WorldWideScience

Sample records for quality effects caused

  1. Quality effects caused by torrefaction of pellets made from Scots pine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shang, Lei; Nielsen, Niels Peter K.; Dahl, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    by mechanical compression was determined using a material tester and results showed a rapid decrease before torrefaction temperature reached 250°C. Slightly further decrease was observed when increasing the temperature up to 270°C. The strength loss was confirmed by determining the energy required for grinding...... the pellet samples in a bench scale disc mill. Particle size distribution measurements after grinding indicated a significant increase of small particles (diameterca. 2mm). To further analyze the effect on strength, the mechanical durability of pellets was tested according to wood pellet standards, EN 15210...

  2. Landslides - Cause and effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radbruch-Hall, D. H.; Varnes, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Landslides can cause seismic disturbances; landslides can also result from seismic disturbances, and earthquake-induced slides have caused loss of life in many countries. Slides can cause disastrous flooding, particularly when landslide dams across streams are breached, and flooding may trigger slides. Slope movement in general is a major process of the geologic environment that places constraints on engineering development. In order to understand and foresee both the causes and effects of slope movement, studies must be made on a regional scale, at individual sites, and in the laboratory. Areal studies - some embracing entire countries - have shown that certain geologic conditions on slopes facilitate landsliding; these conditions include intensely sheared rocks; poorly consolidated, fine-grained clastic rocks; hard fractured rocks underlain by less resistant rocks; or loose accumulations of fine-grained surface debris. Field investigations as well as mathematical- and physical-model studies are increasing our understanding of the mechanism of slope movement in fractured rock, and assist in arriving at practical solutions to landslide problems related to all kinds of land development for human use. Progressive failure of slopes has been studied in both soil and rock mechanics. New procedures have been developed to evaluate earthquake response of embankments and slopes. The finite element method of analysis is being extensively used in the calculation of slope stability in rock broken by joints, faults, and other discontinuities. ?? 1976 International Association of Engineering Geology.

  3. Effect of methyl salicylate in combination with 1-methylcyclopropene on postharvest quality and decay caused by Botrytis cinerea in tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Dedong; Li, Fujun; Zhang, Xinhua; Shu, Pan; Cui, Xixi; Dong, Lulu; Ren, Chuntao; Meng, Demei; Li, Jian

    2018-01-20

    Postharvest diseases result in major losses in fruits. Tomato is susceptible to postharvest rot caused by Botrytis cinerea and is regarded as a good model system to study postharvest disease and quality deterioration in fruit. To develop a safe and effective technique to alleviate disease and maintain fruit quality, the effects of methyl salicylate (MeSA) and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) either separately or combined on quality and gray mold caused by B. cinerea in tomato fruit were investigated. The results showed that application of MeSA (0.05 mmol L -1 ) delayed fruit ripening and reduced gray mold. Compared with MeSA treatment, 1-MCP (0.5 µL L -1 ) effectively delayed fruit ripening. Further, MeSA combined with 1-MCP treatment was more effective in inhibiting fungal decay during storage than MeSA treatment alone. The combined treatment not only enhanced pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR1) expression, activities of defense enzymes and total phenolic content but also inhibited the increase in electrical conductivity and malondialdehyde content. The combined treatment was also more effective in retaining firmness, color change and titratable acidity content than MeSA treatment alone. MeSA combined with 1-MCP treatment was a useful technique to maintain quality and alleviate gray mold in postharvest tomato fruit during storage. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Small cause - big effect: improvement in interface design results in improved data quality - a multicenter crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlbrandt, Janko; Henrich, Michael; Hartmann, Bernd A; Bundschuh, Bettina B; Schwarz, Julia; Klasen, Joachim; Röhrig, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    In Germany the core data set for anesthesia version 3.0 was recently introduced for external quality assurance, which includes five surgical tracer procedures. We found a low rate of correctly documented tracers when compared to procedure data (OPS-Codes) documented separately. Examination revealed that the graphical user interface (GUI) contravened the dialogue principles as defined in EN ISO 9241-110. We worked with the manufacturer to implement small improvements and roll out the software. A crossover study was conducted at a university hospital and a municipal hospital chain with five hospitals. All study sites and surgical tracer procedures combined, we found an improvement from 42% to 65% (pbig effect small changes to the GUI can have on data quality. They also raise the question, if highly flexible and parameterized clinical documentation systems are suited to achieve high usability. Finding the right balance between GUIs designed by usability experts and the flexibility of parameterization by administrators will be a difficult task for the future and subject to further research.

  5. Reed canary grass observations of effects on crop stand and fibre quality caused by infestation of Epicalamus phalaridis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. HELLQVIST

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A severe infestation of the gall midge Epicalamus phalaridis (Diptera: Cecidomyiidaeoccurred in a field of reed canary grass, Phalaris arundinacea in northern Sweden. The midge species has potential to become a serious pest on Phalaris grown for bioenergy or fibre production. Larvae of the midge feed beneath leaf sheaths and the crop lodges in late summer. Details are given on the biology of the midge. In the infested field, population densities of the midge were very high during three consecutive years. The crop was weakened and the occurrence of weeds increased. The dry matter yields declined markedly and were after three years of midge-attack about 50% of the average yield in the preceding years. The yield dropped comparatively more when the crop was harvested in the spring as opposed to harvest in late autumn and more at a nitrogen fertilisation at 100 kg compared to 200 kg N ha–1 per year. The effect of midge attack on fibre quality was studied. The fibre properties of midge-infested parts of internodes were poor, but as midge-damaged parts are brittle, they could probably be sorted out in a fractionation process. Undamaged parts of infested internodes had the same fibre properties as those from an uninfested crop.;

  6. On the Causes of Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawid, A. Philip; Faigman, David L.; Fienberg, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    We welcome Professor Pearl's comment on our original article, Dawid et al. Our focus there on the distinction between the "Effects of Causes" (EoC) and the "Causes of Effects" (CoE) concerned two fundamental problems, one a theoretical challenge in statistics and the other a practical challenge for trial courts. In this…

  7. On Q: Causing Quality in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Daniel T.

    This book presents college and university education as a quality-oriented service with students, parents, and legislators as customers demanding quality. It attempts to blend the concept of strategic management of quality in industry with the latest thinking on the administration of higher education. The first chapter discusses the importance of…

  8. Breakdown Cause and Effect Analysis. Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biały, Witold; Ružbarský, Juraj

    2018-06-01

    Every company must ensure that the production process proceeds without interferences. Within this article, the author uses the term "interferences" in reference to unplanned stoppages caused by breakdowns. Unfortunately, usually due to machine operators' mistakes, machines break, which causes stoppages thus generating additional costs for the company. This article shows a cause and effect analysis of a breakdown in a production process. The FMEA as well as quality management tools: the Ishikawa diagram and Pareto chart were used for the analysis. Correction measures were presented which allowed for a significant reduction in the number of stoppages caused by breakdowns.

  9. Wood quality changes caused by mineral fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Sette Jr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The diverse and important use of wood from fast growth eucalyptus plantations requires the analysis of the effect of mineral fertilizers on wood quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical characteristics and wood density from Eucalyptus grandis trees (3 m x 2 m spacing fertilized with potassium and sodium (at planting, 6 th and 12th month. Fifteen (15 6 years old eucalyptus trees were selected (5 trees/treatment, cut and wood samples at DBH (1,3 m were taken for anatomical characteristics (fiber and vessels and wood density analysis. Results showed that eucalyptus trees treated with mineral fertilizers did not show significant alteration in average wood density, with radial profile model common to all three treatments, characterized by a values increase in the region next to the pith, toward to bark. Mineral fertilization influenced wood anatomical characteristics: treatment with sodium was characterized by thinner walls and lumen larger diameter; in treatment with potassium, larger vessels were detected.

  10. Causes for variation in pork quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der P.; Engel, B.; Hulsegge, B.

    1997-01-01

    Research was carried out on 260 pigs that were slaughtered in 12 batches in the slaughter facilities of ID-DLO at Zeist. The practical circumstances were highly standardized. The 'animals' meat quality was good with only little variation; 46 animals showed a 'slightly' aberrant quality and 6

  11. Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-10-01

    One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water

  12. BUSINESS PROCESS REENGINEERING: CONCEPTS CAUSES AND EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Nugroho Yahya

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Some people made a wrong concept about Business Process Reengineering (BPR. Some were misunderstanding about the BPR term. In other way, so many researches were introduced to describe a better definition about BPR. The thinking about concepts, causes, and effect of BPR will make a new perception about the term of BPR itself as a better methodology instead of the other Quality Management Methodology such as Total Quality Management (TQM, Just In Time (JIT, etc. This paper will mention the context of BPR in some of case study's journal.

  13. Esophageal hypermotility: cause or effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespin, O M; Tatum, R P; Yates, R B; Sahin, M; Coskun, K; Martin, A V; Wright, A; Oelschlager, B K; Pellegrini, C A

    2016-07-01

    Nutcracker esophagus (NE), Jackhammer esophagus (JHE), distal esophageal spasm (DES), and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (HTLES) are defined by esophageal manometric findings. Some patients with these esophageal motility disorders also have abnormal gastroesophageal reflux. It is unclear to what extent these patients' symptoms are caused by the motility disorder, the acid reflux, or both. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) on esophageal motility disorders, gastroesophageal reflux, and patient symptoms. Between 2007 and 2013, we performed high-resolution esophageal manometry on 3400 patients, and 221 patients were found to have a spastic esophageal motility disorder. The medical records of these patients were reviewed to determine the manometric abnormality, presence of gastroesophageal symptoms, and amount of esophageal acid exposure. In those patients that underwent LNF, we compared pre- and postoperative esophageal motility, gastroesophageal symptom severity, and esophageal acid exposure. Of the 221 patients with spastic motility disorders, 77 had NE, 2 had JHE, 30 had DES, and 112 had HTLES. The most frequently reported primary and secondary symptoms among all patients were: heartburn and/or regurgitation, 69.2%; respiratory, 39.8%; dysphagia, 35.7%; and chest pain, 22.6%. Of the 221 patients, 192 underwent 24-hour pH monitoring, and 103 demonstrated abnormal distal esophageal acid exposure. Abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring was detected in 62% of patients with heartburn and regurgitation, 49% of patients with respiratory symptoms, 36.8 % of patients with dysphagia, and 32.6% of patients with chest pain. Sixty-six of the 103 patients with abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring underwent LNF. Thirty-eight (13NE, 2JHE, 6 DES, and 17 HTLES) of these 66 patients had a minimum of 6-month postoperative follow-up that included clinical evaluation, esophageal manometry, and 24-hour pH monitoring

  14. Effective quality auditing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivertsen, Terje

    2004-01-01

    The present report focuses on how to improve the effectiveness of quality audits and organization-wide quality management. It discusses several concepts related to internal quality auditing, includes guidelines on how to establish auditing as a key process of the organization, and exemplifies its application in the management of quality, strategy, and change. The report follows a line of research documented previously in the reports 'Continuous Improvement of Software Quality' (HWR-584) and 'ISO 9000 Quality Systems for Software Development' (HWR-629). In particular, the concepts of measurement programmes and process improvement cycles, discussed in HWR-584, form the basis for the approach advocated in the present report to the continual improvement of the internal quality audit process. Internal auditing is an important ingredient in ISO 9000 quality systems, and continual improvement of this process is consistent with the process-oriented view of the 2000 revision of the ISO 9000 family (HWR-629). The overall aim of the research is to provide utilities and their system vendors with better tools for quality management in digital I and C projects. The research results are expected to provide guidance to the choice of software engineering practices to obtain a system fulfilling safety requirements at an acceptable cost. For licensing authorities, the results are intended to make the review process more efficient through the use of appropriate measures (metrics), and to be of help in establishing requirements to software quality assurance in digital I and C projects. (Author)

  15. Measuring Effectiveness of Food Quality Management in the Bakery Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiegel, van der M.; Luning, P.A.; Boer, de W.J.; Ziggers, G.W.; Jongen, W.M.F.

    2006-01-01

    Inappropriate management of food production operations cause several quality performance problems. Therefore, the actual contribution of food quality management to quality performance has to be revealed. This article investigates the effectiveness of food quality management in the bakery sector.

  16. Colossal magnetodielectric effect caused by magnetoelectric effect ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The colossal magnetodielectric effect is reported in Pb(Zr,Ti)O3/Terfenol-D laminate composite under low magnetic field. When the composite is placed in an external a.c. magnetic field, magnetoelectric effect is produced, as a result, the dielectric properties of the Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 is changed, i.e. magnetodielectric effect. Both the ...

  17. Colossal magnetodielectric effect caused by magnetoelectric effect ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -D laminate composite under low magnetic field. When the composite is placed in an external a.c. magnetic field, magnetoelectric effect is produced, as a result, the dielectric properties of the Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 is changed, i.e. magnetodielectric effect ...

  18. The additional greenhouse effect: Causes, effects, countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassl, H.

    1992-01-01

    The carbon dioxide, ozone, nitrous oxide and methane influence through steam and all of them through the distribution of temperature and precipitation on earth. Since the beginning of the industrialisation, man has been destroying the composition of the atmosphere thus causing global changes in the climate. Due to the retardation of the warming up by oceans and ice regions and due to the strong natural variability, neither the heating-up observed during the measuring concentration of the above listed gases nor the rising sea level can be definitely traced back to man's activities. The results of complex climate models - supported by findings from climate history - forecast, with emissions continuing to rise, a continuing average heating-up by approximately 3 C up to the year 2100, i.e. a temperature rise in only 100 years which nearly equals to that of 10,000 years between the ice age and the warm age. (orig./KW) [de

  19. PHYSIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF SOYBEAN SEEDS UNDER MECHANICAL INJURIES CAUSED BY COMBINES

    OpenAIRE

    FÁBIO PALCZEWSKI PACHECO; LÚCIA HELENA PEREIRA NÓBREGA; GISLAINE PICOLLO DE LIMA; MÁRCIA SANTORUM; WALTER BOLLER; LORIVAN FORMIGHIERI

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical harvesting causes injuries on seeds and may affect their quality. Different threshing mechanisms and their adjustments may also affect the intensity of impacts that machines cause on seeds. So, this study aimed at diagnosing and evaluating the effect of two combines: the first one with a threshing system of axial flow and the other one with a threshing system of tangential flow, under adjustments of concave opening (10 mm, 30 mm and 10 mm for a combine with axial ...

  20. Causes And Effects Of Fast Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Al-Saad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fast food affects our life in many aspects. In fact There are many reasons that have been shown why people continuing eating fast food while they knew about its negative effects on their health and family because of eating fast food. The commercial advertisements play a major role in consuming fast food. In this research I will focus on causes and effects of eating fast food.

  1. Causes And Effects Of Fast Food

    OpenAIRE

    Eman Al-Saad

    2015-01-01

    Fast food affects our life in many aspects. In fact There are many reasons that have been shown why people continuing eating fast food while they knew about its negative effects on their health and family because of eating fast food. The commercial advertisements play a major role in consuming fast food. In this research I will focus on causes and effects of eating fast food.

  2. Prediction of water quality variation caused by dredging urban river-bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hong-Je; Lee, Byung-Ho; Kim, Jung-Sik [University of Ulsan, Ulsan(Korea); Lee, Kun-Bae [Metropolitan City Hall of Ulsan, Ulsan(Korea)

    2002-04-30

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of water quality improvement due to dredging the bottom deposit at the downstream of a urban river. The finite difference method was used to analyze the water quality variations caused by the depths of dredging and intercepting ratios of the goal years. 21 boring points were selected along the 11.2 Km river reach running through a metropolitan city. The pollution levels of the deposits from the bored points were examined by the leaching test. The improvement effect of the water quality, measured as changes of COD, were carried at under drought, minimal, and normal flow. The result indicates that the dredging of the contaminated sludge contributes the improvement of the water quality. (author). 10 refs., 8 tabs., 7 figs.

  3. Foliar Nutritional Quality Explains Patchy Browsing Damage Caused by an Invasive Mammal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah R Windley

    Full Text Available Introduced herbivores frequently inflict significant, yet patchy damage on native ecosystems through selective browsing. However, there are few instances where the underlying cause of this patchy damage has been revealed. We aimed to determine if the nutritional quality of foliage could predict the browsing preferences of an invasive mammalian herbivore, the common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula, in a temperate forest in New Zealand. We quantified the spatial and temporal variation in four key aspects of the foliar chemistry (total nitrogen, available nitrogen, in vitro dry matter digestibility and tannin effect of 275 trees representing five native tree species. Simultaneously, we assessed the severity of browsing damage caused by possums on those trees in order to relate selective browsing to foliar nutritional quality. We found significant spatial and temporal variation in nutritional quality among individuals of each tree species examined, as well as among tree species. There was a positive relationship between the available nitrogen concentration of foliage (a measure of in vitro digestible protein and the severity of damage caused by browsing by possums. This study highlights the importance of nutritional quality, specifically, the foliar available nitrogen concentration of individual trees, in predicting the impact of an invasive mammal. Revealing the underlying cause of patchy browsing by an invasive mammal provides new insights for conservation of native forests and targeted control of invasive herbivores in forest ecosystems.

  4. AN ANALYSIS OF THE CAUSES OF PRODUCT DEFECTS USING QUALITY MANAGEMENT TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna MIDOR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To stay or strengthen its position on the market, a modern business needs to follow the principles of quality control in its actions. Especially important is the Zero Defects concept developed by Philip Crosby, which means flawless production. The concept consists in preventing the occurrence of defects and flaws in all production stages. To achieve that, we must, among other things, make use of quality management tools. This article presents an analysis of the reasons for the return of damaged or faulty goods in the automotive industry by means of quality management tools such as the Ishikawa diagram and Pareto analysis, which allow us to identify the causes of product defectiveness. Based on the results, preventive measures have been proposed. The actions presented in this article and the results of the analysis prove the effectiveness of the aforementioned quality management tools.

  5. Thermoluminescent Signals Caused by Disturbing Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    German, U.; Weinstein, M.; Ben-Shachar, B.

    1999-01-01

    One of the major sources of uncertainty in the measurement of low radiation doses by means of thermoluminescence dosemeters is the presence of disturbing thermoluminescence signals, especially luminescence caused by visible light, and by materials attached to the heated areas. Glow curves of thermoluminescence dosemeters contain useful information that can improve the accuracy and the reliability of the thermoluminescent measurements. The influence of the various disturbing effects can be recognised in the shape of the glow curves and can sometimes be separated from the exposure. Some examples are presented of signals arising from the two disturbing effects mentioned above, the signal contributed by Teflon used in the TLD-100 cards of Bicron/Harshaw and some abnormal glow curves due to dirt attached to the cards. Subtraction of the contributions due to these effects is suggested to obtain the net exposure signal. (author)

  6. CAUSE AND EFFECT IN PROMOTING A PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEVERIAN-VLĂDUȚ IACOB

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available For a project to be considered successful it is necessary, besides a proper coordination, to be also done a good and wide promotion. In view of communication, promotion and maintenance ensures the organization's image. Disturbances occurring in any type of project, as a result of poor promotion, affect the image of the team and highlight the weaknesses in its management. Therefore, the promotion should be permanently monitored and evaluated. Cause-effect analysis is one of the ways we can identify some of nonconformities of the promotion process within a project.

  7. Space storms and radiation causes and effects

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, Carolus J

    2010-01-01

    Heliophysics is a fast-developing scientific discipline that integrates studies of the Sun's variability, the surrounding heliosphere, and the environment and climate of planets. The Sun is a magnetically variable star and for planets with intrinsic magnetic fields, planets with atmospheres, or planets like Earth with both, there are profound consequences. This 2010 volume, the second in this series of three heliophysics texts, integrates the many aspects of space storms and the energetic radiation associated with them - from causes on the Sun to effects in planetary environments. It reviews t

  8. Causes and Solutions of the Trampoline Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Masamiki; Ota, Noboru; Ando, Chiyono; Miyazaki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    A trampoline effect may occur mainly when a buttonhole tract and the vessel flap fail to form a straight line. Certain findings, however, suggest another cause is when the vessel flap is too small. The frequency of the trampoline effect, for example, is lower when a buttonhole tract is created by multiple punctures of the arteriovenous fistula (AVF) vessel than when it is done by one-time puncture of the vessel. Lower frequency of the trampoline effect with multiple punctures of the AVF vessel may be due to enlargement of the initial puncture hole on the vessel every time the vessel is punctured with a sharp needle. Even if aiming at exactly the same point on the AVF vessel every time, the actual puncture point shifts slightly at every puncture, which potentially results in enlargement of the initial hole on the AVF vessel. Moreover, in some patients, continued use of a buttonhole tract for an extended period of time increases the frequency of the trampoline effect. In such cases, reduction of the incidence of the trampoline effect can be achieved by one buttonhole cannulation using a new dull needle with sharp side edges that is used to enlarge the vessel flap. Such single buttonhole cannulation may suggest that the increased frequency of the trampoline effect also potentially occurs in association with gradually diminishing flap size. As a final observation, dull needle insertion into a vessel flap in the reverse direction has been more smoothly achieved than insertion into a vessel flap in the conventional direction. A vessel flap in the reverse direction can be adopted clinically. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Causes, Effects, and Remedies in Conflict Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Khan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available While workplace conflicts have been widely studied in the literature, this researchprovides a holistic view of the causes and effects of such, and how managers or amanagement can resolve the conflicts among their teams and organization througha detailed, multidimensional framework carried out on one of the biggest textilefirms of Pakistan. With an initial sample of 145 respondents, 37 questionnaireswere dropped because of invalid and incomplete answers; therefore, the studywas carried out on 108 respondents. Conflicts are a part of human nature, butmanagement should play an important role in dealing with these issues, as therecan be enormous chances of conflicts due to a diverse workforce. Conflict alsoresults in poor work performance and low productivity; therefore, it’s suggestedto create teams or groups which may encourage a competitive culture in theorganization. Additionally, a few remedies are identified, which may resolve someissues; managers must look at those techniques for a better culture. 

  10. Peristomal skin complications: causes, effects, and treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doctor K

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kimberly Doctor, Dorin T Colibaseanu Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA Abstract: Enterostomal formation remains a necessary part of multiple types of surgeries. Stomal difficulties can be a source of frustration for patients; however, a properly functioning stoma in a patient educated in its care can result in a highly functional individual, with a high quality of life, comparable to a person without a stoma. Correct surgical technique is vital to creating a stoma that is sufficiently everted, and in a good anatomical location. Loop ileostomies have a higher chance of complications, thus care in their formation is especially important. Systemic disease (inflammatory conditions, and autoimmune diseases especially as well as local conditions (pyoderma gangrenosum, infections, and fistulas, among others can be the causes for difficult-to-treat peristomal complications. Accurate diagnosis is essential in order to be able to address the underlying disease. Choosing the appropriate products to care for the stoma is often a process of trial and error, and is best done under the guidance of an enterostomal therapist. This is especially true for stomas in overweight individuals or stomas that have become flush with the skin with time and changing body habitus. Inattention to care can result in problems that range from simple mucocutaneous separations (separation of the bowel edge from the surrounding skin to large and difficult-to-heal ulcers. This article provides a systematic review of the most common challenges that patients with stoma are faced with, and offers solutions based on up-to-date review of the literature. Keywords: stoma care, stoma complications, stoma wound

  11. Hypothyroidism and obesity: Cause or Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, A.; Jayaraman, M.; Kumar, Hari K.V.S.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to establish relationship between obesity and hypothyroidism and to analyze the frequency of primary hypothyroidism in obese patients and frequency of obesity in primary hypothyroidism patients. We conducted this retrospective, observational study in Department of Endocrinology and Obesity Clinic, Medwin Hospital, Hyderabad, India in March 2008. In the last 18 months (between September 2006 to February 2008), data on 625 consecutive primary hypothyroidism patients (Group I) and 450 patients from obesity clinic (Group II) were analyzed. Frequency difference between the 2 groups was assessed by Chi-square test. In Group I, 278/625 (44%) had body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m2. Obesity was higher (46% versus 34%) in overt hypothyroidism than in subclinical hypothyroidism (p=0.21). More patients were overweight in overt hypothyroidism group than in subclinical hypothyroidism group (p=0.02). In obesity patients, overt hypothyroidism was present in 33% and subclinical hypothyroidism in 11% patients. Overall thyroid dysfunction was found more in obese individuals with varying degree of significance. Detailed studies are required to assess the cause and effect relation between obesity and hypothyroidism. (author)

  12. Causes, effects and therapy of radiophobie syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    2005-01-01

    The basic symptoms and causes of the origination of radiophobie in Germany and other developed countries are considered. The economic and ecological consequences of the ideological antinuclear politics and the struggle against NPP are analyzed. The measures on overcoming radiophobie among population of developed countries are proposed. The particular attention for this problem solving is given to the position of mass media [ru

  13. The Young Drinking Driver: Cause or Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Patricia F.; Waller, Marcus B.

    Drunk driving is a major public health problem and young people suffer disproportionately high rates of morbidity and mortality as a result of drinking and driving. Motor vehicle injuries are the leading cause of death for persons aged 15-24 in this country, and alcohol is implicated in many of these deaths. Countermeasures to drinking and driving…

  14. The Monju accident. Causes and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marth, W.

    1996-01-01

    On December 8, 1995, the Japanese prototype fast breeder reactor, Monju, suffered an accident which aroused considerable national and international attention. A thermocouple in a pipe carrying sodium in the secondary plant system had broken, causing some 700 kg of non-radioactive sodium to be spilled. The safety of the reactor, of the plant crew, and of the environment was not jeopardized. However, as a consequence of some badly handled public relations, rather negative reactions of the public authorities and of the public at large were encountered. One member of the investigating committee, facing a conflict of loyalities not uncommon in Japan, even committed suicide. According to current estimates, Monju will be down for at least two years, thus causing major financial problems to the operator, PNC. On the political level, more difficulties are expected to arise in the introduction of plutonium recycling. (orig.) [de

  15. PHYSIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF SOYBEAN SEEDS UNDER MECHANICAL INJURIES CAUSED BY COMBINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FÁBIO PALCZEWSKI PACHECO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical harvesting causes injuries on seeds and may affect their quality. Different threshing mechanisms and their adjustments may also affect the intensity of impacts that machines cause on seeds. So, this study aimed at diagnosing and evaluating the effect of two combines: the first one with a threshing system of axial flow and the other one with a threshing system of tangential flow, under adjustments of concave opening (10 mm, 30 mm and 10 mm for a combine with axial flow and 3.0 mm, 15 mm and 3.0 mm for a combine with tangential flow and three cylinder rotations on the quality of soybean seeds harvested at two moisture contents. Soybean seeds of cultivar 'ND 4910' were harvested at 16.6% moisture (mid - morning and 13.7% moisture in the afternoon. The seeds quality was evaluated by germination tests, germination speed index (GSI, germination rate, moisture content, percentage of purity and vigor by tetrazolium test. Despite the combine, the results showed that the mechanical injury has most reduced seeds quality, at 16.6% moisture content, concave opening of 30 mm (axial and 10 mm (tangential and cylinder rotation of 1100 rpm (axial and 1000 (tangential, both with the highest rotations used. The combine with tangential flow had the highest degree of seeds purity. When seeds moisture content at harvest was close to 13.7%, there was the highest seed injury, while, at 16.6%, there was the highest number of crushed soybeans, regardless the combine adjustment.

  16. Predicting Causes of Data Quality Issues in a Clinical Data Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ritu; Ruth, Byron J; Miller, Matthew; Tucker, Joshua; Utidjian, Levon H; Razzaghi, Hanieh; Patibandla, Nandan; Burrows, Evanette K; Bailey, L Charles

    2018-01-01

    Clinical data research networks (CDRNs) invest substantially in identifying and investigating data quality problems. While identification is largely automated, the investigation and resolution are carried out manually at individual institutions. In the PEDSnet CDRN, we found that only approximately 35% of the identified data quality issues are resolvable as they are caused by errors in the extract-transform-load (ETL) code. Nonetheless, with no prior knowledge of issue causes, partner institutions end up spending significant time investigating issues that represent either inherent data characteristics or false alarms. This work investigates whether the causes (ETL, Characteristic, or False alarm) can be predicted before spending time investigating issues. We trained a classifier on the metadata from 10,281 real-world data quality issues, and achieved a cause prediction F1-measure of up to 90%. While initially tested on PEDSnet, the proposed methodology is applicable to other CDRNs facing similar bottlenecks in handling data quality results.

