measuring patients' experiences with quality of care after a total hip or knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delnoij Diana MJ

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dutch Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire (CQI Hip Knee was used to assess patients' experiences with and evaluations of quality of care after a total hip (THA or total knee arthroplasty (TKA. The aim of this study is to evaluate the construct validity and internal consistency reliability of this new instrument and to assess its ability to measure differences in quality of care between hospitals. Methods Survey data of 1,675 subjects who underwent a THA or TKA were used to evaluate the psychometric properties. Exploratory factor analyses were performed and item-total correlations and inter-factor correlations were calculated to assess the construct validity of the instrument. Reliability analyses included tests of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficients. Finally, multilevel analyses were performed to assess the ability of the instrument to discriminate between hospitals in quality of care. Results Exploratory factor analyses indicated that the survey consisted of 21 items measuring five aspects of care (i.e. communication with nurses, communication with doctors, communication with general practitioner, communication about new medication, and pain control. Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from 0.76 to 0.90 indicating good internal consistency. The survey's ability to discriminate between hospitals was partly supported by multilevel analysis. Two scales (i.e. communication with nurses and communication with doctors were able to measure differences between hospitals with respect to patients' experiences with quality of care. Logistic multilevel analyses indicated that hospitals explained part of the variation between patients in receiving information. Conclusion These findings suggest that the CQI Hip Knee is reliable and valid for use in Dutch health care. Health care providers or health plans can use this survey to measure patients' experiences with hospital care and to identify variations in care

  8. The PAMINO-project: evaluating a primary care-based educational program to improve the quality of life of palliative patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemann, T.J.; Hermann, K.; Miksch, A.; Engeser, P.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The care of palliative patients challenges the health care system in both quantity and quality. Especially the role of primary care givers needs to be strengthened to provide them with the knowledge and the confidence of applying an appropriate end-of-life care to palliative patients. To

  9. The PAMINO-project: evaluating a primary care-based educational program to improve the quality of life of palliative patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemann, T.J.; Hermann, K.; Miksch, A.; Engeser, P.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The care of palliative patients challenges the health care system in both quantity and quality. Especially the role of primary care givers needs to be strengthened to provide them with the knowledge and the confidence of applying an appropriate end-of-life care to palliative patients. To

  10. Toward a Definition of Quality Care for Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotti, Lynn Marie

    2015-09-01

    Health care systems and payers are placing increasing emphasis on the measurement and improvement of quality. The process of quality improvement is complex but can be supported by professional organizations such as the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM). In 2013, the AASM commissioned a series of restless legs syndrome (RLS)-specific quality measures, consisting of process and outcome measures. This article provides an overview of the measure development process and discusses the individual RLS quality measures. These measures were designed to support the goals of improved diagnostic accuracy, decreased symptom severity, and reduced treatment complications.

  11. Patient safety and quality of care: How may clinical simulation contribute?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Jensen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The usability of health information technology (IT is increasingly recognized as critically important to the development of systems that ensure patient safety and quality of care. The substantial complexity of organizations, work practice and physical environments within the healthcare sector influences the development and application of health IT. When health IT is introduced in local clinical work practices, potential patient safety hazards and insufficient support of work practices need to be examined. Qualitative methods, such as clinical simulation, may be used to evaluate new technology in correlation with the clinical context and to study the interaction between users, technology and work practice. Compared with the “classic” methods, such as heuristic inspection and usability testing, clinical simulation takes the clinical context into account. Clinical simulation can be useful in many processes in the human-centred design cycle. In the requirement specification, clinical simulation can be useful to analyze user requirements and work practice as well to evaluate requirements. In the design of health IT, clinical simulation can be used to evaluate clinical information systems and serve as common ground to help to achieve a shared understanding between various communities of practice. In a public procurement process, a clinical simulation-based assessment can help give insight into different solutions and how they support work practice. Before organizational implementation, clinical simulation is a very suitable means, by which to assess an application in connection with work practice.

  12. Effect of continuous care model on sleep quality and dialysis adequacy of hemodialysis Patients: a clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojat M

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Chronic renal failure can eventually lead to various complications such as impaired sleep quality of patient, so the adequacy of dialysis in these patients is very important .This study was done aimed to determine the effect of continuous care model on sleep quality and dialysis adequacy of hemodialysis patients in Jahrom.  Materials and Method:In this clinical trial study, 40 patients in hemodialysis ward were selected through simple random sampling in Motahari Hospital in Jahrom in 2013. To survey the quality of sleep, the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and to measure the adequacy of dialysis, the formula kt/v was used. For applying the continuous care model, patients were divided into 5 groups and for each group, 4 to 6 training sessions were held during the 4 weeks. Sleep quality and dialysis adequacy were measured during four stages 1 month and immediately before intervention, immediately and 1 month after intervention. Data analysis was done through SPSS16 and using the independent t-test, repeated measures analysis and Pearson’s correlation coefficient.   Results:The mean score of sleep quality was significantly higher before the intervention (9.96±1.87 in compare to after (9.07±2.19 the intervention (p=0.002. Also the mean score of dialysis adequacy was improved immediately after the intervention (1.13± 0.3, but it decreased again one month (0.97±0.31 after the intervention (p=0.034.  Conclusion: The implementing of continuous care model caused an improvement in sleep quality, but there was no positive effect on dialysis adequacy. It is recommended that the nurses implement this model in caring of other patients through doing further research in this area.

  13. Optimizing quality of care for patients with ALS and their family caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.W.J. Creemers

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focussed on patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and their most important informal caregivers, and investigated previously identified bottlenecks in complex multidisciplinary ALS care: 1) prognostication of the rate of functional decline, 2) the procurement process of assist

  14. Quality of Care for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Dubai: A HEDIS-Like Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelagh M. Szabo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. As little data are available on the quality of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM care in the Arabian Gulf States, we estimated the proportion of patients receiving recommended monitoring at the Dubai Hospital for T2DM over one year. Methods. Charts from 150 adults with T2DM were systematically sampled and quality of care was assessed during one calendar year, using a Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set- (HEDIS- like assessment. Screening for glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, blood pressure, retinopathy, and nephropathy was considered. Patients were classified based on their most recent test in the period, and predictors of receiving quality care were examined. Results. Mean age was 58 years (standard deviation (SD: 12.4 years and 33% were males. Over the year, 98% underwent HbA1c screening (50% had control and 28% displayed poor control; 91% underwent LDL screening (65% had control; 55% had blood pressure control; 30% had retinopathy screening; and 22% received attention for nephropathy. No individual characteristics examined predicted receiving quality care. Conclusion. Some guideline monitoring was conducted for most patients; and rates of monitoring for selected measures were comparable to benchmarks from the United States. Greater understanding of factors leading to high adherence would be useful for other areas of preventive care and other jurisdictions.

  15. Quality of Care for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Dubai: A HEDIS-Like Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Shelagh M; Osenenko, Katherine M; Qatami, Lara; Korenblat Donato, Bonnie M; Korol, Ellen E; Al Madani, Abdulrazzaq A; Al Awadi, Fatheya F; Al-Ansari, Jaber; Maclean, Ross; Levy, Adrian R

    2015-01-01

    Objective. As little data are available on the quality of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) care in the Arabian Gulf States, we estimated the proportion of patients receiving recommended monitoring at the Dubai Hospital for T2DM over one year. Methods. Charts from 150 adults with T2DM were systematically sampled and quality of care was assessed during one calendar year, using a Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set- (HEDIS-) like assessment. Screening for glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), blood pressure, retinopathy, and nephropathy was considered. Patients were classified based on their most recent test in the period, and predictors of receiving quality care were examined. Results. Mean age was 58 years (standard deviation (SD): 12.4 years) and 33% were males. Over the year, 98% underwent HbA1c screening (50% had control and 28% displayed poor control); 91% underwent LDL screening (65% had control); 55% had blood pressure control; 30% had retinopathy screening; and 22% received attention for nephropathy. No individual characteristics examined predicted receiving quality care. Conclusion. Some guideline monitoring was conducted for most patients; and rates of monitoring for selected measures were comparable to benchmarks from the United States. Greater understanding of factors leading to high adherence would be useful for other areas of preventive care and other jurisdictions.

  16. [Geriatric trauma centers - requirements catalog. An initiative to promote and guarantee the quality of care of elderly trauma patients receiving inpatient care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogol, M; van den Heuvel, D; Lüttje, D; Püllen, R; Reingräber, A C; Schulz, R-J; Veer, A; Wittrich, A

    2014-06-01

    For the care of the elderly, specific geriatric care facilities in hospitals and specialized rehabilitation centers have been established in the last 20 years throughout Germany. In addition, trauma surgery departments in hospitals and clinics also provide comprehensive care for trauma patients. The present requirements catalog was developed with the aim to ensure the standardization and quality assurance of these care facilities. Thus, the structural basics and, in particular, the structured cooperation between geriatrics and trauma surgery are described and defined in terms of structure, process, and outcome quality. The Bundesverband Geriatrie, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Geriatrie, and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gerontologie und Geriatrie offer documentation for external and internal use and evaluation of the structures and processes for certification of geriatric trauma centers. Prerequisite for certification is to meet the technical requirements defined in the requirements catalogue or documents derived from it, and proof of a quality management system according to ISO 9001.

  17. Professional Quality of Life of Veterans Affairs Staff and Providers in a Patient-Centered Care Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Sara M; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the work environment prompted by the movement toward patient-centered care have the potential to improve occupational stress among health care workers by improving team-based work activities, collaboration, and employee-driven quality improvement. This study was conducted to examine professional quality of life among providers at patient-centered care pilot facilities. Surveys were conducted with 76 Veterans Affairs employees/providers at facilities piloting patient-centered care interventions, to assess demographics, workplace practices and views (team-based environment, employee voice, quality of communication, and turnover intention), and professional quality of life (compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress).Professional quality-of-life subscales were not related to employee position type, age, or gender. Employee voice measures were related to lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction. In addition, employees who were considering leaving their position showed higher burnout and lower compassion satisfaction scores. None of the work practices showed relationships with secondary traumatic stress.

  18. Knowledge and attitudes of Saudi intensive care unit nurses regarding oral care delivery to mechanically ventilated patients with the effect of healthcare quality accreditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Alotaibi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a major morbid outcome among intensive care unit (ICU patients. Providing oral care for intubated patients is an important task by the ICU nursing staff in reducing the mortality and morbidity. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the attitudes and knowledge of ICU nurses regarding oral care delivery to critically ill patients in Saudi Arabian ICUs. The findings were further correlated to the presence of healthcare quality accreditation of the institution. Materials and Methods: The nurses′ knowledge, attitudes, and healthcare quality accreditation status of the hospital were recorded. Two hundred fifteen nurses conveniently selected from 10 random hospitals were included in this study from Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia. This is a cross-sectional study in the form of a questionnaire. Results: When comparing the knowledge of the participants to their level of education, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups of nurses. The majority of the nurses agreed that the oral cavity is difficult to clean and that oral care delivery is a high priority for mechanically ventilated patients. Furthermore, there was no statistically significant difference in the attitudes between nurses working in accredited and nonaccredited hospitals. Conclusion: The presence of healthcare quality accreditation did not reflect any significance in attitudes or knowledge of the ICU nurses in regard to mechanically ventilated patients. Factors affecting oral care delivery should be evaluated on the personal and institutional level to achieve better understanding of them.

  19. Providing informal home care for pressure ulcer patients: how it affects carers' quality of life and burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Alexandre M; Ferreira, Pedro L; Ferré-Grau, Carmen

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the quality of life of informal caregivers of patients with pressure ulcer; to assess their levels of burden; to analyse the variables influencing both their quality of life and burden. Informal caregivers of pressure ulcer patients, besides coping with the natural dependency of these patients, deal with the specificity of caring these types of wounds. This situation has an impact on not only the quality of life and burden felt by informal caregivers but also on individual and familiar dynamics. Descriptive and correlational study. This study focused on 145 informal caregivers providing home care. Measurement instruments were: SF-36v2 and the Burden Interview Scale. Descriptive analysis of the quantitative variables was carried out according to measures of central tendency, and the qualitative variables were described using absolute and relative frequencies. The relationships or associations between variables were explored through correlational analysis and, whenever the data allowed, multivariate techniques were used. Informal caregivers showed low levels of quality of life and, most of them, significant burden. Quality of life decreased with overload, with the increasing number of pressure ulcer and with less experience of informal caregivers, with lack of financial remuneration, with unemployment, with patient positioning and with the direct care of the wound. The burden increased with the number of pressure ulcer in each patient and with the lack of financial remuneration. These informal caregivers have low quality of life and are overburdened. Both situations are positively and negatively influenced by factors related to the pressure ulcer and to the patients' sociodemographic data. The results of this study allow more effective monitoring by health professionals of levels of burden and quality of life encountered in pressure ulcer informal caregivers, as well as direct interventions to inhibit the factors inducing burden and enhance those that

  20. Effect of empowerment on professional practice environments, work satisfaction, and patient care quality: further testing the Nursing Worklife Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test Leiter and Laschinger's Nursing Worklife Model linking structural empowerment to Lake's 5-factor professional practice work environment model and work quality outcomes. A predictive, nonexperimental design was used to test the model in a random sample of 234 staff nurses. The analysis revealed that professional practice environment characteristics mediated the relationship between structurally empowering work conditions and both job satisfaction and nurse-assessed patient care quality.

  1. Evaluating quality of care for patients with type 2 diabetes using electronic health record information in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Doubova, Svetlana V; Suarez-Ortega, Magdalena; Law, Michael; Pande, Aakanksha H; Escobedo, Jorge; Espinosa-Larrañaga, Francisco; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Wagner, Anita K

    2012-06-06

    Several low and middle-income countries are implementing electronic health records (EHR). In the near future, EHRs could become an efficient tool to evaluate healthcare performance if appropriate indicators are developed. The aims of this study are: a) to develop quality of care indicators (QCIs) for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) health system; b) to determine the feasibility of constructing QCIs using the IMSS EHR data; and c) to evaluate the quality of care (QC) provided to IMSS patients with T2DM. We used a three-stage mixed methods approach: a) development of QCIs following the RAND-UCLA method; b) EHR data extraction and construction of indicators; c) QC evaluation using EHR data from 25,130 T2DM patients who received care in 2009. We developed 18 QCIs, of which 14 were possible to construct using available EHR data. QCIs comprised both process of care and health outcomes. Several flaws in the EHR design and quality of data were identified. The indicators of process and outcomes of care suggested areas for improvement. For example, only 13.0% of patients were referred to an ophthalmologist; 3.9% received nutritional counseling; 63.2% of overweight/obese patients were prescribed metformin, and only 23% had HbA1c IMSS. This information can be used to guide targeted interventions to improve QC.

  2. Quality indicators for colorectal cancer surgery and care according to patient-, tumor-, and hospital-related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathoulin-Pélissier Simone

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC care has improved considerably, particularly since the implementation of a quality of care program centered on national evidence-based guidelines. Formal quality assessment is however still needed. The aim of this research was to identify factors associated with practice variation in CRC patient care. Methods CRC patients identified from all cancer centers in South-West France were included. We investigated variations in practices (from diagnosis to surgery, and compliance with recommended guidelines for colon and rectal cancer. We identified factors associated with three colon cancer practice variations potentially linked to better survival: examination of ≥12 lymph nodes (LN, non-use and use of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II and stage III patients, respectively. Results We included 1,206 patients, 825 (68% with colon and 381 (32% with rectal cancer, from 53 hospitals. Compliance was high for resection, pathology report, LN examination, and chemotherapy use for stage III patients. In colon cancer, 26% of stage II patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and 71% of stage III patients. 84% of stage US T3T4 rectal cancer patients received pre-operative radiotherapy. In colon cancer, factors associated with examination of ≥12 LNs were: lower ECOG score, advanced stage and larger hospital volume; factors negatively associated were: left sided tumor location and one hospital district. Use of chemotherapy in stage II patients was associated with younger age, advanced stage, emergency setting and care structure (private and location; whereas under-use in stage III patients was associated with advanced age, presence of comorbidities and private hospitals. Conclusions Although some changes in practices may have occurred since this observational study, these findings represent the most recent report on practices in CRC in this region, and offer a useful methodological approach for assessing quality of care

  3. The effect of generalist and specialist care on quality of life in asthma patients with and without allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Lotte; Nolte, Hendrik; Backer, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of asthma and rhinitis patients is often provided by both generalists (GPs) and specialists (SPs). Studies have shown differences in clinical outcomes of treatment between these settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of GP and SP care on health-related quality of life...

  4. Improved cytodiagnostics and quality of patient care through double reading of selected cases by an expert cytopathologist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Chantal C H J; Visser, Mike; Sie-Go, Daisy M D S; de Leeuw, Henk; de Rooij, Mathilda J.; van Diest, Paul J.; Jiwa, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Double reading may be a valuable tool for improving the quality of patient care by restoring diagnostic errors before final sign-out, but standard double reading would significantly increase costs of pathology. The aim of this study was to assess the added value of routine double reading of defined

  5. The effect of generalist and specialist care on quality of life in asthma patients with and without allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Lotte; Nolte, Hendrik; Backer, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of asthma and rhinitis patients is often provided by both generalists (GPs) and specialists (SPs). Studies have shown differences in clinical outcomes of treatment between these settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of GP and SP care on health-related quality of life...... (HRQoL)....

  6. Predictors of health-related quality of life in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease in European primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludt, S.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Szecsenyi, J.; Lieshout, J. van; Rochon, J.; Freund, T.; Campbell, S.M.; Ose, D.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular risk management plays an important role in primary care. In patients at high risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) lifestyle and, where appropriate, medical interventions are recommended in guidelines. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important outcome in clin

  7. [Quality control and improvement of the care provided to the patient with acute myocardial infarction. Implementation of a quality assurance program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Bueno, F; Gómez Doblas, J J; Ruiz Ruiz, M; Jiménez Navarro, M F; Rodríguez Bailón, I; Espinosa Caliani, J S; Pérez Lanzac, F J; Alonso Briales, J H; Galván, E T

    2001-01-01

    Hospital care of patients with acute myocardial infarction involves a series of therapeutic measures and risk stratification which are a must since their efficacy has been clearly demonstrated. The aim of this study was to develop an internal program to guarantee and improve the quality of hospital care to acute myocardial infarction patients. A medical audit was carried out for evaluation. Seven evaluation criteria considered as class I by the guidelines on the management of acute myocardial infarction patients were analyzed in the discharge report of 163 consecutive patients. Following analysis of the results corrective measures were implemented. In the second phase reevaluation of 40 patients was performed to determine the efficacy of the adopted measures. Following the first evaluation the use of AAS, IECAS and the beta-blockers was found to be correctly indicated in 95, 80 and 72% of the patients, respectively. A strategy of the adequate stratification of risk was carried out and ventricular function was evaluated in 93 and 96% of the cases. Correct hypolipemia treatment was indicated in 54% of the cases with an adequate diet being prescribed in 100%. Three months after the intervention, 40 new patients were evaluated with all the criteria analyzed being fulfilled in 100% of the cases. The use of evaluation techniques and improvement in the quality of health care provided to cases of acute myocardial infarction allows the determination of the care undertaken and its correction if necessary in order to follow the guidelines recommended for the care of these patients.

  8. Quality of Care and Disparities in Obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Elizabeth A; Zeitlin, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Growing attention is being paid to obstetric quality of care as patients are pressing the health care system to measure and improve quality. There is also an increasing recognition of persistent racial and ethnic disparities prevalent in obstetric outcomes. Yet few studies have linked obstetric quality of care with racial and ethnic disparities. This article reviews definitions of quality of care, health disparities, and health equity as they relate to obstetric care and outcomes; describes current efforts and challenges in obstetric quality measurement; and proposes 3 steps in an effort to develop, track, and improve quality and reduce disparities in obstetrics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Most prevalent unmet supportive care needs and quality of life of breast cancer patients in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edib, Zobaida; Kumarasamy, Verasingam; Binti Abdullah, Norlia; Rizal, A M; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman

    2016-02-22

    Addressing breast cancer patients' unmet supportive care needs in the early stage of their survivorship have become a prime concern because of its significant association with poor quality of life (QOL), which in turn increases healthcare utilization and costs. There is no study about unmet supportive care needs of breast cancer patients in Malaysia. This study aims to assess the most prevalent unmet supportive care needs of Malaysian breast cancer patients and the association between QOL and patients' characteristics, and their unmet supportive care needs. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Surgery and Oncology Clinic between May 2014 and June 2014 in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia. A total of 117 patients out of 133 breast cancer patients recruited by universal sampling were interviewed using a structured questionnaire consisted of three parts: participants' socio-demographic and disease characteristics, Supportive Care Needs Survey-Short Form Questionnaire (SCNS-SF34) and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 (EORTC QLQ-C30). The highest unmet supportive care needs were observed in the psychological domain (Mean 53.31; SD ± 21.79), followed by physical domain (Mean 38.16; SD ± 27.15). Most prevalent unmet supportive care needs were uncertainty about the future (78.6 %), fears about the cancer spreading (76.1 %), feelings of sadness (69.2 %), feelings about death and dying (68.4 %), concerns about those close to the patient (65.0 %) and feeling down or depressed (65.0 %). Multivariate linear analysis showed that early breast cancer survivors diagnosed at an advanced stage and with greater physical and psychological needs were significantly (p < 0.05) associated with poorer QOL. Most prevalent unmet needs among Malaysian breast cancer patients were found in the psychological domain. Early breast cancer survivors with late stage diagnosis who had more unmet needs in psychological and physical

  10. Quality of medical care for the elderly in out-patient conditions according to the sociological survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina G. Novokreshchenova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The process of aging is caused by the early development of chronic complications and diversity of morphological and functional changes of organs and systems. Therefore the provision of preventive and curative care of this category of citizens has significant clinical and organizational features. Aim — To identify the main problems of medical care for the elderly and to examine the medical care. Material and Methods — 250 physicians of various specialties of medical institutions of the Saratov region on health care of the elderly in out-patient clinics have been surveyed by specially designed questionnaires. The state of receiving care in out-patient clinics has been studied among the elderly and the senile patients (n=568 by questioning. Results — The majority of physicians recognize the importance of the problem of increasing the quality of care for the elderly. The development of assistance of gerontological profile and the need for optimization of rendering out-patient care for this category of population in the central clinics and regional medical institutions. Conclusion — The level of satisfaction of elderly patients depends on the age characteristics, gender, health and social status and the place of residence of the study group.

  11. Impact of pharmaceutical care on the quality of life of patients with Chagas disease and heart failure: randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Gilberto M Sperandio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmaceutical care is the direct interaction between pharmacist and patient, in order to improve therapeutic compliance, promote adequate pharmacotherapeutic follow-up, and improve quality of life. Pharmaceutical care may be effective in reducing complications and in improving the quality of life of patients with chronic diseases, like Chagas heart disease, while bringing a positive impact on health system costs. The morbidity and mortality indexes for patients with Chagas heart disease are high, especially if this heart disease is complicated by heart failure. In this setting, we hypothesize that pharmaceutical care might be an important tool for the clinical management of these patients by improving their quality of life, as a better compliance to their treatment and the avoidance and prompt correction of drug-related problems will minimize their symptoms, improve their functional class, and decrease the number of hospital admissions. Therefore, the aim of this trial is to evaluate the contribution of pharmaceutical care to clinical treatment of patients with Chagas heart disease complicated by heart failure. Methods/design A prospective, single-center randomized clinical trial will be conducted in patients with Chagas heart disease complicated by heart failure. A total of 88 patients will be randomly assigned into two parallel groups: an intervention group will receive standard care and pharmaceutical care, and a control group will receive only standard care. Both groups will be subjected to a follow-up period of 12 months. The primary outcome of this trial is the evaluation of quality of life, measured by the 36-item short-form and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include drug-related problems, exercise tolerance as measured by the standard six-minute-walk test, and compliance. Discussion Patients with Chagas heart disease complicated by heart failure under pharmaceutical care are

  12. Moving a step forward to promote patient safety and quality of care in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Iglesia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving safety and quality of care has always been at the heart of national, European and international policies. The premises of such concern have their roots in the times of the Greek physician Hippocrates of Cos, about the 4th century BC, with the directive primum non nocere (“first do no harm”. [...

  13. Doctor-patient communication and the quality of care: the role of affective behaviour.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Several studies have shown that between 30 and 60 percent of the patients in general practice present health problems for which no firm diagnosis can be made. This makes the work of general practitioners fundamentally different from hospital care. Luckily most of these patients get better because of

  14. Self-Care Program With Multimedia Software Support Effect on Quality of Life in Patients With Diabetes Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Abumasoudi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Different studies have shown that health level, performance statutes and quality of life in chronic patients are less than the expected level especially in patients with diabetes. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a self-care program with a multimedia software support on quality of life in patients with diabetes type II. Patients and Methods This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial in which 60 patients who had been referred to the diabetes clinic of Arak city were randomly divided to experimental (n = 30 and control (n = 30 groups. Diabetes Quality of Life Brief Clinical Inventory was used for determining the quality of life. Data were collected before and two months after the intervention for both groups. An educational program with equal content was conducted for both the experimental group (self-care program with multimedia software support in two sessions and control group (lecture and presentation with PowerPoint in one session. Data analysis was made by the SPSS 16 software. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean scores of quality of life before the intervention (P = 0.97 while after the intervention, the difference between the two groups was significant (P = 0.029. Applying the self-care program with software support improved quality of life of the experimental group after the intervention (P < 0.0001 while there was no significant difference in mean score of quality of life in the control group after eight weeks (P = 0.051. Conclusions According to the results of this study, the examined method is a simple, cheap, effective and attractive intervention program for patients with diabetes.

  15. Effects of Psychosocial Day Care Programme on Quality of Life in Patients Affected with Schizophrenia - a Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juretić, Tanja Grahovac; Ružić, Klementina; Letica-Crepulja, Marina; Petrić, Daniela; Dadić-Hero, Elizabeta; Frančišković, Tanja

    2016-06-01

    The basic aim of this prospective research was to establish the effect of psychosocial day care programme on the therapy outcomes in patients with schizophrenia. While 115 patients with schizophrenia were invited to participate, 100 of them completed the study and were subdivided into two groups. In addition to pharmacotherapy, the experimental group only (N=50) was integrated into a day-hospital-based psychosocial day care programme. The instruments were applied in three phases: the first measurement for experimental group subjects took place on the first day of psychosocial day-care programme, while for the control group subjects the same was performed on the last day of inpatient care. The second measurement for the experimental group was performed in the end of psychosocial day-care programme, while for the control group patients it occurred four months after inpatient treatment. The third measurement was carried out six months after the second one. The following instruments were applied: General Demographic Questionnaire at the first measurement, Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life-MANSA both at the first and third measurement, and Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale-PANSS at all three measurements. Experimental group patients showed a statistically significant increase in quality of life outcomes as well as statistically significant decrease in positive symptoms and general psychopathology at all three measurements and with regard to the control group. As to the negative symptoms, only the third measurement revealed a statistically significant difference. The results obtained indicate that the adjuvant treatment of psychosocial day care programme has a positive effect on treatment outcomes: on the increase of the patients' quality of life, and, to some extent, on the decrease of symptom intensity in positive symptoms in schizophrenia spectrum. However, the effect of psychosocial day-care programme on the negative symptoms was proved to be

  16. An Android-enabled mobile framework for ensuring quality of life through patient-centric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koufi, Vassiliki; Malamateniou, Flora; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2012-01-01

    The drive to achieve excellence in healthcare delivery while containing costs, underlies the need for a new generation of applications which facilitate the realization of a patient-centric care model. Under this emerging care model healthcare delivery can be integrated across the continuum of services, from prevention to follow up, and care can be coordinated across all settings. With care moving out into the community, health systems require real-time information to deliver coordinated care to patients. The integration of leading-edge technologies, such as mobile technology, with Personal Health Records (PHRs) can meet this requirement by making comprehensive and unified health information available to authorized users at any point of care or decision making through familiar environments such as Google's Android. This paper presents a framework that provides ubiquitous access to patients' PHRs via Android-enabled mobile devices. Where possible health information access and management is performed in a transparent way, thus enabling healthcare professionals to devote more time on practicing medicine and patients to manage their own health with the least possible intervention. This depends heavily on the context, which is collected by both Android-specific core system services and special purpose software agents with the latter being also responsible for preserving PHR data privacy.

