WorldWideScience

Sample records for quality of life

  1. Quality of life technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wac, Katarzyna; Fiordelli, M.; Gustarini, M.

    2015-01-01

    Inevitably, as basic human needs are assured in any developed society, differentiating factors for quality of life (QoL) relate to a greater capacity to make informed decisions across daily life activities, especially those related to health. The availability of powerful, personalized, and wearable...

  2. Quality of Life in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norina Popovici

    2016-01-01

    Many times we wondered why people want a certain comfort in exchange for sacrifices on longterm: we want houses, cars, holidays, quality services. All our life we work and give up many tothings (maybe more important than achieving material benefits. It's about quality of life. In thispaper we analyzed the quality of life in Europe addressing several factors, such as subjective wellbeing,living standards and material constraints, work-life balance, family life and social life,health and education.

  3. Life Quality of Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorallah Tahery

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with chronic and advanced kidney failure undergo hemodialysis treatment and because of various drug therapies have basic problems in their life style which affects their psychosocial operation. The purpose of this study was to determine the hemodialysis patients’ quality of life in Abadan and Khorramshahr in 2011. Methods: This is a cross - sectional study in which all patients (80 cases referring to Abadan and Khorramshahr hemodialysis clinics completed a questionnaire which included two sections of demographic data and kidney diseases quality of life (KDQOL. Data analysis was done using SPSS-17 software and statistical tests such as ANOVA, Pearson correlation coefficient, and Independent T test were used. Results: The mean score of life quality of the participants was 47.22 ± 8.82 which indicates their low quality of life. Result showed that between quality of life and age (P = 0.04 & r = 0.5 and ESRD patience period (P=0.03 & r= 0.23, there exists a statistically significant relationship. A positive and significant association was also observed between education and quality of life (p= 0.003 and between income level and quality of life (P<0.0001. Conclusion: Life quality of Hemodialysis patients is low and authorities need to provide these patients with more social support and see into their welfare.

  4. Quality of life: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The term “quality of life” serves as a catchword for different notions of the good life. It is used in fact to denote a set of qualities of life, which can be ordered on the basis of the following two distinctions. One distinction is between opportunities for a good lif

  5. [Living, life and quality of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer Santos, Urbano

    2008-01-01

    Human life and quality of life are approached unitarily from their common root in living person, since only the person can claim them as rights and observe them as duties. The passage from the natural inclination to live towards the moral order is fulfilled from the ethical-ontological bridge-concept of human dignity. The absolute character of dignity means that life appears in the ethical realm as a duty prior to a right, both with regard to its care by the subject itself and its respect by others. This right-duty extends from life to the quality of life, since the living person always has a margin between personal living and the vital achievements it is capable of: this margin must be respected and promoted.

  6. Health and Quality of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje; Lenk, Christian (ed.); Aumüller, Gerhard (ed.)

    How could one define health and disease? On what presuppositions, and oughtwe look for such definitions? Does quality of life inherit a subjective orobjective evaluation? Are health and quality of life culture dependentconcepts? Under the conditions of technologically advanced medicine...... and thecommon tendency towards a hedonistic lifestyle such questions come intofocus. Hence, one question is of special relevance: which role does healthplay in our quality of life? The contributions of this interdisciplinaryvolume aim at the clarification of the various concepts in use.Internationally well......-known scholars and scientists such as AlfredMusschenga, Alfons Labisch, Lennart Nordenfelt, Peter Janich, Henrik Wulffand several others outline the framework for a more comprehensive anddemanding concept of health and quality of life including philosophical andcultural aspects as well as medical...

  7. Soldier Quality of Life Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    SUSTAINMENT LOGISTICS EMOTIONS QUALITY OF LIFE MENTAL READINESS FUEL DEMAND REDUCTION FEEDBACK ARMY PERSONNEL ARMY...conducted a survey with approximately 1,200 Soldiers to receive feedback on critical aspects of Quality of Life (QoL) at contingency base camps. Data...QoL. In addition, the model allows the SLB-STO-D to assess the impact of candidate technologies within their portfolio on Soldier QoL and make

  8. [quality Of Life And Autism].

    OpenAIRE

    Alexsandra V. Elias; Assumpção, Francisco B

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the index quality of life (QL) in bearers of including upset of the development. 20 autistic children, between 4 and 12 years, submitted to the diagnostic evaluation by autistic traces scale-ATA and for the Vineland adaptive behavior scales, needing to obtain in this a quotient of superior development over 70. The data about QL were obtained by the scale of quality of life-AUQEI and compared from the application of Vineland and of AUQEI in a population of normal children, resembli...

  9. Geographical conceptualization of quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murgaš František

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The conceptualization of quality of life in terms of geography is based on two assumptions. The first assumption is that the quality of life consists of two dimensions: subjective and objective. The subjective is known as ‘well-being’, while the objective is the proposed term ‘quality of place’. The second assumption is based on the recognition that quality of life is always a spatial dimension. The concept of quality of life is closely linked with the concept of a good life; geographers enriched this concept by using the term ‘good place’ as a place in which the conditions are created for a good life. The quality of life for individuals in terms of a good place overlaps with the quality of life in society, namely the societal quality of life. The geographical conceptualisation of quality of life is applied to settlements within the city of Liberec.

  10. Quality-of-Life Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAs a fairly new interdisciplinary field of inquiry the quality of life research has benefited greatly from the discipline of sociology. The field consists of five overlapping traditions, namely 1) social indicators research, 2) happiness studies, 3) gerontology of successful aging, 4) ps

  11. Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Defense 1995 Sexual Harrassment Survey Education Trust - Ticket to Nowhere - Thinking K-16, Fall 1999 GAO Report to Congressional Committee Gender...Marital Status Communication Style Work Style Gender Ethnic Heritage Race Mental Occupation Sexual Orientation Age AppearanceProblem Solving Style...Meaningful incentives to attract, motivate and retain diverse personnel. Also, objective determination of candidate aptitudes. Workplace

  12. Bilastine and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui, I; Bartra, J; del Cuvillo, A; Dávila, I; Ferrer, M; Montoro, J; Mullol, J; Sastre, J; Valero, A

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of quality of life (QoL) and its modification through therapeutic interventions has become a prioritary concern in recent years and a requirement on the part of regulatory agencies for the authorization of new drugs. In clinical studies of allergic disorders, particularly allergic rhinitis and urticaria, different types of generic questionnaires have been used - especially disease specific instruments such as the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) or skin disease specific tools such as the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Throughout its clinical development, bilastine has been shown to be more effective than placebo and at least as effective as cetirizine, levocetirizine, fexofenadine or desloratadine in controlling the symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis and chronic urticaria. QoL has been studied as a secondary objective in three allergic rhinitis clinical trials, using the RQLQ, in a total of 2335 patients. Likewise, in chronic urticaria, QoL has been evaluated using the DLQI in a total of 525 patients, versus levocetirizine and placebo. The improvement in the QoL parameters in these studies (RQLQ or DLQI domains) at all times proved proportional to the symptoms improvement. In general, the data obtained relating to changes in QoL are concordant with the mean global visual analog scale (VAS in mm) values and their changes, from the beginning until the end of the treatment period, for all of the trials, for bilastine and all its comparators.

  13. The Promise of Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruniak, Geoffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Little has been written in the career development literature about quality of life, even though this concept is implied in all counselor interventions. In this article, the author suggests that the broad and subjective nature of quality of life, rather than a liability, is its very strength. Quality of life is presented as an important holistic…

  14. Quality of Life Philosophy I. Quality of Life, Happiness, and Meaning in Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Danish Quality of Life Survey, we asked 10,000 people about their quality of life with the validated SEQOL questionnaire with more than 300 questions on their quality of life. How did they feel? How content were they with their lives? How happy were they? Did they feel their needs were fulfilled? And many more questions. We asked the questions we believed to be important for their quality of life (QOL. The results were quite surprising and forced us to recontemplate the following philosophical questions: What is quality of life, happiness, and meaning in life? What is a human being? Do we need a new biology? Is the brain the seat of consciousness? How do we seize the meaning of life and by doing so, will we become well again? What are the key concepts of quality of life? The meaning of life is connectedness and development. It is about realizing every opportunity and potential in one’s existence. The opportunities must be found and acknowledged. What do you find when you find yourself deep down? You find your real self and your purpose in life. You realize that you are already a part of a larger totality. Antonovsky called it “coherence”. Maslow called it “transcendence”. Frankl called it “meaning of life”. We call it simply “being”.To test if these philosophical questions are actually relevant for medicine, we looked at the consequences for patients being taught the quality of life philosophy. Quite surprisingly we learned from our pilot studies with “quality of life as medicine” that just by assimilating the basic concepts of the quality of life philosophy presented in this series of papers, patients felt better and saw their lives as more meaningful. The improvement of the patient’s personal philosophy of life seems to be the essence of holistic medicine, helping the patient to assume more responsibility for his or her own existence.

  15. Improving Health and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Improving Health and Quality of Life On this Page Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Support ... and improve their ability to function and their quality of life. Doctors may refer some of their CFS patients ...

  16. Quality of life in severe obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, EJ; Geenen, R

    2010-01-01

    Obesity, especially morbid obesity, is a major health problem with considerable impact on physical, mental and social quality of life. Assessment of quality of life is considered crucial to understand and evaluate the consequences of obesity. However, the heterogeneity of the quality of life concept

  17. Quality of life in severe obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MD E.J.M. Wouters; R Geenen

    2010-01-01

    Obesity, especially morbid obesity, is a major health problem with considerable impact on physical, mental and social quality of life. Assessment of quality of life is considered crucial to understand and evaluate the consequences of obesity. However, the heterogeneity of the quality of life concept

  18. Quality of life in severe obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PhD Rinie Geenen; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    2010-01-01

    Obesity, especially morbid obesity, is a major health problem with considerable impact on physical, mental and social quality of life. Assessment of quality of life is considered crucial to understand and evaluate the consequences of obesity. Obesity has major consequences for quality of life, e.g.,

  19. Quality of life in severe obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Eveline; Geenen, Rinie

    2010-01-01

    Obesity, especially morbid obesity, is a major health problem with considerable impact on physical, mental and social quality of life. Assessment of quality of life is considered crucial to understand and evaluate the consequences of obesity. Obesity has major consequences for quality of life, e.g.,

  20. APPROACHES TO QUALITY OF LIFE ANALYSISQUANTICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa E. Danilina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews different approaches to quality of life measurement used in Russian and international statistics. It outlines the essence of J. Stiglitz’s recommendations on development of quality of life statistical indicators, analyses proposals and practical application of innovative approaches of quality of life measurement by the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE. The paper reviews Rosstat’s (Russian Federal State Statistics Service new research as well as an independent research in the area of quality of life research. The authors make proposals to extend the list of aspects analyzed an quality of life research and underline the importance of such a review through regional specifics. They suggest extending the system of quality of life statistical indicators by certain coefficients characterizing economic development disparity and its influence on the quality of life.

  1. [Quality of life in gerodontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C

    2011-04-01

    In clinical decision-making on whether or not to treat an oral disease and on making a choice from the spectrum of treatment options, the influence of the treatment on the physical and psycho-social well-being of the patient should play a crucial role. This awareness originates from gerodontology. To assess the value of a potential treatment, the concept quality of life has been advanced and various related questionnaires have been developed and employed. In the meantime, doubts have arisen about the value of these questionnaires. The present-day trend is to return to so-called qualitative research, which consists of systematic interviews of groups of older people using open-ended questions without making use of structured response options.

  2. Family Life Quality and Emotional Quality of Life in Chinese Adolescents with and without Economic Disadvantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Lee, T. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Chinese secondary school students (N = 2758) responded to measures of perceived family life quality (parenting quality and parent-child relational quality) and emotional quality of life (hopelessness, mastery, life satisfaction and self-esteem). Parenting quality included different aspects of parental behavioral control (parental knowledge,…

  3. Family Life Quality and Emotional Quality of Life in Chinese Adolescents with and without Economic Disadvantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Lee, T. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Chinese secondary school students (N = 2758) responded to measures of perceived family life quality (parenting quality and parent-child relational quality) and emotional quality of life (hopelessness, mastery, life satisfaction and self-esteem). Parenting quality included different aspects of parental behavioral control (parental knowledge,…

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND QUALITY OF LIFE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    must start to spell out a shared concept of what constitutes 'quality of life'. ENVIRONMENTAL .... tables of GNP output, income per capita, school emolment figures ..... contrast with medieval times where religion was what gave one's life ...

  5. The Quality of Life in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoguchi, Takashi; Fujii, Seiji

    2009-01-01

    This study is part of a collaborative project examining the quality of life in Confucian societies in Asia. Our major findings suggest that, when our sixteen specific life domains are grouped into three life spheres, namely, material, post-material, and public, the Japanese people tend to be most satisfied with the post-material sphere of life and…

  6. Pediatric obesity and asthma quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara; Militello, Lisa K; Kouba, Joanne; Harrison, Patrick R; Manion, Amy; Doumit, Rita

    2013-06-01

    Widely researched as separate entities, our understanding of the comorbid effects of childhood obesity and asthma on quality of life is limited. This article discusses the effects of childhood obesity and asthma on self-reported quality of life in low-income African American teens with asthma. When controlling for the influence of symptom frequency, asthma classification, asthma self-efficacy, and asthma self-care levels, body mass index remains a most important factor in determining self-reported quality of life among teens with asthma. Although overweight and obesity did not change the effectiveness of the asthma intervention program, obesity did affect participants quality of life scores.

  7. Researching quality of life in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Tonón

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of quality of life considers at the same time objective and subjective circumstances of people life. In 1995 was created the International Society for Quality of Life Studies (ISQOLS whose purposes are to promote and encourage research in the field of quality-of-life studies and provide an organization through which all academic and professional researchers interested in QOL studies may coordinate their efforts to advance the field of QOL studies within various disciplines. In the case of Argentina since 2004, the Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad Nacional de Lomas de Zamora has organized the Research Program in Quality of life to develop different kind of projects about quality of life in different fields, trying to be considered by national institutions that decide public policies. 

  8. Tobacco smoking and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Kuźmicka

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses the problem of tobacco smoking in the context of quality of life. The aim of the study was to make a synthetic review of scientific research conducted all over the world, which assessed the potential influence of tobacco smoking on health related quality of life. Additionally, the paper reviews the Polish literature concerning comprehending and defining “quality of life”, especially in medical sciences. Meta-analysis was a research method. Descriptions of research findings were divided into two parts: using SF-36 questionnaire (the Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire and using other questionnaires. From the review of scientific research results that tobacco smoking doesn’t influence health related quality of life in an unequivocal manner. Most of the studies showed better assessment of quality of life in non-smokers than in smokers. Improved quality of life was observed among those, who gave up smoking compared to those who continued smoking, but not all researchers demonstrated such a relationship. Research concerning influence of passive smoking on quality of life in individuals inhaling tobacco smoke for example at home, work or in places to eat wasn’t carried out so far. There is a need to do more longitudinal research on quality of life in smokers, passive smokers and among those, who successfully broke the habit to better understand the role of smoking in subjective perceived quality of life.

  9. Quality of Life in Macau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rato, Ricardo; Davey, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    We report the initial findings of an ongoing, long-term investigation into subjective quality of life in Macau, a Special Administrative Region of China. Data were collected via quarterly public surveys (2007 to 2009; n = 8,230), as part of the Macau Quality of Life Report. The main aims of the study were to: (a) ascertain the public's…

  10. Quality of life measures in otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maile, E J; Youngs, R

    2013-05-01

    Disabling hearing impairment is the world's most common disability. Traditionally, hearing levels measured by pure tone audiometry have been used to define and quantify hearing loss. The effects of disabling hearing loss on patients' quality of life can be profound, and audiometric data alone may not correlate with quality of life measures. Generic measures of quality of life can be used to compare different diseases, and as such are useful in resource allocation and burden of disease studies. Their disadvantage is that they are not disease-specific and can therefore under-estimate the effects of a disease on patients' quality of life. Disease-specific measures are more sensitive. In chronic otitis media, additional factors such as discharge augment the effect of hearing loss alone on quality of life. Many of the quality of life measures developed for chronic otitis media have been used to assess improvement following reconstructive surgery. Quality of life measures have also been used to assess the effect of paediatric otitis media. Quality of life measures also have utility in the developing world, where hearing impairment is a huge burden.

  11. Patients' quality of life post thyroidectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, E C

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate health related quality of life post thyroidectomy for hyperthyroidism with respect to clinical benefit and patient satisfaction. This is one of the first such studies in the literature evaluating quality of life post thyroidectomy for hyperthyroidism.

  12. Quality of life in shift work syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puca, F M; Perrucci, S; Prudenzano, M P; Savarese, M; Misceo, S; Perilli, S; Palumbo, M; Libro, G; Genco, S

    1996-01-01

    Air Force radar controllers represent an excellent example of night shift workers, as they are obliged to demonstrate perfect alertness during working hours. We set out: a) to assess the quality of life in these shift workers; b) to identify those with shift work syndrome and c) to evaluate the possible effects of triazolam both on their quality of life and sleep. The results reveal an impairment of the quality of life in shift workers, independently of the presence of a circadian rhythm sleep disorder. Quality of life was more severely impaired in subjects with circadian rhythm sleep disorder. Hypnotic therapy brought about an improvement both in the sleep disorder and in the quality of life of subjects affected by shift work syndrome. Selective alertness tests failed to demonstrate any "sedative carry-over" in the treated patients.

  13. Quality of life in schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobes, Julio; Garcia-Portilla, Maria Paz; Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Saiz, Pilar Alejandra; Bousoño, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    In the last decades, there has been increased interest in the field of quality of life in mental disorders in general, and particularly in schizophrenia. In addition, the appearance of the atypical antipsychotic drugs (amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, and ziprasidone) with different therapeutic and side-effect profiles, has promoted a greater interest in assessing the quality of life of schizophrenic patients. In this paper we will briefly summarize the difficulties in assessing quality of life in schizophrenic patients, as well as the results concerning their quality of life and the influence of psychopathology, especially negative and depressive symptoms, on it. We will also review data from recent clinical trials showing the impact ofantipsychotic treatments and their side effects upon quality of life.

  14. QUALITY OF LIFE IN LIVER TRANSPLANT PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIVIANA ANGÉLICA BURGOS CAMACHO

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A study aimed to describe and evaluate the quality of life in patients with liver transplant in the last 15 years, inColombia, is presented. Twenty five patients voluntarily participated through an informed consent. Quality of life wasevaluated with a semi structured interview, with some items in a scale format, previously validated by a group of threeexperts. Results were analyzed according to the theoretical categories and statistical analysis. Results showed that theliver transplant improved the quality of life the patients were having in their final stage of the liver disease, both in thepsychological and physical aspects; the quality of life was correlated to independency and to an increase in the workingcapacity. A better quality of life was evident, with a better general well-being, a going back to job, and a psychosocialrecovery.

  15. Three Decades of Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalock, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    This article summarizes the current understanding of the "quality of life" construct as applied to people with mental retardation. It examines previous definitions and suggests a definition involving eight life dimensions including emotional well-being, interpersonal relationships, material well-being, social inclusion, and rights. The definition…

  16. [The quality of life in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecardeur, L

    2015-09-01

    The World Health Organization defines quality of life as individuals' perception of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards, and concerns. Quality of life (QoL) is a concept, which reflects multiple as well subjective as objective dimensions. In patients with schizophrenia, quality of life has been negatively correlated with depressive and anxiety symptoms (results seem more unconvincing concerning positive symptoms and cognitive deficits); the remission of positive and negative symptoms has been associated with a better quality of life, but the persistence of depressive symptoms decreases quality of life even when patients were or not in remission; second generation antipsychotics significantly increase more quality of life than first generation antipsychotics; and psychotherapies (rehabilitation, case management...) improve quality of life. Several general and disease-specific QoL scales have been developed and successfully tested in patients with schizophrenia. The most appropriate disease-specific scale is the Quality of Life Scale (Heinrichs et al., 1984) since it takes patients' cognitive deficits into account and because it allows to subtly measuring the patients' subjective feeling during a hetero-evaluation. The Quality of Life Scale is a 21-item scale based on a semi-structured interview, which is comprised of four subscales: interpersonal relations, instrumental role functioning, intra-psychic foundations, and use of common objects and activities. It has been designed initially to assess deficit symptoms in schizophrenia. It is a simple and quite short tool, which is intended for the use as an outcome criterion, a measure of change and an indicator of the efficacy of therapeutic interventions. Convincing metrological qualities have been described: content, construct and nomological validities; inter-raters and test-retest fidelities; it is sensitive

  17. Quality of life in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, J A; Brola, W; Leonardi, M; Błaszczyk, B

    2012-12-15

    In this review report, current possibilities of evaluation of quality of life in Parkinson's disease have been critically presented. Health Related Quality of Life (-HRQoL) comprises a wide spectrum of consequences of the disease. Measurement of quality of life has become increasingly relevant as an outcome parameter, especially in long-term trials. Most of the available QoL instruments depend on patient self-reports. The data can be collected by written questionnaires. There are universal questionnaires of QoL--for many diseases and the specific ones--specially created for one disease. Among universal questionnaires, the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and the Short-Form Health Status Survey (SF-36) are the most popular in Parkinson's disease. As for specific questionnaires: the Parkinson`s Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL) have been described.

  18. Evaluation of depression and quality of life in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-07

    Dec 7, 2015 ... apnea syndrome (OSAS) that may impair quality of life (QOL). This study aimed to ... Key words: Depression, obstructive sleep apnea, quality of life ...... quality of life module for elderly WHOQOL-OLD: Validity and reliability of.

  19. "A La Recherche Du" Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    This essay examines the stages of inquiry when we seek to formulate quality of life in an era before our own. There arises the question of the extent to which today's formulation of quality of life can be applied to an era far removed from our own. Implicitly, there is the nature of the time interval, T[subscript 1]...T[subscript n], and the…

  20. "A La Recherche Du" Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    This essay examines the stages of inquiry when we seek to formulate quality of life in an era before our own. There arises the question of the extent to which today's formulation of quality of life can be applied to an era far removed from our own. Implicitly, there is the nature of the time interval, T[subscript 1]...T[subscript n], and the…

  1. Evaluation of life quality after apicoectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Kovacevska, Ivona; Papakoca, Kiro

    2013-01-01

    AIM. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient experience of quality of life following apicoectomy using two different techniques: preoperative and intra operative ortograde canal opturation. MATERIAL AND METHOD. The study consisted of 40 patients referred for oral surgical treatment (apicectomy with periapical osteotomy). All patients were given a questionnaire with 15 questions to evaluate their quality of life for 7 days after the oral surgery interventions. RESULTS. The average ti...

  2. The Quality of Life in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Ming

    2009-01-01

    The AsiaBarometer of 1,000 respondents shows that Hong Kong people have a great desire for materialistic attainment, and such an emphasis on materialism bodes ill for their quality of life. Negative assessments of the public life sphere, which encompasses the natural environment, the social welfare system, and the democratic system, also detract…

  3. Factor Structure of Quality of Life: The Lehman Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Marianne; Hull, James W.; Terkelsen, Kenneth G.; Smith, Thomas E.; Anthony, Donna

    1997-01-01

    This study of 67 chronically mentally ill outpatients examined subjective Quality of Life Scores from A. Lehman's Quality of Life Interview. Results suggest a model of life satisfaction in which instrumental and affiliative needs comprise significant portions of life satisfaction. Implications for other quality of life and life satisfaction…

  4. Factor Structure of Quality of Life: The Lehman Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Marianne; Hull, James W.; Terkelsen, Kenneth G.; Smith, Thomas E.; Anthony, Donna

    1997-01-01

    This study of 67 chronically mentally ill outpatients examined subjective Quality of Life Scores from A. Lehman's Quality of Life Interview. Results suggest a model of life satisfaction in which instrumental and affiliative needs comprise significant portions of life satisfaction. Implications for other quality of life and life satisfaction…

  5. Quality of Life in Female Epispadias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amesty, Maria Virginia; Chocarro, Gloria; Lobato, Roberto; Monsalve, Shirley; Martinez-Urrutia, Maria Jose; Lopez-Pereira, Pedro Carlos; Jaureguizar, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Introduction and Aim Female epispadias is a rare congenital anomaly associated with significant urinary incontinence. This study aims to evaluate the results of its treatment in terms of continence, sexuality, and impact of incontinence on quality of life. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed nine patients (5-39 years) treated of female epispadias in our hospital during the period 1976-2013. Urinary continence (ICIQ-SF), sexuality, impact of incontinence on quality of life (Potenziani-14-CI-IO-2000-QOL), and overall quality of life (SF-36) were evaluated. Results All nine women were treated by bladder neck reconstruction (Young-Dees-Leadbetter) and genitoplasty; four received 2.5 (R = 1-5) endoscopic bladder neck injections; one required enterocystoplasty, urinary diversion, and bladder neck closure because of persistent incontinence; five performed pelvic floor rehabilitation; and two took anticholinergics. Three achieved continence; five had mild urinary incontinence; and 1 had moderate urinary incontinence and was awaiting an endoscopic injection. Of the seven who were older than 18 years, five answered the questionnaires of quality of life and sexuality. All had a general quality of life (SF-36) that does not differ from the normal population and had a slight impact (7 [0-15] points) of incontinence on quality of life (Potenziani-14-CI-IO-QOL-2000). Four had a normal sex life, and the fifth had lack of self-confidence due to her incontinence. Conclusion Patients with female epispadias have good long-term results regarding quality of life and sexuality, despite having some degree of urinary incontinence.

  6. Fragrance allergy and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisterberg, Maria V; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fragrance ingredients can cause contact allergy, which may affect quality of life (QoL). However, few studies have investigated this topic. OBJECTIVES: To investigate QoL life among subjects with a fragrance allergy as compared with other eczema patients. METHODS: A case-control surve...

  7. Quality of life: its definition and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felce, D; Perry, J

    1995-01-01

    A model of quality of life is proposed that integrates objective and subjective indicators, a broad range of life domains, and individual values. It takes account of concerns that externally derived norms should not be applied without reference to individual differences. It also allows for objective comparisons to be made between the situations of particular groups and what is normative. Considerable agreement exists that quality of life is multidimensional. Coverage may be categorised within five dimensions: physical wellbeing, material wellbeing, social wellbeing, emotional wellbeing, and development and activity. A research agenda is discussed as are the particular problems caused by difficulties in understanding and communicating.

  8. Quality of life of eye amputated patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Ekholm, Ola; Prause, Jan U

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate eye-amputated patients’ health-related quality of life, perceived stress, self-rated health, job separation because of illness or disability and socioeconomic position. Methods: Patients were recruited from a tertiary referral centre situated in Copenhagen. Inclusion criteria......-administered questionnaire containing health-related quality of life (SF-36), the perceived stress scale and answered questions about self-rated health, job changes because of illness or disability and socioeconomic status. These results were compared with findings from the Danish Health Interview Survey 2005. Results......% of the study population has retired or changed to a part-time job because of eye disease. The percentage of eye amputated patients, who were divorced or separated, was twice as high as in the general population. Conclusion: The impact of an eye amputation is considerable. The quality of life, perceived stress...

  9. STRATEGIC MARKETING AND QUALITY OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ploesteanu Mara Gabriela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Theme The strategic marketing phase is one of systematic and continuous analysis of market needs in which the concepts of high performance products or services are developed, further provide the qualitative difference to customer, and which target different categories of consumers, ensuring long-term competitive advantages while increasing their personal welfare and the one society in general. Objectives of the Research The main purpose of our article is to make a documentary study of strategic marketing and quality of life concepts, wanting to emphasize the link between the two, the evolution stages of the concept quality of life and their integration into the concept of quality of life marketing. Research Methodology In order to achieve that goal, a documentary study was conducted, that took into account the conceptualization of the term quality of life marketing. Results The link between quality of life and marketing is even more obviously given by the new paradigm of it - relationship marketing. This focuses on building long term relationships with clients, based on their level of satisfaction felt in relation to company’s products and services. Starting from this philosophy of relationship marketing, we can say that marketers are inclined towards a subjective definition of quality of life, depending on individual needs and their level of satisfaction Implications The term of quality of life has been introduced in the marketing literature in the last decade and is defined as a marketing practice designed to improve the welfare of clients while maintaining the welfare of other stakeholders of the company. This concept comes as a sequel of the concerns of the relational marketing specialists to provide a high quality offer to customers and add value to all other stakeholders interested in the smooth running of the company (suppliers, distributors, shareholders, employees, general public and various public bodies interacting with the

  10. Quality of Life Philosophy VI. The Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The about a hundred central concepts related to research in the global quality of life can, in a holistic medical frame of interpretation, be organized under ten abstract key concepts: existence, creation of the world, state of being, daily living, talents, relations, sex, health, personal development, and therapy with subthemes as discussed in this paper. The paper shows that the concepts in each group can be seen as related to each other in a quite intuitive and logical way, to give a coherent quality of life philosophy that allows the physician to encourage, inspire, and support his patient. In every consultation, one new concept and idea of existence can be taught to the patient, helping him or her to realize the meaning of life, the source of joy, and the reason for the actual suffering. In this way, we help the patient to mobilize hidden and known resources and to improve quality of life, subjective health, and the ability to function. The concepts were harvested in 2003 at a Nordic seminar on quality of life research, held in Sweden. Life does not only cohere on the inside, but also on the outside. The same power that ties together all the cells in our body, seems to tie us together in relationships and new wholeness. This power evolves into new kinds of relations that unite on more and more complex levels, with the global ecosystem as the highest known level.Our intentions come from this coherent matrix of life. In the beginning of our life, the web of life itself gave birth to our fundamental purpose of life. The abstract purpose determines the frame of interpretation of reality: How we will perceive ourselves throughout life, our inner life, and the world around us. The frame of interpretation is pitched in language and concepts, in fact it creates our perceptions. Based on these perceptions and our purposes of life, our behavior arises. Our consciousness evolves through the witnessing of our behavior and through the response caused by

  11. Quality of life in vitiligo patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teovska Mitrevska, Natasa; Eleftheriadou, Viktoria; Guarneri, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Quality of life is defined by the World Health Organization as "individuals' perceptions of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards and concerns." Often overlooked in the past, it is nowadays considered, in a more holistic view of medicine, a decisive factor to understand the impact of diseases and improve the quality of medical care. Such evaluation is particularly relevant for dermatological diseases, because visibility of the lesions can significantly affect self-esteem and social relationships. Vitiligo represents an emblematic case: often disfiguring and located in visible areas, confused in the past (and, in many world regions, even in the present) with leprosy, often perceived by physicians as a harmless, purely cosmetic problem, it significantly decreases the quality of life of affected persons. After a brief overview on definition, usefulness and methods for the assessment of quality of life, the authors examine the peculiarities of its relationship with skin diseases, particularly vitiligo. The state of the art of knowledge and research in this field is presented, together with data showing usefulness and positive results of a multidisciplinary approach, which adequately keeps into account perceived quality of life, on patient's satisfaction, adherence to treatment protocols and, ultimately, better outcome of treatments. In this context, an important role can be played by support communities, groups of patients and dedicated associations and societies, connected through modern communication networks like the Internet. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Quality of Life Theory III. Maslow Revisited

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    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1962, Abraham Maslow published his book Towards a Psychology of Being, and established a theory of quality of life, which still is considered a consistent theory of quality of life. Maslow based his theory for development towards happiness and true being on the concept of human needs. He described his approach as an existentialistic psychology of self-actualization, based on personal growth.When we take more responsibility for our own life, we take more of the good qualities that we have into use, and we become more free, powerful, happy, and healthy. It seems that Maslow�s concept of self-actualization can play an important role in modern medicine. As most chronic diseases often do not disappear in spite of the best biomedical treatments, it might be that the real change our patients have for betterment is understanding and living the noble path of personal development. The hidden potential for improving life really lies in helping the patient to acknowledge that his or her lust for life, his or her needs, and his or her wish to contribute, is really deep down in human existence one and the same. But you will only find this hidden meaning of life if you scrutinize your own life and existence closely enough, to come to know your innermost self.

  13. Quality of life at the end of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downey Lois

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about self-perceived quality of life (QOL near the end of life, because such information is difficult to collect and to interpret. Here, we describe QOL in the weeks near death and determine correlates of QOL over time, with emphasis on accounting for death and missing data. Methods Data on QOL were collected approximately every week in an ongoing randomized trial involving persons at the end of life. We used these data to describe QOL in the 52 weeks after enrollment in the trial (prospective analysis, N = 115, and also in the 10 weeks just prior to death (retrospective analysis, N = 83. The analysis consisted of graphs and regressions that accounted explicitly for death and imputed missing data. Results QOL was better than expected until the final 3 weeks of life, when a terminal drop was observed. Gender, race, education, cancer, and baseline health status were not significantly related to the number of “weeks of good-quality life” (WQL during the study period. Persons younger than 60 had significantly higher WQL than older persons in the prospective analysis, but significantly lower WQL in the retrospective analysis. The retrospective results were somewhat sensitive to the imputation model. Conclusion In this exploratory study, QOL was better than expected in persons at the end of life, but special interventions may be needed for persons approaching a premature death, and also for the last 3 weeks of life. Our descriptions of the trajectory of QOL at the end of life may help other investigators to plan and analyze future studies of QOL. Methodology for dealing with death and the high amount of missing data in longitudinal studies at the end of life needs further investigation.

  14. Quality of Life in Hong Kong: The CUHK Hong Kong Quality of Life Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ying Keung; Kwan, Cheuk Chiu Andy; Shek, Tan Lei Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The CUHK Hong Kong Quality of Life Index, which aims to assess and monitor the quality of life in Hong Kong, is a composite index incorporating both objective and subjective measures. This index, developed by the Faculty of Social Science of The Chinese University of Hong Kong, employs data collected in representative sample surveys and official…

  15. Quality of life of patients with strabismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo de Barros Ribeiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the impact of strabismus on quality of life. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 101 individuals aged 7-67 years with strabismus. They were interviewed and made to answer a questionnaire with 20 questions intended to assess the individual's interaction with their social and working environment, sensory perception, and limitations in their daily lives. There were five types of possible responses for each question: never, rarely or very few times, sometimes, frequently, and always. The questionnaire was based on the AS-20 and contained 11 questions assessing psychosocial aspects and 9 questions assessing functional aspects. Among those who were interviewed, 24.8% had undergone surgical correction of strabismus. Results: We observed a significant impact of strabismus on the quality of life of the interviewed individuals. Feelings of sadness and inferiority because of strabismus were reported by 74.2% and 58.4% respondents, respectively. In terms of functionality, 12.1% reported difficulty in reading, 14% said they had difficulty in depth perception (stereopsis, and 17.8% frequently or always associated pain or burning sensation in the eyes to strabismus. A significant difference was detected in the quality of life scores for the psychosocial aspect among patients who had and had not undergone surgery (Wilcoxon test, 158; p<0.001. Individuals who had undergone surgery had a better quality of life from the psychosocial perspective. Conclusions: In this evaluation, we found a significant negative interference of strabismus on quality of life from both the functional and psychosocial perspectives. This demonstrated the importance of treatment for strabismus, regardless of age, because it can interfere with the functional well-being of the individual.

  16. Health-Related Quality of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Louise; Sørensen, Jan; Ostergaard, Mikkel

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare validity, reliability, and responsiveness of generic and disease specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Two samples of patients completed the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), EuroQol (EQ)-5D......, 15D, Rheumatoid Arthritis Quality of Life Scale (RAQoL), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, fatigue, and global RA. Validity (convergent, discriminant, and known-groups) was evaluated in a cross-section of 200 patients. Reliability was evaluated...

  17. Health-Related Quality of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Louise; Sørensen, Jan; Ostergaard, Mikkel

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare validity, reliability, and responsiveness of generic and disease specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Two samples of patients completed the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), EuroQol (EQ)-5D......, 15D, Rheumatoid Arthritis Quality of Life Scale (RAQoL), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, fatigue, and global RA. Validity (convergent, discriminant, and known-groups) was evaluated in a cross-section of 200 patients. Reliability was evaluated...

  18. Quality of Life Theory II. Quality of Life as the Realization of Life Potential: A Biological Theory of Human Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents one of the eight theories of the quality of life (QOL used for making the SEQOL (self-evaluation of quality of life questionnaire or the quality of life as realizing life potential. This theory is strongly inspired by Maslow and the review furthermore serves as an example on how to fulfill the demand for an overall theory of life (or philosophy of life, which we believe is necessary for global and generic quality-of-life research.Whereas traditional medical science has often been inspired by mechanical models in its attempts to understand human beings, this theory takes an explicitly biological starting point. The purpose is to take a close view of life as a unique entity, which mechanical models are unable to do. This means that things considered to be beyond the individual's purely biological nature, notably the quality of life, meaning in life, and aspirations in life, are included under this wider, biological treatise. Our interpretation of the nature of all living matter is intended as an alternative to medical mechanism, which dates back to the beginning of the 20th century. New ideas such as the notions of the human being as nestled in an evolutionary and ecological context, the spontaneous tendency of self-organizing systems for realization and concord, and the central role of consciousness in interpreting, planning, and expressing human reality are unavoidable today in attempts to scientifically understand all living matter, including human life.

  19. Planning urban settlements for quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boje Groth, N.; Hansen, K.E.; Björnberg, U.

    Notatet er et indlæg på den Europæiske Økonomiske Kommissions (ECE) konference om by- og regionforskning, tema II: "Research on the Quality of Life in Urban Settlements, Warszawa, maj 1976. I notatet opstilles en begrebsramme for livskvalitetsbegrebet, og man diskuterer hvorledes livskvalitetsana......Notatet er et indlæg på den Europæiske Økonomiske Kommissions (ECE) konference om by- og regionforskning, tema II: "Research on the Quality of Life in Urban Settlements, Warszawa, maj 1976. I notatet opstilles en begrebsramme for livskvalitetsbegrebet, og man diskuterer hvorledes...

  20. The Quality of Life in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaoling; Zhu, Yifei

    2009-01-01

    The Asia Barometer Survey of 2,000 respondents reveals that substantial majorities of the Chinese people experience feelings of happiness, enjoyment, and accomplishment. In fact, the proportion experiencing these indicators of a high quality of life are larger in China than in some more prosperous countries. Favorable historical comparison,…

  1. Quality of life after bilateral prophylactic mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Ann M; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Herrinton, Lisa J; Rolnick, Sharon J; Greene, Sarah M; West, Carmen N; Harris, Emily L; Elmore, Joann G; Altschuler, Andrea; Liu, In-Liu A; Fletcher, Suzanne W; Emmons, Karen M

    2007-02-01

    Bilateral prophylactic mastectomy in women with increased breast cancer risk dramatically reduces breast cancer occurrence but little is known about psychosocial outcomes. To examine long-term quality of life after bilateral prophylactic mastectomy, we mailed surveys to 195 women who had the procedure from 1979 to 1999 and to a random sample of 117 women at increased breast cancer risk who did not have the procedure. Measures were modeled on or drawn directly from validated instruments designed to assess quality of life, body image, sexuality, breast cancer concerns, depression, health perception, and demographic characteristics. We used logistic regression to examine associations between quality of life and other domains. The response rate was 58%, with 106 women with and 62 women without prophylactic mastectomy returning complete surveys. Among women who underwent bilateral prophylactic mastectomy, 84% were satisfied with their decision to have the procedure; 61% reported high contentment with quality of life compared with an identical 61% of women who did not have the procedure (P = 1.0). Among all subjects, diminished contentment with quality of life was not associated with bilateral prophylactic mastectomy but with dissatisfaction with sex life (adjusted ratio [OR] = 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-6.2), possible depression (CES-D > 16, OR = 4.9, CI = 2.0-11.8), and poor or fair general health perception (OR = 8.3, 95% CI = 2.4-29.0). The majority of women reported satisfaction with bilateral prophylactic mastectomy and experienced psychosocial outcomes similar to women with similarly elevated breast cancer risk who did not undergo prophylactic mastectomy. Bilateral prophylactic mastectomy appears to neither positively nor negatively impact long-term psychosocial outcomes.

  2. Quality of life after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passier, P.E.C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis was to increase our understanding of quality of life (QoL) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), and the most important determinants of QoL, in order to tailor appropriate rehabilitation programs and thereby enhance their effectiveness. We reviewed the liter

  3. Ways that Social Change Predicts Personal Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Chau-Kiu; Leung, Kwok

    2010-01-01

    A notable way that social change affects personal quality of life would rely on the person's experience with social change. This experience may influence societal quality of life and quality of work life, which may in turn affect personal quality of life. Additionally, the experience of social change is possibly less detrimental to personal…

  4. Quality of life and hematocrit level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, N W

    1992-07-01

    As the anemia that accompanies chronic renal failure (CRF) is successfully treated with recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin), striking improvements in overall quality of life have been noted in several clinical studies of patients receiving chronic hemodialysis. A review of available clinical data has shown that, following epoetin therapy, peak oxygen consumption, a principal indicator of exercise ability, increased by approximately 50% as the hematocrit level increased. Following epoetin therapy in pediatric patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) increased significantly and correlated well with increases in hemoglobin concentrations. Increased exercise capacity associated with the reversal of anemia appeared to positively effect many quality-of-life parameters. Analysis of questionnaires incorporating both subjective and objective quality-of-life indicators showed significant improvements between baseline and follow-up periods. Many patients experienced relief from some of the debilitating symptoms of anemia and many had significantly improved functional ability. Higher activity and energy levels were reflected in enhanced emotional and social well-being, with improvements noted in appetite, sleeping behavior, and sexual function. There was no change in the employment status of most patients. The extent of improvement in overall quality of life may be a function of the baseline level of impairment and the potential for reversal. However, baseline capabilities at rest may not be appropriate for physiologic studies.

  5. Explaining quality of life with crisis theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, M.A.G.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.; de Haes, H.C.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Based on the premises of crisis theory. we expected cancer patients in-crisis to report a poorer quality of life (QL) and cancer patients post-crisis to report a similar level of overall QL in comparison to healthy individuals. To explain these hypothesized findings, we expected the coping resources

  6. Lifestyle, Quality of Life, and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed in order to investigate the connection between lifestyle, quality of life, and health status by way of a questionnaire-based survey. The questionnaire was mailed in February 1993 to 2,460 persons aged between 18 and 88, randomly selected from the CPR (Danish Central Register, and 7,222 persons from the Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959–61. A total of 1,501 persons between the ages of 18 and 88 years and 4,626 persons between the ages of 31 and 33 years returned the questionnaire (response rates 61.0% and 64.1%, respectively. Variables investigated in this study were: alcohol consumption, tobacco consumption, type of diet, amount of exercise taken, quality of life, self-assessed health status, and number of medical complaints from which respondent suffered. The results showed that health has a stronger correlation to quality of life (r = 0.5, p < 0.0001 than it has to lifestyle (r = 0.2, p < 0.0001. It is concluded that preventable diseases could be more effectively handled through a concentrated effort to improve quality of life rather than through an approach that focuses solely on the factors that are traditionally seen to reflect an unhealthy lifestyle.

  7. Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_160885.html Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life Also increases chances of having end-of-life ... incurable cancer helps patients cope and improves their quality of life, a new study shows. It also leads to ...

  8. Fibromyalgia, Spirituality, Coping and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biccheri, Eliane; Roussiau, Nicolas; Mambet-Doué, Constance

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the impact of spirituality on coping strategies and on the quality of life of fibromyalgia patients. The study was carried out on 590 people suffering from fibromyalgia. The data were collected with the French version of the WCC-R (The Ways of Coping Checklist: Cousson et al. 1996), the questionnaire of spirituality (Evaluation de La Spiritualité: Renard and Roussiau, 2016) and Diener's Satisfaction with Life Scale questionnaire, translated into French (Blais et al. 1989). An analysis carried out with the software SPSS and Hayes' models showed that both problem-focused coping and coping through social support seeking are mediating variables that enable an indirect link between spirituality and quality of life.

  9. Quality of Life in adults who stutter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Sonneville (Caroline); C.A.M. Bouwmans-Frijters (Clazien); M-C. Franken (Marie-Christine)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Although persistent developmental stuttering is known to affect daily living, just how great the impact is remains unclear. Furthermore, little is known about the underlying mechanisms which lead to a diminished quality of life (QoL). The primary objective of this study is to e

  10. Quality of Life in adults who stutter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Sonneville (Caroline); C.A.M. Bouwmans-Frijters (Clazien); M-C. Franken (Marie-Christine)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Although persistent developmental stuttering is known to affect daily living, just how great the impact is remains unclear. Furthermore, little is known about the underlying mechanisms which lead to a diminished quality of life (QoL). The primary objective of this study is to e

  11. Quality of Life in Adults Who Stutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedoot, Caroline; Bouwmans, Clazien; Franken, Marie-Christine; Stolk, Elly

    2011-01-01

    Although persistent developmental stuttering is known to affect daily living, just how great the impact is remains unclear. Furthermore, little is known about the underlying mechanisms which lead to a diminished quality of life (QoL). The primary objective of this study is to explore to what extent QoL is impaired in adults who stutter (AWS). In…

  12. Quality of Life in adults who stutter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Sonneville (Caroline); C.A.M. Bouwmans-Frijters (Clazien); M-C. Franken (Marie-Christine)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Although persistent developmental stuttering is known to affect daily living, just how great the impact is remains unclear. Furthermore, little is known about the underlying mechanisms which lead to a diminished quality of life (QoL). The primary objective of this study is to

  13. Quality of Life in Childhood Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PQLI, Version 4.0 and a standardized headache assessment were completed by children and parents, in a survey of 572 consecutive patients (mean age, 11.4 +/- 3.6 years who presented with headaches at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Ohio.

  14. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Madame

    2016-01-01

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established.

  15. The relationship between compliance and quality of life among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship between compliance and quality of life among adolescents with ... the rating scale for compliance (RSC) and Diabetes Quality of Life Scale ... the control group showed more satisfaction with life compared to the intervention ...