  17. Geomagnetic effects caused by rocket exhaust jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipko Yu.V.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the space experiment Radar–Progress, we have made 33 series of measurements of geomagnetic variations during ignitions of engines of Progress cargo spacecraft in low Earth orbit. We used magneto-measuring complexes, installed at observatories of the Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and magnetotelluric equipment of a mobile complex. We assumed that engine running can cause geomagnetic disturbances in field tubes crossed by the spacecraft. When analyzing experimental data, we took into account the following space weather factors: solar wind parameters, total daily mid-latitude geomagnetic activity index Kр, geomagnetic auroral electrojet index AE, global geomagnetic activity. The empirical data we obtained indicate that 18 of the 33 series showed geomagnetic variations with various periods.

  18. Technostress in Libraries: Causes, Effects and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichteler, Julie

    1987-01-01

    Examines some of the fears, frustrations, and misconceptions of library staff and patrons that hamper the effective use of computers in libraries. Strategies that library administrators could use to alleviate stress are outlined, including staff participation in the automation process, well-designed workstations, and adequate training for staff…

  19. Risk-based decision making to manage water quality failures caused by combined sewer overflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwastava, A. K.; Torres-Matallana, J. A.; Tait, S.; Schellart, A.

    2017-12-01

    Regulatory authorities set certain environmental permit for water utilities such that the combined sewer overflows (CSO) managed by these companies conform to the regulations. These utility companies face the risk of paying penalty or negative publicity in case they breach the environmental permit. These risks can be addressed by designing appropriate solutions such as investing in additional infrastructure which improve the system capacity and reduce the impact of CSO spills. The performance of these solutions is often estimated using urban drainage models. Hence, any uncertainty in these models can have a significant effect on the decision making process. This study outlines a risk-based decision making approach to address water quality failure caused by CSO spills. A calibrated lumped urban drainage model is used to simulate CSO spill quality in Haute-Sûre catchment in Luxembourg. Uncertainty in rainfall and model parameters is propagated through Monte Carlo simulations to quantify uncertainty in the concentration of ammonia in the CSO spill. A combination of decision alternatives such as the construction of a storage tank at the CSO and the reduction in the flow contribution of catchment surfaces are selected as planning measures to avoid the water quality failure. Failure is defined as exceedance of a concentration-duration based threshold based on Austrian emission standards for ammonia (De Toffol, 2006) with a certain frequency. For each decision alternative, uncertainty quantification results into a probability distribution of the number of annual CSO spill events which exceed the threshold. For each alternative, a buffered failure probability as defined in Rockafellar & Royset (2010), is estimated. Buffered failure probability (pbf) is a conservative estimate of failure probability (pf), however, unlike failure probability, it includes information about the upper tail of the distribution. A pareto-optimal set of solutions is obtained by performing mean

  20. Measuring effectiveness of food quality management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiegel, van der M.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords: effectiveness, food quality management, instrument, quality performance, contextual factors, agri-food production, conceptual model, performance measurement indicators, identification, validation, assessment, quality assurance systems, QA systems, HACCP, Hygiene code, ISO, BRC, GMP, bakery

  1. Weaknesses of the Quality Evaluation Process in the Spanish University: Causes, Consequences and Proposals for Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente Rodríguez Sabiote

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The process of quality assessment going on in the Spanish university since the early nineties has generated undeniable advances. However, there have been detected a series of weaknesses which have affected the process with consequences unpredictable a priori. This article reviews some of the weaknesses, together with their possible causes and consequences. Suggestions are provided for improving the process of evaluating the quality of university institutions.

  2. Causes, Spectrum and Effects of Surgical Child Abuse and Neglect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Children are dependent on parents/care givers for the quality of health care services received and in developing countries, where they are not protected against child abuse; many die as a result of denial of appropriate treatment. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the causes, ...

  3. Classification of Underlying Causes of Power Quality Disturbances: Deterministic versus Statistical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Styvaktakis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the two main types of classification methods for power quality disturbances based on underlying causes: deterministic classification, giving an expert system as an example, and statistical classification, with support vector machines (a novel method as an example. An expert system is suitable when one has limited amount of data and sufficient power system expert knowledge; however, its application requires a set of threshold values. Statistical methods are suitable when large amount of data is available for training. Two important issues to guarantee the effectiveness of a classifier, data segmentation, and feature extraction are discussed. Segmentation of a sequence of data recording is preprocessing to partition the data into segments each representing a duration containing either an event or a transition between two events. Extraction of features is applied to each segment individually. Some useful features and their effectiveness are then discussed. Some experimental results are included for demonstrating the effectiveness of both systems. Finally, conclusions are given together with the discussion of some future research directions.

  4. Prevalence, Causes and Effects of Academic Corruption in Rivers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the prevalence, causes and effects of academic corruption in Rivers State universities, Nigeria. Data were collected from 400 respondents using a 'Prevalence, Causes and Effects of Academic Corruption Questionnaire' (PCEACQ). The data were analyzed using frequency counts and percentages.

  5. The effect of antiresorptives on bone quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recker, Robert R; Armas, Laura

    2011-08-01

    Currently, antiresorptive therapy in the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis includes bisphosphonates, estrogen replacement, selective estrogen receptor modulators (raloxifene), and denosumab (a human antibody that inactivates RANKL). The original paradigm driving the development of antiresorptive therapy was that inhibition of bone resorption would allow bone formation to continue and correct the defect. However, it is now clear increases in bone density account for little of the antifracture effect of these treatments. We examined the antifracture benefit of antiresorptives deriving from bone quality changes. We searched the archive of nearly 30,000 articles accumulated over more than 40 years in our research center library using a software program (Refman™). Approximately 250 publications were identified in locating the 69 cited here. The findings document antiresorptive agents are not primarily anabolic. All cause a modest increase in bone density due to a reduction in the bone remodeling space; however, the majority of their efficacy is due to suppression of the primary cause of osteoporosis, ie, excessive bone remodeling not driven by mechanical need. All of them improve some element(s) of bone quality. Antiresorptive therapy reduces risk of fracture by improving bone quality through halting removal of bone tissue and the resultant destruction of microarchitecture of bone and, perhaps to some extent, by improving the intrinsic material properties of bone tissue. Information presented here may help clinicians to improve selection of patients for antiresorptive therapy by avoiding them in cases clearly not due to excessive bone remodeling.

  6. Quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic (QUANTEC) guideline validation using quality of life questionnaire datasets for parotid gland constraints to avoid causing xerostomia during head-and-neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tsair-Fwu; Fang, Fu-Min

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a validation test of the quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic (QUANTEC) guidelines against quality of life (QoL) questionnaire datasets collected prospectively from patients with head and neck (HN) cancers, including HN squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and materials: QoL questionnaire datasets from 95 patients with NPC and 142 with HNSCC were analyzed separately. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer H and N35 QoL questionnaire was used as the endpoint evaluation. The primary endpoint (grade 3 + xerostomia) was defined as moderate to severe xerostomia 3 and 12 months after the completion of RT, and excluded patients with grade 3 + xerostomia at the baseline. The Lyman–Kutcher–Burman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model was used to describe the incidence of xerostomia. Negative predictive values (NPVs) were used to determine the rate of correctly predicting the lack of complications. Results: NTCP fitted parameters were TD 50 = 37.8 Gy (CI: 29.1–46.9 Gy), m = 0.59 (CI: 0.48–0.80) and TD 50 = 43.9 Gy (CI: 33.2–52.8 Gy), m = 0.48 (CI: 0.37–0.76) at the 3-month and 12-month time points, respectively. For QUANTEC validation, HN and HNSCC data validation gave similar results at 3 months; at mean doses to the spared parotid of ⩽20 and ⩽25 Gy, the QoL dataset showed approximately 22% and 28% rates of xerostomia, respectively. At 12 months, the rates of xerostomia were approximately 13% and 19%, respectively. For NPC cases, the dataset showed approximately 0% and 33% (∼67% NPV) rates of xerostomia at 3 months. At 12 months, both rates of xerostomia were approximately 0% (∼100% NPV), which differed significantly from the results for the HNSCC cohort. Conclusion: The QoL datasets validated the QUANTEC guidelines and suggested that the modified QUANTEC 20/20-Gy spared-gland guideline is suitable for clinical use in HNSCC cohorts to

  7. The Joint Effect of Sleep Duration and Disturbed Sleep on Cause-Specific Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Kumari, Meena; Lange, Theis

    2014-01-01

    Both sleep duration and sleep quality are related to future health, but their combined effects on mortality are unsettled. We aimed to examine the individual and joint effects of sleep duration and sleep disturbances on cause-specific mortality in a large prospective cohort study....

  8. Cause-and-effect mapping of critical events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Krisanne; Simmons, Debora; Galley, Mark D

    2010-06-01

    Health care errors are routinely reported in the scientific and public press and have become a major concern for most Americans. In learning to identify and analyze errors health care can develop some of the skills of a learning organization, including the concept of systems thinking. Modern experts in improving quality have been working in other high-risk industries since the 1920s making structured organizational changes through various frameworks for quality methods including continuous quality improvement and total quality management. When using these tools, it is important to understand systems thinking and the concept of processes within organization. Within these frameworks of improvement, several tools can be used in the analysis of errors. This article introduces a robust tool with a broad analytical view consistent with systems thinking, called CauseMapping (ThinkReliability, Houston, TX, USA), which can be used to systematically analyze the process and the problem at the same time. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Image quality and dose differences caused by vendor-specific image processing of neonatal radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensakovic, William F.; O'Dell, M.C.; Letter, Haley; Kohler, Nathan; Rop, Baiywo; Cook, Jane; Logsdon, Gregory; Varich, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Image processing plays an important role in optimizing image quality and radiation dose in projection radiography. Unfortunately commercial algorithms are black boxes that are often left at or near vendor default settings rather than being optimized. We hypothesize that different commercial image-processing systems, when left at or near default settings, create significant differences in image quality. We further hypothesize that image-quality differences can be exploited to produce images of equivalent quality but lower radiation dose. We used a portable radiography system to acquire images on a neonatal chest phantom and recorded the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK). We applied two image-processing systems (Optima XR220amx, by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI; and MUSICA"2 by Agfa HealthCare, Mortsel, Belgium) to the images. Seven observers (attending pediatric radiologists and radiology residents) independently assessed image quality using two methods: rating and matching. Image-quality ratings were independently assessed by each observer on a 10-point scale. Matching consisted of each observer matching GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images with equivalent image quality. A total of 210 rating tasks and 42 matching tasks were performed and effective dose was estimated. Median Agfa-processed image-quality ratings were higher than GE-processed ratings. Non-diagnostic ratings were seen over a wider range of doses for GE-processed images than for Agfa-processed images. During matching tasks, observers matched image quality between GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images acquired at a lower effective dose (11 ± 9 μSv; P < 0.0001). Image-processing methods significantly impact perceived image quality. These image-quality differences can be exploited to alter protocols and produce images of equivalent image quality but lower doses. Those purchasing projection radiography systems or third-party image-processing software should be aware that image processing

  10. Image quality and dose differences caused by vendor-specific image processing of neonatal radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sensakovic, William F.; O' Dell, M.C.; Letter, Haley; Kohler, Nathan; Rop, Baiywo; Cook, Jane; Logsdon, Gregory; Varich, Laura [Florida Hospital, Imaging Administration, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Image processing plays an important role in optimizing image quality and radiation dose in projection radiography. Unfortunately commercial algorithms are black boxes that are often left at or near vendor default settings rather than being optimized. We hypothesize that different commercial image-processing systems, when left at or near default settings, create significant differences in image quality. We further hypothesize that image-quality differences can be exploited to produce images of equivalent quality but lower radiation dose. We used a portable radiography system to acquire images on a neonatal chest phantom and recorded the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK). We applied two image-processing systems (Optima XR220amx, by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI; and MUSICA{sup 2} by Agfa HealthCare, Mortsel, Belgium) to the images. Seven observers (attending pediatric radiologists and radiology residents) independently assessed image quality using two methods: rating and matching. Image-quality ratings were independently assessed by each observer on a 10-point scale. Matching consisted of each observer matching GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images with equivalent image quality. A total of 210 rating tasks and 42 matching tasks were performed and effective dose was estimated. Median Agfa-processed image-quality ratings were higher than GE-processed ratings. Non-diagnostic ratings were seen over a wider range of doses for GE-processed images than for Agfa-processed images. During matching tasks, observers matched image quality between GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images acquired at a lower effective dose (11 ± 9 μSv; P < 0.0001). Image-processing methods significantly impact perceived image quality. These image-quality differences can be exploited to alter protocols and produce images of equivalent image quality but lower doses. Those purchasing projection radiography systems or third-party image-processing software should be aware that image

  11. climate change: causes, effects and mitigation measures-a review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BARTH EKWUEME

    Both natural and human causes of climate change including the earth's orbital changes, solar variations .... analysis supported by climate models have revealed that cloud ... clouds could actually exert a small cooling effect as temperature ...

  12. Causes of Indoor Air Quality Problems in Schools: Summary of Scientific Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, C.W.

    2001-02-22

    In the modern urban setting, most individuals spend about 80% of their time indoors and are therefore exposed to the indoor environment to a much greater extent than to the outdoors (Lebowitz 1992). Concomitant with this increased habitation in urban buildings, there have been numerous reports of adverse health effects related to indoor air quality (IAQ) (sick buildings). Most of these buildings were built in the last two decades and were constructed to be energy-efficient. The quality of air in the indoor environment can be altered by a number of factors: release of volatile compounds from furnishings, floor and wall coverings, and other finishing materials or machinery; inadequate ventilation; poor temperature and humidity control; re-entrainment of outdoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs); and the contamination of the indoor environment by microbes (particularly fungi). Armstrong Laboratory (1992) found that the three most frequent causes of IAQ are (1) inadequate design and/or maintenance of the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, (2) a shortage of fresh air, and (3) lack of humidity control. A similar study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH 1989) recognized inadequate ventilation as the most frequent source of IAQ problems in the work environment (52% of the time). Poor IAQ due to microbial contamination can be the result of the complex interactions of physical, chemical, and biological factors. Harmful fungal populations, once established in the HVAC system or occupied space of a modern building, may episodically produce or intensify what is known as sick building syndrome (SBS) (Cummings and Withers 1998). Indeed, SBS caused by fungi may be more enduring and recalcitrant to treatment than SBS from multiple chemical exposures (Andrae 1988). An understanding of the microbial ecology of the indoor environment is crucial to ultimately resolving many IAQ problems. The incidence of SBS related to multiple

  13. Guidance for modeling causes and effects in environmental problem solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Carl L.; Williamson, Samuel C.

    1988-01-01

    Environmental problems are difficult to solve because their causes and effects are not easily understood. When attempts are made to analyze causes and effects, the principal challenge is organization of information into a framework that is logical, technically defensible, and easy to understand and communicate. When decisionmakers attempt to solve complex problems before an adequate cause and effect analysis is performed there are serious risks. These risks include: greater reliance on subjective reasoning, lessened chance for scoping an effective problem solving approach, impaired recognition of the need for supplemental information to attain understanding, increased chance for making unsound decisions, and lessened chance for gaining approval and financial support for a program/ Cause and effect relationships can be modeled. This type of modeling has been applied to various environmental problems, including cumulative impact assessment (Dames and Moore 1981; Meehan and Weber 1985; Williamson et al. 1987; Raley et al. 1988) and evaluation of effects of quarrying (Sheate 1986). This guidance for field users was written because of the current interest in documenting cause-effect logic as a part of ecological problem solving. Principal literature sources relating to the modeling approach are: Riggs and Inouye (1975a, b), Erickson (1981), and United States Office of Personnel Management (1986).

  14. Chronic tattoo reactions cause reduced quality of life equaling cumbersome skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Katrina Hutton; Serup, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    applied to patients with chronic tattoo reactions, tattoo complaints and impact on quality of life that were comparable to patients presenting cumbersome dermatological disease such as psoriasis, eczema and pruritus, which often show widespread effects to the skin, were uncovered. In conclusion, chronic...... impacts, including the effect on quality of life, should be studied. Itch severity and influence on quality of life can be measured objectively. The Itch Severity Scale and Dermatology Life Quality Index scoring systems have been applied to different dermatological diseases. When ISS and DLQI scores were...... tattoo reactions should be ranked as a cumbersome dermatological disease and, accordingly, given priority attention and qualified treatment by the public health care system....

  15. Causes, Effects and Possible Solution of Seasonal Egg Gluts: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to assess small holder poultry farmers' perspectives on the causes, effects and solution to the cyclical egg glut in Ejigbo, Nigeria using questionnaire for data collection and descriptive data analysis. Farmers interviewed agreed that government policies have a registered effect on drop of egg sales ...

  16. Changes in Soil Quality and Hydrological Connectivity Caused by the Abandonment of Terraces in a Mediterranean Burned Catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleix Calsamiglia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Wildfires and agricultural activities are relevant factors affecting soil quality, hydrological cycle and sedimentary dynamics. Land abandonment leads to afforestation, which increases fire risk and land degradation. However, no studies have yet evaluated the effect of combining the two factors, which occur frequently in Mediterranean ecosystems. This study assessed the changes in soil quality caused by the abandonment of terraces in two microcatchments (<2.5 ha affected distinctly by wildfires (once and twice burned and in an unburned control microcatchment by analyzing soil quality parameters, biochemical indices and spatial patterns of hydrological and sediment connectivity. Soil samples were collected in thirty-six plots (25 m2 representing terraced and non-terraced areas within these microcatchments. Unburned non-terraced plots had higher organic matter content and higher microbiological and enzymatic activities than other plots. Plots in abandoned terraces had lower soil quality indices, regardless of the fire effect. Land abandonment induced changes in the spatial patterns of hydrological connectivity, leading to concentrated runoff, enhanced erosion and soil degradation. Fire also negatively affected soil quality in both terraced and non-terraced plots. However, microbiological communities had different positive post-fire recovery strategies (growth and activity, depending on the previous soil conditions and land uses, which is indicative of the resilience of Mediterranean soil ecosystems.

  17. Association of Changes in Diet Quality with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N; Mattei, Josiemer; Fung, Teresa T; Li, Yanping; Pan, An; Willett, Walter C; Rimm, Eric B; Hu, Frank B

    2017-07-13

    Few studies have evaluated the relationship between changes in diet quality over time and the risk of death. We used Cox proportional-hazards models to calculate adjusted hazard ratios for total and cause-specific mortality among 47,994 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 25,745 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1998 through 2010. Changes in diet quality over the preceding 12 years (1986-1998) were assessed with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 score, the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet score. The pooled hazard ratios for all-cause mortality among participants who had the greatest improvement in diet quality (13 to 33% improvement), as compared with those who had a relatively stable diet quality (0 to 3% improvement), in the 12-year period were the following: 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 0.97) according to changes in the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 0.84 (95 CI%, 0.78 to 0.91) according to changes in the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.84 to 0.95) according to changes in the DASH score. A 20-percentile increase in diet scores (indicating an improved quality of diet) was significantly associated with a reduction in total mortality of 8 to 17% with the use of the three diet indexes and a 7 to 15% reduction in the risk of death from cardiovascular disease with the use of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index and Alternate Mediterranean Diet. Among participants who maintained a high-quality diet over a 12-year period, the risk of death from any cause was significantly lower - by 14% (95% CI, 8 to 19) when assessed with the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, 11% (95% CI, 5 to 18) when assessed with the Alternate Mediterranean Diet score, and 9% (95% CI, 2 to 15) when assessed with the DASH score - than the risk among participants with consistently low diet scores over time. Improved diet quality over 12 years was

  18. Image quality and dose differences caused by vendor-specific image processing of neonatal radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensakovic, William F; O'Dell, M Cody; Letter, Haley; Kohler, Nathan; Rop, Baiywo; Cook, Jane; Logsdon, Gregory; Varich, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Image processing plays an important role in optimizing image quality and radiation dose in projection radiography. Unfortunately commercial algorithms are black boxes that are often left at or near vendor default settings rather than being optimized. We hypothesize that different commercial image-processing systems, when left at or near default settings, create significant differences in image quality. We further hypothesize that image-quality differences can be exploited to produce images of equivalent quality but lower radiation dose. We used a portable radiography system to acquire images on a neonatal chest phantom and recorded the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK). We applied two image-processing systems (Optima XR220amx, by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI; and MUSICA(2) by Agfa HealthCare, Mortsel, Belgium) to the images. Seven observers (attending pediatric radiologists and radiology residents) independently assessed image quality using two methods: rating and matching. Image-quality ratings were independently assessed by each observer on a 10-point scale. Matching consisted of each observer matching GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images with equivalent image quality. A total of 210 rating tasks and 42 matching tasks were performed and effective dose was estimated. Median Agfa-processed image-quality ratings were higher than GE-processed ratings. Non-diagnostic ratings were seen over a wider range of doses for GE-processed images than for Agfa-processed images. During matching tasks, observers matched image quality between GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images acquired at a lower effective dose (11 ± 9 μSv; P < 0.0001). Image-processing methods significantly impact perceived image quality. These image-quality differences can be exploited to alter protocols and produce images of equivalent image quality but lower doses. Those purchasing projection radiography systems or third-party image-processing software should be aware that image

  19. Creating the Total Quality Effective School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezotte, Lawrence W.

    This book shows how Deming's Total Quality Management (TQM) theory for organizational management can be integrated with the effective-schools literature. Part 1 compares the 14 principles of TQM with the tenets of effective-schools research. The second part develops a blueprint for creating the total quality effective school. The conceptual…

  20. 73. Surgical site infection after CABG: Root cause analysis and quality measures recommendation SSI quality improvement project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arifi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI, is a preventable and devastating complication with significant morbidity after cardiac surgery. The reported SSI rate at our center, ranging from 3.4% to 11.2% (2007–2013. This rate is considered to be above the standardized rate recommended by the NHSN. Quality improvement project team to address the issue of SSI, (SCIP, where formed by the medical administration late 2014. The aim of the study was to identify SSI risk factors at our cardiac surgical unit, using evidence based practices while taking a local approach to problem solving. We performed Root Cause Analysis (RCA, and we applied other quality improvement tools to identify the area for potential improvement. Data include a Process Map of the pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative factors that might contribute to SSI risk. We prospectively used the RCA form to investigate all the stages of the patient process map (pre, intra op, and post operatively. The data included the Patient related factors, the sterilization and the hygiene practice in the operating room, and the operating room traffic, and the compliance to the bundle of care. Figure represent the “Fishbone” diagram of the possible causes of SSI after cardiac surgery in our unit. Demographic features of patients with SSI were as follows: mean age-65 years; female 83%; time to infection (mean 101 days; range 1–36 days;. The root cause analysis identified a significant weakness in the compliance to the bundle of care to prevent SSI. Furthermore, the patient flow, the operating theatre cleaning and traffic was also identified as a contributing factor to SSI. Surgical site infection after cardiac surgery is a preventable complication. The application of the evidence based practice and structured way of thinking in problem solving, will help identify the potential risk factors. Focusing on solving the right patient process and visually represents the problem will help identifying the

  1. Random safety auditing, root cause analysis, failure mode and effects analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursprung, Robert; Gray, James

    2010-03-01

    Improving quality and safety in health care is a major concern for health care providers, the general public, and policy makers. Errors and quality issues are leading causes of morbidity and mortality across the health care industry. There is evidence that patients in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are at high risk for serious medical errors. To facilitate compliance with safe practices, many institutions have established quality-assurance monitoring procedures. Three techniques that have been found useful in the health care setting are failure mode and effects analysis, root cause analysis, and random safety auditing. When used together, these techniques are effective tools for system analysis and redesign focused on providing safe delivery of care in the complex NICU system. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dispersant effectiveness: Studies into the causes of effectiveness variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.; Kyle, D.; Tennyson, E.

    1995-01-01

    Effectiveness, a key issue of using dispersants, is affected by many interrelated factors. The principal factors involved are the oil composition, dispersant formulation, sea surface turbulence and dispersant quantity. Oil composition is a very strong determinant. Current dispersant formulation effectiveness correlates strongly with the amount of saturate component in the oil. The other components of the oil, the asphaltenes, resins or polars and aromatic fractions show a negative correlation with the dispersant effectiveness. Viscosity is also a predictor of dispersant effectiveness and may have an effect because it is in turn determined by oil composition. Dispersant composition is significant and interacts with oil composition. Dispersants show high effectiveness at HLB values near 10. Sea turbulence strongly affects dispersant effectiveness.Effectiveness rises with increasing turbulence to a maximum value. Effectiveness for current commercial dispersants is gaussian around a peak salinity value. Peak effectiveness is achieved at very high dispersant quantities--at a ratio of 1:5, dispersant-to-oil volume. Dispersant effectiveness for those oils tested and under the conditions measured, is approximately logarithmic with dispersant quantity and will reach about 50% of its peak value at a dispersant to oil ratio of about 1:20 and near zero at a ratio of about 1:50

  3. Effect of corticosteroid therapy in acute pain edema caused by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the curative effect of corticosteroids in the treatment of acute pain, local edema, and skin lesions caused by herpes zoster, and to develop some pertinent therapeutic guidelines. Methods: A total of 48 cases of patients diagnosed with herpes zoster from 2010 to 2011 in the dermatology clinic of Shan ...

  4. Spatiotemporal influence of temperature, air quality, and urban environment on cause-specific mortality during hazy days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hung Chak; Wong, Man Sing; Yang, Lin; Shi, Wenzhong; Yang, Jinxin; Bilal, Muhammad; Chan, Ta-Chien

    2018-03-01

    Haze is an extreme weather event that can severely increase air pollution exposure, resulting in higher burdens on human health. Few studies have explored the health effects of haze, and none have investigated the spatiotemporal interaction between temperature, air quality and urban environment that may exacerbate the adverse health effects of haze. We investigated the spatiotemporal pattern of haze effects and explored the additional effects of temperature, air pollution and urban environment on the short-term mortality risk during hazy days. We applied a Poisson regression model to daily mortality data from 2007 through 2014, to analyze the short-term mortality risk during haze events in Hong Kong. We evaluated the adverse effect on five types of cause-specific mortality after four types of haze event. We also analyzed the additional effect contributed by the spatial variability of urban environment on each type of cause-specific mortality during a specific haze event. A regular hazy day (lag 0) has higher all-cause mortality risk than a day without haze (odds ratio: 1.029 [1.009, 1.049]). We have also observed high mortality risks associated with mental disorders and diseases of the nervous system during hazy days. In addition, extreme weather and air quality contributed to haze-related mortality, while cold weather and higher ground-level ozone had stronger influences on mortality risk. Areas with a high-density environment, lower vegetation, higher anthropogenic heat, and higher PM 2.5 featured stronger effects of haze on mortality than the others. A combined influence of haze, extreme weather/air quality, and urban environment can result in extremely high mortality due to mental/behavioral disorders or diseases of the nervous system. In conclusion, we developed a data-driven technique to analyze the effects of haze on mortality. Our results target the specific dates and areas with higher mortality during haze events, which can be used for development of

  5. Measuring effectiveness of food quality management

    OpenAIRE

    Spiegel, van der, M.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords: effectiveness, food quality management, instrument, quality performance, contextual factors, agri-food production, conceptual model, performance measurement indicators, identification, validation, assessment, quality assurance systems, QA systems, HACCP, Hygiene code, ISO, BRC, GMP, bakery sector.In the last decade several incidents have occurred in the agri-food sector, such as the affairs of dioxin and BSE, whereas also the incidence of food-borne diseases and the production of hi...

  6. Application of cause-and-effect analysis to potentiometric titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufelnicki, A; Lis, S; Meinrath, G

    2005-08-01

    A first attempt has been made to interpret physicochemical data from potentiometric titration analysis in accordance with the complete measurement-uncertainty budget approach (bottom-up) of ISO and Eurachem. A cause-and-effect diagram is established and discussed. Titration data for arsenazo III are used as a basis for this discussion. The commercial software Superquad is used and applied within a computer-intensive resampling framework. The cause-and-effect diagram is applied to evaluation of seven protonation constants of arsenazo III in the pH range 2-10.7. The data interpretation is based on empirical probability distributions and their analysis by second-order correct confidence estimates. The evaluated data are applied in the calculation of a speciation diagram including uncertainty estimates using the probabilistic speciation software Ljungskile.

  7. [Crabtree effect caused by ketoses in isolated rat hepatocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, P; Carrascosa, J M; Núñez de Castro, I

    1982-01-01

    Oxygen uptake and glycolytic activity were studied in hepatocytes isolated from fed rats. The addition of fructose or tagatose resulted in a 38% and 31% inhibition of cellular respiration respectively. The addition of 10 mM D-glyceraldehyde caused a slight Crabtree effect. Glucose, L-sorbose, or glycerol failed to modify oxygen consumption. Only incubation in the presence of fructose showed a high aerobic glycolysis measured by lactate production.