  17. The association between GP and patient ratings of quality of care at outpatient clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, Andrew; Iversen, Hilde; Ruud, Torleif

    2009-01-01

    Background. GPs and patients are frequently asked to evaluate mental health care, but studies including evaluations from both groups are rare. Objective. To assess the association between GPs' and patients' assessment of mental health outpatient clinic in Norway and identify important health care predictors for patient and GP satisfaction with the clinics. Methods. Two cross-sectional national surveys were carried out: survey of GPs in 2006 and patients in 2007 evaluating outpatient clinics at 69 community mental health centres in Norway. A total of 2009 GPs and 9001 outpatients assessed the clinics by means of a postal questionnaire. Main outcome measures were correlations between GP and patient ratings of the outpatient clinics at the clinic level and health care predictors for patient satisfaction and GP satisfaction with the clinics. Results. Clinic scores for GPs' and patients' assessment of waiting time were moderate to highly correlated (0.65), while clinic scores for GP and patient satisfaction had a lower but significant positive association (0.37). Significant positive correlations between clinic scores for GP and patients ratings were found for 38 of the 48 associations tested. The most important predictors for patient satisfaction with the clinics were interaction with the clinician (beta: 0.23) and being met with politeness and respect at the clinic (beta: 0.19), while the most important predictors for GP satisfaction with the clinics were perceived competence (beta: 0.25), rejection of referrals (beta: −0.17) and waiting time for patients (beta: −0.16). Conclusions. A consistent positive association between GP and patient ratings at the clinic level was identified. Mental health services aiming at improving GP and patient satisfaction should be sensitive to the fact that the two groups prioritize different health care factors. PMID:19584122

  18. Nurses' shift length and overtime working in 12 European countries: the association with perceived quality of care and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter; Dall'Ora, Chiara; Simon, Michael; Ball, Jane; Lindqvist, Rikard; Rafferty, Anne-Marie; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Tishelman, Carol; Aiken, Linda H

    2014-11-01

    Despite concerns as to whether nurses can perform reliably and effectively when working longer shifts, a pattern of two 12- to 13-hour shifts per day is becoming common in many hospitals to reduce shift to shift handovers, staffing overlap, and hence costs. To describe shift patterns of European nurses and investigate whether shift length and working beyond contracted hours (overtime) is associated with nurse-reported care quality, safety, and care left undone. Cross-sectional survey of 31,627 registered nurses in general medical/surgical units within 488 hospitals across 12 European countries. A total of 50% of nurses worked shifts of ≤ 8 hours, but 15% worked ≥ 12 hours. Typical shift length varied between countries and within some countries. Nurses working for ≥ 12 hours were more likely to report poor or failing patient safety [odds ratio (OR)=1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.13-1.76], poor/fair quality of care (OR=1.30; 95% CI, 1.10-1.53), and more care activities left undone (RR=1.13; 95% CI, 1.09-1.16). Working overtime was also associated with reports of poor or failing patient safety (OR=1.67; 95% CI, 1.51-1.86), poor/fair quality of care (OR=1.32; 95% CI, 1.23-1.42), and more care left undone (RR=1.29; 95% CI, 1.27-1.31). European registered nurses working shifts of ≥ 12 hours and those working overtime report lower quality and safety and more care left undone. Policies to adopt a 12-hour nursing shift pattern should proceed with caution. Use of overtime working to mitigate staffing shortages or increase flexibility may also incur additional risk to quality.

  19. Using clinical supervision to improve the quality and safety of patient care: a response to Berwick and Francis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Jonathon

    2015-06-11

    After widely publicised investigations into excess patient deaths at Mid Staffordshire hospital the UK government commissioned reports from Robert Francis QC and Professor Don Berwick. Among their recommendations to improve the quality and safety of patient care were lifelong learning, professional support and 'just culture'. Clinical supervision is in an excellent position to support these activities but opportunities are in danger of being squeezed out by regulatory and managerial demands. Doctors who have completed their training are responsible for complex professional judgements for which narrative supervision is particularly helpful. With reference to the literature and my own practice I propose that all practicing clinicians should have regular clinical supervision. Clinical supervision has patient-safety and the quality of patient care as its primary purposes. After training is completed, doctors may practice for the rest of their career without any clinical supervision, the implication being that the difficulties dealt with in clinical supervision are no longer difficulties, or are better dealt with some other way. Clinical supervision is sufficiently flexible to be adapted to the needs of experienced clinicians as its forms can be varied, though its functions remain focused on patient safety, good quality clinical care and professional wellbeing. The evidence linking clinical supervision to the quality and safety of patient care reveals that supervision is most effective when its educational and supportive functions are separated from its managerial and evaluative functions. Among supervision's different forms, narrative-based-supervision is particularly useful as it has been developed for clinicians who have completed their training. It provides ways to explore the complexity of clinical judgements and encourages doctors to question one another's authority in a supportive culture. To be successful, supervision should also be professionally led and

  20. Telegenetics use in presymptomatic genetic counselling: patient evaluations on satisfaction and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Ellen; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V; van Langen, Irene M

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, online counselling has been introduced in clinical genetics to increase patients' access to care and to reduce time and cost for both patients and professionals. Most telegenetics reports so far evaluated online oncogenetic counselling at remote health centres in regions with large travelling distances, generally showing positive patient outcomes. We think online counselling--including the use of supportive tools that are also available during in-person counseling--of presymptomatic patients in their homes can also be feasible and valuable for patients in relatively small regions. We performed a single-centre pilot study of online genetic counselling for 57 patients who were presymptomatic cardiogenetic (n=17), presymptomatic oncogenetic (n=34) and prenatal (3 couples). One-third of presymptomatic patients we approached consented to online counselling. Patient evaluations of practical aspects, satisfaction and psychological outcomes were assessed and compared with a matched control group. Patients managed to fulfil the preparations, were significantly more satisfied with their counsellor and counselling session than controls and were satisfied with the online counselling more than they expected to be beforehand. Psychological outcomes (decreased anxiety and increased control) did not differ with control patients. Technical problems occurred in almost half of online sessions. Nonetheless, online counselling in patients' homes proved to be feasible and was appreciated by a substantial part of presymptomatic patients at our genetics centre in the Netherlands. Based on these outcomes, we conclude online counselling can be a valuable addition to existing counselling options in regular patient care.

  1. Caregiver evaluation of the quality of end-of-life care (CEQUEL scale: the caregiver's perception of patient care near death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip C Higgins

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: End-of-life (EOL measures are limited in capturing caregiver assessment of the quality of EOL care. Because none include caregiver perception of patient suffering or prolongation of death, we sought to develop and validate the Caregiver Evaluation of Quality of End-of-Life Care (CEQUEL scale to include these dimensions of caregiver-perceived quality of EOL care. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data were derived from Coping with Cancer (CwC, a multisite, prospective, longitudinal study of advanced cancer patients and their caregivers (N = 275 dyads. Caregivers were assessed before and after patient deaths. CEQUEL's factor structure was examined; reliability was evaluated using Cronbach's α, and convergent validity by the strength of associations between CEQUEL scores and key EOL outcomes. RESULTS: FACTOR ANALYSIS REVEALED FOUR DISTINCT FACTORS: Prolongation of Death, Perceived Suffering, Shared Decision-Making, and Preparation for the Death. Each item loaded strongly on only a single factor. The 13-item CEQUEL and its subscales showed moderate to acceptable Cronbach's α (range: 0.52-0.78. 53% of caregivers reported patients suffering more than expected. Higher CEQUEL scores were positively associated with therapeutic alliance (ρ = .13; p≤.05 and hospice enrollment (z = -2.09; p≤.05, and negatively associated with bereaved caregiver regret (ρ = -.36, p≤.001 and a diagnosis of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (z = -2.06; p≤.05. CONCLUSION: CEQUEL is a brief, valid measure of quality of EOL care from the caregiver's perspective. It is the first scale to include perceived suffering and prolongation of death. If validated in future work, it may prove a useful quality indicator for the delivery of EOL care and a risk indicator for poor bereavement adjustment.

  2. Evaluating quality of dental care among patients with diabetes: Adaptation and testing of a dental quality measure in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Ana; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Ramoni, Rachel; Yansane, Alfa; Tokede, Bunmi; Etolue, Jini; Vaderhobli, Ram; Simmons, Kristen; Even, Joshua; Mullins, Joanna; Kumar, Shwetha; Bangar, Suhasini; Kookal, Krishna; White, Joel; Walji, Muhammad

    2017-09-01

    Patients with diabetes are at increased risk of developing oral complications, and annual dental examinations are an endorsed preventive strategy. The authors evaluated the feasibility and validity of implementing an automated electronic health record (EHR)-based dental quality measure to determine whether patients with diabetes received such evaluations. The authors selected a Dental Quality Alliance measure developed for claims data and adapted the specifications for EHRs. Automated queries identified patients with diabetes across 4 dental institutions, and the authors manually reviewed a subsample of charts to evaluate query performance. After assessing the initial EHR measure, the authors defined and tested a revised EHR measure to capture better the oral care received by patients with diabetes. In the initial and revised measures, the authors used EHR automated queries to identify 12,960 and 13,221 patients with diabetes, respectively, in the reporting year. Variations in the measure scores across sites were greater with the initial measure (range, 36.4-71.3%) than with the revised measure (range, 78.8-88.1%). The automated query performed well (93% or higher) for sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for both measures. The results suggest that an automated EHR-based query can be used successfully to measure the quality of oral health care delivered to patients with diabetes. The authors also found that using the rich data available in EHRs may help estimate the quality of care better than can relying on claims data. Detailed clinical patient-level data in dental EHRs may be useful to dentists in evaluating the quality of dental care provided to patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Patient, carer and professional perspectives on barriers and facilitators to quality care in advanced heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Browne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Those with advanced heart failure (HF experience high levels of morbidity and mortality, similar to common cancers. However, there remains evidence of inequity of access to palliative care services compared to people with cancer. This study examines patient, carer, and professional perspectives on current management of advanced HF and barriers and facilitators to improved care. METHODS: Qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews and focus groups with advanced HF patients (n = 30, carers (n = 20, and professionals (n = 65. Data analysed using Normalisation Process Theory (NPT as the underpinning conceptual framework. FINDINGS: Uncertainty is ubiquitous in accounts from advanced HF patients and their caregivers. This uncertainty relates to understanding of the implications of their diagnosis, appropriate treatments, and when and how to seek effective help. Health professionals agree this is a major problem but feel they lack knowledge, opportunities, or adequate support to improve the situation. Fragmented care with lack of coordination and poor communication makes life difficult. Poor understanding of the condition extends to the wider circle of carers and means that requests for help may not be perceived as legitimate, and those with advanced HF are not prioritised for social and financial supports. Patient and caregiver accounts of emergency care are uniformly poor. Managing polypharmacy and enduring concomitant side effects is a major burden, and the potential for rationalisation exists. This study has potential limitations because it was undertaken within a single geographical location within the United Kingdom. CONCLUSIONS: Little progress is being made to improve care experiences for those with advanced HF. Even in the terminal stages, patients and caregivers are heavily and unnecessarily burdened by health care services that are poorly coordinated and offer fragmented care. There is evidence that these poor

  4. Quality of life assessment of patients with schizophrenic spectrum disorders from Psychosocial Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Fernandes Carpinteiro da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assessing the quality of life and the clinical and social-demographic factors associated in schizophrenic spectrum patients (ICD-10 F20-F29 attending CAPS at the programmatic area 3.0. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of schizophrenic spectrum patients who have been enrolled in 2008 in CAPS in programmatic area (AP 3 at Rio de Janeiro city, using MINIPLUS to assess schizophrenia spectrum disorder and use of psychoactive substances, Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS to assess psychiatric symptoms and Quality of Life Scale (QLS-BR to assess the quality of life. RESULTS: Seventy nine patients were included, of whom 74 (93.7% presented some impairment in quality of life. The most frequently affected area was occupational performance. Variables that showed a significant association with severe impairment of quality of life were: marital status, race, occupation, who patients lived with, homelessness, having children, previous psychiatric hospitalization, negative symptoms and symptoms designated as not applicable (being characterized by a lack of typical positive and negative symptoms. CONCLUSION: The knowledge of these factors should be crucial to implement health policies and psychosocial rehabilitation programs focused on improving the quality of life of these patients.

  5. Referring a patient and family to high-quality palliative care at the close of life: "We met a new personality... with this level of compassion and empathy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teno, Joan M; Connor, Stephen R

    2009-02-11

    Palliative care services are increasingly available to primary care physicians for both expert consultations and services to seriously ill patients. The United States now has more than 1400 hospital-based palliative care teams and more than 4700 hospice programs. We use an illustrative case of a palliative care hospitalization and intervention for a middle-aged man with severe pain from spinal metastases to discuss 4 key questions that a primary care physician faces in caring for the seriously ill patient with difficult symptom management: (1) Should I refer a patient to a hospital-based palliative care team or to hospice services for difficult symptom management? (2) If the patient is referred to a hospital-based palliative care team, what should I, as the primary care physician, expect? (3) When should I refer to hospice services a patient initially referred to a hospital-based palliative care team? and (4) How can I choose a hospice program that will provide competent, coordinated, and compassionate patient- and family-centered care? Primary care physicians now may choose among hospice programs, and the programs may vary in their quality of care. Validated tools to measure patient and family perceptions of the quality of hospice care are now available but progress in defining and measuring the quality of hospice care is still needed before actionable information will be available to guide the choice of hospice programs for physicians and consumers.

  6. Identifying health care quality attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsaran-Fowdar, Roshnee R

    2005-01-01

    Evaluating health care quality is important for consumers, health care providers, and society. Developing a measure of health care service quality is an important precursor to systems and organizations that value health care quality. SERVQUAL has been proposed as a broad-based measure of service quality that may be applicable to health care settings. Results from a study described in this paper verify SERVQUAL dimensions, but demonstrate additional dimensions that are specific to health care settings.

  7. Satisfaction with care as a quality-of-life predictor for stroke patients and their caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: We sought to identify indicators associated with the quality of life (QoL) of stroke patients and caregivers. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted at nine Dutch stroke service facilities involving 251 stroke patients and their caregivers. We used the EuroQol (EQ-5D)

  8. Involvement of patients or their representatives in quality management functions in EU hospitals: implementation and impact on patient-centred care strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groene, Oliver; Sunol, Rosa; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wang, Aolin; Dersarkissian, Maral; Thompson, Caroline A.; Thompson, Andrew; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, N; Kringos, DS; Lombarts, MJMH; Plochg, T; Lopez, MA; Secanell, M; Sunol, R; Vallejo, P; Bartels, P; Kristensen, S; Michel, P; Saillour-Glenisson, F; Vlcek, F; Car, M; Jones, S; Klaus, E; Bottaro, S; Garel, P; Saluvan, M; Bruneau, C; Depaigne-Loth, A; Shaw, C; Hammer, A; Ommen, O; Pfaff, H; Groene, O; Botje, D; Wagner, C; Kutaj-Wasikowska, H; Kutryba, B; Escoval, A; Lívio, A; Eiras, M; Franca, M; Leite, I; Almeman, F; Kus, H; Ozturk, K; Mannion, R; Arah, OA; DerSarkissian, M; Thompson, CA; Wang, A; Thompson, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe the involvement of patients or their representatives in quality management (QM) functions and to assess associations between levels of involvement and the implementation of patient-centred care strategies. Design A cross-sectional, multilevel study design that surveyed quality managers and department heads and data from an organizational audit. Setting Randomly selected hospitals (n = 74) from seven European countries (The Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Turkey). Participants Hospital quality managers (n = 74) and heads of clinical departments (n = 262) in charge of four patient pathways (acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries) participated in the data collection between May 2011 and February 2012. Main Outcome Measures Four items reflecting essential patient-centred care strategies based on an on-site hospital visit: (1) formal survey seeking views of patients and carers, (2) written policies on patients' rights, (3) patient information literature including guidelines and (4) fact sheets for post-discharge care. The main predictors were patient involvement in QM at the (i) hospital level and (ii) pathway level. Results Current levels of involving patients and their representatives in QM functions in European hospitals are low at hospital level (mean score 1.6 on a scale of 0 to 5, SD 0.7), but even lower at departmental level (mean 0.6, SD 0.7). We did not detect associations between levels of involving patients and their representatives in QM functions and the implementation of patient-centred care strategies; however, the smallest hospitals were more likely to have implemented patient-centred care strategies. Conclusions There is insufficient evidence that involving patients and their representatives in QM leads to establishing or implementing strategies and procedures that facilitate patient-centred care; however, lack of evidence should not be

  9. Involvement of patients or their representatives in quality management functions in EU hospitals: implementation and impact on patient-centred care strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groene, Oliver; Sunol, Rosa; Klazinga, Niek S; Wang, Aolin; Dersarkissian, Maral; Thompson, Caroline A; Thompson, Andrew; Arah, Onyebuchi A

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the involvement of patients or their representatives in quality management (QM) functions and to assess associations between levels of involvement and the implementation of patient-centred care strategies. A cross-sectional, multilevel that surveyed quality managers and department heads and data from an organizational audit. Randomly selected hospitals (n = 74) from seven European countries (The Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Turkey). Hospital quality managers (n = 74) and heads of clinical departments (n = 262) in charge of four patient pathways (acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries) participated in the data collection between May 2011 and February 2012. Four items reflecting essential patient-centred care strategies based on an on-site hospital visit: (1) formal survey seeking views of patients and carers, (2) written policies on patients' rights, (3) patient information literature including guidelines and (4) fact sheets for post-discharge care. The main predictors were patient involvement in QM at the (i) hospital level and (ii) pathway level. Current levels of involving patients and their representatives in QM functions in European hospitals are low at hospital level (mean score 1.6 on a scale of 0 to 5, SD 0.7), but even lower at departmental level (mean 0.6, SD 0.7). We did not detect associations between levels of involving patients and their representatives in QM functions and the implementation of patient-centred care strategies; however, the smallest hospitals were more likely to have implemented patient-centred care strategies. There is insufficient evidence that involving patients and their representatives in QM leads to establishing or implementing strategies and procedures that facilitate patient-centred care; however, lack of evidence should not be interpreted as evidence of no effect.

  10. Creating patient value in glaucoma care: applying quality costing and care delivery value chain approaches--a five-year case study in the Rotterdam Eye Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korne, Dirk F; Sol, Kees; Custers, Thomas; van Sprundel, Esther; van Ineveld, B Martin; Lemij, Hans G; Klazinga, Niek S

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore in a specific hospital care process the applicability in practice of the theories of quality costing and value chains. In a retrospective case study an in-depth evaluation of the use of a quality cost model (QCM) and the applicability of Porter's care delivery value chain (CDVC) was performed in a specific care process: glaucoma care over the period 2001 to 2006 in the Rotterdam Eye Hospital in The Netherlands. The case study shows a reduction of costs per product by increasing the number of outpatient visits and surgery combined with a higher patient satisfaction. Reduction of costs of non-compliance by using the QCM is small, due to the absence of (external) financial incentives for both the hospital and individual physicians. For CDVC to be supportive to an integrated quality and cost management the notion "patient value" needs far more specification as mutually agreed on by the stakeholders involved and related reimbursement needs to depend on realised outcomes. The case study just focused on one specific care process in one hospital. To determine effects in other areas of health care, it is important to study the use and applicability of the QCM and the CDVC in other care processes and settings. QCM and a CDVC can be useful tools for hospital management to manage the outcomes on both quality and costs, but impact is dependent on the incentives in the context of the existing organisational and reimbursement system and asks for an agreed on operationalisation among the various stakeholders of the notion of patient value.

  11. The ecology of the patient visit: physical attractiveness, waiting times, and perceived quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Franklin; Douglass, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the attractiveness of the physical environment of healthcare facilities and patient perceptions of quality, service, and waiting time through systematic observations and patient satisfaction surveys at 7 outpatient practices at Weill Cornell Medical Center. Findings indicate positive correlations between more attractive environments and higher levels of perceived quality, satisfaction, staff interaction, and reduction of patient anxiety. The comparison of actual observed time and patients' perception of time showed that patients tend to overestimate shorter waiting times and underestimate longer waiting times in both the waiting area and the examination room. Further examinations of the way outpatient-practice environments impact patient and staff perceptions and how those perceptions impact behavior and medical outcomes are suggested.

  12. Sexual dysfunction and its impact on quality of life in Chinese patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Cai-Lan; Zang, Yu; Rosen, R C; Cai, Mei-Ying; Li, Yan; Jia, Fu-Jun; Lin, Yong-Qiang; Ungvari, Gabor S; Ng, Chee H; Chiu, Helen F K; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-02-01

    Sexual dysfunction in schizophrenia patients is common. In China, maintenance treatment for clinically stable patients with schizophrenia is usually provided by primary care physicians. Illness- or treatment-related sexual dysfunction in this patient population has been never studied. This study describes the prevalence and correlates of sexual dysfunction and its impact on quality of life (QOL) in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China. A total of 607 patients with schizophrenia treated in 22 randomly selected primary care services in China formed the study sample. Patients' socio-demographic and clinical characteristics including sexual function and QOL were recorded using a standardized protocol and data collection. Sexual dysfunction was present in 69.9% of all patients; 60.7% in males and 80.6% in females. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that female gender, being single, older age and use of first-generation antipsychotics were independently and significantly associated with more sexual dysfunction accounting for 23.5% of its variance (Pschizophrenia treated in primary care in China. Given its negative impact on social adjustment, QOL and treatment adherence, efforts should be made to address sexual dysfunction in this patient population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Are AMI patients with comorbid mental illness more likely to be admitted to hospitals with lower quality of AMI care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueya Cai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Older patients with comorbid mental illness are shown to receive less appropriate care for their medical conditions. This study analyzed Medicare patients hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (AMI and determined whether those with comorbid mental illness were more likely to present to hospitals with lower quality of AMI care. METHODS: Retrospective analyses of Medicare claims in 2008. Hospital quality was measured using the five "Hospital Compare" process indicators (aspirin at admission/discharge, beta-blocker at admission/discharge, and angiotension-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotension receptor blocker for left ventricular dysfunction. Multinomial logit model determined the association of mental illness with admission to low-quality hospitals (rank of the composite process score 90(th percentile, compared to admissions to other hospitals with medium quality. Multivariate analyses further determined the effects of hospital type and mental diagnosis on outcomes. RESULTS: Among all AMI admissions to 2,845 hospitals, 41,044 out of 287,881 patients were diagnosed with mental illness. Mental illness predicted a higher likelihood of admission to low-quality hospitals (unadjusted rate 2.9% vs. 2.0%; adjusted odds ratio [OR]1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-1.34, p<0.01, and an equal likelihood to high-quality hospitals (unadjusted rate 9.8% vs. 10.3%; adjusted OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.93-1.01, p = 0.11. Both lower hospital quality and mental diagnosis predicted higher rates of 30-day readmission, 30-day mortality, and 1-year mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Among Medicare myocardial infarction patients, comorbid mental illness was associated with an increased risk for admission to lower-quality hospitals. Both lower hospital quality and mental illness predicted worse post-AMI outcomes.

  14. The Effect of Orem's Self-Care Model on Quality of Life in Patients with Migraine: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh Zarandi, Fatemeh; Raiesifar, Afsaneh; Ebadi, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Many aspects of the lives of migraineurs are commonly affected by the condition, including occupational affairs, social and family life, responsibilities and ultimately the quality of life. This study was designed to determine the effect of orem's self-care nursing model on quality of life in patients with a migraine. This study was carried out in Tehran, Iran. According to the pre-post design of the randomized clinical trial, 88 patients were selected. After obtaining approval from the ethics committee of the Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University's Research Deputy; Patients who signed the informed consent aged 20-55 years and without any more disease or disability affecting the quality of life were selected and randomly assigned to a group. Data collection tools were a demographic questionnaire, general health survey short form (SF36), and Orem cognition form and self-care checklist. Self-care model were held as four 30-45 minutes training sessions based on self-care deficit needs for the experimental group. The quality of life scores was measured in two stages, before and three months after intervention then were compared in both groups. Data were analyzed with statistical software SPSS and use of descriptive analysis tests, Chi-square, Mann-Whitney u and Wilcoxon. The final analysis was performed on 43 experimental and 40 controls. No significant difference was detected in the two groups in terms of demographic variables (P>0.05). All dimensions of quality of life including physical functioning, physical role limitation, body pain, general health, vitality, social functioning and emotional role limitation and mental health in the experimental group showed a significant increase after intervention compared to the control group (Pcare nursing model improves function and overall quality of life and reduces the high cost of a migraine and migraine-related disability to individuals and society.

  15. Impact of weight bias and stigma on quality of care and outcomes for patients with obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Phelan, SM; Burgess, DJ; Yeazel, MW; Hellerstedt, WL; Griffin, JM; van Ryn, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to critically review the empirical evidence from all relevant disciplines regarding obesity stigma in order to (i) determine the implications of obesity stigma for healthcare providers and their patients with obesity and (ii) identify strategies to improve care for patients with obesity. We conducted a search of Medline and PsychInfo for all peer-reviewed papers presenting original empirical data relevant to stigma, bias, discrimination, prejudice and medical c...

  16. Effects of Aromatherapy on the Anxiety, Vital Signs, and Sleep Quality of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Patients in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Yeon Cho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, sleep, and blood pressure (BP of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI patients in an intensive care unit (ICU. Fifty-six patients with PCI in ICU were evenly allocated to either the aromatherapy or conventional nursing care. Aromatherapy essential oils were blended with lavender, roman chamomile, and neroli with a 6 : 2 : 0.5 ratio. Participants received 10 times treatment before PCI, and the same essential oils were inhaled another 10 times after PCI. Outcome measures patients' state anxiety, sleeping quality, and BP. An aromatherapy group showed significantly low anxiety (t=5.99, P<.001 and improving sleep quality (t=−3.65, P=.001 compared with conventional nursing intervention. The systolic BP of both groups did not show a significant difference by time or in a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F=4.63, P=.036. The diastolic BP did not show any significant difference by time or by a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F=6.93, P=.011. In conclusion, the aromatherapy effectively reduced the anxiety levels and increased the sleep quality of PCI patients admitted to the ICU. Aromatherapy may be used as an independent nursing intervention for reducing the anxiety levels and improving the sleep quality of PCI patients.

  17. Assessing health-care providers' readiness for reporting quality and patient safety indicators at primary health-care centres in Lebanon: a national cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Saleh, Shadi; Natafgi, Nabil

    2015-05-22

    Successful endorsement of quality indicators hinges on the readiness and acceptability of care providers for those measures. This paper aims to assess the readiness of care providers in the primary health-care sector in Lebanon for the implementation of quality and patient safety indicators. A cross-sectional survey methodology was utilized to gather information from 943 clinical care providers working at 123 primary health-care centres in Lebanon. The questionnaire included two sections: the first assessed four readiness dimensions (appropriateness, management support, efficacy, and personal valence) of clinical providers to use quality and safety indicators using the Readiness for Organization Change (ROC) scale, and the second section assessed the safety attitude at the primary care centre utilizing the Agency of Health Research and Quality (AHRQ) Safety Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ)-Ambulatory version. Although two thirds (66%) of respondents indicated readiness for implementation of quality and patient safety indicators in their centres, there appear to be differences by professional group. Physicians displayed the lowest scores on all readiness dimensions except for personal valence which was the lowest among nurses (60%). In contrast, allied health professionals displayed the highest scores across all readiness dimensions. Generally, respondents reflected a positive safety attitude climate in the centres. Yet, there remain a few areas of concern related to punitive culture (only 12.8% agree that staff should not be punished for reported errors/incidents), continuity of care (41.1% believe in the negative consequences of lack in continuity of care process), and resources (48.1% believe that the medical equipment they have are adequate). Providers with the highest SAQ score had 2.7, 1.7, 7 and 2.4 times the odds to report a higher readiness on the appropriateness, efficacy, management and personal valence ROC subscales, respectively (P value quality and patient

  18. Quality in the Danish health care sector – patient identity in transition?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Aase Marie; Strunck, Jeanne; Lassen, Inger Marie

    2015; Ministry of Health 2015). The change implies a gradual transition from an evidence based activity model to a value based quality model centered on patient involvement (Mainz et al 2015; Porter 2010; Rostgaard 2015). As a parallel trend over the past 30 years, welfare state ideology seems to have...... come under rising pressure by economic rationales combined with ideas of lean management and New Public Management (Valgårda 2003; Niklassson 2006; Lassen, Ottesen and Strunck 2015). Seeing that shifting quality perceptions and a stronger focus on patient involvement invites questions about the role...... of the patient in the Danish welfare system, we ask: 1) how is patient identity construed in selected legislation, steering instruments and reports issued by the Danish Board of Health, and 2) how may variation in the construal of patient identity be indicative of discursive struggle at the level of national...