  16. [Quality of life in gerodontology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de

    2011-01-01

    In clinical decision-making on whether or not to treat an oral disease and on making a choice from the spectrum of treatment options, the influence of the treatment on the physical and psycho-social well-being of the patient should play a crucial role. This awareness originates from gerodontology. T

  17. Living with diabetes: quality of care and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Isla Pera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilar Isla PeraDepartment of Public Health Nursing, Mental and Mother and Child Health, University of Barcelona, SpainBackground: The aim of this research was to characterize the experience of living with diabetes mellitus (DM and identify patients’ opinions of the quality of care received and the results of interventions.Methods: A descriptive, exploratory evaluation study using qualitative methodology was performed. Participants consisted of 40 adult patients diagnosed with DM and followed up in a public hospital in Barcelona, Spain. A semistructured interview and a focus group were used and a thematic content analysis was performed.Results: Patients described DM as a disease that is difficult to control and that provokes lifestyle changes requiring effort and sacrifice. Insulin treatment increased the perception of disease severity. The most frequent and dreaded complication was hypoglycemia. The main problems perceived by patients affecting the quality of care were related to a disease-centered medical approach, lack of information, limited participation in decision-making, and the administrative and bureaucratic problems of the health care system.Conclusion: The bureaucratic circuits of the health care system impair patients’ quality of life and perceived quality of care. Health professionals should foster patient participation in decision-making. However, this requires not only training and appropriate attitudes, but also adequate staffing and materials.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, health care quality, quality of life, qualitative research

  18. Quality of life in psoriasis patients

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    Fatma M Abd Al Salam.,** Seham F Mohamed, **Taghreed M El-Shafie.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Skin and psyche share embryonic origins, various psychological factors, including emotional trauma and stressful life events, may affect both onset and progression of some skin conditions, Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease with substantial impact on patient's social and relational ways of living and subsequently on their quality of life. This chronic condition has a significant negative impact on patients' quality of life. Psoriasis has been linked to patients depression and suicidal tendencies Patients and Methods The study group consisted of 50 consenting consecutive cases of psoriasis vulgaris, of both sexes, aged 18-62 years (41.44 ± 0.101, and with duration of the disease 6-10 years, attending the dermatology outpatient clinic of Al Zahraa university hospital. The extent of clinical severity of the disease was assessed by the psoriatic area and severity index (PASI Score, Assessment of quality of life of patients by Lehman Quality of Life Interview (LQLI .According toPASI score they were devided into 3groups :mild cases were treated by topical steroid and salyslic acid while moderate cases were treated by NB-UVB and severe cases were treated by systemic methotrexate. Results showed that 57.4% of patients were unsatisfied with their family relations and 43.5% are satisfied. However, about their social relations they were 55.3% satisfied while 44.6% were unsatisfied. In the other hand, they were 52.3% satisfied with their finance while the other 48.2% were unsatisfied with it. As regard, work or school they were 66.4% satisfied and 33.5% unsatisfied. While they were 85.1% satisfied with low, safety, and 14.8% unsatisfied. The same for health 94.4% satisfied and 6.5% unsatisfied .The third group treated by systemic methotrexate show marked increase in LQLI. Conclusions: Psoriasis is a disease with profound impact on the psychological and social aspect of the patient, particularly because of its visibility. Systemic therapy of psoriasis

  19. Nonlinear Quality of Life Index

    CERN Document Server

    Zinovyev, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper includes supplementary material for the paper [A.N. Gorban, A. Zinovyev, Principal manifolds and graphs in practice: from molecular biology to dynamical systems, International Journal of Neural Systems 20 (3) (2010), 219-232. E-print: arXiv:1001.1122 [cs.NE

  20. PLANNING THE QUALITY OF LIFE FOR TIMISOARA GROWTH POLE

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    Cătălina-Livia POPA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to show that planning the quality of life at local level through economic development can be a new approach for policy makers and community in improving quality of life. In this purpose, the Quality Function Deployment (QFD model will be use to planning the quality of life and to identify the main directions of economic development to support improving the quality of life at the level of Timisoara Growth Pole from Romania. The dimensions of quality of life are analyzed starting from the point of view of inhabitants. The results include a new approach in which the dimensions of quality of life are the key element that orients economic development in order to improve the quality of life of human being. The case study results refer to the main elements of quality of life at Timisoara Growth Pole and the relevant directions of economic development to improve the quality of life for Timisoara Growth Pole.

  1. Study of Quality of Work Life (QWL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Nasl Saraji

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A high quality of work life (QWL is essential for organizations to continue to attract and retain employees. QWL is a comprehensive program designated to improve employee satisfaction. This research aimed to provide insights into the positive and negative attitudes of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS Hospitals’ employees from their quality of life. A cross- sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted among 908 TUMS hospitals’ employees by questionnaire at 15 studied hospitals. A stratified random sampling technique was used to select respondents as nursing, supportive and paramedical groups. The results showed that the majority of employees were dissatisfied with occupational health and safety, intermediate and senior managers , their income, balance between the time they spent working and with family and also indicated that their work was not interesting and satisfying. TUMS hospitals’ employees responding to this survey have a poor quality of work life. We suggest more training and educations for TUMS hospitals’ managers on QWL issues are planned.

  2. Quality of Life and Health-Related Quality of Life of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Livingston, Michael H.; Palisano, Robert J.; Galuppi, Barbara E.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed quality of life (QOL) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of 203 adolescents with cerebral palsy (111 males, 92 females; mean age 16y [SD 1y 9mo]). Participants were classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), as Level I (n=60), Level II (n=33), Level III (n=28), Level IV (n=50), or Level V…

  3. Methodologies for defining quality of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glicken, J. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engi, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-10

    Quality of life as a concept has been used in many ways in the public policy arena. It can be used in summative evaluations to assess the impacts of policies or programs. Alternatively, it can be applied to formative evaluations to provide input to the formation of new policies. In short, it provides the context for the understanding needed to evaluate the results of choices that have been made in the public policy arena, or the potential of choices yet to be made. In either case, the public policy question revolves around the positive or negative impact the choice will have on quality of life, and the magnitude of that impact. This discussion will develop a conceptual framework that proposes that an assessment of quality of life is based on a comparison of expectations with experience. The framework defines four basic components from which these expectations arise: natural conditions, social conditions, the body, and the mind. Each one of these components is generally described, and associated with a general policy or rhetorical category which gives it its policy vocabulary--environmental quality, economic well-being, human health, and self-fulfillment.

  4. Quality of life in lepromatous leprosy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Demir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae bacillus affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system. Leprosy can lead to severe deformities depending on the extent of the disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the quality of life of patients with lepromatous leprosy. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with lepromatous leprosy and 35 healthy controls were included in the study. The patients were evaluated with the Turkish version of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36. The relationship of quality of life with age, gender, marital status, and the grade of the visual impairment was studied and compared with the healthy controls. Results: Total and all the subgroup DLQI scores were higher in the leprosy group than in the control group (p<0.05. The patients with grade 2 visual impairment were more severely affected by the disease with regard to symptoms/feelings and school/work life as compared to the patients with grade 1 visual impairment (p=0.04, p=0.03, respectively. SF-36 physical functioning, physical role functioning, general health perceptions, vitality, social role functioning, and emotional role functioning scores were statistically lower in the patient group than in the control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: We observed that DLQI scores were lower in patients with lepromatous leprosy than in the control group, while increasing impairment in eyes was found to have a negative impact on quality of life. The SF-36 revealed that physical functioning, physical role functioning, general health perceptions, vitality, social role functioning, emotional role functioning, and mental health were negatively influenced in patients with lepromatous leprosy.

  5. Greece Financial Crisis and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechili, Aggelos E; Kalokairinou, Athena; Kaitelidou, Dafni; Diomidous, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    The last six years the global community is facing an economic crisis that first appeared in USA. This crisis has a lot of impacts especially in health sector. Unemployment, job insecurity and the loss of disposable income have a significant impact in health too. The main objective of this research was to investigate the quality of life of the general population in Greece during the financial crisis. To collect the data it has been used the Greek version of Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36v2). In general, income, level of education, cohabitation and parenthood had a significant impact in quality of life. As a conclusion, unemployed participants' score was lower in the entire dimensions and in the two summary scales too.

  6. [Quality of work life in nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, María Olga Quintana; Klijn, Tatiana Maria Paravic

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with aspects that are related to work, quality of life, and its relationship with the nursing staff within the Mexican context. Professionals in health areas present alterations that are commonly overlooked and barely dealt with, especially when the person is a woman and, the care they give to patients, families, and/or friends, or community members, precede their own self care. In the case of institutions or work areas, even when the job provides human beings with several benefits, it usually lacks the proper conditions to perform the job, carries negatives aspects or pathological conditions, all which can relate to poor levels of Quality of Life at Work. Members of the nursing team need to perform their work in the best possible conditions in order to maintain their physical and mental health.

  7. Psychoactive Drugs and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed on a representative sample of the Danish population in order to investigate the connection to the use of psychoactive drugs and quality of life (QOL by way of a questionnaire-based survey. The questionnaire was mailed in February 1993 to 2,460 persons aged between 18 and 88, randomly selected from the CPR (Danish Central Register, and 7,222 persons from the Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959–61.A total of 1,501 persons between the ages 18 and 88 years and 4,626 persons between the ages 31 and 33 years returned the questionnaire (response rates of 61.0% and 64.1%, respectively. Variables investigated in this study were ten different psychotropic drugs and quality of life.Our study showed that over half the Danish population had used illegal psychotropic drugs. The most commonly used was cannabis (marijuana though experience of this drug appeared not to co-vary with QOL to any significant extent. Cocaine, amphetamine, and psilocybin had been used by 1.2 to 3.3% of the population and this varied with QOL to a clear albeit small extent. LSD has been used by 1.2% of the population and the users had a QOL score 10% lower than those who had never used psychotropic drugs. The group with the lowest quality of life was found to be persons who had used heroin, morphine, methadone, and a mixture of alcohol and tranquilizers (10–20% below the group with the highest quality of life.

  8. Psychoactive drugs and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav

    2003-08-18

    This study was performed on a representative sample of the Danish population in order to investigate the connection to the use of psychoactive drugs and quality of life (QOL) by way of a questionnaire-based survey. The questionnaire was mailed in February 1993 to 2,460 persons aged between 18 and 88, randomly selected from the CPR (Danish Central Register), and 7,222 persons from the Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959-61. A total of 1,501 persons between the ages 18 and 88 years and 4,626 persons between the ages 31 and 33 years returned the questionnaire (response rates of 61.0% and 64.1%, respectively). Variables investigated in this study were ten different psychotropic drugs and quality of life. Our study showed that over half the Danish population had used illegal psychotropic drugs. The most commonly used was cannabis (marijuana) though experience of this drug appeared not to co-vary with QOL to any significant extent. Cocaine, amphetamine, and psilocybin had been used by 1.2 to 3.3% of the population and this varied with QOL to a clear albeit small extent. LSD has been used by 1.2% of the population and the users had a QOL score 10% lower than those who had never used psychotropic drugs. The group with the lowest quality of life was found to be persons who had used heroin, morphine, methadone, and a mixture of alcohol and tranquilizers (10-20% below the group with the highest quality of life).

  9. Quality of life after breast reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Boukje J E; Boeckx, Willy D; De Lorenzi, Francesca; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare health-related quality of life in women with symptomatic macromastia before and after breast reduction. Two comparable groups of women were enrolled in the study, those waiting for breast reduction (group 1) and those who underwent surgery approximately 2 years before (group 2). To evaluate the specific beneficial effects of breast reduction, we used a unique combination of general and specific questionnaires: the Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36), the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE), the Self-Consciousness Scale (SCS), and the Derriford Appearance Scale 59 (DAS-59). The esthetic appearance of the breast was also evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). In both groups, preoperative back pain was present in more than 50% of patients. Complaints were significantly reduced after surgery. SF-36 showed significant higher quality of life in group 2 with regard to 7 of 8 investigated domains. Increased self-esteem after surgery, increased personal and public self-consciousness were observed. Moreover, the condition-specific DAS-59 showed that insecurity, pain, shame, and unattractiveness were significantly scored higher in the nonoperated group. Subjective esthetic score was significantly higher in the operated group (2.5 vs. 7.1). The data of this study provide further evidence that women who have been operated for breast hypertrophy have a significant improvement in quality of life compared with those who are not yet operated. These data are further evidence that breast hypertrophy is not solely an esthetic problem.

  10. [Influence of stomatological health upon the quality of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanovskaia, O E

    2008-01-01

    The parameters of quality of life of 58 stomatological patients were investigated. 3 groups of dentist health were allocated. On the basis of correlation dependence was proved that stomatological diseases sharply reduced the quality of life and health. The application for the invention definition of quality of a life on indexes of stomatologic health> is issued, allowing to define individual volume of treatment-and-prophylactic actions depending the parameters of quality of life.

  11. Quality of life in chronic disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalliopi Megari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During the past decades there was an increasing predominance of chronic disorders, with a large number of people living with chronic diseases that can adversely affect their quality of life. The aim of the present paper is to study quality of life and especially Health-related quality of life (HRQoL in chronic diseases. HRQOL is a multidimensional construct that consists of at least three broad domains − physical, psychological, and social functioning − that are affected by one’s disease and/or treatment. HRQoL is usually measured in chronic conditions and is frequently impaired to a great extent. In addition, factors that are associated with good and poor HRQoL, as well as HRQoL assessment will be discussed. The estimation of the relative impact of chronic diseases on HRQoL is necessary in order to better plan and distribute health care resources aiming at a better HRQoL.[«All the people perceive the concept of living good or being well, that is the same as being happy». (Aristotle. 384-322 BC. Ethica Nichomachea

  12. Hand eczema severity and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, Tove; Andersen, Klaus E; Brandao, Francisco M

    2008-01-01

    was found for hand eczema severity and age (P sick leave was getting higher (P ... test clinics participated in the study. Data on QoL were obtained from a self-administered questionnaire using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Severity was assessed by a scoring system (Hand Eczema Severity Index, HECSI) as well as frequency of eruptions and sick leave due to hand eczema...

  13. Impact of Vitiligo on Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Sánchez, M A; Vargas-Salinas, M; Peralta-Pedrero, M L; Olguín-García, M G; Jurado-Santa Cruz, F

    2017-09-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic autoimmune skin disease caused by the destruction of melanocytes. Although quality of life (QOL) in vitiligo has been studied in different countries, it has not yet been investigated in Mexico. The aim of this study was to assess the QOL of Mexican patients with vitiligo. We conducted a cross-sectional study at the research unit of Centro Dermatológico Dr. Ladislao de la Pascua in Mexico City. We included adults with vitiligo and excluded those with other pigmentation disorders or a neurological or psychiatric disorder. Patients on psychoactive medications were also excluded. All the patients were administered the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), a vitiligo-specific quality of life instrument (the VitiQoL), and the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories. We studied 150 patients with vitiligo (103 women [68.7%] and 47 men [31.3%]). The median (interquartile range) age was 38 (20) years. The mean (SD) scores on the DLQI and VitiQoL were 5.2 (5.4) and 32.1 (22.7) out of total possible scores of 30 and 90, respectively. The correlation between questionnaire scores was 0.675 (P<.001). Patients with genital involvement scored significantly worse on the VitiQoL than those without lesions in this area (43.95 [28.4]) vs. 28.98 [20.08], P<.001). The prevalence of depression and anxiety was 34% and 60%, respectively. Vitiligo has a minimal impact on the QOL of our patients. QOL was worse in patients with genital lesions. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Quality of Life of Students with Disabilites Attending Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zboon, Eman; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Theeb, Raied Sheikh

    2014-01-01

    In spite of increasing number of students with disabilities in universities, there is limited research on quality of life of these students. This study aimed to identify the quality of life level of undergraduate students with disabilities at Jordanian universities. The sample consisted of (147) students. A quality of life scale was constructed,…

  15. Impact of Anxiety on Quality of Life in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna, Kristine K.; Alice Cronin-Golomb

    2012-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), both the patient and the health care provider look for ways to preserve the patient's quality of life. Many studies focus on the impact of depression and motor disability on poor life quality but neglect to examine the role of anxiety. We investigated the impact of anxiety and depression on health-related quality of life in PD, using the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life measure (PDQ-39). Symptoms of anxiety, more than depression, cognitiv...

  16. Self-perception of quality of life: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Galli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The idea of Quality of Life includes two areas: objective aspects such as socioeconomic status, and subjective self- perception. Psychoeducation provides useful means to find alternative ways to evaluate and cope with life conditions, thus improving quality of life. Evidence to support if there is a relationship between quality of life self- perception and external life conditions was examined in three cities of Argentina. Objective: to assess the socioeconomic status and to analyze individual differences in self-perception among residents of the cities of Buenos Aires, Balcarce and Lincoln. Participants: a total of 398 adults (200 men and 198 women. Method: a assessment of socioeconomic conditions according to international standards b assessment of quality of life self-perception applying the Quality of Life Index (QLI-Sp. Results: external life conditions do not predict individual self- perception of quality of life

  17. Quality of life in chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Laura Bini; Lorenzo Fantini; Elena Baroni; Davide Campana; Paola Tomassetti; Roberto Corinaldesi

    2006-01-01

    In an era such as the present one in which there is a high demand for health services with the associated pressure of controlling spending, health care organizations are concerned about the cost-effectiveness of quality improvement interventions. On the other hand,the impact of the disease and the treatment on the patient's overall well-being and functioning has become a topic of growing interest not only in clinical research but also in practice. The clinical evaluation of the benefits of specific treatments for chronic, debilitating and incurable diseases should increasingly include formal assessment of patient activity and well-being. Thus, health-related quality of life as subjectively perceived by the patient,is becoming a major issue in the evaluation of any therapeutic intervention, mainly in patients with chronic or difficult diseases where the aim of the intervention is to keep patients either symptom-free and capable of living in the community for a long time or to reduce the discomfort caused by the disease. In this paper,we review the current knowledge on the quality of life assessment in chronic pancreatitis patients.

  18. Intermetropolitan migration and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porell, F W

    1982-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the relative importance of economic and quality of life (QOL) factors as determinants of inter-metropolitan migration in the United States. The study is based on the generalized systemic gravity model of Alonso and on data from a sample of 25 SMSAs over the period 1965-1970. "The most striking feature of the empirical results is the apparent lack of importance of origin economic and QOL factors as determinants of outmigration.... On the other hand, the empirical results suggest both economic and QOL factors to be significant determinants of inmigration."

  19. Interrelationship among physical activity, quality of life, clinical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and quality of life was assessed using the Diabetes. Quality of Life .... is a generic scale and has a reliability of 0.80 and criterion ... diabetes care behaviours and satisfaction with diabetes.

  20. Evaluation of anxiety, depression, and quality of life in patients with acne vulgaris, and quality of life in their families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Duman

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Acne vulgaris does not have an effect on quality of life and the risk of anxiety or depression. In the cases of acne, when the quality of life decreases, the risk of depression as well as anxiety increases and the quality of life of the family members is negatively affected. Acne vulgaris negatively affects the quality of life of the family members of the patients.

  1. Quality of Work Life - A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mily Velayudhan, T. K., Dr.; Yameni, M. D.

    2017-05-01

    The main objective or the purpose of this research is to investigate and identify the significance of work environment towards the performance and also to study the effectiveness of the QWL in the organization. Methods/Analysis:In order to meet the stated objectives a structured questionnaire was framed and data was collected using convenience sampling from 123 employees of the steel manufacturing organization in Chennai, and to study the significant association chi-square was used by the researcher. Findings:QWL of the employees of this steel company can be improved by conducting some more training classes for the employees who are falling in the category of more than 3 to 4 years of experience and >4 years of experience which would boost their self confidence and help them attain their level of satisfaction. Similarly the organization can give some more security to the employees falling in the category of 41 and above so that they feel quite secure in the hand of organization and they can give their paramount performance. Novelty/Improvement:This empirical article on Quality of Work life - A Study’s structured questionnairecan be applied as an Employee opinion Survey taken in once in 6 months on knowing the quality of work life. By doing this survey organizations can get to know the quality of work life of the employees and take necessary steps to improve the QWL among all the Employees. It also helps the employers to know that their employees who are working in their organization are happily working leading to good QWL which will boost up their performance to come happily daily to their work place.

  2. Factors influencing quality of life in asthmatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-kalemji, Abir; Petersen, Karin Dam; Sørensen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The quality of life (QOL) in persons with asthma is reduced and different factors such as demography, asthma severity and psychiatric comorbidity play an influential role. However, little is known about the interplay of these factors. OBJECTIVE: To describe QOL in relation to asthma...... and analyse for the relative impact of asthma severity, psychiatric comorbidity, lifestyle (smoking and obesity) and demographic determinants on QOL in persons with asthma. METHODS: One thousand one hundred sixty-one subjects from an earlier cohort with and without asthma were sent an asthma screening...... gender and smoking were associated with reduced QOL, suggesting that these factors play an independent role on lowering QOL. Depression did not inflate the relationship between asthma severity and worse QOL, suggesting that asthma severity plays an independent role on everyday life regardless...

  3. Quality of life measurements in patients with osteoporosis and fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa M. Madureira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To review all specific questionnaires regarding quality of life in osteoporosis and to describe their distinctive indications, we searched Medline, the Scientific Electronic Library Online database, and the Latin-American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database. Nine specific questionnaires related to osteoporosis quality of life were found: 1 the Women's Health Questionnaire, 2 Osteoporosis Quality of Life Questionnaire, 3 Osteoporosis Assessment Questionnaire, 4 Osteoporosis Functional Disability Questionnaire, 5 Quality of Life Questionnaire of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis, 6 Osteoporosis-Targeted Quality of Life Questionnaire, 7 Japanese Osteoporosis Quality of Life Questionnaire, 8 the 16-item Assessment of Health-Related Quality of Life in Osteoporosis, and 9 the Quality of Life Questionnaire in Osteoporosis (QUALIOST TM. The Quality of Life Questionnaire of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis is the osteoporosis-specific questionnaire most commonly used in the literature. The Quality of Life Questionnaire of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the Osteoporosis Quality of Life Questionnaire are targeted more toward fracture assessment, and the Osteoporosis Functional Disability Questionnaire can be used for longitudinal studies involving exercise. In the present study, the authors summarize all of the specific questionnaires for osteoporosis and demonstrate that these questionnaires should be selected based on the objectives to be evaluated. Osteoporosis-specific quality of life questionnaires should be validated in the language of the country of origin before being used.

  4. Flexible work-arrangements and the quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierop, C.

    2003-01-01

    In the present paper, an attempt has been made to measure the consequences for the quality of life of working with a part-time and/or temporary contract. Quality of life has been defined in a utilitarian and a liberal way. In the utilitarian definition, the quality of life is determined by the exten

  5. Flexible work-arrangements and the quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierop, C.

    2003-01-01

    In the present paper, an attempt has been made to measure the consequences for the quality of life of working with a part-time and/or temporary contract. Quality of life has been defined in a utilitarian and a liberal way. In the utilitarian definition, the quality of life is determined by the

  6. Quality of Life Theory I. The IQOL Theory: An Integrative Theory of the Global Quality of Life Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life (QOL means a good life and we believe that a good life is the same as living a life with a high quality. This paper presents the theoretical and philosophical framework of the Danish Quality of Life Survey, and of the SEQOL, QOL5, and QOL1 questionnaires.The notion of a good life can be observed from subjective to the objective, where this spectrum incorporates a number of existing quality of life theories. We call this spectrum the integrative quality-of-life (IQOL theory and discuss the following aspects in this paper: well being, satisfaction with life, happiness, meaning in life, the biological information system (�balance�, realizing life potential, fulfillment of needs, and objective factors.The philosophy of life outlined in this paper tries to measure the global quality of life with questions derived from the integrative theory of the quality of life. The IQOL theory is an overall theory or meta-theory encompassing eight more factual theories in a subjective-existential-objective spectrum. Other philosophies of life can stress other aspects of life, but by this notion of introducing such an existential depth into the health and social sciences, we believe to have taken a necessary step towards a new humility and respect for the richness and complexity of life.

  7. Quality of life: perception of lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, A; Milroy, R; Gillis, C R; McEwen, J

    1996-12-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine what quality of life means to lung cancer patients. 200 patients with either lung cancer (108) or chronic respiratory disease (92) were interviewed using a short open-ended questionnaire. They were asked to define quality of life in general, identify what they considered to be a good quality of life for themselves and to rank the relative importance attached to each nominated item. A content analysis was carried out and patients' responses were categorised into eight items. These were: ability to do what one wants to do/work, enjoyment of life, family life, financial security, happiness, health, living longer and social life/leisure activities. Of these, health (42%), enjoyment of life (25%) and family life (24%) were the three most nominated items as definition of quality of life in general. Patients perceived a good quality of life for themselves differently. Family life (58%), health (51%) and social life (43%) were found to be the most nominated components of a good quality of life for the patients. Overall, patients ranked family life and health as the first or second most important factors. There were no significant differences between cases and controls. The study results are challenging and serve to remind us that the term quality of life is misused in many studies. Most existing measures do not encompass the wider aspects of quality of life identified here, but rather concentrate on the "health-related" aspects of quality of life. To achieve this, the research into the best ways of measuring and assessing quality of life must continue to seek individual values and preferences and how these can be applied in a simple way in clinical studies.

  8. Putting quality of life on the agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitatani, K

    1991-01-01

    At the Population and Natural Resources Workshop of the World Conservation Union (IUCN) General Assembly in Perth, Australia, December 1990, population and quality of life issues were stressed as one of the central items to be placed on the 1992 Agenda of the UN Conference on Environment. The pace of environmental degradation is quickening, the causes are becoming more entrenched, and indecision will narrow our options. Poverty and population growth are making development unsustainable. Technological miracles will not appear to restore balance. Deforestation, soil erosion, decertification and loss of water resources are fueling urbanization. Therefore the World Commission on Environment and Development, known as the Brundtland Commission, ranks human resources development as a top priority in sustainable development and quality of life. Human resources can be improved by providing maternal and child care, family planning and improving the status of women. Successful family planning programs as seen in Thailand and Malaysia can show results very quickly once national population policies, institutions and capacity are in place.

  9. [Quality of life and mortality of patients in intensive care. Indices of quality of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, D; Galguera, F; Jam, M R; Vilar, S; Castella, X; Artigas, A

    1998-01-01

    At present there is no single practical standardized scale for measuring quality of life (QL). Any proposal should include the patient's physical impairment, level of independence, and subjective perception of happiness. We combined three previously published scales to define a quality of life index (QLI) that we propose as a standard quantitative instrument. The applicability and usefulness of QLI for the measurement of the level of deterioration of patients after admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) was examined. We prospectively evaluated QL before patient admission to determine if it influences mortality, as well as long-term changes in the QL and the factors conditioning te deterioration of patients released from the UCI as evaluated by QL indicators. To calculate QLI, we combined the Karnofsky scale, daily life activities index, and the perception of quality of life scale. The resulting percentage (QLI) was used to evaluate 536 patients after admission to the ICU and 6 and 12 months after release. QLI was compared with the severity of disease (Apache II), probability of death (MPM), diagnostic group, and socioeconomic variables. Using multivariate methods, four significant variables related with mortality were identified: Apache II--MPM, duration of the stay in the unit, age, and QLI. Our analysis of long-term deterioration showed that advanced age, high QLI before admission, and the patient's diagnostic group explained the degree of deterioration. QLI was a useful instrument for obtaining a quantitative estimate of the QL of critically ill patients.

  10. [Quality of life of older people living in Antofagasta, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzúa, Alfonso; Bravo, Miguel; Ogalde, Mario; Vargas, Carolina

    2011-08-01

    As basic needs of older people are covered, the concern about the determinants of their quality of life becomes preeminent. To evaluate the relationship between self-reported quality of life and related variables. The Quality of Life Survey for older people developed by the World Health Organization (WHOQOL-Old), the reduced scale of Ryff Psychological Well Being, the Functional Social Support Questionnaire, the SF-12 and GHQ12 general health surveys were applied to 406 older adults aged 71 ± 7 years (83% women), that were members of older people organizations and lived in Antofagasta, Chile. Older people that perceived themselves as sick had significantly lower quality of life scores. Self-acceptance, social support, autonomy and having a purpose in life also influenced the perception of quality of life. Health issues and the sense of self efficacy are determinants of the quality of life of these older subjects.

  11. The quality of life and satisfaction with life of women who are childless by choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bień, Agnieszka; Rzońca, Ewa; Iwanowicz-Palus, Grażyna; Lecyk, Urszula; Bojar, Iwona

    2017-05-11

    Objective. The study attempts to identify and analyze factors affecting the quality of life and satisfaction with life of women who are childless by choice. Materials and method. The research instruments used were: the WHOQOL-Bref questionnaire and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and author's own questionnaire. Results. A better overall quality of life, perception of own health and quality of life in all the specific domains analyzed was found among childless women living in cities, college/university-educated, and with a good or very good financial standing. Conclusions. A positive correlation was found between satisfaction with life and overall quality of life, general perceived health, and all quality of life domains. Higher satisfaction with life scores in childless women are correlated with a higher quality of life scores and better perceived health.

  12. A review of mothers' prenatal and postnatal quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Symon Andrew

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contemporary broad descriptions of health and well-being are reflected in an increasing appreciation of quality of life issues; in turn this has led to a growing number of tools to measure this. Methods This paper reviews articles cited in MEDLINE, CINAHL and BIDS which have addressed the concept of quality of life in pregnancy and the period following childbirth. Results It describes five groups of articles: those explicitly assessing quality of life in this area; those using broader health assessments as an indicator of quality of life; those articles equating quality of life with certain pregnancy outcomes in identified groups of patients; those studies which identify the possibility of pregnancy as an outcome measure and infer from this that quality of life has been improved; and those articles which are themselves reviews or commentaries of pregnancy and childbirth and which identify quality of life as a feature. Conclusions The term 'quality of life' is used inconsistently in the literature. There are few quality of life tools specifically designed for the maternity care setting. Improved or adversely affected quality of life is frequently inferred from certain clinical conditions.

  13. [Progress of research on quality of life of glaucoma patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Shu-Xin; Guo, Wen-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Glaucoma is a kind of long life disease characterized by irreversible optic nerve damage, visual field impairment, and visual acuity loss. Both the disease and its medical management could make the patient perceive difficulties in their daily life activities and social function. Therefore, their quality of life would be affected significantly. This report briefly reviews the recent researches on the quality of life and its influencing factors of glaucoma patients. The researches on how to improve the quality of life of glaucoma patients are also reviewed.

  14. Health, Quality of Life and Population Density: A Preliminary Study on "Contextualized" Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassio, Omar; Rollero, Chiara; De Piccoli, Norma

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life concerns individual (physical and psychological health), interpersonal (social relationships) and contextual (environment) aspects, which are both subjective and objective. In considering contextual characteristics, empirical findings have demonstrated that people's relation to their living environment is a key issue for their…

  15. Health, Quality of Life and Population Density: A Preliminary Study on "Contextualized" Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassio, Omar; Rollero, Chiara; De Piccoli, Norma

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life concerns individual (physical and psychological health), interpersonal (social relationships) and contextual (environment) aspects, which are both subjective and objective. In considering contextual characteristics, empirical findings have demonstrated that people's relation to their living environment is a key issue for their…

  16. Impact of Anxiety on Quality of Life in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine K. Hanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson's disease (PD, both the patient and the health care provider look for ways to preserve the patient's quality of life. Many studies focus on the impact of depression and motor disability on poor life quality but neglect to examine the role of anxiety. We investigated the impact of anxiety and depression on health-related quality of life in PD, using the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life measure (PDQ-39. Symptoms of anxiety, more than depression, cognitive status, or motor stage, significantly affected quality of life in 38 nondemented patients with mild-to-moderate motor disability. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that anxiety explained 29% of the variance in the PDQ-39 sum score, and depression explained 10% of the variance beyond that accounted for by anxiety. The findings suggest that primary management of anxiety as well as depression may be important to optimizing the quality of life of PD patients.

  17. Dimensions of Identity and Subjective Quality of Life in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleś, Maria

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relations between identity statuses and the perceived quality of life in adolescents aged 16-19. The research methods include the Ego Identity Process Questionnaire to assess identity status of a sample covering 233 participants (148 girls, 85 boys), and the Youth Quality of Life Instrument to assess their subjective quality of life. Diffused identity is linked to the lowest level of subjective quality of life, whereas foreclosed identity to the highest. Five patterns of the connection between identity dimensions and perceived quality of life have been distinguished through cluster analysis. The results indicate that different patterns of identity processes in adolescents coexist with different levels of quality of life.

  18. Quality of life after carotid endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros Henrique

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most studies documenting beneficial outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CE are limited to mortality and morbidity rates, costs, and length of hospital stay (LOS. Few have examined the dependency of patients and how they perceive their own health changes after surgery. The aim of the present study was to evaluate quality of life and independence in activities of daily living (ADL and to study its determinants. Methods Sixty-three patients admitted in the Post Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU after CE were eligible for this 14-month follow-up study. Patients were contacted 6 months after discharge to complete a Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36 and to have their dependency in ADL evaluated. Results Among 59 hospital survivors at 6 months follow-up, 43 completed the questionnaires. Sixty-three percent reported that their general level of health was better on the day they answered the questionnaire than 12 months earlier. Patients had worse SF-36 scores for all domains except bodily pain than a general urban population, and comparison with a group of patients 6 months after surgical ICU discharge showed no differences. Six months after PACU discharge, the Lawton Instrumental Activities of ADL Scale and the Katz Index of ADL demonstrated higher dependency scores (5.9 ± 2.2 versus 4.3 ± 2.4 and 0.3 ± 0.8 versus 0.6 ± 0.9, p Conclusion Patients undergoing CE have improved self-perception of quality of life despite being more dependent. Almost all their scores are worse than those in an urban population. We could identify no predictors of greater dependency in ADL tasks six months after PACU discharge.

  19. Quality of life of elderly people with impaired physical mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria de Paula

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an integrative review, which aimed at identifying the available evidence about the knowledge on the quality of life of the elderly with impaired physical mobility between 2001 and 2011. Data collection happened in the LILACS, MEDLINE and COCHRANEdatabases. After analytical reading of works, we selected 16 articles for analysis in two thematic categories: quality of life and personal satisfaction, and quality of life and functional capacity. The mobilitylimitations, pain and emotional well-being in the elderly can be attributed to chronic conditions, negatively affecting the quality of life; and the elderly who report a decreased quality of life, are those with a higher degree of dependence, influencing social participation and well-being. We suggest the nurse’s performance in research on interventions that allow improving the quality of life of the elderly with impaired physical mobility.

  20. Quality of life assessment in haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullinger, Monika; von Mackensen, Sylvia

    2004-03-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is a recent focus of research in haemophilia. It can be defined--in analogy to the World Health Organization (WHO) definition of health--as patient-perceived wellbeing and function in terms of physical, emotional, mental, social and behavioural life domains. The paper describes conceptual, methodological and practical foundations of QoL research in adults and children at an international level. It then proceeds to review the QoL literature in the field of haemophilia. With regard to assessment of QoL in haemophilia patients, both generic and very recently targeted instruments have been applied. Recent publications have focused on describing QoL in adults, showing specific impairments in terms of physical function (arthropathy) and mental wellbeing (HIV infection) as well as focusing on the cost-benefit (QoL) ratio of haemophilia care. In paediatric haemophilia, research has suggested the beneficial QoL outcomes with prophylaxis and stressed the role of the family for patients' wellbeing and function. QoL research is a relevant area for haemophilia research which should be pursued further.

  1. Health profile and quality of life of elderly with hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Freire de Almeida Vitorino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the quality of life of hypertensive elderly women in the Family Health Strategy. Method: cross-sectional, descriptive and quantitative study that evaluated 60 hypertensive older women using the tool World Health Organization Quality of Life with 26 items divided into four domains: social relations, psychological, physical and environment. Results: regarding the quality of life in all domains, except the psychological domain, the quality of life was considered regular. The psychological domain demonstrated a quality of life that needs to improve. Some questions are presented as unsatisfactory, such as the items: pain and discomfort, dependence on antihypertensive medications, negative feelings, lack of health care and recreation. Conclusion: understanding the health profile and the quality of life of hypertensive elderly women allows better knowledge about them and their adaptation to the condition imposed by the disease, offering support for planning care strategies and health education interventions.

  2. Quality of life in children and teenagers with food hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Heather; Dean, Taraneh

    2010-08-01

    Given that food is essential for life and that there is currently no cure for food hypersensitivity (FHS), quality of life is a key outcome measure for those affected. The quality of life of children and teenagers with FHS is particularly important given that they must learn to manage their FHS while also contending with normal developmental challenges. This article will review the current state of quality of life research in this important area, and discusses the impact of FHS on the quality-of-life of children and teenagers, the availability and suitability of disease-specific health-related quality-of-life measures for this population, and the identification of factors that may influence their health-related quality of life. Two previous reviews have been conducted in this area, and this article aims to extend this work by including recent publications and qualitative studies on this topic.

  3. RETIREMENT AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN SENIORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idalia Alpízar Jiménez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest in retirement is on the increase, especially given the rapid demographic changes and increasing life expectancy. Retirement is a process that requires a comprehensive approach and gerontological intervention. Since it is associated with old age it often implies a threat, particularly for those who have made work their source of identity. The impact of the transition from an active stage to a less active period may trigger some conditions that may be detrimental to the individual´s physical and emotional health. This happens because retirees have not undergone the appropriate retirement preparation and adaptation processes. Adaptation is therefore essential for retirement to be pleasant and for the retiree to enjoy a higher quality of life. Consequently, it is pertinent that all entities have programs aimed at providing proper orientation for the retirement process. In particular, the National University of Costa Rica has not implemented proper guidelines to address the retirees´ situation. Although actions have been taken on some occasions, they have not been followed up on. Within this context, it makes sense to have a retirement adaptation program designed to include gerontological aspects in the National University retirement process. From a holistic point of view, intervention contributes to a better acceptance of old age and its accompanying transitions, which are characterized by a series of losses, mainly including the loss of the employment role and status.

  4. [Osteogenesis imperfecta: quality of life in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fano, Virginia; del Pino, Mariana; Rodríguez Celin, Mercedes; Buceta, Susana; Obregón, M Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    The impact produced by osteogenesis imperfecta in childrens' quality of life almost has not been reported; 65 children, 38 males, were evaluated according to the questionnaire PedsQL 4.0 Argentinean Spanish version. Median age was 7.76 years; 35 children with OI type I were compared with 30 type III-IV (according to Sillence Classification) finding significant difference in the physical domain in both visions, children and parents, and only in parents' vision in the social area. Multivariate analysis showed an association between better PedQL scores and treatment compliance (coef. β= 19.41 p= 0.03) in children's vision. In parental report on the other hand, the association was found with greater pamidronate doses (coef. β 1.44 p=0.037), lower height compromise (coef. β= 3.8; p= 0.039) and less number of fractures (coef. β= 0.69; p= 0.003).

  5. Type 2 diabetes and quality of life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aikaterini; Trikkalinou; Athanasia; K; Papazafiropoulou; Andreas; Melidonis

    2017-01-01

    It is true that a primary goal of diabetes early diagnosis and treatment is quality of life(QoL). The term QoL is still confusing but it is agreed that it composes of four components:The physical component, mental, cogitative component, psychological and social component. Many articles have been written addressing those four components. During the last five years 15500 articles and reviews have been written addressing diabetes and coronary arterial disease, 16100 addressing diabetes and renal function, 28900 addressing diabetes and retinopathy, 16800 addressing diabetic foot ulcers and other 26300 addressing diabetic neuropathy. Moreover 17200 articles are dealing with diabetic sexual dysfunction, 24500 with the correlation of diabetes and depression 17500 about diabetes and dementia, only 1 about diabetes and family functioning and 1950000 about diabetes and QoL, indicating the worldwide interest. In order to confront this metabolic anomaly and its consequences, researchers developed numerous generic and disease specific psychometric tools. With the aid of those psychometric tools the scientific community has started to realize the gruesome effect of diabetes on patients’ lives. Diabetic’s QoL becomes worse when complications start to develop or comorbidities coexist. Dominant amongst complications, in health-related quality of life(HRQoL) lowering, but not related to risk factors(genetic, the weight of birth, or others) is coronary arterial disease followed by renal failure, blindness, and the combination of micro-and macrovascular complications and in some studies by sexual dysfunction. Moreover many are the comorbidities which deteriorate further the effect of diabetes in a patient life. Among them obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, depression, arthritis are the most common. Most intriguing field for research is the interaction of diabetes and depression and in some cases the progression to dementia. Many aspects and combinations of actions are under

  6. The Measurement of Quality of Working life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Orpen

    1983-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that the questionnaire measures of job satisfaction relied on for so long by industrial psychologists do not provide information that can help improve quality of working life. There is little agreement as to what is measured by such scales and the employees' responses to them reflect a variety of things besides satisfaction with their jobs. The problems with job satisfaction measures are highlighted by the fact that such measures have shown high and stable levels of job satisfaction at a time when signs of employee frustration and alienation have been increasing. It is argued that industrial psychologists need to develop quite different ways of assessing job satisfaction in which the subjects participate in the development of the measuring instruments themselves. OpsommingDie bruikbaarheid van vraelyste om inligting te voorsien op grond waarvan die gehalte van 'n werklewe nagevors kan word, word bevraagteken. Daar is weinig ooreenstemming oor wat sodanige vraelyste meet. Die probleem word onderstreep deur die feit dat navorsing waarin sodanige meetinstrumente gebruik word deurgaans 'n hoë mate van werkstevredenheid toon terwyl werknemerfrustrasie en vervreemding aan die orde van die dag is. 'n Nuwe benadering tot die bepaling van werkstevredenheid word bepleit waarin die werknemer deelneem aan die ontwikkeling van die meetinstrumente wat gebruik word.

  7. Quality-of-Life and Happiness: not quite the same

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractQuality-of-life is conceived as a broad concept that covers three meanings: 1) quality of the living environment, 2) quality of performance and 3) subjective enjoyment of life. 'Happiness' is understood as part of the latter meaning. It is defined as the overall appreciation of one's lif

  8. Quality-of-Life and Happiness: not quite the same

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractQuality-of-life is conceived as a broad concept that covers three meanings: 1) quality of the living environment, 2) quality of performance and 3) subjective enjoyment of life. 'Happiness' is understood as part of the latter meaning. It is defined as the overall appreciation of one's

  9. Measurement of quality of life I. A methodological framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Hilden, Jørgen; Merrick, Joav

    2003-01-01

    meet to provide a sound basis for investigation by questionnaire. The seven criteria or desiderata are: (1) an explicit definition of quality of life; (2) a coherent philosophy of human life from which the definition is derived; (3) a theory that operationalizes the philosophy by specifying unambiguous......Despite the widespread acceptance of quality of life (QOL) as the ideal guideline in healthcare and clinical research, serious conceptual and methodological problems continue to plague this area. In an attempt to remedy this situation, we propose seven criteria that a quality-of-life concept must...... guided the design of a validated 5-item generic, global quality-of-life questionnaire (QOL5), and a validated 317-item generic, global quality-of-life questionnaire (SEQOL), administered to a well-documented birth cohort of 7,400 Danes born in 1959-1961, as well as to a reference sample of 2,500 Danes...

  10. The effect of women's employment on children's quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayeh Ghanbari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life in adolescence period determines individual's future. The effect of maternal employment on children's quality of life is important and undeniable issue. This study aimed to investigate and compare the quality of life among children of employed and housewife women. In this study, the participants included selected school children's employed and housewife mothers. The tools for data collection consisted of a questionnaire which was distributed among 671 middle-high school and high school students (304 have employed mothers and 367 have housewives mothers. In this study, the level of significance was considered. Results showed that the life quality of children of employed mothers and housewife mothers in the two groups is statistically significant. Quality of life in employed mothers in the mental, physical, social relations, emotional, religious, achieve life goals, leisure time and economic dimension were higher than housewife mothers but there was not any significant different among employed mothers' children and housewife mothers' children in dimensions of relationships with parents. Girls' quality of Life was more than boys, in the teacher mothers was higher than other occupations and in the exceptional talents school was more than other schools. This study found that maternal employment has effect on children's quality of life, so employed mothers' children have high quality of life.

  11. Measuring Quality of Life in Prosthetic Practice: Benefits and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Pamela; Desmond, Deirdre

    2007-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that the inclusion of quality of life as an outcome measure is important in ensuring a client-centred and holistic assessment. This review outlines the benefits of quality of life as an outcome measurement in the field of prosthetics. It introduces the key concepts and challenges in the definition and assessment of quality of life post-amputation, including the relative advantages and disadvantages of adopting generic, disease/condition specific, dimension spe...

  12. Perceived Pregnancy Stress and Quality of Life amongst Iranian Women

    OpenAIRE

    Shishehgar, Sara; Dolatian, Mahrokh; Majd, Hamid Alavi; Bakhtiary, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stress during pregnancy can result in critical negative outcomes on the mother, the fetus, the newborn, the child and even the adolescent. Quality of life has been recognized as a predictor of stress amongst pregnant women. Objectives: The first aim of this study was to investigate the role of quality of life in pregnancy stress rates. The second aim was to explore the relationship between maternal stress rate and the four domains of quality of life namely physical health, psychol...

  13. The dimensions of life quality in a community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zautra, A; Beier, E; Cappel, L

    1977-03-01

    In this study the dimensions of the quality of life construct were investigated; 454 residents of a large suburban community were asked questions on life changes, psychiatric distress, happiness, and effective participation in life concerns. Selected variables from this survey were factor-analyzed in order to define the dimensions of life quality and six demographic variables; age, sex, marital status, education, income, and religious participation were studied to see how they influenced those dimensions. The results of the analysis revealed that life quality is measurable in terms of a person's happiness, his community participation, and his preferences, answering three major questions that person may pose for himself: (1) How well do I like the life I lead? (2) In what meaningful ways do I spend my time? (3) Why? Each of the six demographic variables influenced these dimensions. Marital status and age, two life-cycle statistics, had the most powerful effects on quality-of-life ratings.

  14. Depression and quality of life in patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schram, Miranda T; Baan, Caroline A; Pouwer, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes patients are known to have a worse quality of life than individuals without diabetes. They also have an increased risk for depressive symptoms, which may have an additional negative effect on their quality of life. This systematic review summarizes the current knowledge on the association...... between depressive symptoms and quality of life in individuals with diabetes. A systematic literature search using MEDLINE, Psychinfo, Social SciSearch, SciSearch and EMBASE was conducted from January 1990 until September 2007. We identified studies that compared quality of life between diabetic...... individuals with and without depressive symptoms. Twenty studies were identified, including eighteen cross-sectional and two longitudinal studies. Quality of life was measured as generic, diabetes specific and domain specific quality of life. All studies reported a negative association between depressive...