  8. Effect of forage quality in faeces from different ruminant species fed high and low quality forage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalali, A R; Nørgaard, P; Nielsen, M O

    2010-01-01

    Effect of forage quality in faeces from different ruminant species fed high and low quality forage......Effect of forage quality in faeces from different ruminant species fed high and low quality forage...

  9. Revisiting the Effect of Anthropomorphizing a Social Cause Campaign.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Williams

    Full Text Available Recent research suggests that anthropomorphism can be harnessed as a tool to boost intentions to comply with social cause campaigns. Drawing on the human tendency to extend moral concern to entities portrayed as humanlike, it has been argued that adding personified features to a social campaign elevates anticipated guilt at failing to comply, and this subsequently boosts intentions to comply with that campaign. The present research aimed to extend extant research by disentangling the effects of emotional and non-emotional anthropomorphism, and differentiating amongst other emotional mechanisms of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect (namely, anticipated pride and anticipated regret. Experiment 1 (N = 294 compared the effectiveness of positive, negative, and emotionally-neutral anthropomorphized campaign posters for boosting campaign compliance intentions against non-anthropomorphized posters. We also measured potential mechanisms including anticipated guilt, regret, and pride. Results failed to support the anthropomorphism-compliance effect, and no changes in anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. Experiments 2 (N = 150 and 3 (N = 196 represented further tests of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect. Despite high statistical power and efforts to closely replicate the conditions under which the anthropomorphism-compliance effect had been previously observed, no differences in compliance intention or anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. A meta-analysis of the effects of anthropomorphism on compliance and anticipated emotion across the three experiments revealed effect size estimates that did not differ significantly from zero. The results of these three experiments suggest that the anthropomorphism-compliance effect is fragile and perhaps subject to contextual and idiographic influences. Thus, this research provides important insight and impetus for future research on the applied and theoretical

  10. Revisiting the Effect of Anthropomorphizing a Social Cause Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lisa A; Masser, Barbara; Sun, Jessie

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests that anthropomorphism can be harnessed as a tool to boost intentions to comply with social cause campaigns. Drawing on the human tendency to extend moral concern to entities portrayed as humanlike, it has been argued that adding personified features to a social campaign elevates anticipated guilt at failing to comply, and this subsequently boosts intentions to comply with that campaign. The present research aimed to extend extant research by disentangling the effects of emotional and non-emotional anthropomorphism, and differentiating amongst other emotional mechanisms of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect (namely, anticipated pride and anticipated regret). Experiment 1 (N = 294) compared the effectiveness of positive, negative, and emotionally-neutral anthropomorphized campaign posters for boosting campaign compliance intentions against non-anthropomorphized posters. We also measured potential mechanisms including anticipated guilt, regret, and pride. Results failed to support the anthropomorphism-compliance effect, and no changes in anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. Experiments 2 (N = 150) and 3 (N = 196) represented further tests of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect. Despite high statistical power and efforts to closely replicate the conditions under which the anthropomorphism-compliance effect had been previously observed, no differences in compliance intention or anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. A meta-analysis of the effects of anthropomorphism on compliance and anticipated emotion across the three experiments revealed effect size estimates that did not differ significantly from zero. The results of these three experiments suggest that the anthropomorphism-compliance effect is fragile and perhaps subject to contextual and idiographic influences. Thus, this research provides important insight and impetus for future research on the applied and theoretical utility of

  11. POOR QUALITY OF PRODUCT DESIGN AS A CAUSE OF OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH HAZARDS: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janko D. Jovanović

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Quality of product design, which is expected from manufacturers on world market these days, could be provided exclusively by integral approach to product design. Such approach aims to achievement of optimal design solution of product, which is in line with a number of requirements, conditions and limitations of functionality, technology, market and usage. Only those manufacturers who are able to provide such approach to product design have prospective on market. This paper deals with a case study of neglect of integral approach to product design and its consequencies, in order to spread awareness of necessity of its adoption. Scope of this case study is focused on bridge crane whose working vibrations are meant to be potential cause of occupational desease of spinal column of crane operator.

  12. General review on climate change problems: causes, potential effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martellet, J.

    1991-01-01

    Greenhouse gases and greenhouse effect principles are reviewed and climate changes due to the human activities are discussed: identification of gases, human or natural causes, composition evolution in the atmosphere and relative roles of greenhouse gases. The various tools and calculations methods for evaluating the climate change due to greenhouse effect are presented. Several problems are stated: evolution of the climate structure in 2030, variations of the climatic extremes and the extreme phenomena, augmentation or diminution of the storms on a warmed planet, long term evolution of the climate. Some consequences of a climate change are reviewed: sea level raising, climate change effects on ecosystems. Precision and validity of these predictions are discussed; recommendations for diminishing the uncertainties are proposed

  13. Black-boxing and cause-effect power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albantakis, Larissa; Tononi, Giulio

    2018-01-01

    Reductionism assumes that causation in the physical world occurs at the micro level, excluding the emergence of macro-level causation. We challenge this reductionist assumption by employing a principled, well-defined measure of intrinsic cause-effect power–integrated information (Φ), and showing that, according to this measure, it is possible for a macro level to “beat” the micro level. Simple systems were evaluated for Φ across different spatial and temporal scales by systematically considering all possible black boxes. These are macro elements that consist of one or more micro elements over one or more micro updates. Cause-effect power was evaluated based on the inputs and outputs of the black boxes, ignoring the internal micro elements that support their input-output function. We show how black-box elements can have more common inputs and outputs than the corresponding micro elements, revealing the emergence of high-order mechanisms and joint constraints that are not apparent at the micro level. As a consequence, a macro, black-box system can have higher Φ than its micro constituents by having more mechanisms (higher composition) that are more interconnected (higher integration). We also show that, for a given micro system, one can identify local maxima of Φ across several spatiotemporal scales. The framework is demonstrated on a simple biological system, the Boolean network model of the fission-yeast cell-cycle, for which we identify stable local maxima during the course of its simulated biological function. These local maxima correspond to macro levels of organization at which emergent cause-effect properties of physical systems come into focus, and provide a natural vantage point for scientific inquiries. PMID:29684020

  14. Black-boxing and cause-effect power.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Marshall

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Reductionism assumes that causation in the physical world occurs at the micro level, excluding the emergence of macro-level causation. We challenge this reductionist assumption by employing a principled, well-defined measure of intrinsic cause-effect power-integrated information (Φ, and showing that, according to this measure, it is possible for a macro level to "beat" the micro level. Simple systems were evaluated for Φ across different spatial and temporal scales by systematically considering all possible black boxes. These are macro elements that consist of one or more micro elements over one or more micro updates. Cause-effect power was evaluated based on the inputs and outputs of the black boxes, ignoring the internal micro elements that support their input-output function. We show how black-box elements can have more common inputs and outputs than the corresponding micro elements, revealing the emergence of high-order mechanisms and joint constraints that are not apparent at the micro level. As a consequence, a macro, black-box system can have higher Φ than its micro constituents by having more mechanisms (higher composition that are more interconnected (higher integration. We also show that, for a given micro system, one can identify local maxima of Φ across several spatiotemporal scales. The framework is demonstrated on a simple biological system, the Boolean network model of the fission-yeast cell-cycle, for which we identify stable local maxima during the course of its simulated biological function. These local maxima correspond to macro levels of organization at which emergent cause-effect properties of physical systems come into focus, and provide a natural vantage point for scientific inquiries.

  15. Effects of political institutions on air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernauer, Thomas; Koubi, Vally

    2009-01-01

    We empirically test existing theories on the provision of public goods, in particular air quality, using data on sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) concentrations from the Global Environment Monitoring Projects for 107 cities in 42 countries from 1971 to 1996. The results are as follows: First, we provide additional support for the claim that the degree of democracy has an independent positive effect on air quality. Second, we find that among democracies, presidential systems are more conducive to air quality than parliamentary ones. Third, in testing competing claims about the effect of interest groups on public goods provision in democracies we establish that labor union strength contributes to lower environmental quality, whereas the strength of green parties has the opposite effect. (author)

  16. THE PRESENT COLLAPSE OF ROMANIAN HIGHER EDUCATION. CAUSES AND EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIELA DUMBRAVĂ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper corroborates statistical data of economic and social nature in an attempt to outline the national and European context within which the Romanian educational system has constantly degraded over the past years. At the same time, the study exceeds the limits of a simple identification of causes and analyzes the collapse of higher education both as an ultimate consequence of governmental oblivion towards national education, and from the perspective of its devastating boomerang effect on the Romanian economy and on the society at large.

  17. I and C functional test facility malfunction cause and effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee Choon.

    1997-06-01

    The objective of I and C function test facility (FTF) is to validate newly developed digital control and protection algorithm, alarm reduction algorithm and the function of operator support system and so on. To realize transient and accident situation in the FTF, the result of the activation of malfunction should be similar to the situation of real nuclear power plants. In this technical report, describe the Group, Malfunction No., Description, Option, Recommendations, Considered in Subroutine, Limitations, Cause, and Effect of the malfunctions implemented in FTF. (author)

  18. Effects of operative treatment for muscular asthenopia caused by esophoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zeng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the effects of operative treatment for muscular asthenopia caused by esophoria. METHODS:Twenty-one cases(42 eyeswith muscular asthenopia caused by esophoria were included. After examination of refraction, phoria and fusion function, all cases were given operative treatment to correct esophoria. RESULTS:At 1wk after surgery, clinical symptoms were improved evidently in all cases, such as headache, diplopia and eye swelling. After followed up for 1a, no recrudescence was found. Before surgery, at 1wk and 1a after surgery, esophoria in the distance were 20.3△±6.3△,-3.1△±1.4△,0.7△±1.6△ respectively and esophoria in the near distance were 10.5△±3.1△,-1.3△±0.6△,1.5△±0.8△ respectively. By comparison of esophoria before and after surgery in different stages separately, the differences were statistically(PP>0.05. CONCLUSION:Esophoria operation may relieve obviously muscular asthenopia caused by esophoria without changing fusion function.

  19. Healthcare Access and Quality Index based on mortality from causes amenable to personal health care in 195 countries and territories, 1990–2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Background National levels of personal health-care access and quality can be approximated by measuring mortality rates from causes that should not be fatal in the presence of effective medical care (ie, amenable mortality). Previous analyses of mortality amenable to health care only focused on high......-income countries and faced several methodological challenges. In the present analysis, we use the highly standardised cause of death and risk factor estimates generated through the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) to improve and expand the quantification of personal health-care...... the extensive data standardisation processes and redistribution algorithms developed for GBD. To isolate the effects of personal health-care access and quality, we risk-standardised cause-specific mortality rates for each geography-year by removing the joint effects of local environmental and behavioural risks...

  20. What causes the density effect in young forest plantations?; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbara J. Bond; Gary A. Ritchie

    2002-01-01

    In young forest plantations, trees planted at high densities frequently show more rapid height and diameter growth than those plants at lower densities. This positive growth response to density (the ''density effect'') often manifests long before seedlings are tall enough to shade one another, so it is not a simple response to shade. The mechanism(s) which trigger and sustain this growth enhancement are unknown. Our objectives were to document the temporal dynamics of positive growth response to increasing density in Douglas-fir plantations and to test two hypotheses as potential mechanisms for this response. The hypotheses are (1) a canopy boundary layer effect, and (2) alterations in the quality of light reflected from neighboring trees. The ''boundary layer'' hypotheses proposes that changes in atmospheric mixing occur in high-density plantations, promoting increased concentrations of CO(sub 2) and H(sub 2)O vapor during early morning hours, which in turn would enhance carbon assimilation. The ''light quality'' hypothesis proposes that the presence of neighbors alters the ratio of red to far red light in the canopy environment. Plant sensors detect this change in light quality, and growth and development is altered in response. We found that boundary layer conductance was higher, as we predicted, in low-density Douglas-fir stands than in high-density stands five years after planting. The changes in boundary conductance were accompanied by higher CO(sub 2) and H(sub 2)O vapor during early morning hours. However, we also found that the primary manifestation of the density effect in Douglas-fir occurs two to four years after planting, and we were not able to measure differences in boundary conductance in different densities at that time. Also, we found no difference in carbon isotope composition of wood cellulose formed in high- vs. low-density stands two to three years after planting. We conclude that although stand density may have a significant impact on

  1. Hypoxemia in patients with COPD: cause, effects, and disease progression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Brian D

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death and disability internationally. Alveolar hypoxia and consequent hypoxemia increase in prevalence as disease severity increases. Ventilation\\/perfusion mismatch resulting from progressive airflow limitation and emphysema is the key driver of this hypoxia, which may be exacerbated by sleep and exercise. Uncorrected chronic hypoxemia is associated with the development of adverse sequelae of COPD, including pulmonary hypertension, secondary polycythemia, systemic inflammation, and skeletal muscle dysfunction. A combination of these factors leads to diminished quality of life, reduced exercise tolerance, increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity, and greater risk of death. Concomitant sleep-disordered breathing may place a small but significant subset of COPD patients at increased risk of these complications. Long-term oxygen therapy has been shown to improve pulmonary hemodynamics, reduce erythrocytosis, and improve survival in selected patients with severe hypoxemic respiratory failure. However, the optimal treatment for patients with exertional oxyhemoglobin desaturation, isolated nocturnal hypoxemia, or mild-to-moderate resting daytime hypoxemia remains uncertain.

  2. Do Carpets Impair Indoor Air Quality and Cause Adverse Health Outcomes: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Becher

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several earlier studies have shown the presence of more dust and allergens in carpets compared with non-carpeted floors. At the same time, adverse effects of carpeted floors on perceived indoor air quality as well as worsening of symptoms in individuals with asthma and allergies were reported. Avoiding extensive carpet use in offices, schools, kindergartens and bedrooms has therefore been recommended by several health authorities. More recently, carpet producers have argued that former assessments were obsolete and that modern rugs are unproblematic, even for those with asthma and allergies. To investigate whether the recommendation to be cautious with the use of carpets is still valid, or whether there are new data supporting that carpet flooring do not present a problem for indoor air quality and health, we have reviewed the literature on this matter. We have not found updated peer reviewed evidence that carpeted floor is unproblematic for the indoor environment. On the contrary, also more recent data support that carpets may act as a repository for pollutants which may become resuspended upon activity in the carpeted area. Also, the use of carpets is still linked to perception of reduced indoor air quality as well as adverse health effects as previously reported. To our knowledge, there are no publications that report on deposition of pollutants and adverse health outcomes associated with modern rugs. However, due to the three-dimensional structure of carpets, any carpet will to some extent act like a sink. Thus, continued caution should still be exercised when considering the use of wall-to-wall carpeted floors in schools, kindergartens and offices, as well as in children’s bedrooms unless special needs indicate that carpets are preferable.

  3. Do Carpets Impair Indoor Air Quality and Cause Adverse Health Outcomes: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Rune; Øvrevik, Johan; Schwarze, Per E; Nilsen, Steinar; Hongslo, Jan K; Bakke, Jan Vilhelm

    2018-01-23

    Several earlier studies have shown the presence of more dust and allergens in carpets compared with non-carpeted floors. At the same time, adverse effects of carpeted floors on perceived indoor air quality as well as worsening of symptoms in individuals with asthma and allergies were reported. Avoiding extensive carpet use in offices, schools, kindergartens and bedrooms has therefore been recommended by several health authorities. More recently, carpet producers have argued that former assessments were obsolete and that modern rugs are unproblematic, even for those with asthma and allergies. To investigate whether the recommendation to be cautious with the use of carpets is still valid, or whether there are new data supporting that carpet flooring do not present a problem for indoor air quality and health, we have reviewed the literature on this matter. We have not found updated peer reviewed evidence that carpeted floor is unproblematic for the indoor environment. On the contrary, also more recent data support that carpets may act as a repository for pollutants which may become resuspended upon activity in the carpeted area. Also, the use of carpets is still linked to perception of reduced indoor air quality as well as adverse health effects as previously reported. To our knowledge, there are no publications that report on deposition of pollutants and adverse health outcomes associated with modern rugs. However, due to the three-dimensional structure of carpets, any carpet will to some extent act like a sink. Thus, continued caution should still be exercised when considering the use of wall-to-wall carpeted floors in schools, kindergartens and offices, as well as in children's bedrooms unless special needs indicate that carpets are preferable.

  4. Quality assurance and organizational effectiveness in hospitals.

    OpenAIRE

    Hetherington, R W

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore some aspects of a general theoretical model within which research on the organizational impacts of quality assurance programs in hospitals may be examined. Quality assurance is conceptualized as an organizational control mechanism, operating primarily through increased formalization of structures and specification of procedures. Organizational effectiveness is discussed from the perspective of the problem-solving theory of organizations, wherein effecti...

  5. Simulation of defoliation caused by Black Sigatoka in the yield and quality of banana 'Nanica ' fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Domingues Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Defoliation caused by Black Sigatoka in yield and quality of banana 'Nanica' was stimulated in this study. A completely randomized 2x8 factorial design with six repetitions was used, in which period of bunch formation and number of leaves at flowering were established as factors. Plants for defoliation were selected on 04/05/2013 (Period 1, and on 07/01/2014 (Period 2. Six to to 13 leaves remained per plant by removing those with more than 50% of blade with injury or senescence. More appropriate climatic conditions before and after flowering, promoted greater mass accumulation in the bunch in Period 2. The increased number of leaves at flowering increased the length of the fruit and the mass of 4th hand, as well as the bunch mass and postharvest period. Defoliation is suggested only for non-functional leaves as well as the maintenance of at least 10 leaves per plant, independent of the period of bunch formation.

  6. Vascular pathology: Cause or effect in Alzheimer disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius-Pérez, S; Tormos, A M; Pérez, S; Taléns-Visconti, R

    2018-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the main cortical neurodegenerative disease. The incidence of this disease increases with age, causing significant medical, social and economic problems, especially in countries with ageing populations. This review aims to highlight existing evidence of how vascular dysfunction may contribute to cognitive impairment in AD, as well as the therapeutic possibilities that might arise from this evidence. The vascular hypothesis emerged as an alternative to the amyloid cascade hypothesis as an explanation for the pathophysiology of AD. This hypothesis locates blood vessels as the origin for a variety of pathogenic pathways that lead to neuronal damage and dementia. Destruction of the organisation of the blood brain barrier, decreased cerebral blood flow, and the establishment of an inflammatory context would thus be responsible for any subsequent neuronal damage since these factors promote aggregation of β-amyloid peptide in the brain. The link between neurodegeneration and vascular dysfunction pathways has provided new drug targets and therapeutic approaches that will add to the treatments for AD. It is difficult to determine whether the vascular component in AD is the cause or the effect of the disease, but there is no doubt that vascular pathology has an important relationship with AD. Vascular dysfunction is likely to act synergistically with neurodegenerative changes in a cycle that exacerbates the cognitive impairment found in AD. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of air quality on sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Wargocki, Pawel; Wyon, David Peter

    2014-01-01

    The effect of air quality on sleep was examined for occupants of 14 identical single-occupancy dormitory rooms. The subjects, half women, were exposed to two conditions (open/closed window), each for one week, resulting in night-time average CO2 levels of 660 and 2585 ppm, and air temperatures...... performance. Although no significant effects on the sleep quality scale or on next-day performance could be shown, there were significant and positive effects of a higher ventilation rate (open window) on the actigraph measured sleep latency and on the subjects’ assessment of the freshness of the air...... of 24.7 and 23.9°C, respectively. Sleep was assessed from movement data recorded on wristwatch-type actigraphs and from online morning questionnaires, including the Groningen Sleep Quality scale, questions about the sleep environment, next-day well-being, SBS symptoms, and two tests of mental...

  8. Erosion of Brassica incana Genetic Resources: Causes and Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscolo, A.; Settineri, G.; Mallamaci, C.; Papalia, T.; Sidari, M.

    2017-07-01

    Brassica incana Ten., possessing a number of useful agronomic traits, represents a precious genetic resource to be used in plant breeding programs to broaden the genetic base in most Brassica crop species. B. incana that grows on limestone cliffs is at risk of genetic erosion for environmental constraints and human activities. We studied the pedological conditions of a Calabrian site where the B. incana grows, and we correlated the soil properties to the physiological and biochemical aspects of B. incana to identify the causes and effects of the genetic erosion of this species. Our results evidenced that physical soil conditions did not affect B. incana growth and nutraceutical properties; conversely, biological soil properties modified its properties. We identified leaf pigments and secondary metabolites that can be used routinely as early warning indicators of plant threat, to evaluate in a short term the dynamic behavior of plants leading to species extinction.

  9. Exploring environmental causes of altered ras effects: fragmentation plus integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Miquel; Ayude, Daniel; Alguacil, Juan; Jariod, Manuel

    2003-02-01

    Mutations in ras genes are the most common abnormality of oncogenes in human cancer and a major example of activation by point mutation. Experimental and epidemiological studies support the notion that Ki-ras activation and expression may be chemically related. We discuss the potential role of several environmental compounds in the induction or promotion of ras mutations in humans, with a focus on exocrine pancreatic cancer, the human tumor with the highest prevalence at diagnosis of Ki-ras mutations. Organochlorine compounds, organic solvents, and coffee compounds may play an indirect role in causing Ki-ras mutations, rather than as direct inducers of the mutations. Although for some organochlorine compounds the induction of point mutations in ras oncogenes cannot be excluded, it seems more likely that the effects of these compounds are mediated through nongenomic or indirectly genotoxic mechanisms of action. Organic solvents also may act via enzymatic induction of ras mutagens or by providing a proliferation advantage to ras-mutated cell clones. In exocrine pancreatic cancer, caffeine, other coffee compounds, or other factors with which coffee drinking is associated could modulate Ki-ras activation by interfering with DNA repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis. Asbestos, cigarette smoking, and some dietary factors also may be involved in the initiation or the promotion of Ki-ras mutations in lung and colon cancers. Further development of the mechanistic scenarios proposed here could contribute to a meaningful integration of biological, clinical, and environmental knowledge on the causes of altered ras effects. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. The causes of geometry effects in ductile tearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.J.; Griesbach, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    An adequate understanding of geometry effects in ductile tearing can only be achieved when the different causes of the effects are distinguished and these geometry effects are linked to particular micromechanical fracture processes or global deformation mechanisms. It is shown that the micromechanical process of ductile (fibrous) fracture is dependent on achieving a critical strain, which is only slightly dependent on the stress state for the range of triaxiality conditions in pressure vessels and through-cracked plates. Under certain conditions, the crack tip strain can be shown to scale with the value of the J integral and there is a direct connection between J and the underlying micro mechanical process. This connection is lost for significant crack extension or large-scale plasticity. Nevertheless the J integral may still be use on an empirical basis under some conditions. Under fully-plastic conditions the primary source of geometry dependence in the J-R curves is due to the geometry dependence of the shape and volume of the plastic region that develops around the uncracked ligament. This occurs because J is essentially proportional to the total plastic work done on the specimen. If it can be assured that the fracture mode in both the test specimen and the structure will remain fully fibrous, it is conservative to extrapolate J-R curves generated from small compact specimens for the analysis of pressure vessel crack stability. 132 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Poor housing quality: Prevalence and health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Emma; Lester, Laurence H; Bentley, Rebecca; Beer, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Housing is a central component of productive, healthy, and meaningful lives, and a principle social determinant of health and well-being. Surprisingly, though, evidence on the ways that housing influences health in Australia is poorly developed. This stems largely from the fact that the majority of the population are accommodated in good quality housing. The dominance of a "good housing paradigm" means that households living in poor quality and unhealthy housing are doubly disadvantaged-by the quality of their housing and because policy makers in Australia do not acknowledge the health effects of housing. In this article, we examine the relationship between health outcomes and quality of housing. We base our analysis on data from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey, a panel dataset that is representative across Australia. We find a sizeable, policy-important, and to date under-acknowledged cohort of Australians whose health is influenced by poor-condition dwellings.

  12. Cause and effect analysis by fuzzy relational equations and a genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotshtein, Alexander P.; Posner, Morton; Rakytyanska, Hanna B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes using a genetic algorithm as a tool to solve the fault diagnosis problem. The fault diagnosis problem is based on a cause and effect analysis which is formally described by fuzzy relations. Fuzzy relations are formed on the basis of expert assessments. Application of expert fuzzy relations to restore and identify the causes through the observed effects requires the solution to a system of fuzzy relational equations. In this study this search for a solution amounts to solving a corresponding optimization problem. An optimization algorithm is based on the application of genetic operations of crossover, mutation and selection. The genetic algorithm suggested here represents an application in expert systems of fault diagnosis and quality control

  13. Effects of tear film dynamics on quality of vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Shizuka; Tung, Cynthia I; Inoue, Yasushi; Jhanji, Vishal

    2018-06-15

    The precorneal tear film is maintained by blinking and exhibits different phases in the tear cycle. The tear film serves as the most anterior surface of the eye and plays an important role as a first refractive component of the eye. Alterations in tear film dynamics may cause both vision-related and ocular surface-related symptoms. Although the optical quality associated with the tear film dynamics previously received little attention, objective measurements of optical quality using wavefront sensors have enabled us to quantify optical aberrations induced by the tear film. This has provided an objective method for assessing reduced optical quality in dry eye; thus, visual disturbances were included in the definition of dry eye disease in the 2007 Dry Eye Workshop report. In addition, sequential measurements of wavefront aberrations have provided us with valuable insights into the dynamic optical changes associated with tear film dynamics. This review will focus on the current knowledge of the mechanisms of wavefront variations that are caused by different aspects of tear film dynamics: specifically, quality, quantity and properties of the tear film, demonstrating the respective effects of dry eye, epiphora and instillation of eye drops on the quality of vision. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Equity and Quality Dimensions in Educational Effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kyriakides, L.; Creemers, B.P.M.; Charalambous, E.

    2018-01-01

    This book aims to make a contribution to the theory, research and practice on quality and equity in education by providing a comprehensive overview of these two dimensions of educational effectiveness and proposing a methodological instrument that may be used to measure the contribution that each

  15. Quality and effectiveness of strategic environmental assessment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the SEA also achieved significant successes in terms of 'indirect outputs', such as a more holistic approach to water management, facilitated more effective public participation and contributed to broader strategic planning in the department. The paper concludes by making recommendations to improve the quality ...

  16. Loneliness and sleep quality: dyadic effects and stress effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segrin, Chris; Burke, Tricia J

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this investigation are to determine whether loneliness is associated with a person's own sleep quality and sleep quality of their partner, and to test stress as a potential mediator. Participants were 255 couples in married (75%) or cohabiting relationships who completed self-report measures of loneliness, sleep quality, stress, and depression. Results of Actor-Partner Interdependence analyses replicated findings in the literature showing an association between loneliness and poor sleep quality. The more lonely a male participant was, the lower his partner's sleep quality. In addition, the more lonely participants were, the higher they rated their partner's sleep disturbance. There were significant indirect effects of loneliness on poor sleep quality through increased stress, even after controlling for depression.

  17. Defensiveness in Communication: Its Causes, Effects, and Cures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William H.

    1980-01-01

    Analyzes defensiveness in communication as caused by an unwillingness to acknowledge and tolerate differences in others, a fear of change in ourselves, and a desire to avoid mental imbalance. It causes a deteriorating cycle between communicators but can be reduced by empathy, treatment of fellow communicators as equals, and genuineness. (JMF)

  18. Distinguishing Cause from Effect Using Observational Data: Methods and Benchmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, J.M.; Peters, J.; Janzing, D.; Zscheischler, J.; Schölkopf, B.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of causal relationships from purely observational data is a fundamental problem in science. The most elementary form of such a causal discovery problem is to decide whether X causes Y or, alternatively, Y causes X, given joint observations of two variables X,Y. An example is to decide

  19. Violence Against Women: Causes, Effects and Challenges to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discusses the types of violence against women such as physical, sexual and emotional abuse. It is argued that the causes of violence against women are multifarious but sex-ratio, male chauvinism, change of values, economic harship and legal protection are the major causes. The violence affects the social, ...

  20. Hypertension in Adults: Part 1. Prevalence, types, causes and effects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Siegal_D

    Hyper / Hypothyroidism. ▫ Acromegaly. ▫ Hyperparathyroidism. ▫ Exogenous hormones, e.g. contraceptive pills, glucocorticoids. 2. Renal causes: ▫ Glomerulonephritis. ▫ Diabetic nephropathy. ▫ Polycystic kidney disease. ▫ Renal artery stenosis. 3. Other causes: ▫ Coarctation of the aorta. ▫ Pregnancy associated hypertension.