  19. Effect of nursing care given at home on the quality of life of patients with stomach cancer and their family caregivers' nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, S; Gozum, S

    2016-12-22

    In Turkey, the high incidences of stomach and oesophageal cancers in East and high incidence of stomach cancer in Northeast regions are remarkable. This study was conducted to identify homecare needs of patients with stomach cancer and their caregivers and the effect of family supportive nursing care on the quality of life of patients and families. The patient and his/her caregiver were assessed with respect to their daily life activities and NANDA was used for the identified nursing diagnoses, NIC for the appropriate interventions and NOC for assessment of the results. This study was conducted in a pre-test, post-test, controlled trial model to identify. The sample of the investigation consisted of 72 patients and 72 caregivers. As a data-collecting instrument, the Quality of Life Scale and Caregiver Quality of Life Index-Cancer were used. The overall quality of life, global health status and emotional and cognitive functions of the patients in the experimental group improved after the interventions. The overall quality of life and global health status was found to be poorer in the control group patients at post-test as compared to pre-test and their physical, role and social functions deteriorated. The caregivers' quality of life in the control group was affected more negatively with respect to the "Disruption in Daily Life" subscale as compared to pre-test values.

  20. Nurse reported quality of care: a measure of hospital quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Matthew D; Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski

    2012-12-01

    As the primary providers of round-the-clock bedside care, nurses are well positioned to report on hospital quality of care. Researchers have not examined how nurses' reports of quality correspond with standard process or outcomes measures of quality. We assess the validity of evaluating hospital quality by aggregating hospital nurses' responses to a single item that asks them to report on quality of care. We found that a 10% increment in the proportion of nurses reporting excellent quality of care was associated with lower odds of mortality and failure to rescue; greater patient satisfaction; and higher composite process of care scores for acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, and surgical patients. Nurse reported quality of care is a useful indicator of hospital performance. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Quality of care in the oncology outpatient setting from patients' perspective: a systematic review of questionnaires' content and psychometric performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, A; Kop, J-L; Efficace, F; Beaudeau, A; Brito, T; Dolbeault, S; Aaronson, N

    2015-04-01

    Cancer care is increasingly provided in the outpatient setting, requiring specific monitoring of care quality. The patients' perspective is an important indicator of care quality and needs to be assessed with well designed, psychometrically sound questionnaires. We performed a systematic literature review of currently available patient satisfaction measures for use in cancer outpatient care settings. We carried out MEDLINE/PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Scopus searches of papers published over the past 15 years that describe cancer patient satisfaction questionnaires for use in the outpatient setting. We used the adapted COSMIN checklist to assess the quality of the questionnaires' measurement properties. A total of 6677 citations were identified and 76 relevant articles were read, of which 55 were found either not to be relevant or to provide insufficient psychometric information. The remaining 21 studies pertained to 14 patient satisfaction questionnaires. Continuity and transition, accessibility, and involvement of family/friends were less frequently addressed despite their relevance in outpatient oncology. Almost half of the psychometric studies did not provide information on item level missing data. Most internal consistency estimates (Cronbach's α) were satisfactory. Few studies reported test-retest assessment (n = 5), used confirmatory factor analysis (n = 2), or assessed fit to a graded response item response theory model (n = 3). Only three questionnaires were cross-culturally validated. Important aspects of care may be missed by current patient satisfaction questionnaires for use in the cancer outpatient setting. Additional evidence is needed of their psychometric performance, especially for cross-cultural comparative assessments. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Individualized care, quality of life and satisfaction with nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, Riitta; Välimäki, Maritta; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2005-05-01

    This paper reports a study of the maintenance of individualized care from surgical patients' point of view and examines associations between individualized care, patient satisfaction with nursing care, and health-related quality of life. Rationale. There is preliminary evidence that individualized care is effective from patients' point of view, and is associated with improved patient outcomes, such as patient satisfaction and quality of life. However, individualized care has mainly been studied from the vantage-point of nurses' experiences. In this cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study the data were collected with surgical adult patients (n = 279, response rate 93%) in surgical wards in Finland using self-administered questionnaires including the Individualized Care Scales, Patient-Satisfaction Scale, and Finnish versions of the Nottingham Health Profile and EuroQol 5D. Associations between individualized care, satisfaction with care and health-related quality of life were examined. Cronbach's alpha values and item analysis were used to evaluate the psychometric properties of the instruments, especially the Individualized Care Scales. The more often patients felt they received support for individuality through specific nursing interventions, the higher the individuality of care received. Secondly, the more individualized patients regarded their care, the higher the level of reported patient satisfaction with nursing care. However, the correlation between individualized care and health-related quality of life was fairly low, albeit statistically significant. Individualized care may produce positive outcomes, such as patient satisfaction. Further research is needed to explore individualized care in relation to health-related quality of life.

  3. Effects of nursing unit spatial layout on nursing team communication patterns, quality of care, and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ying; Becker, Franklin; Wurmser, Teri; Bliss-Holtz, Jane; Hedges, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Studies investigating factors contributing to improved quality of care have found that effective team member communication is among the most critical and influential aspects in the delivery of quality care. Relatively little research has examined the role of the physical design of nursing units on communication patterns among care providers. Although the concept of decentralized unit design is intended to increase patient safety, reduce nurse fatigue, and control the noisy, chaotic, and crowded space associated with centralized nursing stations, until recently little attention has been paid to how such nursing unit designs affected communication patterns or other medical and organizational outcomes. Using a pre/post research design comparing more centralized or decentralized unit designs with a new multi-hub design, the aim of this study was to describe the relationship between the clinical spatial environment and its effect on communication patterns, nurse satisfaction, distance walked, organizational outcomes, patient safety, and patient satisfaction. Hospital institutional data indicated that patient satisfaction increased substantially. Few significant changes were found in communication patterns; no significant changes were found in nurse job satisfaction, patient falls, pressure ulcers, or organizational outcomes such as average length of stay or patient census.

  4. Quality of life in patients with visual impairment in Ibadan: a clinical study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adigun, Kehinde; Oluleye, Tunji S; Ladipo, Modupe Ma; Olowookere, Samuel Anu

    2014-01-01

    Visual function is important for optimal orientation in functional and social life, and has an effect on physical and emotional well-being. Visual impairment, therefore, leads to restrictions in all aspects of daily living and is related to quality of life. The aim of this study was to provide information on the causes of visual impairment in patients presenting to their family physician, the spectrum of impairment, and its impact on quality of life for these patients. This descriptive cross-sectional study of 375 adult patients with ocular symptoms was performed in the general outpatient department of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, from July to September, 2009. After checking their presenting visual acuity, the patients were interviewed using the Vision-Related Quality of Life questionnaire to determine the impact of visual impairment on their quality of life. Ophthalmic examinations were performed to determine the causes of visual impairment. The results were analyzed using proportions and percentages. The main causes of visual impairment were cataracts (58.7%), refractive error (19.4%), and glaucoma (2.9%). Visual impairment was found to be associated with advancing age, low education, and unemployment (Pvisual function (64.2%) and social interaction (50.9%). Quality of life was found to be related to the degree of visual impairment, ie, blind patients reported poor quality of life (41.4%) when compared with those having low vision (8.6%) or near normal vision (2.4%, Pvisual impairment. Family physicians need to identify these visually impaired patients early and make timely referrals.

  5. Health-related quality of life of patients 12 months following surgical intensive care discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Karachi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Health  related  quality  of  life  (HRQoL  and  the  effect  of  selected  socio-demographic  and  clinical  intensive  care  variables  on  HRQoL of  patients  12  months  following  adult  surgical  intensive  care  unit  discharge in  the  Western  Cape  was  evaluated.  A  prospective  observational  study  was conducted.  The  sample  comprised  46  patients  who  had  survived  12  months following discharge. Structured telephonic interviews were conducted using a self-developed  and  SF-36v2  HRQoL  questionnaire.  Data  was  analyzed  using Stastica 7 and values were accepted as significant at the 5% level. Low mean HRQoL  domain  scores  (43%  -  53%  were  found  implying  a  poor  HRQoL outcome. Physical functioning [43.5%], Role Play [44.5%] and Role Emotion [43.1%] scores were specifically lower than the other HRQoL domain scores. Age and severity of illness scores (APACHE II were significantly associated with the social functioning (p=0.01 and physical functioning (p=0.02 scores  respectively. APACHE  II  may  be  a  useful  contributor  in  predicting  long-term  physical  functioning  outcomes  in  patients  following  surgical  ICU  discharge.  The  HRQoL  outcomes  are  slightly  lower  than  that  found  for  inter-national ICU populations however responses in the domains affected are comparable. Low physical functioning, role play  and  role  emotion  scores  indicate  a  need  for  further  physical  and  emotional  rehabilitation  following  surgical  ICU discharge.

  6. Practice size, caseload, deprivation and quality of care of patients with coronary heart disease, hypertension and stroke in primary care: national cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soljak Michael

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reports of higher quality care by higher-volume secondary care providers have fuelled a shift of services from smaller provider units to larger hospitals and units. In the United Kingdom, most patients are managed in primary care. Hence if larger practices provide better quality of care; this would have important implications for the future organization of primary care services. We examined the association between quality of primary care for cardiovascular disease achieved by general practices in England and Scotland by general practice caseload, practice size and area based deprivation measures, using data from the New General Practitioner (GP Contract. Methods We analyzed data from 8,970 general practices with a total registered population of 55,522,778 patients in England and Scotland. We measured practice performance against 26 cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease, left ventricular disease, and stroke Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF indicators for patients on cardiovascular disease registers and linked this with data on practice characteristics and census data. Results Despite wide variations in practice list sizes and deprivation, the prevalence of was remarkably consistent, (coronary heart disease, left ventricular dysfunction, hypertension and cerebrovascular disease was 3.7%; 0.45%; 11.4% and 1.5% respectively. Achievement in quality of care for cardiovascular disease, as measured by QOF, was consistently high regardless of caseload or size with a few notable exceptions: practices with larger list sizes, higher cardiovascular disease caseloads and those in affluent areas had higher achievement of indicators requiring referral for further investigation. For example, small practices achieved lower scores 71.4% than large practices 88.6% (P Conclusion The volume-outcome relationship found in hospital settings is not seen between practices in the UK in management of cardiovascular disorders in primary care

  7. Improving the quality of care of patients with asthma: the example of patients with severely symptomatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Farinpour, R; Sennett, C; Bowers, B W; Legorreta, A P

    2001-08-01

    The increasing economic burden of asthma care is incurred partly by patients with more severe symptoms. However, little is known about the characteristics of these severe asthma patients. This study examined sociodemographic, disease-specific characteristics and health care utilization that are related to asthma disease severity, for the purpose of identifying areas for treatment improvement. A total of 2927 asthma patients (12 years or older), who were continuously enrolled in one of three participating health plans for a 6-month study period and who responded to an asthma survey, were included in the study. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the sociodemographic, disease-specific characteristics and health care utilization by asthma severity. About 25% of the patients reported experiencing severe asthma symptoms. They were more likely to be African-Americans, Hispanics, women, patients with less than a college education, residents in the south-west, current smokers, and those receiving care from non-specialists. Severe asthmatics reported having less of an understanding of the clinical manifestation of asthma and the means to manage asthma exacerbation. Outpatient contacts did not differ significantly between severe and other patients, although their utilization of emergency room and inpatient care was significantly greater. This study suggests that a significant proportion of asthma patients is experiencing severe symptoms and barriers other than access to care prevent appropriate control of asthma. Poor control appears to be related to smoking, deficits in knowledge about self-care, not receiving medical care from a specialist, and inadequate use of medications.

  8. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries.

  9. Lay health educators within primary care practices to improve cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients: challenges in quality improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofters, AK; Vahabi, M; Prakash, V; Banerjee, L; Bansal, P; Goel, S; Dunn, S

    2017-01-01

    Background Cancer screening uptake is known to be low among South Asian residents of Ontario. The objective of this pilot study was to determine if lay health educators embedded within the practices of primary care providers could improve willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients taking a quality improvement approach. Materials and methods Participating physicians selected quality improvement initiatives to use within their offices that they felt could increase willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake. They implemented initiatives, adapting as necessary, for six months. Results Four primary care physicians participated in the study. All approximated that at least 60% of their patients were of South Asian ethnicity. All physicians chose to work with a preexisting lay health educator program geared toward South Asians. Health ambassadors spoke to patients in the office and telephoned patients. For all physicians, ~60% of South Asian patients who were overdue for cancer screening and who spoke directly to health ambassadors stated they were willing to be screened. One physician was able to track actual screening among contacted patients and found that screening uptake was relatively high: from 29.2% (colorectal cancer) to 44.6% (breast cancer) of patients came in for screening within six months of the first phone calls. Although physicians viewed the health ambassadors positively, they found the study to be time intensive and resource intensive, especially as this work was additional to usual clinical duties. Discussion Using South Asian lay health educators embedded within primary care practices to telephone patients in their own languages showed promise in this study to increase awareness about willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake, but it was also time intensive and resource intensive with numerous challenges. Future quality improvement efforts should further develop the phone call invitation process, as well as

  10. Factors influencing new graduate nurse burnout development, job satisfaction and patient care quality: a time-lagged study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boamah, Sheila A; Read, Emily A; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2017-05-01

    To test a hypothesized model linking new graduate nurses' perceptions of their manager's authentic leadership behaviours to structural empowerment, short-staffing and work-life interference and subsequent burnout, job satisfaction and patient care quality. Authentic leadership and structural empowerment have been shown to reduce early career burnout among nurses. Short-staffing and work-life interference are also linked to burnout and may help explain the impact of positive, empowering leadership on burnout, which in turn influences job satisfaction and patient care quality. A time-lagged study of Canadian new graduate nurses was conducted. At Time 1, surveys were sent to 3,743 nurses (November 2012-March 2013) and 1,020 were returned (27·3% response rate). At Time 2 (May-July 2014), 406 nurses who responded at Time 1 completed surveys (39·8% response rate). Descriptive analysis was conducted in SPSS. Structural equation modelling in Mplus was used to test the hypothesized model. The hypothesized model was supported. Authentic leadership had a significant positive effect on structural empowerment, which in turn decreased both short-staffing and work-life interference. Short-staffing and work-life imbalance subsequently resulted in nurse burnout, lower job satisfaction and lower patient care quality 1 year later. The findings suggest that short-staffing and work-life interference are important factors influencing new graduate nurse burnout. Developing nurse managers' authentic leadership behaviours and working with them to create and sustain empowering work environments may help reduce burnout, increase nurse job satisfaction and improve patient care quality. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Restricted duty hours for surgeons and impact on residents quality of life, education, and patient care: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeifer Roman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work-hour limitations have been implemented by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME in July 2003 in order to minimize fatigue related medical adverse events. The effects of this regulation are still under intense debate. In this literature review, data of effects of limited work-hours on the quality of life, surgical education, and patient care was summarized, focusing on surgical subspecialities. Methods Studies that assessed the effects of the work-hour regulation published following the implementation of ACGME guidelines (2003 were searched using PubMed database. The following search modules were selected: work-hours, 80-hour work week, quality of life, work satisfaction, surgical education, residency training, patient care, continuity of care. Publications were included if they were completed in the United States and covered the subject of our review. Manuscrips were analysed to identify authors, year of publication, type of study, number of participants, and the main outcomes. Review Findings Twenty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. Studies demonstrate that the residents quality of life has improved. The effects on surgical education are still unclear due to inconsistency in studies. Furthermore, according to several objective studies there were no changes in mortality and morbidity following the implementation. Conclusion Further studies are necessary addressing the effects of surgical education and studying the objective methods to assess the technical skill and procedural competence of surgeons. In addition, patient surveys analysing their satisfaction and concerns can contribute to recent discussion, as well.

  12. Perceptions of health care providers and patients on quality of care in maternal and neonatal health in fourteen Bangladesh government healthcare facilities: a mixed-method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farzana; Rahman, Aminur; Halim, Abdul; Eriksson, Charli; Rahman, Fazlur; Dalal, Koustuv

    2015-06-19

    Bangladesh has achieved remarkable progress in healthcare with a steady decline in maternal and under-5 child mortality rates in efforts to achieve Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. However, the mortality rates are still very high compared with high-income countries. The quality of healthcare needs improve to reduce mortality rates further. It is essential to investigate the current quality of healthcare before implementing any interventions. The study was conducted to explore the perception of healthcare providers about the quality of maternal and neonatal health (MNH) care. The study also investigated patient satisfaction with the MNH care received from district and sub-district hospitals. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in the study. Two district and 12 sub-district hospitals in Thakurgaon and Jamalpur in Bangladesh were the study settings. Fourteen group discussions and 56 in-depth interviews were conducted among the healthcare providers. Client exit interviews were conducted with 112 patients and their attendants from maternity, labor, and neonatal wards before being discharged from the hospitals. Eight physicians and four anthropologists collected data between November and December 2011 using pretested guidelines. The hospital staff identified several key factors that affected the quality of patient care: shortage of staff and logistics; lack of laboratory support; under use of patient-management protocols; a lack of training; and insufficient supervision. Doctors were unable to provide optimal care because of the high volume of patients. The exit interviews revealed that 85 % of respondents were satisfied with the hospital services received. Seven out of 14 respondents were satisfied with the cleanliness of the hospital facilities. More than half of the respondents were satisfied with the drugs they received. In half of the facilities, patients did not get an opportunity to ask the healthcare providers questions about their health

  13. THE QUALITY OF LIFE OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS AT PRIMARY CARE CENTER, ANANINDEUA - PARÁ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Cunha Botelho Alves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the quality of life of hypertensive patients enrolled in a Family Health Strategy. Method: Analytical cross. Data collection was performed by using two questionnaires, one being the Minichal-Brazil, and the other on the clinical and socioeconomic aspects of the patient. Results: The majority of patients were women, aged over 40 years, earning up to three minimum wages and elementary and middle school level. Of the respondents, 62.50% had normal blood pressure and 83.00% correctly reported following treatment. At comorbidities were dyslipidemia (35.10%, overweight (47.00%, obesity (28.19% and diabetes (22.52%, and 74.34% reported a family history of cardiovascular disease. It was observed that sex, blood pressure and correct treatment showed influences the quality of life of hypertensive patients (p<0.05. In contrast we did not observe an association with quali of life variables: monthly income (p=0.0377, education (p=0.5011, family history (p = 0.6309, time since diagnosis (p=0.1317 or the fact consume no alcohol or smoking (p=0.1508, comorbidity (p=0.3460, age (p= 0.1253 and BMI (p = 0.5829. Conclusion: We found that patients who presented alone variables: female gender, uncontrolled blood pressure and non-adherence to treatment showed lower level of quality of life.

  14. Direct-Access Online Care for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial Examining Patient Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornmehl, Heather; Singh, Sanminder; Johnson, Mary Ann; Armstrong, April W

    2017-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic disease requiring regular follow-up. To increase access to dermatological care, online management of AD is being studied. However, a critical knowledge gap exists in determining AD patients' quality of life in direct-to-patient online models. In this study, we examined quality of life in AD patients managed through a direct-access online model. We randomized 156 patients to receiving care through a direct-access online platform or in person. Patients were seen for six visits over 12 months. At each visit, the patients completed Dermatology Life Quality Index/Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI/CDLQI), and Short Form (SF-12). Between baseline and 12 months, the mean (standard deviation, SD) within-group difference in DLQI score in the online group was 4.1 (±2.3); for the in-person group, the within-group difference was 4.8 (±2.7). The mean (SD) within-group difference in CDLQI score in the online group was 4.7 (±2.8); for the in-person group, the within-group difference was 4.9 (±3.1). The mean (SD) within-group difference in physical component score (PCS) and mental component score (MCS) SF-12 scores in the online group was 6.5 (±3.8) and 8.6 (±4.3); for the in-person group, it was 6.8 (±3.2) and 9.1(±3.8), respectively. The difference in the change in DLQI, CDLQI, SF-12 PCS, and SF-12 MCS scores between the two groups was 0.72 (95% confidence interval [90% CI], -0.97 to 2.41), 0.23 (90% CI, -2.21 to 2.67), 0.34 (90% CI, -1.16 to 1.84), and 0.51 (90% CI, -1.11 to 2.13), respectively. All differences were contained within their equivalence margins. Adult and pediatric AD patients receiving direct-access online care had equivalent quality of life outcomes as those see in person. The direct-access online model has the potential to increase access to care for patients with chronic skin diseases.

  15. Perception of quality in a Radiation Oncology Department: Is it different for patients and health care providers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Kataria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Patient satisfaction is increasingly being identified as an important benchmark in health care industry. Studies addressing patients' perceptions of quality are available but there is paucity of data regarding the perception of health care providers towards their own services. This study was undertaken to compare the satisfaction level between the patients and the staff from a Radiation Oncology Department.Materials and Methods: A common 16-item questionnaire addressing various aspects of patient care was served to 40 patients and 40 staff members. The responses were statistically evaluated to assess the satisfaction level among the two groups and the scores were compared to assess the agreement between two groups.Results: Overall, satisfaction level of both groups regarding quality of services ranged from “good” to “excellent”. A high level of agreement was observed between the two groups. The physician's ability to give an explanation to patients, helping attitude of the staff and the staff's concern for patient safety were the most satisfying features of the department while inconvenience during scheduling of appointments, billing and registration process, status of the changing rooms and inter-department coordination were the least satisfying features.Conclusion: A high level of satisfaction may be achieved from the consumers if service providers are trained to assess the needs and expectations of consumers and to critically evaluate themselves. The service provider's perception regarding their own services may serve as a preliminary indicator of overall quality. Future studies with more participants in different setting may further explore this hypothesis.

  16. Osteoarthritis: quality of life, comorbidities, medication and health service utilization assessed in a large sample of primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szecsenyi Joachim

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess the gender related impact of osteoarthritis (OA on quality of life (QoL and health service utilization (HSU of primary care patients in Germany. Methods Cross sectional study with 1250 OA patients attending 75 primary care practices from March to May 2005. QoL was assessed using the GERMAN-AIMS2-SF. Data about comorbidities, prescriptions, health service utilization, and physical activity were obtained by questioning patients or from the patients' medical files. Depression was assessed by means of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. Results 1021 (81.7% questionnaires were returned. 347 (34% patients were male. Impact of OA on QoL was different between gender: women achieved significantly higher scores in the AIMS 2-SF dimensions lower body (p Conclusion The extent to which OA impacts men and women differs in primary care patients. This might have resulted in the revealed differences in the pharmacological treatment and the HSU. Further research is needed to confirm our findings and to assess causality.

  17. Dutch Melanoma Treatment Registry: Quality assurance in the care of patients with metastatic melanoma in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochems, Anouk; Schouwenburg, Maartje G; Leeneman, Brenda; Franken, Margreet G; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Haanen, John B A G; Gelderblom, Hans; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A; Aarts, Maureen J B; van den Berkmortel, Franchette W P J; Blokx, Willeke A M; Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C; Groenewegen, Gerard; de Groot, Jan Willem B; Hospers, Geke A P; Kapiteijn, Ellen; Koornstra, Rutger H; Kruit, Wim H; Louwman, Marieke W; Piersma, Djura; van Rijn, Rozemarijn S; Ten Tije, Albert J; Vreugdenhil, Gerard; Wouters, Michel W J M; van der Hoeven, Jacobus J M

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the treatment of metastatic melanoma has changed dramatically due to the development of immune checkpoint and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors. A population-based registry, the Dutch Melanoma Treatment Registry (DMTR), was set up in July 2013 to assure the safety and quality of melanoma care in the Netherlands. This article describes the design and objectives of the DMTR and presents some results of the first 2 years of registration. The DMTR documents detailed information on all Dutch patients with unresectable stage IIIc or IV melanoma. This includes tumour and patient characteristics, treatment patterns, clinical outcomes, quality of life, healthcare utilisation, informal care and productivity losses. These data are used for clinical auditing, increasing the transparency of melanoma care, providing insights into real-world cost-effectiveness and creating a platform for research. Within 1 year, all melanoma centres were participating in the DMTR. The quality performance indicators demonstrated that the BRAF inhibitors and ipilimumab have been safely introduced in the Netherlands with toxicity rates that were consistent with the phase III trials conducted. The median overall survival of patients treated with systemic therapy was 10.1 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.1-11.1) in the first registration year and 12.7 months (95% CI 11.6-13.7) in the second year. The DMTR is the first comprehensive multipurpose nationwide registry and its collaboration with all stakeholders involved in melanoma care reflects an integrative view of cancer management. In future, the DMTR will provide insights into challenging questions regarding the definition of possible subsets of patients who benefit most from the new drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. How Kaiser Permanente uses video ethnography of patients for quality improvement, such as in shaping better care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwirth, Esther B; Bellows, Jim; Jackson, Ana H; Price, Patricia M

    2012-06-01

    Keeping patients and caregivers at the center of quality improvement is critical. Kaiser Permanente's Care Management Institute adapted video ethnography to achieve this aim, using video to capture interviews with-and observations of-patients and caregivers, identify patient-centered improvement opportunities, and communicate them effectively to clinical and administrative leaders and front-line staff. This method is particularly effective for helping understand the needs of frail elders, patients nearing the end of life, those with multiple chronic conditions, and other vulnerable people who are not well represented in focus groups and patient advisory councils. As part of an initiative to improve care transitions for elders with heart failure, video ethnography contributed to greatly reduced thirty-day hospital readmission rates, helping reduce readmissions at one medical center from 13.6 percent to 9 percent in six months. It also helped improve the reliability of the readmissions reduction program. When embedded within an established quality improvement framework, video ethnography can be an effective tool for innovating new solutions, improving existing processes, and spreading knowledge about how best to meet patient needs.

  19. Lay health educators within primary care practices to improve cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients: challenges in quality improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofters AK

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AK Lofters,1–4 M Vahabi,5 V Prakash,6 L Banerjee,7 P Bansal,8 S Goel,7,8 S Dunn1,2,9 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, 2Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, 4Centre for Urban Health Solutions, St Michael’s Hospital, 5Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, 6Screening Saves Lives Program, Canadian Cancer Society, Mississauga, 7Wise Elephant Family Health Team, Brampton, 8Mississauga Halton Central West Regional Cancer Program, Mississauga, 9Women’s College Research Institute, Women’s College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: Cancer screening uptake is known to be low among South Asian residents of Ontario. The objective of this pilot study was to determine if lay health educators embedded within the practices of primary care providers could improve willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients taking a quality improvement approach.Materials and methods: Participating physicians selected quality improvement initiatives to use within their offices that they felt could increase willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake. They implemented initiatives, adapting as necessary, for six months.Results: Four primary care physicians participated in the study. All approximated that at least 60% of their patients were of South Asian ethnicity. All physicians chose to work with a preexisting lay health educator program geared toward South Asians. Health ambassadors spoke to patients in the office and telephoned patients. For all physicians, ~60% of South Asian patients who were overdue for cancer screening and who spoke directly to health ambassadors stated they were willing to be screened. One physician was able to track actual screening among contacted patients and found that screening uptake was relatively high: from 29.2% (colorectal cancer to 44.6% (breast cancer of patients came in for screening

  20. The examination of the effect of nurse care to the quality of care and to the patient satisfaction which is given through the standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gül Ertem

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This examination is planned as an analytical, partial and experimantal examination targeting women normally given birth in order to examine the effect of nurse care to the patient satisfaction and quality of care which is given in ‘’postpartum’’ period. The examination is naturally formed by 470 normally given birth women in the ministry of health of the Turkish Republic Dr.Ekrem Hayri Üstündag woman Diseases and Maternity Hospital between 01.04.2002 / 15.08.2003. The sample of the examination is farmed by 70 women chosen through an ‘’impossible sample’’ method among women (between 20-30 ages,who are unless primary school graduate given birth in the Turkish Republic Ministry of Health Dr.Ekrem Hayri Üstündag woman diseases and maternity hospital between 01.04.2003-15.08.2003. Women are matched with two groups:an experiment (35 persons and a control of ( 35 person the examination is explained to the women by the researcher and their oral approval is taken for their participation. In the evaluation of thedatas received,number percentage,’’ki’’square,The test of the importance of the difference between two averages double directed ‘’varyans’’analysis and bonferroni test. There has been no noticeabledifferences found concerning women’s socio-demographic characteristics participating to the experiment and to control groups.Experiment and control groups considering their nurse care have founded that the average number to reach the target is 67.62 ± 4,20 for the control groups and the differences (student test among the average numbers to reach the target taken by the experiment and control grups for each standarts are considered statistically meaningful (t=0.000, p<0.0001The distribution of women is examined according to their satisfaction of the nurse care they had taken in the hospital  and it is considered that women in the experiment group is satisfied about nurse care.The difference between the two groups

  1. Impact of oral health care needs on health-related quality of life in adult HIV+ patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; D'Eramo, Luciana R; Lecumberri, Rodolfo; Squassi, Aldo F

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the social impact of oral conditions on health-related quality of life in adult HIV+ patients and create a predictive model. The oral health impact profile questionnaire OHIP-49 was randomly administered to 200 HIV+ adults patients of any age and either sex at the High Risk Patients Dental Care Unit (CLAPAR I), School of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires. Argentina. For each of the 49 items, participants indicated their responses on a five point Likert-type frequency scale ranging from "never" to "very often". Oral health needs were assessed through the CCITN (Community Caries Index of Treatment Need) and CPITN (Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Need). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the OHIP-49 score between male and female respondents. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to assess score differences among the OHIP-49 domains. Altogether, 50% of the respondents were male and 50% were female, aged 36.45 +/- 0.70 years and 38.03 +/- 0.78 years respectively. The assessment of oral health care needs revealed a great need for treatment. Mean CCITN was 11.15 +/- 0.35 and CPITN was 2.41 +/- 0.12. The average total OHIP-49 score (83) revealed a high level of social impact, which was higher for female compared to male respondents (Z(T) = 2.08, p = 0.037). The domains concerning functional limitation (domain 1), physical pain (domain 2) and psychological discomfort (domain 3) showed higher levels of social impact (H = 395.06, p < 0.0001). The social impact observed in these domains was higher for female compared to male patients. In the correlation analysis, oral conditions, age, gender and social impact were significantly associated. These results demonstrate that unmet oral health care need impairs the quality of life of HIV+ patients and suggest the need of comprehensive oral health care interventions.