  15. Predictors of Quality of Life in Patients with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monnavar Afzalaghaee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of life among patients with epilepsy is severely affected by consequences of physical, psychological, social of epilepsy. The aim of present study was to evaluate predictors of quality of life in epileptic patients and to determine the main effective factors. Methods: This is a comparative cross sectional study on 100 epileptic patients and 100 healthy people from patient's relatives who referred to neurology clinic of 22 Bahman hospital in Mashhad. Data were collected through the WHO quality of life (QOL standard questionnaire. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine predictor factors of quality of life in patients with epilepsy. Results: The mean total score of quality of life in two groups of patients and healthy people showed no significant difference. Only in the physical (P<0.001, environment (P=0.002 and social domain (P<0.001 differences were statistically significant. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that age, sex, education level, type of epilepsy, and numbers of seizures in one month are effective factors. In all four domains of QOL, quality of life score decreased by increasing the episodes of seizures. Moreover, females compared with males had higher quality of life scores. Conclusion: Age, sex, education level, type of epilepsy, and number of seizures were important predictors of total QOL in patients with epilepsy. Number of seizures and female gender had higher effect on QOL. Based on our findings controlling numbers of seizures is the key factor in improving the quality of life among patients with epilepsy.

  16. Quality of Life of Older Malaysians Living Alone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Nurizan; Abdullah, Siti Suhailah; Momtaz, Yadollah Abolfathi; Hamid, Tengku Aizan

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2000 census report, about 7% of the 1.4 million people 60 years and over in Malaysia live alone. This study investigated socioeconomic factors affecting the quality of life of this vulnerable population. Data from a subsample of the study on Mental Health and Quality of Life of Older Malaysians were used in this paper. About 10%…

  17. Quality of life and positive person-centred rehabilitation.

    OpenAIRE

    Baumann, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) assessment is important when monitoring over time the recovery of survivors living at home, two years after stroke onset. The associations between Newcastle Stroke-Specific Quality of life (newsqol) domains, socioeconomic factors and satisfaction with information and home-care services were analysed. This problem remains partially addressed though positive and optimal supports may improve post-stroke’ quality of life. Methods. Stroke-survivors admitted to all hospital...

  18. Radiology employees' quality of work life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, Hussein; Changizi, Vahid; Jazayeri Gharabagh, Elaheh

    2012-01-01

    Quality of work Life (QWL) originates from interactions between employees' needs and relative organizational resources. QWL is aimed to improve and retain employees' satisfaction, productivity and effectiveness of all organizations. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among 15 Tehran University of Medical Sciences. A Cross-Sectional, descriptive study was conducted among 15 Tehran University of Medical Sciences' Hospitals' Radiology Departments' Employees by QWL questionnaire. Respondents were asked to express their attitudes about a range of key factors as the most important issues impacting their QWL. The data was collected and analyzed by SPSS version 15 software. Most of the respondents indicated that they were unsatisfied and very unsatisfied with key factors of their QWL. Comparison of QWL key factors of TUMS radiology employees with the other countries indicated that most of the employees are unsatisfied with their poor QWL factors. We hope, the implications of these findings deliberate to improve QWL within each of TUMS hospitals radiology departments and also be relevant and value to policymakers of healthcare organizations in Iran.

  19. Why Quality of Work Life Doesn't Always Mean Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Deborah Shaw

    1981-01-01

    From participatory management to autonomous work groups, the quality of work life movement has made an impact on U.S. corporations. To make the quality of work life connection, commitment must originate with top management. (Author)

  20. Why Quality of Work Life Doesn't Always Mean Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Deborah Shaw

    1981-01-01

    From participatory management to autonomous work groups, the quality of work life movement has made an impact on U.S. corporations. To make the quality of work life connection, commitment must originate with top management. (Author)

  1. Quality of life measurements in patients with osteoporosis and fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Madureira,Melisa M.; Ciconelli,Rozana M.; Pereira,Rosa M. R.

    2012-01-01

    To review all specific questionnaires regarding quality of life in osteoporosis and to describe their distinctive indications, we searched Medline, the Scientific Electronic Library Online database, and the Latin-American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database. Nine specific questionnaires related to osteoporosis quality of life were found: 1) the Women's Health Questionnaire, 2) Osteoporosis Quality of Life Questionnaire, 3) Osteoporosis Assessment Questionnaire, 4) Osteoporosis F...

  2. Quality of Life in Sarcopenia and Frailty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli, René; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Arnal, Jean-François; Bautmans, Ivan; Beaudart, Charlotte; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike; Biver, Emmanuel; Boonen, Steven; Brandi, Maria-Luisa; Chines, Arkadi; Cooper, Cyrus; Epstein, Sol; Fielding, Roger A.; Goodpaster, Bret; Kanis, John A.; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Laslop, Andrea; Malafarina, Vincenzo; Mañas, Leocadio Rodriguez; Mitlak, Bruce H.; Oreffo, Richard O.; Petermans, Jean; Reid, Kieran; Rolland, Yves; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Tsouderos, Yannis; Visser, Marjolein; Bruyère, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The reduced muscle mass and impaired muscle performance that defines sarcopenia in older individuals is associated with increased risk of physical limitation and a variety of chronic diseases. It may also contribute to clinical frailty. A gradual erosion of quality of life (QoL) has been evidenced in these individuals, although much of this research has been done using generic QoL instruments, particularly the SF-36, which may not be ideal in older populations with significant comorbidities. This review and report of an expert meeting, presents the current definitions of these geriatric syndromes (sarcopenia and frailty). It then briefly summarises QoL concepts and specificities in older populations, examines the relevant domains of QoL and what is known concerning QoL decline with these conditions. It calls for a clearer definition of the construct of disability and argues that a disease-specific QoL instrument for sarcopenia/frailty would be an asset for future research and discusses whether there are available and validated components that could be used to this end and whether the psychometric properties of these instruments are sufficiently tested. It calls also for an approach using utility weighting to provide some cost estimates and suggests that a time trade off study could be appropriate. PMID:23828275

  3. Quality of life of nurses in the operating room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Murano Alfaia dos Santos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the quality of life of operating room nurses and collect their opinions as to the influence their professional activity exerts on their quality of life. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out on a sample of 24 nurses that work in the operating room of a large private hospital in the city of São Paulo. Two questionnaires were applied; one was designed by the authors of this research project, and the other was the Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF. Rresults: As to quality of life, the environment domain obtained the highest score, while the psychological domain obtained the lowest. When asked if their professional activity in the operating room influenced their quality of life, most responded affirmatively. Regarding the justifications offered by the nurses for the influence of their professional activity on their quality of life, 50% mentioned environment-related stress, responsibilities, duties, risk situations, relationships with the multiprofessional team, and the type of work carried out in the operating room. Cconclusions: The psychological domain obtained the lowest score in the nurse quality of life evaluation, pointing out the need to facilitate and/or encourage nurses to seek psychological support. As to the influence of their professional activity on their quality of life, the nurses mentioned stress related to their work environment and professional activities in the operating room. This highlights the importance of managers in this area, paying greater attention to the individual and collective needs of their employees.

  4. Moving Toward Incorporation a Definition of the Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunmi Emily Kwak

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept of quality of life is a fundamental goal in the practice of music therapy, whether implicitly or explicitly defined in the philosophy of the practitioner. To improve the quality of life is often mentioned as one of the goals for music therapy treatment. However, the definition of quality of life has not always been clearly defined. The purpose of this article is to review the literature concerned with a definition for quality of life in other disciplines and to suggest a model for a more comprehensive definition of the quality of life for use in the practice of music therapy. Anecdotal examples are given to stir the issues toward a more comprehensive definition of the quality of life to be used in music therapy. As the title suggests, this article will not give a decisive answer for the definition of quality of life. However, this article will afford readers a chance to think and revisit their experiences as music therapists and define their own definition for quality of life.

  5. Quality of work life: experiences of Iranian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagharseyyedin, Seyyed Abolfazl; Vanaki, Zohreh; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experiences of Iranian nurses concerning their quality of work life. A purposive sample of nurses (n = 14) was recruited from two university hospitals. The data were collected through unstructured interviews and were analyzed by using qualitative content analysis. The results indicated that the participants discerned their quality of work life by assessing how favorable were their working conditions, the level of fulfilment of their personal needs, and the impact of their working conditions on their private life and their social life. Three main themes were identified: quality of work life, as experienced from a personal perspective; quality of work life, as experienced from a sociocultural perspective; and quality of work life, as experienced from an organizational-professional perspective. The results of the present study will help Iranian nurse administrators to adopt effective strategies in order to improve nurses' quality of work life. Future research can broaden the scope of the current results and offer a more comprehensive understanding of nurses' quality of work life. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Quality of life with anal fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, H A; Buchanan, G N; Schizas, A; Cohen, R; Williams, A B

    2016-05-01

    Anal fistula affects people of working age. Symptoms include abscess, pain, discharge of pus and blood. Treatment of this benign disease can affect faecal continence, which may, in turn, impair quality of life (QOL). We assessed the QOL of patients with cryptoglandular anal fistula. Newly referred patients with anal fistula completed the St Mark's Incontinence Score, which ranges from 0 (perfect continence) to 24 (totally incontinent), and Short form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire at two institutions with an interest in anal fistula. The data were examined to identify factors affecting QOL. Data were available for 146 patients (47 women), with a median age of 44 years (range 18-82 years) and a median continence score of 0 (range 0-23). Versus population norms, patients had an overall reduction in QOL. While those with recurrent disease had no difference on continence scores, QOL was worse on two of eight SF-36 domains (pfistula patients, 19.4% of patients experienced urgency versus 36.3% of those with recurrent fistulas. Patients with anal fistula had a reduced QOL, which was worse in those with recurrent disease, secondary extensions and urgency. Loose seton had no impact on QOL.

  7. Quality of life and characteristics of diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Karina; Gouvêa, Giovana Renata; Silva, Marco Antonio Viera da; Possobon, Rosana de Fátima; Barbosa, Luis Fernando de Lima Nunes; Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Miranda, Luciane Guerra; Cortellazzi, Karine Laura

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the association between quality of life and clinical and sociodemographic variables in type 2 diabetes patients, after they had started treatment in Primary and Specialized Health Care. This is an analytical cross-sectional study with a sampling of diabetic patients from Primary (n = 385) and Specialized (n = 385) Health Care. The dependent variable, quality of life, was evaluated by the Diabetes Quality of Life Measure - Brazil. Clinical and sociodemographic data were collected. Bivariate analysis by chi square test tested the association between the dependent variable with the independent ones. Next, we performed an analysis of multiple logistic regression. In Specialized Health Care, individuals who practice physical activity had less chance of having worse quality of life and those with less time of diagnosis presented higher chance of worse quality of life. In Primary Health Care, those who performed diets and presented glycated hemoglobin ≤ 7% had less chance of having worse quality of life. Women presented higher chances of worse quality of life than men. We concluded that with exception to the time of diagnosis and sex, other variables that influenced quality of life of diabetics were modifiable factors (glycated hemoglobin, alimentary diet and physical activity).

  8. Effect of hemodiafiltration on quality of life over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazairac, A.H.; Wit, G.A. de; Grooteman, M.P.C.; Penne, E.L.; Weerd, N.C. van der; Hoedt, C.H. den; Levesque, R.; Dorpel, M.A. van den; Nube, M.J.; Wee, P.M. ter; Bots, M.L.; Blankestijn, P.J.; Hamersvelt, H.W. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: It is unclear if hemodiafiltration leads to a better quality of life compared with hemodialysis. It was, therefore, the aim of this study to assess the effect of hemodiafiltration on quality of life compared with hemodialysis in patients with ESRD. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICI

  9. Effect of hemodiafiltration on quality of life over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H.A. Mazairac (Albert); G.A. de Wit (Ardine); M.P.C. Grooteman (Muriel); E.L. Penne (Lars); N.C. van der Weerd (Neelke); C.H. den Hoedt (Claire); R. Lévesque (Renée); M.A. van den Dorpel (Marinus); M.J. Nubé (Menso); P.M. ter Wee (Piet); M.L. Bots (Michiel); P.J. Blankestijn (Peter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground and objectives It is unclear if hemodiafiltration leads to a better quality of life compared with hemodialysis. It was, therefore, the aim of this study to assess the effect of hemodiafiltration on quality of life compared with hemodialysis in patients with ESRD. Design, setti

  10. Quality of life in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ad A. Kaptein; Satoshi Morita; Junichi Sakamoto

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To summarize the empirical research on assessing quality of life (QOL) in patients with gastric carcinoma. METHODS: Literature searches were conducted in MedLine from 1966 to February 2004. RESULTS: Twenty-six studies were identified. QOL was used as an outcome measure in virtually all identified studies, such as those examining the effects of gastric cancer and various medical or surgical treatments in the patients. QOL was assessed mainly with generic measures; the social dimensions of QOL were largely neglected. The lack of gastric cancer-specific QOL measures hampers QOL research up to now. The gastric cancer-specific EORTCQLQ-STO22 and the FACT-Ga are important additions to the arsenal of disease-specific QOL measures. In most of the studies, the label QOL is used for questionnaires, which only assess symptoms or performance status, or are physician-reported rather than patient-reported outcomes. CONCLUSION: QOL in patients with gastric cancer deserves more systematic studies, especially as one of the outcome measures in randomized clinical trials. Results of studies that include QOL in patients with gastric cancer should be applied in clinical care, which aims at improving QOL of these patients.

  11. The influence of nocturia on the quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, D.G.; Dijk, L. van; Schellevis, F.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Previous studies identified an effect of nocturia (two or more micturitions per night) on quality of life. We hypothesize that nocturia indeed affect quality of life but that effect is mediated via sleep. Nocturia and sleep disturbances are clearly associated. To go to the toilet one has

  12. Quality of life in children with narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inocente, Clara O; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Lavault, Sophie; Guignard-Perret, Anne; Raoux, Aude; Christol, Noemie; Gerard, Daniel; Dauvilliers, Yves; Reimão, Rubens; Bat-Pitault, Flora; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Franco, Patricia

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQL) and its correlates in children and adolescents with narcolepsy. We compared the clinical characteristics of control subjects and patients with primary narcolepsy from data collected at the National Reference Centers for Narcolepsy. The cohort included 69 control subjects (29 boys) and 117 patients (65 boys; 59 de novo patients). Cataplexy was present in 81% and DQB1*0602 was positive in 91%. The control children were older (13.5±3.2 vs. 11.6±3.1 years, PNarcolepsy seriously impacts HRQL in terms of vitality, physical well-being, relations with friends and leisure activities, especially in adolescents. Depression was the factor that most affected HRQL in both narcoleptic and control subjects. For the control subjects and the narcoleptic patients, when the CDI score was entered into the multivariable regression model adjusted for gender and age, no other continuous independent variable could significantly increase the likelihood of the model. When the CDI score increased by 1, the mean HRQL score decreased by 1.7 for narcoleptic patients and 1.5 for control subjects. Apnea-hypopnoea index, diagnosis delay, disease duration, obesity, the presence of cataplexy or treatment had no effects on HRQL. Narcoleptic children and adolescents were at high risk for poor HRQL. Depressive symptoms had a major impact on HRQL. We recommend a more thorough assessment and management of psychological health in this population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    organizational structures for quality patient care and also provide ... change, improve quality of life and prevent resistance to ... development of HIV resistance to drugs and. 19, 20 ..... the problems they seek to overcome . Health care providers ...

  14. Assessment of quality of life in bronchial asthma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Nalina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Asthma is a common chronic disease that affects persons of all ages. People with asthma report impact on the physical, psychological and social domains of quality of life. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL measures have been developed to complement traditional health measures such as prevalence, mortality and hospitalization as indicators of the impact of disease. Objective and Study Design: The objective of this study was to assess HRQoL in Bronchial asthma patients and to relate the severity of asthma with their quality of life. About 85 asthma patients were evaluated for HRQoL and their pulmonary function tests values were correlated with HRQoL scores. Results and Conclusion: It was found that asthma patients had poor quality of life. There was greater impairment in quality of life in females, obese and middle age patients indicating that sex, body mass index and age are determinants of HRQoL in asthma patients.

  15. Quality of Life in Schizophrenic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naema Khodadadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, quality of life (QoL is an important indicator of treatment outcome and it's evaluation in schizophrenic patients will be vital. So, this study is conducted to compare QoL in schizophrenic patients and healthy people in Rasht, Guilan.Materials and Method: This study is a cross-sectional descriptive survey that was done on 52 patients with schizophrenia referred to Shafa hospital with convenience sampling method and 153 healthy people of Rasht by cluster method. Data collection instrument was a 3 part questionnaire consisting demographic-social questionnaire, WHO QoL questionnaire, and mental status assessment form. Data gathered by interview and analyzed with SPSS software using descriptive and inferential statistics (χ2, ANOVA, independent-t test. Results: Our finding indicated that patients and healthy individuals QoL had overall statistically significant difference (p<0.0001, and it's general (p<0.006, physical (p<0.0001, psychiatric (p<0.001, and social relationship (p<0.015. Conclusion: According result, schizophrenic clients compare with healthy people had lower QoL level that need special attention to improve treatment and their post-discharge care with focus on social relationship in this group of patients.

  16. Quality of life and sleep impairment in chronic cocaine dependents

    OpenAIRE

    Lima,Adriana; ROSSINI, Sueli; Reimão,Rubens

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate quality of life (QL) and sleep quality impairment of cocaine chronic dependents in use of cocaine. METHOD: 40 patients, chronic cocaine dependents were evaluated (37 M; 3 F), with mean age of 28.92 years, along with 40 controls paired for gender and age. The following instruments were used: a) the semi-structured clinical interview; b) the Brazil Economic Classification; c) the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; d) World Heath Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF...

  17. Assessment of quality of life during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnars, B; Nygren, P; Glimelius, B

    2001-01-01

    Increasingly more aggressive chemotherapy together with expected small differences between treatments with respect to objective endpoints has heightened awareness about the importance of addressing how patients experience and value the impact that treatment has had on their overall life situation. Assessment of a patient's quality of life (QoL) is now conceptually viewed as an important complement to traditional objective evaluation measures. It was therefore considered important to review the basis for the assessment of this endpoint when The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) performed a systematic overview of chemotherapy effects in several tumour types. The group came to the following conclusions: QoL assessments, mostly by patient self-reporting in questionnaires, have come increasingly into use during the past decade. A number of general, cancer-specific and cancer diagnosis-specific instruments have been developed. There is at present little need for development of new cancer instruments, although specific treatment modalities and tumour types may need new additional modules. A predefined hypothesis should determine the instrument to be used. Since the selection of a QoL instrument in a specific study influences both the results and the conclusions, it is essential to carefully select the instrument or instruments that have the greatest likelihood of identifying relevant differences between treatment alternatives. Interpretation of QoL data is more difficult than interpretation of objective endpoints such as survival time, objective response rates or toxicity. Despite these difficulties, QoL analyses have provided new insights into the advantages and disadvantages of various treatments not provided by traditional end-points. Some palliative treatments seemingly increase patients' QoL despite side-effects or the lack of, or marginal, increases in survival. When using potentially curative chemotherapy, it is not a matter of when the

  18. [Influence of psychiatric and psychosomatic disorders on quality of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikó, Bettina; Rudisch, Tibor

    2007-09-02

    The term 'quality of life' has received a growing highlight in relation to the care of chronically ill people during the past decades. The main goal of the present study has been to analyze patients' quality of life regarding the following diagnoses: headache (tension headache); mood disorders (depression); anxiety, and comorbid states, involving some psychological variables, such as hostility or social support. There were 157 patients participating in the study who came from a registered patients' pool in the Neuropsychiatric Rehabilitation Ward, Department of Psychiatry, University of Szeged, during the spring semester of 2005. The final sample size contained 151 patients who might be sorted into five main disease groups: mood disorders (depression); anxiety disorders; mixed psychiatric diagnosis; headache; and comorbid diagnosis (headache and psychiatric disorder together). The mean scores of the scales of patients' quality of life were investigated according to gender and disease groups; in addition, we also analyzed the psychological background of the quality of life. Based on factor analysis, two factors of the quality of life scale were detected: one factor labelled 'everyday activities' factor (including items such as work, financial situation, nutrition, sexual life or self-actualization), and another one labelled 'social activities' factor (e.g., activities with spouse, family, other persons, religious and community activities). According to the disease groups, differences could be detected particularly in the field of everyday activities; especially patients suffering from mood disorders reported higher levels of deterioration of their quality of life, whereas in comparison with them, patients of headache showed less changes. When there was comorbid psychiatric illness besides headache, a more determinant deterioration of the quality of life could be detected. Hostility and psychosomatic/anxiety symptoms contributed mostly to deterioration of the quality

  19. Complex Monitoring of Life Quality in the Voronezh Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkova Svetlana Aleksandrovna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the historical aspects of the formation of the life quality category and studies Russian experience in assessing the life quality of the population at the regional level as well as the deficiencies of existing methodological approaches. The author carries out the comparative analysis of methodological approaches to the development of indicators for life quality assessment. The generalization of existing methodological approaches makes it possible to identify several areas of evaluation of the life quality in various spheres of human activity, ranging from professional activity and to the ecological environment, household devices, etc. It is shown that quality of life is a multifaceted category that defies unambiguous objective assessment. The author presents the indicators for monitoring the life quality in the Voronezh region, including a set of indicators: unit 1 – the level and differentiation of incomes of the population; unit 2 – the level of development of the consumer market; unit 3 – housing supply and quality of housing conditions; unit 4 – health; unit 5 – education and innovation; unit 6 – the quality of the environment; unit 7 – security of the person; unit 8 – the state of the labor market; unit 9 – indicators characterizing the demographic dynamics, and unit 10 – the quality of leisure and recreation. Thus, the author implemented the evaluation of the indicators of the life quality in the region, resulting in the suggested vectors in the active socio-economic policy development.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF QUALITY OF LIFE IN CANCER PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Farzianpour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Standards of Joint Commission International (JCI emphasize on the organizational performance level in basic functional domains including patient right, patient care, medical safety and infection control. These standards are focused on two principles: Expectations of the actual organizational performance and assessment of organizational capabilities to provide high quality and safe Health Care Services (HCS. The aim of this study was to analyze the regression model of the Quality of Life (QOL in cancer patients from Mazandaran province in 2013. This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on 185 cases after a chemotherapy treatment session during in the first three months that was referred to Rajaee Chemotherapy Center in 2013. The method of sampling was Purposive. General quality of life was assessed using WHO questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF and particular life quality was assessed using researcher-developed questionnaire. Data analysis was consisted of a multiple regression method and for comparison one-sample test of Kolmogrov-Smirnov was used. Statistical analysis showed that the average of general life quality, particular life quality and total average was evaluated, 1<0.96<5, 1<1.13<5 and 1<1.04<5, respectively. Due to the low quality of general and particular life, fully integration of the care program of patient care in primary health care system, easy access and facilitation in intervention to improve the quality of life is offered. Our motivation behind the research and the implications of the research was improvement of QOL cancer patients.

  1. THE IMPACT OF LATERAL EPICONDYLITIS ON QUALITY OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Sudhakar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lateral epicondylitis is a work related disorder which is considered to be due to over-use or over-stress of the wrist extensors of the forearm. The patient suffers from pain and decreased function which affects the basic activities in daily life. This reduction in function leading to disability may affect the quality of life as it includes items related to self care, usual activities, emotional problems, pain etc. The present study was conducted to study the impact of Lateral epicondylitis on quality of life. Methods: 52 subjects diagnosed with Lateral epicondylitis were included in the study according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Outcome measures were: pain using Visual analog scale, functional disability using Patient rated tennis elbow evaluation and health-related quality of life using Short Form 36. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between pain and functional disability (p<.001. A significant negative correlation between pain and physical (p=.014 and mental (p=.052 component summary scores of quality of life was found. A significant negative correlation was found between functional disability and physical (p=.002 and mental (p=.015 component summary scores of quality of life. Also a significant correlation was found between physical and mental component summary scores of quality of life (p<.001. Conclusions: Significant correlation was seen between pain, functional disability and quality of life. This suggests that with an increase in severity of pain there is increase in functional disability with lower QOL both physically and mentally.

  2. Health, Quality of Care and Quality of Life: A Case of Frail Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between health, quality of care of geriatric case management and quality of life for the purpose of furthering the understanding of the relationship between quality of life and geriatric case management. Using survey data from a group of frail older adults, this study assesses the relative merit of two…

  3. Perception of female nursing professors about their quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Miranda Cruz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe the perception of female nursing professors about their quality of life. Methods: descriptive exploratory study with a qualitative approach, performed at a public university, with 24 nursing professors, using semi-structured interviews to obtain the data. Speeches were recorded, transcribed and analyzed by Minayo’s categorical analysis, with the categories: defining quality of life by female nursing professors and checking the existence of quality of life. Results: perceptions were related to balance in life, good conditions of life and stress reduction. It proved the existence of quality of life for most of them, and for those who did not have it or had it partially one mentioned problems related to the environment or to the working hours. Quality of life was related to well-being and to a sense of life satisfaction. Conclusion: quality of life of female nursing professors both in the workplace and in their personal lives stem from several factors, involving environment and interpersonal relationships.

  4. Predicting young children's quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirojanakul, Pragai; Skevington, Suzanne M; Hudson, John

    2003-10-01

    This paper represents an investigation into the determinants of young children's quality of life (QOL) in Thailand. The empirical work is based upon a sample of 498 children (aged 5-8); 220 were urban children and 278 children of construction workers in Bangkok. Their QOL was assessed using a new self-report QOL measure for children. Multiple regression analyses indicated that the father's income and education, type of school, mode of transportation to school, and the amount of time that the child spent on extra study courses were significant explanatory variables. It was found that these factors had different influences on the QOL of urban children and those of construction workers. Extra sport-related activities and extra work (other than housework) improved the QOL of urban children, while the QOL of construction workers' children was directly linked to father's education and income. This result is consistent with income having a diminishing marginal effect on the QOL of children. There is also evidence that amongst construction workers' children, boys have a lower QOL than girls. The different causal explanations for the QOL of urban and construction workers' children suggests that it is context specific, and what impacts one group of children's QOL within a particular context may not impact another group in a different situation. This has important policy implications. Throughout the study we could find no significant impact of health on QOL-neither chronic, acute nor severe illness has any significant impact on QOL. This is consistent with the hypothesis that QOL is influenced by expectations (Social Science and Medicine 41 (10) (1995) 1403). Findings of the effects of social and environmental factors on children's QOL are new in this field and should be further investigated.

  5. Quality end-of-life care: A global perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singer Peter A

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality end-of-life care has emerged as an important concept in industrialized countries. Discussion We argue quality end-of-life care should be seen as a global public health and health systems problem. It is a global problem because 85 % of the 56 million deaths worldwide that occur annually are in developing countries. It is a public health problem because of the number of people it affects, directly and indirectly, in terms of the well being of loved ones, and the large-scale, population based nature of some possible interventions. It is a health systems problem because one of its main features is the need for better information on quality end-of-life care. We examine the context of end-of-life care, including the epidemiology of death and cross-cultural considerations. Although there are examples of success, we could not identify systematic data on capacity for delivering quality end-of-life care in developing countries. We also address a possible objection to improving end-of-life care in developing countries; many deaths are preventable and reduction of avoidable deaths should be the focus of attention. Conclusions We make three recommendations: (1 reinforce the recasting of quality end-of-life care as a global public health and health systems problem; (2 strengthen capacity to deliver quality end-of-life care; and (3 develop improved strategies to acquire information about the quality of end-of-life care.

  6. Quality end-of-life care: A global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Peter A; Bowman, Kerry W

    2002-07-25

    BACKGROUND: Quality end-of-life care has emerged as an important concept in industrialized countries. DISCUSSION: We argue quality end-of-life care should be seen as a global public health and health systems problem. It is a global problem because 85 % of the 56 million deaths worldwide that occur annually are in developing countries. It is a public health problem because of the number of people it affects, directly and indirectly, in terms of the well being of loved ones, and the large-scale, population based nature of some possible interventions. It is a health systems problem because one of its main features is the need for better information on quality end-of-life care. We examine the context of end-of-life care, including the epidemiology of death and cross-cultural considerations. Although there are examples of success, we could not identify systematic data on capacity for delivering quality end-of-life care in developing countries. We also address a possible objection to improving end-of-life care in developing countries; many deaths are preventable and reduction of avoidable deaths should be the focus of attention. CONCLUSIONS: We make three recommendations: (1) reinforce the recasting of quality end-of-life care as a global public health and health systems problem; (2) strengthen capacity to deliver quality end-of-life care; and (3) develop improved strategies to acquire information about the quality of end-of-life care.

  7. Physical activity and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Diane L; Hammond, Cara C; Reifsteck, Erin J; Jehu, Christine M; Williams, Rennae A; Adams, Melanie M; Lange, Elizabeth H; Becofsky, Katie; Rodriguez, Enid; Shang, Ya-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) professionals and participants recognize enhanced quality of life (QoL) as a benefit of and motivator for PA. However, QoL measures are often problematic and rarely consider the participants'perspective. This paper focuses on recent findings from a larger project on the role of QoL in PA and health promotion. More specifically, we focus on the views of participants and potential participants to better understand the relationship of PA and QoL. In earlier stages of the project we began with a conceptual model of QoL and developed a survey. We now focus on participants' views and ask two questions: 1) what is QoL? and 2) how does PA relate to QoL? We first asked those questions of a large sample of university students and community participants as open-ended survey items, and then asked focus groups of community participants. Overall, participants' responses reflected the multidimensional, integrative QoL model, but the responses and patterns provided information that may not be picked up with typical survey measures. Findings suggest that PA contributes to multiple aspects of QoL, that social and emotional benefits are primary motivators and outcomes for participants, and that the meaning of QoL and PA benefits is subjective and contextualized, varying across individuals and settings. Programs that directly target and highlight the multiple dimensions and integrative QoL, while considering the individual participants and contexts, may enhance both PA motivation and participants' health and QoL.

  8. Source, Method, and Surmise: Quality of Life in History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the essay is to demonstrate that study of quality of life can explore eras before our own. There are caches of social data as early as the seventeenth century, and there were people who attempted to formulate social circumstances close to today's concepts of quality of life. Data from England and Ireland are presented and analyzed.

  9. Quality of Life in Ageing Societies: Italy, Portugal, and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Ozgur; Cevik, Aylin Cakiroglu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and analyze the quality of life of the elderly in three aging countries: Italy, Portugal, and Turkey. This was done by using data provided by the European Quality of Life Survey completed in 2004. By doing so, we could then operationalize the conditions of the elderly in Turkey who have a rapid aging process…

  10. The Major Contributors to Quality of Life for the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, John C.

    Factors contributing to the quality of life of older adults were investigated. A national survey provided the data which were collected in four-hour interviews from a representative national sample of 800 persons 68 to 72 years old when interviewed. The respondents reported on aspects of their quality of life related to their family, education,…

  11. Quality of life questionnaires in otorhinolaryngology; a systematic overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenraads, Simone P C; Aarts, Mark C J; vd Veen, EL; Grolman, Wilko; Stegeman, Inge

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The importance of quality of life (QOL) as an endpoint and the use of validated QOL questionnaires has increased over time. OBJECTIVE OF OVERVIEW: To evaluate health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) measurement instruments used in patients in otorhinolaryngology (ORL). We aim to

  12. The Empty Nest Syndrome: Ways to Enhance Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dianbing; Yang, Xinxiao; Aagard, Steve Dale

    2012-01-01

    Empty nest syndrome occurs as a result of urbanization and loosened relationships among family members. It may threaten the life quality of older adults and stability of society as a whole. This survey was designed to investigate the situation and factors that influence the life quality of a sample of older adults in a western state. Thirty-five…

  13. Pain with pericoronitis affects quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magraw, Caitlin B L; Golden, Brent; Phillips, Ceib; Tang, Dana T; Munson, Joshua; Nelson, Blake P; White, Raymond P

    2015-01-01

    To assess the association between patients' pericoronitis pain symptoms and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes for lifestyle and oral function. Subjects (American Society of Anesthesiologists health risk assessment level I or II) with mild symptoms of pericoronitis were enrolled in a study approved by the institutional review board and asked to complete a QOL instrument specifically for third molar problems covering lifestyle, oral function, and pain. Subjects assessed lifestyle and oral function using a 5-point Likert-type scale, ranging from "no trouble" (score, 1) to "lots of trouble" (score, 5), and worst and average pain using a 7-point Likert-type scale, ranging from "no pain" (score, 1) to "worst pain imaginable" (score, 7). Pain levels reported at enrollment were compared with QOL outcomes for lifestyle and oral function using Spearman correlation coefficients. Correlations of at least 0.6 were considered clinically quite important, and correlations of at least 0.4 were considered clinically important. Associations between these outcome measurements were considered statistically significant at a P value less than .05. Most of the 113 subjects were Caucasian (51%), women (56%), 23 years old or younger (58%), and well educated (91% with at least some college). Mean pain levels ± standard deviation were low (worst pain, 3.3 ± 1.5; average pain, 2.4 ± 1.2). All pain outcomes were significantly associated with items in the lifestyle and oral function domains (P pericoronitis pain and lifestyle and oral function, associations not often considered by clinicians or policy makers. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. QUALITY OF LIFE IN CHILDREN WITH VISION DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Nefedovskaya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this trial was to evaluate the peculiarities of quality of life (QL of blind and purblind children, educated in specialized schools. 64 schoolchildren from specialized correction school and 78 schoolchildren from boarding school of Tatarstan Republic in age 8-12 and 13-18 years old took part in this trial. Instrument of this trial was Russian version of general questionnaire Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory – PedsQL4.0. Results of study showed, that quality of life of blind and purblind children was lower then in their healthy coevals, according to opinion of children, their parents and teachers. On the other hand, quality of life of children with vision disorders, educated in different types of correction schools, did not differ.Key words: quality of life, blind and purblind children.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(1:10-12

  15. Pedobarographic analysis and quality of life after lisfranc fracture dislocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Schepers (Tim); B.C.T. Kieboom (Brenda); P. van Diggele (Peter); P. Patka (Peter); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Few studies on tarsometatarsal fracture dislocations report on plantar pressure analysis and quality of life. The primary aim of this study was to determine the added value of plantar pressure analysis. The secondary aim was to determine quality of life and functional outcome

  16. Predictors of quality of life among Chinese people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Qin; Petrini, Marcia A; Morisky, Donald E

    2017-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the association of quality of life, perceived stigma, and medication adherence among Chinese patients with schizophrenia, and to ascertain the predictors of quality of life. A cross-sectional correlation study was conducted with 146 participants. All participants completed self-report scales: the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale, Link's Stigma Scale, and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Pearson parametric correlations and stepwise multiple regressions were performed. The total quality of life score and psychosocial subscale was significantly positively correlated with perceived stigma, coping orientation of withdrawal, and feelings of stigma, and negatively correlated with age and medication adherence. The means of all subscale scores except perceived devaluation-discrimination and different/guilty feelings were significantly higher than the midpoint of 2.5. The best predictors of quality of life and psychosocial domains were stigma-related feelings: feeling misunderstood, feeling different/shame, and age. Our findings suggest that an individual's negative emotional response may strengthen internalized stigma and decrease quality of life. As the best predictor, age indicated that adaptation to mental illness may relieve perceived stigma and achieve favorable quality of life. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Reduced quality of life in very overweight Mexican American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Chermaine; Johnston, Craig A; Fullerton, Ginny; Foreyt, John P

    2007-04-01

    Quality of life (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, PedsQL) was assessed for 175 Mexican American adolescents with measured height and weight used to determine body mass index (BMI) percentile/weight classification. Main effects for weight classification were detected using One-way ANOVAs (p < .05 for total, physical, and psychosocial), with the heaviest adolescents demonstrating the lowest ratings.

  18. Professional Quality of Life and Clinical Competencies among Korean Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyunghee Kim, PhD

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that it is possible to directly examine the relationship between professional quality of life level and clinical competence among nurses. Thus, interventions to increase nurses' compassion satisfaction and relieve compassion fatigue are needed, as professional quality of life may affect clinical competence.

  19. Quality of life issues relating to endocrine treatment options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P

    1999-01-01

    treatments for prostate cancer, such as castration, combined androgen blockade and non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy, have shown similar results in terms of time to progression and survival. The main difference between these treatments is their impact on patients' quality of life. Instruments...... for measuring health-related quality of life should assess both overall and disease-specific quality of life. Data from two large studies of bicalutamide monotherapy show that this non-steroidal antiandrogen is associated with significant health-related quality of life advantages in the treatment of patients...... with locally advanced (M0) disease compared with castration, suggesting that this treatment may benefit patients with early disease. Bicalutamide was favoured in 8 out of 9 evaluable quality of life dimensions, and this was statistically significant for sexual interest and physical capacity. Endocrine...

  20. Quality of life issues relating to endocrine treatment options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P

    1999-01-01

    treatments for prostate cancer, such as castration, combined androgen blockade and non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy, have shown similar results in terms of time to progression and survival. The main difference between these treatments is their impact on patients' quality of life. Instruments...... for measuring health-related quality of life should assess both overall and disease-specific quality of life. Data from two large studies of bicalutamide monotherapy show that this non-steroidal antiandrogen is associated with significant health-related quality of life advantages in the treatment of patients...... with locally advanced (M0) disease compared with castration, suggesting that this treatment may benefit patients with early disease. Bicalutamide was favoured in 8 out of 9 evaluable quality of life dimensions, and this was statistically significant for sexual interest and physical capacity. Endocrine...

  1. Measurement of Quality of Life I. A Methodological Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the widespread acceptance of quality of life (QOL as the ideal guideline in healthcare and clinical research, serious conceptual and methodological problems continue to plague this area. In an attempt to remedy this situation, we propose seven criteria that a quality-of-life concept must meet to provide a sound basis for investigation by questionnaire. The seven criteria or desiderata are: (1 an explicit definition of quality of life; (2 a coherent philosophy of human life from which the definition is derived; (3 a theory that operationalizes the philosophy by specifying unambiguous, nonoverlapping, and jointly exhaustive questionnaire items; (4 response alternatives that permit a fraction-scale interpretation; (5 technical checks of reproducibility; (6 meaningfulness to investigators, respondents, and users; and (7 an overall aesthetic appeal of the questionnaire. These criteria have guided the design of a validated 5-item generic, global quality-of-life questionnaire (QOL5, and a validated 317-item generic, global quality-of-life questionnaire (SEQOL, administered to a well-documented birth cohort of 7,400 Danes born in 1959�1961, as well as to a reference sample of 2,500 Danes. Presented in outline, the underlying integrative quality-of-life (IQOL theory is a meta-theory. To illustrate the seven criteria at work, we show the extent to which they are satisfied by one of the eight component theories. Next, two sample results of our investigation are presented: satisfaction with one's sex life has the expected covariation with one's quality of life, and so does mother's smoking during pregnancy, albeit to a much smaller extent. It is concluded that the methodological framework presented has proved helpful in designing a questionnaire that is capable of yielding acceptably valid and reliable measurements of global and generic quality of life.

  2. Quality of life of Taiwanese adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Yi Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, few recent studies have investigated the quality of life of adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. It remains unclear how individuals with ASD view their own quality of life. OBJECTIVE: The primary purpose of this study was to compare the quality of life scores among adults with ASD with those of a non-ASD control group and the Taiwanese health population reference group. METHODS: The study comprised 41 adults with ASD (M age = 26.9, SD = 5.0, and without intellectual disabilities (IQ>70. A comparison sample of 41 adults without ASD was selected by matching the age and sex of the participants with ASD. A validated measure, the Taiwanese version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF, was used. Independent t-tests were performed to examine the differences in the quality of life between groups. RESULTS: The highest quality of life was scored in the environment domain, followed by the physical health and psychological health domains. The lowest quality of life score was found in the social relationship domain. Adults with ASD scored significantly lower in all domains than did the non-ASD control group. Additionally, adults with ASD scored significantly lower in the physical health, psychological health, and social relationship domains than did the Taiwanese health population reference group. Comorbid psychiatric disorders, self-rated health status, and perceived happiness were correlated with quality of life among adults with ASD. CONCLUSION: The preliminary findings suggest that adults with ASD need more supportive social contexts and interventions to promote their quality of life. Based on our findings, social relationship must be considered in designing and applying treatment programs for adults with ASD.

  3. 'Quality of life' and the analogy with the Nazis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C B

    1983-05-01

    The introduction of 'quality of life' judgments into treatment decisions is viewed as pernicious by some who claim that these presuppose the Nazi position that those who are 'devoid of value' must be exterminated. 'Quality of life' judgments are said to deny the equal value of human beings and to assume that some lives are not 'worthy to be lived'. It is argued that the analogy misconstrues the senses of 'value' and 'quality' employed by Naziism and a 'quality of life' position. This leads the analogizers incorrectly to claim that both views assimilate the value of human beings to the value of their condition. A 'quality of life' position is grounded in recognition of the logical priority of the value of human beings as self-reflective evaluators and agents, which is a matter of kind, not degree. The 'quality of life' is explicated in terms of the standards of well-being of individuals, which are derived from their basic human needs and their individual priorities and goals. The use of 'quality of life' judgments is morally required to ensure that considerations of justice and individual autonomy govern treatment decisions. The purported analogy misconstrues the views of both the Nazi position and a 'quality of life' position and so is seriously misdirected.

  4. Relationship between life satisfaction and quality of life in Turkish nursing school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Yasemin; Kilic, Serap Parlar; Akyol, Asiye Durmaz

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between life satisfaction and quality of life of nursing students. This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted with a research population of 396 nursing students who received education at a school of nursing. The research data were collected between May and June of the 2007-2008 academic year. The data collection tools included "Student Description Form," Life Satisfaction Scale, and WHOQOL-BREF (TR) Quality of Life (QOL) Scale. The mean score of life satisfaction was 22.90 ± 5.74. Participants' QOL mean scores were 67.16 ± 15.29 in the physical domain, 64.33 ± 14.72 in the psychological domain, 62.81 ± 19.12 in the social relationships domain, and 60.59 ± 12.59 in the environmental domain. There was a significant correlation between life satisfaction and the four main domains of quality of life scores (P life satisfaction and quality of life among nursing students. In addition, it was determined that being a nursing student had a positive effect on students' life satisfaction and quality of life. Therefore, the education system is recommended to be redesigned in such a way as to make students more active and to improve their life satisfaction and quality of life. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Quality of Life and Philosophy of Life Determines Physical and Mental Health: Status Over Research Findings From The Quality of Life Research Center, Copenhagen, 1991-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life (QOL has over the past decade become an important part of health science and also increased public awareness. It has become increasingly apparent that illness is closely related to the individual perception of a good life, and therefore the exploration of indicators related to quality of life appears to be of broad importance for the prevention and treatment of diseases. Identifying, which factors constitute a good life may reveal an understanding about what areas in life should be encouraged, in order to enhance the global quality of life, health, and ability. In this paper we present results from studies initiated in 1989 to examine quality of life in relation to disease. The purpose of this presentation was to assemble the results from the study carried out in the years between 1993 and 1997, examining a total of 11.500 Danes, to show the association between quality of life and a wide series of social indicators.

  6. Quality of life in non-melanoma skin cancer--the skin cancer quality of life (SCQoL) questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Gabrielle Randskov; Christensen, Karl Bang; Esmann, Solveig

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disease-specific quality of life (QoL) questionnaires are increasingly used to provide patient-reported out-come measures in both malignant and non-malignant disease. OBJECTIVE: To create, validate and test the psychometrics of the Skin Cancer Quality of Life (SCQoL), which was designed...

  7. Evaluation of perception of quality of life of disabled athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolach Bartosz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the perception of quality of life for athletes - disabled, participating in individual and team Paralympic sports. Material: The study involved 32 athletes sports club "Start" in Wroclaw in 2013, engaged in individual sports: swimming, weightlifting, powerlifting (powerlifting and command: wheelchair basketball and volleyball in a sitting position. Results: Studies have proven that sports people with physical disabilities have a positive effect on the quality of their lives. Conclusions: 1. Study aspects of perception of quality of life is a complex issue, but deserves proper attention and appropriate force to study it. 2. Athletes - Disabled involved both individual and team sports, the perception of quality of life is average.

  8. The Quality of Life in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chong-Min

    2009-01-01

    The AsiaBarometer survey of 1,023 respondents shows Life in Korea is highly modernized and digitalized without being much globalized. Despite the modernization and digitalization of their lifestyles, ordinary citizens still prioritize materialistic values more than post-materialistic values, and they remain least satisfied in the material life…

  9. The effects of chiropractic treatment on patients' quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Tech. The purpose of this study is to determine whether chiropractic care has an effect on a patient's quality of life using the endpoints of: "the ability to perform general activities of daily living" (patient's level of disability, and restored function) and their "general emotional state" (energy level, depression, interference from emotional problems and feeling of wellness), also how these endpoints affect quality of life. Two hundred and fifty-three subjects participated in this s...

  10. Moving Us Toward a Theory of Individual Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalock, Robert L; Verdugo, Miguel A; Gomez, Laura E; Reinders, Hans S

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses three steps involved in moving us toward a theory of individual quality of life: developing a conceptual model, integrating theory components, and applying and evaluating the theory. Each of the proposed steps is guided by established standards regarding theory development and use. The article concludes with a discussion of criteria that can be used to evaluate the theory and the contribution that a theory of individual quality of life would make to the field of disability.

  11. Predictors of Quality of Life in Patients with Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Monnavar Afzalaghaee; Mohsen Dehghani; Rasoul Alimi; Mohsen Mehdinejad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Quality of life among patients with epilepsy is severely affected by consequences of physical, psychological, social of epilepsy. The aim of present study was to evaluate predictors of quality of life in epileptic patients and to determine the main effective factors. Methods: This is a comparative cross sectional study on 100 epileptic patients and 100 healthy people from patient's relatives who referred to neurology clinic of 22 Bahman hospital in Mashhad. Data were collecte...

  12. Anxiety and quality of life in phobic dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofts-Barnes, N P; Brough, E; Wilson, K E; Beddis, A J; Girdler, N M

    2010-03-01

    Little is known about the anxiety patients experience before attending for dental treatment. The aim of this study was to determine, in dentally phobic patients, the temporal relationship of pre-operative anxiety levels, and the disruption to daily life caused by this. Twenty-four phobic and 19 comparison (non-phobic) dental patients were recruited. Four validated questionnaires were used to assess anxiety and quality of life, which each patient completed for 5 days prior to, and on the day of, treatment. Those in the experimental group were found to have significantly greater levels of dental and general anxiety, and a significantly lower quality of life compared with those in the comparison group. Significant temporal relationships were found with all of the questionnaires. Dental and general anxiety scores were significantly correlated with quality-of-life measures. This study suggests that phobic dental patients are experiencing significant increased anxiety, and significant negative quality-of-life effects, in this period.