  1. Cause Related Marketing and its Effects on Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Quiñones

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Research is lacking concerning the perspectives professional accountants and the administrative staffs working for a global firm strongly involved in social causes have concerning cause-related (CRM. This paper discusses internal customers’ (employees feelings towards cause-related marketing activities sponsored by their employer at an important accounting firm located in Puerto Rico. The results show that internal customers strongly favor the firms’ involvement in cause-related activities and that such activities not only increases the public perception of the firm, but in addition, the way the firm is perceived as an employer, by both the business and non-business communities. The main driving force supporting internal customers responses appear to be an increased awareness of worthy causes throughout our society, as well as employees urge in making significant contributions to their surrounding environment or community of which they are also part of.

  2. Lower limb atherosclerotic disease causes various deteriorations of patients' health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Kirsi; Lukkarinen, Hannele

    2006-12-01

    Lower limb atherosclerotic disease (LLAD) is a worldwide health problem. Approximately 100,000 Finns have LLAD. Currently, a large number of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) studies are available, but we still have scant comprehensive information of HRQoL of patients with LLAD. The aim was to describe the HRQoL of women and men with LLAD in relation to the age- and sex-matched general population. In addition, the purpose was to study which demographic and relevant clinical and psychologic factors are connected with HRQoL of patients with LLAD. Patients with LLAD (N = 180, 62 women and 118 men) were recruited to participate in this study in the Clinic of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, from 2001 to 2004. The control sample consisted of an age- and sex-matched general population (N = 2126; 1081 women and 1045 men). The HRQoL of the women and men with LLAD was evaluated using the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) instrument, in relation to an age- and sex-matched general population (N = 2126) as well as demographic and relevant clinical and psychologic factors. The HRQoL of men was significantly (P women with LLAD was only significantly poorer (P women. The most emphasized relationships between poor HRQoL and the demographic, relevant clinical and psychologic factors were male sex, lack of exercise, retirement, a short painless walking distance, other atherosclerotic disease, poor subjective health status, problems with ability to cope at home, problems with the treatment of illness, and sex life. Male patients with LLAD had poorer HRQoL than the corresponding female patients on the dimensions of energy (P = .023), emotional reaction (P = .050), social isolation (P = .028), and NHP total score (P = .023). Those who did not exercise regularly had poorer HRQoL on the dimensions of energy (P = .005), pain (P = .049), emotional reaction (P = .007), social isolation (P = .001), and physical mobility (P = .028) than those who did exercise regularly. The HRQoL of

  3. Air Quality Deterioration of Urban Areas Caused by Wildfires in a Natural Reservoir Forest of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Carbajal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many regions of the world suffer loss of vegetation and reduced air quality due to wildfires. Studies on aerosol emissions by wildfires often discuss the negative effects of atmospheric contaminants from a regional or mesoscale perspective. The occurrence of wildfires reveals that a high percentage takes place close to large urban areas. Very high concentration of pollutants and PM10 particulate matter reach urban zones and millions of inhabitants. These events of high pollutant concentrations are seasonally recurrent. There are many large urban areas in the world that often undergo severe air deterioration due to wildfires smoke. We document the extreme impact of wildfire that occurs in the Protected Area of Flora and Fauna La Primavera located in neighborhood of Guadalajara, a large urban zone in Mexico. The simultaneous emissions of aerosols by 60 wildfires were simulated and compared with observed data. The plume generated by the wildfires reached large areas of the central part of Mexico. The principal characteristics of smog emissions (CO, NO2, and PM10 over the urban area were acceptably reproduced. Observed and modeled CO, PM10, and NO2 data indicated that aerosol plumes generated by the wildfires increased notably the concentrations over the metropolitan zone of Guadalajara.

  4. Natural hazard communication : effectiveness and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presta, A.; Sole, A.; de Luca, G.

    2009-04-01

    Scientific, technological and methodological knowledge regarding the risks caused by natural events are in continuous evolution. A careful analysis of the communication and information, practiced by administrations and institutions involved in the decision-making processes, show a peculiar difference between the quality of the theoretical-operating level and the effectiveness of communication systems of the risk obtained. This is the level which involves directly citizens and institutions and needs, therefore, an efficacious and shared system whose aim is to inform the whole community, in a simple and clear way, during the different phases correlated to the environmental risk. The hypotesis is, in fact, to create a distinct typology of message, corresponding to each phase: • prevention of the risk > sensitization > information. If the potential risk is imminent or changes into real emergency, it is necessary to plan a communication aimed at supporting a very fast alarm to the community. • anticipation of the risk > pre-alert > information • imminence of the risk > alert > alarm • post-event /risk > information > precept and rules. The lack of a uniform and coerent planning process, both on the linguistic field (the typology of the message, iconic and verbal) and technical (the typology of supports) it is clear analysing the reference scenario in Italy. This involves the creation of deeply discordant systems which don't communicate the different typologies of risk efficaciously during distinct moments. To come to a systemic vision of the problem we proceed to collect and to obtain documentation about the "alarm" and communication systems existing in Italy nowadays. So we will have a classification of the different typologies about natural risk and communication systems related to them. The aim of this research is to propose a rationalization and a standard coding of signals. The logical conclusion of this course can be the creation of a national

  5. No-Reference Video Quality Assessment Model for Distortion Caused by Packet Loss in the Real-Time Mobile Video Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiarun Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Packet loss will make severe errors due to the corruption of related video data. For most video streams, because the predictive coding structures are employed, the transmission errors in one frame will not only cause decoding failure of itself at the receiver side, but also propagate to its subsequent frames along the motion prediction path, which will bring a significant degradation of end-to-end video quality. To quantify the effects of packet loss on video quality, a no-reference objective quality assessment model is presented in this paper. Considering the fact that the degradation of video quality significantly relies on the video content, the temporal complexity is estimated to reflect the varying characteristic of video content, using the macroblocks with different motion activities in each frame. Then, the quality of the frame affected by the reference frame loss, by error propagation, or by both of them is evaluated, respectively. Utilizing a two-level temporal pooling scheme, the video quality is finally obtained. Extensive experimental results show that the video quality estimated by the proposed method matches well with the subjective quality.

  6. Insight in schizophrenia spectrum disorders: relationship with behavior, mood and perceived quality of life, underlying causes and emerging treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaker, Paul H; Pattison, Michelle L; Leonhardt, Bethany L; Phelps, Scott; Vohs, Jenifer L

    2018-02-01

    Poor insight in schizophrenia is prevalent across cultures and phases of illness. In this review, we examine the recent research on the relationship of insight with behavior, mood and perceived quality of life, on its complex roots, and on the effects of existing and emerging treatments. This research indicates that poor insight predicts poorer treatment adherence and therapeutic alliance, higher symptom severity and more impaired community function, while good insight predicts a higher frequency of depression and demoralization, especially when coupled with stigma and social disadvantage. This research also suggests that poor insight may arise in response to biological, experiential, neuropsychological, social-cognitive, metacognitive and socio-political factors. Studies of the effects of existing and developing treatments indicate that they may influence insight. In the context of earlier research and historical models, these findings support an integrative model of poor insight. This model suggests that insight requires the integration of information about changes in internal states, external circumstances, others' perspectives and life trajectory as well as the multifaceted consequences and causes of each of those changes. One implication is that treatments should, beyond providing education, seek to assist persons with schizophrenia to integrate the broad range of complex and potentially deeply painful experiences which are associated with mental illness into their own personally meaningful, coherent and adaptive picture. © 2018 World Psychiatric Association.

  7. Selenium toxicity: cause and effects in aquatic birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallholz, J.E.; Hoffman, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    There are several manners in which selenium may express its toxicity: (1) an important mechanism appears to involve the formation of CH3Se- which either enters a redox cycle and generates superoxide and oxidative stress, or forms free radicals that bind to and inhibit important enzymes and proteins. (2) Excess selenium as selenocysteine results in inhibition of selenium methylation metabolism. As a consequence, concentrations of hydrogen selenide, an intermediate metabolite, accumulate in animals and are hepatotoxic, possibly causing other selenium-related adverse effects. (3) It is also possible that the presence of excess selenium analogs of sulfur-containing enzymes and structural proteins play a role in avian teratogenesis. l-selenomethionine is the most likely major dietary form of selenium encountered by aquatic birds, with lesser amounts of l-selenocysteine ingested from aquatic animal foods. The literature is suggestive that l-selenomethionine is not any more toxic to adult birds than other animals. l-Selenomethionine accumulates in tissue protein of adult birds and in the protein of egg white as would be expected to occur in animals. There is no suggestion from the literature that the levels of l-selenomethionine that would be expected to accumulate in eggs in the absence of environmental concentration of selenium pose harm to the developing embryo. For several species of aquatic birds, levels of Se as selenomethionine in the egg above 3 ppm on a wet weight basis result in reduced hatchability and deformed embryos. The toxicity of l-selenomethionine injected directly into eggs is greater than that found from the entry of l-selenomethionine into the egg from the normal adult diet. This suggests that there is unusual if not abnormal metabolism of l-selenomethionine in the embryo not seen when l-selenomethionine is present in egg white protein where it likely serves as a source of selenium for glutathione peroxidase synthesis in the developing aquatic chick.

  8. ANALYSIS OF THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF RECIDIVISM IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    objectives: causes, consequences, and prevention and control of recidivism in the Nigerian ... not only facing the Nigerian prison system but also the society at large. Abrifor et al. ..... Relational problems with peers, gender and delinquency.

  9. Motion-induced blindness and microsaccades: cause and effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonneh, Y.S.; Donner, T.H.; Sagi, D.; Fried, M.; Heeger, D.J.; Arieli, A.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that subjective disappearance of visual stimuli results from a spontaneous reduction of microsaccade rate causing image stabilization, enhanced adaptation, and a consequent fading. In motion-induced blindness (MIB), salient visual targets disappear intermittently when

  10. Effect of corticosteroid therapy in acute pain edema caused by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and skin lesions caused by herpes zoster, and to develop some pertinent therapeutic guidelines. Methods: A total of 48 ... antiviral, pain-relieving and nerve nutrition. They were ... nerve dysfunction as well as Ramsay-Hunt syndrome (facial.

  11. Effects of Diet on Sleep Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Mikic, Anja; Pietrolungo, Cara E

    2016-09-01

    There is much emerging information surrounding the impact of sleep duration and quality on food choice and consumption in both children and adults. However, less attention has been paid to the effects of dietary patterns and specific foods on nighttime sleep. Early studies have shown that certain dietary patterns may affect not only daytime alertness but also nighttime sleep. In this review, we surveyed the literature to describe the role of food consumption on sleep. Research has focused on the effects of mixed meal patterns, such as high-carbohydrate plus low-fat or low-carbohydrate diets, over the short term on sleep. Such studies highlight a potential effect of macronutrient intakes on sleep variables, particularly alterations in slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep with changes in carbohydrate and fat intakes. Other studies instead examined the intake of specific foods, consumed at a fixed time relative to sleep, on sleep architecture and quality. Those foods, specifically milk, fatty fish, tart cherry juice, and kiwifruit, are reviewed here. Studies provide some evidence for a role of certain dietary patterns and foods in the promotion of high-quality sleep, but more studies are necessary to confirm those preliminary findings. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Root-Cause Analysis of Persistently High Maternal Mortality in a Rural District of Indonesia: Role of Clinical Care Quality and Health Services Organizational Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Afzal Mahmood

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite significant reduction in maternal mortality, there are still many regions in the world that suffer from high mortality. District Kutai Kartanegara, Indonesia, is one such region where consistently high maternal mortality was observed despite high rate of delivery by skilled birth attendants. Method. Thirty maternal deaths were reviewed using verbal autopsy interviews, terminal event reporting, medical records’ review, and Death Audit Committee reports, using a comprehensive root-cause analysis framework including Risk Identification, Signal Services, Emergency Obstetrics Care Evaluation, Quality, and 3 Delays. Findings. The root causes were found in poor quality of care, which caused hospital to be unprepared to manage deteriorating patients. In hospital, poor implementation of standard operating procedures was rooted in inadequate skills, lack of forward planning, ineffective communication, and unavailability of essential services. In primary care, root causes included inadequate risk management, referrals to facilities where needed services are not available, and lack of coordination between primary healthcare and hospitals. Conclusion. There is an urgent need for a shift in focus to quality of care through knowledge, skills, and support for consistent application of protocols, making essential services available, effective risk assessment and management, and facilitating timely referrals to facilities that are adequately equipped.

  13. Root-Cause Analysis of Persistently High Maternal Mortality in a Rural District of Indonesia: Role of Clinical Care Quality and Health Services Organizational Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Mohammad Afzal; Mufidah, Ismi; Scroggs, Steven; Siddiqui, Amna Rehana; Raheel, Hafsa; Wibdarminto, Koentijo; Dirgantoro, Bernardus; Vercruyssen, Jorien; Wahabi, Hayfaa A

    2018-01-01

    Despite significant reduction in maternal mortality, there are still many regions in the world that suffer from high mortality. District Kutai Kartanegara, Indonesia, is one such region where consistently high maternal mortality was observed despite high rate of delivery by skilled birth attendants. Thirty maternal deaths were reviewed using verbal autopsy interviews, terminal event reporting, medical records' review, and Death Audit Committee reports, using a comprehensive root-cause analysis framework including Risk Identification, Signal Services, Emergency Obstetrics Care Evaluation, Quality, and 3 Delays. The root causes were found in poor quality of care, which caused hospital to be unprepared to manage deteriorating patients. In hospital, poor implementation of standard operating procedures was rooted in inadequate skills, lack of forward planning, ineffective communication, and unavailability of essential services. In primary care, root causes included inadequate risk management, referrals to facilities where needed services are not available, and lack of coordination between primary healthcare and hospitals. There is an urgent need for a shift in focus to quality of care through knowledge, skills, and support for consistent application of protocols, making essential services available, effective risk assessment and management, and facilitating timely referrals to facilities that are adequately equipped.

  14. Climate change: Causes, effects and mitigation measures- A review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences ... far more than at any time in the last 650,000 years resulting in climate change or global warming. Both natural and human causes of climate change including the earth's orbital changes, ... food production, loss of biodiversity, food insecurity, decreased animal health et cetera.

  15. Effect of irradiation as quarantine treatment on citrus fruit quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancurt, Pablo; Montalban, Antonio; Arcia, Patricia; Borthagaray, Maria D.; Curutchet, Ana; Pica, Leticia; Soria, Alejandra; Abreu, Anibal V.; Ares, M. Ines

    2009-01-01

    Gamma radiations have been used to improve sanitation treatments without significant effects on fresh fruit quality. The objective of this work was to evaluate the fruit quality characteristics of citrus variety Valencia (Valencia Late), main variety produced and exported in Uruguay. All samples were stored at 3-5 deg C, 80% RH, for 20 and 40 days. Irradiation doses used were 0,35 kGy min. and 0,80 kGy max. (doses that also eliminate the fruit fly). Irradiation experiments were conducted using irradiation equipment from Atomic Center (CAE), year 1968, Co60 source, 800.000 Ci. The effects of irradiation on sensory qualities and physical characteristics were studied. The attributes evaluated were visual appearance (1- 4 hedonic scale, expert), overall acceptance (1-9 hedonic scale, consumers), texture (TAB Stevens, speed: 2m/s, distance: 2mm), yield of juice and colour (Hunter values). In general, no significant changes in these parameters were observed after irradiation. Quality was not significantly affected by doses usually applied to decrease the viability of pathogen that cause citrus Scab. This is an important contribution for the protocols that would allow citrus fruit exportation. (author)

  16. Quality assurance and human error effects on the structural safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertero, R.; Lopez, R.; Sarrate, M.

    1991-01-01

    Statistical surveys show that the frequency of failure of structures is much larger than that expected by the codes. Evidence exists that human errors (especially during the design process) is the main cause for the difference between the failure probability admitted by codes and the reality. In this paper, the attenuation of human error effects using tools of quality assurance is analyzed. In particular, the importance of the independent design review is highlighted, and different approaches are discussed. The experience from the Atucha II project, as well as the USA and German practice on independent design review, are summarized. (Author)

  17. Rapid chilling cannot prevent inferior pork quality caused by high preslaughter stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hambrecht, E.; Eissen, J.J.; Klein, W.J.H.; Ducro, B.J.; Smits, C.H.M.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Hartog, den L.A.

    2004-01-01

    The present experiment investigated whether increasing chilling rate could improve meat quality in pigs exposed to either minimal or high stress immediately preslaughter. Pigs (n = 192) were offspring of halothane-free lines. On various days, four groups of 48 pigs were processed at a commercial

  18. Rebels with a cause : How positive deviance works for quality of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Bal (Roland); J.W.M. Weggelaar-Jansen (Anne Marie); I. Wallenburg (Iris)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Research Aim:__ How do healthcare rebels do ‘quality work’, design alternative forms of care delivery and account for their practices? __Methods:__ Selection of rebel-groups based on interviews. Ethnographic observational study of three rebel-groups in three Dutch hospitals with

  19. Residual-limb quality and functional mobility 1 year after transtibial amputation caused by vascular insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Arwert (Henk); M.H. van Doorn-Loogman (Mirjam); J. Koning (Jan); M. Terburg (Martinus); M. Rol (Mathilde); M.E. Roebroeck (Marij)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis study identified which residual-limb quality factors are related to functional mobility 1 year after transtibial (TT) amputation. A group of 28 TT amputees were evaluated with respect to their functional mobility (Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire [PEQ], Locomotor Index, Timed Up

  20. Workplace aggression as cause and effect: Emergency nurses' experiences of working fatigued.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Lisa A; Perhats, Cydne; Delao, Altair M; Clark, Paul R

    2017-07-01

    Emergency nursing requires acute attention to detail to provide safe and effective care to potentially unstable or critically ill patients; this requirement may be significantly impaired by physical and mental fatigue. There is a lack of evidence regarding the effects of fatigue caused by factors other than a sleep deficit (e.g., emotional exhaustion). Fatigue affects nurses' ability to work safely in the emergency care setting and potentially impacts their health and quality of life outside of work. This was the qualitative arm of a mixed methods study; we used a qualitative exploratory design with focus group data from a sample of 16 emergency nurses. Themes were identified using an inductive approach to content analysis. The following themes were identified: "It's a weight on your back;" "Competitive nursing;" "It's never enough;" "You have to get away;" and "Engagement as a solution." Our participants reported high levels of fatigue, which compromised patient care, had a negative effect on their personal lives, and created a toxic unit environment. They reported lateral violence as both the cause and effect of mental and emotional fatigue, suggesting that unit culture affects nurses and the patients they care for. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Selenium Poisoning of Wildlife and Western Agriculture: Cause and Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.

    2000-02-01

    This project examined the hypothesis that selenium contamination is not the principal cause of the decline of endemic fish species in the Upper Colorado Basin. Activities employed to test this hypothesis included a reconnaissance of locations altered by recent road construction, a re-interpretation of available literature regarding selenium toxicity, and the interpretation of unpublished data obtained from the Upper Colorado Basin Fish Recovery Program. The project demonstrates that most of the evidence implicating selenium is circumstantial.

  2. Symptoms and causes : gender effects and institutional failures.

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimzade, N.; Vershinina, N.

    2017-01-01

    The existence and causes of gender gaps in pay and in occupational choice have been increasingly at the centre of research in economics, sociology, psychology, managerial science, and other fields. The research findings across countries and over time generally suggest that gaps exist and are significant, indicating that gender inequality remains persistent in many areas, even in the developed Western democracies. Forcefully closing the gaps directly, however, may not be sufficient in the long...

  3. Ionization waves caused by the effects of a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kosuke; Imazu, Shingo

    1980-01-01

    The self-excited ionization waves was observed in the Ne positive column. The experiments were made for Ne gas from 0.07 to 1.0 Torr, with the magnetic field from 0 to 3.33 kG. The discharge current were 10 to 300 mA. The longitudinal magnetic field was made by an air-core solenoid coil. The axial electric field was measured by two wall probes. The frequency, wave length and amplitude of waves were measured with a photo multiplier. It was found that the longitudinal magnetic field caused new self-excited ionization waves. The frequency of these waves decreased monotonously with increasing field. The behaviors of the wave length and amplitude were complicate, and the cause of these phenomena is related to the ionization waves due to the spatial resonance of electron gas, namely s-waves, p-waves and fluid γ-waves. The threshold of the magnetic field to cause the ionization waves increased with increasing gas pressure, and with decreasing discharge current in the range 0.07 to 0.44 Torr. The frequency of the self-excited ionization waves occurred at zero field was almost constant in the field-frequency relation. A simple dispersion equation was derived, and the Novak constant can be introduced. (J.P.N.)

  4. Effect of the patient-to-patient communication model on dysphagia caused by total laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, L; An, R; Zhang, J; Sun, Y; Zhao, R; Liu, M

    2017-03-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of a patient-to-patient communication model on dysphagia in laryngeal cancer patients after total laryngectomy. Sixty-five patients who had undergone total laryngectomy were randomly divided into three groups: a routine communication group, a patient communication group (that received the patient-to-patient communication model) and a physician communication group. Questionnaires were used to compare quality of life and swallowing problems among all patient groups. The main factors causing dysphagia in total laryngectomy patients were related to fear and mental health. The patient communication group had improved visual analogue scale scores at one week after starting to eat. Quality of life in swallowing disorders questionnaire scores were significantly higher in the patient communication and physician communication groups than in the routine communication group. In addition, swallowing problems were much more severe in patients educated to high school level and above than in others. The patient-to-patient communication model can be used to resolve swallowing problems caused by psychological factors in total laryngectomy patients.

  5. Chemotherapy Side Effects: A Cause of Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can chemotherapy side effects increase the risk of heart disease? Answers from Timothy J. Moynihan, M.D. Chemotherapy side effects may increase the risk of heart disease, including weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) and ...

  6. What are the causes and consequences of impaired sleep quality during and following extended hospitalisation amongst older adults?

    OpenAIRE

    AISLINN FELICITY LALOR

    2017-01-01

    Sleep is essential to everyone's health and wellbeing. Between 30-40% of people experience impaired sleep and is most common in older adults. Older adults also experience a higher number of hospitalisations in comparison to any other age group. This thesis aimed to investigate the causes and consequences of impaired sleep quality for older adults during and following hospital admission. Over 80% of older adults with self-reported poor sleep do not discuss it with any health professionals. Thi...

  7. The Relationship Quality Effect on Customer Loyalty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilte Auruskeviciene

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio tiene como objetivo la identificación de los elementos constitutivos de la calidad de relación que permite a las empresas oferentes de servicios profesionales establecer relaciones a largo plazo con sus clientes y fortalecer la lealtad de los mismos.El marco teórico sobre el que se ha formulado la identificación de dichos elementos y de la interrelación inherente a la lealtad del cliente ha sido contrastado empíricamente sobre una muestra de 74 directivos de empresas lituanas compradoras de servicios relacionados con las tecnologías de la información. Los resultados sugieren que las variables "calidad funcional", "confianza" y "compromiso" tienen un efecto significativo sobre la lealtad del cliente de servicios de tecnologías de la información. La calidad funcional es el elemento más importante a la hora de construir relaciones a largo plazo con clientes en el mercado de servicios profesionales.This study aims to identify the dimensions of relationship quality that enables professional services companies to establish long-term relations with their clients and fosters the loyalty of the client. The theoretical framework of relationship quality dimensions and customer loyalty interrelationship in a sample of 74 Lithuanian companies' managers buying IT service has been empirically tested. The findings suggest that the three variables (functional quality, trust, and commitment have a significant effect on IT services customer loyalty. Functional quality construct is the most important in building long-term relationship with customers in a professional services market.

  8. A splice mutation in the PHKG1 gene causes high glycogen content and low meat quality in pig skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwu Ma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycolytic potential (GP in skeletal muscle is economically important in the pig industry because of its effect on pork processing yield. We have previously mapped a major quantitative trait loci (QTL for GP on chromosome 3 in a White Duroc × Erhualian F2 intercross. We herein performed a systems genetic analysis to identify the causal variant underlying the phenotype QTL (pQTL. We first conducted genome-wide association analyses in the F2 intercross and an F19 Sutai pig population. The QTL was then refined to an 180-kb interval based on the 2-LOD drop method. We then performed expression QTL (eQTL mapping using muscle transcriptome data from 497 F2 animals. Within the QTL interval, only one gene (PHKG1 has a cis-eQTL that was colocolizated with pQTL peaked at the same SNP. The PHKG1 gene encodes a catalytic subunit of the phosphorylase kinase (PhK, which functions in the cascade activation of glycogen breakdown. Deep sequencing of PHKG1 revealed a point mutation (C>A in a splice acceptor site of intron 9, resulting in a 32-bp deletion in the open reading frame and generating a premature stop codon. The aberrant transcript induces nonsense-mediated decay, leading to lower protein level and weaker enzymatic activity in affected animals. The mutation causes an increase of 43% in GP and a decrease of>20% in water-holding capacity of pork. These effects were consistent across the F2 and Sutai populations, as well as Duroc × (Landrace × Yorkshire hybrid pigs. The unfavorable allele exists predominantly in Duroc-derived pigs. The findings provide new insights into understanding risk factors affecting glucose metabolism, and would greatly contribute to the genetic improvement of meat quality in Duroc related pigs.

  9. A splice mutation in the PHKG1 gene causes high glycogen content and low meat quality in pig skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junwu; Yang, Jie; Zhou, Lisheng; Ren, Jun; Liu, Xianxian; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Zhiyan; Ma, Huanban; Xie, Xianhua; Xing, Yuyun; Guo, Yuanmei; Huang, Lusheng

    2014-10-01

    Glycolytic potential (GP) in skeletal muscle is economically important in the pig industry because of its effect on pork processing yield. We have previously mapped a major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for GP on chromosome 3 in a White Duroc × Erhualian F2 intercross. We herein performed a systems genetic analysis to identify the causal variant underlying the phenotype QTL (pQTL). We first conducted genome-wide association analyses in the F2 intercross and an F19 Sutai pig population. The QTL was then refined to an 180-kb interval based on the 2-LOD drop method. We then performed expression QTL (eQTL) mapping using muscle transcriptome data from 497 F2 animals. Within the QTL interval, only one gene (PHKG1) has a cis-eQTL that was colocolizated with pQTL peaked at the same SNP. The PHKG1 gene encodes a catalytic subunit of the phosphorylase kinase (PhK), which functions in the cascade activation of glycogen breakdown. Deep sequencing of PHKG1 revealed a point mutation (C>A) in a splice acceptor site of intron 9, resulting in a 32-bp deletion in the open reading frame and generating a premature stop codon. The aberrant transcript induces nonsense-mediated decay, leading to lower protein level and weaker enzymatic activity in affected animals. The mutation causes an increase of 43% in GP and a decrease of>20% in water-holding capacity of pork. These effects were consistent across the F2 and Sutai populations, as well as Duroc × (Landrace × Yorkshire) hybrid pigs. The unfavorable allele exists predominantly in Duroc-derived pigs. The findings provide new insights into understanding risk factors affecting glucose metabolism, and would greatly contribute to the genetic improvement of meat quality in Duroc related pigs.

  10. Rebels with a cause : How positive deviance works for quality of care

    OpenAIRE

    Bal, Roland; Weggelaar-Jansen, Anne Marie; Wallenburg, Iris

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Research Aim:__ How do healthcare rebels do ‘quality work’, design alternative forms of care delivery and account for their practices? __Methods:__ Selection of rebel-groups based on interviews. Ethnographic observational study of three rebel-groups in three Dutch hospitals with different institutional backgrounds (academic, large ‘top clinical’ teaching and general). __Conclusion:__ Rebels build their own micro systems of providing and organizing care. They have a strong fo...