  2. Role of clinical pathway in improving the quality of care for patients with faecal incontinence: A randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Zeiad I; Lim, Michael; Stojkovic, Stevan

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the development and implementation of the Integrated Rapid Assessment and Treatment (IRAT) pathway for the management of patients with fecal incontinence and measure its impact on patients’ care. METHODS Patients referred to the colorectal unit in our hospital for the management of faecal incontinence were randomised to either the Standard Care pathway or the newly developed IRAT pathway in this feasibility study. The IRAT pathway is designed to provide a seamless multidisciplinary care to patients with faecal incontinence in a timely fashion. On the other hand, patients in the Standard Pathway were managed in the general colorectal clinic. Percentage improvements in St. Marks Incontinence Score, Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score and Rockwood Faecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale after completion of treatment in both groups were the primary outcome measures. Secondary endpoints were the time required to complete the management and patients’ satisfaction score. χ2, Mann-Whitney-U and Kendall tau-c correlation coefficient tests were used for comparison of outcomes of the two study groups. A P value of 0.05 or less was considered significant. RESULTS Thirty-nine patients, 34 females, consented to participate. Thirty-one (79.5%) patients completed the final assessment and were included in the outcome analysis. There was no significant difference in the quality of life scales and incontinence scores. Patients in the IRAT pathway were more satisfied with the time required to complete management (P = 0.033) and had stronger agreement that all aspects of their problem were covered (P = 0.006). CONCLUSION Despite of the lack of significant difference in outcome measures, the new pathway has positively influenced patient’s mindset, which was reflected in a higher satisfaction score. PMID:28217378

  3. Quality of Care of Nursing from Brain Death Patient in ICU Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Toktam Masoumian Hoseini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, Intensive Care Unit (ICU nurses play a significant and key role in the care of brain dead patients and their families, therefore their Practice extremely important to the success of organ donation. To assess ICU nurse's practice in relation to nurse's role in the organ donation process from brain dead patients in Iran. Materials and Methods:In a cross-sectional analytical study 90 ICU nurses in Ghaem and Imam Reza Hospitals in Mashhad through stratified random sampling allocation method were selected. Data collection tools included a questionnaire on demographic information, factors influencing nurse's practice during the organ donation process and surveying "nurse's practice in relation to their roles in the organ donation process." Results: 90 nurses participated in this study. (70.0% of the research subjects had spoken with their own families about organ donation, and (20.0% had organ donation cards. Practice scores were calculated on a scale of 100. The mean score of nurses' practice was (6.04± 3.66. 96.7% of nurses’ weak practice in terms of their roles in the organ donation process. Conclusion: As a result, they do not have adequate practice regard nurse's role in organ donation process and in relation to brain death patient and their families. Therefore it is suggested to include nursing courses in the organ donation process and organ transplantation as well as educational programs to acquaint nurses with their roles in the process to improve their practice by different training methods.

  4. Excellent Patient Care Processes in Poor Hospitals? Why Hospital-Level and Patient-Level Care Quality-Outcome Relationships Can Differ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, John W; Humphreys, Keith; Kivlahan, Daniel R; Harris, Alex H S

    2016-04-01

    Studies finding weak or nonexistent relationships between hospital performance on providing recommended care and hospital-level clinical outcomes raise questions about the value and validity of process of care performance measures. Such findings may cause clinicians to question the effectiveness of the care process presumably captured by the performance measure. However, one cannot infer from hospital-level results whether patients who received the specified care had comparable, worse or superior outcomes relative to patients not receiving that care. To make such an inference has been labeled the "ecological fallacy," an error that is well known among epidemiologists and sociologists, but less so among health care researchers and policy makers. We discuss such inappropriate inferences in the health care performance measurement field and illustrate how and why process measure-outcome relationships can differ at the patient and hospital levels. We also offer recommendations for appropriate multilevel analyses to evaluate process measure-outcome relationships at the patient and hospital levels and for a more effective role for performance measure bodies and research funding organizations in encouraging such multilevel analyses.

  5. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Patient Safety Indicator for Postoperative Respiratory Failure (PSI 11) does not identify accurately patients who received unsafe care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michelle C; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D; Strosberg, David S; Puttmann, Kathleen T; Pan, Yangshu L; Eiferman, Daniel S

    2016-10-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Indicator 11 is used to identify postoperative respiratory failure events and detect areas for quality improvement. This study examines the accuracy of Patient Safety Indicator 11 in identifying clinically valid patient safety events. All cases flagged for Patient Safety Indicator 11 from July 2013 to July 2015 by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality QI Version 4.5 including International Classification of Diseases-9 codes were evaluated. Code-confirmed cases underwent independent review by 2 physicians. Inpatient electronic medical records were used to identify clinical factors for postoperative respiratory failure in each case to determine if postoperative respiratory failure was a result of unsafe care. The clinical true-positive rate and positive predictive value were calculated. A total of 166 postoperative respiratory failure cases were reviewed; 51 were recoded and reversed due to coding or documentation errors; 115 cases met the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality definition of postoperative respiratory failure. A total of 71 (61.7%) of the 115 cases were false positives and did not reflect unsafe care, while 44 cases were true positives with a positive predictive value of 38.3%. χ(2) analysis did not reveal an association between demographics, clinical characteristics, or operative procedure with true-positive cases. Administrative coding data for Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Indicator 11 do not identify accurately patients who received unsafe care when taking into account unpreventable clinical factors causing postoperative respiratory failure. The use of Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Indicator 11 as a hospital performance measure should be reconsidered until inclusion and exclusion criteria are revised. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Older people's perceptions of quality of care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sixma, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: User views on quality of care are generally assessed by patients satisfaction questionnaires. However, doubts have been cast on the validity and reliability of such instruments. Aim of this paper are: (1) to describe the development of a new instrument measuring quality of care from the per

  7. An Evaluation of the Quality of Nursing Care Provided for Vascular Access in Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Chamanzari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Care for vascular access of patients undergoing hemodialysis is a critical issue. Inflammation and subsequent infection are the major factors which threaten patients' health and diminish effectiveness of hemodialysis. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the severity and incidence of inflammation of vascular access in hemodialysis patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 90 patients undergoing hemodialysis in Emam Reza and Montazerie Hospitals in Mashhad, June, 2014. Evaluation of inflammation severity over the course of one month (12 hemodialysis sessions was performed by means of an inflammation tool designed by the Board of Nursing. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16, and performing descriptive and Chi-square tests.  Results:The mean and standard deviation of incidence of inflammation in the first session of hemodialysis was 3.2±1.3 cases. The mean and standard deviation of the intensity of inflammation was 12.5±4.7. Conclusion: Since inflammation of vascular access in hemodialysis patients impairs their safety and health improvement, necessary measures to reduce this complication must be taken.

  8. A systematic review of human factors and ergonomics (HFE)-based healthcare system redesign for quality of care and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Anping; Carayon, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare systems need to be redesigned to provide care that is safe, effective and efficient, and meets the multiple needs of patients. This systematic review examines how human factors and ergonomics (HFE) is applied to redesign healthcare work systems and processes and improve quality and safety of care. We identified 12 projects representing 23 studies and addressing different physical, cognitive and organisational HFE issues in a variety of healthcare systems and care settings. Some evidence exists for the effectiveness of HFE-based healthcare system redesign in improving process and outcome measures of quality and safety of care. We assessed risk of bias in 16 studies reporting the impact of HFE-based healthcare system redesign and found varying quality across studies. Future research should further assess the impact of HFE on quality and safety of care, and clearly define the mechanisms by which HFE-based system redesign can improve quality and safety of care.

  9. Using baldrige performance excellence program approaches in the pursuit of radiation oncology quality care, patient satisfaction, and workforce commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternick, Edward S

    2011-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies.

  10. Using Baldrige Performance Excellence Program Approaches in the Pursuit of Radiation Oncology Quality Care, Patient Satisfaction and Workforce Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward eSternick

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance U.S. business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice’s operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies.

  11. Enhancing rehabilitation of mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, David; Weblin, Jonathan; Atkins, Gemma; Bion, Julian; Williams, Jenny; Elliott, Catherine; Whitehouse, Tony; Snelson, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    Prolonged periods of mechanical ventilation are associated with significant physical and psychosocial adverse effects. Despite increasing evidence supporting early rehabilitation strategies, uptake and delivery of such interventions in Europe have been variable. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of an early and enhanced rehabilitation program for mechanically ventilated patients in a large tertiary referral, mixed-population intensive care unit (ICU). A new supportive rehabilitation team was created within the ICU in April 2012, with a focus on promoting early and enhanced rehabilitation for patients at high risk for prolonged ICU and hospital stays. Baseline data on all patients invasively ventilated for at least 5 days in the previous 12 months (n = 290) were compared with all patients ventilated for at least 5 days in the 12 months after the introduction of the rehabilitation team (n = 292). The main outcome measures were mobility level at ICU discharge (assessed via the Manchester Mobility Score), mean ICU, and post-ICU length of stay (LOS), ventilator days, and in-hospital mortality. The introduction of the ICU rehabilitation team was associated with a significant increase in mobility at ICU discharge, and this was associated with a significant reduction in ICU LOS (16.9 vs 14.4 days, P = .007), ventilator days (11.7 vs 9.3 days, P rehabilitation within this European ICU improved levels of mobility at critical care discharge, and this was associated with reduced ICU and hospital LOS and reduced days of mechanical ventilation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Quality indicators for patient safety in primary care. A review and Delphi-survey by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frigola-Capell, E.; Pareja-Rossell, C.; Gens-Barber, M.; Oliva-Oliva, G.; Alava-Cano, F.; Wensing, M.; Davins-Miralles, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quality indicators are measured aspects of healthcare, reflecting the performance of a healthcare provider or healthcare system. They have a crucial role in programmes to assess and improve healthcare. Many performance measures for primary care have been developed. Only the Catalan model

  13. Laboratory diagnosis of the rare anaemias: external quality assessment benefits patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara De La Salle

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in the 1960s, external quality assessment has developed to become an essential component of the quality management system of the diagnostic laboratory. External quality assessment provides a long term, retrospective view of laboratory performance, demonstrating the competence of the laboratory to others. The ENERCA project (the European Network for Rare and Congenital Anaemias has established a list of core laboratory tests that are used in the diagnosis of rare and congenital anaemias, which has been used as the basis for questionnaires to laboratories, to establish the use and quality assurance of diagnostic testing in the congenital and rare anaemias, and to European EQA providers for services in this key area. In general, the provision of EQA for rare and congenital anaemias is widely variable with little provision for the very rare disorders. For the more common congenital anaemias, such as the haemoglobinopathies and thalassaemias, provision is better but there is variation in aspects of the scheme design, especially the frequency of distribution. Where laboratories did not take part in EQA for individual tests, or there was no EQA available, a desire to participate was expressed in 66% (102/154 of cases. The provision of external quality assessment (EQA services for rare disorders is a challenge. For many of these conditions, the number of patients in any one member state is very small with only a few laboratories providing diagnostic testing. In these cases, the development of pan-European or cross-border EQA may be the only means by which standardisation of methods and results can be achieved. An EQA survey of 243 laboratories for performance in Hb A2 quantification showed encouraging results in that there was a clear differentiation in the results from a beta Thalassaemia carrier and an individual with no evidence of Thalassaemia; however, a bias was observed between different methods of measurement.

  14. Patient-Reported Barriers to High-Quality, End-of-Life Care: A Multiethnic, Multilingual, Mixed-Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyakoil, Vyjeyanthi S; Neri, Eric; Kraemer, Helena

    2016-04-01

    The study objective was to empirically identify barriers reported by multiethnic patients and families in receiving high-quality end-of-life care (EOLC). This cross-sectional, mixed-methods study in Burmese, English, Hindi, Mandarin, Tagalog, Spanish, and Vietnamese was held in multiethnic community centers in five California cities. Data were collected in 2013-2014. A snowball sampling technique was used to accrue 387 participants-261 women, 126 men, 133 Caucasian, 204 Asian Americans, 44 African Americans, and 6 Hispanic Americans. Measured were multiethnic patient-reported barriers to high-quality EOLC. A development cohort (72 participants) of responses was analyzed qualitatively using grounded theory to identify the six key barriers to high-quality EOLC. A new validation cohort (315 participants) of responses was transcribed, translated, and back-translated for verification. The codes were validated by analyses of responses from 50 randomly drawn subjects from the validation cohort. All the 315 validation cohort transcripts were coded for presence or absence of the six barriers. In the validation cohort, 60.6% reported barriers to receiving high-quality EOLC for persons in their culture/ethnicity. Primary patient-reported barriers were (1) finance/health insurance barriers, (2) doctor behaviors, (3) communication chasm between doctors and patients, (4) family beliefs/behaviors, (5) health system barriers, and (6) cultural/religious barriers. Age (χ(2) = 9.15, DF = 1, p = 0.003); gender (χ(2) = 6.605, DF = 1, p = 0.01); and marital status (χ(2) = 16.11 DF = 3, p = 0.001) were associated with reporting barriers; and women care. Efforts must be made to rapidly improve access to culturally competent EOLC for diverse populations.

  15. Improving the quality of care of the critically ill patients: Implementing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Care bundles were originally developed in the USA as a health care ... The consistent implementation of evidence-based practice has been proven to improve ... included articles published in the medical and nursing critical care literature from ...

  16. Effect of oral care gel on the quality of life for oral lichen planus in patients with chronic HCV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sata Michio

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral lichen planus (OLP decreases the quality of life because it can cause spontaneous pain during eating and tooth-brushing and an uncomfortable feeling in the mouth. In addition, OLP may be associated with HCV-related liver disease. We investigated the visual analogue scale (VAS and effects of oral care gel, REFRECARE-H®, on patients with OLP associated with HCV infection. Results Nine OLP patients (mean age 67.9 ± 7.6 years with HCV-related liver diseases were recruited and their VAS score determined along with a biochemical examination of the blood. Types of OLP included erosive (6 patients and reticular (3. REFRECARE-H®, an oral care gel (therapeutic dentifrice containing hinokitiol, was applied by each patient as a thin layer on the oral membrane, after each meal and at bedtime for 30 days. Application of REFRECARE-H® improved the quality of life in all terms of dry mouth, breath odor, oral freshness, oral pain during rest, oral pain at a mealtimes, taste disorder, loss of appetite, sleep disorder, depressive mood and jitteriness. VAS scores of dry mouth, breath odor, oral freshness, and sleep disorder were significantly increased 30 days after application of REFRECARE-H® (P = 0.01, P = 0.05, P = 0.03, P = 0.04. VAS scores of oral pain at a mealtimes and taste disorder were increased 30 days after application of REFRECARE-H® (P = 0.06. There was an absence of side effects. Conclusions REFRECARE-H® improved the quality of life for OLP. It is necessary for the hepatologist to educate patients regarding oral hygiene, as well as provide treatment of liver disease.

  17. Predictors of image quality of coronary computed tomography in the acute care setting of patients with chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberg, Fabian; Abbara, Suhny; Schlett, Christopher L.; Cury, Ricardo C.; Truong, Quynh A.; Rogers, Ian S. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Nagurney, John T. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Brady, Thomas J. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: uhoffmann@partners.org

    2010-04-15

    Objective: We aimed to determine predictors of image quality in consecutive patients who underwent coronary computed tomography (CT) for the evaluation of acute chest pain. Method and materials: We prospectively enrolled patients who presented with chest pain to the emergency department. All subjects underwent contrast-enhanced 64-slice coronary multi-detector CT. Two experienced readers determined overall image quality on a per-patient basis and the prevalence and characteristics of non-evaluable coronary segments on a per-segment basis. Results: Among 378 subjects (143 women, age: 52.9 {+-} 11.8 years), 345 (91%) had acceptable overall image quality, while 33 (9%) had poor image quality or were unreadable. In adjusted analysis, patients with diabetes, hypertension and a higher heart rate during the scan were more likely to have exams graded as poor or unreadable (odds ratio [OR]: 2.94, p = 0.02; OR: 2.62, p = 0.03; OR: 1.43, p = 0.02; respectively). Of 6253 coronary segments, 257 (4%) were non-evaluable, most due to severe calcification in combination with motion (35%). The presence of non-evaluable coronary segments was associated with age (OR: 1.08 annually, 95%-confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.12, p < 0.001), baseline heart rate (OR: 1.35 per 10 beats/min, 95%-CI: 1.11-1.67, p = 0.003), diabetes, hypertension, and history of coronary artery disease (OR: 4.43, 95%-CI: 1.93-10.17, p < 0.001; OR: 2.27, 95-CI: 1.01-4.73, p = 0.03; OR: 5.12, 95%-CI: 2.0-13.06, p < 0.001; respectively). Conclusion: Coronary CT permits acceptable image quality in more than 90% of patients with chest pain. Patients with multiple risk factors are more likely to have impaired image quality or non-evaluable coronary segments. These patients may require careful patient preparation and optimization of CT scanning protocols.

  18. Patients' experiences of the quality of long-term care among the elderly: comparing scores over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuidgeest Marloes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Every two years, long-term care organizations for the elderly are obliged to evaluate and publish the experiences of residents, representatives of psychogeriatric patients, and/or assisted-living clients with regard to quality of care. Our hypotheses are that publication of this quality information leads to improved performance, and that organizations with substandard performance will improve more than those whose performance is relatively good. Methods The analyses included organizational units that measured experiences twice between 2007 (t0 and 2009 (t1. Experiences with quality of care were measured with Consumer Quality Index (CQI questionnaires. Besides descriptive analyses (i.e. mean, 5th and 95th percentile, and 90% central range of the 19 CQI indicators and change scores of these indicators were calculated. Differences across five performance groups (ranging from 'worst' to 'best' were tested using an ANOVA test and effect sizes were measured with omega squared (ω2. Results At t0 experiences of residents, representatives, and assisted-living clients were positive on all indicators. Nevertheless, most CQI indicators had improved scores (up to 0.37 change score at t1. Only three indicators showed a minor decline (up to -0.08 change score. Change scores varied between indicators and questionnaires, e.g. they were more profound for the face-to-face interview questionnaire for residents in nursing homes than for the other two mail questionnaires (0.15 vs. 0.05 and 0.04, respectively, possibly due to more variation between nursing homes on the first measurement, perhaps indicating more potential for improvement. A negative relationship was found between prior performance and change, particularly with respect to the experiences of residents (ω2 = 0.16 and assisted-living clients (ω2 = 0.15. However, the relation between prior performance and improvement could also be demonstrated with respect to the experiences reported

  19. Regulatory considerations for prospective patient care registries: lessons learned from the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J; Glassman, Steven D; Groman, Rachel; Resnick, Dan K; Mehrlich, Melissa; Spivey, Elizabeth; McCormick, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Clinical registries have emerged in the current resource-restricted environment of modern medicine as useful and logical mechanisms for providing health care stakeholders with high-quality data related to the safety, effectiveness, and value of specific interventions. Temporal and qualitative requirements for data acquisition in the context of clinical registries have rapidly expanded as clinicians and other stakeholders increasingly recognize the central importance of this information to the intelligent transformation of health care processes. Despite the potential of more robust clinical data collection efforts to advance the science of care, certain aspects of these newer systems, particularly the prospective, longitudinal acquisition of clinical data and direct patient contact, represent areas of structural overlap between emerging quality improvement efforts and traditional models of human subjects research. This overlap has profound implications for the design and implementation of modern clinical registries. In this paper, the authors describe the evolution of clinical registries as important tools for advancing the science of practice, and review the existing federal regulations that apply to these systems.

  20. Effects of a primary care intervention to improve the quality of zolpidem prescriptions in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sepúlveda, Rocío; García Lirola, María Ángeles; Espínola García, Esther; Martín Sances, Salvadora; Anaya Ordóñez, Sonia; Jurado Martínez, José María; Cabeza Barrera, José

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the impact of an intervention on the prescription habits of general practitioners (GPs) in order to improve the quality of zolpidem prescriptions in patients aged 75 or older. A prospective multicentric non-randomized trial was performed in the Metropolitan Granada Primary Healthcare Area (Andalusian Public Healthcare Service, Spain), which serves a total population of approximately 675,000 inhabitants. All health centers volunteering to participate in the trial were included. The intervention consisted of training sessions, individualized feedback, clinical information, and financial incentives. A daily dose over 5 mg was considered non-safe. Reduction in non-safe prescriptions of zolpidem in the elderly population became a quality prescribing indicator in a pay-for-performance scheme. Statistically significant differences versus baseline were found between the intervention and control groups in mean zolpidem prescription prevalence (28.5 vs. 37.5‰, respectively; p = 0.008) and mean non-safe zolpidem prescription prevalence (16.5 vs. 34.2‰, respectively; p safe prescriptions was 1309, 35% lower versus baseline, with a significant difference of p GPs who receive no financial incentive are required to evaluate the relative importance of an economic reward in achieving this improvement.

  1. Attributes of patient-centered primary care associated with the public perception of good healthcare quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Guanais, Frederico C; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Canning, David; Macinko, James; Reich, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated primary care attributes of patient-centered care associated with the public perception of good quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador. We conducted a secondary data analysis of a Latin American survey on public perceptions and experiences with healthcare systems. The primary care attributes examined were access, coordination, provider-patient communication, provision of health-related information and emotional support. A double-weighted multiple Poisson regression with robust variance model was performed. The study included between 1500 and 1503 adults in each country. The results identified four significant gaps in the provision of primary care: not all respondents had a regular place of care or a regular primary care doctor (Brazil 35.7%, Colombia 28.4%, Mexico 22% and El Salvador 45.4%). The communication with the primary care clinic was difficult (Brazil 44.2%, Colombia 41.3%, Mexico 45.1% and El Salvador 56.7%). There was a lack of coordination of care (Brazil 78.4%, Colombia 52.3%, Mexico 48% and El Salvador 55.9%). Also, there was a lack of information about healthy diet (Brazil 21.7%, Colombia 32.9%, Mexico 16.9% and El Salvador 20.8%). The public's perception of good quality was variable (Brazil 67%, Colombia 71.1%, Mexico 79.6% and El Salvador 79.5%). The primary care attributes associated with the perception of good quality were a primary care provider 'who knows relevant information about a patient's medical history', 'solves most of the health problems', 'spends enough time with the patient', 'coordinates healthcare' and a 'primary care clinic that is easy to communicate with'. In conclusion, the public has a positive perception of the quality of primary care, although it has unfulfilled expectations; further efforts are necessary to improve the provision of patient-centered primary care services in these four Latin American countries.

  2. Health-related quality of life and rehabilitation cost following intensive care unit stay in multiple trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiannis, Pantelis; Katsoulas, Theodoros; Fildissis, George; Intas, George; Galanis, Peter; Kosta, Natalia; Zidianakis, Vasilios; Baltopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess changes in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in multiple trauma patients due to motor vehicle crashes during a follow-up period of 2 years after discharge from an intensive care unit (ICU) and the effect of income and financial cost of rehabilitation in HRQOL. The study was a prospective observational study of multiple trauma patients from January 2009 to January 2011 who were hospitalized in a general, medical, and surgical ICU of a district hospital in Athens, Greece. Eighty-five patients with multiple traumas due to motor vehicle crashes and with an ICU stay of more than 24 hours were included in the study. HRQOL was assessed by a general questionnaire, the EuroQol 5D. Increased monthly household income and absence of traumatic brain injuries were associated with an improved EQ-VAS score. The frequency of severe problems in mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression decreased over time. The financial cost of rehabilitation was initially high but decreased over time. Severely injured victims of motor vehicle crashes suffer from serious problems in terms of HRQOL which is gradually improved even 2 years after hospital discharge. In addition, HRQOL is significantly related to income. Resources used for rehabilitation decrease over time, but even at 24 months, the patients still use half of the amount as compared with the cost of the first 6 months after trauma.

  3. SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry - a tool for improving the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of dementia patients in clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Religa

    Full Text Available The Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem was developed with the aim to improve the quality of diagnostic work-up, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden.SveDem is an internet based quality registry where several indicators can be followed over time. It includes information about the diagnostic work-up, medical treatment and community support (www.svedem.se. The patients are diagnosed and followed-up yearly in specialist units, primary care centres or in nursing homes.The database was initiated in May 2007 and covers almost all of Sweden. There were 28 722 patients registered with a mean age of 79.3 years during 2007-2012. Each participating unit obtains continuous online statistics from its own registrations and they can be compared with regional and national data. A report from SveDem is published yearly to inform medical and care professionals as well as political and administrative decision-makers about the current quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden.SveDem provides knowledge about current dementia care in Sweden and serves as a framework for ensuring the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care across the country. It also reflects changes in quality dementia care over time. Data from SveDem can be used to further develop the national guidelines for dementia and to generate new research hypotheses.