  13. Quality of life in adolescents with primary headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Riahta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Headaches are common problems in adults, adolescents, and children. Headaches impact a child’s life, their family life, and even society. An assessment of quality of life in adolescents with primary headaches may help to determine actions necessary to improve the quality of life of these patients. Objective To assess the quality of life of adolescents with primary headaches compared to healthy adolescents. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in December 2009 on adolescents aged 13 to 18 years. The headache group consisted of children with primary headaches according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders and the control group consisted of healthy adolescents. Subjects were selected by consecutive sampling, with 75 subjects in each group. Subjects filled the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory version 4.0 (PedsQL 4.0 questionnaire. Results The mean PedsQL total score was significantly lower in the headache group than in the control group [175.7 vs. 392.2, respectively, (95%CI of differences -28.1 to -219.3, P = 0.001]. However, out of 23 items in the questionnaire, 9 were not significantly different between the headache and control groups. Conclusions Primary headaches in adolescents is associated with lower quality of life. Most quality of life domains scores are significantly lower in adolescents with primary headaches compared to those without primary headaches. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:350-4.].

  14. Quality of life of individuals submitted to vestibular rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Patatas, Olívia Helena Gomes [UNIFESP; Ganança, Cristina Freitas; Ganança,Fernando Freitas

    2009-01-01

    Balance disorders affect social, family and professional activities. Vestibular rehabilitation can reduce the impact of these disorders on the quality of life of individuals with vertigo. AIM: to study the influence of vestibular rehabilitation on the quality of life of individuals, correlating it with gender, age, results from computerized vectoelectronystagmography and vertigo. Study type: Retrospective. MATERIALS AND METHODS:Twenty-two individuals were submitted to customized vestibular re...

  15. Quality of life and oral health in elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrijos-Gómez, Gema; González-Serrano, José; López-Pintor-Muñoz, Rosa-María; López-Bermejo, Miguel-Ángel; Hernández-Vallejo, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Background We want to assess quality of life in elderly patients in relation to the number of remaining teeth, the number of ingested drugs and xerostomía and to determine the correlation between an increased intake of drugs and a greater feeling of dry mouth and to know the most commonly used measures to control xerostomia. Material and Methods 30 subjects aged between 65 and 95 years (14 males, 16 females) completed the OHIP questionnaire to determine quality of life. For oral status, the number of remaining teeth according to WHO criteria and xerostomia using the xerostomia index (XI) were studied. In cases of dry mouth sensation, the measures to alleviate it were asked. Results The average quality of life according to the OHIP rate is 19.23 (Dt = 10.58), being 56 the worst quality of life. The Pearson correlation coefficient indicates that quality of life is not related to the number of remaining teeth (r = -0.046; p = 0.810) nor the number of ingested drugs (r = 0.226; p = 0.23) but a greater sensation of dry mouth is related to a poorer quality of life (r = 0.678; p = 0.230). There is no association between the number of ingested drugs and the xerostomia index (r = 0.144; p = 0.447). The most frequently measures used against dry mouth were drinking water (21 subjects) and sugarless candies (15 subjects). Conclusions Quality of life is not related to the number of remaining teeth nor the number of ingested drugs. However, a higher level of xerostomia was significantly associated with a poorer quality of life. There is no association between the number of drugs ingested and xerostomia index. Sugarless candies and drinking water are the more frequently used measures to alleviate dry mouth. Key words:Quality of life, oral health, elderly. PMID:27957276

  16. Quality of life and oral health in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Rodríguez, Víctor-Manuel; Torrijos-Gómez, Gema; González-Serrano, José; López-Pintor-Muñoz, Rosa-María; López-Bermejo, Miguel-Ángel; Hernández-Vallejo, Gonzalo

    2016-12-01

    We want to assess quality of life in elderly patients in relation to the number of remaining teeth, the number of ingested drugs and xerostomía and to determine the correlation between an increased intake of drugs and a greater feeling of dry mouth and to know the most commonly used measures to control xerostomia. 30 subjects aged between 65 and 95 years (14 males, 16 females) completed the OHIP questionnaire to determine quality of life. For oral status, the number of remaining teeth according to WHO criteria and xerostomia using the xerostomia index (XI) were studied. In cases of dry mouth sensation, the measures to alleviate it were asked. The average quality of life according to the OHIP rate is 19.23 (Dt = 10.58), being 56 the worst quality of life. The Pearson correlation coefficient indicates that quality of life is not related to the number of remaining teeth (r = -0.046; p = 0.810) nor the number of ingested drugs (r = 0.226; p = 0.23) but a greater sensation of dry mouth is related to a poorer quality of life (r = 0.678; p = 0.230). There is no association between the number of ingested drugs and the xerostomia index (r = 0.144; p = 0.447). The most frequently measures used against dry mouth were drinking water (21 subjects) and sugarless candies (15 subjects). Quality of life is not related to the number of remaining teeth nor the number of ingested drugs. However, a higher level of xerostomia was significantly associated with a poorer quality of life. There is no association between the number of drugs ingested and xerostomia index. Sugarless candies and drinking water are the more frequently used measures to alleviate dry mouth. Key words:Quality of life, oral health, elderly.

  17. Larynx cancer: quality of life and voice after treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaneli Colombo Rossi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Treatment for patients with larynx cancer often results in a negative impact on their physical, social and psychological functions. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate quality of life and voice in patients treated for advanced laryngeal cancer as a consequence of surgery or exclusive chemoradiation. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study with 30 patients free of disease: 10 total laryngectomy patients without production of esophageal speech (EVS; 10 Total laryngectomy patients with tracheoesophageal voice (TEV and 10 patients with laryngeal voice. Quality of life was measured by SF-36; Voice-Related Quality of Life (V-RQOL and Voice Handicap Index (VHI protocols, applied on the same day. RESULTS: The SF-36 demonstrated that patients who received chemoradiotherapy exclusively enjoyed a feature better quality of life than the group of TEV and EVS. In V-RQOL it was observed that the quality of life related to voice is lower than in the EVS. In the VHI group EVS presented higher scores for overall VHI, emotional, functional and organic. DISCUSSION: Quality of life and voice in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy was better than in patients treated surgically. CONCLUSION: The type of medical treatment selected in patients with laryngeal cancer can influence changes in quality of life and voice.

  18. Quality of life among patients with hand eczema in Iran

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    Hossein Safizadeh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background — Hand eczema is among the most common dermatological diseases with a chronic course. It has undesirable psychological, social and occupational outcomes affecting patient’s quality of life. Objective — The aim of the present study was to study the quality of life of patients with hand eczema in an Iranian population. Methods and Results — This cross-sectional study was performed on 196 patients with hand eczema through clinical exam and filling specific questionnaires. Hand Eczema Severity Index (HECSI and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI were used for studying the disease severity and quality of life, respectively. Mean±SD of HECSI and DLQI scores were 57.05±48.85 and 14.80±5.79 respectively. In 94% of cases, hand eczema had significant effect on patients’ quality of life. Based on DLQI, symptoms, feelings and personal relationships were the most affected aspects. There was a significant positive relationship between DLQI and HECSI scores (p<0.05. No significant difference was found in the quality of life based on age, sex and the disease duration. Conclusions — Since hand eczema significantly affects the quality of life, beside medical treatments, attention to psycho-social and occupational outcomes of the disease is highly recommended.

  19. Quality of life and multimorbidity of elderly outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Cano Miranda de Nóbrega

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Substantial medical research has established an inverse relationship between quality of life and illness. However, there exists minimal evidence for such a connection in the context of stable and controlled diseases. OBJECTIVE: We wished to correlate multimorbidity with quality of life for elderly patients who suffer from stable chronic diseases. METHODS: We used a tool to evaluate quality of life, namely World Health Organization quality of life-BRIEF, together with a scale of multimorbidity known as the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale - Geriatric Version. Furthermore, the quality of life data were correlated with scores recorded on the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale - Geriatric Version, the number of drugs used, and individual perceptions of health and age. RESULTS: We studied 104 elderly patients who suffered from chronic diseases. The patients had exhibited neither acute events nor secondary complications, their cognition was intact, and they were functionally independent. The Cumulative Illness Rating Scale - Geriatric Version showed an inverse correlation with the physical domain (p= 0.008 and a tendency toward an inverse correlation with the psychological domain (p= 0.052. Self-perception of health showed a high correlation with the physical domain (p= 0.000, psychological domain (p= 0.000 and environmental domain (p= 0.000. The number of drugs used correlated only with the physical domain (p= 0.004. Age and social domain showed a tendency toward a positive correlation (p= 0.054. DISCUSSION: We uncovered an inverse relationship between quality of life and multimorbidity in a group of patients who suffered from stable chronic diseases, with no functional limitations, pain or complications. Our data suggest that a patient's knowledge that they have a certain clinical condition changes their subjective assessment of quality of life in the related domain. CONCLUSION: The perceived quality of life of the sample was affected by

  20. What affects the quality of life in autoimmune Addison's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G; Hackemann, A; Penna-Martinez, M; Badenhoop, K

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have shown a reduced quality of life in patients with Addison's disease, but little is known about the potential influences. We determined the quality of life in 200 patients with Addison's disease using an Addison's disease-specific quality-of-life questionnaire. Data about first symptoms, time to diagnosis and current medication were collected by questionnaires. With increasing latency between first symptoms and diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency, the quality of life decreased in highly significant manner (pdisease (p=0.05), atrophic gastritis (p=0.01) and primary ovarian failure (p=0.01) were highly correlated with reduced scores. Quality of life was significantly lower in female patients and in those with manifestation at older ages. With more autoimmune comorbidities, the quality of life scores dropped. The most important factor, however, was latency between first symptoms and diagnosis that affected patients' quality of life even years after manifestation of the disease. These results confirm and extend previous observations and emphasize the importance of a timely diagnosis. Therefore, medical awareness for this rare but easily treatable disorder needs to be sharpened. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. [Larynx cancer: quality of life and voice after treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Vaneli Colombo; Fernandes, Fernando Laffitte; Ferreira, Maria Augusta Aliperti; Bento, Lucas Ricci; Pereira, Pablo Soares Gomes; Chone, Carlos Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Treatments for patients with laryngeal cancer often have an impact on physical, social, and psychological functions. To evaluate quality of life and voice in patients treated for advanced laryngeal cancer through surgery or exclusive chemoradiation. Retrospective cohort study with 30 patients free from disease: ten total laryngectomy patients without production of esophageal speech (ES); ten total laryngectomy patients with tracheoesophageal speech (TES), and ten with laryngeal speech. Quality of life was measured by SF-36, Voice-Related Quality of Life (V-RQOL), and Voice Handicap Index (VHI) protocols, applied on the same day. The SF-36 showed that patients who received exclusive chemoradiotherapy had better quality of life than the TES and ES groups. The V-RQOL showed that the voice-related quality of life was lower in the ES group. In the VHI, the ES group showed higher scores for overall, emotional, functional, and organic VHI. Quality of life and voice in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy was better than in patients treated surgically. The type of medical treatment used in patients with laryngeal cancer can bring changes in quality of life and voice. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Quality of life in dialysis: A Malaysian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen J; Musa, Ramli; Chew, Thian F; Lim, Christopher T S; Morad, Zaki; Bujang, Adam

    2014-04-01

    There is a growing interest to use quality of life as one of the dialysis outcome measurement. Based on the Malaysian National Renal Registry data on 15 participating sites, 1569 adult subjects who were alive at December 31, 2012, aged 18 years old and above were screened. Demographic and medical data of 1332 eligible subjects were collected during the administration of the short form of World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF) in Malay, English, and Chinese language, respectively. The primary objective is to evaluate the quality of life among dialysis patients using WHOQOL-BREF. The secondary objective is to examine significant factors that affect quality of life score. Mean (SD) transformed quality of life scores were 56.2 (15.8), 59.8 (16.8), 58.2 (18.5), 59.5 (14.6), 61.0 (18.5) for (1) physical, (2) psychological, (3) social relations, (4) environment domains, and (5) combined overall quality of life and general health, respectively. Peritoneal dialysis group scored significantly higher than hemodialysis group in the mean combined overall quality of life and general health score (63.0 vs. 60.0, P income, mode of dialysis, hemoglobin, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, cerebral vascular accident and leg amputation. Subjects on peritoneal dialysis modality achieved higher combined overall quality of life and general health score than those on hemodialysis. Religion and cerebral vascular accident were significantly associated with all domains and combined overall quality of life and general health.

  3. Quality of life of people with diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Martins Lima Neto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: evaluate the quality of life of people with diabetic foot and its association with age and gender. Methods: cross-sectional study conducted with people with diabetic foot seen in the vascular clinic of a Municipal Hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, lifestyle and evaluation of quality of life SF-36 questionnaires were used. Results: sample was consisted of 48 people. The majority was elderly (58.4%, female (56.3%, non-smoker (93.7%, non-alcoholic (83.4%, with recurrence of ulcers (50.0%, with present secretion (54.2% and absent fetid odor (81.3%. Regarding quality of life, the best result was in the domain vitality and the worse, in the domain physical aspects. All domains, except the vitality, had a score below 50 in the measurement of quality of life. There was no significant difference in the comparison of quality of life between age groups and gender. Conclusion: participants presented domains of quality of life that tend to a poorer health status.

  4. Quality of life of people with diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Martins Lima Neto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: evaluate the quality of life of people with diabetic foot and its association with age and gender. Methods: cross-sectional study conducted with people with diabetic foot seen in the vascular clinic of a municipal hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, lifestyle and evaluation of quality of life SF-36 questionnaires were used. Results: sample was consisted of 48 people. The majority was elderly (58.4%, female (56.3%, non-smoker (93.7%, non-alcoholic (83.4%, with recurrence of ulcers (50.0%, with present secretion (54.2% and absent fetid odor (81.3%. Regarding quality of life, the best result was in the domain vitality and the worse, in the domain physical aspects. All domains, except the vitality, had a score below 50 in the measurement of quality of life. There was no significant difference in the comparison of quality of life between age groups and gender. Conclusion: participants presented domains of quality of life that tend to a poorer health status.

  5. Resilience and professional quality of life among military healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leners, Colleen; Sowers, Ramona; Quinn Griffin, Mary T; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2014-07-01

    The retention of qualified military healthcare providers is a top priority for Department of Defense (DoD) leaders. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between resilience and professional quality of life and to explore differences among providers who had been deployed and those who had never been deployed. Results indicated high resilience scores among all providers, and significant relationships between dimensions of professional quality of life and resilience. There were significant differences in professional quality of life based on deployment. Recommendations for future research are included, particularly as retention is an important issue for the DoD.

  6. Quality of Life in Patients with Neurocysticercosis in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattarai, Rachana; Christine M Budke; Carabin, Hélène; Proaño, Jefferson V.; Flores-Rivera, Jose; Corona, Teresa; Cowan, Linda D; Ivanek, Renata; Snowden, Karen F.; Flisser, Ana

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare quality of life measures in patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC) to those of a matched control group. The NCC outpatients and their controls were recruited from two neurology referral hospitals in Mexico City, Mexico during 2007–2008. The quality of life of 224 NCC patients was compared with 224 age-sex-hospital-day matched controls using the short form 12 v2 (SF-12 v2) quality of life survey. Medical chart reviews were also conducted for the NCC o...

  7. Caregivers’ Quality of Life and Quality of Services for Children with Cancer: A Review from Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Homeira; Vameghi, Meroe; Ghazinour, Mehdi; KhodaeiArdakani, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Caregivers of cancer patients are exposed to different types of psychosocial stress which influence their quality of life. The purposes of this study were to assess quality of life in caregivers of children with cancer and to investigate the relationship between the caregivers’ quality of life and quality of services in the social work section. Method: 125 caregivers were recruited. Quality of life was measured by the Iranian version of the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire and data concerning service quality were obtained from the Iranian version of the SERVQUAL questionnaire. Findings: Scores in physical health, psychological status and environmental conditions for caregivers of children with cancer were significantly lower than the general population. There was a negative correlation between the tangible domain of SERVQUAL and the psychological status and environmental conditions of quality of life. The tangible dimension was the only aspect of service quality to predict caregivers’ quality of life regarding psychological status and environmental conditions. Conclusion: Caregivers of children with a disease are care consumers and, like all consumers, they expect good service. Delivering high quality services consistently is difficult but profitable for a service organization. In other words, trying to deliver more appropriate services than patients expect to receive from their social work care is one of the most reliable ways to promote caregivers’ satisfaction and quality of life. PMID:23618487

  8. Performance and Quality of Working Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.D. Pruijt (Hans)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAn examination of the deep structure of the discourse on the organization of work shows that the most successful texts share a common structure: they construct an ideal model in which performance and quality go hand in hand. They provide explanations for the self-constructed gap between

  9. Measuring service life and evaluating the quality of solid tires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charoenyut Dechwayukul

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to propose procedures for measuring service life and evaluating the quality of locallymade and used solid tires in Thailand. The solid tires were stressed and rotated until blowout on a drum-like test apparatuswhich is designed, constructed by the authors and equipped with laboratory instrumentation. Solid tires from five differentmanufacturers were selected for testing. We measured service life, length of time to tire failure, at three different loadingamplitudes and three different speeds on the testing drum. The service life of all specimens was studied and compared todetermine the possibility of using service life to evaluate the quality of a solid tire.

  10. Impact of hearing impairment on quality of life of adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škrbić Renata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hearing impairment, as a type of sensory disability affects the quality of life of adolescents. The aim of this study was to determine whether the quality of life of adolescents with hearing impairments was different from the quality of life of adolescents without disabilities, and to examine the correlation between self- reported quality of life and proxy- report by their parents. Materials and Methods. The study included 52 adolescents with hearing impairment and 122 adolescents without developmental disabilities, aged from 13 to 18 years and their parents. Data were collected by a standardized questionnaire, the PedsQLTM 4.0 Generic Core Scale. The survey was conducted during May and June 2011 in 6 schools in Novi Sad and Belgrade. Results. Adolescents with hearing impairment and their parents reported lower scores on all scales of questionnaire. The average score of physical health was 77.58; p<0.001 (adolescents, and 75; p=0,006 (parents; on psycho-social summary scale 75.35; p=0.025 (adolescents, and 73.37; p=0.02 (parents. On the overall scale, the adolescents scored 76.13; p<0.001, and parents reported 73.93; p<0.001. The parents assessed the quality of life lower than their children. On the total summary scale, a moderate agreement (r = 0.51 was found between self- report and proxy- report. Conclusion. Hearing loss affects all aspects of the quality of life of adolescents. A multidisciplinary approach is required in order to provide better conditions for functioning of these children and improve their quality of life.

  11. Subjective Quality of Life in the Psychology of Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapoval I.A.,

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a theoretical introduction to the discussion of the subjective quality of life for carriers of psychology of poverty. We revealed the socio-cultural determinants of subjective quality of life, systematize its psychological components and factors of its high level. We describe a set of characteristics of psychology of poverty, including the sense of displacement from normal life, hopelessness, fatalism, deprivation, social envy, metapathology of personality, lack of subjectivity, responsibility, an outsider position, survivor guilt complex, and so on. On the criterion of the relationship to own life we revealed types of carriers of psychology of poverty: a passive-contemplative, passive-aggressive, pseudocompensatory-devalued, infantile, anomic. We analyzed the specificity of reflection and benchmarking of carriers of psychology of poverty as a cognitive and affective strategies to assess the quality of own lives, focused on the maintenance of self-esteem

  12. Health related quality of life of Canary Island citizens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-Bastida Julio

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to describe the health-related quality of life of Canarian population using information from the Canary Island Health Survey and three observational studies developed in the Canary Islands. Methods A descriptive analysis was carried out on a sample of 5.549 Canarian citizens using information from 2004 Canary Island Health Survey and three observational studies on Alzheimer's disease, Stroke and HIV. EQ-5 D was the generic tool used for revealing quality of life of people surveyed. Besides the rate of people reporting moderate or severe decrease in quality of life, TTO-index scores and visual analogue scale were used for assessing health related quality of life of people that suffer a specific diseases and general population. Results Self-perceived health status of citizens that suffer chronic diseases of high prevalence, identifies by the Canary Island Health Survey and other diseases such Alzheimer's disease, Stroke and HIV, independently examined in observational studies, are worse than self-perceived health of general population. Depression/anxiety and pain/discomfort were identified as the dimensions of the EQ-5 D with highest prevalence of problems. Alzheimer's disease and stroke were the illnesses with greater loss of quality of life. Conclusions Health related quality of life should be integrated into a set of information along with expectancy of life, incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases for developing health policy and planning health care activities The combination of information on health related quality of life from population health surveys with data from observational studies enlarges the sources of relevant information for setting health priorities and assessing the impact of health policies.

  13. The Quality of Life of Retired Reengaged Academics in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejechi, Eucharia Onyema

    2012-01-01

    The quality of life (QL) of retired academics reengaged in some Nigerian Universities was studied using physical health, subjective happiness, life satisfaction and psychological well-being domains and a measure based on control, autonomy, self-realization and pleasure (CASP) as indicators. Satisfactory QL was indicated all respondents (greater…

  14. Depression and quality of life in first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Renwick, Laoise

    2012-07-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has gained recognition as a valid measure of outcome in first-episode psychosis (FEP). This study aimed to determine the influence of specific groups of depressive symptoms on separate domains of subjectively appraised QOL.

  15. Quality of life assessment in musculo-skeletal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudart, Charlotte; Biver, Emmanuel; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Al-Daghri, Nasser; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Rizzoli, René

    2017-06-29

    Musculoskeletal disorders affect morbidity, quality of life and mortality, and represent an increasing economic and societal burden in the context of population aging and increased life expectancy. Improvement of quality of life should be one of the priorities of any interventions to prevent and treat musculoskeletal disorders in the ageing population. Two main approaches, namely generic and disease-specific instruments, can be applied to measure health-related quality of life. Among the generic tools available in scientific literature, the short form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and the Euroqol five item questionnaire (EQ-5D) are two of the most popular questionnaires used to quantify the health related quality of life in people with musculoskeletal disorders. However, because generic tools may not always be able to detect subtle effects of a specific condition on quality of life, a specific tool is highly valuable. Specific tools improve the ability to clinically characterize quality of life in subjects with a specific musculoskeletal disorder, as well as the capacity to assess changes over time in the QoL of these subjects. The recent development of specific tools should help to validate preventive and therapeutic interventions in this field.

  16. Health and quality of life vs. occupational activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kowalska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The level of quality of life and health status of the population largely depends on the determinants related to occupational activity. The results of reviewed bibliography indicate a significant and growing importance of employment conditions on the quality of life and population health status in most countries of the world, especially in those with market economy. Of the evaluated determinants the following factors should be listed in particular: sources and the amount of income, stability of the income and employment, the nature of work and the degree of job satisfaction, as well as autonomy and career prospects. Moreover, they proved that the situation of persisting and long-term unemployment and precarious employment leads to a significant deterioration in the quality of life and health, especially among young people. In conclusion, the study of quality of life and population health status should take into consideration factors related to occupational activity. Med Pr 2016;67(5:663–671

  17. [Health-related Quality of Life After Oropharyngeal Cancer Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkenstein, S; Willers, J; Noack, V; Dazert, S; Minovi, A

    2015-08-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer is a diagnosis which means a change in life and even after successful treatment a tremendous reduction in the quality of life. Aim of this study is to analyse the health-related quality of life in patients with oropharyngeal cancer dependent on different treatment options. Charts of 256 patients treated for oropharyngeal cancer between 1997 and 2007 were analysed in a retrospective study. Inclusion criteria for this study has been fulfilled by 98 patients, 82 of these completed the study. Therefore, standardised questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 und EORTC QLQ-H&N35) have been used and 2 groups were compared: patients with primary radiochemotherapy (pRCT) vs. patients treated by an operation and adjuvant radiation. Most of the health-related quality of life domains in our patients were significantly reduced compared to the general population. There have been just very few significant differences in the quality of life domains in between the 2 groups. Health-related quality of life after treatment of oropharyngeal cancer is significantly compromised for these patients compared to the general population, but there have been no obvious differences depending on the compared treatment options. Only regarding the items "physical and cognitive functioning" patients after primary radiochemotherapy showed significantly better results and thus a better quality of life, despite the fact, that this group has a significantly advanced cancer stadium. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Good Job, Good Life? Working Conditions and Quality of Life in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drobnic, Sonja; Beham, Barbara; Prag, Patrick; Drobnič, S.; Präg, P.

    2010-01-01

    Cross-national comparisons generally show large differences in life satisfaction of individuals within and between European countries. This paper addresses the question of whether and how job quality and working conditions contribute to the quality of life of employed populations in nine strategical

  19. Good Job, Good Life? Working Conditions and Quality of Life in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobnic, Sonja; Beham, Barbara; Prag, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Cross-national comparisons generally show large differences in life satisfaction of individuals within and between European countries. This paper addresses the question of whether and how job quality and working conditions contribute to the quality of life of employed populations in nine strategically selected EU countries: Finland, Sweden, the…

  20. Good Job, Good Life? Working Conditions and Quality of Life in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobnic, Sonja; Beham, Barbara; Prag, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Cross-national comparisons generally show large differences in life satisfaction of individuals within and between European countries. This paper addresses the question of whether and how job quality and working conditions contribute to the quality of life of employed populations in nine strategically selected EU countries: Finland, Sweden, the…

  1. ECONOMIC STANDARD – QUANTITATIVE COMPONENT OF QUALITY OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROXANA PLEŞA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present social/economic conditions of our country, the problem of objective analysis and research of the population’s everyday social life, of its wellbeing, of final consumption and possibilities of satisfying vital necessities, of the living standard and lifestyle, of the quality of life as a whole, becomes more and more present and significant. In the present period, the concept of quality of life was not only used by specialist, it actually became “exchange currency” in public debates. Considering the political and economic context and the integration of Romania in the European Union, the assurance of life quality is a vital objective in order to rapidly reach a living standard at acceptable level of civilization, defined in a European context.

  2. Quality of life of patients with occupational hand eczema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenraads, PJ; Bouma, J; Diepgen, TL

    2004-01-01

    In recent years quality of life has been studied in a growing number of different dermatological diseases. Internationally validated questionnaires such the RAND-36 (identical to the SF-36) do not contain enough questions which are relevant for skin diseases. There is no publication on quality of li

  3. Work-related quality of life of Ugandan healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opollo, J G; Gray, J; Spies, L A

    2014-03-01

    To describe perceived work-related quality of life of Ugandan healthcare workers. A secondary aim was to seek participant input on ways to improve work environments. Poor patient outcomes, decreased employee motivation and decisions to leave the organization have been linked to poor work conditions. Interventions to correct healthcare worker shortage in developing countries require information about work quality of life. Descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in health and educational settings in Uganda in July 2011. Participants completed the Biographical Information Scale demographic questionnaire and the validated 24-item Work-Related Quality of Life scale. Sample included 146 healthcare workers employed in various settings. Participants reported poorer quality of work life on the work conditions, control at work and home-work interface subscales. Participants perceived stress at work to be low and experienced higher job career satisfaction. There was a significant relationship between work-related quality of life, gender and hours worked. Participants' suggestions to improve work life ranged from simple no-cost suggestions to more complex system level interventions. Work-related quality of life was low in this convenience sample. Perceived stress at work was lower than expected, but may have been due to nurses' expectations of a normal work assignment. Predominantly women, the participants had significant caregiving responsibilities. Nurses must acquire a seat at the table where crucial decisions about nursing and its future are made. By advancing leadership skills, nurses can effectively advocate for organizational changes that address broad factors related to increasing job satisfaction, and retaining and attracting nurses. Nurses can influence work quality of life individually and collectively by identifying workplace concerns, demanding safe work environments, fostering teamwork and enhancing professional growth. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  4. Easing Opioid Dose May Improve Pain and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167269.html Easing Opioid Dose May Improve Pain and Quality of Life ... when it comes to long-term use of opioid painkillers, cutting back on the dose of the ...

  5. Review: Quality of life in lower limb peripheral vascular surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, J.M.; de Vries, Jolanda; Ho, G.H.; Bastos Gonçalves, F.; Hoeks, S.E.; Verhagen, H.J.M.; van der Laan, L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Vascular intervention studies generally consider patency and limb salvage as primary outcomes. However, quality of life is increasingly considered an important patient-oriented outcome measurement of vascular interventions. Existing literature was analyzed to determine the effect of differen

  6. Interdependence of life insurance service quality and premium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Benazić

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Insurance companies in Croatia feel the need to find new sources of competitive advantage on the Croatian life insurance market amid increasing competition and a poorly profiled offer of life insurance services. Lately, both marketing literature and practice seem to point to the shaping of a relationship between service quality and price as a possible solution to improving the position of insurance companies on the Croatian market. In providing life insurance services, the insurance companies should focus on the quality elements that offer certain benefits a client is willing to pay for. Changes in individual quality features have been evaluated differently by clients. Such differences in their evaluation of changes in the individual elements of service quality also reflect the willingness of clients to pay a suitable increase on their insurance premium. Improvements in the service quality features that are subjectively evaluated as important should lead to the client’s acceptance of a higher life insurance premium. The paper considers the interdependence between the quality of life insurance services and the premium from the aspect of the client’s willingness to pay a higher life insurance premium for a higher service quality.

  7. Proxy-rated quality of life in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Bhattacharya, Suvosree; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the change in proxy rated quality of life (QoL) of a large cohort of home living patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) over a period of 36 months.......The study investigated the change in proxy rated quality of life (QoL) of a large cohort of home living patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) over a period of 36 months....

  8. Harmonization of gender roles as a basis for life quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nešić Ana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activities that determine the quality of life are related to environmental factors, economic factors, social and personal factors that largely determine the relationships among people and, especially, relations between genders. Particularly important for the quality of life is work, development and work results. Career is now perceived as a development of our own competencies, understanding of the meaning of work through the integration of psychological, sociological, educational, physical and economic factors, which together form the individual's career in life. Women's career developments are often different from men's, due to the phenomenon of the glass ceiling, which represents an invisible barrier to the advancement of women, and which often influences their behaviour. Harmonization of gender roles in business and private life of women is imperative to improve the quality of life all citizens.

  9. Quality of life after liver transplantation with old donor graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Nascimento Flor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare the quality of life of liver transplant patients who received liver from donor aged ≤60 or >60 years old. Methods: a prospective study with a sample of 141 recipients from liver donors aged equal to or less than 60 years and recipients of elderly donor liver, in a reference center. Authors used a tool for identification and the Short Form-36. The Student-t and Mann-Whitney tests were applied for comparison between groups. Results: there were higher levels of quality of life with a statistically significant difference: Group A in social aspect (p=0.02 and Group B >50 months of transplantation (p=0.05 in physical component summary. Conclusion: the quality of life of liver receptors from older donor livers was similar to those who received a graft from younger donors in most dimensions. Transplanting time had a positive impact on the quality of life of elderly recipients.

  10. Quality of life in cancer survivors: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Knob Pinto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at identifying factors related to the quality of life of cancer survivors. The databases PubMed, LILACS and SciELO were used, being quality of life, survival and neoplasms the main keywords entered. Sixty-eight articles were found and ten that approached aspects related to quality of life of cancer survivors were selected. The results analysis was performed in stages. Several factors were identified and grouped into physical (chewing, pain and others, psychological (disease conception, social, financial (high cost of treatment and miscellaneous (age, treatment performance among others. It is believed that the analysis of the different areas that comprise the quality of life of patients can assist health professionals in the implementation of assistance practices that consider the multidimensionality of cancer survival.

  11. The Quality of Life and Regional Development in FYR Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Bartlett

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on regional disparities in the quality of life in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. It explores the relationship between the quality of life, social exclusion, and policies towards regional and local economic development. The paper is based on a household survey carried out in August 2008 which provides a detailed picture of the situation facing households across regions. Overall, the survey shows that there are large regional disparities in life satisfaction, indicating an important role for regional policy in improving the life experience of people living in the most deprived parts of the country. The paper concludes with a number of recommendations for improving the focus of regional policies to ensure a higher quality of life in the deprived regions of Macedonia.

  12. The Quality of Life Scale (QOLS: Reliability, Validity, and Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Kathryn L

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Quality of Life Scale (QOLS, created originally by American psychologist John Flanagan in the 1970's, has been adapted for use in chronic illness groups. This paper reviews the development and psychometric testing of the QOLS. A descriptive review of the published literature was undertaken and findings summarized in the frequently asked questions format. Reliability, content and construct validity testing has been performed on the QOLS and a number of translations have been made. The QOLS has low to moderate correlations with physical health status and disease measures. However, content validity analysis indicates that the instrument measures domains that diverse patient groups with chronic illness define as quality of life. The QOLS is a valid instrument for measuring quality of life across patient groups and cultures and is conceptually distinct from health status or other causal indicators of quality of life.

  13. Evaluation of life quality in patients with gastric remnant cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹曙明

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the health-related quality of life(HRQoL)and its influencing factors in patients with gastric remnant cancer(GRC).Methods A total of 130 patients received gastrectomy more than

  14. Quality of life in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zarrabeitia, Roberto; Fariñas-Álvarez, Concepción; Santibáñez, Miguel; Señaris, Blanca; Fontalba, Ana; Botella, Luisa María; Parra, José Antonio

    2017-01-01

    ... hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), a rare disease in which epistaxis is a cardinal symptom. Purpose To assess the quality of life in a population of Spanish patients with HHT and compare it with the general population...

  15. [Evaluation of quality of life in elders undergoing hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Angélica Yukari; Okubo, Patrícia; Bedendo, João; Carreira, Lígia

    2011-06-01

    Hemodialysis affects not only physical but psychological and social aspects, with repercussions on personal and family life. Considering the increase in the elderly population in Brazil, this study aims to evaluate the quality of life of elderly patients with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis. This is a quantitative, descriptive exploratory study with elderly patients held in a facility specializing in hemodialysis in Guarapuava, Paraná, Brazil. The data were collected between May and June 2010, through a structured instrument and were submitted to the statistical software Statistica 7.1. Analyzing the domains of the questionnaire the highest score refers to the social domain (70.42) and the lowest, to the physical domain (49.37). Thus, the quality of life of these elderly had to be low, with variations according to the analyzed field. Researches aimed at assessing quality of life are relevant and instrumentalize the daily practice of care.

  16. Impact of hand eczema severity on quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujwala Priya Charan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hand eczema is a common disease seen in dermatological practice comprising of a spectrum ranging from mild disease to a severe distressing and chronic course with a negative impact on the quality of life. Aim: To assess the impact of hand eczema severity on quality of life. Materials and Methods: Patients with hand eczema were enrolled in a prospective study. Disease severity was assessed by hand eczema severity index (HECSI score and quality of life by dermatology life quality index (DLQI questionnaire. Results: Forty-six patients participated of which 22 (47.8% were males and 24 (52.2% females. The commonest age group affected among men and women was 50-59 years (31.8% and 40-49 years (41.7% respectively. History of atopy was found in 23.9% and 63% had persistent disease. In 28 (60.9%, the trigger was washing soaps and detergents of which 21 (87.5% were housewives. Of those employed, 27.7% reported loss of work days. The mean HECSI score was 14.46 (S.D = 20.98 and mean DLQI score was 9.54 (S.D = 5.62. Gender, age, occupation and duration of disease did not significantly affect the quality of life or disease severity. Increased episodes of eczema (>4 episodes/year showed a statistically significant correlation with DLQI (P value = 0.021. There was no significant correlation between HECSI score and DLQI in this study. Conclusion: Majority of the patients with hand eczema had a significant impairment of their quality of life. The impairment of quality of life in this study was mainly dependent on increased frequency of the eruptions and not on hand eczema severity.

  17. Quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Cruz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the dimensions of quality of life in the stages of chronic kidney disease and the influence of sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory data. INTRODUCTION: The information available on the quality of life of patients on conservative treatment and the relationship between the quality of life and glomerular filtration rate is limited. METHODS: 155 patients in stages 1-5 of chronic kidney disease and 36 in hemodialysis were studied. Quality of life was rated by the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36-Item (SF-36 and functional status by the Karnofsky Performance Scale. Clinical, laboratory and sociodemographic variables were investigated. RESULTS: Quality of life decreased in all stages of kidney disease. A reduction in physical functioning, physical role functioning and in the physical component summary was observed progressively in the different stages of kidney disease. Individuals with higher educational level who were professionally active displayed higher physical component summary values, whereas men and those with a higher income presented better mental component summary values. Older patients performed worse on the physical component summary and better on the mental component summary. Hemoglobin levels correlated with higher physical component summary values and the Karnofsky scale. Three or more comorbidities had an impact on the physical dimension. CONCLUSION: Quality of life is decreased in renal patients in the early stages of disease. No association was detected between the stages of the disease and the quality of life. It was possible to establish sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory risk factors for a worse quality of life in this population.

  18. Sexuality and Quality of Life among Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P.; Cummins, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the association between quality of life and attitudes toward, and experience of, sexual activities during adolescence. Findings demonstrate the importance of relationships and sexual experience to satisfaction with life. Discusses results in terms of the significance of sexuality for adolescents' general well-being. (Author/GCP)

  19. Metabolic syndrome and quality of life: a systematic review 1

    OpenAIRE

    Saboya, Patrícia Pozas; Bodanese,Luiz Carlos; Zimmermann,Paulo Roberto; Gustavo,Andréia da Silva; Assumpção, Caroline Melo; Londero, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to present currently available evidence to verify the association between metabolic syndrome and quality of life. Method: Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Medline and LILACS databases were studied for all studies investigating the association with metabolic syndrome and quality of life. Two blinded reviewers extracted data and one more was chosen in case of doubt. Results: a total of 30 studies were included, considering inclusion and exclusion criteria, which involved 62.063 pa...

  20. [Influence of occupational respiratory diseases on life quality parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslaia, N A; Khasanova, G N

    2010-01-01

    The article covers results of life quality studies in patients with occupational respiratory diseases and in workers at risk of diseases due to dust. Findings are that occuupational respiratory diseases negatively influence physical and psycho-social status of the patients. The influence degree is connected to smoking intensity, the disease duration and bronchial obstruction grade. Life quality study is an important indicator of the symptoms control, additional parameter to clinical and functional state monitoring.

  1. Aerobic exercise improves quality of life, psychological well-being ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aerobic exercise improves quality of life, psychological well-being and systemic ... Methods: Forty Alzheimer elderly subjects were enrolled in two groups; the first ... interleukin-6 (IL-6), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES),Beck Depression ...

  2. Age decreases quality of life in adolescents with intractable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prastiya Indra Gunawan

    2015-12-01

    Intractable epileptic adolescents have higher scores for physical functioning and health perception, but lower scores for social stigmatization. Social support has extremely low scores. Increasing age decreases quality of life in adolescents with intractable epilepsy.

  3. Cochlear implantation and change in quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Christian; Grøntved, Ågot Møller

    2000-01-01

    to significant improvements in a number of factors: self-perceived communication skills, frequency of conversation with others, telephone usage, self-confidence and the impact of hearing impairments on family life. CI dramatically changed the quality of life for all patients. No surgical complications were...

  4. Quality of life as an outcome measure in surgical oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenhoff, B S; Krabbe, P F; Wobbes, T; Ruers, T J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing interest in assessing the impact of a disease and the effect of a treatment on a patient's life, expressed as health-related quality of life (HRQoL). HRQoL assessment can provide essential outcome information for cancer surgery. METHODS: The core of this review is deri

  5. Quality of life and sleep in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Edalat-Nejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the quality of life and sleep of chronic hemodialysis (HD patients. Quality of sleep was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and quality of life (QoL was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form (SF-36 in 115 HD patients. One hundred (87% patients were "poor sleepers" (global PSQI ≥5. The SF-36 mental component summary and physical component summary (PCS scores were higher than 50 only in 43% and 32% of the subjects, respectively. No significant differences were found in QoL and sleep according to the patient′s gender, presence of diabetes and time on HD. Correlation between total SF-36 score and global PSQI was statistically significant (r = -0.227, P <0.05. Poor sleep is common in dialysis patients and is associated with lower QoL, especially with mental health component of life quality.

  6. Quality of life in aphasia: Greek adaptation of the stroke and aphasia quality of life scale - 39 item (SAQOL-39)

    OpenAIRE

    Kartsona, A.; Hilari, K.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Health-related quality of life (HRQL) measures are becoming increasingly popular in evaluating health care interventions and services. The stroke and aphasia quality of life scale-39 item (SAQOL-39) is an English questionnaire that measures HRQL in people with aphasia. There is currently no measure to assess the HRQL of Greek-speaking people with aphasia. This study began the cross-cultural adaptation of the SAQOL-39 into Greek, by translating and linguistically validating the instrument...

  7. Life satisfaction and health related quality of life during pregnancy and puerperium

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    While previous studies have defined ranges for health related quality of life (HRQOL) in other populations, there has been little attention to pregnant women. This study was undertaken to describe the evolution of the health related quality of life (HRQOL) and life satisfaction during pregnancy and puerperium. Poster submitted to the 22nd International Conference Stress and Anxiety Research Society (STAR), Palma de Mallorca, July, 12-14, 2001.

  8. Malnutrition affects quality of life in gastroenterology patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kristina Norman; Henriette Kirchner; Herbert Lochs; Matthias Pirlich

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between malnutrition and quality of life in patients with benign gastrointestinal disease.METHODS: Two hundred patients (104 wellnourished and 96 malnourished) were assessed according to the Subjective Global Assessment, anthropometric measurements and bioelectrical impedance analysis. Quality of life was determined with the validated Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form General Health Survey (SF 36). Muscle function was assessed by hand grip strength and peak flow.RESULTS: Body mass index, body cell mass, arm muscle area and hand grip strength were significantly lower in the malnourished patients. Quality of life was generally lower when compared to norm values. Seven out of eight quality of life scales (excluding bodily pain) were significantly reduced in the malnourished patients. Comparing patients with liver cirrhosis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), patients with IBD experienced significantly lower values in the perception of bodily pain, social functioning and mental health. Malnourished liver cirrhotics suffered reductions in more scales (six out of eight) than malnourished IBD patients did (four out of eight).CONCLUSION: Quality of life is generally low in benign gastrointestinal disease and is further reduced in patients who are classified as malnourished. It appears that liver cirrhosis patients experience a higher quality of life than IBD patients do, but the impact of malnutrition seems to be greater in liver cirrhosis than in IBD.

  9. Quality of life assessment among patients with peristomal skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybaek, Hanne; Knudsen, Dorte Bang; Laursen, Troels Nørgaard

    2010-01-01

    No data exist to describe how a skin problem may additionally affect the quality of life (QOL) in ostomates. We have studied the QOL in patients with peristomal skin problems and the variables that may affect it.......No data exist to describe how a skin problem may additionally affect the quality of life (QOL) in ostomates. We have studied the QOL in patients with peristomal skin problems and the variables that may affect it....

  10. Quality of Life and Recommendations for Further Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Michael S; Tak, Hyo Jung; Curlin, Farr A; Yoon, John D

    2016-11-01

    Physician recommendations for further medical treatment or palliative treatment only at the end of life may influence patient decisions. Little is known about the patient characteristics that affect physician-assessed quality of life or how such assessments are related to subsequent recommendations. A 2010 mailed survey of practicing U.S. physicians (1,156/1,878 or 62% of eligible physicians responded). Measures included an end of life vignette with five experimentally varied patient characteristics: setting, alimentation, pain, cognition, and communication. Physicians rated vignette patient quality of life on a scale from 0 to 100 and indicated whether they would recommend continuing full medical treatment or palliative treatment only. Cognitive deficits and alimentation had the greatest impacts on recommendations for further care, but pain and communication were also significant (all p < 0.001). Physicians who recommended continuing full medical treatment rated quality of life three times higher than those recommending palliative treatment only (40.41 vs 12.19; p < 0.01). Religious physicians were more likely to assess quality of life higher and to recommend full medical treatment. Physician judgments about quality of life are highly correlated with recommendations for further care. Patients and family members might consider these biases when negotiating medical decisions.

  11. Stressful Life Events and Health-Related Quality of Life in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damush, Teresa M.; Hays, Ron D.; DiMatteo, M. Robin

    1997-01-01

    Examines the relationship between stressful life events, occurring in the year previous to the study, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among 350 college students. Results indicate that stressful life events were related to poorer HRQOL. Gender did not moderate the relationship between stressful events and HRQOL. (Author/RJM)

  12. Elderly people´s definition of quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Flávio M F

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Senescence for some elderly people is a phase of with development and satisfaction, whereas for others is a negative stage of life. The determinants of a good quality of life in old age vary from person to person. The aims of this study were to identify: 1 the prevalence of octogenarian people who evaluate their current life as being mainly characterized by a positive quality and 2 which were the domains that they identified as being the determinants of this positive quality. A same parallel study was conducted with subjects who evaluated senescence as a preponderantly negative experience. METHODS: A random and representative sample of 35% of the octogenarian people, living residing in the community, was selected among the dwellers of the city of Veranópolis, state of Rio Grande do Sul. A semi-structured questionnaire on quality of life quality was applied as well as the scale of depressive symptoms Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS and the index of general health Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS. RESULTS: Slightly more than half of the studied sample (57% defined their current quality of life with positive evaluations, whereas 18% presented a negative evaluation of it. A group 0f 25% defined their current lives as neutral or having both values (positive and negative. Those who were dissatisfied presented more health problems according to the CIRS and more depressive symptoms when evaluated by the GDS. Satisfied subjects ones had different reasons to justify this state, however, the dissatisfied had mainly the lack of health as a reason for their suffering. The main source of reported daily well-being was the involvement with rural or domestic activities. Among the interviewed, lack of health was the main source for not presenting well-being, although there was interpersonal variability regarding what each subject considered as loss of health. CONCLUSION: Possibly, for the elderly subjects a negative quality of life is equivalent

  13. Anemia decreases quality of life of the elderly in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiyanti Meiyanti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is a very common disorder both in clinical practice and in the community. The recent rise in the population of the elderly has become the focus of attention in developing countries, because of the increasing longevity of the elderly, whilst the prevalence of anemia increases with age. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and its association with the quality of life in the elderly. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April to June 2008, located in the Mampang Prapatan district, South Jakarta. A total of 298 elderly persons participated in this study, comprising 109 (36.6% males and 189 (63.4% females. Anemia was measured by the parameters of hemoglobin and quality of life was assessed by the WHOQOL-BREF instrument, a short version of the WHOQOL-100 instrument. The results of the study showed the prevalence of anemia to be 26.2%, with a higher prevalence rate in females compared with males. The quality of life in the physical, psychological, social and environmental domains differed significantly with decreasing hemoglobin levels, whereas the physical and mental quality of life declined significantly with age. Anemia is thus indicative of a reduction in the quality of life of the elderly.