  11. School quality and the educational effectiveness knowledge base

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, Jaap; van Hoorn, Marjo

    2014-01-01

    Educational effectiveness is an important facet of educational quality. In this article educational effectiveness is used as the general term for instructional effectiveness, school level effectiveness and system effectiveness. Instructional (or teaching) effectiveness largely depends on teachers’

  12. Effects of Common Cause Failure on Electrical Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The essential electrical systems of reactor designs have developed progressively with an increased focus on the use of redundant, segregated and independent safety system equipment 'trains'. In this arrangement, essential safety functions associated with safe shutdown and cooling of the reactor are replicated on near identical electrical systems with each of the trains of safety system equipment supported by a fully rated standby generator. Development in designs has seen the number of trains increased to enable maintenance to be undertaken with reactors at power, improving the economics of the units whilst maintaining nuclear safety. This paper provides a background to common cause failure and provides examples where supporting guidance and international experience is available. It also highlights the regulatory guidance available to UK licensees. Recent examples of common cause failures on plant in the UK are presented together with an issue identified during the recent Generic Design Assessment review of new reactor designs within the UK. It was identified that one design was claiming a very low probability of failure associated with the loss of a single break and no-break voltage level, orders of magnitude below the target figure within ONR's Safety Assessment Principles. On closer scrutiny it was established that a significant safety function provided from identical low voltage switchboards would be lost in the event of a common cause failure affecting these boards. The paper will explain the action that has been taken by the requesting party to improve the resilience of the design and how this impacts on the ONR reliability targets for reactor designs within the UK. (authors)

  13. Effective training based on the cause analysis of operation errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Eimitsu; Noji, Kunio; Kobayashi, Akira.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have investigated typical error types through our training experience, and analyzed the causes of them. Error types which are observed in simulator training are: (1) lack of knowledge or lack of its applying ability to actual operation; (2) defective mastery of skillbase operation; (3) rote operation or stereotyped manner; (4) mind-setting or lack of redundant verification; (5) lack of team work; (6) misjudgement for the plant overall conditions by operation chief, who directs a reactor operator and a turbine operator in the training. The paper describes training methods used in Japan for BWR utilities to overcome these error types

  14. Air quality models and unusually large ozone increases: Identifying model failures, understanding environmental causes, and improving modeled chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzo, Evan A.

    Several factors combine to make ozone (O3) pollution in Houston, Texas, unique when compared to other metropolitan areas. These include complex meteorology, intense clustering of industrial activity, and significant precursor emissions from the heavily urbanized eight-county area. Decades of air pollution research have borne out two different causes, or conceptual models, of O 3 formation. One conceptual model describes a gradual region-wide increase in O3 concentrations "typical" of many large U.S. cities. The other conceptual model links episodic emissions of volatile organic compounds to spatially limited plumes of high O3, which lead to large hourly increases that have exceeded 100 parts per billion (ppb) per hour. These large hourly increases are known to lead to violations of the federal O 3 standard and impact Houston's status as a non-attainment area. There is a need to further understand and characterize the causes of peak O 3 levels in Houston and simulate them correctly so that environmental regulators can find the most cost-effective pollution controls. This work provides a detailed understanding of unusually large O 3 increases in the natural and modeled environments. First, we probe regulatory model simulations and assess their ability to reproduce the observed phenomenon. As configured for the purpose of demonstrating future attainment of the O3 standard, the model fails to predict the spatially limited O3 plumes observed in Houston. Second, we combine ambient meteorological and pollutant measurement data to identify the most likely geographic origins and preconditions of the concentrated O3 plumes. We find evidence that the O3 plumes are the result of photochemical activity accelerated by industrial emissions. And, third, we implement changes to the modeled chemistry to add missing formation mechanisms of nitrous acid, which is an important radical precursor. Radicals control the chemical reactivity of atmospheric systems, and perturbations to

  15. Health effects of fluoride pollution caused by coal burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, M.; Tadano, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Tamura, K.; Chen, X. [Regional Environment Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, 305-0083 Ibaraki (Japan); Asanuma, S. [Japan Institute of Rural Medicine, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Saku Central Hospital, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Kondo, T. [Matsumoto Dental College, Shiojiri, Nagano (Japan); Sakurai, S. [Otsuma Women' s University, Tama, Tokyo (Japan); Ji, R.; Liang, C.; Cao, S. [Institute of Environmental Health and Engineering, Beijing (China); Hong, Z. [Shanxi Maternity and Children' s Hospital, Taiyuan (China)

    2001-04-23

    Recently a huge amount of fluoride in coal has been released into indoor environments by the combustion of coal and fluoride pollution seems to be increasing in some rural areas in China. Combustion of coal and coal bricks is the primary source of gaseous and aerosol fluoride and these forms of fluoride can easily enter exposed food products and the human respiratory tract. Major human fluoride exposure was caused by consumption of fluoride contaminated food, such as corn, chilies and potatoes. For each diagnostic syndrome of dental fluorosis, a log-normal distribution was observed on the logarithm of urinary fluoride concentration in students in China. Urinary fluoride content was found to be a primary health indicator of the prevalence of dental fluorosis in the community. In the fluorosis areas, osteosclerosis in skeletal fluorosis patients was observed with a high prevalence. A biochemical marker of bone resorption, urinary deoxypyridinoline content was much higher in residents in China than in residents in Japan. It was suggested that bone resorption was stimulated to a greater extent in residents in China and fluoride may stimulate both bone resorption and bone formation. Renal function especially glomerular filtration rate was very sensitive to fluoride exposure. Inorganic phosphate concentrations in urine were significantly lower in the residents in fluorosis areas in China than in non-fluorosis area in China and Japan. Since airborne fluoride from the combustion of coal pollutes extensively both the living environment and food, it is necessary to reduce fluoride pollution caused by coal burning.

  16. Effects of energy development on ground water quality: an overview and preliminary assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, W.M. III; Yin, S.C.L.; Davis, M.J.; Kutz, W.J.

    1981-07-01

    A preliminary national overview of the various effects on ground water quality likely to result from energy development. Based on estimates of present and projected energy-development activities, those regions of the country are identified where ground water quality has the potential for being adversely affected. The general causes of change in ground water quality are reviewed. Specific effects on ground water quality of selected energy technologies are discussed, and some case-history material is provided. A brief overview of pertinent legislation relating to the protection and management of ground water quality is presented. Six methodologies that have some value for assessing the potential effects on ground water quality of energy development activities are reviewed. A method of identifying regions in the 48 contiguous states where there is a potential for ground water quality problems is described and then applied

  17. Shading of the fruit zone to reduce grape yield and quality losses caused by sunburn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Oliveira

    2014-09-01

    Significance and impact of the study: The study highlights the effects of solar radiation on the composition of grape musts and suggests a potentially cost-effective method to control excessive radiation in vineyards.

  18. Environmental chemicals and autoimmune disease: cause and effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Evelyn V.

    2002-01-01

    Many important clues have been provided by the relationship of certain medications to lupus and other autoimmune syndromes. These are temporary conditions that resolve when the medication is removed. There are now over 70 such medications which have been reported related to these autoimmune conditions. Interest continues to grow in the potential for environmental substances to cause these syndromes. Among those under suspicion are hydrazines, tartrazines, hair dyes, trichloroethylene, industrial emissions and hazardous wastes. Other possible associations include silica, mercury, cadmium, gold and L canavanine. Two recognised outbreaks include 'toxic oil syndrome' related to contaminated rape seed oil in Spain in 1981 and exposure to a contaminated environmental substance associated with an autoimmune attack on muscle tissue in 1989. Recently, there have been proposals made for the definition and identification of environmentally associated immune disorders. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has also provided recent publications for other environmentally related problems. All these aspects will be presented and reviewed in detail

  19. Does neighborhood size really cause the word length effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitard, Dominic; Saint-Aubin, Jean; Tehan, Gerald; Tolan, Anne

    2018-02-01

    In short-term serial recall, it is well-known that short words are remembered better than long words. This word length effect has been the cornerstone of the working memory model and a benchmark effect that all models of immediate memory should account for. Currently, there is no consensus as to what determines the word length effect. Jalbert and colleagues (Jalbert, Neath, Bireta, & Surprenant, 2011a; Jalbert, Neath, & Surprenant, 2011b) suggested that neighborhood size is one causal factor. In six experiments we systematically examined their suggestion. In Experiment 1, with an immediate serial recall task, multiple word lengths, and a large pool of words controlled for neighborhood size, the typical word length effect was present. In Experiments 2 and 3, with an order reconstruction task and words with either many or few neighbors, we observed the typical word length effect. In Experiment 4 we tested the hypothesis that the previous abolition of the word length effect when neighborhood size was controlled was due to a confounded factor: frequency of orthographic structure. As predicted, we reversed the word length effect when using short words with less frequent orthographic structures than the long words, as was done in both of Jalbert et al.'s studies. In Experiments 5 and 6, we again observed the typical word length effect, even if we controlled for neighborhood size and frequency of orthographic structure. Overall, the results were not consistent with the predictions of Jalbert et al. and clearly showed a large and reliable word length effect after controlling for neighborhood size.

  20. Radiation, waves, fields. Causes and effects on environment and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitgeb, N.

    1990-01-01

    The book discusses static electricity, alternating electric fields, magnetostatic fields, alternating magnetic fields, electromagnetic radiation, optical and ionizing radiation and their hazards and health effects. Each chapter presents basic physical and biological concepts and describes the common radiation sources and their biological effects. Each chapter also contains hints for everyday behaviour as well as in-depth information an specific scientific approaches for assessing biological effects; the latter are addressed to all expert readers working in these fields. There is a special chapter on the problem of so-called 'terrestrial radiation'. (orig.) With 88 figs., 31 tabs [de

  1. Students' perceived causes and effects of examination malpratices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and effects of examination malpratices: implications for counselling strategies. ... Thus, this study attempted to investigate the perception of students about the ... unseriousness, uncompleted syllabus, fear of failure and poor reading skills ...

  2. Measurement of reactivity effect caused by nonuniform fuel distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Yasushi; Yasui, Hazime; Nishina, Kojiro; Shiroya, Seiji

    1991-01-01

    A reactivity effect due to a spatial variation of nuclear fuel concentration is an important problem in a reprocessing plant. To estimate this reactivity effect theoretically, the ''Goertzel's necessary condition, and th Fuel Importance'' theory have been proposed. In order to verify these theories, we have performed systematic measurements of reactivity effect due to the nonuniformity in the fuel distribution within the Kyoto University Critical Assembly. Neutron flux distribution and Fuel Importance distribution were also determined. A nonuniform assembly whose fuel concentration in the center region was 40% higher than the uniform one was found to have an excess reactivity of 0.3%Δk/k, with the same total uranium mass for which the uniform assembly was just critical. Moreover, its spatial distribution of thermal neutron flux and of Fuel Importance were more flat than those of the uniform assembly, as expected by the Goertzel's condition and the Fuel Importance theory. (Author)

  3. Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure - Cause or Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Sandeep; Voskoboinik, Aleksandr; Kaye, David M; Kistler, Peter M

    2017-09-01

    There are emerging epidemics of atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure in most developed countries, with a significant health burden. Due to many shared pathophysiological mechanisms, which facilitate the maintenance of each condition, AF and heart failure co-exist in up to 30% of patients. In the circumstance where known structural causes of heart failure (such as myocardial infarction) are absent, patients presenting with both conditions present a unique challenge, particularly as the temporal relationship of each condition can often remain elusive from the clinical history. The question of whether the AF is driving, or significantly contributing to the left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, rather than merely a consequence of heart failure, has become ever more pertinent, especially as catheter ablation now offers a significant advancement over existing rhythm control strategies. This paper will review the inter-related physiological drivers of AF and heart failure before considering the implications from the outcomes of recent clinical trials in patients with AF and heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Warm Dry Weather Conditions Cause of 2016 Fort McMurray Wild Forest Fire and Associated Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo, S. C.; Singh, R. P.; da Silva, E. A., Sr.

    2016-12-01

    The climate change is evident from the increasing temperature around the world, day to day life and increasing frequency of natural hazards. The warm and dry conditions are the cause of frequent forest fires around the globe. Forest fires severely affect the air quality and human health. Multi sensor satellites and dense network of ground stations provide information about vegetation health, meteorological, air quality and atmospheric parameters. We have carried out detailed analysis of satellite and ground data of wild forest fire that occurred in May 2016 in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. This wild forest fire destroyed 10 per cent of Fort McMurray's housing and forced more than 90,000 people to evacuate the surrounding areas. Our results show that the warm and dry conditions with low rainfall were the cause of Fort McMurray wild fire. The air quality parameters (particulate matter, CO, ozone, NO2, methane) and greenhouse gases measured from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) satellite show enhanced levels soon after the forest fire. The emissions from the forest fire affected health of population living in surrounding areas up to 300 km radius.

  5. The greenhouse effect: Its causes, possible impacts, and associated uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.H.; Rosenberg, N.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Earth's climate changes. The climatic effects of having polluted the atmosphere with gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) may already be felt. There is no doubt that the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere has been rising. CO2 tends to trap heat near the Earth's surface. This is known as the greenhouse effect, and its existence and basic mechanisms are not questioned by atmospheric scientists. What is questioned is the precise amount of warming and the regional pattern of climatic change that can be expected on the Earth from the anthropogenic increase in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 and other greenhouse gases. It is the regional patterns of changes in temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture that will determine what impact the greenhouse effect will have on natural ecosystems, agriculture, and water supplies. These possible effects are discussed in detail. It is concluded, however, that a detailed assessment of the climatic, biological, and societal changes that are evolving and should continue to occur into the next century cannot reliably be made with available scientific capabilities. Nevertheless, enough is known to suggest a range of plausible futures with attendant impacts, both positive and negative, on natural resources and human well being

  6. Eutrophication of an Urban Forest Ecosystem: Causes and Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednova, O. V.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Tarasova, N. P.

    2018-01-01

    The combined use of methods of passive dosimetry of the status of atmospheric air, phytoindication, and cartographic visualization of data made it possible to elaborate and substantiate approaches to evaluation of the effect of atmospheric air contamination on the eutrophication of forest ecosystems under urban conditions.

  7. Does length or neighborhood size cause the word length effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Surprenant, Aimée M

    2011-10-01

    Jalbert, Neath, Bireta, and Surprenant (2011) suggested that past demonstrations of the word length effect, the finding that words with fewer syllables are recalled better than words with more syllables, included a confound: The short words had more orthographic neighbors than the long words. The experiments reported here test two predictions that would follow if neighborhood size is a more important factor than word length. In Experiment 1, we found that concurrent articulation removed the effect of neighborhood size, just as it removes the effect of word length. Experiment 2 demonstrated that this pattern is also found with nonwords. For Experiment 3, we factorially manipulated length and neighborhood size, and found only effects of the latter. These results are problematic for any theory of memory that includes decay offset by rehearsal, but they are consistent with accounts that include a redintegrative stage that is susceptible to disruption by noise. The results also confirm the importance of lexical and linguistic factors on memory tasks thought to tap short-term memory.

  8. Size effect related to damping caused by water submersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    An important effect of water submersion on the dynamic response of a structure is the increase in effective damping. The dynamic response of submerged structures is of interest in the nuclear power industry for reasons of operational safety during seismic and other dynamic excitations. In this paper, the added damping contribution that results from the viscosity of water and the dependence of the contribution on structural size are examined. Other factors considered are the applicable range of viscous damping with respect to displacement amplitude and, as far as damping is concerned, how far neighboring members must be from each other to respond as if in open water. An expression is derived for relating the damping value to structural size. Estimated added-damping values for representative fuel elements, fuel bundles, and main steam-pressure-relief-valve lines are given based on our derived expression for added damping

  9. Linguistic ostracism causes prejudice: Support for a serial mediation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitlan, Robert Thomas; A Zárate, Michael; Kelly, Kristine M; Catherine DeSoto, M

    2016-01-01

    This research investigated the effects of linguistic ostracism, defined as any communication setting in which a target individual (or group) is ostracized by another individual (or group) in a language that the target has extremely limited ability to understand. Participants were included or ostracized by their group members during a computer-mediated group discussion. Half of the ostracized participants were linguistically ostracized via their group members conversing with one another in a language the participant did not know well (Spanish Ostracism: SO), or in a language the participant did know well (English Ostracism: EO). SO participants reported feeling less similar than both included and EO participants. SO participants also reported being angrier and expressed more prejudice than included participants (and EO participants using effect size estimates). Results also provided support for the hypothesized serial mediation model. Findings are discussed in terms of implications for intergroup relations.

  10. May disordered protein cause serious drug side effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tou, Weng Ieong; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2014-04-01

    Insomnia is a self-reported disease where patients lose their ability to initiate and maintain sleep, leading to daytime performance impairment. Several drug targets to ameliorate insomnia symptoms have been discovered; however, these drug targets lead to serious side effects. Thus, we characterize the structural properties of these sleep-related receptors and the clock complex and discuss a possible drug design that will reduce side effects. Computational prediction shows that disordered property is shared. Over 30% of the structure of CLOCK, PER1/2/3, BMAL-1, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-M1, melatonin receptor and casein kinase I are structurally disordered (the remaining proteins represent insomnia drugs might be closely related to the protein architecture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Food stress causes sex-specific maternal effects in mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Andreas; Schausberger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Life history theory predicts that females should produce few large eggs under food stress and many small eggs when food is abundant. We tested this prediction in three female-biased size-dimorphic predatory mites feeding on herbivorous spider mite prey: Phytoseiulus persimilis, a specialized spider mite predator; Neoseiulus californicus, a generalist preferring spider mites; Amblyseius andersoni, a broad diet generalist. Irrespective of predator species and offspring sex, most females laid only one small egg under severe food stress. Irrespective of predator species, the number of female but not male eggs decreased with increasing maternal food stress. This sex-specific effect was probably due to the higher production costs of large female than small male eggs. The complexity of the response to the varying availability of spider mite prey correlated with the predators' degree of adaptation to this prey. Most A. andersoni females did not oviposit under severe food stress, whereas N. californicus and P. persimilis did oviposit. Under moderate food stress, only P. persimilis increased its investment per offspring, at the expense of egg number, and produced few large female eggs. When prey was abundant, P. persimilis decreased the female egg sizes at the expense of increased egg numbers, resulting in a sex-specific egg size/number trade-off. Maternal effects manifested only in N. californicus and P. persimilis. Small egg size correlated with the body size of daughters but not sons. Overall, our study provides a key example of sex-specific maternal effects, i.e. food stress during egg production more strongly affects the sex of the large than the small offspring. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Spacecraft Charging: Hazard Causes, Hazard Effects, Hazard Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steve.

    2018-01-01

    Spacecraft flight environments are characterized both by a wide range of space plasma conditions and by ionizing radiation (IR), solar ultraviolet and X-rays, magnetic fields, micrometeoroids, orbital debris, and other environmental factors, all of which can affect spacecraft performance. Dr. Steven Koontz's lecture will provide a solid foundation in the basic engineering physics of spacecraft charging and charging effects that can be applied to solving practical spacecraft and spacesuit engineering design, verification, and operations problems, with an emphasis on spacecraft operations in low-Earth orbit, Earth's magnetosphere, and cis-Lunar space.

  13. Protective effect of rutin on cognitive impairment caused by phenytoin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Shagun; Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Bansal, Divya; Dubey, Nazneen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of the co-administration of phenytoin (PHT) and rutin in comparison with PHT and piracetam (PIM) on seizure control, cognitive, and motor functions in mice. Materials and Methods: Increasing current electroshock seizure (ICES) test was used to evaluate the effect of the co-administration of PHT and PIM on convulsions. Cognitive functions in mice were assessed by a spontaneous alternation in behavior on a plus maze while motor functions were screened using rolling roller apparatus and by counting the number of arms entries on a plus maze. Brain acetyl-cholinesterase (AChE) activity was also estimated. Statistical Analysis: The expression of data was done as mean ± standard error of the mean. The normally distributed data were subjected to one-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett's test. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The study showed that rutin when co-administered with PHT, significantly reversed PHT-induced reduction in spontaneous alternation without altering the efficacy of PHT against ICES, in both acute and chronic studies. Further, it also reversed PHT-induced increase in AChE activity. Conclusion: Rutin alleviated the PHT-induced cognitive impairment without compromising its antiepileptic efficacy. PMID:26729954

  14. Study on shadowing effect caused by transient rods at NSRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, T.; Yachi, S.; Ishijima, K.

    1992-01-01

    Irregularly inserted three control rods created so called shadowing effects on some of the neutronic instruments at the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR). During operations at the reactor power of up to 10 MW, the three control rods called transient rods, could be fully or partly inserted into the NSRR core. Reactor power monitors located outside of the core at the direction of deeply inserted transient rods indicated lower power in such operations. Power profiles of the reactor and neutron fluxes at power monitor locations were calculated with a three dimensional neutron diffusion code, CITATION. The calculation indicated that the real reactor power could be smaller than the measured maximum power by as mush as 30 % in such operations. The calculated neutron fluxes well described the changes in the apparent power monitor indications as a function of the transient rod position. (author)

  15. The Effect of an Education Program Utilising PRECEDE Model on the Quality of Life in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghdisi, M. H.; Borhani, M.; Solhi, M.; Afkari, M. E.; Hosseini, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective: The problems caused by diabetes have direct and indirect impacts on the quality of life of diabetic patients. An increase of these problems means a decrease in a patient's quality of life. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the educational programme based on the precede model in promoting quality of life of…

  16. Quality assurance in radiotherapy: analysis of the causes of not starting or early radiotherapy withdrawal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, Meritxell; Sabater, Sebastià; Gascón, Marina; Henríquez, Ivan; Bueno, M José; Rius, Àngels; Rovirosa, Àngels; Gómez, David; Lafuerza, Anna; Biete, Albert; Colomer, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the reasons for not starting or for early of radiotherapy at the Radiation Oncology Department. All radiotherapy treatments from March 2010 to February 2012 were included. Early withdrawals from treatment those that never started recorded. Clinical, demographic and dosimetric variables were also noted. From a total of 3250 patients treated and reviewed, 121 (4%) did not start or complete the planned treatment. Of those, 63 (52%) did not receive any radiotherapy fraction and 58 (48%) did not complete the course, 74% were male and 26% were female. The mean age was 67 ± 13 years. The most common primary tumour was lung (28%), followed by rectum (16%). The aim of treatment was 62% radical and 38% palliative, 44% of patients had metastases; the most common metastatic site was bone, followed by brain. In 38% of cases (46 patients) radiotherapy was administered concomitantly with chemotherapy (10 cases (22%) were rectal cancers). The most common reason for not beginning or for early withdrawal of treatment was clinical progression (58/121, 48%). Of those, 43% died (52/121), 35 of them because of the progression of the disease and 17 from other causes. Incomplete treatment regimens were due to toxicity (12/121 (10%), of which 10 patients underwent concomitant chemotherapy for rectal cancer). The number of patients who did not complete their course of treatment is low, which shows good judgement in indications and patient selection. The most common reason for incomplete treatments was clinical progression. Rectal cancer treated with concomitant chemotherapy was the most frequent reason of the interruption of radiotherapy for toxicity

  17. Effects of Packaging and Storage Conditions on Quality of Spider ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development ... However, quality of spider plant seed is affected by one or more factors that cause negative ... The purpose of this research was to increase insight into how the seed quality of ...

  18. Effects of gamma irradiation on durum wheats and spaghetti quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köksel, H.; Celik, S.; Tuncer, T.

    1996-01-01

    The efficient control of insects in cereal grains has long been the main objective of processors who are always looking for safer and more economical methods. Gamma irradiation is a physical technique of food preservation that seems to have a potential to protect grains from insect infestation and microbial contamination during storage. It has been reported that gamma irradiation doses in the range of 0.2-1.0 kGy are effective in controlling insect infestation in cereals (IAEA 1991). Increasing the dose to 5 kGy totally kills the spores of many fungi surviving the lower doses (Murray 1990). Besides its protective role from insects and microorganisms, gamma irradiation also has important effects on various quality criteria of cereal grains. Experiments have been performed to study the effects of gamma irradiation on various aspects of wheat quality such as milling characteristics, dough properties, and baking quality (Lai et al 1959, Lee 1959, Fifield et al 1967, Rao et al 1975, Paredes-Lopez and Covarrubias-Alvarez 1984, MacArthur and D'Appolonia 1983, Ng et al 1989). It was reported that amylograph peak viscosity and falling number values of the flour decreased significantly as radiation levels increased (MacArthur and D'Appolonia 1983, Ng et al 1989). Rao et al (1975) showed that as radiation dose increased, amylograph peak height and dough stability decreased. At 10 kGy, loaf volume and crumb grain were impaired. Paredes-Lopez and Covarrubias-Alvarez (1984) found that the overall bread quality of wheat was greatly reduced at medium doses of radiation (1-10 kGy). At doses >5 kGy, irrespective of the baking formula used, loaf volume and baking quality deteriorated (Lai et al 1959). Irradiation of grain has also caused problems in noodle quality. Japanese noodles (udon) show increased cooking losses and inferior scores in sensory analysis when the bread wheats have been irradiated in the range of 0.2-1.0 kGy (Shibata et al 1974, Urbain 1986). However, no detailed

  19. Effects of aromatherapy massage on the sleep quality and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    related concerns, unknown encounters after surgery, quality of sleep, restrictions in position after surgery is known to be serious. The study was conducted to determine the effect of aromatherapy massage on quality of sleep and physiological ...

  20. the effect of hypertension on neurocognitive functioning and quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    survey domains. Conclusion: Quality of life seems to be more affected .... Relationship between Quality of Life and side effects of medication. ... swings, alertness, sleep disorders, performance at work, and relations with family. In many cases ...

  1. The Effectiveness of Hypnotherapy in Treating Depression, Anxiety and Sleep Disturbance Caused by Subjective Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mahmoud Mirzamani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with tinnitus encounter many problems, including depression, anxiety, insomnia, increased sensitivity to sound, and negativity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of hypnotherapy on the depression, anxiety, and insomnia caused by tinnitus. Materials and Methods: This study was a pilot research with a pretest-posttest and control design. The statistical population included individuals who suffered from tinnitus and its associated symptoms. Twenty patients with tinnitus were selected through available sampling. The subjects were divided randomly into two experimental and control groups. Both groups completed the Beck Depression Inventory, Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in both pretest and post-test phases. Only the experimental group received 10 sessions of hypnotherapy. In this study, independent and dependent t-tests were used to obtain the data.Results: The two groups were similar in terms of tinnitus severity and age range. The results of independent and dependent t-tests at p=0.05 level in all three variables of depression, anxiety, and insomnia showed a significant difference between the scores of pretest and post-test as well as the post-test scores of control and experimental groups.Conclusion: The results indicated the effectiveness and usefulness of hypnotherapy in the reduction and treatment of the depression, anxiety, and insomnia caused by tinnitus in the experimental group.

  2. The Effect of Fit and Company’s Motivation on Consumers’ Evaluation of Cause Related Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN, YUN-PING

    2011-01-01

    Cause Related Marketing has increasingly became a prevalent and meaningful part of a company’s marketing plan. A successful Cause Related Marketing campaign can create a win-win-win situation for companies, customers and non-profit organisations. It has been found that whether company and cause is compatible with each other and perceived company motives are two key determinants of the effectiveness of Cause Related Marketing campaigns. Most of research has shown that a high fit partnersh...

  3. Air Pollution and Forest Health: Establishing Cause and Effect in the Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Manning

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available I participated in a NATO Advanced Research Workshop titled “Effects of Air Pollution on Forest Health and Biodiversity in Forests of the Carpathian Mountains,” in Stara Lesna, Slovakia from May 22–26, 2001. Researchers from Canada, Czech Republic, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Ukraine, and the U.S. met to present their results from a three-year cooperative study of tree health and air quality monitoring in forests of the Carpathian Mountains in Central Europe. Much of the work reported related to assessing the crown condition of trees in permanent plots in natural or managed (planted forests in the mountains. The endpoint was tree condition, with results extrapolated to the forests in the Carpathian range. From this I learned that, of the 50,000 trees evaluated, European beech (Fagus sylvatica was the most healthy, while Norway spruce (Picea abies (the principal forest tree and white fir (Abies alba sustained crown defoliation of up to 12.8%. The cause of this crown defoliation and tree decline was usually attributed to “air pollution” as a generic term and an automatic assumption. It is well known that deposition of heavy metals and acidic sulfur and nitrogen compounds can cause tree decline and predispose affected trees to bark beetles and climatic damage. Chemical analyses can also be done to detect metals and sulfur compounds in trees and soils. Sometimes these analyses were done, but most often the assumption was that crown defoliation was caused by air pollution. The assumption was that given sufficient exposure to high enough concentrations of toxic elements, sooner or later there will be a visible adverse response.