  4. SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry – A Tool for Improving the Quality of Diagnostics, Treatment and Care of Dementia Patients in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Religa, Dorota; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Cermakova, Pavla; Edlund, Ann-Katrin; Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Granqvist, Nicklas; Hallbäck, Anne; Kåwe, Kerstin; Farahmand, Bahman; Kilander, Lena; Mattsson, Ulla-Britt; Nägga, Katarina; Nordström, Peter; Wijk, Helle; Wimo, Anders; Winblad, Bengt; Eriksdotter, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background The Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem) was developed with the aim to improve the quality of diagnostic work-up, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden. Methods SveDem is an internet based quality registry where several indicators can be followed over time. It includes information about the diagnostic work-up, medical treatment and community support (www.svedem.se). The patients are diagnosed and followed-up yearly in specialist units, primary care centres or in nursing homes. Results The database was initiated in May 2007 and covers almost all of Sweden. There were 28 722 patients registered with a mean age of 79.3 years during 2007–2012. Each participating unit obtains continuous online statistics from its own registrations and they can be compared with regional and national data. A report from SveDem is published yearly to inform medical and care professionals as well as political and administrative decision-makers about the current quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden. Conclusion SveDem provides knowledge about current dementia care in Sweden and serves as a framework for ensuring the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care across the country. It also reflects changes in quality dementia care over time. Data from SveDem can be used to further develop the national guidelines for dementia and to generate new research hypotheses. PMID:25695768

  5. Repeat prescribing: scale, problems and quality management in ambulatory care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Peter A G M; Dautzenberg, Maaike

    2004-01-01

    The reported scale of repeat prescriptions ranges from 29% to 75% of all items prescribed, depending on the definition of repeat prescribing and other variables. It is likely that a substantial part of repeat prescribing by general practitioners (GPs) occurs without direct doctor-patient contact. While this reduces the workload for the GP and is convenient for the patient, it does not provide the adequate control that is needed to ensure that every repeat prescription is still appropriate, effective and well tolerated, and that it is still being viewed upon and taken by the patient as intended. Infrequent therapy reviews may lead to failure to prevent, identify and solve drug-related problems and drug wastage, and may, thereby, have a negative impact on the effectiveness, safety or cost of the medications prescribed. Studies evaluating the repeat prescribing process have shown that GPs and medical practices vary widely in their degree of administrative and clinical control of repeat prescriptions. Contrary to the opinion that GPs cannot change prescribing behaviour when the prescription is initiated by a medical specialist, GPs have their own responsibility for controlling the repeats of such prescriptions. Intervention studies suggest that a medication review by a pharmacist can help to reduce drug-related problems with repeat prescriptions, and the effectiveness of the intervention may be increased by combining the medication review with a consultation of the patient's medical records and a patient interview. In several studies, such an intervention was relatively inexpensive and, therefore, feasible. However, these conclusions should be viewed with appropriate caution because a number of caveats pertain. There is still no evidence that these types of intervention improve health-related quality of life or reduce healthcare cost, and so far only a few trials have produced any evidence of clinical improvement. As implicit and explicit screening criteria have their

  6. Clinical profile, quality of care, and recurrence in Arab-American and Caucasians prostate cancer patients in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussawi, Ahmad H; Yassine, May; Dey, Subhojit; Soliman, Amr S

    2013-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States with striking differences in incidence and mortality among ethnic groups. Michigan has one of the largest concentrations of Arab Americans (AAs) in the U.S. and little is known about this ethnic minority with respect to prostate cancer. This study investigated differences in clinical profile, quality of care, and recurrence among prostate cancer survivors comparing AAs and Caucasian Americans (CAs). Participants in this study included 2499 prostate cancer survivors from the Michigan Cancer Registry from 1985 to 2004. Participants completed surveys regarding health-seeking behavior, post-treatment symptoms, quality of care and recurrence. Ethnicity was self-reported and AAs and CAs were compared with respect to clinical profile, quality of care, and recurrence. There were 52 AAs and 1886 CAs patients with AAs being younger ([Formula: see text] age 68.3 ± SD 21.4 years, [Formula: see text] age 72.3 ± SD 14.1 years, for AAs and CAs, respectively) (P = 0.05). AAs had lower socioeconomic standard than CAs (34 vs. 10.6 %, <$20,000 yearly income/year; for AAs vs. CAs, respectively) (P < 0.0001). AAs reported poorer health than AAs (7.7 vs. 3.0 % for AAs vs. CAs, respectively) (P < 0.0001). AAs were more likely to visit specialists for prostate follow-up (44.5 vs. 19.7 % visited a specialist, for AAs vs. CAs respectively) (P < 0.0001) and received supplementary healthcare workers (13 % of AAs vs. 3.1 % CAs) (P = 0.032). In addition, AAs reported higher occurrence of urinary incontinence compared to CAs (67.4 vs. 60.4 %, for AAs vs. CAs, respectively) (P = 0.001). Ethnic background was not a predictor of recurrence [(Odds ratio (OR) = 1.1 (95 % confidence intervals CI = 0.40, 2.9)] (P = 0.873) even after adjusting for age, PSA levels within the last 2 years, metastasis and hormonal therapy. While AAs prostate cancer patients were different from CAs in age, income

  7. Nursing skill mix in European hospitals: cross-sectional study of the association with mortality, patient ratings, and quality of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Bruyneel, Luk; McHugh, Matthew; Maier, Claudia B; Moreno-Casbas, Teresa; Ball, Jane E; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Sermeus, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the association of hospital nursing skill mix with patient mortality, patient ratings of their care and indicators of quality of care. Design Cross-sectional patient discharge data, hospital characteristics and nurse and patient survey data were merged and analysed using generalised estimating equations (GEE) and logistic regression models. Setting Adult acute care hospitals in Belgium, England, Finland, Ireland, Spain and Switzerland. Participants Survey data were collected from 13 077 nurses in 243 hospitals, and 18 828 patients in 182 of the same hospitals in the six countries. Discharge data were obtained for 275 519 surgical patients in 188 of these hospitals. Main outcome measures Patient mortality, patient ratings of care, care quality, patient safety, adverse events and nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction. Results Richer nurse skill mix (eg, every 10-point increase in the percentage of professional nurses among all nursing personnel) was associated with lower odds of mortality (OR=0.89), lower odds of low hospital ratings from patients (OR=0.90) and lower odds of reports of poor quality (OR=0.89), poor safety grades (OR=0.85) and other poor outcomes (0.80nurses is associated with an 11% increase in the odds of death. In our hospital sample, there were an average of six caregivers for every 25 patients, four of whom were professional nurses. Substituting one nurse assistant for a professional nurse for every 25 patients is associated with a 21% increase in the odds of dying. Conclusions A bedside care workforce with a greater proportion of professional nurses is associated with better outcomes for patients and nurses. Reducing nursing skill mix by adding nursing associates and other categories of assistive nursing personnel without professional nurse qualifications may contribute to preventable deaths, erode quality and safety of hospital care and contribute to hospital nurse shortages. PMID:28626086

  8. Development and psychometric evaluation of a measure to evaluate the quality of integrated care : the Patient Assessment of Integrated Elderly Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uittenbroek, Ronald J; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Stewart, Roy E; Spoorenberg, Sophie L W; Kremer, Hubertus P H; Wynia, Klaske

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Novel population-based integrated care services are being developed to adequately serve the growing number of elderly people. Suitable, reliable and valid measurement instruments are needed to evaluate the quality of care delivered. OBJECTIVE: To develop a measure to evaluate the quality

  9. Development and application of the informational and communication technologies in quality standards of health care management for patients with arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smііanov, V; Smiianova, O; Tarasenko, S

    2014-01-01

    Mobile health technologies improve the quality of health care service. The information and communication technology is developed and applied to remind patients with arterial hypertension to follow medical recommendations. The feedback system from general practitioners was developed (the reminder system for patients sending the feedbacks). It helped to supervise follow-up patients online. Suggested system provides for forming the database for summarized analysis of online survey of the patients, who receive medical care at health care institution, to take managerial decisions concerning the improvements of medical services quality. Evaluation of efficiency of the applied technology assured that the number of patients, who checked regularly his/her arterial pressure, increased by 31.00%. The number of patients, who visited doctors for preventive purpose two or more times during given year, rose by 18.24%. The number of patients with target pressure grew by 24.51% and composed 38.55±4.26%.

  10. The availability and quality across Europe of outpatient care for difficult-to-engage patients with severe mental illness: a survey among experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Cornelis L; Ruud, Torleif; Bahler, Michiel; Kroon, Hans; Priebe, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    As many patients with severe mental illness (SMI) who have complex needs are difficult to engage, outreach mental health services are needed to engage them into treatment. The extent to which these services exist in large European cities is unknown. Experts in 29 European countries were sent a structured questionnaire containing two case vignettes of difficult-to-engage patients (a first-episode psychosis patient and a homeless chronic schizophrenia patient). The type and quality of outpatient care was assessed and related to several national indices. The questionnaire was returned by experts from 22 countries (76%) representing 92% of the EU population. Six countries (21%) had a systematic method for detecting difficult-to-engage patients. The most important route whereby such patients entered the mental health system was through informal care; the most important reasons for entering it were the level of psychiatric symptoms, nuisance and violence. Assertive outreach was available in nine countries (41%), with coverage ranging from a few teams (sometimes for a specific target group) to most of the country. The case vignettes showed that outpatient care for these difficult-to-engage patients varied widely. In seven (30%) of the 22 countries, a hospital would take no action if such patients who had been admitted voluntarily discharged themselves prematurely. On a scale of 0-10, the experts' mean scores regarding the quality of outpatient care for patients with SMI in general were 5.2 (SD = 1.9) and 3.2 (SD = 2.2) in difficult-to-engage ones. Explorative analyses showed that the quality of outpatient care for difficult-to-engage patients was associated with gross national income and the number of psychiatrists per capita. Outpatient mental health services for difficult-to-engage SMI patients varied widely among European countries; experts judged their overall quality to be poor. It is now important to achieve consensus on a minimum European standard for the quality

  11. Caring for Latino patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckett, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Latinos comprise nearly 16 percent of the U.S. population, and this proportion is anticipated to increase to 30 percent by 2050. Latinos are a diverse ethnic group that includes many different cultures, races, and nationalities. Barriers to care have resulted in striking disparities in quality of health care for these patients. These barriers include language, lack of insurance, different cultural beliefs, and in some cases, illegal immigration status, mistrust, and illiteracy. The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services address these concerns with recommendations for culturally competent care, language services, and organizational support. Latinos have disproportionately higher rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Other health problems include stress, neurocysticercosis, and tuberculosis. It is important to explore the use of alternative therapies and belief in traditional folk illnesses, recognizing that health beliefs are dependent on education, socioeconomic status, and degree of acculturation. Many-but not all-folk and herbal treatments can be safely accommodated with conventional therapy. Physicians must be sensitive to Latino cultural values of simpatia (kindness), personalismo (relationship), respeto (respect), and modestia (modesty). The LEARN technique can facilitate cross-cultural interviews. Some cultural barriers may be overcome by using the "teach back" technique to ensure that directions are correctly understood and by creating a welcoming health care environment for Latino patients.

  12. Computerized knowledge bases in primary health care: a curse or a blessing for health promotion, prevention and patient quality?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alendahl, K; Timpka, T; Sjöberg, C

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a future scenario analysis of how the introduction of computerized knowledge bases (KBs) can come to affect primary care practice. For the collection and analysis of data, a two-level video method was applied. First, four consultations where a computerized KB was used were video-recorded. A search workshop was then carried out by letting a multi-disciplinary panel comment on the video recordings. The comments were categorized with regard to content and perspective. Analyses of the comments showed a concern for a disregard of patients' health beliefs and for difficulties in portioning out the acquired medical knowledge to the patient during the consultation. Furthermore, the computerized KB was found to easily break the natural flow of the consultation and be perceived as a third party. The conclusion is that the most critical aspects for using computerized KBs in a reformed primary health care concern the integration of the systems into the consultation process. Health promotion, prevention, and patient quality are central here, and the introduction of KB technology must not lead the consultation away from these issues.

  13. The PAMINO-project: evaluating a primary care-based educational program to improve the quality of life of palliative patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engeser Peter

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The care of palliative patients challenges the health care system in both quantity and quality. Especially the role of primary care givers needs to be strengthened to provide them with the knowledge and the confidence of applying an appropriate end-of-life care to palliative patients. To improve health care services for palliative patients in primary care, interested physicians in and around Heidelberg, Germany, are enabled to participate in the community-based program 'Palliative Medical Initiative North Baden (PAMINO' to improve their knowledge in dealing with palliative patients. The impact of this program on patients' health and quality of life remains to be evaluated. Methods/Design The evaluation of PAMINO is a non-randomized, controlled study. Out of the group of primary care physicians who took part in the PAMINO program, a sample of 45 physicians and their palliative patients will be compared to a sample of palliative patients of 45 physicians who did not take part in the program. Every four weeks for 6 months or until death, patients, physicians, and the patients' family caregivers in both groups answer questions to therapy strategies, quality of life (QLQ-C15-PAL, POS, pain (VAS, and burden for family caregivers (BSFC. The inclusion of physicians and patients in the study starts in March 2007. Discussion Although participating physicians value the increase in knowledge they receive from PAMINO, the effects on patients remain unclear. If the evaluation reveals a clear benefit for patients' quality of life, a larger-scale implementation of the program is considered. Trial registration: The study was registered at ‘current controlled trials (CCT’, registration number: ISRCTN78021852.

  14. RN assessments of excellent quality of care and patient safety are associated with significantly lower odds of 30-day inpatient mortality: A national cross-sectional study of acute-care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeds-Alenius, Lisa; Tishelman, Carol; Lindqvist, Rikard; Runesdotter, Sara; McHugh, Matthew D

    2016-09-01

    Quality and safety in health care has been increasingly in focus during the past 10-15 years. Stakeholders actively discuss ways to measure safety and quality of care to improve the health care system as a whole. Defining and measuring quality and safety, however, is complicated. One underutilized resource worthy of further exploration is the use of registered nurses (RNs) as informants of overall quality of care and patient safety. However, research is still scarce or lacking regarding RN assessments of patient safety and quality of care and their relationship to objective patient outcomes. To investigate relationships between RN assessed quality of care and patient safety and 30-day inpatient mortality post-surgery in acute-care hospitals. This is a national cross-sectional study. A survey (n=>10,000 RNs); hospital organizational data (n=67); hospital discharge registry data (n>200,000 surgical patients). RN data derives from a national sample of RNs working directly with inpatient care in surgical/medical wards in acute-care hospitals in Sweden in 2010. Patient data are from the same hospitals in 2009-2010. Adjusted multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate relationships between RN assessments and 30-day inpatient mortality. Patients cared for in hospitals where a high proportion of RNs reported excellent quality of care (the highest third of hospitals) had 23% lower odds of 30-day inpatient mortality compared to patients cared for in hospitals in the lowest third (OR 0.77, CI 0.65-0.91). Similarly, patients in hospitals where a high proportion of RNs reported excellent patient safety (highest third) had is 26% lower odds of death (OR 0.74, CI 0.60-0.91). RN assessed excellent patient safety and quality of care are related to significant reductions in odds of 30-day inpatient mortality, suggesting that positive RN reports of quality and safety can be valid indicators of these key variables. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by

  15. The association between patients' perception of their overall quality of care and their perception of pain management in the prehospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnek, Jonathan R; Fernandez, Antonio R; Vandeventer, Steven; Davis, Sheryl; Garvey, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether there is an association between a patient's impression of his or her overall quality of care and his or her satisfaction with the pain management provided. We hypothesized that satisfaction with pain management would show a significant positive association with a patient's impression of overall quality of care. This was a retrospective review of patient satisfaction data initially collected by a third-party company from January 1, 2007, to September 1, 2010. Participants were randomly selected from all transported patients, proportional to their paramedic-defined acuity level, with a goal of 100 interviews per month. The proportions of patients sampled from each acuity level were 25% priority 1 (high), 50% priority 2 (medium), and 25% priority 3 (low). Patients were excluded if there was no telephone number recorded in the prehospital patient record, no transportation was recorded, or the call was labeled as a psychiatric complaint. All satisfaction questions used a five-point Likert scale with ratings from excellent to poor, which were dichotomized for analysis. The outcome variable was the patient's perception of his or her overall quality of care. The main independent variable was the patient's rating of his or her pain management by emergency medical services (EMS) staff at the scene. Demographic variables were assessed for potential confounding. There were 2,741 patients with complete data for the outcome and main independent variables; 41.7% of the respondents were male and the average age was 54.1 years (standard deviation = 22.6). The overall quality of care was rated as excellent by 65.9% of the patients, whereas 59.2% rated their pain management as excellent. Of the patients who rated their pain management as excellent, 79.0% rated the overall quality of care as excellent, whereas only 21.0% of the patients rated the overall quality of care as excellent if pain management was not excellent. When the patients rated

  16. The impact of perceived social support and sense of coherence on health-related quality of life in multimorbid primary care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, I.; Miksch, A.; Goetz, K.; Ose, D.; Szecsenyi, J.; Freund, T.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the impact of perceived social support and sense of coherence as positive resources for health-related quality of life in multimorbid primary care patients. We analysed cross-sectional survey data on health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), perceived social support (FSozU-K22),

  17. Living with diabetes: quality of care and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Isla Pera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilar Isla PeraDepartment of Public Health Nursing, Mental and Mother and Child Health, University of Barcelona, SpainBackground: The aim of this research was to characterize the experience of living with diabetes mellitus (DM and identify patients’ opinions of the quality of care received and the results of interventions.Methods: A descriptive, exploratory evaluation study using qualitative methodology was performed. Participants consisted of 40 adult patients diagnosed with DM and followed up in a public hospital in Barcelona, Spain. A semistructured interview and a focus group were used and a thematic content analysis was performed.Results: Patients described DM as a disease that is difficult to control and that provokes lifestyle changes requiring effort and sacrifice. Insulin treatment increased the perception of disease severity. The most frequent and dreaded complication was hypoglycemia. The main problems perceived by patients affecting the quality of care were related to a disease-centered medical approach, lack of information, limited participation in decision-making, and the administrative and bureaucratic problems of the health care system.Conclusion: The bureaucratic circuits of the health care system impair patients’ quality of life and perceived quality of care. Health professionals should foster patient participation in decision-making. However, this requires not only training and appropriate attitudes, but also adequate staffing and materials.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, health care quality, quality of life, qualitative research

  18. Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY: impact of an eye health education program on patient knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodes LA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay A Rhodes,1 Carrie E Huisingh,1 Gerald McGwin Jr,1,2 Stephen T Mennemeyer,3 Mary Bregantini,4 Nita Patel,4 Jinan Saaddine,5 John E Crews,5 Christopher A Girkin,1 Cynthia Owsley11Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, 2Department of Epidemiology, 3Department of Health Care Organization and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, 4Prevent Blindness, Chicago, IL, USA; 5Vision Health Initiative, Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USAPurpose: To assess the impact of the education program of the Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY telemedicine program on at-risk patients’ knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care as well as to assess patient satisfaction with EQUALITY.Patients and methods: New or existing patients presenting for a comprehensive eye exam (CEE at one of two retail-based primary eye clinics were enrolled based on ≥1 of the following at-risk criteria for glaucoma: African Americans ≥40 years of age, Whites ≥50 years of age, diabetes, family history of glaucoma, and/or preexisting diagnosis of glaucoma. A total of 651 patients were enrolled. A questionnaire was administered prior to the patients’ CEE and prior to the patients receiving any of the evidence-based eye health education program; a follow-up questionnaire was administered 2–4 weeks later by phone. Baseline and follow-up patient responses regarding knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care were compared using McNemar’s test. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association of patient-level characteristics with improvement in knowledge and attitudes. Overall patient satisfaction was summarized.Results: At follow-up, all patient responses in the knowledge and attitude domains significantly improved from baseline (P≤0.01 for all questions. Those who were unemployed (odds

  19. Examining the influence of family dynamics on quality of care by informal caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's dementia in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyavin, Ivan; Trujillo, Michael A; Peralta, Silvina Victoria; Stolfi, Miriam E; Morelli, Eliana; Perrin, Paul B; Lasa, Javier Peña; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the pattern of family dynamics of Argentinian individuals with dementia that most heavily influences the quality of care provided by family caregivers (CGs). One hundred and two CGs of individuals with Alzheimer's disease in Argentina participated in this study. The majority (75%) were female, with an average age of 57.8 years (standard deviation = 13.5) and had spent a median of 48 months (interquartile range [IQR]: 36.00-60.00) providing care to their family member with dementia, devoting a median of 60 hours (IQR: 50.00-80.00) per week to these duties. Caregivers completed Spanish versions of instruments assessing their family dynamics and quality-of-care provision. Hierarchical regression analyses suggested that higher quality of informal care (Provide and Respect) was related to greater levels of empathy and reduced levels of overall dysfunction in CGs' families. Higher quality of care-Provide was also related to shorter duration of time (in months) spent providing care. Dementia CG interventions in Latino populations would likely benefit from addressing difficulties experienced when providing care for a prolonged period of time, as well as programming or techniques to improve family dynamics, especially family empathy and general functioning, given the strong reciprocal influence of these factors on CG quality of care. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Total quality management in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, S C

    1994-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM), continuous quality improvement (CQI) and quality control are terms that are becoming very familiar to workers in the health care environment. The purpose of this article is to discuss these terms and the concepts they describe. The origins of TQM and the keen interest in its application to the health care environment today are addressed. In other environments, TQM has shown significant increases in productivity while increasing effectiveness. Its application to the health care environment is the provision of the best possible care through continuously improving service to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of the customer. The customer in the health care environment could be the patient, staff, physician and community serviced by the hospital. Characteristics of the new organizational structure are reviewed. Established techniques and processes are commonly used to identify process-improvement opportunities to assist the manager in continuously evaluating quality trends.

  1. Association between sense of coherence and health-related quality of life among primary care patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumbler, Neale R; Kroenke, Kurt; Outcalt, Samantha; Bair, Matthew J; Krebs, Erin; Wu, Jingwei; Yu, Zhangsheng

    2013-12-26

    Sense of Coherence (SOC) is a measure of an individual's capacity to use various coping mechanisms and resources when faced with a stressor. Chronic pain is one of the most prevalent and disabling conditions in clinical practice. This study examines the extent to which a strong SOC is associated with less pain and better health related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with chronic pain. We analyzed data from the Stepped Care to Optimize Pain care Effectiveness (SCOPE) trial which enrolled 250 patients with persistent (3 months or longer) musculoskeletal pain who were receiving care in an United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care clinic. The abbreviated three-item SOC scale was used to measure personal coping capability. Participants were categorized into Strong SOC (score 0-1) and Weak SOC (score 2-6). The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) was used to assess the severity and disability associated with pain. Additionally, pain self-efficacy (ASES) and catastrophizing (CSQ) were assessed. HRQoL was assessed with the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) social functioning, vitality, and general health subscales. Multiple linear regression models were performed to examine whether SOC was independently associated with pain-specific and HRQoL outcomes, after adjusting for sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics, medical comorbidities and major depression. Of the 250 study patients, 61% had a strong SOC whereas 39% had a weak SOC. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that a strong SOC was significantly associated with better general health, vitality, social functioning and pain self-efficacy as well as less pain catastrophizing. These significant findings were partially attenuated, but remained statistically significant, after controlling for major depression. SOC was not significantly associated with pain severity or pain disability. A strong SOC is associated with better HRQoL and self-efficacy as well as less

  2. EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION AS AN IMPORTANT SKILL FOR QUALITY CARE IN ELDERLY PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Dorit

    2014-10-01

    The increase in the number of older people in the world emphasizes the need to reevaluate and change health care policy and care services priorities. The provision of health care for this growing population has consequently become an important worldwide concern. The purpose of this article is to highlight the challenges stemming from the growing number of elderly people and their need for care. Collaborative and coordinated health care services for elderly people should be focused on the ethical issues deriving from the interpersonal relationships between the professional caregiver and the older person. Any discussion on ethics and aging should be focused on the roles of autonomy, informed consent, respect, advance directive, end of life decisions and privacy. In addition, such a discussion should stress the important role of effective communication and its effect on the older person's adherence with the recommended treatment. The desired consequence should be the empowerment of positive and successful experiences attained by the recipients of the health care services.

  3. Evaluation of patients' attitudes to their care during oral and maxillofacial surgical outpatient consultations: the importance of waiting times and quality of interaction between patient and doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimovska, E O F; Sharma, S; Trebble, T M

    2016-06-01

    Knowing what patients think about their care is fundamental to the provision of an effective, quality service, and it can help to direct change and reduce costs. Much of the work in oral and maxillofacial departments concerns the treatment of outpatients, but as little is known about what they think about their care, we aimed to find out which aspects were associated with satisfaction. Consecutive patients (n=244) who attended the oral and maxillofacial outpatient department at Southampton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust over a 7-day period were given a questionnaire to complete before and after their consultation. It included questions with Likert scale responses on environmental, procedural, and interactive aspects of the visit, and a 16-point scale to rank their priorities. A total of 187 patients (77%) completed the questionnaires. No association was found between expected (p=0.93) or actual (p=0.41) waiting times, and 90% of patients were satisfied with their visit. Seeing the doctor, having confidence in the treatment plan, being listened to, and the ability of the doctor to recognise their personal needs, were ranked as important. Environmental and procedural aspects were considered the least important. These findings may be of value in the development of services to improve patient-centred care.

  4. Quality Assessment in the Primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem Ak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available -Quality Assessment in the Primary care Dear Editor; I have read the article titled as “Implementation of Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS at Primary Health Centre Durvesh” with great interest. Shrivastava et all concluded that assessment mechanism for the achievement of objectives for the suggested RKS model was not successful (1. Hereby I would like to emphasize the importance of quality assessment (QA especially in the era of newly established primary care implementations in our country. Promotion of quality has been fundamental part of primary care health services. Nevertheless variations in quality of care exist even in the developed countries. Accomplishment of quality in the primary care has some barriers like administration and directorial factors, absence of evidence-based medicine practice lack of continuous medical education. Quality of health care is no doubt multifaceted model that covers all components of health structures and processes of care. Quality in the primary care set up includes patient physician relationship, immunization, maternal, adolescent, adult and geriatric health care, referral, non-communicable disease management and prescribing (2. Most countries are recently beginning the implementation of quality assessments in all walks of healthcare. Organizations like European society for quality and safety in family practice (EQuiP endeavor to accomplish quality by collaboration. There are reported developments and experiments related to the methodology, processes and outcomes of quality assessments of health care. Quality assessments will not only contribute the accomplishment of the program / project but also detect the areas where obstacles also exist. In order to speed up the adoption of QA and to circumvent the occurrence of mistakes, health policy makers and family physicians from different parts of the world should share their experiences. Consensus on quality in preventive medicine implementations can help to yield

  5. Health-Related Quality of Life in Primary Care: Which Aspects Matter in Multimorbid Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Community Setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamradt, Martina; Krisam, Johannes; Kiel, Marion; Qreini, Markus; Besier, Werner; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ose, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge about predictors of health-related quality of life for multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care could help to improve quality and patient-centeredness of care in this specific group of patients. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of several patient characteristics on health-related quality of life of multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a community setting. A cross-sectional study with 32 primary care practice teams in Mannheim, Germany, and randomly selected multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N = 495) was conducted. In order to analyze associations of various patient characteristics with health-related quality of life (EQ-5D index) a multilevel analysis was applied. After excluding patients with missing data, the cohort consisted of 404 eligible patients. The final multilevel model highlighted six out of 14 explanatory patient variables which were significantly associated with health-related quality of life: female gender (r = -0.0494; p = .0261), school education of nine years or less (r = -0.0609; p = .0006), (physical) mobility restrictions (r = -0.1074; p = .0003), presence of chronic pain (r = -0.0916; p = .0004), diabetes-related distress (r = -0.0133; p diabetes-related distress, chronic pain, restrictions in (physical) mobility, female gender, as well as lower education and, increased BMI have a noteworthy impact on health-related quality of life in multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus seen in primary care practices in a community setting. The highlighted aspects should gain much more attention when treating multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Quality of care for patients with type 2 diabetes in general practice according to patients' ethnic background: a cross-sectional study from Oslo, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkeland Kåre

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent decades immigration to Norway from Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe has increased rapidly. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of care for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients from these ethnic minority groups compared with the care received by Norwegians. Methods In 2006, electronic medical record data were screened at 11 practices (49 GPs; 58857 patients. 1653 T2DM patients cared for in general practice were identified. Ethnicity was defined as self-reported country of birth. Chi-squared tests, one-way ANOVAs, multiple regression, linear mixed effect models and generalized linear mixed models were used. Results Diabetes was diagnosed at a younger age in patients from the ethnic minority groups (South Asians (SA: mean age 44.9 years, Middle East/North Africa (MENA: 47.2 years, East Asians (EA: 52.0 years, others: 49.0 years compared with Norwegians (59.7 years, p 85% of patients in all groups with minor differences between minority groups and Norwegians. A greater proportion of the minority groups were prescribed hypoglycaemic medications compared with Norwegians (≥79% vs. 72%, p 9% was higher in minority groups (SA: 19.6%, MENA: 18.9% vs. Norwegians: 5.6%, p Conclusions Mean age at the time of diagnosis of T2DM was 8-15 years younger in minority groups compared with Norwegians. Recording of important processes of care measures is high in all groups. Only one in four of most patient groups achieved all four treatment targets and prescribing habits may be sub-optimal. Patients from minority groups have worse glycaemic control than Norwegians which implies that it might be necessary to improve the guidelines to meet the needs of specific ethnic groups.

  7. Predictors of health-related quality of life in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease in European primary care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Ludt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular risk management plays an important role in primary care. In patients at high risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD lifestyle and, where appropriate, medical interventions are recommended in guidelines. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL is an important outcome in clinical practice. This study aimed to assess the HRQoL of this patient group and to investigate the impact of both patients' characteristics and practice quality scores on their assessments of HRQoL. METHODS AND FINDINGS: An observational study in 218 general practices from 8 European countries was conducted. 2142 patients at risk for CVD (33.5% female with a mean age of 66.3 (SD 9.1 years completed a questionnaire including the EQ-5D instrument and provided data from medical record. Validated quality indicators of general practices were assessed using practice questionnaires and face-to-face interviews. A hierarchical multilevel analysis was performed to identify predictors of EQ-5D scores at patient and practice level. The mean EQ-5D score was 0.78 (SD 0.19. Female gender (r=-0.03, p<0.0016, age (r=-0.01, p=0.0387 and lower educational level (r=-0.03, p<0.0001 were correlated negatively with EQ-5D scores. Clinically more important was the correlation of HRQoL with the frequency of practice contacts (r=-0.12, p<0.0001 and the number of uncontrolled risk factors (r= -0.01, p<0.0039. Medication adherence (r=0.032, p<0.0001, and physical activity (r=0.02, p<0.0001 were identified as positive predictors of HRQoL. The EUPROPEP-score category 'organization' (r=0.02, p<0.0001 was positively related to EQ-5D scores, whereas other practice scores were not correlated to EQ-5D-scores. CONCLUSIONS: In patients at risk for CVD, good medication adherence, regular physical activity, controlling of biomedical risk factor levels and patient-centered practice organization have been shown to be positively correlated to HRQoL and should therefore be targeted in

  8. What are patient factors associated with the quality of diabetes care?: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently there has been a growing interest in healthcare quality control in Korea. We examined the association between patient factors and quality indicators of diabetic care among Korean adults with diabetes. Methods We obtained a sample of 335 adults aged 20 or older diagnosed with diabetes from the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Patient factors were divided into two categories: socioeconomic position and health-related factors. Quality indicators for diabetes care were defined as receiving preventive care services for diabetes complications (e.g., fundus examination, microalbuminuria examination, diabetes education) and diabetes-related clinical outcomes (e.g., HbA1c, blood pressure, LDL-cholesterol). We performed multiple logistic regression analyses for each quality indicator. Results We found that people with lower education levels or shorter duration of diabetes illness were less likely to receive preventive care services for diabetes complications. Women or people with longer duration of diabetes were less likely to reach the glycemic target. Obese diabetic patients were less likely to accomplish adequate control of blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol. Conclusions Several factors of patients with diabetes, such as education level, duration of illness, gender, and obesity grade are associated with the quality of diabetes care. These findings can help inform policy makers about subpopulations at risk in developing a public health strategy in the future. PMID:22913274

  9. What are patient factors associated with the quality of diabetes care?: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko Ki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently there has been a growing interest in healthcare quality control in Korea. We examined the association between patient factors and quality indicators of diabetic care among Korean adults with diabetes. Methods We obtained a sample of 335 adults aged 20 or older diagnosed with diabetes from the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Patient factors were divided into two categories: socioeconomic position and health-related factors. Quality indicators for diabetes care were defined as receiving preventive care services for diabetes complications (e.g., fundus examination, microalbuminuria examination, diabetes education and diabetes-related clinical outcomes (e.g., HbA1c, blood pressure, LDL-cholesterol. We performed multiple logistic regression analyses for each quality indicator. Results We found that people with lower education levels or shorter duration of diabetes illness were less likely to receive preventive care services for diabetes complications. Women or people with longer duration of diabetes were less likely to reach the glycemic target. Obese diabetic patients were less likely to accomplish adequate control of blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol. Conclusions Several factors of patients with diabetes, such as education level, duration of illness, gender, and obesity grade are associated with the quality of diabetes care. These findings can help inform policy makers about subpopulations at risk in developing a public health strategy in the future.