  14. MODERN HEMOPHILIA TREATMENT - MEDICAL IMPROVEMENTS AND QUALITY-OF-LIFE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROSENDAAL, FR; SMIT, C; VAREKAMP, [No Value; BROCKERVRIENDS, AHJT; VANDIJCK, H; SUURMEIJER, TPBM; VANDENBROUCKE, JP; BRIET, E

    1990-01-01

    Adequate replacement therapy in haemophilia has been available for two decades. This has led to considerable improvements in the life expectancy and physical status of haemophilia patients. A study was conducted to investigate whether this has also led to improvements in quality of life. With this a

  15. Understanding the life experience of people on hemodialysis: adherence to treatment and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Guerrerro, Verónica; Plazas, Maria del Pilar Camargo; Cameron, Brenda L; Salas, Anna Valeria Santos; González, Carmen Gloria Cofre

    2014-01-01

    This hermeneutic-phenomenological study explores the lived experiences of patients on hemodialysis in regard to the adherence to treatment and quality of life. Fifteen patients were interviewed, including six women and nine men from three dialysis centers in Chile. Two main themes derived from the analysis: 1) embracing the disease and dialysis, and 2) preventing progression of the disease through treatment management. The findings suggest that patients recognize adherence to treatment and quality of life as conditions that derive from self-care and environmental conditions, which the healthcare provider must constantly assess for care planning to improve the adherence and quality of life in this population.

  16. Family sense of coherence and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Fei-Wan; Ngu, Siew-Fei

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between family sense of coherence, social support, stress, quality of life and depressive symptoms among Chinese pregnant women. A cross-sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 267 Chinese pregnant women was recruited at the antenatal clinic and completed the Family Sense of Coherence Scale, Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey, Social Readjustment Rating Scale, Medical Outcome Study Short Form 12-Item Health Survey and General Health Questionnaire. Path analysis was employed. Family sense of coherence and social support had a direct impact on the mental health component of quality of life and depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Family sense of coherence also mediated the effect of stress on quality of life and depressive symptoms. The study provides evidence that family sense of coherence and social support play a significant role in promoting quality of life and reducing depressive symptoms during the transition to motherhood. Culturally competent healthcare should be developed to strengthen women's family sense of coherence and foster social support to combat the stress of new motherhood, thereby promoting quality of life during that period of their lives.

  17. Tools used for evaluation of Brazilian children's quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gabriel S. Souza

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To review the available tools to evaluate children's quality of life validated for Brazilian language and culture.DATA SOURCES: Search of scientific articles in Medline, Lilacs and SciELO databases using the combination of descriptors "quality of life", "child" and "questionnaires" in Portuguese and English.DATA SYNTHESIS: Among the tools designed to assess children's quality of life validated for the Brazilian language and culture, the Auto questionnaire Qualité de Vie Enfant Imagé (AUQEI, the Child Health Questionnaire - Parent Form 50 (CHQ-PF50, the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL(tmversion 4.0 and the Kidscreen-52 are highlighted. Some tools do not include all range of ages and some lack domains that are currently considered relevant in the context of childhood, such as bullying. Moreover, due to the cultural diversity of Brazil, it may be necessary to adapt some instruments or to validate other tools.CONCLUSIONS: There are validated instruments to evaluate children's quality of life in Brazil. However, the validation or the adaptation of other international tools have to be considered in order to overcome current deficiencies

  18. Quality of life in post-menopausal osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortolani Sergio

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the impact of osteoporosis on the patients' quality of life, particularly in the absence of fractures. Methods 100 post-menopausal women (age 50-85 - 62 with uncomplicated primary osteoporosis and 38 with primary osteoporosis complicated by vertebral fractures; all already treated - were studied using two validated questionnaires: Qualeffo-41 for quality of life in osteoporosis, and Zung for depression. Data were compared to those of 35 controls of comparable age, affected by a different chronic disease (hypothyroidism. Results Family history of osteoporosis and T-score of spine were similar in the two subgroups of osteoporotic women. Body mass index, age at menopause and education level were similar in the two subgroups of osteoporotic women and in the control group. The patients affected by osteoporosis perceived it as a disease affecting their personal life with undesirable consequences: chronic pain (66% of women with fractures and 40% of women without fractures, impaired physical ability, reduced social activity, poor well-being (21% of women without fractures and depressed mood (42% of women irrespective of fractures. Overall, 41% of the women showed a reduced quality of life. On the contrary, in the control group only 11% reported a reduced quality of life. Conclusion The quality of life of osteoporotic patients should be investigated even before fractures, in order to develop appropriate counselling, support and care interventions to help patients develop efficient strategies for accepting the disease and coping with it.

  19. QALYs: incorporating the rate of change in quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katostaras, Theofanis; Katostara, Niki

    2013-01-01

    The need for comparisons and economic evaluations between various health care interventions requires the evaluation of health-related quality of life. To ensure comparability in terms of the duration of any given condition, measures of quality have to integrate the parameter of time, as is the case in measures like QALY. Usually, the rate of change of quality that results from a given intervention is not incorporated in these measures, resulting in a systematically erroneous estimation of QALYs. This estimation error may lead to either a lower QALYs' value compared to the true one, when quality of life improves with a decreasing rate or deteriorates with an increasing rate, or to a higher QALYs' value compared to the true one, when quality of life improves with an increasing rate or deteriorates with a decreasing rate. The proposed method for the estimation of QALYs takes into account the rate of change in health-related quality of life at all stages and discloses deviations up to 16.67% from currently used methods.

  20. Quality of life in unaffected twins discordant for affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Bech, Per; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The disability and hardship associated with affective disorder is shared by the family members of affective patients and might affect the family member's quality of life. METHOD: In a cross-sectional, high-risk, case-control study, monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins with (High...... of life. RESULTS: Univariate analyses showed that quality of life in all domains was impaired for the 121 High-Risk twins compared to the 84 Low-Risk twins. In multiple regression analyses, the differences remained significant after adjustment for sex, age, marital status and years of education. Adjusted...

  1. Individual Planning: An Exploration of the Link between Quality of Plan and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Lynn; Beadle-Brown, Julie; Mansell, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Individual plans for people with intellectual disabilities were evaluated for quality and effectiveness in improving quality of life. Quality was assessed by rating whether goals were relevant, observable, age appropriate, necessary, timetabled, developmental, measurable, realistic, assigned to staff and improving at least one of O'Brien's five…

  2. Questionnaire of quality of life in patients with primary hyperhidrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos José Ribas Milanez de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperhidrosis or excessive sudoresis is a chronic disease associated with important subjective distress. OBJECTIVE: To propose a specific questionnaire to evaluate the quality of life of patients with hyperhidrosis. METHODS: From October 1995 to March 2002, 378 patients (234 females, with a mean age of 26.8 years, were evaluated before and after video-assisted thoracic sympathectomy. RESULTS: Therapeutic success was obtained in 90% of the procedures. The recurrence rate was 10% for palmar and 11% for axillary hyperhidrosis; 27% of the patients who had recurrence were re-operated successfully. No serious complications were reported. Of the total number of patients, 91% answered to the quality of life questionnaire, and 86% of them reported improvement after the procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Thoracic sympathectomy is a therapeutic method capable of changing the quality of life of patients with hyperhidrosis. The questionnaire applied has shown these changes.

  3. Adolescent distinctions between quality of life and self-rated health in quality of life research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valois Robert F

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In adult quality of life (QOL research, the QOL construct appears to differ from self-rated health status. Although increased QOL continues to be recognized as an important outcome in health promotion and medical intervention, little research has attempted to explore adolescent perceptual differences between self-rated health and QOL. Methods Correlational analyses were performed between self-rated health, physical health days and mental health days, and QOL. Data were collected from two different public high school adolescent samples during two different time periods (1997 & 2003 in two different geographic regions in the USA (a southern & midwestern state with two different sample sizes (N = 5,220 and N = 140, respectively using the CDC Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS. The Centers for Disease Control and Preventions' health-related quality of life scale (HRQOL provided estimates of self-rated health, physical health days and mental health days, and QOL. Results All correlation coefficients were significant in both samples (p ≤ .0001, suggesting sample size was not a contributing factor to the significant correlations. In both samples, adolescent QOL ratings were more strongly correlated with the mean number of poor mental health days (r = .88, southern sample; r = .89, midwestern sample than with the mean number of poor physical health days (r = .75, southern sample; r = .79, midwestern sample, consistent with adult QOL research. However, correlation coefficients in both samples between self-rated health and the mean number of poor physical health days was slightly smaller (r = .24, southern, r = .32, midwestern than that between self-rated health and the mean number of poor mental health days (r = .25, southern, r = .39 midwestern, which is contrary to adult QOL research. Conclusion Similar to adults, these results suggest adolescents are rating two distinct constructs, and that self-rated health and QOL should not be

  4. Assessing Weight-Related Quality of Life in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotkin, Ronette L.; Zeller, Meg; Modi, Avani C.; Samsa, Gregory P.; Quinlan, Nicole Polanichka; Yanovski, Jack A.; Bell, Stephen K.; Maahs, David M.; de Serna, Daniela Gonzales; Roehrig, Helmut R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective The development of a new weight-related measure to assess quality of life in adolescents [Impact of Weight on Quality of Life (IWQOL)-Kids] is described. Research Methods and Procedures Using a literature search, clinical experience, and consultation with pediatric clinicians, 73 items were developed, pilot tested, and administered to 642 participants, 11 to 19 years old, recruited from weight loss programs/studies and community samples (mean z-BMI, 1.5; range, –1.2 to 3.4; mean age, 14.0; 60% female; 56% white). Participants completed the 73 items and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory and were weighed and measured. Results Four factors (27 items) were identified (physical comfort, body esteem, social life, and family relations), accounting for 71% of the variance. The IWQOL-Kids demonstrated excellent psychometric properties. Internal consistency coefficients ranged from 0.88 to 0.95 for scales and equaled 0.96 for total score. Convergent validity was demonstrated with strong correlations between IWQOL-Kids total score and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (r = 0.76, p obesity in youth, the development of a reliable and valid weight-related measure of quality of life is timely. PMID:16648616

  5. Quality of life, postnatal depression and baby gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tychey, Claude; Briançon, Serge; Lighezzolo, Joëlle; Spitz, Elisabeth; Kabuth, Bernard; de Luigi, Valerie; Messembourg, Catherine; Girvan, Françoise; Rosati, Aurore; Thockler, Audrey; Vincent, Stephanie

    2008-02-01

    To study the impact of postnatal depression on the quality of life of young French mothers and to evaluate if the gender of their child influences this. Postnatal depression (PND) constitutes a major public health problem considering its high prevalence and consequences upon quality of life and parental skills. This research is a cross-sectional study during the postnatal period. This study was carried out during a two-month period. Data were collected by interview and questionnaires. The authors compared the prevalence rate of PND and life quality in a cohort of 181 women and measured the short-term impact of the child's birth. Postnatal depression strongly negatively influences all dimensions of life quality explored through the SF36, e.g. physical functioning (PF), physical Role (RP), bodily pain (BP), mental health (MH), emotional role (RE), social functioning (SF), vitality (VT), general health (GH), standardized physical component (PCS) and standardized mental component (MCS). The baby's gender (having a boy) also significantly reduces quality of life, irrespective of depressive state. There is a relationship between baby gender and PND. This research is the first to show that the birth of a boy reduces several dimensions of the mothers' quality of life. The importance of the impairment of quality of life in case of PND, as well as its effects on mother-child interaction, could justify prevention programs and early psychotherapeutic care. Further research needs to explore the effectiveness of programmes targeting the construction of parenting skills as a preventative measure against PND, especially for parents of boys.

  6. Quality of life of women undergoing treatment for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francieli Ana Dallabrida

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the quality of life of women with cervical cancer. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study developed with 43 women undergoing oncological treatment assisted at an Oncology High Complexity Center, in the Southern region of Brazil. The instrument used was the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer – Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30, and the data were analyzed through descriptive statistics. The average age was 54.6 years old. Married women prevailed (53.4%, with incomplete elementary education (72.1% and income from one to two minimum wages (62.8%. Quality of Life was considered very satisfactory. According to the development scales and emotional functioning, the result was from regular to satisfactory. The most frequent symptoms were fatigue, lack of appetite and pain. There is a need of structure of public health policies, for preventing cervical cancer in the most vulnerable population.

  7. Quality-of-life assessment in advanced cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, S

    2000-07-01

    In the past 5 years, quality-of-life (QOL) assessment measures such as the McGill, McMaster, Global Visual Analogue Scale, Assessment of QOL at the End of Life, Life Evaluation Questionnaire, and Hospice QOL Index have been devised specifically for patients with advanced cancer. The developers of these instruments have tried to respond to the changing needs of this specific population, taking into account characteristics including poor performance status, difficulty with longitudinal study, rapidly deteriorating physical condition, and change in relevant issues. Emphasis has been placed on patient report, ease and speed of completion, and the existential domain or meaning of life. Novel techniques in QOL measurement have also been adapted for palliative care, such as judgment analysis in the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life. It is generally agreed that a single tool will not cover all QOL assessment needs.

  8. QUALITY OF LIFE IN MALE AND FEMALE VITILIGO PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharath Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Vitiligo is a common, acquired discoloration of the skin, characterized by w ell - circumscribed ivory or chalky white macules which are flush to the skin surface 1 . It affects atleast 0.5 - 1% of the total population 2 . It is commonly distributed in the peri - orificial areas, trunk, extensor surface of extremities, flexor wrists and axil lae. It results from a cellular autoimmune phenomenon that causes destruction of melanocytes. AIMS: To compare the quality of life between vitiligo patients and healthy individuals and to compare the quality of life between males and females vitiligo patie nts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A comparative study of Twenty eight patients with vitiligo attending the Out Patient Department of Skin and STD department at KIMS Hospital, Bangalore was done between April and May 2013. RESULTS: A total of 13 male patients, 15 female patients and 15 male controls and 15 female controls, all within the age group of 16 - 50 years were taken and their DLQI scores were tabulated and analysed as follows: The mean and standard deviation of scores for all patients is 5.14±4.44, and that for controls is 0. This shows higher impairment in quality of life for patients as compared to controls and the results are statistically significant (Z value=2.08 and p value<0.05. CONCLUSION: 1. Quality of life was impaired in vitiligo patients. 2. Amo ng the patients, females had poorer quality of life. 3. Quality of life was more impaired in younger patients. 4. Impairment of quality of life was higher in unmarried patients than among married patients

  9. The impact of ICT on quality of working life

    CERN Document Server

    Korunka, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the impact and effects of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) on quality of working life of employees. It describes the changes and the acceleration of processes caused by the widespread use of ICT in a broad range of working areas and in different national contexts. It explores the important role ICT has come to play in nearly all work places in developed societies and the impact it is starting to have on work places in developing countries. The book brings together experts from the fields of ICT and quality of working life and from a variety of backgrounds an

  10. Cancer Communication and Family Caregiver Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Wittenberg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Family caregivers have enormous communication responsibilities tied to caregiving, such as sharing the patient’s medical history with providers, relaying diagnosis and prognosis to other family members, and making decisions about care with the patient. While caregiver stress and burden has been widely documented in the caregiving literature, little is known about how communication burden, real or perceived communication challenges, impacts caregiver quality of life. In family caregiving, the City of Hope (COH Quality of Life model proposes that the caregiving experience is reciprocal to the patient experience, impacting physical, social, psychological, and spiritual quality of life. We used data from a pilot study testing a communication coaching call intervention with family caregivers of lung cancer patients to analyze caregiver reported communication burden and quality of life. We found variances in each quality of life domain, suggesting that caregiver interventions should range from self-care skill building for physical care to psycho-educational interventions that support caregiver coping and communication skill building. These findings demonstrate the importance of caregiver assessment and attention to communication burden in quality cancer care.

  11. Cancer Communication and Family Caregiver Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Borneman, Tami; Koczywas, Marianna; Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty

    2017-01-01

    Family caregivers have enormous communication responsibilities tied to caregiving, such as sharing the patient’s medical history with providers, relaying diagnosis and prognosis to other family members, and making decisions about care with the patient. While caregiver stress and burden has been widely documented in the caregiving literature, little is known about how communication burden, real or perceived communication challenges, impacts caregiver quality of life. In family caregiving, the City of Hope (COH) Quality of Life model proposes that the caregiving experience is reciprocal to the patient experience, impacting physical, social, psychological, and spiritual quality of life. We used data from a pilot study testing a communication coaching call intervention with family caregivers of lung cancer patients to analyze caregiver reported communication burden and quality of life. We found variances in each quality of life domain, suggesting that caregiver interventions should range from self-care skill building for physical care to psycho-educational interventions that support caregiver coping and communication skill building. These findings demonstrate the importance of caregiver assessment and attention to communication burden in quality cancer care. PMID:28257110

  12. [Quality of life of neurological patients during therapy and rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaev, A V; Guseĭnova, S G; Imamverdieva, S S; Mustafaeva, E E; Musaeva, I R

    2006-01-01

    A total of 198 neurological patients on physiotherapeutic rehabilitation participated in a questionnaire survey on their quality of life. The patients had diabetic polyneuropathy (n = 86), disorders in spinal blood circulation (n = 65), 47 patients were operated for discal hernia of the lumbar spine. It was found that all the responders suffer from physical, psychological, emotional and social sequelae of their diseases which deteriorate their quality of life. The severity of this deterioration depends on the form and stage of the disease, motor and sensitive disturbances. Rehabilitation improved subjective response, social, psychological and emotional parameters. Thus, the proposed questionnaires proved valid for assessment of physiotherapy efficacy in neurological patients.

  13. Assesment of Quality of Life in Children with Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Serhat Gümüş; Selvi Kelekçi; İlyas Yolbaş; Mehmet Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Bronchial asthma is among the most common chronic pediatric diseases that can result in variable restriction in the physical, emotional and social aspects of the patient%u2019s life. The aim of this study was to assess impairment on quality of life (QOL) in asthmatic children. Material and Method: Ninety seven patients aged between 7 and 15 years which followed up at Pediatric Pulmonology Department of Dicle University Hospital were included into the study, during October 2009 %u2013 Jan...

  14. Quality of life of adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luce Marina F.C. da Costa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent chronic disease. Type 1 diabetes mellitus usually develops during infancy and adolescence and may affect the quality of life of adolescents. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of life of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus in a metropolitan region of western central Brazil. METHODS: Adolescents aged 10-19 years who had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus at least 1 year previously were included. Patients with verbal communication difficulties, severe disease, and symptomatic hypo- or hyperglycemic crisis as well as those without an adult companion and who were 7%. In general, the adolescents consistently reported having a good quality of life. The median scores for the domains of the instrument were as follows: “satisfaction”: 35; “impact”: 51; and “worries“: 26. The total score for all domains was 112. Bivariate analysis showed significant associations among a lower family income, public health assistance, and insulin type in the “satisfaction” domain; and a lower family income, public health assistance, public school attendance, and a low parental education level in the “worries“ domain and for the total score. A longer time since diagnosis was associated with a lower total score. Multivariable analysis confirmed the association of a worse quality of life with public health assistance, time since diagnosis, and sedentary lifestyle in the “satisfaction” domain; female gender in the “worries” domain; and public health assistance for the total score. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the adolescents evaluated in this study viewed their quality of life as good. Specific factors that led to the deterioration of quality of life, including public assistance, time since diagnosis, sedentary lifestyle, and female gender, were identified. No potential conflict of interest was reported.

  15. Effect of Vertebral Fracture on Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Yılmaz

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of vertebral fractures on quality of life in postmenopausal women. Method: 41 postmenopausal women were classified into two groups as those having osteopenia (Group I t score>-2.5 or osteoporosis (Group II t score£-2.5. Patients were further investigated by lateral spine radiographs with respect to vertebral fracture defined as 20 percent height loss compared to the neighbouring vertebra. Short Form-36 (SF-36, Quality of Life Questionnaire of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis (QUALEFFO and Notthingam Health Profile (NHP were the questionnaires used to evaluate life quality. Results: The mean age of the 11 patients in Group I was significantly (p£0.05 greater than those in Group II. Age at menopause, height and weight were not significantly different between the groups. 16 patients had vertebral fractures and the number of fractures was 25. Energy subgroup of SF-36 was significantly lower in Group II than in Group I (37.3±16 vs 48.2±11, p£0.05. Only physical activity subgoup of the NHP was significantly different between the two groups. On the other hand, there was not any significant difference between the two groups and between the patients with and without vertebral fractures with respect to life quality. Number of fractures was significantly correlated (r= 0.31 with the home activities subgoup of QUALEFFO 41 and physical activity subgroup of NHP (r= 0.32. Conclusion: Life quality indicis of osteoporotic patients were almost identical to osteopenic patients which suggested that osteoporosis is not a life quality diminishing disease in patients in the 6th decade. The indicis could not also disemminate patients with and without vertebral fractures either.

  16. Quality of life of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Anne F

    2005-02-01

    To review the results of studies of quality of life in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, three databases were searched and quality of life findings were reviewed. Comparisons were made with population norms for four studies that used the 50-item parent-reported Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ-PF50). Effect sizes were computed to estimate the clinical importance of differences in quality of life. In total, ten publications were identified representing 1382 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Five different quality of life measures were used and compared with norms for the CHQ-PF50. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder had more problems in all psychosocial domains and family activities. Effect sizes for aspects of physical health domains were small in size. Pooled effect sizes for the CHQ-PF50 psychosocial domains and family activities were as follows: mental health = -0.55; self-esteem = -0.75; parental impact - time = -0.85; role emotional/behavioral = -1.22; behavior = -1.44; parental impact - emotions = -1.45 and family activities = -1.67. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have a poorer quality of life than children in the general population. Quality of life is an important outcome that is starting to receive attention in studies of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The use of tools such as the CHQ-PF50 shows how additional and useful information can be obtained that is relevant to a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and their family.

  17. The impact of food allergies on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacal, Liane R

    2013-07-01

    CME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES 1. Recognize and appreciate the impact of food allergies on psychosocial health. 2. List the factors that have been shown to negatively affect health-related quality of life. 3. Understand how physicians can directly help to improve a child's quality of life while living with food allergies. Food allergy is a serious problem affecting a growing number of children worldwide. There is a large body of evidence supporting the detrimental effects that food allergy can have on a child's quality of life. With validated tools, we can identify these children and focus on how to protect, guide, and help them to live a safe life. Recent research articulates how food allergies impact health-related quality of life (HRQL). There are studies reported from the child's perspective, as well as studies reported from the parent's perspective. With the development of validated disease and age-specific questionnaires, researchers can reliably gather data on the psychological aspect of children with food allergies. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature examining the psycho-social impact of food allergies on children. This article was designed to outline suggestions to help physicians care for the whole child - both mind and body.

  18. Evaluation of the quality of life and risk of suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica de Medeiros Alves

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the socio-demographic profiles, suicidal ideation, the presence of mental disorders and the quality of life of patients using mental health services in Arapiraca, Alagoas, Brazil. METHOD: Interviews were conducted in family health units and the Psychosocial Attention Center. The sample included 202 mental disorder patients with a risk of suicide attempts, 207 mental disorder patients without a risk of suicide attempts and 196 controls. This study used an identification questionnaire, the abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire, Beck‘s Suicidal Ideation Scale and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. RESULTS: Patients who had a mental disorder and a risk of suicide attempts tended to be single, had less education and lower family income, were not working and showed lower scores in quality of life domains; 73 of these patients had suicidal ideation in the previous week. Depressive disorders, manic episodes, hypomanic episodes, social phobias, obsessive compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, psychotic syndromes and generalized anxiety disorder were more frequent and statistically significant for patients at risk for suicide attempts. CONCLUSION: The management of patients with a risk of suicide attempts must focus on individual patients because this risk is directly linked to changes in quality of life and the improvement of these patients’ prognosis.

  19. Assessment of anxiety and quality of life in fibromyalgia patients

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    Tathiana Pagano

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic, diffuse musculoskeletal pain, and by a low pain threshold at specific anatomical points. The syndrome is associated with other symptoms such as fatigue, sleep disturbance, morning stiffness and anxiety. Because of its chronic nature, it often has a negative impact on patients' quality of life. OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of life and anxiety level of patients with fibromyalgia. TYPE Of STUDY: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Rheumatology outpatient service of Hospital das Clínicas (Medical School, Universidade de São Paulo. METHODS: This study evaluated 80 individuals, divided between test and control groups. The test group included 40 women with a confirmed diagnosis of fibromyalgia. The control group was composed of 40 healthy women. Three questionnaires were used: two to assess quality of life (FIQ and SF-36 and one to assess anxiety (STAI. They were applied to the individuals in both groups in a single face-to-face interview. The statistical analysis used Student's t test and Pearson's correlation test (r, with a significance level of 95%. Also, the Pearson chi-squared statistics test for homogeneity, with Yates correction, was used for comparing schooling between test and control groups. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant difference between the groups (p = 0.000, thus indicating that fibromyalgia patients have a worse quality of life and higher levels of anxiety. The correlations between the three questionnaires were high (r = 0.9. DISCUSSION: This study has confirmed the efficacy of FIQ for evaluating the impact of fibromyalgia on the quality of life. SF-36 is less specific than FIQ, although statistically significant values were obtained when analyzed separately, STAI showed lower efficacy for discriminating the test group from the control group. The test group showed worse quality of life than did the control group, which was demonstrated by both FIQ and SF-36. Even

  20. Quality of life and consequences for daily life of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) family members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, K.F.L.; Bleiker, E.M.A.; Vasen, H.F.A.; Gundy, C.M.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2011-01-01

    Aim  The study aimed to document the impact of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and several practical aspects of daily life and to identify factors associated significantly with HRQOL. This study is the first to compare HRQOL between FAP-patients, at-ris

  1. Quality of life and consequences for daily life of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) family members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, K.F.L.; Bleiker, E.M.A.; Vasen, H.F.A.; Gundy, C.M.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2011-01-01

    The study aimed to document the impact of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and several practical aspects of daily life, and to identify factors significantly associated with HRQOL. This study is the first to compare HRQOL between patients with FAP, at-ri

  2. Quality of sleep in patients with schizophrenia is associated with quality of life and coping

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    Mayeda Aimee R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While sleep disturbance is widespread in schizophrenia it is less clear whether sleep disturbance is uniquely related to impaired coping and perceived quality of life. Methods We simultaneously assessed sleep quality, symptoms, and coping in 29 persons with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder in a post acute phase of illness. Assessment instruments included the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale; the Heinrichs Quality of Life Scale; and the Ways of Coping Scale. Multiple regressions were performed predicting quality of life and coping from sleep quality controlling for age and symptom severity. On a subset of seven subjects non-dominant wrist actigraphy was used as an objective check of their self-reported poor sleep. Results Analyses revealed that poor sleep quality predicted low quality of life (r = -0.493; p = .022 and reduced preference for employing positive reappraisal when facing a stressor (r = -0.0594; p = 0.0012. Actigraphy confirmed poor sleep quality in a subset of subjects. They had shorter sleep duration (p Conclusion The results are consistent with the hypotheses that poor sleep may play a unique role in sustaining poor quality of life and impaired coping in patients with schizophrenia. These associations may hold for community controls as well.

  3. A Study on Quality of Life in Patients with Diabetes

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    Mucahit Bilgin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Diabetes Mellitus, a chronic progressive disorder, characterized with hyperglycemia and derangements of carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism. During its course microvascular, macrovascular and neurologic complications may develop. Being a patient with a chronic disorder like diabetes mellitus not only limits physical activities but also hinders other activities such as social life, education, career, occupational opportunities, and transportation, thus it influences individuals life quality unfavorably. Material and Method: Patient group with 229 individuals diagnosed with Type 2 DM and control group with 77 healthy individuals are involved in this study. A form questioning socio-demographic characteristics, past medical and family history and SF36 and EQ-5d life quality surveys are applied to individuals. 130 of the 306 people included in the study (42.5% in the group with complications, 99 (32.4% complications in the group, 77 (25.2% were in the control group. Analyzing complicated group; 74 persons (56.9% coronary artery disease, 40 patients (30.8% nephropathy, 37 patients (28.5% retinopathy, 35 patients (26.9% neuropathy, 1 person (0.8% stroke was found to be enhanced.In our study, it is observed that some factors such as low education level, low income level, female gender, obesity, suffering from any diabetic complication and insulin treatment effected life quality adversely. Results: Efforts including increasing sociocultural level in society, making society gain the habit of healthy nutrition and regular exercise, educating patients properly about diabetus mellitus and serving adequate health service will evidently result in more quality life. Doing more research studies about diabetus mellitus and life quality, checking laboratory results and other parameters at determined intervals within year, and comparing those with life quailty survey results will enlighten us about what we can do further to increase life quality of

  4. Family survivorship and quality of life following a cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S; Northouse, L L

    2001-12-01

    The objectives of this study were: (a) to examine the quality of life of the family as a unit during the long-term survivor phase of illness and (b) to test a family model of factors that may influence family quality of life. The family survivorship model, which includes illness survival stressors (family stressors, fear of recurrence, and patient somatic concerns), resources (family hardiness and family social support), appraisal (family meaning of the illness), and the outcome, family quality of life, was used to guide this exploratory cross-sectional study. A random, stratified sample of 123 families (N = 246 individuals) was interviewed 1-5 years after treatment ended. The model explained 63% of the variance in family quality of life, with the strongest predictors being concurrent family stressors, family social support, family member fear of recurrence, family meaning of the illness, and patient employment status. The study findings suggest the importance of addressing cancer-related stressors, family resources, and family meaning as key factors related to family quality of life.

  5. Quality of life and deglutition after total laryngectomy

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    Pernambuco, Leandro de Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Total laryngectomy creates deglutition disorders and causes a decrease in quality of life Aim: To describe the impact of swallowing and quality of life of patients after total laryngectomy. Method: A case series study. Patients completed a Swallowing and Quality of Life questionnaire composed of 44 questions assessing 11 domains related to quality of life (burden, eating duration, eating desire, frequency of symptoms, food selection, communication, fear, mental health, social functioning, sleep, and fatigue. The analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency and variability. Results: The sample comprised 15 patients who underwent total laryngectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Of these, 66.7% classified their health as good and 73% reported no restrictions on food consistency. The domains "communication" and "fear" represented severe impact and "eating duration" represented moderate impact on quality of life. The items with lower scores were: longer time to eat than others (domain "eating duration", cough and cough to remove the liquid or food of the mouth when they are stopped (domain "symptom frequency", difficulties in understanding (domain "communication" and fear of choking and having pneumonia (domain "fear". Conclusion: After total laryngectomy, patients report that swallowing issues have moderate to severe impact in "communication," "fear," and "eating duration" domains.

  6. Quality of Life and Gait in Elderly Group

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    Taguchi, Carlos Kazuo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The process of aging could lead to seniors being more prone to falls, which affects their quality of life. Objective The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between quality of life and gait in the elderly. Methods We used World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief (WHOQOL-Brief Brazilian version and the Dynamic Gait Index to assess fifty-six volunteers from the northeast of Brazil. Ages ranged from 60 to 85 years. Results The Dynamic Gait Index, which indicates the probability of falls, resulted in 36.3% of the sample presenting abnormal results. There was correlation between domain 2 (psychological and domain 4 (environment with domain 1(Physical and domain 3 (Social; a negative correlation between age and Domain 2; correlation between Question 1 (How would you rate your quality of life? and domains 1, 2, and 4 and no correlation between questions 1 and 2 (How satisfied are you with your health?. Question 2 was correlated with all of the domains. There was negative association between question 1 and falls, and a slight correlation between the Dynamic Gait Index scores and Question 1. Conclusion The self-perception of the study group about their quality of life was either good or very good, even though a considerable percentage of individuals had suffered falls or reported gait disturbances.

  7. Quality of Life and Gait in Elderly Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Carlos Kazuo; Teixeira, Jacqueline Pitanga; Alves, Lucas Vieira; Oliveira, Priscila Feliciano; Raposo, Oscar Felipe Falcão

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  The process of aging could lead to seniors being more prone to falls, which affects their quality of life. Objective  The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between quality of life and gait in the elderly. Methods  We used World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief (WHOQOL-Brief) Brazilian version and the Dynamic Gait Index to assess fifty-six volunteers from the northeast of Brazil. Ages ranged from 60 to 85 years. Results  The Dynamic Gait Index, which indicates the probability of falls, resulted in 36.3% of the sample presenting abnormal results. There was correlation between domain 2 (psychological) and domain 4 (environment) with domain 1(Physical) and domain 3 (Social); a negative correlation between age and Domain 2; correlation between Question 1 (How would you rate your quality of life?) and domains 1, 2, and 4 and no correlation between questions 1 and 2 (How satisfied are you with your health?). Question 2 was correlated with all of the domains. There was negative association between question 1 and falls, and a slight correlation between the Dynamic Gait Index scores and Question 1. Conclusion  The self-perception of the study group about their quality of life was either good or very good, even though a considerable percentage of individuals had suffered falls or reported gait disturbances. PMID:27413405

  8. Quality of life in patients with chronic renal failure

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    Petrović Lada

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemodialysis and transplantation are performed not only to replace renal function, but also to improve patients' quality of life. The aim of our investigation was to compare the quality of life in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF before and after the introduction of active therapy. Material and methods. We tested 76 patients (pts: 20 pts on conservative therapy (CT, 21 pts on chronic hemodialysis and 35 pts with renal transplantation. A questionnaire (combining two questionnaires was used to investigate the physical, emotional and social aspects of health. Results. In regard to physical health of transplantation patients (TP it was established that work capacity and activities were less damaged, whereas physical activity was highest in pts on CT. Social activity was limited in a higher percentage in TP (40% than in hemodialysis patients (HD (19%, while family relationships were most damaged in pts on HD (28.57%. Discomforts were most common in pts on HD. The highest percentage of pts estimated their health status as good or average, but their health status improved after transplantation in 82.86% that is in 57.14% after HD. It was similar with the quality of life: 28.57% of kidney transplant patients rated their quality of life as very good, and 54.28% rated it as good; 38.09% of HD patients rated their quality of life as very good, whereas only 5% of CT patients rated it as very good, and 20% as good. .

  9. Resilience and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Patients

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    Gordana Ristevska-Dimitrоvska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many studies have shown that a relationship exists between quality of life (QoL and resilience in breast cancer patients, but few studies present information on the nature of this relationship of resilience on QoL. Our aim was to examine the relationship between resilience and quality of life in breast cancer patients. METHODS: QoL was measured in 218 consequent breast cancer patients, with EORTC - QLQ Core 30 questionnaire, and EORTC QLQ-BR23. The resilience was measured with Connor Davidson Resilience Scale. RESULTS: The global quality of life was positively correlated with the levels of resilience (R = 0.39 p < 0.001. All functional scales (physical, role, emotional, cognitive and social functioning was in a positive correlation with resilience. The symptoms severity (fatigue, nausea and vomitus, pain, dyspnea, insomnia, appetite loss, constipation, diarrhea, financial difficulties was in negative correlation with resilience. Less resilient breast cancer patients reported worse body image and future perspective and suffered from more severe adverse effects of systemic therapy, and arm/breast symptoms. CONCLUSION: Our findings show that psychological resilience affects different aspects of health-related quality of life. More resilient patients have significantly better quality of life in almost all aspects of QoL.

  10. Quality of life in Swedish children with congenital ichthyosis

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    Agneta Gånemo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital ichthyosis encompasses a large group of keratinizing disorders with widespread scaling and a variable degree of erythema. Little is known about the quality of life in children with congenital ichthyosis and the impact of the disease on their family. Fifteen children aged 5-16 years with lamellar ichthyosis, Netherton’s syndrome, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis or Harlequin ichthyosis, were investigated concerning the effect of their ichthyosis on their quality of life. This was measured with the established Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI, and the Dermatitis Family Impact questionnaire (DFI modified by substituting the word ichthyosis for eczema. The questionnaires covered the preceding seven days and each had a maximum score of 30: the higher the score, the greater the Quality of Life impairment. The median score was 9.0 (range 2-19 for the CDLQI and 9.0 (range 3-21 for DFI. There was a significant correlation between the DFI and the CDLQI scores. The item in the CDLQI questionnaire that showed the highest score was “itchy, scratchy, sore or painful skin” and the most highly scored item in the DFI questionnaire was effect on “housework, e.g. washing, cleaning”; both items related to the children’s symptoms. The results of the study clearly establish that congenital ichthyosis impairs the quality of life of the affected children and their families.

  11. Work addiction and quality of life: a study with physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Walter Fernandes de; Mathias, Lígia Andrade da Silva Telles

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the quality of life of physicians and investigate to what extent it is affected by work addiction. This is an exploratory, descriptive and cross-sectional study, conducted with 1,110 physicians. For data collection, we used a questionnaire with sociodemographic information, the World Health Organization Quality of Life BREF, and the Work Addiction Scale. Most physicians presented high quality of life. Female participants presented lower quality of life in the domains psychologic, environment and general (pQuality of life was negatively correlated with the number of shifts (pwork, the lower the quality of life. The research allowed understanding the implications of work addiction in the quality of life. Further studies are required to support the development of strategies that improve health conditions and quality of life of medical professionals. Avaliar a qualidade de vida de médicos e investigar em que medida a adição ao trabalho a afeta. Trata-se de um estudo exploratório, descritivo e transversal, realizado com 1.110 médicos. Para coleta de dados, optou-se por utilizar um questionário contendo informações sociodemográficas, bem como aplicar o instrumento World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF e a Escala de Adição ao Trabalho. Os médicos, em sua maioria, apresentaram alta qualidade de vida. Os participantes do sexo feminino tiveram menor qualidade de vida em relação aos homens nos domínios psicológico, meio ambiente e geral (p<0,05). A qualidade de vida correlacionou-se negativamente com o número de plantões (p<0,005), e quanto maior a adição ao trabalho, menor a qualidade de vida. A pesquisa permitiu o conhecimento das implicações da adição ao trabalho sobre a qualidade de vida. Novos estudos são necessários para subsidiar a elaboração de estratégias que melhorem a saúde e a qualidade de vida do profissional médico.

  12. Professionalism and professional quality of life for oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Insil; Kim, Yuna; Kim, Kyunghee

    2016-10-01

    To identify the relationship between professionalism and professional quality of life among oncology nurses working at tertiary hospitals in Korea. Oncology nurses are combined with core competencies and qualities required in cancer patient care. Professionalism that means compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue is a main concept in problem-solving strategies as motivation. Their satisfaction is representative of professionalism and professional quality of life. However, little research has focused on professionalism and professional quality of life. A cross-sectional study with self-administered questionnaires. A total of 285 nurses from two tertiary hospitals were included. Data collection was undertaken using Korean version of professionalism scale derived from the Hall Professional Inventory Scale and professional quality of life. Data were analysed by spss 21.0 for Windows Program using t-test, anova, and multiple regression. The mean score of professionalism in oncology nurses was 77·98 ± 7·31. The mean professional quality of life score for compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress was 33·84 ± 5·62, 28·38 ± 5·36 and 28·33 ± 5·48. Compassion satisfaction was affected by factors of professionalism with an explanatory power of 49·2%. Burnout and secondary traumatic stress were affected by factors of professionalism with an explanatory power of 39·3% and 4·8%. The higher the professionalism leads to the higher the compassion satisfaction, the lower the compassion fatigue. The relationship between professionalism and professional quality of life for a health work environment requires further investigation. Our study supports the idea that enhancing professionalism can increase professional quality of life. It is necessary to develop professionalism by recognised qualifications and applied rewards in advanced nursing organisational culture. Furthermore, compassion satisfaction is increased by

  13. Metabolic syndrome and quality of life: a systematic review

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    Patrícia Pozas Saboya

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: to present currently available evidence to verify the association between metabolic syndrome and quality of life. Method: Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Medline and LILACS databases were studied for all studies investigating the association with metabolic syndrome and quality of life. Two blinded reviewers extracted data and one more was chosen in case of doubt. Results: a total of 30 studies were included, considering inclusion and exclusion criteria, which involved 62.063 patients. Almost all studies suggested that metabolic syndrome is significantly associated with impaired quality of life. Some, however, found association only in women, or only if associated with depression or Body Mass Index. Merely one study did not find association after adjusted for confounding factors. Conclusion: although there are a few studies available about the relationship between metabolic syndrome and quality of life, a growing body of evidence has shown significant association between metabolic syndrome and the worsening of quality of life. However, it is necessary to carry out further longitudinal studies to confirm this association and verify whether this relationship is linear, or only an association factor.

  14. Metabolic syndrome and quality of life: a systematic review 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboya, Patrícia Pozas; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Zimmermann, Paulo Roberto; Gustavo, Andréia da Silva; Assumpção, Caroline Melo; Londero, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to present currently available evidence to verify the association between metabolic syndrome and quality of life. Method: Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Medline and LILACS databases were studied for all studies investigating the association with metabolic syndrome and quality of life. Two blinded reviewers extracted data and one more was chosen in case of doubt. Results: a total of 30 studies were included, considering inclusion and exclusion criteria, which involved 62.063 patients. Almost all studies suggested that metabolic syndrome is significantly associated with impaired quality of life. Some, however, found association only in women, or only if associated with depression or Body Mass Index. Merely one study did not find association after adjusted for confounding factors. Conclusion: although there are a few studies available about the relationship between metabolic syndrome and quality of life, a growing body of evidence has shown significant association between metabolic syndrome and the worsening of quality of life. However, it is necessary to carry out further longitudinal studies to confirm this association and verify whether this relationship is linear, or only an association factor. PMID:27901223

  15. Patients' quality of life after laparoscopic or open cholecystectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Li; TAO Si-feng; XU Yuan; FANG Fu; PENG Shu-you

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study was aimed at evaluating and comparing the quality of life in patients who underwent laparoscopic and open cholecystectomy for chronic cholecystolithiasis. Methods: The study included 25 patients with laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC group) and 26 with open cholecystectomy (OC group). The quality of life was measured with the Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GLQI) preoperatively, thereafter regularly at 2, 5, 10 and 16 weeks after the operation. Results:The mean preoperative overall GLQI scores were 112.5 and 110.3 in LC and OC group respectively (P>0.05). In the LC group, the mean overall GLQI score reduced slightly to 110.0 two weeks after the operation (P>0.05). The LC group showed significant improvement in overall score and in the aspects of symptomatology, emotional and physiological status from 5 to 16 weeks postoperatively. In the OC group, the GLQI score reduced to 102.0 two weeks after surgery (P0.05). The patients experienced significant improvements of GLQI sixteen weeks after OC operation (P<0.01~0.05). Within the 10 postoperative weeks, the LC group had significantly higher GLQI scores than the OC group (P<0.05). Conclusions: LC can improve the quality of life postoperatively better and more rapidly than OC. The assessment of quality of life assessment is a valid method for measuring the effects of surgical treatment.

  16. Perception of the quality of life of caregivers of octogenarians

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    Camila Alves Nogueira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to investigate the perception that caregivers of octogenarians have regarding the quality of life and aspects of life that are more harmful to this quality. A cross-sectional, descriptive and quantitative study conducted in 2010 with 52 subjects of the Family Health Units in Campina Grande-PB, Brazil that responded a socio-demographic questionnaire and the WHOQOL-Bref. Data were analyzed with the SPSS. The total WHOQOL-bref score was 52.26 points. The aspects that were more jeopardized were: sex life (94.3%, feelings (67.4%, pain (65.5% and leisure (53.8%; the least affected were: living quarters (82.8%, energy (78.9%, physical appearance (78.9% and personal relationships (76.9%. The caregivers’ perceptions regarding the quality of life are marked by dissatisfaction, thereby leading to the belief that the care activities can have a negative effect on their lives.

  17. Family Quality of Life Following Early Identification of Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Carla W.; Wegner, Jane R.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Family members' perceptions of their quality of life were examined following early identification of deafness in children. Method: A questionnaire was used to solicit ratings of satisfaction from the family members of 207 children who were deaf and younger than 6 years of age. Results: Results indicated that families were generally…

  18. Quality of Work Life: Perceptions of Jordanian Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zboon, Eman K.; Al_Dababneh, Khuloud A. H.; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the level of quality of work life QOWL of Jordanian special education teachers. Participants of the study were 133 special education teachers. Results showed that special education teachers cited average level of QOWL. Furthermore, teachers rated administrators' and colleagues' respect as the…

  19. Quality of Work Life: Perceptions of Jordanian Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zboon, Eman K.; Al_Dababneh, Khuloud A. H.; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the level of quality of work life QOWL of Jordanian special education teachers. Participants of the study were 133 special education teachers. Results showed that special education teachers cited average level of QOWL. Furthermore, teachers rated administrators' and colleagues' respect as the…

  20. Insulin therapy and quality of life. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Francois; Hermanns, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    Three central goals in the treatment of diabetes mellitus are (1) the avoidance of hyperglycaemia to prevent the development or progression of diabetes complications over time, (2) the avoidance of hypoglycaemia and (3) the maintenance or achievement of good quality of life. Insulin is the most...... powerful agent that can be used to control blood glucose levels. This article reviews the studies that have investigated the effects of different types of insulin and insulin delivery techniques on quality of life of patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. First, the concept of 'quality of life' (Qo......-acting insulin analogues or biphasic mixtures; (3) multiple daily injections versus pump therapy. Having multiple complications of diabetes is clearly associated with decreased QoL. Results from large studies such as the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes...

  1. An Epistemological Perspective on the Quality of Life Concept

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    George ŞERBAN-OPRESCU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Any researcher interested in defining the concept of quality of life faces a difficult epistemological task in terms of harmonizing a concept that seems by its very nature subjective and dispersed. Therefore, at present one can not speak of a universally accepted definition of quality of life but a series of different approaches to the concept based on hypothesis, assumptions and methods of analysis and research. From this viewpoint, the main aim of the present paper is to analyze two most known approaches on the concept of quality of life, so as to highlight the epistemological difficulties and challenges inherent to these approaches. Nevertheless, this paper does not seek definitive answers to the epistemological dilemmas, but set into the limelight these difficulties for further encouraging debate on these questions which might advance the state of research.

  2. Perceived Quality of Life in Mothers of Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Anne C.; Skinner, Debra G.; Bailey, Donald B.

    2008-01-01

    A mixed method approach was used to explore quality of life of 101 mothers of children with fragile X syndrome. Mothers completed a self-report of personal quality of life and measures of mental health and well-being. A subset was interviewed about quality of life. The distribution of scores on the Quality of Life Inventory was similar to the…

  3. Quality of life in Dermatology: tests for its evaluation

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    Catalina Restrepo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life can be approached from the perspective of different dimensions, among them: economic, religious, spiritual, sociological and health-related. Changes in the perception of health can affect either one of these dimensions. Satisfaction and well-being of patients are becoming ever more important. These considerations have stimulated the development of scales to measure and quantify the quality of life in order to assess the impact on it of chronic diseases and therapeutic interventions, as well as to define the allocation of resources. Presently, many scales are available to evaluate the quality of life in dermatological patients; among them, DLQI and Skindex 29 are the most frequently used. We present a review of the literature concerning this subject.