  4. Diet Quality Scores and Prediction of All-Cause, Cardiovascular and Cancer Mortality in a Pan-European Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Lassale

    Full Text Available Scores of overall diet quality have received increasing attention in relation to disease aetiology; however, their value in risk prediction has been little examined. The objective was to assess and compare the association and predictive performance of 10 diet quality scores on 10-year risk of all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality in 451,256 healthy participants to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, followed-up for a median of 12.8y. All dietary scores studied showed significant inverse associations with all outcomes. The range of HRs (95% CI in the top vs. lowest quartile of dietary scores in a composite model including non-invasive factors (age, sex, smoking, body mass index, education, physical activity and study centre was 0.75 (0.72-0.79 to 0.88 (0.84-0.92 for all-cause, 0.76 (0.69-0.83 to 0.84 (0.76-0.92 for CVD and 0.78 (0.73-0.83 to 0.91 (0.85-0.97 for cancer mortality. Models with dietary scores alone showed low discrimination, but composite models also including age, sex and other non-invasive factors showed good discrimination and calibration, which varied little between different diet scores examined. Mean C-statistic of full models was 0.73, 0.80 and 0.71 for all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality. Dietary scores have poor predictive performance for 10-year mortality risk when used in isolation but display good predictive ability in combination with other non-invasive common risk factors.

  5. Genetic effects on seed quality in diallel crosses of popcorn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Diego Silva Cabral

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The failure to obtain the ideal stand is one of the causes of decreased crop yields, in this sense it is important to investigate the genetic effects related to seed quality. The aim of this study was to measure the general combining ability (GCA, the specific combining ability (SCA and the reciprocal effects (RE for popcorn seed quality in addition to evaluate the association between germination and vigor tests with field emergencein order to identify hybrids with better germination and vigour. Ten inbred lines were evaluated using a complete diallel cross with reciprocals. Seed quality was measured by germination tests (GT and by modified cold vigour tests (MCV. In the GT, the numbers of strong normal seedlings (SNS, weak normal (WNS, abnormal (AS and ungerminated seeds (UGS were counted. In the MCV, the numbers of normal seedlings (NPC, abnormal (ASC and ungerminated seeds (UGSC were counted, and the plants' dry matter (DM was measured. Analysis of variance for GCA, SCA and RE were significant for all variables. The quadratic components for SCA were higher than those for GCA for the SNS, AS, UGS, ASC and UGSC traits, which indicates higher significance for the non-additive effects. The most favourable GCA estimates, were found in lines P3 and L70. The best hybrids were P1xL70, P3xP6 and P8xL70. The RE results showed that L70 and P3 should be used as the female parent in the P1xL70 and P3xP6 hybrid crosses, respectively. The MCV was the test that was most strongly correlated with field emergence, with a magnitude of 0.667.

  6. Reduced Stress and Improved Sleep Quality Caused by Green Tea Are Associated with a Reduced Caffeine Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Unno

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine, one of the main components in green tea, can interfere with sleep and block the effect of theanine. Since theanine, the main amino acid in tea leaves, has significant anti-stress effects in animals and humans, we examined the effects of green tea with lowered caffeine content, i.e., low-caffeine green tea (LCGT, on stress and quality of sleep of middle–aged individuals (n = 20, mean age 51.3 ± 6.7 years in a double-blind crossover design. Standard green tea (SGT was used as the control. These teas (≥300 mL/day, which were eluted with room temperature water, were consumed over a period of seven days after a single washout term. The level of salivary α-amylase activity (sAA, a stress marker, was significantly lower in participants that consumed LCGT (64.7 U/mL than in those that consumed SGT (73.9 U/mL. Sleep quality was higher in participants that consumed a larger quantity of LCGT. In addition, a self-diagnostic check for accumulated fatigue was significantly lower in those participants that consumed LCGT than SGT. These results indicate that LCGT intake can reduce stress in middle-aged individuals and improve their quality of sleep. The reduction in caffeine is suggested to be a valid reason for enhancing the anti-stress effect of green tea.

  7. Reduced Stress and Improved Sleep Quality Caused by Green Tea Are Associated with a Reduced Caffeine Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Keiko; Noda, Shigenori; Kawasaki, Yohei; Yamada, Hiroshi; Morita, Akio; Iguchi, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Yoriyuki

    2017-07-19

    Caffeine, one of the main components in green tea, can interfere with sleep and block the effect of theanine. Since theanine, the main amino acid in tea leaves, has significant anti-stress effects in animals and humans, we examined the effects of green tea with lowered caffeine content, i.e., low-caffeine green tea (LCGT), on stress and quality of sleep of middle-aged individuals ( n = 20, mean age 51.3 ± 6.7 years) in a double-blind crossover design. Standard green tea (SGT) was used as the control. These teas (≥300 mL/day), which were eluted with room temperature water, were consumed over a period of seven days after a single washout term. The level of salivary α-amylase activity (sAA), a stress marker, was significantly lower in participants that consumed LCGT (64.7 U/mL) than in those that consumed SGT (73.9 U/mL). Sleep quality was higher in participants that consumed a larger quantity of LCGT. In addition, a self-diagnostic check for accumulated fatigue was significantly lower in those participants that consumed LCGT than SGT. These results indicate that LCGT intake can reduce stress in middle-aged individuals and improve their quality of sleep. The reduction in caffeine is suggested to be a valid reason for enhancing the anti-stress effect of green tea.

  8. Effect of gamma radiation on honey quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bera, A.; Almeida-Muradian, L.B.; Sabato, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    Honey is one of the most complex substances produced by bees, mainly from the nectar of flowers. Gamma radiation is a technique that can be used to decrease the number of microbiological problems associated with food and increase the shelf life of certain products. The objective of this study was to verify the effect of gamma radiation with source of cobalto-60 (10 kGy) on some parameters used in honey quality control. Seven samples of pure honey were obtained from local markets in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2007. The methods used are in accordance with Brazilian Regulations. The physicochemical parameters analyzed were: moisture, HMF, free acidity, pH, sugars and ash. The results showed that gamma radiation, in the dose mentioned above, did not cause significant physicochemical alterations.

  9. Effect of gamma radiation on honey quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, A. [Radiation Technology Center, IPEN-CNEN/SP, A. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: berale@usp.br; Almeida-Muradian, L.B. [Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 580-Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sabato, S.F. [Radiation Technology Center, IPEN-CNEN/SP, A. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: sfsabato@ipen.br

    2009-07-15

    Honey is one of the most complex substances produced by bees, mainly from the nectar of flowers. Gamma radiation is a technique that can be used to decrease the number of microbiological problems associated with food and increase the shelf life of certain products. The objective of this study was to verify the effect of gamma radiation with source of cobalto-60 (10 kGy) on some parameters used in honey quality control. Seven samples of pure honey were obtained from local markets in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2007. The methods used are in accordance with Brazilian Regulations. The physicochemical parameters analyzed were: moisture, HMF, free acidity, pH, sugars and ash. The results showed that gamma radiation, in the dose mentioned above, did not cause significant physicochemical alterations.

  10. Rhizobium Impacts on Seed Productivity, Quality, and Protection of Pisum sativum upon Disease Stress Caused by Didymella pinodes: Phenotypic, Proteomic, and Metabolomic Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Ranjbar Sistani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In field peas, ascochyta blight is one of the most common fungal diseases caused by Didymella pinodes. Despite the high diversity of pea cultivars, only little resistance has been developed until to date, still leading to significant losses in grain yield. Rhizobia as plant growth promoting endosymbionts are the main partners for establishment of symbiosis with pea plants. The key role of Rhizobium as an effective nitrogen source for legumes seed quality and quantity improvement is in line with sustainable agriculture and food security programs. Besides these growth promoting effects, Rhizobium symbiosis has been shown to have a priming impact on the plants immune system that enhances resistance against environmental perturbations. This is the first integrative study that investigates the effect of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae (Rlv on phenotypic seed quality, quantity and fungal disease in pot grown pea (Pisum sativum cultivars with two different resistance levels against D. pinodes through metabolomics and proteomics analyses. In addition, the pathogen effects on seed quantity components and quality are assessed at morphological and molecular level. Rhizobium inoculation decreased disease severity by significant reduction of seed infection level. Rhizobium symbiont enhanced yield through increased seed fresh and dry weights based on better seed filling. Rhizobium inoculation also induced changes in seed proteome and metabolome involved in enhanced P. sativum resistance level against D. pinodes. Besides increased redox and cell wall adjustments light is shed on the role of late embryogenesis abundant proteins and metabolites such as the seed triterpenoid Soyasapogenol. The results of this study open new insights into the significance of symbiotic Rhizobium interactions for crop yield, health and seed quality enhancement and reveal new metabolite candidates involved in pathogen resistance.

  11. Cause-Effect Analysis: Improvement of a First Year Engineering Students' Calculus Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoff, Quay; Harding, Ansie

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the mathematics department at a South African university and in particular on teaching of calculus to first year engineering students. The paper reports on a cause-effect analysis, often used for business improvement. The cause-effect analysis indicates that there are many factors that impact on secondary school teaching of…

  12. Quality of foraging material and the effect on hens feed intake, egg production and - quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenfeldt, Sanna; Hammershøj, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    In a project with organic egg laying hens, the effect of different kind of foraging material was studied on feed intake, egg-production and -quality. Udgivelsesdato: August......In a project with organic egg laying hens, the effect of different kind of foraging material was studied on feed intake, egg-production and -quality. Udgivelsesdato: August...

  13. Analysis of cause-effect relationship of hip dysplasia in pre-school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rudenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze and scientifically substantiate peculiarities of cause-effect relationship of hip dysplasia in pre-school children. Material and Methods: analysis and systematization of scientific and methodological literature, medical histories, anamneses, interviews and questionings. Results: it is specified that failure to timely identify and eliminate the symptoms of hip dysplasia in pre-school children leads to negative consequences, namely limited amplitude of hip joint movements; lower limp muscle weakness; valgus and varus deformations of lower limp; increasing of L-lordosis; skewness of hip bones; scoliosis; claudication. Conclusions: the modern state of the problem of hip dysplasia in pre-school children is analyzed. The cause-effect relationship is defined, their mutual transition is projected. All cause-effect relationships are in direct proportion and in constant interaction: the cause the forms effect and the effect influences the cause

  14. Transrectal microwave thermotherapy causing a short-time influence on sperm quality in Chinese chronic nonbacterial prostatitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jia-Xin; Wang, Han-Zhang; Zhai, Zheng-Xing; Ma, Bao-Liang; Li, Qin-Fang; Xiao, Nan; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis can affect the sperm's quality. Previous studies have shown that transrectal microwave thermotherapy (TRMT) results in symptomatic relief in patients with chronic prostatitis, but the effects on sperm have not been carefully investigated. This study evaluates the impact of TRMT on the relief or decrease of symptoms and quality of sperm when used to treat patients with chronic nonbacterial prostatitis. Sixty patients were enrolled in the study. TRMT treatment was administered over 5 days, 1 h per day. Semen examination was carried out pretreatment and immediately at the conclusion of the 5-day treatment. Also, it was repeated 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months later. The treatment's symptom relief efficacy was evaluated using the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI). After the treatment, the overall NIH-CPSI scores were lower compared to those of pretreatment. In addition, the white blood cells and lecithin in expressed prostatic secretion were normal after the treatment. The sperm count was decreased by 23.8% 3 months after the treatment, sperm motility was reduced by 10.3% immediately after treatment, and sperm deformity was increased by 17.2%. The sperm volume and PH were not affected. However, the sperm quality recovered after treatment and the malformation rate was also lower at 6 months after treatment. TRMT is a favorable and safe treatment option for patients with nonbacterial chronic prostatitis. It could relieve the patient's symptoms and impact on sperm quality in the short-term.

  15. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of policies and programmes to reduce the harm caused by alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter; Chisholm, Dan; Fuhr, Daniela C

    2009-06-27

    This paper reviews the evidence for the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of policies and programmes to reduce the harm caused by alcohol, in the areas of education and information, the health sector, community action, driving while under the influence of alcohol (drink-driving), availability, marketing, pricing, harm reduction, and illegally and informally produced alcohol. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses show that policies regulating the environment in which alcohol is marketed (particularly its price and availability) are effective in reducing alcohol-related harm. Enforced legislative measures to reduce drink-driving and individually directed interventions to already at-risk drinkers are also effective. However, school-based education does not reduce alcohol-related harm, although public information and education-type programmes have a role in providing information and in increasing attention and acceptance of alcohol on political and public agendas. Making alcohol more expensive and less available, and banning alcohol advertising, are highly cost-effective strategies to reduce harm. In settings with high amounts of unrecorded production and consumption, increasing the proportion of alcohol that is taxed could be a more effective pricing policy than a simple increase in tax.

  16. Effects of Applying Hydrotherapy on Quality of Life in Women with Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Somayyeh Ghaffari; Fazlollah Ahmadi; Seyyed Masoud Nabavi; Anoushirvan Kazem-Nezhad

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common chronic diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), which causes important changes patient’s life, specially in adults life. MS decreases the quality of life (QOL) of patients severely and led to disability gradually. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of applying hydrotherapy on quality of life of Multiple Sclerosis patients. Materials & Methods: In this Quasi-experimental study, 50 Multiple Sclerosis patients wer...

  17. Effects of Sleep Hygiene Education on Subjective Sleep Quality and Academic Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Erkan Sahin

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Sleep problems are common in students with one third of university students reporting insufficient sleep. It is known that sleep quality and daytime sleepiness cause decrasing academic performans. For this reason we aimed to investigate the effects of a sleep hygiene education on sleep quality and academic performance of first year medical students. Material and Method: Self-reported sleep data and academic performance of 131 first grade medical students were collected. To all students e...

  18. Introduction to Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Offices Regional Offices Labs and Research Centers Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Contact Us Share Introduction to Indoor Air Quality Health Effects Primary Causes Identifying Problems Improving IAQ ...

  19. Evaluating the Effect of Software Quality Characteristics on Health Care Quality Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakineh Aghazadeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Various types of software are used in health care organizations to manage information and care processes. The quality of software has been an important concern for both health authorities and designers of Health Information Technology. Thus, assessing the effect of software quality on the performance quality of healthcare institutions is essential. Method: The most important health care quality indicators in relation to software quality characteristics are provided via an already performed literature review. ISO 9126 standard model is used for definition and integration of various characteristics of software quality. The effects of software quality characteristics and sub-characteristics on the healthcare indicators are evaluated through expert opinion analyses. A questionnaire comprising of 126 questions of 10-point Likert scale was used to gather opinions of experts in the field of Medical/Health Informatics. The data was analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling. Results: Our findings showed that software Maintainability was rated as the most effective factor on user satisfaction (R2 =0.89 and Functionality as the most important and independent variable affecting patient care quality (R2 =0.98. Efficiency was considered as the most effective factor on workflow (R2 =0.97, and Maintainability as the most important factor that affects healthcare communication (R2 =0.95. Usability and Efficiency were rated as the most effectual factor affecting patient satisfaction (R2 =0.80, 0.81. Reliability, Maintainability, and Efficiency were considered as the main factors affecting care costs (R2 =0.87, 0.74, 0.87. Conclusion: We presented a new model based on ISO standards. The model demonstrates and weighs the relations between software quality characteristics and healthcare quality indicators. The clear relationships between variables and the type of the metrics and measurement methods used in the model make it a reliable method to assess

  20. FIELD SURVEY REPORT OF TSUNAMI EFFECTS CAUSED BY THE AUGUST 2012 OFFSHORE EL SALAVADOR EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Gavidia-Medina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the field survey of the western zone of El Salvador conducted by an international group of scientists and engineers following the earthquake and tsunami of 27 August 2012 (04:37 UTC, 26 August 10:37 pm local time. The earthquake generated a tsunami with a maximum height of ~ 6 m causing inundation of up to 300 m inland along a 40 km section of coastline in eastern El Salvador. * (Note: Presentation from the 6th International Tsunami Symposium of Tsunami Society International in Costa Rica in Sept. 2014 - based on the Field Survey Report of the tsunami effects caused by the August 2012 Earthquake which were compiled in a report by Jose C. Borrero of the University of California Tsunami Research Center. Contributors to that report and field survey participants included Hermann M. Fritz of the Georgia Institute of Technology, Francisco Gavidia-Medina, Jeniffer Larreynaga-Murcia, Rodolfo Torres-Cornejo, Manuel Diaz-Flores and Fabio Alvarad: of the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales de El Salvador (MARN, Norwin Acosta: of the Instituto Nicaragüense de Estudios Territoriales( INOTER, Julie Leonard of the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID, OFDA, Nic Arcos of the International Tsunami Information Center (ITIC and Diego Arcas of the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (NOAA – PMEL The figures of this paper are from the report compiled by Jose C. Borrero and are numbered out of sequence out of sequence from the compiled joint report. The quality of figures 2.2, 2.3 and 2.4 is rather poor and the reader is referred to the original report, as shown in the references.

  1. EFFECT OF QUALITY CONTROL SYSTEM ON AUDIT QUALITY WITH PROFESSIONAL COMMITMENTS AS A MODERATION VARIABLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadhani R.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to test the effect of every element of Quality Control System (QCS that is leadership responsibilities for quality on audit, relevant ethical requirements, acceptance and continuance of client relationships and certain engagements, assignment of engagement team, engagement performance, monitoring, and documentation on audit quality as well as to test whether the professional commitment moderate effect of every element of QCS on audit quality. The population was the staff auditors working in public accounting firms domiciled in Jakarta City, especially Central Jakarta area with the drawing of 84 respondents. The statistical method used was SEM PLS with the help of SmartPLS application. The results of this study indicate that from seven elements of QCS, only relevant ethical requirements that affect on audit quality. Furthermore, the study also found that professional commitment cannot moderate the relationship between the seven elements of QCS on audit quality.

  2. Identification of Causes and Effects of Poor Communication in Construction Industry: A Theoretical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Gamil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction industry is characterized in nature as complex, fragmented, dynamic and involves many parties therefore effective communication is essential to overcome these challenges. Many researchers found that the industry faces major challenge to ensure effective and successful communication throughout the lifecycle of the project which therefore resulted to project failure. Poor communication in construction industry had been addressed in previous research studies; however, this paper presents and examines the identification of causes and effects which lead to poor communication. Further investigations on previous literature were conducted to extract the causes and effects which contributed to poor communication in construction industry. Similarity technique was applied to avoid duplications in the identified causes and effect of poor communication. Using the frequency technique, from the 33 causes of poor communication it was found that the most dominant cause is lack of effective communication. Whereas, out of 21 effects from poor communication, it was found that highly repeated effect is time overrun. These findings will serve a good platform for further investigation on the relevancy of causes and effects to the local construction practitioners.

  3. AIR POLLUTION EFFECTS ON SEMEN QUALITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential impact of exposure to periods of high air pollution on male reproductive health was examined within the framework of an international project conducted in the Czech Republic. Semen quality was evaluated in young men (age 18) living in the Teplice District who are ex...

  4. Endogenous Quality Effects of Trade Policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L. Moraga-Gonzalez (José Luis); J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe study the optimal trade policy against a foreign oligopoly with endogenous quality. We show that, under the Most Favoured Nation (MFN) clause, a uniform tariff policy is always welfare improving over the free trade equilibrium. However, a nonuniform tariff policy is always desirable

  5. Heat Damaged Forages: Effects on Forage Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditionally, heat damage in forages has been associated with alterations in forage protein quality as a result of Maillard reactions, and most producers and nutritionists are familiar with this concept. However, this is not necessarily the most important negative consequence of spontaneous heating...

  6. Healthcare Access and Quality Index based on mortality from causes amenable to personal health care in 195 countries and territories, 1990–2015 : a novel analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barber, Ryan M.; Fullman, Nancy; Sorensen, Reed JD; Bollyky, Thomas; McKee, Martin; Nolte, Ellen; van Boven, Job; Murray, Christopher J L

    2017-01-01

    Background National levels of personal health-care access and quality can be approximated by measuring mortality rates from causes that should not be fatal in the presence of effective medical care (ie, amenable mortality). Previous analyses of mortality amenable to health care only focused on

  7. Effect of Strip Mining on Water Quality in Small Streams in Eastern Kentucky, 1967-1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth L. Dyer; Willie R. Curtis

    1977-01-01

    Eight years of streamflow data are analyzed to show the effects of strip mining on chemical quality of water in six first-order streams in Breathitt County, Kentucky. All these watersheds were unmined in August, 1967, but five have since been strip mined. The accumulated data from this case history study indicate that strip mining causes large increases in the...

  8. The Anthropogenic "Greenhouse Effect": Greek Prospective Primary Teachers' Ideas about Causes, Consequences and Cures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonomidis, Simos; Papanastasiou, Dimitris; Melas, Dimitris; Avgoloupis, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the ideas of Greek prospective primary teachers about the anthropogenic greenhouse effect, particularly about its causes, consequences and cures. For this purpose, a survey was conducted: 265 prospective teachers completed a closed-form questionnaire. The results showed serious misconceptions in all areas (causes, consequences…

  9. Causes of Indiscipline in the Family and Its Effect on the Child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Causes of Indiscipline in the Family and Its Effect on the Child. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... revealed causes of indiscipline in the home to include lack of attention/love from parents, poor parent-child relationship, ...

  10. Effect of technology on quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvis, E.E. III

    1984-01-01

    Optimizing Quality Assurance activities by taking advantage of technological improvements is an issue directly related to overall product cost, quality, and delivery schedules. Use of automated tooling and numerical control have reduced manufacturing cycle time and thereby enabled better response to changing consumer tastes and market demand. Non-nuclear industries are using computer-aided technology for in-process inspection and final product acceptance. Non-destructive examination can also be performed real-time, on the production line. The challenge faced by the nuclear industry is to make the best use of new and emerging technology while satisfying compliance requirements. Currently, use of new methods is hampered by uncertainty about the affect on regulatory issues. Ways of using the technology have been developed for commercial applications without consideration of nuclear requirements

  11. Causes and effects of the corrosion of a plumbing galvanised steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandre Sánchez, F. J.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Hot dip galvanising life as a corrosion protective coatings on steel depends basically on three factors: coatings quality (thickness, correct installation of the galvanised article, and weathering effects. The aim of this research it is to study the decaying causes and effects of a plumbing installation made with hot dip galvanised steel tubes. The mentioned installation was of use during 30 years in the water supply system of the Parque Alcosa market (Sevilla, Spain. The research was divided in three parts: in the first one, shape analysis and XDR of internal decayed products was carried out: in the second one, physical properties were determined according to UNE 37- 505-89, corrosion morphology was conducted by metalographic microscopy, and it was evaluated also water quality: and finally, in the third one, diameter, section, and internal volume decrease was calculated in order to evaluate friction increase and pressure decrease in the installation. The results obtained show the correct plumbing installation according to quality requirements (UNE 37-509-89, so corrosion causes are mainly attributed to an aggressive environment for the hot dip galvanising.

    La durabilidad de los galvanizados en caliente como recubrimientos protectores de la corrosión del acero dependen básicamente de tres factores: la calidad del recubrimiento (espesor, la correcta instalación del elemento galvanizado, y la agresividad del medio al que se encuentren expuestos. En este trabajo se estudian las causas y consecuencias del deterioro sufrido por una tubería de acero galvanizado, destinada durante unos 30 años a la conducción de agua potable de la red en el mercado del Parque Al cosa (Sevilla. La investigación se ha dividido en tres etapas: en la primera, se ha realizado el análisis formal y la caracterización mediante DRX de los productos de alteración generados en el interior del tubo: en la segunda, se han determinado las características f

  12. The effect of soil on cork quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Nugent Pestana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to contribute for a better knowledge regarding soil features as cork quality indicators for stoppers.Cork sampling was made in eight Cork oak stands (montados de sobreiro located in different Plio-Plistocene sedimentary formations of Península de Setúbal and Carbonic shistes from paleozoic periods in Saw Grândola, both in southern Tagus River regionThe samples used to classify the cork as stopper for wine bottles were obtained in eight cork oak stands located in Península de Setúbal, south of the River Tagus, covering soils of different types of sandstones of the Plio-plistoceneIn each stand, we randomly chose five circular plots with 30 m radius. Five trees with same stripping conditions determined by the dendrometric features: HD (height stipping, PBH (perimeter at breaster height, and percentage canopy cover, trees vegetative condition (defoliation degree stand features (density, and site conditions (soil type and orientation. In the center of each plot a pit was open to characterize the soil profile and to classify the soil of each plot sampling.Cork quality for stoppers was evaluated according to porosity, pores/per cm 2 and thickness. The soil was characterized according to morphological soil profile features (lithology, soil profound and soil horizons and chemical soil surface horizon features (organic matter, pH, macro and micronutrients availability.Based on the variables studied and using the numerical taxonomy, we settled relationships between the cork quality and some soil features. The results indicate: (1 high correlation between the cork caliber and boron, caption exchange capacity, total nitrogen, exchange acidity and exchangeable magnesium, potassium, calcium and sodium in soils of theirs cork oaks; (2 the cork porosity is correlated with the number of pores/cm2 and magnesium; (3 the other soil features have a lower correlation with the caliber, porosity and the number of pores per cm2.

  13. The effect of soil on cork quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestana, Miguel; Gomes, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    The present work aimed to contribute for a better knowledge regarding soil features as cork quality indicators for stoppers. Cork sampling was made in eight Cork oak stands (montados de sobreiro) located in different Plio-Plistocene sedimentary formations of Península de Setúbal and Carbonic shistes from paleozoic periods in Saw Grândola, both in southern Tagus River region The samples used to classify the cork as stopper for wine bottles were obtained in eight cork oak stands located in “Península de Setúbal”, south of the River Tagus, covering soils of different types of sandstones of the Plio-plistocene In each stand, we randomly chose five circular plots with 30 m radius. Five trees with same stripping conditions determined by the dendrometric features: HD (height stipping, PBH (perimeter at breaster height), and percentage canopy cover, trees vegetative condition (defoliation degree) stand features (density), and site conditions (soil type and orientation). In the center of each plot a pit was open to characterize the soil profile and to classify the soil of each plot sampling. Cork quality for stoppers was evaluated according to porosity, pores/per cm 2 and thickness. The soil was characterized according to morphological soil profile features (lithology, soil profound and soil horizons) and chemical soil surface horizon features (organic matter, pH, macro and micronutrients availability). Based on the variables studied and using the numerical taxonomy, we settled relationships between the cork quality and some soil features. The results indicate: (1) high correlation between the cork caliber and boron, caption exchange capacity, total nitrogen, exchange acidity and exchangeable magnesium, potassium, calcium and sodium in soils of theirs cork oaks; (2) the cork porosity is correlated with the number of pores/cm2 and magnesium; (3) the other soil features have a lower correlation with the caliber, porosity and the number of pores per cm2.

  14. The effect of soil on cork quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestana, Miguel N; Gomes, Alberto A

    2014-01-01

    The present work aimed to contribute for a better knowledge regarding soil features as cork quality indicators for stoppers. Cork sampling was made in eight Cork oak stands (montados de sobreiro) located in the Plio-Plistocene sedimentary formations of Península de Setúbal in southern Tagus River region. The samples used to classify the cork as stopper for wine bottles were obtained in eight cork oak stands, covering soils of different types of sandstones of the Plio-plistocene. In each stand, we randomly chose five circular plots with 30 m radius and five trees per plot with same stripping conditions determined by: dendrometric features (HD- height stipping, PBH- perimeter at breaster height), trees vegetative condition (defoliation degree); stand features (density, percentage canopy cover); site conditions (soil type and orientation). In the center of each plot a pit was open to characterize the soil profile and to classify the soil. Cork quality for stoppers was evaluated according to porosity, pores/per cm(2) and cork boards thickness. The soil was characterized according to morphological soil profile features (lithology, soil profound, and soil horizons) and chemical soil surface horizon features (organic matter, pH, macro, and micronutrients availability). Based on the variables studied and using the numerical taxonomy, we settled relationships between the cork quality and some soil features. The results indicate: (1) high correlation between the cork caliber and boron, cation exchange capacity, total nitrogen, exchange acidity, and exchangeable magnesium, potassium, calcium, and sodium in soils of theirs cork oaks; (2) the cork porosity is correlated with the number of pores/cm(2) and magnesium soil content; (3) the other soil features have a lower correlation with the caliber, porosity, and the number of pores per cm(2).

  15. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient's trust is the service quality. This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient's trust. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient's trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff.

  16. Effects of pumice mining on soil quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Ruíz, A.; Cruz-Ruíz, E.; Vaca, R.; Del Aguila, P.; Lugo, J.