  10. The importance of older patients ’ experiences with care delivery for their quality of life after hospitalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Hartgerink (Jacqueline); J.M. Cramm (Jane); T.J.E.M. Bakker (Ton); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Background:Older patients’experiences with care delivery may be important for their quality of life over time.Evidence is however lacking. Therefore, this study aims to identify the longitudinal relationship between older patients’experiences with hospital care, perceived

  11. Assessing the impact of general practitioner team service on perceived quality of care among patients with non-communicable diseases in China: a natural experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jia; Wei, Xiaolin; Li, Haitao; Jiang, Yanling; Mao, Chunfang

    2016-10-01

    China issued the national primary care policy of promoting general practitioner (GP) team service in 2011. We conducted this study to assess the impact of the GP team service on quality of primary care as perceived by patients with non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Natural experimental study. This study was conducted in Shanghai, where the policy was effectively implemented, and Kunming, where the policy was not implemented. In both cities, NCD patients were interviewed with primary care assessment tool (PCAT) after their clinical consultations in their community health centers. The implementation of GP team service policy. Multiple linear regressions were employed to compare PCAT scores between the two rounds of the surveys in each city. Difference-in-difference (DID) analysis was used to identify the changes between two cities over time. A total of 663 and 587 patients in Shanghai, and 400 and 441 patients in Kunming were surveyed in 2011 and 2013, respectively. The DID analysis showed that the total primary care quality scores improved in Shanghai compared with Kunming between 2011 and 2013 (β = 1.30, 95% CI: 0.74, 1.87). In Shanghai, care quality in 2013 improved significantly for the total score and the six components when compared with those in 2011. No significant changes were observed in Kunming in the same period. Primary care policies that promote long-term provider-patient relationships, coordinated service with hospitals and capitation payment for the GP team may contribute to the improvement of care quality in Shanghai. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Prevalence of Insomnia and Clinical and Quality of Life Correlates in Chinese Patients With Schizophrenia Treated in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Cai-Lan; Li, Yan; Cai, Mei-Ying; Ma, Xin-Rong; Zang, Yu; Jia, Fu-Jun; Lin, Yong-Qiang; Ungvari, Gabor S; Chiu, Helen F K; Ng, Chee H; Zhong, Bao-Liang; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Tam, Man-Ian; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2017-04-01

    To describe the prevalence and clinical correlates of insomnia in schizophrenia patients treated in primary care. Six hundred and twenty-three schizophrenia patients from 22 primary care services were recruited. The prevalence of at least one type of insomnia was 28.9% (180/623), while those of difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, and early morning wakening were 20.5%, 19.6%, and 17.7%, respectively. Only 53.3% of patients suffering from insomnia received treatment. Insomnia is common in Chinese patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care and the rate of treatment appears low. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Leadership for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nackel, J G; Shelley, S R

    1991-01-01

    In an era of change in health-care delivery and, particularly, change in patient care, leadership is the cornerstone of change management. The environment of the 1990s will challenge even the most sophisticated and capable health-care executives. This paper discusses key aspects of leadership and models them to the patient-care setting. Leadership will be the differentiating factor as organizations seek competitive advantage.

  14. A review of national policies and strategies to improve quality of health care and patient safety: a case study from Lebanon and Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jardali, Fadi; Fadlallah, Racha

    2017-08-16

    Improving quality of care and patient safety practices can strengthen health care delivery systems, improve health sector performance, and accelerate attainment of health-related Sustainability Development Goals. Although quality improvement is now prominent on the health policy agendas of governments in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), including countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR), progress to date has not been optimal. The objective of this study is to comprehensively review existing quality improvement and patient safety policies and strategies in two selected countries of the EMR (Lebanon and Jordan) to determine the extent to which these have been institutionalized within existing health systems. We used a mixed methods approach that combined documentation review, stakeholder surveys and key informant interviews. Existing quality improvement and patient safety initiatives were assessed across five components of an analytical framework for assessing health care quality and patient safety: health systems context; national policies and legislation; organizations and institutions; methods, techniques and tools; and health care infrastructure and resources. Both Lebanon and Jordan have made important progress in terms of increased attention to quality and accreditation in national health plans and strategies, licensing requirements for health care professionals and organizations (albeit to varying extents), and investments in health information systems. A key deficiency in both countries is the absence of an explicit national policy for quality improvement and patient safety across the health system. Instead, there is a spread of several (disjointed) pieces of legal measures and national plans leading to fragmentation and lack of clear articulation of responsibilities across the entire continuum of care. Moreover, both countries lack national sets of standardized and applicable quality indicators for performance measurement and benchmarking

  15. Investigating organizational quality improvement systems, patient empowerment, organizational culture, professional involvement and the quality of care in European hospitals: the 'Deepening our Understanding of Quality Improvement in Europe (DUQuE' project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Andrew

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitals in European countries apply a wide range of quality improvement strategies. Knowledge of the effectiveness of these strategies, implemented as part of an overall hospital quality improvement system, is limited. Methods/Design We propose to study the relationships among organisational quality improvement systems, patient empowerment, organisational culture, professionals' involvement with the quality of hospital care, including clinical effectiveness, patient safety and patient involvement. We will employ a cross-sectional, multi-level study design in which patient-level measurements are nested in hospital departments, which are in turn nested in hospitals in different EU countries. Mixed methods will be used for data collection, measurement and analysis. Hospital/care pathway level constructs that will be assessed include external pressure, hospital governance, quality improvement system, patient empowerment in quality improvement, organisational culture and professional involvement. These constructs will be assessed using questionnaires. Patient-level constructs include clinical effectiveness, patient safety and patient involvement, and will be assessed using audit of patient records, routine data and patient surveys. For the assessment of hospital and pathway level constructs we will collect data from randomly selected hospitals in eight countries. For a sample of hospitals in each country we will carry out additional data collection at patient-level related to four conditions (stroke, acute myocardial infarction, hip fracture and delivery. In addition, structural components of quality improvement systems will be assessed using visits by experienced external assessors. Data analysis will include descriptive statistics and graphical representations and methods for data reduction, classification techniques and psychometric analysis, before moving to bi-variate and multivariate analysis. The latter will be conducted

  16. Quality in Trauma Care : Improving the Discharge Procedure of Patients by Means of Lean Six Sigma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, Gerard C.; Trip, Albert; Ahaus, Kees T. B.; Does, Ronald J. M. M.; Wendt, Klaus W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The University Medical Center Groningen is a level I trauma center in the northern part of the Netherlands. Sixty-three percent of all the patients admitted at the Trauma Nursing Department (TND) are acute patients who are admitted directly after trauma. In 2006 and 2007, the University

  17. Quantitative comparison of measurements of urgent care service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong; Prybutok, Victor; Prybutok, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Service quality and patient satisfaction are essential to health care organization success. Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry introduced SERVQUAL, a prominent service quality measure not yet applied to urgent care. We develop an instrument to measure perceived service quality and identify the determinants of patient satisfaction/ behavioral intentions. We examine the relationships among perceived service quality, patient satisfaction and behavioral intentions, and demonstrate that urgent care service quality is not equivalent using measures of perceptions only, differences of expectations minus perceptions, ratio of perceptions to expectations, and the log of the ratio. Perceptions provide the best measure of urgent care service quality.

  18. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part IV: Quality and Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2015-11-01

    The 1999 Institute of Medicine report Ensuring Quality Cancer Care discussed the difference between the actual cancer care received in the United States and the care that the patients should get, as well as some points to consider in delivering optimum care. In 2012, a follow-up review article in the journal Cancer entitled "Ensuring quality cancer care" indicated that there had been some interval progress, but more are needed to be done. The 2013 Institute of Medicine report Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis indicated that there are continuing major problems with cancer care and that they advocated a national system of quality reporting and a major information technology system to capture and help assess the data.

  19. Assessment of quality of life in breast cancer patients at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Damodar

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: These findings have shown that there exists a strong correlation between the length of treatment and the QoL among breast cancer patients. Future interventions should target each specific aspect of QoL.

  20. Quality of anticoagulation therapy in neurological patients in a tertiary care hospital in north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat Singh

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: It may be concluded that stable therapeutic INR is difficult to maintain in neurological patients. Optimal modification of diet, drug and dose of oral anticoagulant may help in stabilization of INR.

  1. Quality Care for Hemodialysis Patients Efifcacy%优质护理服务用于血液透析患者中的效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宇

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨优质护理服务在血液透析患者中的应用价值。方法收集122例维持性血液透析患者将其分为常规组和优质护理组,分别行常规护理及优质护理,对比护理效果。结果两组在并发症发生情况及患者健康状况等方面比较均有显著差异(P<0.05)。结论在血液透析患者中展开优质护理服务临床价值显著,应推广应用。%Objective To investigate the value of quality care in hemodialysis patients. Methods Collected 122 cases of hemodialysis patients were divided into groups and regular quality care groups, routine care and quality care, compared to nursing effect. Results And other aspects of the two groups occurred in complications and patient health status were significant differences (P<0.05). Conclusion Expand in hemodialysis patients quality care clinical value signiifcantly, should be widely applied.

  2. Turning teamwork into quality care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    To promote quality in the healthcare setting, many organizations are realizing that they need to consider using teams to promote quality care. From establishing "a lean production system" to eliminating "waste"--in the form of poor customer service, employee dissatisfaction, and medical errors--to lowering average lengths of stays, two medical organizations found that taking a team approach can encourage good clinical care while improving bottom lines.

  3. Influence of quality of care and individual patient characteristics on quality of life and return to work in survivors of the acute respiratory distress syndrome: protocol for a prospective, observational, multi-centre patient cohort study (DACAPO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Susanne; Dodoo-Schittko, Frank; Blecha, Sebastian; Sebök, Philipp; Thomann-Hackner, Kathrin; Quintel, Michael; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Bein, Thomas; Apfelbacher, Christian

    2015-12-17

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and return to work are important outcomes in critical care medicine, reaching beyond mortality. Little is known on factors predictive of HRQoL and return to work in critical illness, including the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and no evidence exists on the role of quality of care (QoC) for outcomes in survivors of ARDS. It is the aim of the DACAPO study ("Surviving ARDS: the influence of QoC and individual patient characteristics on quality of life") to investigate the role of QoC and individual patient characteristics on quality of life and return to work. A prospective, observational, multi-centre patient cohort study will be performed in Germany, using hospitals from the "ARDS Network Germany" as the main recruiting centres. It is envisaged to recruit 2400 patients into the DACAPO study and to analyse a study population of 1500 survivors. They will be followed up until 12 months after discharge from hospital. QoC will be assessed as process quality, structural quality and volume at the institutional level. The main outcomes (HRQoL and return to work) will be assessed by self-report questionnaires. Further data collection includes general medical and ARDS-related characteristics of patients as well as sociodemographic and psycho-social parameters. Multilevel hierarchical modelling will be performed to analyse the effects of QoC and individual patient characteristics on outcomes, taking the cluster structure of the data into account. By obtaining comprehensive data at patient and hospital level using a prospective multi-centre design, the DACAPO-study is the first study investigating the influence of QoC on individual outcomes of ARDS survivors.

  4. Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your healthcare provider about your medications, symptoms, and health problems. May 2013 Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care Expert information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in the Care of Older Adults After you’ve placed your family member in a facility KEEP VISITING! Seeing family ...

  5. Repeat prescribing: scale, problems and quality management in ambulatory care patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Dautzenberg, M.

    2004-01-01

    The reported scale of repeat prescriptions ranges from 29% to 75% of all items prescribed, depending on the definition of repeat prescribing and other variables. It is likely that a substantial part of repeat prescribing by general practitioners (GPs) occurs without direct doctor-patient contact.

  6. QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISEASE ATTENDING TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul J

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD is a prevalent atherosclerotic disorder characterized by exertional limb pain , loss of limband a high mortality rate.All the aspects of health status , life style , life satisfaction , mental state or well - being to gether reflect the multi - dimensional nature of Quality of Life in an individual . MATERIAL &METHODS: A cross sectional study was conducted over a period of 6 months from October 2012 to march 2013. P atients with signs and symptoms of peripheral arterial occlusive disease were ref erred for further evaluation by Color Doppler Ultrasonography to the Department of Radiodiagnosis. The evaluation of QO L in respondents with PAOD was performed , by means of WHO QOL - BREF questionnaire , after obtaining clearance from the Institution’s Ethics Committee. RESULTS: - The mean scores in each of the four domains for both men and women were found to be similar. The difference between men and women was not found to be statist ically significant for any of the four domains.The mean scores of the gangrene absent groups and gangrene present groups were found to differ significantly inthe domainsof physical (p=0.025 , psychological (p=0.031 , environmental(p=0.048and social relatio ns (p=0.017. The mean scores of the age groups of 70 years were found to differ significantly in the domains of physical (p=0.046 , psychological (p=0.037.The mean scores , of thegroups according to the Stage of PAD in accordance with Fontaine classification , were found to differ significantly in thedomains of physical (p=0.0316 , psychological (p=0.0241 , environmental(p=0.0472and social relations (p=0.0126. KEYWORDS: - Quality of life (QOL , WHOQOL BREF , Peripheral arterial occlusive disease ( PAOD

  7. [Improvement in health care quality for patients from the thoracic/chest pain unit in a regional hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano Ortega, M A; Romero de Castilla, R J; Rus Mansilla, C; Cortez Quiroga, G A; Bayona Gómez, A J; Duran Torralba, M C

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of an improvement cycle in patients suffering thoracic/chest pain in hospital emergencies, especially in those who could benefit from the early Bruce Treadmill Test. A multidisciplinary group care protocol was designed, which identified improvement opportunities and gave priority to the fact that «an early Bruce Treadmill Test was carried out on fewer occasions than recommended». Causes were analysed (Ishikawa diagram) and six quality criteria were defined. These criteria were evaluated in a random sample of 30 patients out of the total of 180 who used the ergometer at the Hospital in the first six months of 2007, as well as questionnaire for the doctors. Corrective measures were introduced: circulation, accessibility through intranet and explicit information for new employees (doctors). The second evaluation was carried out during the first six-months of 2008 using another random sample of 30 patients from a total of 120. In the first evaluation, the classification of the risk according to the protocol was very low (100% non-compliance) and patients whose admission to the Chest Pain Unit was recommended and an early Bruce Treadmill Test (74% criteria failure) were referred to cardiology clinics. After implementation of the corrective measures, we obtain a general improvement in all the criteria, but very significant from the previous ones, with non-compliances being reduced to 17% in classification and to the 23% in referrals. The structured cycle has helped resolve the priority problem in the short-term. The adopted measures have mainly been organisational, dependent on the professionals involved, and at a very low cost. Simple but organised methodological approaches should be taken into account before the incorporation of higher cost technologies. Copyright © 2010 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Does a competitive voucher program for adolescents improve the quality of reproductive health care? A simulated patient study in Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorter Anna C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about how sexual and reproductive (SRH health can be made accessible and appropriate to adolescents. This study evaluates the impact and sustainability of a competitive voucher program on the quality of SRH care for poor and underserved female adolescents and the usefulness of the simulated patient (SP method for such evaluation. Methods 28,711 vouchers were distributed to adolescents in disadvantaged areas of Managua that gave free-of-charge access to SRH care in 4 public, 10 non-governmental and 5 private clinics. Providers received training and guidelines, treatment protocols, and financial incentives for each adolescent attended. All clinics were visited by female adolescent SPs requesting contraception. SPs were sent one week before, during (with voucher and one month after the intervention. After each consultation they were interviewed with a standardized questionnaire. Twenty-one criteria were scored and grouped into four categories. Clinics' scores were compared using non-parametric statistical methods (paired design: before-during and before-after. Also the influence of doctors' characteristics was tested using non-parametric statistical methods. Results Some aspects of service quality improved during the voucher program. Before the program started 8 of the 16 SPs returned 'empty handed', although all were eligible contraceptive users. During the program 16/17 left with a contraceptive method (p = 0.01. Furthermore, more SPs were involved in the contraceptive method choice (13/17 vs.5/16, p = 0.02. Shared decision-making on contraceptive method as well as condom promotion had significantly increased after the program ended. Female doctors had best scores before- during and after the intervention. The improvements were more pronounced among male doctors and doctors older than 40, though these improvements did not sustain after the program ended. Conclusion This study illustrates provider

  9. The effectiveness of clinical networks in improving quality of care and patient outcomes: a systematic review of quantitative and qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bernadette Bea; Patel, Cyra; McInnes, Elizabeth; Mays, Nicholas; Young, Jane; Haines, Mary

    2016-08-08

    Reorganisation of healthcare services into networks of clinical experts is increasing as a strategy to promote the uptake of evidence based practice and to improve patient care. This is reflected in significant financial investment in clinical networks. However, there is still some question as to whether clinical networks are effective vehicles for quality improvement. The aim of this systematic review was to ascertain the effectiveness of clinical networks and identify how successful networks improve quality of care and patient outcomes. A systematic search was undertaken in accordance with the PRISMA approach in Medline, Embase, CINAHL and PubMed for relevant papers between 1 January 1996 and 30 September 2014. Established protocols were used separately to examine and assess the evidence from quantitative and qualitative primary studies and then integrate findings. A total of 22 eligible studies (9 quantitative; 13 qualitative) were included. Of the quantitative studies, seven focused on improving quality of care and two focused on improving patient outcomes. Quantitative studies were limited by a lack of rigorous experimental design. The evidence indicates that clinical networks can be effective vehicles for quality improvement in service delivery and patient outcomes across a range of clinical disciplines. However, there was variability in the networks' ability to make meaningful network- or system-wide change in more complex processes such as those requiring intensive professional education or more comprehensive redesign of care pathways. Findings from qualitative studies indicated networks that had a positive impact on quality of care and patients outcomes were those that had adequate resources, credible leadership and efficient management coupled with effective communication strategies and collaborative trusting relationships. There is evidence that clinical networks can improve the delivery of healthcare though there are few high quality quantitative

  10. Nursing skill mix in European hospitals: cross-sectional study of the association with mortality, patient ratings, and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Sloane, Douglas; Griffiths, Peter; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Bruyneel, Luk; McHugh, Matthew; Maier, Claudia B; Moreno-Casbas, Teresa; Ball, Jane E; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Sermeus, Walter

    2017-07-01

    To determine the association of hospital nursing skill mix with patient mortality, patient ratings of their care and indicators of quality of care. Cross-sectional patient discharge data, hospital characteristics and nurse and patient survey data were merged and analysed using generalised estimating equations (GEE) and logistic regression models. Adult acute care hospitals in Belgium, England, Finland, Ireland, Spain and Switzerland. Survey data were collected from 13 077 nurses in 243 hospitals, and 18 828 patients in 182 of the same hospitals in the six countries. Discharge data were obtained for 275 519 surgical patients in 188 of these hospitals. Patient mortality, patient ratings of care, care quality, patient safety, adverse events and nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction. Richer nurse skill mix (eg, every 10-point increase in the percentage of professional nurses among all nursing personnel) was associated with lower odds of mortality (OR=0.89), lower odds of low hospital ratings from patients (OR=0.90) and lower odds of reports of poor quality (OR=0.89), poor safety grades (OR=0.85) and other poor outcomes (0.80patient and hospital factors. Each 10 percentage point reduction in the proportion of professional nurses is associated with an 11% increase in the odds of death. In our hospital sample, there were an average of six caregivers for every 25 patients, four of whom were professional nurses. Substituting one nurse assistant for a professional nurse for every 25 patients is associated with a 21% increase in the odds of dying. A bedside care workforce with a greater proportion of professional nurses is associated with better outcomes for patients and nurses. Reducing nursing skill mix by adding nursing associates and other categories of assistive nursing personnel without professional nurse qualifications may contribute to preventable deaths, erode quality and safety of hospital care and contribute to hospital nurse

  11. Non-adherence to self-care practices & medication and health related quality of life among patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Farzana; Mumu, Shirin J; Ara, Ferdous; Hafez, Md Abdul; Ali, Liaquat

    2014-05-07

    Non-adherence to lifestyle modification among diabetic patients develops the short-term risks and the long-term complications as well as declines the quality of life. This study aimed to find out the association between non-adherence to self-care practices, medication and health related quality of life (HR-QoL) among type 2 diabetic patients. At least 1 year diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes (N = 500), age>25 years were conveniently selected from the Out-Patient Department of Bangladesh Institute of Health Sciences Hospital. Patients' self-care practices were assessed via interviewer-administered questionnaires using an analytical cross-sectional design. HRQoL was assessed by an adapted and validated Bangla version of the EQ-5D (EuroQol Group, 2009) questionnaire which has five domains- mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression and two levels on each dimension. EQ-5D responses were further translated into single summery EQ-5D index using UK TTO value set. Patients' were considered as non-adhered to self-care practices according to the guidelines of Diabetic Association of Bangladesh. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess the association between non-adherence towards self-care practices and HRQoL. Among the study patients, 50.2% were females and mean ± SD age was 54.2 (±11.2) years. Non-adherence rate were assessed for: blood glucose monitoring (37%), diet (44.8%), foot care (43.2%), exercise (33.2%) and smoking (37.2%). About 50.4% patients had problem in mobility, 28.2% in self-care, 47.6% in usual activities, 72.8% in pain/discomfort and 73.6% in anxiety/depression. On chi-squared test, significant association was found between non adherence to foot care and problem with mobility, self-care and usual activities (p non-adherence to exercise and poor mobility, self- care, usual activities, pain and anxiety (p Non-adherence to diet was associated with poor mobility (p non-adherence to foot care (p

  12. Nursing home care quality: a cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Fagerli, Liv Berit

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore potential differences in how nursing home residents rate care quality and to explore cluster characteristics. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional design was used, with one questionnaire including questions from quality from patients' perspective and Big Five personality traits, together with questions related to socio-demographic aspects and health condition. Residents ( n=103) from four Norwegian nursing homes participated (74.1 per cent response rate). Hierarchical cluster analysis identified clusters with respect to care quality perceptions. χ(2) tests and one-way between-groups ANOVA were performed to characterise the clusters ( pclusters were identified; Cluster 1 residents (28.2 per cent) had the best care quality perceptions and Cluster 2 (67.0 per cent) had the worst perceptions. The clusters were statistically significant and characterised by personal-related conditions: gender, psychological well-being, preferences, admission, satisfaction with staying in the nursing home, emotional stability and agreeableness, and by external objective care conditions: healthcare personnel and registered nurses. Research limitations/implications Residents assessed as having no cognitive impairments were included, thus excluding the largest group. By choosing questionnaire design and structured interviews, the number able to participate may increase. Practical implications Findings may provide healthcare personnel and managers with increased knowledge on which to develop strategies to improve specific care quality perceptions. Originality/value Cluster analysis can be an effective tool for differentiating between nursing homes residents' care quality perceptions.

  13. The association between quality of HIV care, loss to follow-up and mortality in pediatric and adolescent patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisola Ojikutu

    Full Text Available Access to pediatric HIV treatment in resource-limited settings has risen significantly. However, little is known about the quality of care that pediatric or adolescent patients receive. The objective of this study is to explore quality of HIV care and treatment in Nigeria and to determine the association between quality of care, loss-to-follow-up and mortality. A retrospective cohort study was conducted including patients ≤18 years of age who initiated ART between November 2002 and December 2011 at 23 sites across 10 states. 1,516 patients were included. A quality score comprised of 6 process indicators was calculated for each patient. More than half of patients (55.5% were found to have a high quality score, using the median score as the cut-off. Most patients were screened for tuberculosis at entry into care (81.3%, had adherence measurement and counseling at their last visit (88.7% and 89.7% respectively, and were prescribed co-trimoxazole at some point during enrollment in care (98.8%. Thirty-seven percent received a CD4 count in the six months prior to chart review. Mortality within 90 days of ART initiation was 1.9%. A total of 4.2% of patients died during the period of follow-up (mean: 27 months with 19.0% lost to follow-up. In multivariate regression analyses, weight for age z-score (Adjusted Hazard Ratio (AHR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.85, 0.95 and high quality indicator score (compared a low score, AHR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.26, 0.73 had a protective effect on mortality. Patients with a high quality score were less likely to be lost to follow-up (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR: 0.42; 95% CI: 0.32, 0.56, compared to those with low score. These findings indicate that providing high quality care to children and adolescents living with HIV is important to improve outcomes, including lowering loss to follow-up and decreasing mortality in this age group.

  14. The potential for integrated care programmes to improve quality of care as assessed by patients with COPD: early results from a real-world implementation study in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); M.P.M.H. Rutten-van Mölken (Maureen); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: We investigated whether patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who were enrolled in disease-management programmes (DMPs) felt that they received a better quality of care than non-enrolled COPD patients. Methods: Our cross-sectional study was performed among

  15. How trained volunteers can improve the quality of hospital care for older patients. A qualitative evaluation within the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steunenberg, Bas; van der Mast, Roos; Strijbos, Marije J.; Inouye, Sharon K.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, using a mixed-methods design, the added value of a trained Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) volunteer to the quality of hospital care in the Netherlands. The trained volunteers daily stimulate older patients, at risk of a delirium, to eat, to drink, and to

  16. Health-related quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis attending two primary care clinics in Malaysia: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Zainal F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQOL among patients with osteoarthritis (OA helps the health care provider to understand the impact of the disease in the patients' own perspective and make health services more patient-centered. The main aim of this study was to measure the quality of life among patients with symptomatic knee OA attending primary care clinic. We also aimed to ascertain the association between socio-demographic and medical status of patients with knee OA and their quality of life. Methods A clinic based, cross sectional study using the Short Form-36 (SF-36 questionnaire was conducted in two primary care health clinics in Hulu Langat, Selangor, Malaysia over a period of 8 months. The nurses and medical assistants were involved in recruiting the patients while the family physicians conducted the interview. Results A total 151 respondents were recruited. The mean age was 65.6 ± 10.8 years with females constituted 119 (78.8% of the patients. The mean duration of knee pain was 4.07 ± 2.96 years. Half of the patients were overweight and majority, 138 (91.4%, had at least one co-morbidity, the commonest being hypertension. The physical health status showed lower score as compared to mental health component. The domain concerning mental health components showed positive correlation with age. There was a significant negative correlation between age and physical functioning (p Conclusions This study has shown that patients with knee OA attending primary care clinics have relatively poor quality of life pertaining to the physical health components but less impact was seen on the patients' mental health.