  4. Quality of life: a dimension in multiaxial classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastrup, M; Mezzich, J E

    2001-01-01

    The study provides an overview of the historical aspects of multiaxial classification. Particular reference is paid to the multiaxial formats of ICD-10, DSM-IV and the WPA International Guidelines for Diagnostic Assessment (IGDA). The IGDA proposes a tetraaxial format with quality of life as one axis as well as an axis on symptomatology, an axis on adaptive functioning and an axis on environmental/psychosocial conditions. The axis on quality of life is added in recognition of the increasing importance placed upon the patient's perception of his/her capacity of self fulfillment and the attention paid to quality of life as a major descriptor of health status as well as an outcome measure of clinical care.

  5. Diabetic patients treated with dialysis: complications and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, V R; Mathiesen, E R; Watt, T

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of complications, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the influence of beliefs about control over health in diabetic dialysis patients. METHODS: Of 53 eligible diabetic patients on chronic dialysis during January 2004...... in our clinic, 38 (76%) completed a kidney-specific (Kidney Disease Quality of Life) and a generic (SF-36) questionnaire and were characterised in terms of cardiovascular diseases and diabetic complications. Matched groups of non-diabetic dialysis patients (n = 40) and diabetic patients with a long...... population (47 +/- 19). The diabetic dialysis patients had similar levels of kidney-specific quality of life and mental health compared with the control groups. Reduced physical health was predicted by the presence of end-stage renal disease, diabetes and short time spent in education. Among the diabetic...

  6. Quality of Sexual Life in Males with Allergic Rhinitis

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    Gul Soylu Ozler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of sexual life of males with allergic rhinitis(AR. Material and Method: 40 patients with AR diagnosed with skin prick test and 40 control subjects with no evidence of allergy completed the study. International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire (IIEF was used to evaluate the quality of sexual life of the subjects. Results: The mean scores of erectile function, orgasmic function, sexual desire, intercourse satisfaction and overall satisfaction for AR group were significantly lower than control group(p=0.0001. Discussion: AR has negative effects on quality of life. The effective treatment of AR by the clinician will also avoid these concomitting social, sexual and sleep disturbances.

  7. In Pursuit of Learning: Sensemaking the Quality of Work Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Roland K.; Li, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to explore how employees make sense of their work context and its influence on their learning orientation to improve their quality of work life. Design/methodology/approach: Qualitative data drawn from a dynamic online discussion that spanned three years were used in the content analysis. A total of 137 MBA…

  8. The Health-Related Quality of Life of Custodial Grandparents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely-Barnes, Susan L.; Graff, J. Carolyn; Washington, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was explored in a sample of 119 custodial grandparents. A latent profile analysis identified three groups of grandparents along a continuum of good to poor HRQOL, with most custodial grandparents reporting Short Form-12 Health Survey (version 2) scores significantly below U.S. population means. Grandparent…

  9. Quality of life after surgical treatment of colorectal liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenhoff, B S; Krabbe, P F M; Peerenboom, L; Wobbes, T; Ruers, T J M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The surgical approach to colorectal liver metastases is becoming increasingly aggressive. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the impact of surgery on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with colorectal liver metastases. METHODS: HRQoL data from 97 patients w

  10. Standardized measurement of quality of life after incisional hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Henriksen, Nadia A; Harling, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    repair. The aim of this systematic review was to analyze existing standardized methods to measure quality of life after incisional hernia repair. DATA SOURCES: A PubMed and Embase search was carried out together with a cross-reference search of eligible papers, giving a total of 26 included studies...

  11. Quality of Life and Perceptions of Crime in Saskatoon, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between crime and quality of life in Saskatoon, Canada. The city has one of the highest crime rates in the country and has been referred to as the "Crime Capital of Canada", a label that comes as a surprise to many residents and causes considerable concern among others. The aim of this research…

  12. In Pursuit of Learning: Sensemaking the Quality of Work Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Roland K.; Li, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to explore how employees make sense of their work context and its influence on their learning orientation to improve their quality of work life. Design/methodology/approach: Qualitative data drawn from a dynamic online discussion that spanned three years were used in the content analysis. A total of 137 MBA…

  13. Emotional style, health and perceived quality of life in pregnants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Guarino

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to determine the possible relationship among emotional style (rumination and emotional inhibition and the perceived health and quality of life of pregnant women. To do so, a sample of 94 Venezuelan women on their first trimester of pregnancy completed questionnaires measuring the studied variables: Rumination, Emotional Inhibition, Global Health and perceived Quality of Life. Results support previous findings regarding the positive association between negative emotional style and the deterioration of the health status, while brings new evidence of the inverse relationship between these individual difference and the quality of life in this particular group, who has been poorly studied in its psychosocial dimension. 

  14. Definition of quality of life in people with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyrychenko A. G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine quality of life of people with disabilities according to age, gender and functional limitations using questionnaire SF-36 study was conducted. The study was conducted by examining questionnaire data and performed using the comparison of the data in the standard forms of primary documentation. It was revealed that in disabled caused by diseases of the nervous system a significant decrease of quality of life by the most scales of SF-36 questionnaire, was noted it is reliable, valid, and a highly convenient method of assessing physical and mental health of persons with disabilities and allows to control various components of life activity and has prognostic significance with respect to the effectiveness of rehabilitation, reintegration and resocialization.

  15. Occupational Stress and Quality of Life in Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Moraes da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To reduce the work related to stress and the psychosocial risk is not only an imperative question, but also moral. This epistemological study aims to verify the presence of the occupational stress and quality of life related to health in nursing professionals. We used three questionnaires: (a Socio Demographic Questionnaire, (b Job Strain Scale, and (c Item Short Form Health Survey. Statistical analysis was performed between the questionnaires, analysis of variance (ANOVA and simple and multiple linear regression. It was found that 60.8% of the participants see the high demand of work, 71.8% high control on the developed activity and 85.5% low social support. Related to eight dominant of quality of life, the most damaged are: pain (µ = 61.87 and vitality (µ = 62.25. It was concluded that although in most sample experiences an intermediary risk situation to stress, the quality of life showed a damaged.

  16. Quality of life in patients with neurocysticercosis in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Rachana; Budke, Christine M; Carabin, Hélène; Proaño, Jefferson V; Flores-Rivera, Jose; Corona, Teresa; Cowan, Linda D; Ivanek, Renata; Snowden, Karen F; Flisser, Ana

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare quality of life measures in patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC) to those of a matched control group. The NCC outpatients and their controls were recruited from two neurology referral hospitals in Mexico City, Mexico during 2007-2008. The quality of life of 224 NCC patients was compared with 224 age-sex-hospital-day matched controls using the short form 12 v2 (SF-12 v2) quality of life survey. Medical chart reviews were also conducted for the NCC outpatients to evaluate presenting clinical manifestations. Compared with the controls, NCC patients had a significantly lower score for each of the eight domains of health evaluated and significantly lower Physical and Mental Component Summary scores. Chart reviews indicated that hydrocephalus (48%), severe headaches (47%), and epilepsy (31%) were the most common clinical manifestations in these NCC outpatients.

  17. Parkinson′s disease, depression, and quality-of-life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Menon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder associated with Parkinson′s disease (PD but is often under diagnosed and under treated leading to worsening of symptoms and deterioration of the quality-of-life of the people suffering from this disease. Aims: The current study aims to determine the correlation between depression and health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL domains in patients with PD. Materials and Methods: A sample of 65 consecutive patients attending the specialty Parkinson′s clinic was assessed by a psychiatrist as part of the treatment protocol. Diagnosis of depression was done using the International Classification of Diseases-10 by a psychiatrist and depression was scored using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS. QOL-BREF Malayalam version was used to assess quality-of-life in the patients. Statistical Analysis: One-way ANOVA was used to find the difference in the quality-of-life experienced by different age categories, duration of the disease, psychiatric co-morbidity. Independent sample t-test was used to find the difference in the quality-of-life experienced by genders, co morbid conditions and to find the difference in the scores on GDS and domains of WHO QOL BREF. Association of H and Y staging and duration of Parkinsonism with GDS Scores were computed using Pearson′s Chi-square test. Results and Conclusions: There was a significant association of female gender and depression with the physical and psychological domains of QOL while the duration and staging of PD did not have any association with QOL Domains. Depression thus emerges as one of the main predictors of poor quality-of-life in PD.

  18. Limits on quality of life in communication after total laryngectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaves, Adriana Di Donato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among people affected by cancer, the impairment of quality of life of people affected by cancer can cause have devastating effects. The self-image of patients after post-laryngectomyzed patients may be find themselves compromised, affecting the quality of life in this population. Objective: To characterize quality of life in related to communication in people who have undergone went total laryngectomy surgery. Methods: This is an observational study, with a cross-sectional and descriptive series. Design of series study. The sample were comprised 15 patients interviewed the period from January to February of 2011. We used the Quality Protocol for Life Communication in Post-laryngectomy adapted from Bertocello (2004; which this questionnaire contains 55 questions. The protocol was organized from the nature of using responses classified as positive and negative aspects, proposals in with respect to five 5 communication domains: family relationships, social relationships, personal analysis; morphofunctional aspect, and use of writing. To promote and guarantee the autonomy of the respondents, was examiners made use of used assistive technology with the Visual Response Scale. Results: The responses that total laryngectomy compromises the quality of life in communication amounted to 463 occurrences (65.7%, and that who responses suggesting good quality of life were represented with amounted to 242 occurrences (34.3%, from a total of 705 occurrencesresponses. From Among the five 5 Communication domains, four 4 had percentages of above 63% for occurrences of negative content for impact on communication. Appearance Morphofunctional appearance gave the had the highest percentage of negative content, amounting to 77.3% of cases. Conclusions: The results showed important limitations of a personal and social nature due to poor communication with their peers. Thus, there is a need for multidisciplinary interventions that aim to minimize the

  19. Quality of Life in People with Leg Ulcer, Integrative Review

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    Daniela Alves

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the main changes in the daily life of people with leg ulcer and how that affects the person’s quality of life. Methodology: We used the methodology PI [C] OD and selected four research articles, taken from EBSCO, PubMed, and EWMA. Results: The main changes identified in the people’s daily live with leg ulcers are physical (pain, decreased mobility, presence of exudate, bad smell from the wound and change in the style of clothing, psychological (sleep disorders, depression, anxiety, feelings of rejection and low self-steem, social (isolation, restriction in leisure activities, inability to perform household chores. Conclusions: The literature about the person’s quality of life with leg ulcer reported a significant impact in the daily life. The care provided by nurses should be centered on the person, integrating all the kind of needs and the leg ulcer must not be the sole focus of care

  20. Quality Of Life And Autism [qualidade De Vida E Autismo

    OpenAIRE

    Elias A.V.; Assumpcao Jr. F.B.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the index quality of life (QL) in bearers of including upset of the development. Method: 20 autistic childrens, between 4 and 12 years, submitted to the diagnostic evaluation by autistic traces scale-ATA and for the Vineland adaptive behavior scales, needing to obtain in this a quotient of superior development over 70. The data about QL were obtained by the scale of quality of life-AUQEI and compared from the application of Vineland and of AUQEI in a population of norma...

  1. Measuring quality of life in Macedonia - using human development indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar Eftimoski

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available By the end of the 1980s, the central issue of development was focused on the growth of income and not on the growth of quality of life. Therefore, the development strategies were oriented towards production and left no significant space for improving the welfare of individuals.In the beginning of the 1990s, the human development concept emerged, stressing that economic development ultimately should result in growth of quality of life of individuals, while the goal of the development process was to expand the capabilities of individuals by placing them in the focus of the efforts for development.This paper if focused on the quality of life of the individuals. Moreover, in addition to the previous practice in Macedonia of calculating the human development index (HDI - as a measure of quality of life, an attempt will be made to calculate the humanpoverty index (HPI-2 - as a measure of non-income poverty, gender development index (GDI - as a measure of inequality between men and women, as well as the human development index at the level of aggregated urban and rural municipalities.We hope that it will contribute to the improvement of the quality of decisions made by the state and local authorities in Macedonia when it comes to issues concerning the human development.

  2. Quality of life in participants of a CRC screening program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kapidzic (Atija); I.J. Korfage (Ida); L. van Dam (Leonie); A.H.C. Roon (Aafke); J.C.I.Y. Reijerink (Jacqueline); A. Zauber (Ann); M. van Ballegooijen (Marjolein); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M.E. van Leerdam (Monique)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Little is known about the effect of participating in a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programme on quality of life (QOL), neither for participants with a negative nor for those with a positive test result. These findings, however, are important to evaluate the impact of

  3. Thalassemia Major: how do we improve quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhirar, Nonita; Khandekar, Jyoti; Bachani, Damodar; Mahto, Deonath

    2016-01-01

    Thalassemia Major is a preventable genetic disorder characterized by abnormal hemoglobin synthesis and lifelong blood transfusions. The children suffering from Thalassemia Major have poor quality of life. This study was conducted to assess the factors influencing quality of life of these children and how it can be improved. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in 2014 at Thalassemia Day Care Centre of a tertiary level children's hospital in Delhi, to assess quality of life of children suffering from Thalassemia Major. A total of 241 eligible children (age 2-18 years) were enrolled in the study. Socio demographic and clinical characteristics were collected from interview and existing medical records. The PedsQL 4.0 generic core scale was used for assessing the quality of life of the children. The mean age of children was 8.69 ± 4.98 years. Two-thirds (63.5%) were boys. The total mean QoL score of the children was 82.0 ± 14.4. The quality of life scores were better for boys as compared to girls. The most affected domain was the emotional domain which showed statistically significant (p = 0.025) difference between boys and girls. The total QoL scores were significantly affected by the current age of the child (p = 0.000) and presence of co-morbidity (p = 0.026). Children not on any form of iron chelation therapy (p = 0.003) and fewer hospital visits (p = 0.044) had better QoL scores. Factors improving the quality of life were control of iron overload and adverse effects of ICTs, management of co morbidities and fewer hospital visits.

  4. [Quality of life in Latin American immigrant caregivers in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover, Andreu; Taltavull, Joana Maria; Gastaldo, Denise; Luengo, Raquel; Izquierdo, María Dolores; Juando-Prats, Clara; Sáenz de Ormijana, Amaia; Robledo, Juana

    2015-01-01

    To describe perceived quality of life in Latin American caregivers working in Spain and how it varies in relation to certain variables shared by this group. We used the SF-36 to measure perceived quality of life in 517 women residing in five Spanish regions: the Balearic Islands, Catalonia, the Basque Country, the Canary Islands, and Madrid. Several variables related to the socio-demographic profile and migration process were studied using Student's t test, ANOVA and linear regression models. The participants scored very low on the dimensions of physical and emotional roles. The factors associated with lower quality of life scores within the group were working as a live-in caregiver, lack of contract, multitasking, irregular status, and younger age. The vulnerability of these women can be explained by poor working conditions and other factors related to the migratory process. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Poles Living in Ireland and their Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka NOLKA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The economic growth of Ireland resulted in a significant number of Poles migrating to Ireland following the EU enlargement in 2004. The article explores the quality of life of Poles living in Ireland. Using data from a preliminary survey conducted in 2006, several dimensions of living conditions are analysed, including interpersonal relations, material security, health and healthcare. The study shows that evaluations of almost all aspects of quality of life improved, apart from components such as healthcare and the ability to acquire help from social organisations. Also interpersonal relations, contrary to the initial assumption, were enhanced by migration to Ireland.

  6. Pancreatitis Quality of Life Instrument: Development of a new instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahid Wassef

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The goal of this project was to develop the first disease-specific instrument for the evaluation of quality of life in chronic pancreatitis. Methods: Focus groups and interview sessions were conducted, with chronic pancreatitis patients, to identify items felt to impact quality of life which were subsequently formatted into a paper-and-pencil instrument. This instrument was used to conduct an online survey by an expert panel of pancreatologists to evaluate its content validity. Finally, the modified instrument was presented to patients during precognitive testing interviews to evaluate its clarity and appropriateness. Results: In total, 10 patients were enrolled in the focus groups and interview sessions where they identified 50 items. Once redundant items were removed, the 40 remaining items were made into a paper-and-pencil instrument referred to as the Pancreatitis Quality of Life Instrument. Through the processes of content validation and precognitive testing, the number of items in the instrument was reduced to 24. Conclusions: This marks the development of the first disease-specific instrument to evaluate quality of life in chronic pancreatitis. It includes unique features not found in generic instruments (economic factors, stigma, and spiritual factors. Although this marks a giant step forward, psychometric evaluation is still needed prior to its clinical use.

  7. Quality of Life in Chronic Hepatitis B and C Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abitin Heidarzadeh

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Chronic hepatitis B and C are prevalent diseases, especially in developing countries. In many of the patients they cause limitations in physical and mental functions and finally cause reduction in their life quality. We wanted to assess the quality of life in these patients.Methods: This research was done on 74 chronic hepatitis B and C patients of Rasht which their diseases were confirmed by serologic and histologic methods and their hepatic enzymes including AST & ALT was two times more than normal range for at least 6 months. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey performed in October 2003 till Jully 2004 in Gastrointestinal & Liver Diseases Research Center of Rasht (north city of Iran, Razi hospital. The questionnaires consisted of 29 questions that were given to the patients and they were let free to complete it. Results: The individuals under survey consisted of 15 (20.27% chronic hepatitis B patients and 59 (79.72% chronic hepatitis C patients. 54 (72.79% ones were male and 20 (27.02% were female. Total adjusted score (up to 100 points of life quality was 54.4 ± 22.5. No meaningful difference was seen between two sexes based on total score of life quality. Also, in different fields of life quality no significant difference was seen between two genders, except the systemic signs that the average of adjusted score of females (43 ± 28 was less than males (63 ± 27 that means meaningful statistical difference (P < 0.007.Conclusions: Generally, it seems that chronic hepatitis B and C have untoward life qualities which could result from concern of decrease of social support or fear of society or decrease in patronage of the family or friends and it is mandate to be concerned when furnishing services to these patients.

  8. Pain management and quality of life in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jo; Thomas, Veronica J; Rawle, Heather M

    2009-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited disease worldwide and is responsible for a massive health burden. Its main clinical feature is severe pain that is unpredictable and recurrent, and this, in addition to the other acute and chronic features of SCD, may have a huge impact on the quality of life of both the patient and their families and carers. We consider medical and psychological methods of pain management in SCD, drawing on recently published UK Standards of Care, and also consider the effect of SCD on quality of life.

  9. The development of the Pictorial Thai Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phattharayuttawat, Sucheera; Ngamthipwatthana, Thienchai; Pitiyawaranun, Buncha

    2005-11-01

    "Quality of life" has become a main focus of interest in medicine. The Pictorial Thai Quality of Life (PTQL) was developed in order to measure the Thai mental illness both in a clinical setting and community. The purpose of this study was to develop the Pictorial Thai Quality of Life (PTQL), having adequate and sufficient construct validity, discriminant power, concurrent validity, and reliability. To develop the Pictorial Thai Quality of Life Test, two samples groups were used in the present study: (1) pilot study samples: 30 samples and (2) survey samples were 672 samples consisting of normal, and psychiatric patients. The developing tests items were collected from a review of the literature in which all the items were based on the WHO definition of Quality of Life. Then, experts judgment by the Delphi technique was used in the first stage. After that a pilot study was used to evaluate the testing administration, and wording of the tests items. The final stage was collected data from the survey samples. The results of the present study showed that the final test was composed 25 items. The construct validity of this test consists of six domains: Physical, Cognitive, Affective, Social Function, Economic and Self-Esteem. All the PTQL items have sufficient discriminant power It was found to be statistically significant different at the. 001 level between those people with mental disorders and normal people. There was a high level of concurrent validity association with WHOQOL-BREF, Pearson correlation coefficient and Area under ROC curve were 0.92 and 0.97 respectively. The reliability coefficients for the Alpha coefficients of the PTQL total test was 0.88. The values of the six scales were from 0.81 to 0:91. The present study was directed at developing an effective psychometric properties pictorial quality of life questionnaire. The result will be a more direct and meaningful application of an instrument to detect the mental health illness poor quality of life in

  10. Body image and quality of life in a Spanish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jáuregui Lobera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui Lobera1, Patricia Bolaños Ríos21Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain; 2Behavior Science Institute, Seville, SpainPurpose: The aim of the current study was to analyze the psychometric properties, factor structure, and internal consistency of the Spanish version of the Body Image Quality of Life Inventory (BIQLI-SP as well as its test–retest reliability. Further objectives were to analyze different relationships with key dimensions of psychosocial functioning (ie, self-esteem, presence of psychopathological symptoms, eating and body image-related problems, and perceived stress and to evaluate differences in body image quality of life due to gender.Patients and methods: The sample comprised 417 students without any psychiatric history, recruited from the Pablo de Olavide University and the University of Seville. There were 140 men (33.57% and 277 women (66.43%, and the mean age was 21.62 years (standard deviation = 5.12. After obtaining informed consent from all participants, the following questionnaires were administered: BIQLI, Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2, Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ, Self-Esteem Scale (SES, and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R.Results: The BIQLI-SP shows adequate psychometric properties, and it may be useful to determine the body image quality of life in different physical conditions. A more positive body image quality of life is associated with better self-esteem, better psychological wellbeing, and fewer eating-related dysfunctional attitudes, this being more evident among women.Conclusion: The BIQLI-SP may be useful to determine the body image quality of life in different contexts with regard to dermatology, cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, and endocrinology, among others. In these fields of study, a new trend has emerged to assess body image-related quality of life.Keywords: body appreciation, wellbeing, self-esteem, social

  11. Comparison of quality of life measures in a depressed population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Stephen R; Rush, A John; Bryan, Charlene; Shelton, Richard; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Marcus, Sheila; Husain, Mustafa M; Hollon, Steven D; Fava, Maurizio

    2007-03-01

    Measures of quality of life have been increasingly used in clinical trials. When designing a study, researchers must decide which quality of life measure to use. Some literature provides guidance through general recommendations, though lacks quantitative comparisons. In this report, 2 general quality of life measures, the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q), are compared in a depressed population. STAR*D data were used to analyze the associations among the SF-12 and the Q-LES-Q. Each measure covers 6 domains, overlapping on 5 (health, self-esteem/well-being, community/productivity, social/love relationships, leisure/creativity), with the SF-12 addressing family and the Q-LES-Q addressing living situations. Strong item-by-item associations exist only between the Q-LES-Q and the SF-12 physical health items. The 2 measures overlap on the domains covered while the lack of correlation between the 2 measures may be attributed to the perspective of each question as the Q-LES-Q measures satisfaction while the SF-12 measures the patient's perception of function.

  12. Some Themes in the Discussion of the Quality of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    1999-01-01

    Abstract This paper is motivated by the need to discuss the quality of life as a part of the background for devising environmental strategies. When environmental strategies are devised, it is often more or less tacitly assumed that we should try to avoid measures that imply a decrease in the level...

  13. Understanding Quality of Working Life of Workers with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Noelia; Jenaro, Cristina; Orgaz, M. Begona; Martin, M. Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Background: This paper examines the perceived quality of working life of workers with intellectual disabilities. Specifically, this paper looks at participants' perceptions in relation to perceived job demands and resources and their impact on experienced job satisfaction. Methods: In this cross-sectional survey, 507 workers with intellectual…

  14. Heritability of health-related quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenstrup, Troels; Pedersen, Ole Birger; Hjelmborg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The present study aims to estimate the relative importance of genetic and environmental factors for health-related quality of life (HRQL) measured by the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). Methods: The study was based on two Danish twin cohorts (46,417 twin individuals) originating from...

  15. Understanding Quality of Working Life of Workers with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Noelia; Jenaro, Cristina; Orgaz, M. Begona; Martin, M. Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Background: This paper examines the perceived quality of working life of workers with intellectual disabilities. Specifically, this paper looks at participants' perceptions in relation to perceived job demands and resources and their impact on experienced job satisfaction. Methods: In this cross-sectional survey, 507 workers with intellectual…

  16. Quality of life of elderly persons with newly diagnosed cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, B A; Osterlind, K; Roer, O

    2004-01-01

    The aim was to investigate quality of life (QoL) in elderly persons newly diagnosed with cancer (65+ years) in relation to age, contact with the health-care system, ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL), hope, social network and support, and to identify which factors were associated...

  17. Treatment and Quality of Life of Patients with Varicose Veins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.M. Biemans (Anke)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractVaricose veins are common and have a substantial impact on patients’ quality of life. Multiple good treatment options are currently available. In this thesis we describe the indications, procedures, safety, efficacy and recurrence profiles of the most frequently performed treatments for

  18. Graded Response Modeling of the Quality of Life Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttaro, Thomas; Lehman, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Outlined a graded response model and applied it to an aggregated data set from four studies involving subjective items from the Quality of Life Interview (QOLI) (A. Lehman, 1988). Used the results to create customized QOLI scales. Discusses the use of this methodology for scales involving ordered, graded categories. (SLD)

  19. Quality of life and cost factors in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, J R

    1996-01-01

    Quality of life encompasses domains of personal happiness, role fulfillment, and health status. Increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between quality of life and panic disorder, with accumulating evidence now available to suggest impairment in several domains among subjects with panic disorder. This review summarizes the results of community-based and treatment-seeking populations of subjects with panic disorder. Impaired personal happiness, restricted role functioning, and increased use of health services are all described. Evidence suggests that accurate diagnosis and effective treatment can significantly lessen health service utilization, resulting in substantial cost offset and also leading to increased work productivity and personal effectiveness.

  20. Health related quality of life among insulin-dependent diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalto, A M; Uutela, A; Aro, A R

    1997-01-01

    This crossectional questionnaire study examined the associations of health factors and psychosocial factors with Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) in a sample of adult type I diabetic patients (n = 385). Health related quality of life was measured by the Finnish version of MOS SF-20....... Psychosocial measures were general social support, diabetes-specific social support, diabetes locus of control (DCL), self-efficacy, diabetes health beliefs and self-care practices. In multivariate analyses, limitations in physical functioning showed strong associations with perceived health (beta = -0.33, P...... diabetes and glycemic control were not related to HRQOL...

  1. Quality of Life Assessment for Physical Activity and Health Promotion: Further Psychometrics and Comparison of Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Diane L.; Reifsteck, Erin J.; Adams, Melanie M.; Shang, Ya-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Despite the clear relationship between physical activity and quality of life, few sound, relevant quality of life measures exist. Gill and colleagues developed a 32-item quality of life survey, and provided initial psychometric evidence. This study further examined that quality of life survey in comparison with the widely used short form (SF-36)…

  2. Quality of life characteristics inpatients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelic-Radisic, Vesna; Jensen, Pernille T; Vlasic, Karin Kuljanic

    2012-01-01

    Annually about 500,000 women worldwide are diagnosed with cervical cancer. For many patients, young age at the time of diagnosis and a good prognosis regarding the disease imply a long life with the side-effects and sequels of various treatment options. The present study investigated the extent...... to which different quality of life (QoL) domains in patients during and after treatment for cervical cancer are affected according to menopausal status, treatment status and treatment modality....

  3. Quality of Life of Testicular Cancer Survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, Joke

    2006-01-01

    Men who are diagnosed with testicular cancer are generally young. As a consequence of the treatment they receive nowadays, they are likely to cure from the disease, even when they have metastases. This means that they have to live with possible short- and long-term sequel of diagnosis and treatment

  4. Quality-of-life factors in adolescent inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, M; Hoffenberg, E J; Feranchak, A

    1998-02-01

    Little is known about the specific psychosocial factors that influence quality of life in adolescents with newly diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We adapted a model by Garrett and Drossman to assess adolescent adjustment to recent-onset IBD. Thirty adolescent-parent pairs completed a set of standardized questionnaires. The inclusion criteria were adolescents 12-18 years of age with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis of life scores significantly correlated with satisfaction and degree of closeness with their social support members, such as parents. An unexpected finding was that the adolescents included more extended family than peers in their social support networks. Also of note was that parental coping styles rather than adolescent coping styles significantly correlated with adolescents' quality-of-life health scores. Severity of illness did not correlate with adolescent quality-of-life health scores. There was significant agreement between adolescent and parental quality-of-life health scores and stressful event ratings. Adolescents with recent-onset IBD rely more on family members than their peers for emotional support, and they depend more on their parents' coping skills than their own. These findings may indicate lags in normal adolescent development. Adolescents and parents do communicate and share concerns with each other. Support programs for adolescents with IBD should reinforce existing coping skills and parent-adolescent communication while promoting normative development.

  5. Determinants of geriatric patients' quality of life after stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijck, Bianca I.; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Spruit-van Eijk, Monica; Bor, Hans; Gerritsen, Debby L.; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Geriatric patients' physical disabilities, dependency on care, and possible psychological ill-being may negatively affect both the patient's quality of life and the informal caregiver burden. Focusing on this interrelationship which can be particularly prominent in geriatric patients wit

  6. Body image quality of life in eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jáuregui Lobera

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui Lobera1, Patricia Bolaños Ríos21Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain; 2Behavior Sciences Institute, Seville, SpainPurpose: The objective was to examine how body image affects quality of life in an eating-disorder (ED clinical sample, a non-ED clinical sample, and a nonclinical sample. We hypothesized that ED patients would show the worst body image quality of life. We also hypothesized that body image quality of life would have a stronger negative association with specific ED-related variables than with other psychological and psychopathological variables, mainly among ED patients. On the basis of previous studies, the influence of gender on the results was explored, too.Patients and methods: The final sample comprised 70 ED patients (mean age 22.65 ± 7.76 years; 59 women and 11 men; 106 were patients with other psychiatric disorders (mean age 28.20 ± 6.52; 67 women and 39 men, and 135 were university students (mean age 21.57 ± 2.58; 81 women and 54 men, with no psychiatric history. After having obtained informed consent, the following questionnaires were administered: Body Image Quality of Life Inventory-Spanish version (BIQLI-SP, Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2, Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ, Self-Esteem Scale (SES, and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R.Results: The ED patients' ratings on the BIQLI-SP were the lowest and negatively scored (BIQLI-SP means: +20.18, +5.14, and —6.18, in the student group, the non-ED patient group, and the ED group, respectively. The effect of body image on quality of life was more negative in the ED group in all items of the BIQLI-SP. Body image quality of life was negatively associated with specific ED-related variables, more than with other psychological and psychopathological variables, but not especially among ED patients.Conclusion: Body image quality of life was affected not only by specific pathologies related to body

  7. Quality of life among non-hodgkin lymphoma survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Samura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Little is known about change in quality of life among lymphoma survivors. We examined change over time in quality of life among long-term survivors of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and identified demographic, clinical and psychosocial risk factors for poor outcomes depending on the appearance of cardiovascular events. Methods and results. Fifty three cumulative clinical events occurred in 21 (25.6% patients. Patients who had cardiovascular events reported significantly worse psychological well-being, general health, less vitality and health-related quality of life than patients who had not cardiovascular events. Chemotherapy was associated with quality of lives outcomes. Patients who were not diagnosed with cardiovascular events reported better social well-being than patients who were diagnosed with cardiovascular events. The observed differences in quality of life were significant only when they were measured with the QOL-CS, and not with the SF-36. Conclusion. The general health perceptions and vitality levels of non-Hodgkin lymphoma survivors with cardiovascular events remained significantly lower than those of patients without cardiovascular events.

  8. Race-Related Stress, Quality of Life Indicators, and Life Satisfaction among Elderly African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsey, Shawn O.; Payne, Yasser A.; Jackson, Ebonique S.; Jones, Antoine M.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the relationships among race-related stress, quality of life indicators, and life satisfaction among elderly African Americans. Results indicated that elderly African American men and women differed significantly with regard to institutional and collective racism-related stress. In addition, institutional racism-related stress was a…

  9. Hydroxyurea and sickle cell anemia: effect on quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Pegelow Charles H; Eckman James R; Swerdlow Paul; Waclawiw Myron A; Barton Franca B; Ballas Samir K; Koshy Mabel; Barton Bruce A; Bonds Duane R

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The Multicenter Study of Hydroxyurea (HU) in Sickle Cell Anemia (MSH) previously showed that daily oral HU reduces painful sickle cell (SS) crises by 50% in patients with moderate to severe disease. The morbidity associated with this disease is known to have serious negative impact on the overall quality of life(QOL) of affected individuals. Methods The data in this report were collected from the 299 patients enrolled in the MSH. Health quality of llife (HQOL) measures wer...

  10. Quality-of-life assessment techniques for veterinarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Alice E

    2011-05-01

    The revised veterinary oath commits the profession to the prevention and relief of animal suffering. There is a professional obligation to properly assess quality of life (QoL) and confront the issues that ruin it, such as undiagnosed suffering. There are no clinical studies in the arena of QoL assessment at the end of life for pets. This author developed a user-friendly QoL scale to help make proper assessments and decisions along the way to the conclusion of a terminal patient's life. This article discusses decision aids and establishes commonsense techniques to assess a pet's QoL.

  11. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: vocal and quality of life analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Furtado e Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare voice and life quality of male patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, with individuals without disease (Control Group. METHODS: A cross-sectional study that evaluated the voice of individuals with Parkinson's disease, the group was composed of 27 subjects, aged from 39 to 79 years-old (average 59.96. The Control Group was matched on sex and age. Participants underwent voice recording. Perceptual evaluation was made using GRBASI scale, which considers G as the overall degree of dysphonia, R as roughness, B as breathiness, A as asthenia, S as strain and I as instability. The acoustic parameters analyzed were: fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and harmonic to noise ratio (NHR. For vocal self-perception analysis, we used the Voice Related Quality of Life protocol. RESULTS: Fundamental frequency and jitter presented higher values in the Parkinson's group. NHR values were higher in the Control Group. Perceptual analysis showed a deviation ranging. The vocal disorder self-perception demonstrated a worse impact on quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with Parkinson's disease have an altered voice quality and a negative impact on quality of life.

  12. Perception of Quality of Life among People with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheah WL

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects a patient’s quality of life. this cross-sectional study aimed to determine the socio-demographic and disease profile factors associated with poor quality of life among patients with diabetes. the study was conducted at a primary health care clinic in Kuching between August to november 2010. short Form - 36 (sF - 36 questionnaire was used to assess the quality of life of diabetic patients aged ≥ 18. A total of 142 respondents participated in the survey. After adjusting for age, those with no education scored lower at vitality (p=0.043 and emotional health (p=0.033 compared with those who have tertiary education. those working in the private sector scored better for physical functioning (p=0.042 compared with pensioners and the unemployed. Patients with uncontrolled diabetes scored lower in the role-emotional domain (p=0.003. Participants who were on <3 (p=0.014 and ≥3 (p=0.024 oral medications had better score for role-physical than those on insulin. those on insulin had worse score for bodily pain than those on oral medication only (vs <3 oral drugs, p=0.026; vs ≥3 oral drugs, p=0.001. Various socio-demographic factors, uncontrolled diabetes and insulin usage were found to have negative impact on a diabetic patient’s quality of life. Programmes addressing the physical and emotional needs of diabetic patients at the primary health care setting are essential to help improve their quality of life.

  13. Effect of Store and Forward Teledermatology on Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, John D.; Warshaw, Erin M.; Edison, Karen E.; Kapur, Kush; Thottapurathu, Lizy; Raju, Srihari; Cook, Bethany; Engasser, Holly; Pullen, Samantha; Parks, Patricia; Sindowski, Tom; Motyka, Danuta; Brown, Rodney; Moritz, Thomas E.; Datta, Santanu K.; Chren, Mary-Margaret; Marty, Lucinda; Reda, Domenic J.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Although research on quality of life and dermatologic conditions is well represented in the literature, information on teledermatology’s effect on quality of life is virtually absent. Objective To determine the effect of store and forward teledermatology on quality of life. Design Two-site, parallel-group, superiority randomized controlled trial. Setting Dermatology clinics and affiliated sites of primary care at 2 US Department of Veterans Affairs medical facilities. Participants Patients being referred to a dermatology clinic were randomly assigned, stratified by site, to teledermatology or the conventional consultation process. Among the 392 patients who met the inclusion criteria and were randomized, 326 completed the allocated intervention and were included in the analysis. Interventions Store and forward teledermatology (digital images and a standardized history) or conventional text-based consultation processes were used to manage the dermatology consultations. Patients were followed up for 9 months. Main Outcome Measures The primary end point was change in Skindex-16 scores, a skin-specific quality-of-life instrument, between baseline and 9 months. A secondary end point was change in Skindex-16 scores between baseline and 3 months. Results Patients in both randomization groups demonstrated a clinically significant improvement in Skindex-16 scores between baseline and 9 months with no significant difference by randomization group (P=.66, composite score). No significant difference in Skindex-16 scores by randomization group between baseline and 3 months was found (P=.39, composite score). Conclusions Compared with the conventional consultation process, store and forward teledermatology did not result in a statistically significant difference in skin-related quality of life at 3 or 9 months after referral. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00488293 PMID:23426111

  14. The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis quality of life selenium trial (CATALYST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Watt, Torquil; Bjørner, Jakob Bue

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis have impaired health-related quality of life. The thyroid gland has a high selenium concentration, and specific selenoprotein enzyme families are crucial to immune function, and catalyze thyroid hormone metabolism and redox processes in thyroid cells......-enriched yeast or matching placebo tablets daily for 12 months. The experimental supplement will be SelenoPrecise(R). The primary outcome is thyroid-related quality of life assessed by the Thyroid Patient-Reported Outcome (ThyPRO) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include serum thyroid peroxidase antibody...

  15. Untreated cavitated dentine lesions: impact on children's quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leal, S.C.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Fan, M.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to assess the impact of dental caries prevalence and the consequences of untreated cavitated dentine lesions on quality of life of 6- and 7-year-old Brazilian children. A total of 826 schoolchildren were assessed using ICDAS and pufa (to score consequences of

  16. Navy Quality of Life Survey: Shipboard Life Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Messing Areas and Final Report for Period Ending May 31, 1974. Berkeley, CA: The Department of Architecture, University of California. Tate, C. C...Destroyer types (includes frigates) Minecraft Submarine Tender/Repair ship Reserve Unit Service Force ship Amphibious ship Amphibious craft Other (Please...Distribution AIR UNIVERSITY LIBRARY ARMY MANAGEMENT STAFF COLLEGE LIBRARY ARMY RESEARCH INSTITUTE LIBRARY ARMY WAR COLLEGE LIBRARY CENTER

  17. [The TPE nurse improving the patient's quality of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Thierry

    The impact of interventions by therapeutic education nurses on compliance and the quality of life of patients with chronic diseases has been proven. These different perspectives of caregivers and patients highlight the specific case of the treatment of HIV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of the quality of life and risk of suicide

    OpenAIRE

    Verônica de Medeiros Alves; Leilane Camila Ferreira de Lima Francisco; Flaviane Maria Pereira Belo; Valfrido Leão de-Melo-Neto; Vinicius Gomes Barros; Antonio E Nardi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the socio-demographic profiles, suicidal ideation, the presence of mental disorders and the quality of life of patients using mental health services in Arapiraca, Alagoas, Brazil. METHOD: Interviews were conducted in family health units and the Psychosocial Attention Center. The sample included 202 mental disorder patients with a risk of suicide attempts, 207 mental disorder patients without a risk of suicide attempts and 196 controls. This study used an identification...

  19. Combined effects of sleep quality and depression on quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Pan; Lou, Peian; Chang, Guiqiu; Chen, Peipei; Zhang, Lei; Li, Ting; Qiao, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor sleep quality and depression negatively impact the health-related quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes, but the combined effect of the two factors is unknown. This study aimed to assess the interactive effects of poor sleep quality and depression on the quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 944) completed the Diabetes Specificity Quality of Life scale (DSQL) and questionnaires on sleep quality and depression. T...

  20. Issues in Evaluating Importance Weighting in Quality of Life Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chang-ming

    2013-01-01

    For most empirical research investigating the topic of importance weighting in quality of life (QoL) measures, the prevailing approach has been to use (1) a limited choice of global QoL measures as criterion variables (often a single one) to determine the performance of importance weighting, (2) a limited option of weighting methods to develop…

  1. QUALITY-OF-LIFE AFTER CARDIOPULMONARY-RESUSCITATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MIRANDA, DR

    Objectives: This study evaluates the influence of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) on the components of quality of life (QOL) of patients after discharge from the hospital. Design: Extracted from a prospective national survey on Dutch intensive care units (ICUs). Setting: Thirty-six ICUs of both

  2. Oral Health-Quality of Life Predictors Depend on Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk-Werkhoven, Yvonne A. B.; Dijkstra, Arie; van der Schans, Cees P.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of the development and evaluation of oral health interventions that take into account people's oral health-related quality of life (OH-QoL), it is important to know what determinants and effects of OH-QoL are. Because the processes involved in the experience of OH-QoL may differ for

  3. Health-Related Quality of Life in HIV Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Ron D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The structure of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was studied in 205 symptomatic adults. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a two-factor model of HRQOL, with physical and mental health dimensions. Correlations of HRQOL with other aspects of health and support are discussed. (SLD)

  4. Burnout and Quality of Life among Healthcare Research Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Felicity; West, Colin P.; Dyrbye, Liselotte; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Burnout is increasingly recognized as a problem in the workplace--30% to 50% of physicians experience burnout, but no assessment of burnout has been done among healthcare research faculty. A cross-sectional survey of burnout, quality of life, and related factors was sent to all doctoral-level faculty in a large department of healthcare research.…

  5. The quality of life of women of Chinese origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christine

    2000-05-01

    This paper draws upon qualitative data to explore the quality of life of Chinese mothers with preschool children in the central part of Manchester. In doing this it considers their own self-reported health conditions. Both semi-structured and conversational face-to-face interviews were used with mothers in their homes. The names of Chinese mothers were drawn from the immunization records of the Health Authority and Hospital Trust of Central Manchester. The final interview sample of 30 had a Chinese surname in the record. 'Lee' as a surname was excluded because it was used both by Chinese and English people. The mothers' socio-economic background and their quality of life in terms of work conditions and leisure, housing and residential environment, marital support and life satisfaction were examined. The findings indicate that since they settled in the United Kingdom, the women have been under great psychological stress from a variety of sources. These sources included hardship and overwork, poverty and deprivation, poor social support and social isolation, unhappy family relationships, gambling husbands and domestic violence, together with language and cultural difficulties. All of these contributed to poor quality of living standards as well as indirectly causing negative psychosocial health outcomes. The unsatisfactory self-reported health conditions and poor quality of life of Chinese mothers were naturally interrelated and might be determined by the disadvantages of migration. However, the mothers themselves expressed little satisfaction with the health services and it may be that improvements are necessary in this area to ameliorate some of the disadvantages of migration.

  6. Assesment of Quality of Life in Children with Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat Gümüş

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Bronchial asthma is among the most common chronic pediatric diseases that can result in variable restriction in the physical, emotional and social aspects of the patient%u2019s life. The aim of this study was to assess impairment on quality of life (QOL in asthmatic children. Material and Method: Ninety seven patients aged between 7 and 15 years which followed up at Pediatric Pulmonology Department of Dicle University Hospital were included into the study, during October 2009 %u2013 January 2010. To assess the quality of life Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life questionnaire%u2019s (PAQLQ self-applied Turkish version was used. In addition, the severity of asthma was measured using by Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT. Results: The male to female ratio of asthmatic children was 2/1 and the mean age was 10.0 %uF0B1 2.5 years. Severity of asthma, history of steroid use and low family income were found as having negative effect on the PAQLQ scores (p < 0.001. Mother%u2019s education level also had statistically significant effect on the PAQLQ scores (P = 0.02. Father%u2019s education level; patient%u2019s age, gender, passive smoking exposure, family history of asthma or eczema and duration of disease did not have statistically significant effect on PAQLQ scores (p>0.05. Asthma control test score had a significant correlation with PAQLQ score (p

  7. Quality of life and life circumstances in German myasthenia gravis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pöhlau Dieter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myasthenia gravis (MG is a chronic neuromuscular disease. Advances in medical therapy have continuously increased the life expectancy of MG patients, without definitively curing the disease. To analyze life circumstances and quality of life (QoL, a large German MG cohort was investigated. Methods and Sample In cooperation with the German Myasthenia Association, 2,150 patients with confirmed MG were asked to respond to a mailed questionnaire. The standardized questions related to demographic data, impairments, therapeutic course, use of complementary therapies, illness-related costs, and quality of life (SF-36. In total, 1,518 patients participated, yielding a response rate of 70.6%. The average age was 56.7 years, and the proportion of females 58.6%. Results Despite receiving recommended therapy, many patients still suffered from MG-related impairments. In particular, mobility and mental well-being were reduced; moreover, quality of life was markedly reduced. Stepwise linear regression analysis revealed illness stability, impairments, mental conditions, comorbid diseases, and employment to be determinants of QoL. Conclusion Results indicate that despite prolonged life expectancy among MG patients, health-related quality of life is low. This outcome resulted mainly from impaired mobility and depression. Physical and mental well-being might be improved by additional therapy options. Additionally, health care resources could be used more efficiently in these patients.

  8. Asian Medical Students: Quality of Life and Motivation to Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Marcus A.; Hawken, Susan J.; Krageloh, Christian; Zhao, Yipin; Doherty, Iain

    2011-01-01

    Issues linked with the notions of quality of life (QOL) and motivation to learn among Asian medical students have not been well documented. This is true in both the international and the New Zealand contexts. Our paper addresses this lack of research by focusing on the QOL of international and domestic Asian students studying in New Zealand, where…

  9. Intimate Adult Relationships, Quality of Life and Psychological Adjusment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleque, Abdul

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess relations between adult intimacy, quality of life, and psychological adjustment. Data were collected in the United States from a sample of 64 college students. The measuring instruments used were Personal Information Sheet, Adult version of the Personality Assessment Questionnaire (Adult PAQ), Intimate…

  10. Patients’ perspectives on quality of life after burn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.B.; Geenen, R.; Egberts, M.R.; Wanders, H.; Van Loey, N.E.E.

    2017-01-01

    Background The concept quality of life (QOL) refers to both health-related outcomes and one’s skills to reach these outcomes, which is not yet incorporated in the burn-related QOL conceptualisation. The aim of this study was to obtain a comprehensive overview of relevant burn-specific domains of QOL

  11. Quality of life in children with undiagnosed and diagnosed asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gent, R.; van Essen, L.E.; Rovers, M.M.; Kimpen, J.L.; van der Ent, C.K.; de Meer, G.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the impact of undiagnosed and diagnosed asthma on quality of life in schoolchildren aged 7-10 years and their caregivers in a cross-sectional community-based study. Diagnosed asthma was defined as the parents' confirmation of a physician's diagnosis of asthma. Undiagnosed asthma

  12. Quality of life in children with undiagnosed and diagnosed asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gent, R.; van Essen, L.E.; Rovers, M.M.; Kimpen, J.L.; van der Ent, C.K.; de Meer, G.