    2015-04-01

    México is the worl's fourth most important maize producer; hence, there is a need to maintain soil quality for a sustainable production in the upcoming years. Pumice mining, a superficial operation, modifies large areas in Central Mexico. The main aim was to assess the present state of agricultural soils differing in elapsed-time since pumice mining (0-15 years), in a representative area of the Calimaya region in the State of Mexico. The study sites in 0, 1, 4, 10 and 15 year-old reclaimed soils were compared with adjacent undisturbed site. Our results indicate that soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, microbial biomass carbon and microbial quotients were greatly impacted by disturbance. A general trend of recovery towards the undisturbed condition with reclamation age was found after disturbance. Recovery of soil total nitrogen was faster than soil organic carbon. Principal components analysis was applied. The first three components together explain 71.72 % of the total variability. First factor reveals strong associations between total nitrogen, microbial biomass carbon and pH. The second factor reveals high loading of urease and catalase. The obtained results revealed that the most appropriate indicators to diagnose the quality of the soils were: total nitrogen, microbial biomass carbon and soil organic carbon.

  17. Protective effects of imedeen on spermatogenic disorders caused by oxidative stress induction in cyclophosphamide-treated mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezazadeh Y

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: One of the side effects of chemotherapy drugs is oxidative stress that can damage the sperm and decrease fertility potential. Antioxidant agents in Imedeen like Lycophence GS and Biomarine complex play important role in preventing the direct and indirect effects of free radicals. So, in this study, the inhibitory effects of Imedeen on the damage caused by cyclophosphamide were investigated. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 60 mature male mice were divided into six groups. The control group received physiological serum, the second group received CP with 12mg/kg/day dosage, the third group received Imedeen with 111µg/kg/day dosage, the fourth group received Imedeen with 222 µg/kg/day dosage, the fifth group received CP and Imedeen with one dosage and the last group received CP and Imedeen with double dosage. Sampling and studies on sperm quality were performed after 35 days. Results: The results obtained from the caudal epididymal sperm analysis revealed that treated with CP caused significant decrease in sperm count, motility, and viability, while abnormal sperms increased as compared to control gruop. These changes were associated with significant increase in DNA damage and chromatin abnormality in the caudal epididymal spermatozoa as evidenced by Acridine Orange and Aniline Blue staining respectively. Notably administration of Imedeen caused a considerable recovery in above-mentioned parameters. Conclusion: The results suggest that Imedeen as an antioxidant could diminish the side effects of cyclophosphamide in the reproductive system of male mice.

  18. The Effect of Financial Reporting Quality on Financing and Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windy Angela

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analysis the effect of reporting quality on financing and investment. It is important for us to understand the relation among them in order to prepare Indonesian companies for ASEAN Economic Community in 2015. The study examines the effect of financial reporting quality on financing and investment of 15 Indonesian companies with large market capitalization based on the Standard and Poor’s Rating Services in its first survey of the major corporate credit trends in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN. Those companies may still be under-investing in relation to its regional peers. The results suggest that (1 financial reporting quality has negative effect on financing. (2 financial reporting quality has positive effect on investment among companies with higher likelihood of over-investing and negative effect on investment among those with higher likelihood of under-investing.DOI: 10.15408/etk.v16i1.4600 

  19. Making quality improvement programs more effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Taylor, Yoku

    2014-01-01

    In the past 25 years, and as recent as 2011, all external evaluations of the Quality Improvement Organization (QIO) Program have found its impact to be small or difficult to discern. The QIO program costs about $200 million on average to administer each year to improve quality of healthcare for people of 65 years or older. The program was created to address questionable quality of care. QIOs review how care is provided based on performance measures. The paper aims to discuss these issues. In 2012, the author supported the production of quarterly reports and reviewed internal monitoring and evaluation protocols of the program. The task also required reviewing all previous program evaluations. The task involved many conversations about the complexities of the program, why impact is difficult to discern and possible ways for eventual improvement. Process flow charts were created to simulate the data life cycle and discrete event models were created based on the sequence of data collection and reporting to identify gaps in data flow. The internal evaluation uncovered data gaps within the program. The need for a system of specification rules for data conceptualization, collection, distribution, discovery, analysis and repurposing is clear. There were data inconsistencies and difficulty of integrating data from one instance of measurement to the next. The lack of good and reliable data makes it difficult to discern true impact. The prescription is for a formal data policy or data governance structure to integrate and document all aspects of the data life cycle. The specification rules for governance are exemplified by the Data Documentation Initiative and the requirements published by the Data Governance Institute. The elements are all in place for a solid foundation of the data governance structure. These recommendations will increase the value of program data. The model specifies which agency units must be included in the governance authority and the data team. The

  20. Public Management and Organizational Performance: The Effect of Managerial Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Toole, Laurence J.; Meier, Kenneth J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the first large study of public management quality and its effect on program performance. Using 5 years of data from more than 1000 Texas school districts, the authors measure quality as the additional salary paid to school superintendents over and above the normal determinants

  1. An Effective Time and Management Strategy in Quality Circles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Don E.

    Contending that participation in quality circles enhances effective time management by school administrators and teachers, this guide provides both a theoretical briefing and practical recommendations for better time management. A pre- posttest prefaces a review of basic concepts of quality circles with reference to the work of Abraham Maslow,…

  2. Effects of Quality Improvement System for Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Kavanaugh, Amy; Lu, Xuejin; Brandi, Karen; Goodman, Jeff; Till, Lance; Watson, Grace

    2011-01-01

    Using multiple years of data collected from about 100 child care centers in Palm Beach County, Florida, the authors studied whether the Quality Improvement System (QIS) made a significant impact on quality of child care centers. Based on a pre- and postresearch design spanning a period of 13 months, QIS appeared to be effective in improving…

  3. Effect of Processing on the Quality of Pineapple Juice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hounhouigan, M.H.; Linnemann, A.R.; Soumanou, M.M.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Pineapple processing plays an important role in juice preservation. Because the quality of the pineapple juice is affected by the processing technology applied, the effects of pasteurization and other preservation methods on the overall juice quality were discussed. During juice processing,

  4. Demonstrating a lack of brand/cause effects on point of sale donations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman Joshua T.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Point of sale cause-related marketing has raised over $2 billion for charities over the past 30 years, yet the subject remains largely unexplored in academic literature. The subject of brand/cause fit, however, is prolific throughout extant research, with many studies showing that high congruence between a company and a charity is necessary to achieve philanthropic success. This paper challenges current marketing thinking both conceptually and empirically. Employing tests of no-effect hypotheses following the guidelines set out by Cortina and Folger (1998, it is established that, in the point of sale cause-related marketing context, the traditional effects of brand/cause fits do not apply. Across three studies involving experimental designs and over 500 respondents, the results of one-way ANOVA analyses consistently demonstrate that a low brand/cause fit can be just as effective as a high/brand cause fit. These findings contribute to a profound understanding of social efforts such as cause-related marketing may not be as simple or easily understood as was once thought.

  5. Effects of Sleep Quality on Quality of Life in Patients with Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şule Şahin Onat

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate sleep quality in osteoporotic individuals, and to determine the associated factors with sleep quality and to investigate the relationship between quality of life and sleep quality Material and Methods: 154 patients with osteoporosis admitted to our outpatient clinic included in the study. A questionnaire that was including patients age, sex, marital status, education level, occupation, height, weight, alcohol use, smoking, physical activity level, milk consumption and previous fragility fracture was completed. DXA was used to determine bone mineral density of the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Thoracal and lumbar compression fractures were evaulated with thoracal and lumbar radiography.Visual analog scale was used to evaluate back pain. Pittsburgh sleep quality index was used to determine sleep quality and QUALEFFO was used to evaluate quality of life in the individuals. Results: A total of 154 individuals included in the study. 65 patients (42.2% had a sleep disorder and 89 patients (57.8% hadn’t a sleep disorder. Mean age, female gender, not being married, not working actively, illiteracy rates were higher; the mean of weekly consumption of milk were lower in patients with sleep disorders than without sleep disorders. Vertebral compression fracture was more in patients with sleep disorders than without sleep disorders. Both lumbar and femoral T and Z values, VAS values were significantly higher in patients with sleep disorders than without sleep disorders (p<0.05. The value of all sub-parameters of quality of life scale QUALEFFO and total value were significantly higher in patients with sleep disorders than without sleep disorders (p<0.05. Conclusion: Sleep disorders in patients with osteoporosis are releated to factors such as age, sex, marital status, education level and diet. Sleep disorders cause a further decrease in the quality of life of patients with osteoporosis. (Turkish Journal of

  6. Effect of glyphosate on wheat quality characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world. It is a non-selective, broad spectrum, post-emergence herbicide, and therefore controls a wide range of different species. Although glyphosate is effective in weed control, side effects of this herbicide on the crop itself, micro and macro o...

  7. The effects of hospital competition on inpatient quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Ryan L; Wong, Herbert S; Goldfarb, Marsha G

    2008-01-01

    Existing empirical studies have produced inconclusive, and sometimes contradictory, findings on the effects of hospital competition on inpatient quality of care. These inconsistencies may be due to the use of different methodologies, hospital competition measures, and hospital quality measures. This paper applies the Quality Indicator software from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to the 1997 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases to create three versions (i.e., observed, risk-adjusted, and "smoothed") of 38 distinct measures of inpatient quality. The relationship between 12 different hospital competition measures and these quality measures are assessed, using ordinary least squares, two-step efficient generalized method of moments, and negative binomial regression techniques. We find that across estimation strategies, hospital competition has an impact on a number of hospital quality measures. However, the effect is not unidirectional: some indicators show improvements in hospital quality with greater levels of competition, some show decreases in hospital quality, and others are unaffected. We provide hypotheses based on emerging areas of research that could explain these findings, but inconsistencies remain.

  8. ELECTRONIC TEXTBOOK AS AN EFFECTIVE TOOL FOR IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Yuliia M. Shepetko

    2011-01-01

    The urgency of the material stated in article, is caused by requirements for use of information and communication technologies for educational process, in particular the electronic textbook which can facilitate perception of the information, diversify work forms, interest by technical possibilities. The article aims to proof the necessity of  electronic textbooks use as effective tool for improving the quality of education. Use of the electronic textbook at training will effectively and posit...

  9. Split resonance modes of a AuBRC plasmonic nanosystem caused by the coupling effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Yuan; Kan, Caixia; Xu, Haiying; Wang, Changshun

    2016-01-01

    A plasmonic nanosystem can give rise to particular optical responses due to a coupling effect. In this work, we investigate the optical properties and field distributions of a novel ‘matrioska’ nanocavity structure composed of a Au nanorod (AuNR) within a nanobox (AuNB) via finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. This nanocavity can be fabricated by a two-step wet-chemical method. The multiple SPR modes of optical spectrum for nanocavity are caused by the strong interaction between the AuNR-core and AuNB-shell when the incident light is perpendicular or parallel to the long axis of the Au box/rod nanocavity (AuBRC). The SPR modes are known as the dipole–dipole bonding resonance mode in the lower-energy region and the antibonding resonance mode in the higher-energy region. It is proposed that AuBRC can escape the orientation confinement of AuNR because the multiple modes occur and provide a potential application for the enhancement of the photoluminescence signal. Additionally, the SPR modes red-shift with increasing the offset of the AuNR-core, whereas the SPR mode dramatically blue-shifts when the conductive coupling is formed. The intense ‘hot-spot’ could be induced within a small interaction region in the conductive coupled system. The SPR line-shape of high quality would also be promoted. The SPR is highly sensitive to the medium, which is promising in the sensing and detecting devices. (paper)

  10. Effects of gamma irradiation of barley and malt on malting quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köksel, H.; ÇElik, S.; ÖZkara, R.

    1998-01-01

    Two two-rowed barley cultivars, Tokak and Clerine, were irradiated at two different dose ranges (0.05–0.75 kGy and 0.5–5.0 kGy) using a 60Co source. Irradiation of barley at the medium levels before malting had detrimental effects on most of the malt quality criteria. The detrimental effects of irradiation was lower at doses up to 0.25 kGy. Irradiation of malt samples caused either slight or no deterioration of quality characteristics

  11. Fuel quality and its effect on the design of power boilers in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.

    1984-05-01

    Statistical data, taken from Power, Proceedings of the American Power Conference and others, on developments since the 1950s in boiler design caused by the increasing use of lower quality fuel (subbituminous and lignite coals) are presented. The effect of pollution regulations in the USA on boiler design is discussed. The results of a 16 year study by the TVA on the decrease in coal quality fired in its boilers and its effect on boiler efficiency are presented. Methods of transport are surveyed. Descriptions and characteristics of several modern boilers designed by Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, Foster-Wheeler and Riley Stoker are given. 13 references.

  12. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on drake semen quality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sp3

    2014-01-30

    Jan 30, 2014 ... This study was conducted to determine the effect on semen quality traits of supplementing the diets of. Iraqi drakes with L-carnitine. ... Keywords: Carnitine, ducks, reproductive performance ..... clinical result. Drug Exp. Clin.

  13. Effects of processing on nutritional composition and quality

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of processing on the nutritional composition and quality evaluation of ... P ≤ 0.01 ) differences in total dry matter and total sugar content between samples, ... Faculty of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Department of Nutrition, ...

  14. Biofuels that cause land-use change may have much larger non-GHG air quality emissions than fossil fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, C-C; Campbell, J E; Mena-Carrasco, M; Spak, S N; Carmichael, G R; Chen, Y

    2012-10-02

    Although biofuels present an opportunity for renewable energy production, significant land-use change resulting from biofuels may contribute to negative environmental, economic, and social impacts. Here we examined non-GHG air pollution impacts from both indirect and direct land-use change caused by the anticipated expansion of Brazilian biofuels production. We synthesized information on fuel loading, combustion completeness, and emission factors, and developed a spatially explicit approach with uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to estimate air pollution emissions. The land-use change emissions, ranging from 6.7 to 26.4 Tg PM(2.5), were dominated by deforestation burning practices associated with indirect land-use change. We also found Brazilian sugar cane ethanol and soybean biodiesel including direct and indirect land-use change effects have much larger life-cycle emissions than conventional fossil fuels for six regulated air pollutants. The emissions magnitude and uncertainty decrease with longer life-cycle integration periods. Results are conditional to the single LUC scenario employed here. After LUC uncertainty, the largest source of uncertainty in LUC emissions stems from the combustion completeness during deforestation. While current biofuels cropland burning policies in Brazil seek to reduce life-cycle emissions, these policies do not address the large emissions caused by indirect land-use change.

  15. An effective quality model for evaluating mobile websites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, W.U.; Nawaz, M.T.; Syed, T.H.; Naseem, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Evolution in Web development in recent years has caused emergence of new area of mobile computing, Mobile phone has been transformed into high speed processing device capable of doing the processes which were suppose to be run only on computer previously, Modem mobile phones now have capability to process data with greater speed then desktop systems and with the inclusion of 3G and 4G networks, mobile became the prime choice for users to send and receive data from any device. As a result, there is a major increase in mobile website need and development but due to uniqueness of mobile website usage as compared to desktop website, there is a need to focus on quality aspect of mobile website, So, to increase and preserve quality of mobile website, a quality model is required which has to be designed specifically to evaluate mobile website quality, To design a mobile website quality model, a survey based methodology is used to gather the information regarding website unique usage in mobile from different users. On the basis of this information, a mobile website quality model is presented which aims to evaluate the quality of mobile websites. In proposed model, some sub characteristics are designed to evaluate mobile websites in particular. The result is a proposed model aims to evaluate features of website which are important in context of its deployment and its usability in mobile platform. (author)

  16. The Effects of Development Team Skill on Software Product Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Justin M.; Schiavone, Guy A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the effect of the skill/experience of the software development team on the quality of the final software product. A method for the assessment of software development team skill and experience is proposed, and was derived from a workforce management tool currently in use by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Using data from 26 smallscale software development projects, the team skill measures are correlated to 5 software product quality metrics from the ISO/IEC 9126 Software Engineering Product Quality standard. in the analysis of the results, development team skill is found to be a significant factor in the adequacy of the design and implementation. In addition, the results imply that inexperienced software developers are tasked with responsibilities ill-suited to their skill level, and thus have a significant adverse effect on the quality of the software product. Keywords: software quality, development skill, software metrics

  17. The causal effect of institutional quality on outsourcing

    OpenAIRE

    H.J. Roelfsema; Zhang Yi

    2009-01-01

    This paper empirically investigates the relationship between institutional quality and outsourcing to developing economies. In contrast to cross-sectional studies on institutions, this paper uses panel data for 76 countries over 25 years (1980-2004). Employing panel data helps to show the causal relationship by controlling for the fixed effects and dynamic factors. Using within and IV estimations, we find that there is a positive effect of institutional quality on outsourcing in the lower-mid...

  18. Effects of electrocardiogram gating on CT pulmonary angiography image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardley, Nicholas D.; Lau, Ken K.; Troupis, John M.; Buchan, Kevin; Paul, Eldho

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is the third most common cause of death from cardiovascular disease. Computed-tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is an accurate and safe test for diagnosing PE. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the effects on image quality (IQ) of electrocardiogram (ECG) gating during CTPA. Fifty consecutive patients presenting for CTPA were included in the study. A single acquisition was performed, resulting in two reconstructions: one at 75% of the R–R interval and the other without ECG influence. IQ evaluation was undertaken by two radiologists, focusing on respiratory and cardiac motion, image noise, low-contrast resolution, vessel and lung clarity, contrast media opacification and artefacts. Various regions of the lungs and vasculature were evaluated, and IQ scores were statistically compared. For the ECG-tagged reconstructions, IQ was noted to be better overall with regard to vessel clarity (P<0.05) and cardiac motion (P<0.05), while lung clarity was better only in the left lower zone (P<0.05). IQ was better with regard to image noise (P<0.05) and low-contrast resolution (P<0.05) in the non-ECG-tagged reconstructions. No statistical IQ difference between the two types of reconstruction was noted with regard to respiratory motion, contrast media opacification or presence of artefacts. The two types of reconstruction provide complementary information for evaluating CTPA results.

  19. Effects of oils on feed mildew and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Qi, Ming; Huang, Yakuan; Guo, Jiao; Zhang, Jiacai; Li, Chong; Zhang, Niya; Sun, Lvhui; Qi, Desheng

    2017-08-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of oils on feed mildew and feed quality. Under different moisture content conditions (10%, 13% and 16%), the basal feeds were supplemented with 4%, 6%, 8%, 10% and 12% soybean oil. In addition, at different moisture content levels (10%, 13% and 16%), the basal feed was supplemented with 12% of various types of oil (soybean, peanut, corn and fish). Subsequently, a mixed mold spore suspension was added. The feed samples were incubated at 28°C, and the total mold, water activity (Aw), moisture, acid value, crude protein (CP), crude lipid (CL), crude ash (CA) and nitrogen-free extract (NFE) levels were determined at 15, 30, 45 and 60 days. The results showed no significant variations in the feed moisture, CP, CL, CA and NEF contents. However, the acid value gradually increased in the feed samples with an extended incubation time and increasing initial moisture. The feed moisture content was a critical factor controlling feed mildew, and high levels of oil supplementation caused an elevated Aw. Additionally, peanut oil promoted mold growth in feed. These results provide a reference for the production and scientific management of formulated feed. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  20. Twelve-month quality of life improvement and all-cause mortality in elderly patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleczyński, Paweł; Bagieński, Maciej; Dziewierz, Artur; Rzeszutko, Łukasz; Sorysz, Danuta; Trębacz, Jarosław; Sobczyński, Robert; Tomala, Marek; Stąpór, Maciej; Dudek, Dariusz

    2016-10-10

    Restoration of quality of life (QoL) and improvement of clinical outcomes is crucial in elderly patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We sought to evaluate changes in QoL and all-cause mortality 12 months after TAVI. A total of 101 patients who underwent TAVI were included. Patients were followed for 12 months. QoL was assessed at baseline and at 1, 6 and 12 months after TAVI using EQ-5D-3L with a visual analog scale (VAS). Patients who reported some problems with mobility at baseline showed better mobility after 12 months (p = 0.001). On the other hand, those who reported issues with self-care, usual activity or pain did not show significant improvement (p = 0.41; p = 0.12; p = 0.27, respectively). Patients reporting anxiety at baseline improved 12 months later (p = 0.003). VAS score showed an incremental increase during follow-up (p<0.001). Transfemoral access was associated with higher VAS score values after 1 month (median (IQR): 65.0 (50.0-75.0) vs. 54.0 (50.0-60.0); p = 0.019) but not after 12 months (70.0 (62.5-80.0) vs. 67.5 (55.0-70.0); p = 0.07) as compared to non-transfemoral access. In multivariable regression analysis, only age and the presence of coronary chronic total occlusion were independently associated with VAS score at 12 months. In-hospital, 1-, 6- and 12-month mortality rates were 6.9%, 10.9%, 15.8 and 17.8%, respectively. TAVI provides improved QoL with relatively good clinical outcomes. However, not all components of QoL may be improved. Patients treated with transfemoral access might have better QoL than those who had non-transfemoral access, especially early after TAVI.

  1. Influence of Machine Exploitation Effectiveness on Furniture Production Quality Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stasiak-Betlejewska Renata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors determining the company‘s capacity to produce high quality products is the level of machinery operation effectiveness. Companies having modern machinery are characterized by high productivity. To obtain a high quality product, the equipment should be properly used, without any failure, which contributes significantly to the exploitation level increase. The modernity level and the exploitation effectiveness level for chosen machine producing furniture components in relation to the product quality level were analysed in the paper. As a result of the research findings analysis, proposals for corrective actions with regard to machinery maintenance and production processes were presented.

  2. Contribution of quality assurance to effective nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisic, N.

    1984-01-01

    The regulatory requirements related to quality assurance (QA) serve as an effective mechanism in establishing and implementing the QA programme during the design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants. However, these requirements only relate to the equipment and activities concerning the safety of nuclear power plants; the decision as to their implementation on other non-safety-related equipment is left to the plant management. As a result, operation statistics show that the safety-related systems are performing satisfactorily and that they are not of serious concern to plant unavailability. On the other hand, non-safety-related equipment which is still vital to plant performances is more frequently responsible for plant outages and losses in electricity production. QA programmes implemented on such equipment are in principle less strict, unsystematic and, in a number of cases, non-existent. An attempt has been made to analyse the existing operating experience data in order to identify the correlation of outage statistics with QA programmes required by existing standards and their implementation practices, both in respect of programme coverage and intensity. Unfortunately, existing operating experience data cannot directly correlate plant performance with the QA programmes implemented in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of QA techniques to plant safety, reliability of plant equipment and plant availability. For these reasons an analysis is made of outage statistics to identify the modes and causes of outages and to relate them to existing QA requirements and practices. Some conclusions are deduced that relate to a possible improvement of plant performance by consequent implementation of QA requirements to the equipment and activities responsible for both plant safety and efficient electricity production, and by adequate grading of QA activities to obtain a cost-effective QA programme in plant operation. (author)

  3. Effects of Soybean Cultivars on Soymilk Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziadekey, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Soymilk was prepared from twelve soybean cultivars grown under the same environmental conditions to evaluate their effects on soymilk characteristics. Significant correlations were observed between the Chemical composition of the seeds and the resultant soymilk. Soymilk solids were significantly affected by seed size and seed phosphorus contents. Cultivars with dark hilum produced soymilk with less attractive colour.

  4. The effect of women's employment on children's quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayeh Ghanbari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life in adolescence period determines individual's future. The effect of maternal employment on children's quality of life is important and undeniable issue. This study aimed to investigate and compare the quality of life among children of employed and housewife women. In this study, the participants included selected school children's employed and housewife mothers. The tools for data collection consisted of a questionnaire which was distributed among 671 middle-high school and high school students (304 have employed mothers and 367 have housewives mothers. In this study, the level of significance was considered. Results showed that the life quality of children of employed mothers and housewife mothers in the two groups is statistically significant. Quality of life in employed mothers in the mental, physical, social relations, emotional, religious, achieve life goals, leisure time and economic dimension were higher than housewife mothers but there was not any significant different among employed mothers' children and housewife mothers' children in dimensions of relationships with parents. Girls' quality of Life was more than boys, in the teacher mothers was higher than other occupations and in the exceptional talents school was more than other schools. This study found that maternal employment has effect on children's quality of life, so employed mothers' children have high quality of life.

  5. Observation for clinical effect of phellodendron wet compress in treating the phlebitis caused by infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ying

    2018-05-01

    Aim of the study was to observe and analyze the clinical effect of phellodendron wet compress in treating the phlebitis caused by infusion. The research objects were 600 cases of phlebitis caused by infusion, all of which were treated in our hospital from June 2013 to June 2016. All patients were entitled to the right to know. They were randomly divided into the research group and the control group. Patients in the control group were treated with magnesium sulfate solution wet compress, while patients in the research group were treated with phellodendron wet compress. The effects in these two groups were observed and compared. Compared with the control group, the research group has better overall treatment efficiency, pred swelling and pain, p<0.05. Phellodendron wet compress shows a beneficial effect in treating the phlebitis caused by infusion. It can not only obviously shorten the onset of action, but also level up the overall treatment efficiency that helps patients to recover.

  6. Effects of undetected data quality issues on climatological analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hunziker

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Systematic data quality issues may occur at various stages of the data generation process. They may affect large fractions of observational datasets and remain largely undetected with standard data quality control. This study investigates the effects of such undetected data quality issues on the results of climatological analyses. For this purpose, we quality controlled daily observations of manned weather stations from the Central Andean area with a standard and an enhanced approach. The climate variables analysed are minimum and maximum temperature and precipitation. About 40 % of the observations are inappropriate for the calculation of monthly temperature means and precipitation sums due to data quality issues. These quality problems undetected with the standard quality control approach strongly affect climatological analyses, since they reduce the correlation coefficients of station pairs, deteriorate the performance of data homogenization methods, increase the spread of individual station trends, and significantly bias regional temperature trends. Our findings indicate that undetected data quality issues are included in important and frequently used observational datasets and hence may affect a high number of climatological studies. It is of utmost importance to apply comprehensive and adequate data quality control approaches on manned weather station records in order to avoid biased results and large uncertainties.

  7. Effects of gamma irradiation on wheat quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozkaya, B.; Koksel, H.; Ozkaya, H.; Tutluer, H.

    1994-01-01

    Effect of gamma irradiation at the doses of 2.5,5.0,7.5,10.0 and 12.5 kGy on two bread wheat samples (Bezostaya and Gerek) with distinct physical and technological properties was investigated in this study.Irradiation at the levels used had no significant effect on the flour yields of both varieties.No apparent changes were observed in ash,protein and wet gluten contents of the irradiated samples and control.However,as the radiation level was increased the falling number and sedimentation values of the irradiated samples showed a steady decrease.Thiamine and riboflavin contents also decreased significantly with irradiation.Farinograph absorption increased with increasing radiation exposure.However, dough development time,stability and valorimeter values decreased as radiation levels increased.Maximum resistance to extension(Rm), resistance at constant deformation (R 5) and area(A) values of extensograms decreased in both varieties as radiation levels increased

  8. Noninvasive ventilation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: effects on sleep quality and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandoorne, Eva; Vrijsen, Bart; Belge, Catharina; Testelmans, Dries; Buyse, Bertien

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the effects of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) on sleep quality in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We aim to evaluate the long-term effects of NIV on sleep quality and quality of life in patients with ALS. In this prospective observational study, 13 ALS patients were followed for one year after initiating NIV. We evaluated sleep quality, quality of life and functional status with several questionnaires: Epworth sleepiness Scale (ESS), Pittsburg sleep quality index (PSQI), Short Form 36 Health Questionnaire (SF-36), McGill Quality of Life questionnaire (McGillQoL) and revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale scores (ALSFRS-R). Median and interquartile range (IQR) at the start of NIV was 59 (53-65) years. The ALSFRS-R at start was 30 (24-37) (median, IQR), with three patients having severe bulbar impairment (ALSFRS-R-bulbar ≤ 9). The P a CO 2 at start of NIV treatment was 48 (43-52) mmHg (median, IQR). During the one-year follow-up period, a significant decrease in the ALSFRS-R was observed. The impact of NIV in a short term (1 month) revealed a statistically significant decrease in ESS, decrease in total PSQI and of four PSQI subscales and improvement of almost all subscales of the McGill questionnaire. Long-term analyses (9 months to 1 year) revealed that amelioration in ESS and total PSQI was sustained. We conclude that accurately titrated NIV in ALS patients can stabilize sleep quality and quality of life for at least one year, despite significant disease progression.