  17. Electronic symptom reporting between patient and provider for improved health care service quality: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. part 2: methodological quality and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Monika Alise; Berntsen, Gro K Rosvold; Schuster, Tibor; Henriksen, Eva; Horsch, Alexander

    2012-10-03

    We conducted in two parts a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on electronic symptom reporting between patients and providers to improve health care service quality. Part 1 reviewed the typology of patient groups, health service innovations, and research targets. Four innovation categories were identified: consultation support, monitoring with clinician support, self-management with clinician support, and therapy. To assess the methodological quality of the RCTs, and summarize effects and benefits from the methodologically best studies. We searched Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and IEEE Xplore for original studies presented in English-language articles between 1990 and November 2011. Risk of bias and feasibility were judged according to the Cochrane recommendation, and theoretical evidence and preclinical testing were evaluated according to the Framework for Design and Evaluation of Complex Interventions to Improve Health. Three authors assessed the risk of bias and two authors extracted the effect data independently. Disagreement regarding bias assessment, extraction, and interpretation of results were resolved by consensus discussions. Of 642 records identified, we included 32 articles representing 29 studies. No articles fulfilled all quality requirements. All interventions were feasible to implement in a real-life setting, and theoretical evidence was provided for almost all studies. However, preclinical testing was reported in only a third of the articles. We judged three-quarters of the articles to have low risk for random sequence allocation and approximately half of the articles to have low risk for the following biases: allocation concealment, incomplete outcome data, and selective reporting. Slightly more than one fifth of the articles were judged as low risk for blinding of outcome assessment. Only 1 article had low risk of bias for blinding of participants and personnel. We excluded 12

  18. Sociodemographic and Geographic Predictors of Quality of Care in United States Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease Due to Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Laura C.; Drenkard, Cristina; Patzer, Rachel E.; Klein, Mitchel; Kramer, Michael R.; Pastan, Stephen; Lim, S. Sam; McClellan, William M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe end-stage renal disease (ESRD) quality of care (receipt of pre-ESRD nephrology care, access to kidney transplantation, and placement of permanent vascular access for dialysis) in US patients with ESRD due to lupus nephritis (LN-ESRD) and to examine whether quality measures differ by patient sociodemographic characteristics or US region. Methods National surveillance data on patients in the US in whom treatment for LN-ESRD was initiated between July 2005 and September 2011 (n = 6,594) were analyzed. Odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were determined for each quality measure, according to sociodemographic factors and US region. Results Overall, 71% of the patients received nephrology care prior to ESRD. Black and Hispanic patients were less likely than white patients to receive pre-ESRD care (OR 0.73 [95% CI 0.63–0.85] and OR 0.73 [95% CI 0.60–0.88], respectively) and to be placed on the kidney transplant waitlist within the first year after the start of ESRD (HR 0.78 [95% CI 0.68–0.91] and HR 0.82 [95% CI 0.68–0.98], respectively). Those with Medicaid (HR 0.51 [95% CI 0.44–0.58]) or no insurance (HR 0.36 [95% CI 0.29–0.44]) were less likely than those with private insurance to be placed on the waitlist. Only 24% had a permanent vascular access, and placement was even less likely among the uninsured (OR 0.62 [95% CI 0.49–0.79]). ESRD quality-of-care measures varied 2–3-fold across regions of the US, with patients in the Northeast and Northwest generally having higher probabilities of adequate care. Conclusion LN-ESRD patients have suboptimal ESRD care, particularly with regard to placement of dialysis vascular access. Minority race/ethnicity and lack of private insurance are associated with inadequate ESRD care. Further studies are warranted to examine multilevel barriers to, and develop targeted interventions to improve delivery of, care among patients with LN-ESRD. PMID:25692867

  19. Evaluation of the quality of care of a multi-disciplinary risk factor assessment and management programme (RAMP for diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fung Colman SC

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a common chronic disease associated with multiple clinical complications. Management guidelines have been established which recommend a risk-stratified approach to managing these patients in primary care. This study aims to evaluate the quality of care (QOC and effectiveness of a multi-disciplinary risk assessment and management programme (RAMP for type 2 diabetic patients attending government-funded primary care clinics in Hong Kong. The evaluation will be conducted using a structured and comprehensive evidence-based evaluation framework. Method/design For evaluation of the quality of care, a longitudinal study will be conducted using the Action Learning and Audit Spiral methodologies to measure whether the pre-set target standards for criteria related to the structure and process of care are achieved. Each participating clinic will be invited to complete a Structure of Care Questionnaire evaluating pre-defined indicators which reflect the setting in which care is delivered, while process of care will be evaluated against the pre-defined indicators in the evaluation framework. Effectiveness of the programme will be evaluated in terms of clinical outcomes, service utilization outcomes, and patient-reported outcomes. A cohort study will be conducted on all eligible diabetic patients who have enrolled into RAMP for more than one year to compare their clinical and public service utilization outcomes of RAMP participants and non-participants. Clinical outcome measures will include HbA1c, blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic, lipids (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and future cardiovascular diseases risk prediction; and public health service utilization rate will include general and specialist outpatient, emergency department attendances, and hospital admissions annually within 5 years. For patient-reported outcomes, a total of 550 participants and another 550 non-participants will be

  20. How Do Patients Perceive and Expect Quality of Surgery, Diagnostics, and Emergency Services in Tertiary Care Hospitals? An Evidence of Gap Analysis From Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Iram; Humayun, Ayesha; Anwar, Muhammad Imran; Iftikhar, Adil; Aslam, Muhammad; Shafiq, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Service quality is one of the important gears to appraise services and determine the gray areas that need improvement. In countries with a resource-poor health system, the first step of measuring quality is yet to be taken. This study seeks to inform policy makers in developing contextual service quality models by identifying service quality gaps in tertiary care teaching hospitals using patients’ perspective. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed using multistage cluster sampling, and a modified version of the SERVQUAL (SERV-service, QUAL-quality) instrument was administered to determine patient’s expectations and perceptions. A total of 817 completed questionnaires were obtained from patients and/or their attendants using convenience sampling. Results Data analysis revealed statistically significant negative quality gaps between expectations and perceptions of tangibility, reliability, empathy, assurance, responsiveness, and communication. The difference in mean expectation and perception for responsiveness across the sexes was significant (p quality were independent of sex. Educational status showed significant difference in expectation and perception in responsiveness (p service quality: p service departments showed no relationship with any of the perceived or expected dimension of service quality of hospitals. Conclusions Tertiary care hospitals failed to meet patients’ expectations in all major areas of service quality, posing a question of how hospitals implement and evaluate their quality assurance policy. PMID:28804582

  1. High Quality Nursing Care in Hyperemesis Gravidarum Patients%优质护理在妊娠剧吐患者中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄慧芳

    2014-01-01

    目的:为妊娠剧吐的患者提供优质护理服务。方法对我科80例妊娠剧吐患者实施优质护理。结果实施优质护理后,80例患者对护士服务的满意度明显高于平时,降低患者住院日。结论优质护理体现在我们平时的一言一行之中,此方法简单,方便,易于掌握,能明显提高患者满意度,从而提高护理质量。%Objectives To improve the quality of nursing care for patients with hyperemesis gravidarum. Methods To implement the high quality nursing care to the 80 cases of hyperemesis gravidarum patients in our department. Results Implementing of high quality nursing, satisfaction to nursing service in 80 patients was obviously higher than usual. Conclusion High quality nursing embodies in our every word and action, this method is simple, convenient, and it can significantly improve the satisfaction of patients, so as to improve the quality of nursing care.

  2. "Patient care in radiology"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro Brask, Kirsten; Birkelund, Regner

    2014-01-01

    and semistructured interviews and analyzed according to the guidelines for meaning condensation by Giorgi. The imaging staff found that care is expressed in an administrative, an instrumental, and a compassionate sense. The imaging staff perceived care in a way that clearly differs from the traditional perception...... of care understood as the close relations between people. In their self-understanding, the staff found that care not only comprised the relational aspect but also that it was already delivered during the preparatory phases before the actual meeting with the patient and up until the image...... was electronically forwarded. And, care expressed in between was perceived as care in the traditional sense and termed as “patient care in radiology.”...

  3. Effects of perceptions of care, medical advice, and hospital quality on patient satisfaction after primary total knee replacement: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Tom; Schoenfelder, Tonio; Klewer, Joerg; Kugler, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    The increase in the number of patients presenting with osteoarthritis in the past decade has led to a 32% increase in knee replacement surgeries designed to reduce restrictions on patient movement and improve their quality of life. Patient satisfaction is becoming an increasingly important indicator of quality of care. This study was designed to identify predictors of various service components in the treatment process and hospital key performance indicators significantly associated with patient satisfaction. A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted with 856 patients having their primary total knee replacements at 41 hospitals. Patient satisfaction was queried via a validated, multidimensional questionnaire mainly using a six-point scale. In addition to bivariate calculations, patient satisfaction was the dependent variable in a binary logistic regression model. The bivariate analysis showed a strong association between satisfaction and sex (male or female), the patients' health before admission, and the length of stay. The number of cases treated at each hospital did not reveal any impact on satisfaction. The multivariate analysis identified three predictors associated with overall satisfaction. The strongest factor was the treatment outcome and the weakest was the quality of food. It became apparent that the statutory procedure minimums were not being met. The relevant factors influencing patient satisfaction were partially the same as previous study results and allowed more detailed conclusions. The results provide suggestions across hospitals that could help health care providers better meet needs of patients after knee arthroplasties.

  4. Does a competitive voucher program for adolescents improve the quality of reproductive health care? A simulated patient study in Nicaragua.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwissen, L.E.; Gorter, A.C.; Kester, A.D.M.; Knottnerus, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Little is known about how sexual and reproductive (SRH) health can be made accessible and appropriate to adolescents. This study evaluates the impact and sustainability of a competitive voucher program on the quality of SRH care for poor and underserved female adolescents and the usefuln

  5. Does a competitive voucher program for adolescents improve the quality of reproductive health care? A simulated patient study in Nicaragua.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwissen, L.E.; Gorter, A.C.; Kester, A.D.M.; Knottnerus, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Little is known about how sexual and reproductive (SRH) health can be made accessible and appropriate to adolescents. This study evaluates the impact and sustainability of a competitive voucher program on the quality of SRH care for poor and underserved female adolescents and the usefuln

  6. Psychopathology, rehospitalization and quality of life among patients with schizophrenia under home care case management in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ren Chang

    2013-04-01

    Conclusion: Non-ICM can help to decrease rehospitalization of home care patients. HRQoL and functioning can be assessed by the three perspectives we used, and each measure was correlated to different dimensions of patient psychopathology. It will be better if we include baseline and post-intervention PANSS scores, HRQoL and functioning as outcome indicators.

  7. Ethnic differences in mortality, end-stage complications, and quality of care among diabetic patients: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Lanting (Loes); I.M.A. Joung (Inez); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); A.H. Bootsma (Aart)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To determine the influence of ethnic differences in diabetes care on inequalities in mortality and prevalence of end-stage complications among diabetic patients. The following questions were examined: 1) Are there ethnic differences among diabetic patients in

  8. Organizational relationships between nursing homes and hospitals and quality of care during hospital-nursing home patient transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boockvar, Kenneth S; Burack, Orah R

    2007-07-01

    To identify organizational factors and hospital and nursing home organizational relationships associated with more-effective processes of care during hospital-nursing home patient transfer. Mailed survey. Medicare- or Medicaid-certified nursing homes in New York State. Nursing home administrators, with input from other nursing home staff. Key predictor variables were travel time between the hospital and the nursing home, affiliation with the same health system, same corporate owner, trainees from the same institution, pharmacy or laboratory agreements, continuous physician care, number of beds in the hospital, teaching status, and frequency of geriatrics specialty care in the hospital. Key dependent variables were hospital-to-nursing home communication, continuous adherence to healthcare goals, and patient and family satisfaction with hospital care. Of 647 questionnaires sent, 229 were returned (35.4%). There was no relationship between hospital-nursing home interorganizational relationships and communication, healthcare goal adherence, and satisfaction measures. Geriatrics specialty care in the hospital (r=0.157; P=.04) and fewer hospital beds (r=-0.194; P=.01) were each associated with nursing homes more often receiving all information needed to care for patients transferred from the hospital. Teaching status (r=0.230; P=.001) and geriatrics specialty care (r=0.185; P=.01) were associated with hospital care more often consistent with healthcare goals established in the nursing home. No management-level organizational relationship between nursing home and hospital was associated with better hospital-to-nursing home transfer process of care. Geriatrics specialty care and characteristics of the hospital were associated with better hospital-to-nursing home transfer processes.

  9. Barriers and facilitators to evidence based care of type 2 diabetes patients: experiences of general practitioners participating to a quality improvement program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Karen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the barriers and facilitators to high-quality diabetes care as experienced by general practitioners (GPs who participated in an 18-month quality improvement program (QIP. This QIP was implemented to promote compliance with international guidelines. Methods Twenty out of the 120 participating GPs in the QIP underwent semi-structured interviews that focused on three questions: 'Which changes did you implement or did you observe in the quality of diabetes care during your participation in the QIP?' 'According to your experience, what induced these changes?' and 'What difficulties did you experience in making the changes?' Results Most GPs reported that enhanced knowledge, improved motivation, and a greater sense of responsibility were the key factors that led to greater compliance with diabetes care guidelines and consequent improvements in diabetes care. Other factors were improved communication with patients and consulting specialists and reliance on diabetes nurse educators. Some GPs were reluctant to collaborate with specialists, and especially with diabetes educators and dieticians. Others blamed poor compliance with the guidelines on lack of time. Most interviewees reported that a considerable minority of patients were unwilling to change their lifestyles. Conclusion Qualitative research nested in an experimental trial may clarify the improvements that a QIP may bring about in a general practice, provide insight into GPs' approach to diabetes care and reveal the program's limits. Implementation of a QIP encounters an array of cognitive, motivational, and relational obstacles that are embedded in a patient-healthcare provider relationship.

  10. The impact of perceived social support and sense of coherence on health-related quality of life in multimorbid primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Ines; Miksch, Antje; Goetz, Katja; Ose, Dominik; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Freund, Tobias

    2012-12-01

    This study explores the impact of perceived social support and sense of coherence as positive resources for health-related quality of life in multimorbid primary care patients. We analysed cross-sectional survey data on health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), perceived social support (FSozU-K22), sense of coherence (SOC-L9), social demographics and self reported morbidity of 103 multimorbid patients from 10 general practices in Germany. A multiple linear regression model was used to determine the impact of social support and sense of coherence on the health-related quality of life while controlling for age, sex, educational level, marital status and number of chronic conditions. In the final regression model, higher sense of coherence scores were associated with higher health-related quality of life scores (standardized ß 0.34, p life scores (standardized ß -0.41, p life scores (standardized ß 0.35, p sense of coherence which is a potential resource for improving health-related quality of life in multimorbid primary care patients. It emerged as a significant element contributing to the prediction of health-related quality of life. This issue may indicate the importance of internal resources for multimorbid patients.

  11. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  12. A pilot study exploring quality of life experienced by patients undergoing negative-pressure wound therapy as part of their wound care treatment compared to patients receiving standard wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousey, Karen J; Milne, Jeanette; Cook, Leanne; Stephenson, John; Gillibrand, Warren

    2014-08-01

    The use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been widely documented as a technique to help heal complex wounds. This article presents the findings of a preliminary study which aimed to explore quality of life (QoL) experienced by patients undergoing NPWT as part of their wound care treatment in comparison to that of patients with a wound using traditional (standard) wound care therapies. A quasi-experimental study was undertaken, with patients treated in wound care/vascular clinics with chronic/acute wounds. QoL impact was measured using the Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule and administered post-consent at timed intervals. Our results identified that there were no real differences in QoL scores recorded by patients over the 12-week period. Although there was no overall interaction between the therapies used for wound healing, NPWT did have an effect on social life: during the first 2 weeks of the application of therapy, patients in the NPWT group reported an increase in the social life domain. The authors conclude that true QoL can only be elicited if an accurate baseline is established or if data is collected over a long enough period to allow comparison of scores over time.

  13. The perspectives of Aboriginal patients and their health care providers on improving the quality of hemodialysis services: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Elizabeth F; Barclay, Lesley; Stirling, Janelle; Tong, Allison; Wilson, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease has a higher prevalence in Indigenous populations globally. The incidence of end-stage kidney disease in Australian Aboriginal people is eight times higher than non-Aboriginal Australians. Providing services to rural and remote Aboriginal people with chronic disease is challenging because of access and cultural differences. This study aims to describe and analyze the perspectives of Aboriginal patients' and health care providers' experience of renal services, to inform service improvement for rural Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. We conducted a thematic analysis of interviews with Aboriginal patients (n = 18) receiving hemodialysis in rural Australia and health care providers involved in their care (n = 29). An overarching theme of avoiding the "costly" crisis encompassed four subthemes: (1) Engaging patients earlier (prevent late diagnosis, slow disease progression); (2) flexible family-focused care (early engagement of family, flexibility to facilitate family and cultural obligations); (3) managing fear of mainstream services (originating in family dialysis experiences and previous racism when engaging with government organizations); (4) service provision shaped by culture (increased home dialysis, Aboriginal support and Aboriginal-led cultural education). Patients and health care providers believe service redesign is required to meet the needs of Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. Participants identified early screening and improving the relationship of Aboriginal people with health systems would reduce crisis entry to hemodialysis. These strategies alongside improving the cultural competence of staff would reduce patients' fear of mainstream services, decrease the current emotional and family costs of care, and increase efficiency of health expenditure on a challenging and increasingly unsustainable treatment system.

  14. Building capacity for quality and safety in critical care: A roundtable discussion from the second international patient safety conference in April 9-11, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaseen M Arabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the roundtable discussion from the Second International Patient Safety Conference held in April 9-11, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The objectives of the roundtable discussion were to: (1 review the conceptual framework for building capacity in quality and safety in critical care. (2 examine examples of leading international experiences in building capacity. (3 review the experience in Saudi Arabia in this area. (4 discuss the role of building capacity in simulation for patient safety in critical care and (5 review the experience in building capacity in an ongoing improvement project for severe sepsis and septic shock.

  15. Quality, Safety and Patient Centered Care--A Dream Come True in the Mountains of Northern Pakistan. An Award winning project of "2015 Quality, Safety & Patient Centered Care Award" at, Chicago USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassani, Kashif; Essani, Rozina Roshan; Abbas, Syed Nadeem Husain

    2016-01-01

    Northern Pakistan remains very challenging terrain due to harsh weather all year round presenting an infrastructura, human resource and supply chain challenge of its own. Many times the facility had to move to different locations on emergency and ad hoc basis due to landslides, earthquakes affecting continuity of care. Providing quality healthcare to often resource constraint hard-to-reach areas has always been AKHS,P's unique forte. Breaking barriers for catchment population to access quality healthcare, AKHS,P embarked on an initiative of implementing, achieving and sustaining ISO 9001:2008 Quality Management System international standards certification. This article shares the unique experience of AKHS,P in achieving and sustaining ISO 9001:2008 International Quality Management System Certification. After untiring efforts and the hard work of ground staff; AKHS,P achieved ISO 9001:2008 International Quality Management System Certification as well as 1st Surveillance Audit which itself proved that AKHS,P sustained quality systems and ensured continuous quality improvement in the Mountains of Northern Pakistan.

  16. Evaluating the Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation Care Plan on Quality of Life of Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Zahra Masoumi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular surgeries are among the conventional surgeries aimed at increasing the survival rate and improving the quality of life of patients. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of cardiac rehabilitation on quality of life of patients undergoing Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery.Methods: This was a semi-experimental study performed on 160 patients undergoing CABG surgery. The rehabilitation program was carried out for 13 weeks (three sessions per week in 40 sessions, six weeks after the CABG surgery. The MacNew standard questionnaire and the general health questionnaire (S-f 36 were completed before the beginning of rehabilitation sessions as well as after completion of these sessions by patients.Results: According to the results, the quality of life of patients significantly increased in the physical and emotional areas after the rehabilitation program. The results also indicated that there was a significant difference between various levels of research in the physical functioning variables, dysfunction due to physical health, dysfunction due to emotional health, energy/fatigue of individuals, emotional well-being, social functioning, pain, and general health.Conclusions: The present results indicated the improved quality of life of patients in all the areas after cardiac rehabilitation intervention, compared to before that. Therefore, paying more attention to cardiac rehabilitation is necessary due to its positive effects on increasing the quality of life of patients.

  17. Quality Care Applications in Elderly Patients with Orthopedic%优质护理在骨科老年患者中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石淑兰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the quality care in elderly patients with orthopedic clinical ef ect applied to improve the standard of care for the elderly orthopedic patients. Methods January 2011-2013 in May in our hospital 86 cases of elderly orthopedic patients were randomly divided into observation group and control group, 43 cases in the control group of patients for routine care, observe patients for quality care, compared two groups of patients the incidence of accidental injuries and nursing complaint rate. Results The incidence of patients with accidental injuries and care complaint rate was significantly lower than the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion In elderly patients with a high quality of orthopedic care to the greatest degree of reduction of elderly patients with orthopedic injury accident incidence and care complaint rate, and enhance patient satisfaction with care.%目的观察优质护理在老年骨科患者中应用的临床效果,以提高对老年骨科患者护理水平。方法选取2011年01月-2013年05月我院收治的86例老年人骨科患者,随机分为观察组和对照组各43例,对照组患者进行常规护理,观察组患者进行优质护理,对比两组患者的意外伤发生率及护理投诉率。结果观察组患者意外伤发生率和护理投诉率明显低于对照组(P<0.05)。结论在老年骨科患者中实施优质护理服务能最大程度的减少老年骨科患者意外伤发生率及护理投诉率,增强患者对护理服务的满意程度。

  18. Effects of skin care and makeup under instructions from dermatologists on the quality of life of female patients with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoshie; Yoneda, Kozo; Sadahira, Chieko; Katsuura, Junko; Moriue, Tetsuya; Kubota, Yasuo

    2006-11-01

    Acne vulgaris significantly affects patients' quality of life (QOL) and their lives in various ways, including social behavior and body dissatisfaction. This may be heightened by acne's typical involvement of the face. We investigated whether the use of skin care and makeup could influence the QOL of affected patients without deteriorating conventional acne treatments. Fifty female patients with acne were recruited for our study. Twenty-five patients were instructed how to use skin care and cosmetics, while 25 patients received no specific instructions from dermatologists. Both groups received conventional topical and/or oral medication for acne during the study period for 4 weeks. Both groups did not show any significant difference in clinical improvement of acne severity. Two validated QOL questionnaires, World Health Organization (WHO)QOL26 and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) were administered to all patients at first visit and 4 weeks later. The mean scores of psychological and overall domains in WHOQOL26 for patients with instructions were improved significantly, while only the overall score was significantly improved for patients without instructions. The total mean scores and all domains except work/school in DLQI for patients with instructions were improved significantly, while the total scores and all domains except discomfort for treatment in DLQI were significantly improved for patients without instructions. Thus, instructions on the use of skin care and cosmetics for female acne patients did not deteriorate acne treatment and influenced patients' QOL effectively. We therefore suggest that instructions for using skin care and cosmetics complement conventional medical treatments for acne.

  19. Development of an instrument to measure patient perception of the quality of nursing care and related hospital services at the national hospital of sri lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senarat, Upul; Gunawardena, Nalika S

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate an instrument to measure patient perception of quality of nursing care and related hospital services in a tertiary care setting. We compiled an instrument with 72 items that patients may perceive as quality of nursing care and related hospital services, following an extensive literature search, discussions with patients and care pro-I viders and a brainstorming session with an expert panel. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the National Hospital of Sri Lanka. A sample (n = 120) of patients stayed in general surgical or medical units responded to the interviewer administered instrument upon discharge. Item analysis and principal component factor analysis were performed to assess validity, and internal consistency was calculated to measure reliability. Of the 72 items, 18 had greater than 20% of responses as 'not relevant'. A further 11 items were eliminated since item-total correlations were less than .2. Factor analysis was performed on remaining 43 items which resulted in 36 items classifying into eight factors accounting for 71% of the variation. Factor loadings in the final solution after Varimax rotation were interpersonal aspects (.68-.85), efficiency (.62-.79), competency (.66-.68), comfort (.60-.84), physical environment (.65-.82), cleanliness (.81-.85), personalized information (.76-.83), and general instructions (.61-.78). The instrument had high Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .91). We developed a comprehensive, reliable and valid, 36-item instrument that may be used to measure patient perception of quality of nursing care in tertiary care settings. Copyright © 2011 Korean Society of Nursing Science. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of a stroke-specific follow-up care model on the quality of life of stroke patients and caregivers: A controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fens, Manon; van Heugten, Caroline M; Beusmans, George; Metsemakers, Job; Kester, Arnold; Limburg, Martien

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a stroke-specific follow-up care model on quality of life for stroke patients, being discharged home, and their caregivers. A non-randomized, controlled trial, comparing an intervention group with a control group (usual care). Stroke patients and their caregivers. Intervention involved 5 home visits by a stroke care coordinator over a period of 18 months, using a structured assessment tool. Outcome measures were conducted at baseline (T0) and every 6 months thereafter (T6, T12 and T18) in the domains of quality of life (primary), activities of daily living, social activities, depression, anxiety and caregiver strain. The intervention group (n = 62) had significantly increased its social activities after 18 months, whereas the control group (n = 55) showed significantly decreased levels of social activities. In the first 6 months, levels of depression decreased significantly in caregivers of the intervention group. No differences were found for quality of life and the other outcome measures. The intervention was not effective in improving quality of life, but was effective in improving levels of social activities. The intervention may have focussed too much on screening for stroke-related problems and not as much on adequate follow-up care and referral.

  1. Older patients with acute stroke in Denmark: quality of care and short-term mortality. A nationwide follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palnum, K.D.; Sorensen, H.T.; Ingeman, A.;

    2008-01-01

    care across age groups, as measured by admission to a specialised stroke unit, administration of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, examination with CT/MR scan, assessment by a physiotherapist and an occupational therapist, or assessment of nutritional risk. Further, we estimated 30- and 90-day......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: age may predict level of care and subsequent outcome among patients with stroke. We examined fulfilment of quality-of-care criteria according to age and the possible impact of any age-related differences on short-term mortality in a population-based nationwide follow......-up study in Denmark. METHODS: we identified 29,549 patients admitted with stroke between January 2003 and October 2005 in the Danish National Indicator Project (DNIP). Data on 30- and 90-day mortality were obtained from the Civil Registration System. We compared proportions of patients receiving adequate...

  2. Patient safety, satisfaction, and quality of hospital care: cross sectional surveys of nurses and patients in 12 countries in Europe and the United States.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aiken, L.H.; Sermeus, W.; Heede, K. Van den; Sloane, D.M.; Busse, R.; McKee, M.; Bruyneel, L.; Rafferty, A.M.; Griffiths, P.; Moreno-Casbas, M.T.; Tishelman, C.; Scott, A.; Brzostek, T.; Kinnunen, J.; Schwendimann, R.; Heinen, M.M.; Zikos, D.; Sjetne, I.S.; Smith, H.L.; Kutney-Lee, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether hospitals with a good organisation of care (such as improved nurse staffing and work environments) can affect patient care and nurse workforce stability in European countries. DESIGN: Cross sectional surveys of patients and nurses. SETTING: Nurses were surveyed in

  3. Patient safety, satisfaction, and quality of hospital care: cross sectional surveys of nurses and patients in 12 countries in Europe and the United States.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aiken, L.H.; Sermeus, W.; Heede, K. Van den; Sloane, D.M.; Busse, R.; McKee, M.; Bruyneel, L.; Rafferty, A.M.; Griffiths, P.; Moreno-Casbas, M.T.; Tishelman, C.; Scott, A.; Brzostek, T.; Kinnunen, J.; Schwendimann, R.; Heinen, M.M.; Zikos, D.; Sjetne, I.S.; Smith, H.L.; Kutney-Lee, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether hospitals with a good organisation of care (such as improved nurse staffing and work environments) can affect patient care and nurse workforce stability in European countries. DESIGN: Cross sectional surveys of patients and nurses. SETTING: Nurses were surveyed in gen

  4. [European Union Network for Patient Safety and Quality of Care (PASQ). Development and preliminary results in Europe and in the Spanish National Health System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agra-Varela, Y; Fernández-Maíllo, M; Rivera-Ariza, S; Sáiz-Martínez-Acitorez, I; Casal-Gómez, J; Palanca-Sánchez, I; Bacou, J

    2015-01-01

    The joint action, European Union Network for Patient Safety and Quality of Care: PaSQ, aims to promote patient safety (PS) in the European Union (EU) and to facilitate the exchange of experiences among Member States (MS) and stakeholders on issues related to quality of care, PS, and patient involvement. The development and preliminary results are presented here, especially as regards the Spanish National Health System (SNHS). PaSQ is developed through 7 work packages, primarily aimed at sharing good practices (GP), which were identified using specific questionnaires and selected by means of explicit criteria, as well as to implement safe clinical practices (SCP) of proven effectiveness and agreed among MS. A total of 482 GP (39% provided by Spanish professionals) were identified. The 34 events organised in the EU, 11 including Spanish participation, facilitate sharing these practices. A total of 194 Health Care centres (49% in Spain) are implementing SCP (hand hygiene, safe surgery, medication reconciliation, and paediatric early warning scores) ACHIEVEMENTS AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES: PaSQ is making it possible to strengthen collaboration between organizations and professionals at EU and SNHS level regarding PS and quality of care. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. The beginning of the journey to study patient safety and care quality in hospital settings using inpatient falls as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huey-Ming Tzeng

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to share with readers the beginning of my journey to study patient safety and care quality in hospital settings with a focus on inpatient falls. Studying patient safety and care quality can be overwhelming because of the breadth and depth of this subject and the many gaps that must be addressed to move nursing science forward. I used a graphic method, concept mapping, to capture my research journey. Data sources used in my program specific to inpatient falls for adults in hospital inpatient care include: (1) publicly available datasets; (2) published legal cases; (3) archived hospital data; (4) surveys; and (5)interviews, focus groups, observation, and field studies. I have summarized a series of my studies related to the relationship between nursing staff's response time to call lights and the prevalence or occurrence of inpatient falls in acute hospital settings. Thesestudies illustrate the development of a line of research on inpatient falls. Finally, I discuss the pivotal points in pursuing this research and scholarship. To sustain the persistence and resilience on this journey requires passion for the subjects of patient safety and care quality.