    This study describes the impact of undiagnosed and diagnosed asthma on quality of life in schoolchildren aged 7-10 years and their caregivers in a cross-sectional community-based study. Diagnosed asthma was defined as the parents' confirmation of a physician's diagnosis of asthma. Undiagnosed asthma

  13. Poor Health-related Quality of Life After Severe Preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedjes, Meeke; Berks, Durk; Vogel, Ineke; Franx, Arie; Duvekot, Johannes J.; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Raat, Hein

    Background: Preeclampsia is a major complication of pregnancy associated with increased maternal morbidity and mortality, and adverse birth outcomes. The objective of this study was to describe changes in all domains of health-related quality of life between 6 and 12 weeks postpartum after mild and

  14. Quality of life in children with undiagnosed and diagnosed asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gent, R.; van Essen, L.E.; Rovers, M.M.; Kimpen, J.L.; van der Ent, C.K.; de Meer, G.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the impact of undiagnosed and diagnosed asthma on quality of life in schoolchildren aged 7-10 years and their caregivers in a cross-sectional community-based study. Diagnosed asthma was defined as the parents' confirmation of a physician's diagnosis of asthma. Undiagnosed asthma

  15. Quality of Life in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Cakci, Aytul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on QoL. This cross-sectional study included 54 patients with SCI. The Turkish version of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey was…

  16. Health-related quality of life in sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korenromp, Ingrid H.E.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review: The review presents an overview of the scientific publications in the field of health-related quality of life (HRQL) in sarcoidosis. Recent findings: Literature on HRQL in sarcoidosis is limited. HRQL was mainly used as a primary or secondary endpoint in intervention studies.

  17. Social functioning, psychological functioning, and quality of life in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suurmeijer, TPBM; Reuvekamp, MF; Aldenkamp, BP

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Part of our research intended to explain "Quality of Life" (QoL) differences between people with epilepsy. To this end, a series of already existing generic and disease-specific health status measures were used. In this study, they were considered as determinants of people's QoL, whereas Qo

  18. Health-related quality of life in sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korenromp, Ingrid H.E.; Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review: The review presents an overview of the scientific publications in the field of health-related quality of life (HRQL) in sarcoidosis. Recent findings: Literature on HRQL in sarcoidosis is limited. HRQL was mainly used as a primary or secondary endpoint in intervention studies. Mo

  19. Poor Health-related Quality of Life After Severe Preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedjes, Meeke; Berks, Durk; Vogel, Ineke; Franx, Arie; Duvekot, Johannes J.; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Raat, Hein

    2011-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia is a major complication of pregnancy associated with increased maternal morbidity and mortality, and adverse birth outcomes. The objective of this study was to describe changes in all domains of health-related quality of life between 6 and 12 weeks postpartum after mild and

  20. Quality of Life in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Cakci, Aytul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on QoL. This cross-sectional study included 54 patients with SCI. The Turkish version of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey was…

  1. Social Power: Effect on Spouses' Quality of Personal Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Cher Carrie

    It is the dimension of power or control, either in the workplace or in the family, that determines the degree to which social relations are alienating. The consequences of social inequality for the quality of personal life were examined in 314 married couples, of whom 70 were dual-earning non-parents, 123 were dual-earning parents, and 41 were…

  2. Intimate Adult Relationships, Quality of Life and Psychological Adjusment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleque, Abdul

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess relations between adult intimacy, quality of life, and psychological adjustment. Data were collected in the United States from a sample of 64 college students. The measuring instruments used were Personal Information Sheet, Adult version of the Personality Assessment Questionnaire (Adult PAQ), Intimate…

  3. OF THE CONCEPT OF QUALITY OF PHYSICAL PERFECTION IN THE CONTEXT OF QUALITY OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Khorloohiyn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of definition of the concept of quality of physical perfection in a context of quality of life is described. Necessity of application to the decision of the given problem of system approaches is shown. The structure of developed model of system of quality management of granting of service as complex of the interconnected systems is defined. Questions of maintenance of a complex of means and methods of an estimation of a condition of the client and definition of a technique of formation of the correct typical program of physical preparation of the client are allocated. 

  4. Quality of Services and Quality of Life from Service Providers' Perspectives: Analysis with Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenaro, C.; Vega, V.; Flores, N.; Cruz, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Concepts such as support, quality of life and quality of services are customary in services for people with intellectual disabilities. The identification of the different ways of conceiving, prioritising and implementing these concepts by service providers can help to drive changes to achieve better personal outcomes for this…

  5. Quality of Services and Quality of Life from Service Providers' Perspectives: Analysis with Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenaro, C.; Vega, V.; Flores, N.; Cruz, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Concepts such as support, quality of life and quality of services are customary in services for people with intellectual disabilities. The identification of the different ways of conceiving, prioritising and implementing these concepts by service providers can help to drive changes to achieve better personal outcomes for this…

  6. Quality of life after major trauma with multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Silvana; Lee, Geraldine; Summerhayes, Robyn; Fitzgerald, Mark; Bailey, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Rib fractures are a common injury presenting to major trauma centres and community hospitals. Aside from the acute impact of rib fracture injury, longer-term morbidity of pain, disability and deformity have been described. Despite this, the mainstay of management for the vast majority of rib fracture injuries remains supportive only with analgesia and where required respiratory support. This study aimed to document the long-term quality of life in a cohort of major trauma patients with rib fracture injury over 24 months. Retrospective review (July 2006-July 2011) of 397 major trauma patients admitted to The Alfred Hospital with rib fractures and not treated with operative rib fixation. The main outcome measures were quality of life over 24 months post injury assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended and SF12 health assessment forms and a pain questionnaire. Assessment over 24 months of major trauma patients with multiple rib fractures demonstrated significantly lower quality of life compared with published Australian norms at all time points measured. Return to work rates were poor with only 71% of those who were working prior to their accident, returning to any work. This study demonstrates a significant reduction in quality of life for rib fracture patients requiring admission to hospital, which does not return to the level of Australian norms for at least two years. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. How to Measure Progress Towards Quality and Sustainability of Life?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nováček Pavel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The vagueness of the concept of ‘sustainable development’ ceased to serve as a consensus platform and instead became a source of controversy. Therefore an instrument is needed to measure whether we are striving towards sustainable development or not. Today the most widely used indicator of economic prosperity is gross domestic product (GDP. It is often incorrectly interpreted as an indicator of quality of life. If, however, GDP is considered to be quality-of-life indicator, it is a misleading indicator as GDP does not cover the services people conduct outside the official market. As a result, environmentalists together with economists have long been cooperating in designing an alternative indicator capable of better capturing the development of society. Even though GDP is good for measuring economic performance, it is highly misleading as an indicator of the quality and sustainability of life. This article describes briefly the most relevant alternative indicators to GDP developed during last two decades including Czech and Slovak methodology of the Quality and Sustainability of Life Index.

  8. Quality of life related to swallowing in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Danielle; das Graças Wanderley de Sales Coriolano, Maria; Belo, Luciana Rodrigues; de Marcos Rabelo, Aneide Rocha; Asano, Amdore Guescel; Lins, Otávio Gomes

    2014-10-01

    Swallowing difficulties in Parkinson's disease can result in decreased quality of life. The swallowing quality of life questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) is an instrument for specifically assessing quality of life with respect to swallowing, which has been little explored in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The goal of this study was to evaluate the quality of life with respect to swallowing in persons with PD compared to controls and at several stages of the disease using the SWAL-QOL. The experimental group was composed of 62 persons with PD at stages 1-4. Forty-one age-matched healthy subjects constituted the control group. The SWAL-QOL scores were significantly lower for the patients with PD than for the controls in all SWAL-QOL domains. Eating duration had the largest difference in score between persons with PD and the controls and the lowest mean score, followed by communication, fatigue, fear, sleep, and food selection. The scores of most domains were lower at later stages of the disease. The scores for eating duration, symptom frequency, and sleep were significantly lower at stage 4 than stages 1 and 2. In conclusion, patients with PD have significantly lower scores in all domains of the SWAL-QOL than normal controls. This means swallowing difficulties occurring in patients with PD negatively affect their QOL. Progression of the disease worsens swallowing QOL, more specifically in the domains of eating duration, symptom frequency, and sleep. This occurs mostly at later stages of the disease.

  9. Quality of life in dementia : a study on proxy bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arons, Alexander M M; Krabbe, Paul F M; Schölzel-Dorenbos, Carla J M; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Rikkert, Marcel G M Olde

    2013-01-01

    Background: Measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in dementia is difficult. At some point people with dementia become unable to meaningfully assess their own HRQoL. At such a point in time researchers need to rely on other types of information such as observation or assessments from

  10. Quality of life in dementia: a study on proxy bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arons, A.M.M.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Scholzel-Dorenbos, C.J.M.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in dementia is difficult. At some point people with dementia become unable to meaningfully assess their own HRQoL. At such a point in time researchers need to rely on other types of information such as observation or assessments from

  11. Exercise and Quality of Life in Women with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Dietrich, Frederick; Larson, Rebecca; White, Lesley J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate perceptions of quality of life after a 4-month progressive resistance training program for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). A second purpose was to examine participants' views about factors that facilitated or impeded exercise behavior. Qualitative interviews were conducted with eight females…

  12. Reform Brings Marked Increase in Quality of Life for Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SheWeihong

    2003-01-01

    One of the most tangible benefits brought about by the reform and opening up program-initiated in the end of 1978 by the late Deng Xiaoping-has been the continual rise in the quality of life for the average Chinese people.This is evidenced by rising per capita incomes,poverty

  13. Quality of life in patients with benign nontoxic goiter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramon, Per; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Bjørner, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While health-related quality of life (HRQoL) issues often prompt treatment of benign nontoxic goiter (NTG), few clinical studies have systematically assessed HRQoL in patients with this condition. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate thyroid-related and generic HRQo...

  14. Monitoring health related quality of life in adolescents with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Wit, M; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A; Pouwer, F

    2007-01-01

    Particularly in chronic conditions, monitoring health related quality of life (HRQoL) of adolescents in clinical practice is increasingly advocated. We set out to identify and review the clinical utility of available generic and diabetes specific HRQoL questionnaires suitable for use in adolescents...

  15. Life quality index revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2004-01-01

    The derivation of the life quality index (LQI) is revisited for a revision. This revision takes into account the unpaid but necessary work time needed to stay alive in clean and healthy conditions to be fit for effective wealth producing work and to enjoyable free time. Dimension analysis...... consistency problems with the standard power function expression of the LQI are pointed out. It is emphasized that the combination coefficient in the convex differential combination between the relative differential of the gross domestic product per capita and the relative differential of the expected life...... at birth should not vary between countries. Finally the distributional assumptions are relaxed as compared to the assumptions made in an earlier work by the author. These assumptions concern the calculation of the life expectancy change due to the removal of an accident source. Moreover a simple public...

  16. Factors associated with low quality of life in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Clareci Silva

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in quality of life in mental health care has been stimulated by the deinstitutionalization of psychiatric patients as well as a parallel interest in understanding the scope of their daily lives. This study aims to investigate the socio-demographic and clinical variables related to low quality of life, using a cross-sectional design to evaluate quality of life by means of the QLS-BR scale. We interviewed a sample of 123 outpatients from a reference mental health center in Divinópolis, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, clinically diagnosed with schizophrenia. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out. The results showed that low quality of life is associated with one or more of the following: male gender, single marital status, low income plus low schooling, use of three or more prescribed psychoactive drugs, psychomotor agitation during the interview, and current follow-up care. The study identifies plausible indicators for the attention and care needed to improve psychiatric patient treatment.

  17. Quality of life issues and measurement in patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan X

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Xi Tan1, Steven R Feldman2, Rajesh Balkrishnan11Department of Clinical, Social and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USAAbstract: Psoriasis is a chronic immunologic disease characterized by red papules and plaques with a silver colored scale. The impact of psoriasis on patients’ overall quality of life is significant, broad, and deep, including effects on emotional wellbeing, psychological stress, self-esteem, relationship, work, social activities, financial burden, and even physical function. Although there are various measures available for assessing health-related quality of life (HRQoL in research studies, there is no consensus on which measure is best to use in clinical practice or for research comparing different treatments. Choosing treatments based on patients’ specific individual preferences, goal-orientation, and close, attentive cooperation between patients and their doctors may be an effective strategy that can be applied to improve patients’ quality of life.Keywords: treatment, health related quality of life, HRQoL

  18. Demographic potential as a component of life quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Vladimirovna Polkova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and methodical reasons for allocation of components of life quality with the particular importance of population quality, including demographic (reproduction potential are provided in the article. The integrated indicators of population quality in Ural federal district regions were calculated and analyzed in dynamics, basing on an author’s technique of integrated index estimation of population quality. Advantages of use the integrated index of population quality (IIKN before the human development index (HDI caused by inclusion in it the major demographic indicators in regional estimates are proved. Peculiarities of HDI and IIKN dynamics in Russia regions for the last decade are demonstrated; their value for efficiency evaluation of realizing state programs in the social and demographic sphere is shown.

  19. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN SUICIDE ATTEMPTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Attempted suicide is a common clinical problem in general hospitals. Persons with Psychiatric disorders and poor quality of life are at increased risk for suicide. There are few case-control studies on psychiatric morbidity and quality of life of suicide attempters in India. AIMS: The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity and to study the quality of life in survivors following their first suicide attempt, to age and sex matched comparison subjects. SETTING AND DESIGN: This study is cross sectional, hospital based, case control study. Ethical clearance was given from the Ethical Committee of MGMC, Jaipur. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 100 cases of first suicide attempt (Group-I were compared with an equal number of randomly selected controls (Group-II. Variables related to psychiatric morbidity and quality of life were analyzed. Schedule for clinical assessment in neuropsychiatry (SCAN was used for psychiatric diagnosis as ICD-10 criteria, MADRS was used for assessing level of depression and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A was used for assessing level of anxiety in both the groups. Quality of Life of both groups was assessed by WHOQOL-BREF version. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The two groups were compared by calculating percentages, applying chi-square test and t-test with appropriate statistical measures. RESULTS: 90% of the group-I compared to 25% of the group-II had at least one psychiatric disorder. Mood disorders (52%, neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders (33%, and substance related disorders (28% were the most common disorders. Psychotic disorders were diagnosed in 13% of cases. Alcohol dependence was third most common diagnosis that presented exclusively among males (16%. Mean of the total transformed score of WHO quality of life-bref was lower (56.58 in attempters for all the domains. CONCLUSION: Individuals who made first suicide attempt had high prevalence of psychiatric morbidity, had

  20. Quality of life domains affected in women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Nunes Garcia

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the quality of life of women suffering from breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy in public and private health care systems. METHOD: It is an observational, prospective study with 64 women suffering from breast cancer. Data was collected with two instruments: Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and Breast Cancer Module BR23. By applying Mann Whitney and Friedman's statistical tests, p values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: The significant results in public health care systems were: physical functions, pain symptom, body image, systemic effects and outlook for the future. In private health care systems, the results were sexual, social functions and body image. Women's quality of life was harmed by chemotherapy in both institutions. CONCLUSION: The quality of life of women has been harmed as a result of the chemotherapy treatment in both institutions, but in different domains, indicating the type of nursing care that should be provided according to the characteristics of each group.

  1. Do Non-Economic Quality of Life Factors Drive Immigration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Gail Anne; Rossouw, Stephanie; Lewer, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to the immigration literature by generating two unique non-economic quality of life (QOL) indices and testing their role on recent migration patterns. Applying the generated QOL indices in conjunction with four independent welfare measures to an augmented gravity model of immigration, this paper finds an insignificant…

  2. Food Allergy and Quality of Life : What Have We Learned?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, Jantina L.; Dubois, Anthony E. J.; Flokstra-de Blok, Bertine M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) has become an emerging focus of interest in food allergy. Food allergy is a disease characterized by low mortality and symptoms which only occur during an allergic reaction. However, food-allergic patients continuously need to be alert when eating in order to pr

  3. Measuring Quality of Life: A New and Practical Survey Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, James R.; Greenberg, Jan Steven; Brown, Roger

    1997-01-01

    Presents a new, short, self-administered questionnaire that assesses the quality of life in seven areas. Evidence for the reliability and validity of the questionnaire was based on data gathered from 971 clients; results indicate instrument reliability. The questionnaire features low-cost administration and valid psychometric properties. (RJM)

  4. Quality of Family Life and Mortality in Seventeenth Century Dublin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Inquiry into the quality of family life in seventeenth century Dublin is an attempt to understand conditions in the second largest city in the British Isles; further, the era was one of convulsions in the body politic, social, and religious. The Scottish James I and VI (1556 1625) determined that the Irish province closest to Scotland, Ulster,…

  5. Spiritual Needs and Quality of Life in Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Mare; Murdvee, Mart; Saks, Kai

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on three field studies using the WHOQOL-100 and WHOQOL-BREF instruments that utilized three different samples (N = 1,801) to get a better understanding of how important the person's spiritual needs are for quality of life. The most striking negative difference between the Estonian and World Health Organization samples was in…

  6. Do Non-Economic Quality of Life Factors Drive Immigration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Gail Anne; Rossouw, Stephanie; Lewer, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to the immigration literature by generating two unique non-economic quality of life (QOL) indices and testing their role on recent migration patterns. Applying the generated QOL indices in conjunction with four independent welfare measures to an augmented gravity model of immigration, this paper finds an insignificant…

  7. Quality of Life in the Economic and Urban Economic Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambiri, Dionysia; Biagi, Bianca; Royuela, Vicente

    2007-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is increasingly becoming a concept researched empirically and theoretically in the field of economics. In urban economics in particular, this increasing interest stems mainly from the fact that QoL affects urban competitiveness and urban growth: research shows that when households and businesses decide where to locate, QoL…

  8. Personal informatics in practice: Improving quality of life through data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ian; Medynskiy, Yevgeniy; Froehlich, Jon

    2012-01-01

    of personal informatics applications poses new challenges for human-computer interaction and creates opportunities for applications in various domains related to quality of life, such as fitness, nutrition, wellness, mental health, and sustainability. This workshop will continue the conversations from the CHI...

  9. Impaired quality of life in patients commencing radiotherapy for cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janda, M; Newman, B; Obermair, A; Woelfl, H; Trimmel, M; Schroeckmayr, H; Widder, J; Poetter, R

    2004-01-01

    Background: This study tested a three-item questionnaire to measure global quality of Life (QOL) and pain in patients commencing radiotherapy, based on items from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 instrument. Patients and Methods: In a pretest, the EORTC

  10. Exercise and quality of life in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Mette; Jacobsen, Ulla; Bregnballe, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    It was hypothesised that increased exercise capacity is related to improved quality of life (QoL) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A 12-week individually tailored unsupervised aerobic exercise programme was offered to 42 patients with CF. At the start and at the end of the exercise programm...

  11. Chronic pain and quality of life in schizophrenic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouce Gabriela de Almeida

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence and characteristics of chronic pain in schizophrenic patients and to compare the quality of life in patients with and without chronic pain. METHODS: Crossover design with a probablistic sample of 205 adult schizophrenic outpatients (80% paranoid schizophrenia. Socio-demographic, psychiatric disorder, pain and quality of life (WHOQOL- brief data were collected between June and September 2008. RESULTS: Mean age was 37 years, 65% were men, and the mean time spent in school was 9 years; 87% were single, 65% lived with parents and 25% had a job. Among patients with chronic pain, 70% did not receive treatment for pain. Regarding quality of life, patients with pain had more physical disabilities compared to those without pain (p < .001. There were no differences in other domains. Comparisons between patients with and without pain did not show any differences in how much they felt their mental health problems disabled them. Conclusion: Chronic pain was common in schizophrenic patients (similar to the general population of a similar age and decreased their quality of life. It is necessary to pay more attention to this co-morbidity.

  12. Quality of life in women with premature ovarian failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti-Pinto, Cristina L; de Almeida, Deborah M B; Makuch, Maria Y

    2011-09-01

    A cross-sectional and case-control study with a matching for age was performed to evaluate quality of life in 58 women with a diagnosis of premature ovarian failure (POF) and 58 women with normal ovarian function paired for age (± 2 years) (control group). In both groups were excluded women with chronic diseases and iatrogenic or genetic causes. Quality of life was evaluated using the WHOQOL-BREF. Although there were no statistically significant differences in quality of life in general between the two groups, there were statistically significant differences in mean scores in the physical health [61.3 ± 18.0 and 72.8 ± 16.4 for the POF and control groups, respectively (p < 0.0001)] and psychological domains [64.2 ± 16.7 and 69.3 ± 14.1, respectively (p = 0.0455)]. Having POF represented an approximately 2.5-fold greater risk of scoring poorly in the physical health and psychological domains. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups with respect to the social relationships or environment domains or for overall health. Women with POF have more difficulty with respect to their physical health and psychological aspects, indicating a need to provide adequate psychosocial and clinical support for these women to minimize the repercussion of this diagnosis on their activities and quality of life.

  13. Assessment on Quality of Life of Hypertensive Patients in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓晖; 王硕仁

    2003-01-01

    @@ Previously, in managing hypertension, a chronic disease, physicians always paid their attention to control patients' blood pressure for avoiding the damage of target organs, such as heart, brain and kidney, but neglected the effect on hypertension patients' quality of life (QOL), which includes: (1) the symptoms induced by hypertension itself; (2) the discomfort in patients' daily life and habits brought about by antihypertensive therapy; (3) the adverse-effects of hypotensive drugs, such as headache, dizziness, cough and drowsiness; (4) label effect due to diagnosing hypertension.

  14. Quality of life after surgery for neuromuscular scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Obid

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Surgery in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis is associated with a higher rate of complications. It is still controversially discussed whether the patients truly benefit from deformity correction. The purpose of this study is to investigate if the quality of life has been improved and if the patients and their caregivers are satisfied with the results of surgery. This is a retrospective clinical outcome study of 46 patients with neuromuscular scoliosis which were treated with primary stable posterior pedicle screw instrumentation and correction. To achieve fusion only autologous bone was used. Follow up was minimum 2 years and maximum 5 years with an average of 36 months. The patients and/or their caregivers received a questionnaire based on the PEDI (pediatric disability inventory and the GMFS (gross motor function score. The patients (and their caregivers were also asked if the quality of life has improved after surgery. Only 32 of 46 patients answered the questionnaire. The answers showed a high approval-rate regarding the patients satisfaction with the surgery and the improvement of quality of life. The questionnaire could be answered from 1 (I do not agree to 4 (I completely agree. The average agreement to the following statements was: i the quality of life has improved: 3.35; ii I am satisfied with surgery: 3.95; iii the operation has fulfilled my expectations: 3.76. The average age at surgery was 12.7 years. The mean pre-operative cobb-angle of the main curve was 83.1° with a correction post-operatively to a mean of 36.9° and 42.6° at final follow-up. That is an average correction of 56.9%. Although spinal fusion in neuromuscular scoliosis is associated with a higher rate of complications our results show that the patients and their caregivers are satisfied with the operation and the quality of life has improved after surgery.

  15. Quality of life in old patients with proximal femoral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T A Raskina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study quality of life in Kemerovo old patients with proximal femoral fractures. Patients and methods. Quality of life in osteoporotic fractures was analyzed in 219 patients (173 women and 46 men who had sustained the injury in January 2004 to December 2008. Results. In the patients with hip fractures, the lowest (41.94+31.16 scores values were recorded by the physical functioning scale reflecting the degree to which their health limited the performance of physical exercises (self-service, walking, going upstairs, weight carriage, etc.. The role functioning and life activity scales showed the highest values (50.96+19.04 and 51.44+26.51 scores, respectively. The mean value of the physical component scale was 46.42+28.26 scores. That of the psychological component scale was 49.56+19.55 scores. Conclusion. The patients with proximal femoral fractures were found to have lower scores on all SF-36 dimensions.

  16. [Quality of professional life and musculoskeletal disorders in nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodarte-Cuevas, Lilia; Araujo-Espino, Roxana; Trejo-Ortiz, Perla María; González-Tovar, José

    To characterize the conditions of quality of working life, the presence of muscle- skeletal disorders and the association between these variables in nursing staff of a public hospital in Zacatecas, Mexico. A cross-sectional study with descriptive-correlational scope was designed. A stratified random sampling per shift was used in 107 cases. The Questionnaire Professional Quality of Life (CVP-35) was applied as well as the Nordic Questionnaire Standardized for musculoskeletal pain and work-related risk factors questionnaire. The quality of working life gained an average of 55.62 (SD=13.57), the intrinsic motivation was the best rated component with (M=75.06, SD=18.44), contrary to managerial support that got the lowest scores with (M=43.74, SD=21.71). The presence of risk factors in the development work of musculoskeletal problems obtained a mean of 50.10 (SD=26.69). The main musculoskeletal disorders occurred in the neck region, lumbar spine and knees with 42.1% for each one. The quality of working life decreased in the presence of muscle-skeletal problems in the lumbar region with (-0.188, p≤.050), dorsal (-0.206, p≤.050), neck (-0.175, p≤.050) and knees (-0.220, p≤.010). It is necessary to improve the working conditions of nurses to reduce the presence of musculoskeletal problems and improve their quality of working life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Individualized care, quality of life and satisfaction with nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, Riitta; Välimäki, Maritta; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2005-05-01

    This paper reports a study of the maintenance of individualized care from surgical patients' point of view and examines associations between individualized care, patient satisfaction with nursing care, and health-related quality of life. Rationale. There is preliminary evidence that individualized care is effective from patients' point of view, and is associated with improved patient outcomes, such as patient satisfaction and quality of life. However, individualized care has mainly been studied from the vantage-point of nurses' experiences. In this cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study the data were collected with surgical adult patients (n = 279, response rate 93%) in surgical wards in Finland using self-administered questionnaires including the Individualized Care Scales, Patient-Satisfaction Scale, and Finnish versions of the Nottingham Health Profile and EuroQol 5D. Associations between individualized care, satisfaction with care and health-related quality of life were examined. Cronbach's alpha values and item analysis were used to evaluate the psychometric properties of the instruments, especially the Individualized Care Scales. The more often patients felt they received support for individuality through specific nursing interventions, the higher the individuality of care received. Secondly, the more individualized patients regarded their care, the higher the level of reported patient satisfaction with nursing care. However, the correlation between individualized care and health-related quality of life was fairly low, albeit statistically significant. Individualized care may produce positive outcomes, such as patient satisfaction. Further research is needed to explore individualized care in relation to health-related quality of life.

  18. Perceived pregnancy stress and quality of life amongst Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishehgar, Sara; Dolatian, Mahrokh; Majd, Hamid Alavi; Bakhtiary, Maryam

    2014-04-24

    Stress during pregnancy can result in critical negative outcomes on the mother, the fetus, the newborn, the child and even the adolescent. Quality of life has been recognized as a predictor of stress amongst pregnant women. The first aim of this study was to investigate the role of quality of life in pregnancy stress rates. The second aim was to explore the relationship between maternal stress rate and the four domains of quality of life namely physical health, psychological status, social relationships and environmental conditions. The present study was a quantitative cross-sectional research. It was conducted on 210 pregnant women in all trimesters of pregnancy who attended a hospital located in the west of Tehran for prenatal care between August and October 2012. Two questionnaires of The WHO QOL-BREF and Specific Pregnancy Stress were given to respondents to complete. The collected data was analyzed by SPSS version 22 using one-way ANOVA and Spearman correlation and Lisrel 8.8 using statistical path analyzing to describe the direct dependencies among variables. In the current study, we hypothesized that quality of life may influence the perceived stress during pregnancy. The mean age of the women surveyed was estimated 27±4.8 years. The ultimate result showed that there is a significant relationship between quality of life and pregnancy stress level (Pvalue pregnancy stress (Pvalue < 0.05, r=-0.365, r=-0.181). Further investigations may be considered for extending the results to all pregnant women. Thus, further research across country would be required to validate the results of this study and to generalize the findings to wider population.

  19. Subjective quality of life in war-affected populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matanov, A.; Giacco, D.; Bogic, M.; Ajdukovic, D.; Franciskovic, T.; Galeazzi, G.M.; Kucukalic, A.; Lecic-Tosevski, D.; Morina, N.; Popovski, J.; Schützwohl, M.; Priebe, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Exposure to traumatic war events may lead to a reduction in quality of life for many years. Research suggests that these impairments may be associated with posttraumatic stress symptoms; however, wars also have a profound impact on social conditions. Systematic studies utilising

  20. Subjective quality of life in war-affected populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Matanov; D. Giacco; M. Bogic; D. Ajdukovic; T. Franciskovic; G.M. Galeazzi; A. Kucukalic; D. Lecic-Tosevski; N. Morina; J. Popovski; M. Schützwohl; S. Priebe

    2013-01-01

    Background: Exposure to traumatic war events may lead to a reduction in quality of life for many years. Research suggests that these impairments may be associated with posttraumatic stress symptoms; however, wars also have a profound impact on social conditions. Systematic studies utilising subjecti

  1. Physical functioning and quality of life after cancer rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, E; Hoekstra-Weebers, JEHM; Grol, BMF; Otter, R; Arendzen, JH; Postema, K; van der Schans, CP

    2004-01-01

    In order to overcome cancer-related problems and to improve quality of life, an intensive multi-focus rehabilitation programme for cancer patients was developed. We hypothesised that this six-week intensive rehabilitation programme would result in physiological improvements and improvement in qualit

  2. Children with Autism: Quality of Life and Parental Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ching; Harrington, Rebecca A.; Louie, Brian B.; Newschaffer, Craig J.

    2008-01-01

    Past research has shown that children with autism and their families have compromised quality of life (QOL) in several domains. This study examined QOL and parental concerns in children with autism during early childhood, childhood, and adolescence compared to children with Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder…

  3. Improving quality of life in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dufour, D.N.; Esmann, S.; Jemec, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic recurrent inflammatory skin disease with abscess formation and scarring predominantly in the inverse areas. The disease is often difficult to treat and patients experience a decreased quality of life (QoL) and related psychosocial morbidity. Current knowledge...

  4. Framework for dementia Quality of Life assessment with Assistive Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth; Prasad, Neeli R.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical framework for a Quality of Life (QOL) evaluation tool that is sensitive, flexible, computerized, and specific to assistive technology (AT) for dementia care. Using the appropriate evaluation tool serves to improve methodologies that are used for AT assessment...

  5. Quality of life in unaffected twins discordant for affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Bech, Per; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The disability and hardship associated with affective disorder is shared by the family members of affective patients and might affect the family member's quality of life. METHOD: In a cross-sectional, high-risk, case-control study, monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins with (High......-Risk twins) and without (the control group/Low-Risk twins) a co-twin history of affective disorder were identified through nationwide registers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hypothesis that a genetic liability to affective disorder is associated with a lower perception of quality...... for the effect of subclinical anxiety and depressive symptoms, the differences were significant on the domain environment and total WHOQoL-BREF and marginally significant on the domain physical health and overall quality of life. LIMITATIONS: It is not possible from the cross-sectional analyses to distinguish...

  6. For a better quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractI was born in 1942 in The Netherlands, during World War II, when my country was under German occupation. I have no memories of that war, but I do remember several vestiges of it. As a child I played in the ruins of bombed housing blocks near my home and I had Sunday school in what had be

  7. Leisure, environment, and the quality of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Williams

    2006-01-01

    The environment is omnipresent. It is everything and anything external to us that might have an impact on how we think, feel, and act. It is physical and social, natural and human made. It includes not just our immediate surroundings but also a kind of mental shell of spatially and temporally nested situations and contexts we carry around with us in the form of...

  8. On The Quality of Life and Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylin, Ned L.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the concept of copability and the development of a sense of competence in juxtaposition to the depersonalization and anomie resulting from an increasingly industrialized and institutionalized society. Explores this juxtaposition by relating these concepts to experiencing a close family member's death. (Author)

  9. Civil Engineering: Improving the Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    One Feather, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    American Indian civil engineers describe the educational paths that led them to their engineering careers, applications of civil engineering in reservation communities, necessary job skills, opportunities afforded by internship programs, continuing education, and the importance of early preparation in math and science. Addresses of 12 resource Web…

  10. On The Quality of Life and Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylin, Ned L.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the concept of copability and the development of a sense of competence in juxtaposition to the depersonalization and anomie resulting from an increasingly industrialized and institutionalized society. Explores this juxtaposition by relating these concepts to experiencing a close family member's death. (Author)

  11. Cities, productivity, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaeser, Edward

    2011-07-29

    Technological changes and improved electronic communications seem, paradoxically, to be making cities more, rather than less, important. There is a strong correlation between urbanization and economic development across countries, and within-country evidence suggests that productivity rises in dense agglomerations. But urban economic advantages are often offset by the perennial urban curses of crime, congestion and contagious disease. The past history of the developed world suggests that these problems require more capable governments that use a combination of economic and engineering solutions. Though the scope of urban challenges can make remaining rural seem attractive, agrarian poverty has typically also been quite costly.

  12. Anthophilia and the Quality of Life

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    commingling of the senses of color vision, texture, and smell – otherwise ... less toxic pesticides with respect to the direct burden on humans and wildlife. ... but on the residuals left in the land and in the water systems that support floriculture.

  13. Caffeine, sleep and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorist, M.M.; Snel, J.; Verster, J.C.; Pandi-Perumal, S.R.; Streiner, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    Caffeine is regarded as a mild stimulant acting on the central nervous system that is responsible for a significant portion of the behavioural and physiological effects of coffee and tea. Motives why people take caffeine are reflected in consumption patterns. Early in the morning caffeine might help

  14. Caffeine, sleep and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorist, M.M.; Snel, J.; Verster, J.C.; Pandi-Perumal, S.R.; Streiner, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    Caffeine is regarded as a mild stimulant acting on the central nervous system that is responsible for a significant portion of the behavioural and physiological effects of coffee and tea. Motives why people take caffeine are reflected in consumption patterns. Early in the morning caffeine might help

  15. Family Quality of Life in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuwon, P. M.; Brown, I.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The limited literature that exists about intellectual disabilities (ID) in Nigeria suggests that perceptions of ID may be shaped by social and cultural beliefs, and that socio-economic factors have prevented the development of policy and services. The present study sought to explore these suggestions in more detail by administering the…

  16. Selecting Capabilities for Quality of Life Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeyns, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    The capability approach advocates that interpersonal comparisons be made in the space of functionings and capabilities. However, Amartya Sen has not specified which capabilities should be selected as the relevant ones. This has provoked two types of criticism. The stronger critique is Martha Nussbaum's claim that Sen should endorse one specific…

  17. Fragrance allergy and quality of life - development and validation of a disease-specific quality of life instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisterberg, Maria V; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fragrance allergy is a lifelong condition that may give rise to permanent or recurrent contact dermatitis and may affect quality of life (QoL). The effect on QoL has not yet been investigated, and no disease-specific QoL instrument for fragrance allergy exists. OBJECTIVE: To develop a...

  18. Quality of life in osteosarcoma survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, D B; Goorin, A; Gebhardt, M C; Gupta, L; Stier, N; Harmon, D; Mankin, H

    1994-11-01

    Charts of 89 osteosarcoma survivors from Massachusetts General Hospital and The Children's Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Center, who had received primary treatment more than 1 year previously and had no evidence of disease, were reviewed. Sixty-two patients, mean 12 years from diagnosis, agreed to structured interviews. Rates of psychopathology did not differ significantly from the general population. High distress was noted in 13%. Twenty-three normal progeny had been born postchemotherapy to eight women and the wives of five male patients. One pregnancy was complicated by doxorubicin-induced cardiac toxicity. Only two with previous childhood tumors believed themselves infertile. All felt the effort to save the limb was worthwhile. In most, ongoing pain was mild; phantom pain and neuralgia common. Most survivors were in good mental and physical health with the capacity to bear children.

  19. Does antioxidant therapy influence every aspect of quality of life?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomasz Stefaniak; Ad Vingerhoets; Zbigniew Sledzinski

    2012-01-01

    To present problems that might severely impact the conclusions drawn by the authors of an article on antioxidant treatment in chronic pancreatitis (World J Gastroenterol 2010; 16:4066-4071).We analyzed and discussed this paper by Shah etal,and found that promising as it is,this study has some methodological shortcomings,such as:cross-sectional nature of the study,lack of initial evaluations of quality of life and regular follow-ups to determine the dynamics and real directions of changes in quality of life.We therefore concluded that the results of the study by Shah et al are biased and,although very promising,should not be considered as scientifically relevant.

  20. Impact of cardiac rehabilitation on health related quality of life.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Riaz, A

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs are recognized as integral part of the comprehensive care of patients with cardiovascular disease and are recommended as useful and effective (Class I) by the American Heart Association (AHA). In this study we used serial administration of the short form 36 (SF36) to evaluate patient\\'s response to CR in terms of improvement in Health related Quality of Life. A total of 49 patients were included in the analysis. There was a significant improvement observed after CR in the Physical Capacity Score (42.3 vs 49.9 p = 0.0005). There was no significant improvement in the Mental Capacity Score (54.8 vs 54.9 p = 0.96). We conclude that Cardiac Rehabilitation Program causes a significant improvement in the health related quality of life of patients by improving their physical health and well being but does not improve the mental capacity which is already at a healthy level before CR.

  1. Quality of life in eating disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Laura Vad; Christiansen, Erik; Lichtenstein, Mia Beck

    2014-01-01

    to general population norm data and to investigate potential differences between ED diagnostic groups. A systematic review of the current literature was conducted using a keyword-based search in PubMed and PsychInfo. The search covered anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), eating disorders...

  2. Quality of Life After Prophylactic Oophorectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    hormone replacement therapy, dietary supplements, micronutrients, as well as exercise, yoga, meditation , and other forms of coping strategies. The...in some ways things were better. I no longer had the migraines that I typically got along with my periods, no backaches, no mood swings. I have enjoyed...practice stress management techniques such as deep abdominal breathing, meditation , and/or yoga. 38 DALY, Mary B. APPENDIX [Sidebar:] My Experience

  3. Quality of life after surgery of the alimentary tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco; Scarpa

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, patient-reported outcomes have become important in clinical medicine. Nowadays, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is considered a primary outcome in many clinical trials, and it is often the major criterion for judging treatment success. At the beginning of the 21st century, morbidity and mortality rates after surgery of the alimentary tract have dropped dramatically and they can no longer be considered the only outcome measures to determine the success of a surgical procedure. QOL c...

  4. [Impact on quality of life in caregivers of stroke survivors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Espuela, Fidel; González-Gil, Teresa; Jiménez-Gracia, María Antonia; Bravo-Fernández, Sherezade; Amarilla-Donoso, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the first cause of disability in adults. Often, the care falls on the family and can affect their quality of life. To determine the health-related quality of life and the level of caregiver burden of a patient after a stroke. Descriptive and cross-sectional study. Caregivers, who had cared for a patient for more than six months and without pay, were included. This study had been approved by the Ethics Committee. Variables collected: sociodemographic, EuroQol-5D questionnaire, Zarit scale, mood and sleep problems. Forty-eight caregivers were included, with a mean age of 55.63 (SD: 13.48) and the majority were women (70.8%). The mean time of the care was 28.8 months (SD: 28.68), with 58% stated having a depressed mood, 31% had burden, and 89.6% had sleep problems. The dimensions that presented problems (moderate and severe) in the EQ-5D were pain-discomfort (66.7%) and anxiety-depression (68.8%). The score on the visual analog scale rating of quality of life was associated with a worse mood (75.5 vs. 32, p=0.0028), with the pain (81.94 vs. 38, pcaregivers of stroke patients often falls on women. To be a caregiver affects the quality of life, mainly in the pain-discomfort and anxiety-depression dimensions, regardless of the functional status of the patient. Nurses must identify the psychopathological needs and develop strategies on the prevention of the risk of burnout. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Parental Anxiety and Quality of Life of Epileptic Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YONG LI; CHENG-YE JI; JIONG QIN; ZHI-XIANG ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of parental anxiety associated with epileptic children, and to explore whether and how this specific condition affects children's quality of life (QOL), and what are the significant determinants for parental anxiety. Methods Three hundred and forty parents whose children were affected with known epilepsy were enrolled in the study. Questionnaires for quality of life in childhood epilepsy (QOLCE), and hospital anxiety and depression (HAD) of parents were used to collect demographic data of both children and their parents, as well as clinical manifestations of epilepsy and family status. Results Parental anxiety (of any severity) was observed in 191 subjects at interview, giving a prevalence rate of 56.2%. Of the 191 subjects, 18.5% reported mild anxiety, 24.4% moderate anxiety, and 13.2% severe anxiety. Factors associated with parental anxiety included frequency of seizure in children, average monthly income per person and parents' knowledge about epilepsy (P<0.05). Parental anxiety significantly (P=0.000) correlated with quality of life of children with epilepsy. Conclusion Parents of children with epilepsy are at high risk of having anxiety. Factors associated with parental anxiety originate both from children and from parents. Parental anxiety is significantly related with children's QOL. It is important for experts concerned to recognize such a relationship to improve the QOL of children and their parents.

  6. Qualidade de vida e TDAH Quality of life and ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Mattos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Portadores adultos de transtorno de déficit de atenção/hiperatividade (TDAH apresentam comprometimento funcional em diferentes áreas da vida diária que deve ser investigado durante a avaliação clínica. Apesar disso, até recentemente não existiam instrumentos para avaliar o impacto do TDAH na qualidade de vida de adultos portadores. O Adult ADHD Quality of Life Questionnaire (AAQoL é um instrumento desenhado a partir da sistematização de um conjunto de informações na literatura especializada sobre impacto da doença e desfechos clínicos, bem como opinião de especialistas, de modo a avaliar quantitativamente a qualidade de vida de portadores adultos. O instrumento é subdividido em quatro diferentes subescalas, denominadas produtividade, saúde psicológica, perspectivas de vida e relacionamentos. É discutida a utilidade de um questionário especificamente desenvolvido para avaliar qualidade de vida no TDAH adulto e é apresentado o projeto de validação semântica, validade de constructo e confiabilidade do instrumento em andamento.Adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD present higher rates of functional impairment in several areas of daily life which must be investigated during clinical evaluation. Nevertheless, until recently there were no instruments available to measure the impact of ADHD in adult patient’s quality of life. The Adult ADHD Quality of Life Questionnaire (AAQoL was developed based on literature reports of the burden of ADHD and its outcomes as well as experts’ reports in order to quantify quality of life levels. The instrument consists of four different domains: life productivity, psychological healthy, relationships and life outlook. The present paper will discuss the usefulness of a questionnaire specially developed to measure adult ADHD quality of life and also portray the project of semantic validation; construct validity and reliability of the instrument under progress.

  7. Dissociation, Paranormal Belief, and Quality of Life in Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tungshan Chou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of religiosity in current health-related literature is mostly based on the traditional Christian belief system. It has been argued that such a measurement approach may misrepresent the true degree of religiosity in Taiwanese people. In this study, religiosity was measured in two ways: self-reported religion type and a qualitatively derived index of religious piety based on principles as suggested by Gries, Su, and Schak to be used in the Taiwanese context. Their effects on dissociation, paranormal belief, and quality of life were juxtaposed for comparison. In addition, the beneficial effect of religious piety was examined in the framework of McClenon’s ritual healing theory. A total of 266 healthy older adults across Taiwan were interviewed by four trained assistants over a 4-month period. Factor scores were used to represent the dissociative tendencies (depersonalization/derealization, forgetfulness, amnesia, and psychological absorption and paranormal belief facets (precognition, psi power, other forms of life, traditional religious belief, superstition, and telepathy. The results showed that older people of high religious piety display better quality of life profiles than their counterparts in the low religious piety group. The effects of self-reported religion type were mainly seen with paranormal beliefs compatible with their religious beliefs, whereas the effects of religious piety were more pronounced in relation to quality of life than dissociation and paranormal belief. The beneficial advantage of dissociation hypothesized by ritual healing theory did not receive empirical support in the nonclinical sample of this study.

  8. A theory of social integration as quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Norma C; Hopper, Kim; Tugenberg, Toni; Dickey, Barbara; Fisher, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Quality of life, once a priority in caring for people with severe mental illness, has since been eclipsed by other concerns. This article returns attention to quality of life by offering a theory of social integration (as quality of life) for persons disabled by severe mental illness. Data collection for this qualitative study consisted of 78 individual, unstructured interviews with 56 adults who have been psychiatrically disabled. Field observations and interviews with staff and service users were carried out during eight ethnographic visits to service sites working to promote social integration. Data were analyzed with an inductive strategy based on grounded theory methodology and framed theoretically by the capabilities approach to human development. Goals were to identify personal capacities needed for integration, characterize occasions for capacity development in mental health care, and develop a working theory. Six personal capacities were identified: responsibility, accountability, imagination, empathy, judgment, and advocacy. Occasions were characterized in terms of their defining mechanisms: contradiction, reinterpretation, rehearsal, raising expectations, and confrontation. A working theory was constructed to characterize the process of capacity development for social integration through exposure to increasingly challenging occasions for growth in the context of mental health care. Capacities for social integration can be effectively developed as part of the everyday routines of mental health care. Eventually, the process shifts from development to the exercise of capacities and to participation as full citizens in the social world beyond treatment.

  9. Nonformal Education in Improving Quality of Life of Underprivileged Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al Mamun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the role of Non-formal Primary Education (NFPE in improving the quality of the life of underprivileged children in Bangladesh considering their economic, health, environmental issues and life skills. It uses a mixed method approach of research where three NGOs which run NFPE programs were selected purposefully. Data were derived from six NGO officers, nine teachers, ninety students and eighteen guardians by using two sets of questionnaires for NGO officers and teachers, an interview schedule for guardians and 9 focus group discussions with the students. The findings show that there is no income generating program initiated by the organizations for the learners along with education. So, the scope of their income has reduced. But their daily life behavior and skills have improved. Besides, their awareness on health and environmental issues have increased. The findings lead to some recommendations which will give insights to policy makers and professionals engaged in this field.

  10. Quality end-of-Life cancer care: An overdue imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faguet, Guy B

    2016-12-01

    This review assesses the current status of end-of-life care based on large-scale, multiyear nationwide surveys of treatment modality, setting, and cost of care during terminal patients' last months of life. It shows that end-of-life care goals often remain suboptimal. Contributing factors include prioritized life preservation, uneven commitment to palliative care, few palliative care specialists, and perverse financial incentives that encourage costly interventions. Although not determinant per se, these factors coupled to doubts about what constitutes end-of-life can lead to overextended disease treatment and a late implementation of palliative care. In order to bridge the existing gap between care received and care expected and achieve quality end-of-life and promote death with dignity, we propose both to view the person rather than the disease as the unit of care and a pragmatic definition of end-of-life. Such a strategy should facilitate selecting an optimal time to transition from disease-targeted treatment to palliative care.

  11. Quality of life of women with chronic pelvic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Azevedo da Luz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this cross-sectional study was to compare the quality of life and socioeconomic characteristics of women with and without pelvic pain and investigate clinical and surgical findings about women with chronic pelvic pain. Data were collected in a public hospital in Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analogical scale, whereas quality of life was assessed through the SF-36. Most women classified pain as intensive (52% and lived with pain for 8.8 (±7.7 years. Women belonging to the group of chronic pelvic pain scored less in all dimensions evaluated by the SF-36 (p< 0.05, except for the mental health dimension, when compared to the painless group. Correlation was negative (p=0,017 between pain intensity and the SF-36 bodily pain dimension. Pelvic pain presented significant negative impact on quality of life with losses to the physical and mental health of women.

  12. Evaluation of life quality of patients submitted to orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Catarina Alves e Silva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare changes related to self-esteem and appearance satisfaction between pre and postsurgical phases in patients undergoing orthognathic surgery and to assess the quality of life and psychosocial changes of these patients six months after surgery. METHODS: A longitudinal observational qualitative study was performed. The sample comprised 15 patients with dentofacial deformities who underwent orthognathic surgery. One questionnaire and two forms were answered during pre and postoperative phases. RESULTS: The results showed that 13.3% of patients demonstrated self-esteem improvement, especially in relation to appearance satisfaction. Improvements were also noted in social, occupational and family relationships. With regard to the assessment of quality of life, according to the World Health Organization questionnaire, the lowest improvement averages corresponded to environmental control. CONCLUSION: Orthognathic surgery brings along many emotional changes that should be considered before and after surgery, since the patients' psychological state may be favorable and/or unfavorable during recovery, influencing their quality of life, self-esteem and appearance satisfaction.

  13. Comparison of quality of life of the elderly. Medellin, 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Cardona A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: compare the quality of life of older adults in Medellin with two groups. Methodology: comparative descriptive study of secondary information source, using the 82,601 records in the Quality of Life Survey of 2008, distributed into three groups: youth, adults and seniors. The analysis was univariate and bivariate, the demographic, economic, social and health security, together with statistical tests of association. Results: older adults account for 9.2%, with female advantage, marital status was married, with a marked difference in the condition of widowhood and 39% did not record any education. Economically it was found that 34.7% engaged in the home, 34.1% are retired and 9.5% continues to work with an average income of a minimum wage. The 71.4% is affiliated to the contributive regime, preventive medical consultations take place at higher rates than young and 31.3% do not. Only 7.3% fell ill last month and his sufferings were hypertension, stress and depression. Conclusions: the older adult with no differences against the other two groups, but age makes it more vulnerable in economic and health conditions have limited the access to opportunities, by not acceding to the demands that the means of production and society require, forgetting their experience and wisdom gained in the course of his life.

  14. Health-related quality of life and life satisfaction in colorectal cancer survivors: trajectories of adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jeff; Ng, Shu Kay; Breitbart, William; Aitken, Joanne; Youl, Pip; Baade, Peter D; Chambers, Suzanne K

    2013-03-14

    This longitudinal study describes the five year trajectories of health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) and life satisfaction in long term colorectal cancer survivors. A population-based sample of 1966 colorectal cancer survivors were surveyed at six time points from five months to five years post-diagnosis. Predictor variables were: socio-demographic variables, optimism; cancer threat appraisal; perceived social support. Quality of life was assessed with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Colorectal (HR-QOL); and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Growth mixture models were applied to identify trajectory classes and their predictors. Distinct adjustment trajectories were identified for HR-QOL and life satisfaction. Lower optimism, poorer social support, a more negative cognitive appraisal, and younger age were associated with poorer life satisfaction, while survivors with less than 8 years of education had higher life satisfaction. This pattern was similar for overall HR-QOL except that educational level was not a significant predictor and later stage disease and female gender emerged as related to poorer outcomes. One in five survivors reported poorer constant HR-QOL (19.2%) and a small group had poor life satisfaction (7.2%); 26.2% reported constant high HR-QOL and 48.8% had high constant life satisfaction. Socioeconomic disadvantage and remoteness of residence uniquely predicted poorer outcomes in the colorectal cancer specific HR-QOL sub domain. Although HR-QOL and subjective cognitive QOL share similar antecedents their trajectory patterns suggested they are distinct adjustment outcomes; with life satisfaction emerging as temporally stable phenomenon. Unique patterns of risk support suggest the need to account for heterogeneity in adjustment in longitudinal QOL studies with cancer survivors.

  15. Happy life-expectancy. A comprehensive measure of quality-of-life in nations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractABSTRACT
    One of the aims of social indicator research is to develop a comprehensive measure of quality-of-life in nations that is analogous to GNP in economic indicator research. For that purpose, several multi dimensional indexes have been proposed. In addition to economic

  16. Health-related quality of life and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Padilla, Geraldine V; Ashing-Giwa, Kimlin

    2010-02-01

    To clarify the relationship between quality of life (QOL) and culture. Journal articles, proceedings, and clinical experience. QOL is a subjective, multidimensional experience of well-being that is culturally constructed as individuals seek safety and security, a sense of integrity and meaning in life, and a sense of belonging in one's social network. In a society where health disparities between diverse groups are known to exist, it is incumbent upon nurses to consider the impact of ethnicity/culture on the health care they deliver and on the QOL of their patients. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Self-rated quality of life in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciacci, C; D'Agate, C; De Rosa, A; Franzese, C; Errichiello, S; Gasperi, V; Pardi, A; Quagliata, D; Visentini, S; Greco, L

    2003-11-01

    As much as 1% of the gluten-consuming world is gluten-intolerant. New screening methods are increasingly identifying gluten intolerance in individuals previously free from health problems. The often-abrupt major change in diet may adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Our aim was to evaluate self-perceived quality of life in a large cohort of adult celiac patients after at least one year of a gluten-free diet. In all 581 members (410 females) of five regional celiac societies were on a gluten-free regimen for at least one year. In this cross-sectional study, a modified version of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale was administered to the 581 patients from five Italian regions. Most patients correctly defined celiac disease, and compliance with the gluten-free diet was high, although reporting bias cannot be excluded. Most felt well (83.6% "very well" and "well"); consequently, anxiety and depression scores were low. Happiness also scored low. Most participants did not feel that a gluten-free life differentiated them from the general population. Women and patients diagnosed after 20 years of age had better dietary compliance, but more problems in their social life. Happiness scores were higher in patients diagnosed before 20 years of age. Anxiety and depression were infrequent in this group; however, anxiety was frequently related to feeling different from the general population, and depression to an unsatisfactory sexual life. In conclusion, celiac disease does not appear to be associated to a low level of self-perceived quality of life in members of the Italian Celiac Society.

  18. Links between education, employment and quality of life. The case of Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Mirela Ionela ACELEANU

    2012-01-01

    The field of quality of life is highly discussed in the literature, both in terms of the components of the quality of life and the development of indicators on quality of life in different countries. The quality of life is influenced by many factors, both individually and regionally and globally. The paper aims to present different ways of analyzing the quality of life and to highlight the link between education, employment and quality of life, in Romania and in general. Studies have shown th...

  19. Housing Space Quality towards Quality Of Life: A Case Study of Double Storey Terrace Houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakar Aniza Abu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of every housing area is determined by its user satisfaction level, living there. The quality of the house, its spaces within the unit, housing neighbourhood and green open space can directly influence the quality of life. Limitation of space following high land cost in an urban area, evaluation of the housing environment as a whole including the green open space needs to be studied as it affects the residents’ satisfaction level. This study concentrates on spaces within a housing area to evaluate the residents’ level of satisfaction of the Taman Melati Mastika (TMM, Kuala Lumpur and to understand how they perceived their quality of life through the housing environment and the availability of green open space. Thus, this research was carried out through site observation and analysis, and self-administered questionnaire survey. 247 questionnaire surveys were distributed to the residents of TMM and (n=62 responded. When focused on the housing unit, this study provides insight on the types of outdoor spaces (front yard-front lane and backyard-back lane and their elements and utilization, and quality of housing spaces toward users’ quality of life in TMM, Kuala Lumpur. On the green open space, the assessment of the quality of life is based on three factors that are the safety level of the neighbourhood and park, health issues related to housing environment and park as well as the satisfaction on the housing amenities and park facilities. The result of this study suggests that the residents are satisfied with the existing spaces within their compound and adjacent to it and this lead towards the overall satisfaction living in the area. The quality of space and good utilisation of housing areas can lead towards a better quality of life in the Terrace housing area is confirmed.

  20. Arts and the Perceived Quality of Life in British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalos, Alex C.; Kahlke, P. Maurine

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were (1) to measure the impact of arts-related activities on the perceived quality of life of a representative sample of British Columbians aged 18 years or more in the spring of 2007, and (2) to compare the findings of this study with those of a sample of 1,027 adults drawn from five B.C. communities (Comox Valley,…

  1. Physical function, pain, quality of life and life satisfaction of amputees from the 2008 Sichuan earthquake: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Reinhardt, Jan D; Zhang, Xia; Pennycott, Andrew; Zhao, Zhengen; Zeng, Xianmen; Li, Jianan

    2015-05-01

    To examine the development and determinants of long-term outcomes for earthquake victims with amputations, including physical function, pain, quality of life and life satisfaction. Prospective cohort study with 2-3 measurement points. A total of 72 people who underwent amputations following the 2008 Sichuan Earthquake and resided in Mianzhu County, Sichuan Province, China were enrolled in the study. Of these, 27 people were lost to follow-up. Data on pain (visual analogue scale) and physical function (Barthel Index) were collected at 3 measurement points (2009, 2010 and 2012), and data on quality of life (Medical Outcomes Short-Form 36) and life satisfaction (Life Satisfaction Questionnaire-11) were collected at 2 measurement points (2010 and 2012). Data were analysed with mixed effects regression. Pain severity declined significantly and physical function increased by 2012. Quality of life and life satisfaction remained relatively stable between 2010 and 2012, while quality of life was significantly lower than reference values from the general population. Illiteracy and lower extremity amputations were associated with lower quality of life and life satisfaction in several domains. While amputees' functioning and pain were improved over time, quality of life and life satisfaction did not change. Illiterate earthquake survivors and those with lower extremity amputations are at particular risk of low quality of life and life satisfaction, and may require additional attention in future earthquake rehabilitation programs.

  2. Predicting professional quality of life among professional and volunteer caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avieli, Hila; Ben-David, Sarah; Levy, Inna

    2016-01-01

    This study is one of the few that has compared volunteers' professional quality of life (PQL), which includes secondary traumatic stress (STS), burnout, and compassion satisfaction (CS), to those of professional caregivers. In addition, the research compared the ethical behavior of volunteers with that of professional therapists and examined the connection between years of experience, ethical behavior, and PQL. One hundred eighty-three volunteers and professional caregivers filled out a sociodemographic questionnaire, an Ethical Behavior Questionnaire and the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) questionnaire. The results indicated that professional caregivers report lower levels of STS and burnout, and higher levels of CS and ethical behavior compared with volunteer caregivers. Moreover, the findings suggest that ethical behavior correlates with STS, burnout, and CS. Ethical behavior has a protective value for mental health caregivers. The discussion emphasizes the value of a professional code of ethics and ethical training for professional and volunteering caregivers.

  3. Valid instrument for measuring quality of life in youth: VIHDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Joaquín Martínez Lozano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the validity and reliability of VIDHAB instrument, its objective is to evaluate the quality of urban life of the youth of the municipality of Cucuta, Colombia. Follows a descriptive study design validation through multidimensional scaling factor analysis, construct validity, and face. The study population were people aged 18-28 in Cucuta, the sample comprised 1180 habitants. Results: a scale of 57 items was obtained. Factor analysis showed dimensions of life satisfaction, quality of public space, poverty rate, perception of public space; Internal consistency was adequate (Cronbach's alpha 0.81 to 0.89, overall intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.967 (95%, from 0.933 to 0.984, average sum of differences in items -1.3 (SD: 8.5 and Kappa indices above 0.86 shows high agreement among experts. Conclusion: VIDHAB is a valid and reliable for the context Cucuta, Colombia instrument.

  4. Factors influencing quality of life in patients with active tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cox Victoria C; Marra Fawziah; Marra Carlo A; Palepu Anita; FitzGerald J Mark

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background With effective treatment strategies, the focus of tuberculosis (TB) management has shifted from the prevention of mortality to the avoidance of morbidity. As such, there should be an increased focus on quality of life (QoL) experienced by individuals being treated for TB. The objective of our study was to identify areas of QoL that are affected by active TB using focus groups and individual interviews. Methods English, Cantonese, and Punjabi-speaking subjects with active T...

  5. Animal-assisted interventions and quality of life: expectations among

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier López-Cepero

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study assessed expectations among university students (N= 474, X= 22.7, SD=5.6 years towards the possible benefits of animal-assisted interventions on quality of life. Attitudes were measured with the Improving Quality of Life scale, which is an instrument created ad hoc that demonstrated adequate psychometric properties (four easily interpretable factors, with 49% of explained variance and alphas ranging from .76 to .89. The results showed that the participants (from the departments of Social, Health or Educational Sciences had very positive attitudes (high effect sizes, ES>.80 regardless of training. The experience of sharing households with pets was associated with better expectations. These findings emphasize the high expectations that future professionals in different fields hold regarding animal-assisted interventions, and highlight the current shortcomings in training curricula. The implications of these findings for the development of animal-assisted interventions are discussed.

  6. Sexuality and quality of life in congenital hypogonadisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Oyarzún, María Fernanda; Castelo-Branco, Camil

    2016-12-01

    Turner syndrome and idiopathic congenital hypogonadism including Kallmann syndrome are conditions associated to a large number of widely known comorbidities that need a medical support forever. One of the characteristics shared by both conditions is the lack of sexual development that influencing the sexuality functioning and quality of life of the affected women. Few studies have been conducted to assess these topics, but they need to be considered in the treatment to all women with hypogonadism. This review on the major medical issues and psychological aspects, also focus in the present knowledge about sexual function and quality of life of women with Turner syndrome and idiopathic congenital hypogonadism, which aims to help in the comprehensive management of these patients.

  7. Elderly and ICT – communication skills and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Neves

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Determine whether the Internet use and, more specifically, its communication tools, can contribute to a senior e-inclusion and the life quality improvement as well as expose a process of digital literacy for elderly. Method: It was taught a computer course to a 14 elderly group. The means used in this investigation were 2 surveys (initial and final, as well a direct and participant observation. The data were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Results: The investigation revealed that the use of computers and the Internet reduces loneliness, increases access to information, as well as the frequency of communication between family members and friends. Consequently, the quality of life of older people increases. Conclusions: The use of ICT gives the elderly more autonomy, greater well-being and social integration and, therefore, higher rate of happiness.

  8. Urticaria: impact on quality of life and economic cost.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brigid F

    2014-02-01

    Patients with urticaria suffer itch, swellings, fatigue caused by sleep disturbance and the side effects of medication, and disruption of many facets of their lives. Much progress has been made in formally evaluating the degree of quality-of-life (QoL) impairment suffered by patients with urticaria. This review focuses on QoL in chronic urticaria (>6 weeks duration) and examines QoL measures, including the chronic urticaria-quality of life questionnaire (CU-Q2oL). Patients with urticaria have difficulty identifying and coping with their emotions. The psychiatric comorbidity and the financial burden on the patient and society because of chronic urticaria, is also examined.

  9. IMPACT OF RESILIENCE, ICT SUPPORT AND QUALITY OF STUDENT'S LIFE ON QUALITY OF HIGH EDUCATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Lazic

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Answers to the questions of how and in what way the quality of life of students, resilience and ICT support affects the quality of high education we will get through this work where main objective is to define a network of processes and process management ensuring more quality and more innovative managing and service provision, therefore satisfying the needs of service users - in this case the students of the university. To collect the relevant data in the thematic analysis of this paper, the method of interviewing by questionnaires was applied. The sample survey was conducted among undergraduate students, teachers and staff of the Teacher Training Faculty in Uzice.

  10. Effects of Sleep Quality on Quality of Life in Patients with Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şule Şahin Onat

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate sleep quality in osteoporotic individuals, and to determine the associated factors with sleep quality and to investigate the relationship between quality of life and sleep quality Material and Methods: 154 patients with osteoporosis admitted to our outpatient clinic included in the study. A questionnaire that was including patients age, sex, marital status, education level, occupation, height, weight, alcohol use, smoking, physical activity level, milk consumption and previous fragility fracture was completed. DXA was used to determine bone mineral density of the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Thoracal and lumbar compression fractures were evaulated with thoracal and lumbar radiography.Visual analog scale was used to evaluate back pain. Pittsburgh sleep quality index was used to determine sleep quality and QUALEFFO was used to evaluate quality of life in the individuals. Results: A total of 154 individuals included in the study. 65 patients (42.2% had a sleep disorder and 89 patients (57.8% hadn’t a sleep disorder. Mean age, female gender, not being married, not working actively, illiteracy rates were higher; the mean of weekly consumption of milk were lower in patients with sleep disorders than without sleep disorders. Vertebral compression fracture was more in patients with sleep disorders than without sleep disorders. Both lumbar and femoral T and Z values, VAS values were significantly higher in patients with sleep disorders than without sleep disorders (p<0.05. The value of all sub-parameters of quality of life scale QUALEFFO and total value were significantly higher in patients with sleep disorders than without sleep disorders (p<0.05. Conclusion: Sleep disorders in patients with osteoporosis are releated to factors such as age, sex, marital status, education level and diet. Sleep disorders cause a further decrease in the quality of life of patients with osteoporosis. (Turkish Journal of

  11. Quality of life in childhood, adolescence and adult food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard, A; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Nielsen, D

    2017-01-01

    -reported and parent-reported HRQL in different age groups, (ii) to evaluate the impact of severity of allergic reaction and threshold on HRQL, and (iii) to investigate factors associated with patient-reported and parent-reported HRQL. METHODS: Age-appropriate Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaires (FAQLQ) were......BACKGROUND: Studies of children with food allergy typically only include the mother and have not investigated the relationship between the amount of allergen needed to elicit a clinical reaction (threshold) and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Our aims were (i) to compare self...... completed by 73 children, 49 adolescents and 29 adults with peanut, hazelnut or egg allergy. Parents (197 mothers, 120 fathers) assessed their child's HRQL using the FAQLQ-Parent form. Clinical data and threshold values were obtained from a hospital database. Significant factors for HRQL were investigated...

  12. Navigating Survival: Quality of Life Following Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Identification of factors which detract from survivors quality of life can enable nurses to modify or prevent morbidity to improve the outcomes for... prevent infections have focused on using various forms of protective isolation, and prophylactic antibiotic therapy. These advances have increased the...successfully treated with BMT include disorders of the bone marrow stem cells. Patient’s with aplastic anemia, Falconi’s anemia, thalassemia , and sickle

  13. Finding Quality of Life Despite MS: Harnessing Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Sa

    2011-09-01

    The ability to cope emotionally and experience quality of life (QoL) do not appear to be correlated with severity of disease or disability amongst people with multiple sclerosis (MS). An exploration of the health-related literature (trauma, chronic illness, disability, loss) from a resiliency perspective identifies a constellation of variables: personality and environmental characteristics, resiliency processes and drives for growth and healing which can guide the health-care practitioner wishing to enable QoL despite MS.

  14. Sensitivity to environmental irritants and quality of life in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ternesten-Hasséus E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ewa Ternesten-Hasséus, Sven Larsson, Eva MillqvistDepartment of Internal Medicine/Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: It is a common clinical experience that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD complain of airway symptoms provoked by environmental irritants like chemicals and scents, although few studies can confirm such connections. The aim was to study the prevalence of airway symptoms induced by chemicals and scents in a group of patients with newly diagnosed CPOD and to analyze any relation to illness severity and quality of life. Eighty-one patients with COPD were recruited to the study. By mail they were asked to answer three questionnaires regarding symptoms, quality of life, and social and emotional influence of airway symptoms induced by environmental irritants. A majority (62% of the COPD patients claimed to be hyperreactive to chemicals and scents. As a group they scored higher on a questionnaire measuring social and emotional influences of such environmental irritants compared to healthy control subjects. Further, high scores were more common among patients with a very severe form of COPD and among patients with regular use of β2-stimulants. High scores were also associated with significantly more airway symptoms and, in some aspects, with impaired quality of life. In conclusion, the results of this study show that airway symptoms induced by environmental irritants are common in patients with COPD and that this increased airway sensitivity follows the impairment of lung capacity. The mechanisms behind this remain unclear.Keywords: COPD, hyperresponsiveness, environmental irritants, sensory hyperreactivity, quality of life

  15. The leisure as a tool for work quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandra Fernandes do Nascimento

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a theoretical-empiric study that has as intention the analysis of the use of leisure technology capable of contributing for the improvement of the programs of quality of life at work, having as focus the leisure activities of teachers at CEFET/CE, and how the teachers evaluate them. The 63 teachers of the mentioned institution took part in this research. It is intended to point out some possible ways of analysis to think about contemporaries impasses about the scope of the leisure enterprise, it has the intention to provoke new reflections concerning the thematic. It is understood that leisure in the organizations is capable of contributing meaningfully in the quality of the individual's life at the work, besides benefiting the own organization. This approach given to leisure, as relevant aspect in the quality of life at work, passes through the administrative question of the organization, and how it makes use of it in its planning in moving its effective action of Corporate Social Responsibility.

  16. Hereditary angioedema: quality of life in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Abadia Consuelo M. S. Gomide

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hereditary angioedema is a serious medical condition caused by a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and it is associated with deficient production or dysfunction of the C1 esterase inhibitor. In most cases, affected patients experience unexpected and recurrent crises of subcutaneous, gastrointestinal and laryngeal edema. The unpredictability, intensity and other factors associated with the disease impact the quality of life of hereditary angioedema patients. We evaluated the quality of life in Brazilian hereditary angioedema patients. METHODS: Patients older than 15 years with any severity of hereditary angioedema and laboratory confirmation of C1 inhibitor deficiency were included. Two questionnaires were used: a clinical questionnaire and the SF-36 (a generic questionnaire. This protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo. RESULTS: The SF-36 showed that 90.4% (mean of all the patients had a score below 70 and 9.6% had scores equal to or higher than 70. The scores of the eight dimensions ranged from 51.03 to 75.95; vitality and social aspects were more affected than other arenas. The internal consistency of the evaluation was demonstrated by a Cronbach's alpha value above 0.7 in seven of the eight domains. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, Brazilian patients demonstrated an impaired quality of life, as measured by the SF-36. The most affected domains were those related to vitality and social characteristics. The generic SF-36 questionnaire was relevant to the evaluation of quality of life; however, there is a need for more specific instruments for better evaluation.

  17. Pheromones, sexual attractiveness and quality of life in menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, W B; Genovese, E

    2002-06-01

    Pheromones, and their effects, are reviewed with a special emphasis on their potential contribution to sexual attractiveness in the menopause. Key topics included are biological functions of pheromones in animals and humans, the source of pheromones in humans, the axillary extract studies that led to the independent synthesis of pheromones, olfactory mechanisms for mediating pheromones, and aging, attractiveness and sexual dysfunction. Physical attractiveness is important for a better quality of life. Three separate, double-blind, placebo-controlled investigations, using the same protocol, all demonstrated that a synthesized pheromone, topically applied, increased sexual attractiveness. If partners are available, sexual attractiveness can increase affectionate intimate behavior, which, in turn, increases well-being and quality of life. More research is needed to address ways in which postmenopausal women can benefit from pheromones.

  18. Assessing Quality of Working Life Among Malaysian Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Nur Suffia; Choo, Wan Yuen; Mat Yassim, Abdul Rahim; Van Laar, Darren; Chinna, Karuthan; Majid, Hazreen Abdul

    2015-11-01

    The Work-Related Quality of Life Scale-2 (WRQLS-2) has been used to measure quality of working life (QOWL) in the United Kingdom. In this study, the scale was translated and normalized into Malay. The scale was translated using the back-translation method, pretesting, and pilot testing. It was conducted among health care and office workers. It was tested in 3 stages; confirmatory factor analysis at stages 1 and 3 and exploratory factor analysis at stage 2. The Malaysian WRQLS-2 had 5 factors: "General Well-Being," "Job and Career Satisfaction," "Employee Engagement," "Home-Work Interface," and "Stress at Work." The scale showed good convergent and construct validity and also reliability. Perception of good QOWL may differ because of cultural influences and varying work environments. The validated Malaysian WRQLS-2 can be used to determine the QOWL of Malaysian office and health care workers.

  19. Improving Quality of Life and Depression After Stroke Through Telerehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Susan M.; Rosenfeldt, Anson B.; Bay, R. Curtis; Sahu, Komal; Wolf, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of home-based robot-assisted rehabilitation coupled with a home exercise program compared with a home exercise program alone on depression and quality of life in people after stroke. METHOD. A multisite randomized controlled clinical trial was completed with 99 people stroke who had limited access to formal therapy. Participants were randomized into one of two groups, (1) a home exercise program or (2) a robot-assisted therapy + home exercise program, and participated in an 8-wk home intervention. RESULTS. We observed statistically significant changes in all but one domain on the Stroke Impact Scale and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale for both groups. CONCLUSION. A robot-assisted intervention coupled with a home exercise program and a home exercise program alone administered using a telerehabilitation model may be valuable approaches to improving quality of life and depression in people after stroke. PMID:26122686

  20. A Predictor of Quality of Life of the Mainstreamed Elementary Students: Cognitive Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaci, Hatice; Kalkan, Melek; Karasu, Pinar

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the cognitive errors as predictor of quality of life of mainstreamed elementary students. Quality of life is the degree of well-being felt by an individual. The functional deficiencies, which occur due to physical, cognitive, sensory, emotional disorders, affect the quality of life of the individuals. In this…

  1. Determinants of quality of life in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Sováriová Soósová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the impact of selected demographic (age, sex, socio-economic (marital status, education, income and health factors (functional status, anxiety, depression on quality of life (QOL of seniors in the Košice region. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: QOL was assessed by the WHOQOL-BREF and WHOQOL-OLD questionnaires, functional status was assessed by the Barthel test Activities of Daily Living (ADLs, anxiety by the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and depression by the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale. Relations between variables were assessed by Pearson correlation coefficients. Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate QOL predictors. Results: In a sample of a hundred and two elderly people, the best QOL was found in the domain of social relationships, death and dying, and intimacy. The worst QOL was found in physical health, social participation, and past, present and future activities. QOL was reduced particularly by depression, poly-morbidity, and life without a partner. The maintenance of independence in ADLs had a positive impact on most QOL domains. Conclusion: The results indicate the necessity of creating opportunities for the development and maintenance of social contacts, the involvement of seniors in various leisure activities and in different programs or voluntary activities. The screening for and treatment of depression and anxiety is very important in improving quality of life in older adults, as is maintaining and improving self-care in ADLs.

  2. Quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Елена Александровна Асеева; V. N. Amirdzhanova; ЛИСИЦЫНА Т.А.; M V Zavalskaya

    2013-01-01

    The recent rise in survival rates and therefore in the degree of organ damages due to both disease itself and performed therapy increasingly gives a reason to think about health-related quality of life (QL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Numerous studies initiated in the 1980s to asses QL in patients with SLE have revealed considerable impairments in physical, emotional functioning in this category of patients. SLE leads to social dysadaptation, chronic stress, anxiety, ...

  3. Physical Exercise and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco VALENTI, Giampiero PORZIO, Federica AIELLI, Lucilla VERNA, Katia CANNITA, Renato MANNO, Francesco MASEDU, Paolo MARCHETTI, Corrado FICORELLA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An important goal for cancer patients is to improve the quality of life (QOL by maximising functions affected by the disease and its therapy. Preliminary research suggests that exercise may be an effective intervention for enhancing QOL in cancer survivors. Research has provided preliminary evidence for the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of exercise training in breast cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to assess the association between physical exercise and quality of life in a population of female breast cancer survivors, followed up from diagnosis to the off-treatment time period, and investigated about their exercise habits in pre-diagnosis. A total of 212 female breast cancer survivors consecutively registered from January 2003 to December 2006 at a Supportive Care Unit in an Italian Oncology Department were enrolled. Exercise behaviour was assessed by the Leisure Score Index (LSI of the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire. Patients were asked to report their average weekly exercise for three cancer-related time periods, i.e. pre-diagnosis, during active treatment and off-treatment. Quality of life was assessed by the Italian version of the WHOQOL-BREF standardised instrument. Statistical analysis indicated significant differences across the cancer-relevant time-periods for all exercise behaviour outcomes: the exercise behaviour was significantly lower during both on- and off- treatment than during prediagnosis; exercise during active treatment was significantly lower than during off-treatment. QOL strongly decreases during active treatment. Significant correlations were found between total exercise on- and off-treatment and all QOL indicators. Strenuous exercise is strongly correlated with QOL. Absent/mild exercise seems to be inversely correlated with a positive perception of disease severity and with quality of life on all axes. Need clearly results for inclusion of physical activity programs in comprehensive

  4. QUALITY OF LIFE PARAMETERS IMPROVEMENT FOLLOWING TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Grierosu, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Large joint replacement regarding lower limbs include hip and knee arthroplasty surgical procedures, meant toimprove Quality Of Life (QOL) parameters, an optimal representation for patient recovery toward an independent lifestyle. The present study is a consequence of an imperative requirement from the nursing staff, which, in closecooperation with the surgeon, the physical therapist and the psychologist intend a better understanding regardingpatient perception of the so-called post-discharge...

  5. Quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Елена Александровна Асеева; V N Amirdzhanova; Т А Лисицына; M V Zavalskaya

    2013-01-01

    The recent rise in survival rates and therefore in the degree of organ damages due to both disease itself and performed therapy increasingly gives a reason to think about health-related quality of life (QL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Numerous studies initiated in the 1980s to asses QL in patients with SLE have revealed considerable impairments in physical, emotional functioning in this category of patients. SLE leads to social dysadaptation, chronic stress, anxiety, ...

  6. Quality of life and symptoms in male breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Kathryn J; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Giordano, Sharon H; Goldfarb, Shari; Kereakoglow, Sandra; Winer, Eric P; Partridge, Ann H

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about quality of life and symptoms of male breast cancer survivors. We recruited men with stage 0-4 breast cancer for an on-line survey through www.outoftheshadowofpink.com, www.malebreastcancer.org, and www.malebreastcancer.ca. Surveys included expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC) hormonal/sexual scales, hospitalized anxiety and depression scale (HADS), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B), sociodemographic/disease-related, genetic, and fertility-related items. Forty-two responded. Mean EPIC Sexual and Hormonal scores were 44.5 and 81.3, respectively, suggesting symptom burden. Mean FACT-B score was 111.1, consistent with impaired overall quality of life. Male survivors experience substantial sexual and hormonal symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Health Related Quality Of Life In Patents With Spinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamath Prakash

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal disorders are the major cause of disability and poor Quality Of Life (QoL. This study attempted to measure Health Related Quality Of Life (HRQoL Spinal disorders using a brief, generic scale. Consecutive subjects with spinal disorders (n=102 were interviewed using two scales Karnofsky Performance Status, Euro QoL EQ-5D and two statements from WHOQoL-Bref. The study found that the overall HRQoL in spinal disorders is not so good in most of the patients. Pain and impaired mobility maximally contributed to the poor HRQoL. Socio demographic factors like age, education, habitat had significant relationship with HRQoL scores. Average time taken for HRQoL measurement was less than 5 minutes. In conclusion HRQoL in spinal disorders is generally not so good and brief generic scales to measure HRQOL can prove to be useful for routine use.

  8. Quality of Life Among Food Allergic Patients and Their Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Christopher M; Otto, Alana K; Walkner, Madeline M; Gupta, Ruchi S

    2016-05-01

    Food allergy is increasing in prevalence worldwide. This review summarizes progress made studying relationships between food allergy and quality of life (QOL), with an emphasis on recent work in the field. Early work examining QOL among food allergy patients established that stress and anxiety associated with continuous allergen avoidance and the looming threat of anaphylaxis were associated with significantly impaired food allergy quality of life (FAQOL) for children with food allergy and their caregivers. Recent clinical studies suggest that undergoing oral food challenge to confirm food allergy and oral immunotherapy to treat food allergy may each improve FAQOL among both patients and their caregivers. Other intervention modalities, such as nurse-facilitated counseling and educational workshops, also hold promise, but additional work is needed. Future work must strive to recruit more representative, population-based samples, including adult patients, in order to improve the generalizability and clinical relevance of findings.

  9. Social representations of older adults regarding quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Marielle Cristina Gonçalves; Tura, Luiz Fernando Rangel; Silva, Rafael Celestino da; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção

    2017-01-01

    to identify the social representations of older adults regarding quality of life, and to analyze the care practices adopted to promote it. qualitative, exploratory, descriptive research, applying the Theory of Social Representations. Thirty older people from a Health Academy of Rio de Janeiro participated in the study. The software Alceste was used, and lexical analysis of data was performed. social representations of quality of life are based on the social determinants of health; they evidence knowledge and practices of care by valuing physical activities. The practices promoting quality of life comprise healthy eating habits, daily physical exercise, social participation, interaction and socialization, accomplishment of leisure activities and daily tasks with independence and autonomy, and support and family contact. the elderly have a global understanding of the concept of quality of life, coordinate knowledge built in daily life and knowledge coming from the technical-professional field, which evidences the multidimensionality of the concept. identificar as representações sociais de idosos sobre qualidade de vida e analisar as práticas de cuidado por eles adotadas para promovê-la. pesquisa qualitativa, exploratória, descritiva, com aplicação da Teoria das Representações Sociais. Participaram 30 idosos de uma Academia Carioca de Saúde. Utilizou-se o software Alceste e realizou-se análise lexical dos dados. As representações sociais de qualidade de vida sustentam-se nos determinantes sociais de saúde, evidenciam saberes e práticas de cuidado, com valorização de atividades físicas. As práticas promotoras de qualidade de vida congregam hábitos alimentares saudáveis, exercícios físicos diários, participação social, convívio e interação, realização de atividades de lazer e tarefas cotidianas com independência e autonomia, apoio e contato familiar. Os idosos têm uma compreensão global do conceito de qualidade de vida, articulam

  10. Health related quality of life in Malaysian children with thalassaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Georgina L

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL studies on children with chronic illness such as thalassaemia are limited. We conducted the first study to investigate if children with thalassaemia have a lower quality of life in the four dimensions as measured using the PedsQL 4.0 generic Scale Score: physical, emotional, social and role (school functioning compared to the healthy controls allowing for age, gender, ethnicity and household income. Methods The PedsQL 4.0 was administered to children receiving blood transfusions and treatments at Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia using PedsQL 4.0 generic Scale Score. Accordingly, the questionnaire was also administered to a control group of healthy school children. Socio-demographic data were also collected from patients and controls using an interview schedule designed for the study. Results Of the 96 thalassaemia patients approached, 78 gave consent to be interviewed giving a response rate of 81.3%. Out of 235 healthy controls approached, all agreed to participate giving a response rate of 100%. The mean age for the patients and schoolchildren is 11.9 and 13.2 years respectively. The age range for the patients and the schoolchildren is between 5 to 18 years and 7 to 18 years respectively. After controlling for age and demographic background, the thalassaemia patients reported having significantly lower quality of life than the healthy controls. Conclusion Thalassaemia has a negative impact on perceived physical, emotional, social and school functioning in thalassaemia patients which was also found to be worse than the children's healthy counterparts. Continuing support of free desferal from the Ministry of Health should be given to these patients. More understanding and support especially from health authorities, school authorities and the society is essential to enhance their quality of life.

  11. Quality of Life in Medical Students With Internet Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Farzad; Monajemi, Alireza; Sadeghi, Anahita; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita; Mirzazadeh, Azim

    2016-10-01

    The widespread use of internet has caused new psychological, social, and educational problems for the students. The aim of this study was to examine the quality of life in medical students who suffer from internet addiction. This cross-sectional survey was carried out in Tehran University of Medical Sciences, and a total of 174 fourth-to seventh-year undergraduate medical students were enrolled. The quality of life was assessed by WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire which covers four domains of physical health, psychological, social relationships, and the environment. For assessing internet addiction, we used Internet Addiction Test (IAT) of Young. The students with IAT score higher than 50 were considered as addicted. For evaluating academic performance, the students were requested to report their grade point average (GPA). The mean IA score (±SD) was 34.13±12.76. Twenty-eight students (16.90%) had IAT score above 50. The mean quality of life score in internet addicted group was 54.97±11.38 versus 61.65±11.21 in normal group (P=0.005). Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between IA score and physical domain (r=-0.18, P=0.02); psychological domain (r=-0.35, P=0.000); and social relation domain (r=-0.26, P=0.001). Mean GPA was significantly lower in the addicted group. It seems that quality of life is lower in the internet addicted medical students; moreover, such students academically perform poorer in comparison with non-addicts. Since internet addiction is increasing at a rapid pace which may provoke considerable academic, psychological and social implications; as a result, it may require screening programs to the immediate finding of such problem to give consultations to prevent unwanted complications.

  12. Quality of Life in Medical Students With Internet Addiction

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    Farzad Fatehi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of internet has caused new psychological, social, and educational problems for the students. The aim of this study was to examine the quality of life in medical students who suffer from internet addiction. This cross-sectional survey was carried out in Tehran University of Medical Sciences, and a total of 174 fourth-to seventh-year undergraduate medical students were enrolled. The quality of life was assessed by WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire which covers four domains of physical health, psychological, social relationships, and the environment. For assessing internet addiction, we used Internet Addiction Test (IAT of Young. The students with IAT score higher than 50 were considered as addicted. For evaluating academic performance, the students were requested to report their grade point average (GPA. The mean IA score (±SD was 34.13±12.76. Twenty-eight students (16.90% had IAT score above 50. The mean quality of life score in internet addicted group was 54.97±11.38 versus 61.65±11.21 in normal group (P=0.005. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between IA score and physical domain (r=-0.18, P=0.02; psychological domain (r=-0.35, P=0.000; and social relation domain (r=-0.26, P=0.001. Mean GPA was significantly lower in the addicted group. It seems that quality of life is lower in the internet addicted medical students; moreover, such students academically perform poorer in comparison with non-addicts. Since internet addiction is increasing at a rapid pace which may provoke considerable academic, psychological and social implications; as a result, it may require screening programs to the immediate finding of such problem to give consultations to prevent unwanted complications.

  13. Hippotherapy: quality of life for the elderly on the horse

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    Lia Mara Wibelinger

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hippotherapy is a technique of rehabilitation and education that uses horse riding and equestrian activities to provide physical benefits to the practitioner, psychological, educational and social. This activity requires the participation of the entire body, the practitioner working in a global horse being used as a therapeutic method that will help develop equilibrium, muscle tone, muscle strength, body awareness, improvement of motor coordination, attention, self-confidence, self-esteem and quality of life. Hippotherapy in the elderly will use the horse as a therapeutic agent in treating various pathologies providing welfare and thus improved quality of life, and a pleasurable treatment, because it runs away from offices and indoor environments. Moreover, threedimensional movement, rhythmic rocking horse and will stimulate the vestibular system, the improvement of consciousness space-time, concentration, equilibrium and consolidation of security gravitational leaving the elderly less vulnerable to falls and related disabilities. Therefore, this article literature review aimed to determine the effects and show the importance of the practice of hippotherapy in order to obtain better quality of life and longevity.

  14. Pain and quality of life following radical retropubic prostatectomy.

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    Haythornthwaite, J A; Raja, S N; Fisher, B; Frank, S M; Brendler, C B; Shir, Y

    1998-11-01

    We assess pain and quality of life following radical retropubic prostatectomy and determine whether intraoperative anesthetic management has any long-term effects on outcomes. A total of 110 patients undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy were randomly assigned to receive epidural and/or general anesthesia. Patients responded to a questionnaire mailed 3 and 6 months following surgery that assessed prostate symptoms, pain related to surgery, quality of life and mood. No long-term effects of anesthesia were observed. Of the 103 respondents (94%) at 3 months 49% had some pain related to surgery. Although pain was not related to anesthesic technique, patients who had it at 3 months used significantly more pain medication on postoperative day 3. Pain at 3 months was mild, averaging 1.5 on a scale of 0 to 10, and associated with poor perceptions of overall health (p anesthesic technique were not apparent. Mild pain following radical retropubic prostatectomy was common and associated with reduced quality of life, particularly social functioning. Affective distress, particularly anxiety, before surgery and use of pain medications following surgery may be predictors of chronic pain following radical retropubic prostatectomy.

  15. Experiencing neutropenia: Quality of life interviews with adult cancer patients

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    Okon Ted

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutropenia is a common toxicity in chemotherapy but detailed information about how neutropenia is associated with changes in patients' quality of life is not readily available. This prospective study interviewed patients with grade 4 neutropenia to provide qualitative information on patients' experience of developing and coping with grade 4 neutropenia during a cycle of chemotherapy. Methods A sample of 34 patients who developed grade 4 neutropenia during the first cycle of chemotherapy completed a total of 100 structured clinical interviews. Interviews were transcribed, and 2 raters inductively developed 5 broad categories comprising 80 specific complaint domains nominated by patients. Thirty-five patient-nominated problems were mentioned in 5% or more of the interviews. Results Fatigue was the most common physical symptom. Interference in daily routine, negative self-evaluation, negative emotion, and social isolation were other common complaints associated with neutropenia. Conclusion Neutropenia is associated with a number of negative experiences among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, and these negative experiences have an adverse effect on the patient's quality of life. Oncology nurses can play a key role in helping patients manage adverse effects to maintain their quality of life.

  16. [Quality of life in patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernad-Pineda, M; de Las Heras-Sotos, J; Garcés-Puentes, M V

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the quality of life in patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis through self-assessment and those made by the physician. An observational and cross-sectional multicenter study in which 628 traumatologists or rheumatologists evaluated 1,849 patients with knee and/or hip osteoarthritis, aged ≥ 50 years old, and representative of 49 Spanish provinces. Each researcher evaluated three patients and also completed the SF-12v2 health questionnaire. The patients completed the WOMAC and SF-12v2 questionnaires. The patients were 68.5 ± 9.5 years old, 61.5% had knee osteoarthritis, 19% had hip osteoarthritis, and 19.5% in both locations. Older patients and those who had both knee and hip osteoarthritis had a poorer quality of life, according to patients and researchers. Physical health perceived by the researchers was better than patients reported (36.74 ± 8.6 and 35.21 ± 8.53; respectively, p<0.001), and the mental health score was similar between physicians and patients. Kellgren/Lawrence scale and test Timed Up & Go predict better the quality of life, assessed by WOMAC and SF-12v2 questionnaires. This is the Spanish study on quality of life in osteoarthritis of the knee and hip of larger amplitude and number of patients. These results could be considered as reference values of Spanish population aged ≥ 50 years with knee or hip osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Aircraft Noise and Quality of Life around Frankfurt Airport

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    Thomas Eikmann; Christin Peschel; Cara Kahl; Dirk Schreckenberg; Markus Meis

    2010-01-01

    In a survey of 2,312 residents living near Frankfurt Airport aircraft noise annoyance and disturbances as well as environmental (EQoL) and health-related quality of life (HQoL) were assessed and compared with data on exposure due to aircraft, road traffic, and railway noise. Results indicate higher noise annoyance than predicted from general exposure-response curves. Beside aircraft sound levels source-related attitudes were associated with reactions to aircraft noise. Furthermore, aircraft n...

  18. [Quality of Life of Teenage Mothers, University Students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte, María Rosa Estupiñán; Correa, Diana Rocío Vela

    2012-09-01

    University education and motherhood are two aspects not generally associated, although their relationship determines a significant risk regarding the learning process of student-mothers. To assess life quality as perceived by university- student mothers. Comprehensive study of the phenomenological-hermeneutical type. Interviews and life stories of 34 students between 19 and 24, who were, or are teenager mothers, were used. A qualitative analysis was applied to triangulate the discourses so as to establish relationships between practice and the social phenomenon studied. The University as a social support network is negatively perceived; student mothers feel rejected and disregarded. Sometimes they feel alone and experience emotional emptiness. Additionally, physical health, stress and depression affect their emotional health; in general, they also experience eating and sleeping difficulties. When positively assumed, motherhood generates personal productivity leading to professional growth thus achieving a good working performance. The quality of life in student-mothers is strongly linked to the condition of their family relationships and the social support perceived in the university context. In terms of their personal productivity, emotional expression, health, and safety, they become dependent but can be strengthened with acceptance of the commitment implied by motherhood within their families and academic communities. Universities face a major challenge regarding this reality and the criteria to be followed to accompany the integral formation student-mothers. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Professional quality of life and associated factors among VHA chaplains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Grace W; Beder, Joan

    2013-06-01

    Chaplains play a unique role in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care systems and have numerous responsibilities. Compassion satisfaction (CS), compassion fatigue (CF), and burnout (BO) are three major phenomenons that have been documented in other helping professions, but little is known about VA Chaplains' professional quality of life. This study examines a national sample of VA Chaplains and their professional quality of life along with associated factors. Two-hundred and seventeen VA Chaplains completed an anonymous Internet survey, and regression analyses were conducted to determine which variables affect professional quality of life. On average, participants report high levels of CS and low levels of CF and BO. Gender, perceived support from VA administration, and mental health (MH) integration were significant predictors for CS. MH integration and perceived support significantly affected CF. Age, MH integration, and perceived support affected BO. Significant interaction effects were found for CF and BO. In summary, younger Chaplains and Chaplains who report low levels of collaboration with MH professionals are most likely to develop CF and BO. This supports continued support from the VA for interdisciplinary initiatives and mentorship of younger Chaplains.

  20. Quality of Life after Stapled Hemorrhoidopexy: A Prospective Observational Study

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    Pankaj Kumar Garg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of the study was to assess the change in quality of life (QOL of patients undergoing stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH using WHO Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire. Methods. The study sample comprised patients with symptomatic II, III, and IV degree hemorrhoids, undergoing SH. The patients were asked to complete WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire before and one month following the surgery. Result. There were 20 patients in the study group. The postoperative pain score measured by visual analogue scale at six hours postoperatively was at 24 hours. The items in the WHOQOL-BREF had high-internal consistency or reliability as shown by high Cronbach's alpha coefficient which was 0.82 and 0.90 for pre- and postoperative questionnaires. There was significant improvement in the overall perception of QOL and health, and in physical and psychological domains. There was modest improvement in environmental domain, while no change was noted in social domain. Conclusion. SH improved the quality of life of patients treated for hemorrhoids.