  6. "Patient care in radiology"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro Brask, Kirsten; Birkelund, Regner

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to research how the staff experience care expressed during the brief encounter with the patients in a diagnostic imaging department. This was a qualitative study with a phenomenological and hermeneutical frame of reference. The data were collected using field observations...... and semistructured interviews and analyzed according to the guidelines for meaning condensation by Giorgi. The imaging staff found that care is expressed in an administrative, an instrumental, and a compassionate sense. The imaging staff perceived care in a way that clearly differs from the traditional perception...... of care understood as the close relations between people. In their self-understanding, the staff found that care not only comprised the relational aspect but also that it was already delivered during the preparatory phases before the actual meeting with the patient and up until the image...

  7. Nurse Level of Education, Quality of Care and Patient Safety in the Medical and Surgical Wards in Malaysian Private Hospitals: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Hamzah; Jarrar, Mu'taman; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-04-23

    Nursing knowledge and skills are required to sustain quality of care and patient safety. The numbers of nurses with Bachelor degrees in Malaysia are very limited. This study aims to predict the impact of nurse level of education on quality of care and patient safety in the medical and surgical wards in Malaysian private hospitals. A cross-sectional survey by questionnaire was conducted. A total 652 nurses working in the medical and surgical wards in 12 private hospitals were participated in the study. Multistage stratified simple random sampling performed to invite nurses working in small size (less than 100 beds), medium size (100-199 beds) and large size (over than 200) hospitals to participate in the study. This allowed nurses from all shifts to participate in this study. Nurses with higher education were not significantly associated with both quality of care and patient safety. However, a total 355 (60.9%) of respondents participated in this study were working in teaching hospitals. Teaching hospitals offer training for all newly appointed staff. They also provide general orientation programs and training to outline the policies, procedures of the nurses' roles and responsibilities. This made the variances between the Bachelor and Diploma nurses not significantly associated with the outcomes of care. Nursing educational level was not associated with the outcomes of care in Malaysian private hospitals. However, training programs and the general nursing orientation programs for nurses in Malaysia can help to upgrade the Diploma-level nurses. Training programs can increase their self confidence, knowledge, critical thinking ability and improve their interpersonal skills. So, it can be concluded that better education and training for a medical and surgical wards' nurses is required for satisfying client expectations and sustaining the outcomes of patient care.

  8. Computerized extraction of information on the quality of diabetes care from free text in electronic patient records of general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorham, Jaco; Denig, Petra

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated a computerized method for extracting numeric clinical measurements related to diabetes care from free text in electronic patient records (EPR) of general practitioners. Design and Measurements: Accuracy of this number-oriented approach was compared to manual chart

  9. Health-related quality of life and health care use in cancer survivors compared with patients with chronic diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Korevaar, J.C.; Hopman, E.P.C.; Donker, G.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; Rijken, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of cancer survivors is steadily increasing and these patients often experience long-lasting health problems. To make care for cancer survivors sustainable for the future, it would be relevant to put the effects of cancer in this phase into perspective. Therefore, the authors c

  10. Computerized extraction of information on the quality of diabetes care from free text in electronic patient records of general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorham, Jaco; Denig, Petra

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated a computerized method for extracting numeric clinical measurements related to diabetes care from free text in electronic patient records (EPR) of general practitioners. Design and Measurements: Accuracy of this number-oriented approach was compared to manual chart abs

  11. Variations in the quality and costs of end-of-life care, preferences and palliative outcomes for cancer patients by place of death: the QUALYCARE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koffman Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emerging trends and new policies suggest that more cancer patients might die at home in the future. However, not all have equal chances of achieving this. Furthermore, there is lack of evidence to support that those who die at home experience better care and a better death than those who die as inpatients. The QUALYCARE study aims to examine variations in the quality and costs of end-of-life care, preferences and palliative outcomes associated with dying at home or in an institution for cancer patients. Methods/Design Mortality followback survey (with a nested case-control study of home vs. hospital deaths conducted with bereaved relatives of cancer patients in four Primary Care Trusts in London. Potential participants are identified from death registrations and approached by the Office for National Statistics in complete confidence. Data are collected via a postal questionnaire to identify the informal and formal care received in the three months before death and the associated costs, relatives' satisfaction with care, and palliative outcomes for the patients and their relatives. A well-established questionnaire to measure relatives' views on the care integrates four brief and robust tools - the Client Service Receipt Inventory, the Palliative Outcome Scale, the EQ-5 D and the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief. Further questions assess patients and relatives' preferences for place of death. The survey aims to include 500 bereaved relatives (140 who experienced a home death, 205 a hospital death, 115 a hospice death and 40 a nursing home death. Bivariate and multivariate analyses will explore differences in place of death and place of end-of-life care, in preferences for place of death, patients' palliative outcomes and relatives' bereavement outcomes, in relation to place of death. Factors influencing death at home and the costs of end-of-life care by place of death will be identified. Discussion Collecting data on end

  12. Commentary: "Who was caring for Mary?" revisited: a call for all academic physicians caring for patients to focus on systems and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, Frederick S; Spear, Steven J

    2009-12-01

    Over 15 years have passed since Mary's near death (Annals of Internal Medicine. 1993;118:146-148). Disappointment in the care by fellow academic physicians persists; however, a reanalysis of her case through the lens of complex systems design and performance yields a more accurate and actionable perspective. Mary's suffering was not due to human failure alone. Human failure was provoked and exacerbated by broken processes including ambiguous assignments of responsibility; inadequate transfers of information and authority; unreliable or unavailable protocols for providing safe, effective treatment; and a failure to integrate the deep but narrow perspectives of individual specialists into a complete picture of Mary's condition. Her case exemplifies, in personal terms, many of the system challenges academic medical centers face: Faculty have other missions that can conflict with patient care; disease complexity is high, requiring input from multiple subspecialists; clinical departments serve as roadblocks to communication; and novice physicians, requiring close supervision, have primary responsibility for the day-to-day care of acutely ill patients. The academic physicians who first cared for Mary unwittingly accepted flawed systems, and they failed to work around them. At great monetary and emotional expense, last-minute heroics saved Mary. In a dysfunctional system, even the most conscientious physician may be viewed as uncaring. As Mary's case so clearly illustrates, patients and their families see the system and the physician as one. Only by working to improve the systems of delivery will academic physicians again be consistently viewed as caring.

  13. Patient beliefs about medicines and quality of life after a clinical medication review and follow-up by a pharmaceutical care plan: A study in elderly polypharmacy patients with a cardiovascular disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Marlies M.E.; Stewart, Roy E.; Brouwers, Jacobus R.B.J.; de Graeff, Pieter A.; de Gier, Johan J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of a clinical medication review, followed up by a pharmaceutical care plan, on the beliefs about medicines and quality of life (QoL) of older patients with polypharmacy and a cardiovascular disorder. Methods: Patients were randomly assigned to an intervention or

  14. Prevalence of the use of antihypertensive medications in Greenland: a study of quality of care amongst patients treated with antihypertensive drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, M.; Jarbol, D. E.; Paulsen, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    indicators in antihypertensive care. Study design. Observational and cross-sectional study reviewing electronic medical records. Methods. Information about age and gender was collected from all patients receiving antihypertensive drug prescriptions within a 2-year period prior to the data extraction...... aged 20 or above born within the first 5 days of each month was identified. Review of electronic medical records 1 year back in time (1 January 2010 onwards) was carried out and information on blood pressure obtained. The quality of care was evaluated with respect to 2 indicators: follow-up management......Objectives. The primary objective was to estimate the prevalence of patients diagnosed with hypertension using the proxy marker of antihypertensive drug therapy in Greenland and to compare the prevalences within the 5 health regions in Greenland. The second objective was to review 2 quality...

  15. Social media: opportunities for quality improvement and lessons for providers-a networked model for patient-centered care through digital engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornkessel, Alexandra; Furberg, Robert; Lefebvre, R Craig

    2014-07-01

    Social media brings a new dimension to health care for patients, providers, and their support networks. Increasing evidence demonstrates that patients who are more actively involved in their healthcare experience have better health outcomes and incur lower costs. In the field of cardiology, social media are proposed as innovative tools for the education and update of clinicians, physicians, nurses, and medical students. This article reviews the use of social media by healthcare providers and patients and proposes a model of "networked care" that integrates the use of digital social networks and platforms by both patients and providers and offers recommendations for providers to optimize their use and understanding of social media for quality improvement.

  16. How can we improve outcomes for patients and families under palliative care? implementing clinical audit for quality improvement in resource limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Selman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care in India has made enormous advances in providing better care for patients and families living with progressive disease, and many clinical services are well placed to begin quality improvement initiatives, including clinical audit. Clinical audit is recognized globally to be essential in all healthcare, as a way of monitoring and improving quality of care. However, it is not common in developing country settings, including India. Clinical audit is a cyclical activity involving: identification of areas of care in need of improvement, through data collection and analysis utilizing an appropriate questionnaire; setting measurable quality of care targets in specific areas; designing and implementing service improvement strategies; and then re-evaluating quality of care to assess progress towards meeting the targets. Outcome measurement is an important component of clinical audit that has additional advantages; for example, establishing an evidence base for the effectiveness of services. In resource limited contexts, outcome measurement in clinical audit is particularly important as it enables service development to be evidence-based and ensures resources are allocated effectively. Key success factors in conducting clinical audit are identified (shared ownership, training, managerial support, inclusion of all members of staff and a positive approach. The choice of outcome measurement tool is discussed, including the need for a culturally appropriate and validated measure which is brief and simple enough to incorporate into clinical practice and reflects the holistic nature of palliative care. Support for clinical audit is needed at a national level, and development and validation of an outcome measurement tool in the Indian context is a crucial next step.

  17. Development and feasibility of a set of quality indicators relative to the timeliness and organisation of care for new breast cancer patients undergoing surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrua Marie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because breast cancer is a major public health issue, it is particularly important to measure the quality of the care provided to patients. Survival rates are affected by the timeliness of care, and waiting times constitute key quality criteria. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a set of quality indicators (QIs relative to the timeliness and organisation of care in new patients with infiltrating, non-inflammatory and metastasis-free breast cancer undergoing surgery. The ultimate aim was to use these QIs to compare hospitals. Methods The method of QI construction and testing was developed by COMPAQ-HPST. We first derived a set of 8 QIs from consensus guidelines with the aid of experts and professional associations and then tested their metrological properties in a panel of 60 volunteer hospitals. We assessed feasibility using a grid exploring 5 dimensions, discriminatory power using the Gini coefficient as a measure of dispersion, and inter-observer reliability using the Kappa coefficient. Results Overall, 3728 records were included in the analyses. All 8 QIs showed acceptable feasibility (but one QI was subject to misinterpretation, fairly strong agreement between observers (Kappa = 0.66, and wide variations in implementation among hospitals (Gini coefficient  Conclusions Of the 8 QIs, 3 are ready for nationwide implementation (time to surgery, time to postoperative multidisciplinary team meeting (MDTM, conformity of MDTM. Four are suitable for use only in hospitals offering surgery with on-site postoperative treatment (waiting time to first appointment after surgery, patient information, time to first postoperative treatment, and traceability of information relating to prognosis. Currently, in the French healthcare system, a patient receives cancer care from different institutions whose databases cannot as yet be easily merged. Nationwide implementation of QIs covering the entire care pathway will thus

  18. Prevalence of Undiagnosed Diabetes and Quality of Care in Diabetic Patients Followed at Primary and Tertiary Clinics in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadi, Hussein; Al-Kaabi, Jumaa; Benbarka, Mahmoud; Khalili, Ali; Almahmeed, Wael; Nagelkerke, Nicolaas; Abdel-Wareth, Laila; Al Essa, Awad; Yasin, Javed; Al-Dabbagh, Bayan; Kazam, Elsadig

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the prevalence of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D) at primary health care (PHC) clinics, and to assess the quality of care of diabetic patients followed at a tertiary hospital diabetes center in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE). METHODS: Between May 2009 and October 2010, adult patients attending two PHC clinics, and adult diabetic patients attending the diabetes center, were invited to participate in the study. After overnight fast, participants returned for interview and laboratory tests. Undiagnosed T2D was defined by FPG ≥ 7.0 mmol/l or HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. Quality of care was assessed by reported care practices and achievement of internationally recognized targets. RESULTS: Out of 239 patients at PHC clinics without history of T2D, 14.6% had undiagnosed T2D, and 31% had increased risk of diabetes (FPG 5.6-7.0 mmol/l or HbA1c 5.7-6.5%). The independent predictors of undiagnosed T2D were age (adjusted OR per year 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.11, p < 0.001) and BMI ≥ 25 (adjusted OR 4.2, 95% CI 0.91-19.7, p = 0.033). Amongst all 275 diagnosed T2D patients, including those attending PHC clinics and those followed at the diabetes center, it was found that 40.1% followed dietary recommendations, 12% reported visiting a diabetes educator, 28.2% walked for exercise, and 13.5% attained recognized targets of HbA1c < 7%, blood pressure < 130/80 mmHg, and LDL cholesterol < 2.6 mmol/l. CONCLUSIONS: Almost half of the adult patients attending PHC clinics had undiagnosed T2D, or increased diabetes risk. Care practices, and achievement of treatment targets, were suboptimal. PMID:21713317

  19. The disease management program for type 2 diabetes in Germany enhances process quality of diabetes care - a follow-up survey of patient's experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Bussche Hendrik

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In summer 2003 a disease management program (DMP for type 2 diabetes was introduced on a nationwide basis in Germany. Patient participation and continuity of care within the DMP are important factors to achieve long-term improvements in clinical endpoints. Therefore it is of interest, if patients experience any positive or negative effects of the DMP on their treatment that would support or hamper further participation. The main objective of the study was to find out if the German Disease Management Program (DMP for type 2 diabetes improves process and outcome quality of medical care for patients in the light of their subjective experiences over a period of one year. Methods Cohort study with a baseline interview and a follow-up after 10.4 ± 0.64 months. Data on process and outcome measures were collected by telephone interviews with 444 patients enrolled and 494 patients not enrolled in the German DMP for type 2 diabetes. Data were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results DMP enrolment was significantly associated with a higher process quality of care. At baseline enrolled patients more often reported that they had attended a diabetes education course (OR = 3.4, have ≥ 4 contacts/year with the attending physician (OR = 3.3, have at least one annual foot examination (OR = 3.1 and one referral to an ophthalmologist (OR = 3.4 and possess a diabetes passport (OR = 2.4. Except for the annual referral to an ophthalmologist these parameters were also statistically significant at follow-up. In contrast, no differences between enrolled and not enrolled patients were found concerning outcome quality indicators, e.g. self-rated health, Glycated hemoglobin (GHb and blood pressure. However, 16-36% of the DMP participants reported improvements of body weight and/or GHb and/or blood pressure values due to enrolment - unchanged within one year of follow-up. Conclusions In the light of patient's experiences the DMP

  20. The effect of a complementary e-learning course on implementation of a quality improvement project regarding care for elderly patients: a stepped wedge trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van de Steeg Lotte

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delirium occurs frequently in elderly hospitalised patients and is associated with higher mortality, increased length of hospital stay, functional decline, and admission to long-term care. Healthcare professionals frequently do not recognise delirium, indicating that education can play an important role in improving delirium care for hospitalised elderly. Previous studies have indicated that e-learning can provide an effective way of educating healthcare professionals and improving quality of care, though results are inconsistent. Methods and design This stepped wedge cluster randomised trial will assess the effects of a complementary delirium e-learning course on the implementation of quality improvement initiative, which aims to enhance the recognition and management of delirium in elderly patients. The trial will be conducted in 18 Dutch hospitals and last 11 months. Measurements will be taken in all participating wards using monthly record reviews, in order to monitor delivered care. These measurements will include the percentage of elderly patients who were screened for the risk of developing delirium, use of the Delirium Observation Screening scale, use of nursing or medical interventions, and the percentage of elderly patients who were diagnosed with delirium. Data regarding the e-learning course will be gathered as well. These data will include user characteristics, information regarding use of the course, delirium knowledge before and after using the course, and the attitude and intentions of nurses concerning delirium care. Setting The study will be conducted in internal medicine and surgical wards of eighteen hospitals that are at the beginning stages of implementing the Frail Elderly Project in the Netherlands. Discussion Better recognition of elderly patients at risk for delirium and subsequent care is expected from the introduction of an e-learning course for nurses that is complementary to an existing quality

  1. How Do Patients Perceive and Expect Quality of Surgery, Diagnostics, and Emergency Services in Tertiary Care Hospitals? An Evidence of Gap Analysis From Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iram Fatima

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Service quality is one of the important gears to appraise services and determine the gray areas that need improvement. In countries with a resource-poor health system, the first step of measuring quality is yet to be taken. This study seeks to inform policy makers in developing contextual service quality models by identifying service quality gaps in tertiary care teaching hospitals using patients’ perspective. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed using multistage cluster sampling, and a modified version of the SERVQUAL (SERV-service, QUAL-quality instrument was administered to determine patient’s expectations and perceptions. A total of 817 completed questionnaires were obtained from patients and/or their attendants using convenience sampling. Results: Data analysis revealed statistically significant negative quality gaps between expectations and perceptions of tangibility, reliability, empathy, assurance, responsiveness, and communication. The difference in mean expectation and perception for responsiveness across the sexes was significant (p < 0.003; p < 0.037, respectively as well as in perception of communication (p < 0.026. Other dimensions and overall hospital expected and perceived quality were independent of sex. Educational status showed significant difference in expectation and perception in responsiveness (p < 0.005, but the perception of each dimension was significantly different in different educational categories (assurance: p < 0.001; empathy: p < 0.001; reliability: p < 0.001; tangibility: p < 0.001; responsiveness: p < 0.001; communication: p < 0.001; and for overall service quality: p < 0.001. Age and service departments showed no relationship with any of the perceived or expected dimension of service quality of hospitals. Conclusions: Tertiary care hospitals failed to meet patients’ expectations in all major areas of service quality, posing a question of how hospitals implement and evaluate their

  2. Effective multidisciplinary working: the key to high-quality care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoro, Samuel

    This article explores multidisciplinary team working, inter-disciplinary, trans-disciplinary and effective collaborative practice in order to provide high-quality patient care. It discusses different views on collaboration, some of the issues around cross-discipline and multi-agency working and concerns around promoting 'high-quality' care. It also discusses the importance of evidence-based practice in multidisciplinary teams. Issues around good-quality care, clinical governance and the audit cycle in MDTs are addressed. The article highlights the importance of the 6Cs (care, compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment) in MDTs if quality care is to be achieved. The article also explores advantages and limitations of multidisciplinary team working, trans-disciplinary working and inter-professional working in developing and delivering high-quality patient-centred care. Further research is needed on how clinical audits can help to improve how MDTs function in order improve the quality of service provided to clients.

  3. Smoking and its associations with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hou, Cai-Lan; Ma, Xin-Rong; Zang, Yu; Jia, Fu-Jun; Zhong, Bao-Liang; Lin, Yong-Qiang; Chiu, Helen F K; Ungvari, Gabor S; Himelhoch, Seth; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Cai, Mei-Ying; Lai, Kelly Y C; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance treatment for clinically stable patients with schizophrenia is usually provided by Chinese primary care physicians, but no study has investigated smoking rates in this population. This study investigated the rate of smoking and its associations with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and quality of life (QOL) in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China. This was a cross-sectional, community-based survey. A total of 621 schizophrenia patients were recruited from 22 primary care services in Guangzhou, China, in 2013. Patients' sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, smoking status, and QOL were recorded. The frequency of current smoking was 23.8% in the whole sample; 41.5% for men and 2.5% for women. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that male gender, married status, alcohol use, older age at onset, fewer major medical conditions, lower education level and more hospitalizations were independently associated with current smoking. The frequency of smoking in Chinese schizophrenia patients treated by primary care physicians is lower than most figures reported from Western and Chinese psychiatric settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quality Care Application in Bleeding Patients%优质护理服务在胃出血患者中的应用效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋静芬

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the implementation of quality care in bleeding patients.Methods84 patients were randomly assigned into the control group(usual care),the observation group(quality care),compared to the therapeutic effect and nursing satisfaction.ResultsThe effective rate was 95.24%,higher than the 83.33 percent,observation group care satisfaction 97.62%,higher than the 76.19 percent,compared to a significant difference(P<0.05).Conclusion The quality of care for patients with bleeding effect is significant,high promotional value.%目的:探讨优质护理在胃出血患者中的实施效果。方法选取患者84例,按随机数字表法分为对照组(常规护理)、观察组(优质护理),对比治疗效果及护理满意度。结果观察组治疗有效率为95.24%,高于对照组的83.33%;观察组护理满意度为97.62%,高于对照组的76.19%,对比差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论优质护理用于胃出血患者中的效果显著。

  5. Novel approach to evaluation of medical care quality delivered to patients with ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome: course to clinical result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posnenkova О.М.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to implement system analysis of clinical cases for development of healthcare quality indicators for STe-ACS patients, aimed at achievement of clinical result — decrease of in-hospital mortality. Mathehal and Methods. National recommendations on diagnostic and treatment of patients with myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation on ECG (2007 were used to determine clinical result of treatment and key measures of medical care. To reveal major causes of clinical result non-achievement fishbone diagram was used. Results. Early reperfusion and optimal medical therapy were determined as the key measures of medical care delivered to patients with STe-ACS. The following indicators were developed to control these measures: «Primary reperfusion», «Thrombolysis in 30 minutes», «Primary percutaneous coronary intervention in 90 minutes», «Dual antiplatelet therapy in hospital», «Beta-blockers administration», «ACE-is/ARBs administration». The major causes of in-hospital mortality were separated. Indicators for assessment the major causes of clinical result non-achievement were proposed. Principal stages of performance measures creation were posed. Conclusion. Recommendation-based and clear definition of clinical result of treatment and key measures of the result achievement combined with methods of systems analysis allows development of evidence-based measures for assessment the quality of care delivered to patients with STe-ACS.

  6. Effect of Self-care Ability of Patients and the Quality of Nursing Care of PICC Standard%PICC标准护理对置管患者自护能力和护理质量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈慧

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the standard of care for PICC catheter in patients with self-care ability and quality of care.Methods From January 2014 to December 2014 in our hospital treated 80 patients with PICC, patients were randomly divided into two groups and the control group 40 cases. Implementation of routine care of patients in the control group, the observation group PICC standard of care for patients, two groups of patients self-care ability and quality of care were analyzed.Results From the results of this survey, the observation group was higher in patients self-care ability, the complication rate is lower than the control group, a statistically significant difference between groups (P<0.05).Conclusion PICC catheter can improve the standard of care of patients with self-care capacity, reduce the incidence of complications, improve patient prognosis.%目的:探讨PICC标准护理对置管患者自护能力和护理质量的影响。方法选取2014年1月~2014年12月我院接受治疗的PICC置管患者80例,将患者随机分为观察组与对照组,每组40例。对照组患者实施常规护理,观察组患者实施PICC标准护理,对两组患者自护能力与护理质量进行分析。结果由本次调查结果可知,观察组患者自护能力高于对照组,并发症发生率低于对照组,组间比较差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论 PICC标准护理可提高置管患者的自护能力,降低并发症发生率,改善患者预后。

  7. [Quality of initial trauma care in paediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez Pradas, Vicente; Pérez Montejano, Rut

    2017-04-18

    Trauma care in Spain is not provided in specific centres, which means that health professionals have limited contact to trauma patients. After the setting up of a training program in paediatric trauma, the aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of the initial care provided to these patients before they were admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of a third level hospital (trauma centre), as an indirect measurement of the increase in the number of health professionals trained in trauma. Two cohorts of PICU admissions were reviewed, the first one during the four years immediately before the training courses started (Group 1, period 2001-2004), and the second one during the 4 years (Group 2, period 2012-2015) after nearly 500 professionals were trained. A record was made of the injury mechanism, attending professional, Glasgow coma score (GCS), and paediatric trauma score (PTS). Initial care quality was assessed using five indicators: use of cervical collar, vascular access, orotracheal intubation if GCS ≤ 8, gastric decompression if PTS≤8, and number of actions carried out from the initial four recommended (neck control, provide oxygen, get vascular access, provide IV fluids). Compliance was compared between the 2 periods. A P<.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 218 patient records were analysed, 105 in Group 1, and 113 in Group 2. The groups showed differences both in injury mechanism and in initial care team. A shift in injury mechanism pattern was observed, with a decrease in car accidents (28% vs 6%; P<.0001). Patients attended to in low complexity hospitals increased from 29.4% to 51.9% (P=.008), and their severity decreased when assessed using the GCS ≤ 8 (29.8% vs 13.5%; P=.004), or PTS≤8 (48.5% vs 29.7%; P=.005). As regards quality indicators, only the use of neck collar improved its compliance (17.3% to 32.7%; P=.01). Patients who received no action in the initial care remained unchanged (19% vs 11%%; P=.15

  8. The Effect of High Quality Nursing on the Quality of Nursing Care and Satisfaction Degree of Patients%优质护理对门诊分诊护理质量及患者满意度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of high quality nursing on the quality of outpatient service and the satisfaction of patients. Methods214 patients were randomly divided into study group(quality care)and control group(routine nursing).ResultsThe scores of nursing quality and satisfaction of the study group were better than those of the control group (P<0.05). The incidence of complaints in the two groups had significant difference(P<0.05).Conclusion Quality nursing care can improve the quality of outpatient triage nursing quality and patient satisfaction.%目的:探讨优质护理对门诊分诊护理质量及患者满意度的影响。方法将214例患者随机分为研究组(优质护理)与对照组(常规护理)。结果研究组护理质量评分、满意度均优于对照组(P<0.05);两组投诉纠纷发生率差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论优质护理能提升门诊分诊护理质量及患者满意度。

  9. Quality of diabetes care in Arab Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlie, Helen D; Herman, William H; Brown, Morton B; Hammad, Adnan; Jaber, Linda A

    2008-02-01

    The quality of care received by Arab American patients with type 2 diabetes residing in a city with a large migrant Arab population has not been examined. Arab American adults with a self-reported diagnosis of diabetes were identified in a rigorous cross-sectional, population-based epidemiologic study conducted in Dearborn, MI. Quality of diabetes care was determined by assessing adherence to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) clinical practice recommendations. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) provided data for a national comparison. Among the 53 participants, mean age was 59+/-12 years and the mean duration of diabetes was 11.3+/-13.3 years. The ADA goal for an A1c of Arab American subjects studied were treated less aggressively with pharmacologic agents than recommended by the ADA. 26% of the Arab Americans had an A1c>9.5% as compared to 18% of the national population. Arab Americans generally had worse blood pressure control but better lipid control compared to the national sample. This is the first report of the quality of diabetes care in an Arab American population, and demonstrates sub-optimal quality of care according to the ADA clinical practice recommendations.

  10. Patient Experience Assessment is a Requisite for Quality Evaluation: A Discussion of the In-Center Hemodialysis Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems (ICH CAHPS) Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2016-01-01

    Patient experience surveys provide a critical and unique perspective on the quality of patient-centered healthcare delivery. These surveys provide a mechanism to systematically express patients' voice on topics valued by patients to make decisions about choices in care. They also provide an assessment to healthcare organizations about their service that cannot be obtained from any other source. Regulatory agencies have mandated the assessment of patients' experience as part of healthcare value based purchasing programs and weighted the results to account for up to 30% of the total scoring. This is a testimony to the accepted importance of this metric as a fundamental assessment of quality. After more than a decade of rigorous research, there is a significant body of growing evidence supporting specifically the validity and use of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) surveys, including a version specific to in-center hemodialysis (ICH CAHPS). This review will focus on the ICH CAHPS survey including a review of its development, content, administration, and also a discussion of common criticisms. Although it is suggested that the survey assesses activities and experiences that are not modifiable by the healthcare organization (or the dialysis facility in our case) emerging evidence suggests otherwise. Dialysis providers have an exclusive opportunity to lead the advancement of understanding the implications and serviceability of the evaluation of the patient experience in health care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The PRO nurse: advocate for quality care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, M; Maichele, J

    1993-01-01

    Since the inception of the Socia