  9. Effect of boron on fruit quality in pineapple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Changbin; Ma, Zhiling; Liu, Yuge; Qiao, Jian; Sun, Guangming

    2018-04-01

    Boron (B) is an important element for the plant. The aim of work was to study the effect of B on fruit quality of pineapple. The experiment was carried out with `Comte de paris' variety in pots. The results demonstrated that B had positive effect on fruit weight, TSS, the ratio of TSS/acidity, Vitamin C, the content of aroma volatile compounds. The B had no effect on the content of the three sugars (sucrose, fructose and glucose) and titrable acidity. There was a positive effect on fruit quality by application of B fertilizer in production of pineapple.

  10. Effects of Extreme Temperatures on Cause-Specific Cardiovascular Mortality in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuying; Li, Guoxing; Liu, Liqun; Westerdahl, Dane; Jin, Xiaobin; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-21

    Limited evidence is available for the effects of extreme temperatures on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality in China. We collected data from Beijing and Shanghai, China, during 2007-2009, including the daily mortality of cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, ischemic heart disease and hypertensive disease, as well as air pollution concentrations and weather conditions. We used Poisson regression with a distributed lag non-linear model to examine the effects of extremely high and low ambient temperatures on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality. For all cause-specific cardiovascular mortality, Beijing had stronger cold and hot effects than those in Shanghai. The cold effects on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality reached the strongest at lag 0-27, while the hot effects reached the strongest at lag 0-14. The effects of extremely low and high temperatures differed by mortality types in the two cities. Hypertensive disease in Beijing was particularly susceptible to both extremely high and low temperatures; while for Shanghai, people with ischemic heart disease showed the greatest relative risk (RRs = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.34) to extremely low temperature. People with hypertensive disease were particularly susceptible to extremely low and high temperatures in Beijing. People with ischemic heart disease in Shanghai showed greater susceptibility to extremely cold days.

  11. Effects of Extreme Temperatures on Cause-Specific Cardiovascular Mortality in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuying Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Limited evidence is available for the effects of extreme temperatures on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality in China. Methods: We collected data from Beijing and Shanghai, China, during 2007–2009, including the daily mortality of cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, ischemic heart disease and hypertensive disease, as well as air pollution concentrations and weather conditions. We used Poisson regression with a distributed lag non-linear model to examine the effects of extremely high and low ambient temperatures on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality. Results: For all cause-specific cardiovascular mortality, Beijing had stronger cold and hot effects than those in Shanghai. The cold effects on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality reached the strongest at lag 0–27, while the hot effects reached the strongest at lag 0–14. The effects of extremely low and high temperatures differed by mortality types in the two cities. Hypertensive disease in Beijing was particularly susceptible to both extremely high and low temperatures; while for Shanghai, people with ischemic heart disease showed the greatest relative risk (RRs = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.34 to extremely low temperature. Conclusion: People with hypertensive disease were particularly susceptible to extremely low and high temperatures in Beijing. People with ischemic heart disease in Shanghai showed greater susceptibility to extremely cold days.

  12. Perceived Cause and Effect Relationship for Nutritional Anemia Among Adolescent Girls in Rural Puducherry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayura S

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The prevalence of nutritional anemia among adolescent girls is high (47.6% to 90% as previously reported in the different parts of North India. Since there are limited studies on nutritional anemia at the sub-district level in the Southern part of India, there is a need to know the extent of the problem among adolescent girls to plan context specific interventions. With this background, the present study was done with the objectives 1 To find the prevalence of nutritional anemia among adolescent girls 2 To ‘qualitatively’ explore their perceptions of the causes and effects of nutritional anemia. Methods: The study was undertaken in two wards of Kallitheerthalkuppam village, the field practice area of the Department of Community Medicine, SMVMCH, Puducherry. Mixed-methods design which includes quantitative (survey and qualitative (cause-effect diagram methods was used. A representative sample of 100 adolescent girls aged 12-19 years were the study participants. Data for quantitative (survey using a questionnaire and qualitative (cause-effect diagram methods were collected over the period of two months. Result: The prevalence of anemia among the study population was 58 per cent. In The cause and effect diagram exercise, girls linked deficiency of iron as the cause for tiredness, irregular menstrual cycles and low birth weight. They also linked deficiency of iron and the habit of not wearing footwear to tiredness, reduced intake of green leafy vegetables, and intestinal worm infections to giddiness and hookworm infections to peptic ulcer. Interpretation & Conclusions: The study found a gap between knowledge and practice as reflected in the cause and effect diagram. This result indicates the need to initiate an effective behavior change communication for improving the hemoglobin status of adolescent girls.

  13. Cause and effect in childhood obesity: solutions for a national epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieting, J Michael

    2008-10-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. As a result, children are at increased risk for myriad preventable acute and chronic medical problems--many of which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. In addition, childhood obesity has serious psychosocial consequences, such as low self-esteem, lower quality of life, and depression. The multifaceted causes and solutions to this pervasive health issue are discussed in the present review, as are pertinent health policy issues. Osteopathic physicians and other healthcare providers can play an important role in patient and family education, direct care, and advocacy.

  14. Effect of gamma radiation treatment on some fungi causing storage diseases of banana fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Ashmawi, A.M.M.

    1982-01-01

    Banana is one of the most popular fruits in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. in recent years, the quality of egyptian banana markedly declined. A major factor contributing to this decline is the development of fruit rot, which is the most widely occurring disease either in the field or in storage. Different fungi attack banana fruits causing considerable losses. Most of the fungi responsible for post harvest rots of banana are usually carried from the field, on the surface of the fruit itself or in injured and rotting fruits causing severe rats during storage. These rots make the fruits difficult to handle and undesirable to the consumers. Botryodiplodia theobromae is known to be the most important pathogen responsible for the infection in storage

  15. Effects of elevated ozone, carbon dioxide, and the combination of both on the grain quality of Chinese hybrid rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yunxia; Song, Qiling; Frei, Michael; Shao, Zaisheng; Yang, Lianxin

    2014-01-01

    The effects of CO 2 and/or O 3 elevation on rice grain quality were investigated in chamber experiments with gas fumigation performed from transplanting until maturity in 2011 and 2012. Compared with the control (current CO 2 and O 3 concentration), elevated CO 2 caused a tendency of an increase in grain chalkiness and a decrease in mineral nutrient concentrations. In contrast, elevated O 3 significantly increased grain chalkiness and the concentrations of essential nutrients, while changes in starch pasting properties indicated a trend of deterioration in the cooking and eating quality. In the combination of elevated CO 2 and O 3 treatment, only chalkiness degree was significantly affected. It is concluded that the O 3 concentration projected for the coming few decades will have more substantial effects on grain quality of Chinese hybrid rice than the projected high CO 2 concentration alone, and the combination of two gases caused fewer significant changes in grain quality than individual gas treatments. - Highlights: • We investigated the effects of carbon dioxide and/or ozone elevation on rice grain quality. • Elevated ozone concentration had substantial effects on grain quality under current carbon dioxide concentration. • Elevated carbon dioxide concentration mitigated the impact of elevated ozone concentration on rice grain quality. - Exposure of Chinese hybrid rice to elevated ozone and CO 2 during growth causes fewer changes in grain quality than ozone exposure alone

  16. Effects of nonindigenous invasive species on water quality and quantity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank H. McCormick; Glen C. Contreras; Sherri L. Johnson

    2010-01-01

    Physical and biological disruptions of aquatic systems caused by invasive species alter water quantity and water quality. Recent evidence suggests that water is a vector for the spread of Sudden Oak Death disease and Port-Orfordcedar root disease. Since the 1990s, the public has become increasingly aware of the presence of invasive species in the Nation’s waters. Media...

  17. Perceived service quality's effect on patient satisfaction and behavioural compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Bahari; Azizan, Noor Azlinna

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to advance healthcare service quality research using hierarchical component models. This study used a quantitative approach with cross-sectional design as a survey method, combining cluster and convenience sampling and partial least square structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) to validate the research model and test the hypotheses. The study extends health service quality literature by showing that: patient satisfaction (PS) is dominant, significant and indirect determinant of behavioural compliance (BC); perceived service quality has the strongest effect on BC via PS. Only one hospital was evaluated. The study provides managers with a service quality model for conducting integrated service delivery systems analysis and design. Overall, the study makes a significant contribution to healthcare organizations, better health outcomes for patients and better quality of life for the community.

  18. Weekly variations of discharge and groundwater quality caused by intermittent water supply in an urbanized karst catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmeisen, Felix; Zemann, Moritz; Goeppert, Nadine; Goldscheider, Nico

    2016-06-01

    Leaky sewerage and water distribution networks are an enormous problem throughout the world, specifically in developing countries and regions with water scarcity. Especially in many arid and semi-arid regions, intermittent water supply (IWS) is common practice to cope with water shortage. This study investigates the combined influence of urban activities, IWS and water losses on groundwater quality and discusses the implications for water management. In the city of As-Salt (Jordan), local water supply is mostly based on groundwater from the karst aquifer that underlies the city. Water is delivered to different supply zones for 24, 48 or 60 h each week with drinking water losses of around 50-60%. Fecal contamination in groundwater, mostly originating from the likewise leaky sewer system is a severe challenge for the local water supplier. In order to improve understanding of the local water cycle and contamination dynamics in the aquifer beneath the city, a down gradient spring and an observation well were chosen to identify contaminant occurrence and loads. Nitrate, Escherichia coli, spring discharge and the well water level were monitored for 2 years. Autocorrelation analyses of time series recorded during the dry season revealed weekly periodicity of spring discharge (45 ± 3.9 L s-1) and NO3-N concentrations (11.4 ± 0.8 mg L-1) along with weekly varying E. coli levels partly exceeding 2.420 MPN 100 mL-1. Cross-correlation analyses demonstrate a significant and inverse correlation of nitrate and discharge variations which points to a periodic dilution of contaminated groundwater by freshwater from the leaking IWS being the principal cause of the observed fluctuations. Contaminant inputs from leaking sewers appear to be rather constant. The results reveal the distinct impact of leaking clean IWS on the local groundwater and subsequently on the local water supply and therefore demonstrate the need for action regarding the mitigation of groundwater contamination and

  19. The probable effect of integrated reporting on audit quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer A. El Nashar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a probable effect of integrated reporting on improving the audit quality of organizations. I correlate the hypothesis of this paper in relation to the current trends of protecting the economies, the financial markets and the societies. I predict an improvement of the audit quality, as a result to an estimated percentage of organizations’ reliance on the integrated reporting in their accountability perspective. I used a decision tree and a Bayes’ theorem approach, to predict the probabilities of the significant effect on improving the auditing quality. I find the overall result of this paper, indicates that the probability of organizations to rely on the integrated reporting by a significant percentage, predicts also a significant improvement in audit quality.

  20. Effective Quality-of-Service Renegotiating Schemes for Streaming Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Hwangjun

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents effective quality-of-service renegotiating schemes for streaming video. The conventional network supporting quality of service generally allows a negotiation at a call setup. However, it is not efficient for the video application since the compressed video traffic is statistically nonstationary. Thus, we consider the network supporting quality-of-service renegotiations during the data transmission and study effective quality-of-service renegotiating schemes for streaming video. The token bucket model, whose parameters are token filling rate and token bucket size, is adopted for the video traffic model. The renegotiating time instants and the parameters are determined by analyzing the statistical information of compressed video traffic. In this paper, two renegotiating approaches, that is, fixed renegotiating interval case and variable renegotiating interval case, are examined. Finally, the experimental results are provided to show the performance of the proposed schemes.

  1. Quality management tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Hun

    2011-09-15

    This book introduces basic conception of quality with characteristic, price, cost, and function, basic conception on quality management, introduction and operation of quality management, quality guaranteed and claim like handling of claim of goods, standards, and quality guaranteed method, basic tools of quality management such as Pareto diagram, characteristic diagram, cause-and-effect, fish born diagram check sheet histogram scatter diagram graph and stratification new seven tools of QC, quality deployment function and measurement system.

  2. Quality management tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Hun

    2011-09-01

    This book introduces basic conception of quality with characteristic, price, cost, and function, basic conception on quality management, introduction and operation of quality management, quality guaranteed and claim like handling of claim of goods, standards, and quality guaranteed method, basic tools of quality management such as Pareto diagram, characteristic diagram, cause-and-effect, fish born diagram check sheet histogram scatter diagram graph and stratification new seven tools of QC, quality deployment function and measurement system.

  3. Effects of Artificial Supercooling Followed by Slow Freezing on the Microstructure and Qualities of Pork Loin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of artificial supercooling followed by still air freezing (SSF) on the qualities of pork loin. The qualities of pork frozen by SSF were compared with the fresh control (CT, stored at 4℃ for 24 h), slow freezing (SAF, still air freezing) and rapid freezing (EIF, ethanol immersion freezing) treatments. Compared with no supercooling phenomena of SAF and EIF, the extent of supercooling obtained by SSF treatment was 1.4℃. Despite that SSF was conducted with the same method with SAF, application of artificial supercooling accelerated the phase transition (traverse from -0.6℃ to -5℃) from 3.07 h (SAF) to 2.23 h (SSF). The observation of a microstructure indicated that the SSF prevented tissue damage caused by ice crystallization and maintained the structural integrity. The estimated quality parameters reflected that SSF exhibited superior meat quality compared with slow freezing (SAF). SSF showed better water-holding capacity (lower thawing loss, cooking loss and expressible moisture) and tenderness than SAF, and these quality parameters of SSF were not significantly different with ultra-fast freezing treatment (EIF). Consequently, the results demonstrated that the generation of supercooling followed by conventional freezing potentially had the advantage of minimizing the quality deterioration caused by the slow freezing of meat. PMID:27857541

  4. Effect of Novel Quick Freezing Techniques Combined with Different Thawing Processes on Beef Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seon-Mi; Han, Gui-Jung

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of various freezing and thawing techniques on the quality of beef. Meat samples were frozen using natural convection freezing (NF), individual quick freezing (IQF), or cryogenic freezing (CF) techniques, followed by natural convection thawing (NCT) or running water thawing (RT). The meat was frozen until the core temperature reached -12℃ and then stored at -24℃, followed by thawing until the temperature reached 5℃. Quality parameters, such as the pH, water binding properties, CIE color, shear force, and microstructure of the beef were elucidated. Although the freezing and thawing combinations did not cause remarkable changes in the quality parameters, rapid freezing, in the order of CF, IQF, and NF, was found to minimize the quality deterioration. In the case of thawing methods, NCT was better than RT and the meat quality was influence on the thawing temperature rather than the thawing rate. Although the microstructure of the frozen beef exhibited an excessive loss of integrity after the freezing and thawing, it did not cause any remarkable change in the beef quality. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CF and NCT form the best combination for beef processing; however, IQF and NCT may have practical applications in the frozen food industry. PMID:26761674

  5. Effects of Artificial Supercooling Followed by Slow Freezing on the Microstructure and Qualities of Pork Loin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yiseul; Hong, Geun-Pyo

    2016-10-31

    This study investigated the effects of artificial supercooling followed by still air freezing (SSF) on the qualities of pork loin. The qualities of pork frozen by SSF were compared with the fresh control (CT, stored at 4℃ for 24 h), slow freezing (SAF, still air freezing) and rapid freezing (EIF, ethanol immersion freezing) treatments. Compared with no supercooling phenomena of SAF and EIF, the extent of supercooling obtained by SSF treatment was 1.4℃. Despite that SSF was conducted with the same method with SAF, application of artificial supercooling accelerated the phase transition (traverse from -0.6℃ to -5℃) from 3.07 h (SAF) to 2.23 h (SSF). The observation of a microstructure indicated that the SSF prevented tissue damage caused by ice crystallization and maintained the structural integrity. The estimated quality parameters reflected that SSF exhibited superior meat quality compared with slow freezing (SAF). SSF showed better water-holding capacity (lower thawing loss, cooking loss and expressible moisture) and tenderness than SAF, and these quality parameters of SSF were not significantly different with ultra-fast freezing treatment (EIF). Consequently, the results demonstrated that the generation of supercooling followed by conventional freezing potentially had the advantage of minimizing the quality deterioration caused by the slow freezing of meat.

  6. Effects of Sleep Hygiene Education on Subjective Sleep Quality and Academic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Sahin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Sleep problems are common in students with one third of university students reporting insufficient sleep. It is known that sleep quality and daytime sleepiness cause decrasing academic performans. For this reason we aimed to investigate the effects of a sleep hygiene education on sleep quality and academic performance of first year medical students. Material and Method: Self-reported sleep data and academic performance of 131 first grade medical students were collected. To all students enrolled Pittsburg Sleep Quality Scale in the assessment of sleep quality and Epworth Sleepiness Scale for assessment of daytime sleepiness in the evaluation.The students were divided into two subgroups and the intervention group received a 30 minute structured sleep hygiene education. Global academic performance was assessed by grade point average at the end of the year. Results: Mean Pittsburgh sleep quality index score of the students was 7.9±3.5 and 106 (82.8% of then had a score %u22655.After intervention, .the worse the initial sleep quality, the more improvement by the sleep hygiene education on sleep quality and academic performance. Discussion: An education on sleep hygiene might improve subjective sleep quality and academic performance of medical students.

  7. Does Competition Have an Effect on Price and Quality in Physiotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekola, Piia; Linnosmaa, Ismo; Mikkola, Hennamari

    2017-10-01

    We estimate the effect of competition on quality and prices in physiotherapy organised and financed by the Social Insurance Institution of Finland for disabled individuals. Within the physiotherapy market, firms participate in competitive bidding, prices are determined by the market, services are free at the point of use and firms are allowed to react to patient choice only by enhancing quality. Firm-level data (n = 854) regarding quality and price were analysed. Using 2SLS estimation techniques, we analysed the relationship between quality and competition, and price and competition. Our study found that competition has a negative (yet weak) effect on quality. Prices on the other hand are not affected by competition. The result is likely caused by imperfect information, because it seems that the Social Insurance Institution of Finland has provided too little information for patients to make adequate choices about proper service providers. We argue that by publishing quality information, it is possible to ease the decision-making of patients and influence the quality strategies of firms active in the physiotherapy market. Moreover, we found that competition appeared as an exogenous variable in this study. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Research of reducing the shielding effect caused by vehicles passing the radioactivity monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Xianqi; Li Jianmin; Wang Xiaobing

    2008-01-01

    A kind of Radioactivity Monitor System with Vehicle Contour Acquisition Module based on Optical Screen is developed. The system can reduce the shielding effect caused by the passing vehicles, so that the alarming sensitivity is improved. This paper introduces the work situation of the system and preliminary experimental results. (authors)

  9. Effects of subfertility cause, smoking and body weight on the success rate of IVF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lintsen, A.M.E.; Pasker-Jong, P.C.M. de; Boer, E.J. de; Burger, C.W.; Jansen, C.A.M.; Braat, D.D.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Kortman, M.; Velde, E.R. te; Macklon, N.; Jansen, C.A.M.; Leerentveld, R.A.; Willemsen, W.N.P.; Schats, R.; Naaktgeboren, N.; Helmerhorst, F.M.; Bots, R.S.G.M.; Simons, A.H.M.; Hogerzeil, H.V.; Evers, J.L.H.; Dop, P.A. van

    2005-01-01

    Background: We investigated the separate and combined effects of smoking and body mass index (BMI) on the success rate of IVF for couples with different causes of subfertility. Methods: The success rate of IVF was examined in 8457 women. Detailed information on reproduction and lifestyle factors was

  10. Ionospheric storm effects in the nighttime E region caused by neutralized ring current particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bauske

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic storms an anomalous increase in the ionization density of the nighttime E region is observed at low and middle latitudes. It has been suggested that this effect is caused by the precipitation of neutralized ring current particles. Here a coupled ring current decay-ionosphere model is used to confirm the validity of this explanation.

  11. PREGNANCY LOSS IN THE F344 RAT CAUSED BY BROMODICHLOROMETHANE: EFFECTS ON SERUM LUTEINIZING HORMONE LEVELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    PREGNANCY LOSS IN THE F344 RAT CAUSED BY BROMODICHLOROMETHANE: EFFECTS ON SERUM LUTEINIZING HORMONE LEVELS Bielmeier1, S.R., D.S. Best2, and M.G. Narotsky2; 1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Curriculum in Toxicology, 2Reproductive Toxicology Division, U.S. Enviro...

  12. The Nature, Causes and Effects of School Violence in South African High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncontsa, Vusumzi Nelson; Shumba, Almon

    2013-01-01

    We sought to investigate the nature, causes and effects of school violence in four South African high schools. A purposive sample of five principals, 80 learners and 20 educators was selected from the four schools used in the study. A sequential mixed method approach was used in this study; both questionnaires and interviews were used. The design…

  13. Causal Mechanism Graph - A new notation for capturing cause-effect knowledge in software dependability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Fuqun; Smidts, Carol

    2017-01-01

    Understanding cause-effect relations between concepts in software dependability engineering is fundamental to various research or industrial activities. Cognitive maps are traditionally used to elicit and represent such knowledge; however they seem incapable of accurately representing complex causal mechanisms in dependability engineering. This paper proposes a new notation called Causal Mechanism Graph (CMG) to elicit and represent the cause-effect domain knowledge embedded in experts’ minds or described in the literature. CMG contains a new set of symbols elicited from domain experts to capture the recurring interaction mechanisms between multiple concepts in software dependability engineering. Furthermore, compared to major existing graphic methods, CMG is particularly robust and suitable for mental knowledge elicitation: it allows one to represent the full range of cause-effect knowledge, accurately or fuzzily as one sees fit depending on the depth of knowledge he/she has. This feature combined with excellent reliability and validity poses CMG as a promising method that has the potential to be used in various areas, such as software dependability requirement elicitation, software dependability assessment and dependability risk control. - Highlights: • A new notation CMG for capturing cause-effect conceptual knowledge in software dependability. • CMG is particularly robust and suitable for mental knowledge representation. • CMG is a visual representation that bridges mental knowledge, natural and mathematical language. • CMG possesses excellent representation capability, validity and inter-coder reliability. • CMG is a fundamental method for various areas in dependability engineering.

  14. Fire in Ghana's dry forest: Causes, frequency, effects and management interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra Opoku Agyemang; Michael Muller; Victor Rex Barnes

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the number of fires, area burned, causes and seasonality of fires over a ten year period from 2002-2012 and investigates different fire management strategies and their effectiveness in the Afram headwaters forest reserve in Ghana. Data were collected from interviews of stakeholders in two communities adjacent to the reserve, and from 2002-2012 fire...

  15. Effects of long-term exposure to air pollution on natural-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beelen, Rob; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Stafoggia, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Few studies on long-term exposure to air pollution and mortality have been reported from Europe. Within the multicentre European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE), we aimed to investigate the association between natural-cause mortality and long-term exposure to several air...... pollutants....

  16. Is the increase in allergic respiratory disease caused by a cohort effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, A; Nielsen, N H; Madsen, F

    2002-01-01

    -sectional studies have shown that the prevalence of allergic sensitization decreases with increasing age. This could reflect the natural course of allergic sensitization. Alternatively, this could reflect that the increase in sensitization is caused by a cohort effect, i.e. an increase among subjects born during...... by a cohort effect. Thus, changes in lifestyle or environmental factors that occurred around or after 1960 may have contributed to this increase....

  17. Content and effects of news stories about uncertain cancer causes and preventive behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederdeppe, Jeff; Lee, Theodore; Robbins, Rebecca; Kim, Hye Kyung; Kresovich, Alex; Kirshenblat, Danielle; Standridge, Kimberly; Clarke, Christopher E; Jensen, Jakob; Fowler, Erika Franklin

    2014-01-01

    This article presents findings from two studies that describe news portrayals of cancer causes and prevention in local TV and test the effects of typical aspects of this coverage on cancer-related fatalism and overload. Study 1 analyzed the content of stories focused on cancer causes and prevention from an October 2002 national sample of local TV and newspaper cancer coverage (n = 122 television stations; n = 60 newspapers). Informed by results from the content analysis, Study 2 describes results from a randomized experiment testing effects of the volume and content of news stories about cancer causes and prevention (n = 601). Study 1 indicates that local TV news stories describe cancer causes and prevention as comparatively more certain than newspapers but include less information about how to reduce cancer risk. Study 2 reveals that the combination of stories conveying an emerging cancer cause and prevention behavior as moderately certain leads to an increased sense of overload, while a short summary of well-established preventive behaviors mitigates these potentially harmful beliefs. We conclude with a series of recommendations for health communication and health journalism practice.

  18. Causes and effects of vital instrumentation and control power supply bus failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhlheim, M.D.; Murphy, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study in which the objective was to evaluate nuclear power-plant operating experience to identify the causes and the effects of vital instrumentation and control (I and C) power supply bus failures. Vital I and C power is normally provided to essential instrumentation and controls through either vital d-c or a-c power supply systems. The vital d-c power supply system generally provides control power for starting the diesel generators, for operating electrical circuit breakers, and for controlling various logic circuits. The vital d-c power system also supplies vital a-c power through an inverter. The vital a-c power supply system generally feeds the reactor protection system channels, the engineered safety features actuation system channels, and critical instrumentation in the control room. The leading cause of vital bus failures is inverter failures; other causes are human errors, battery charger failures, and miscellaneous failures. The effects of these failures are that the margin of safety can be degraded by (1) denying key information to the operators, (2) inducing plant transients, (3) causing safety injection actuations, and (4) causing the loss of shutdown cooling flow

  19. The effect of massage therapy on the quality of sleep in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Fahimeh; Kashani, Parisa

    2014-03-01

    Annually, about 6000 new cases are diagnosed with breast cancer in Iran. In Iran, more women are affected with breast cancer than a decade earlier in comparison with other countries, and 70% of them are diagnosed at an advanced phase. Insomnia is the most common disorder following breast cancer, and interference in sleep quality and rest causes changes in physiological functions and reduces the body's daily performance. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of massage therapy on the quality of sleep in patients with breast cancer. This clinical trial was conducted for about 1 month in a referral chemotherapy clinic of a teaching hospital in Isfahan, Iran. The participants consisted of 57 women with breast cancer who were selected by simple random sampling. They were randomly assigned to two groups of control and experimental. The control group was treated only by usual medical therapy, whereas the case group was treated by combined medical-massage therapy. Data collection tools were the validated Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and a demographic questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS using descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, paired t-test, and Student's t-test. The results showed significant differences in the mean scores of quality of sleep before and after the intervention in the case group, while no significant differences were observed in the mean scores of quality of sleep before and after the intervention in the control group. In addition, no significant differences were observed in the mean scores of quality of sleep before the intervention between case and control groups. However, significant differences were observed in the mean scores of quality of sleep after the intervention between case and control groups. According to the results of this study, learning and applying massage techniques by medical staff causes health promotion and improves the quality of sleep in cancer patients. Furthermore, massage therapy is suggested as a

  20. Causes and effects of Romania deepening financial crisis. Short term means

    OpenAIRE

    Tudor Florin

    2011-01-01

    Deepening and expanding financial crisis triggered in October 2008 in the U.S. and other countries is the event that has caused the utmost concern of the policy makers in the economy and society. Forecasts for Romania show a slowdown in economy. As the current global status indicates the likelihood of a major global economic crisis, we attempt through this study to identify the real causes of this deepening crisis in Romania. As well as public policy priorities to counteract the effects of th...

  1. Cause-effect analysis on Fukushima accident reports. What did McMaster undergraduate students learn?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    In the ENG PHYS 4ES3 Course “Special Topics in Energy Systems (2014-2015)” in McMaster University, sixteen 4th-year undergraduate students studied the Fukushima accident, discussed the causes of accident and its impacts on the energy systems from the sustainability point of view, made the oral presentation and submitted the reports. In this paper, a cause-effect and causal-loop analysis was applied to the discussion in the reports, the diagram of cause-effect relationship was drawn, and the important problems were extracted from the diagram. It was found that the important problems and the diagram of cause-effect relationship McMaster undergraduate students considered were similar to the essential problems and the diagram Horii pointed out, although Interim Report of the Investigation Committee on the Accident at Fukushima Nuclear Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company which Horii used was not adopted in the reports submitted by students. (author)

  2. Selecting Health Care Improvement Projects: A Methodology Integrating Cause-and-Effect Diagram and Analytical Hierarchy Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testik, Özlem Müge; Shaygan, Amir; Dasdemir, Erdi; Soydan, Guray

    It is often vital to identify, prioritize, and select quality improvement projects in a hospital. Yet, a methodology, which utilizes experts' opinions with different points of view, is needed for better decision making. The proposed methodology utilizes the cause-and-effect diagram to identify improvement projects and construct a project hierarchy for a problem. The right improvement projects are then prioritized and selected using a weighting scheme of analytical hierarchy process by aggregating experts' opinions. An approach for collecting data from experts and a graphical display for summarizing the obtained information are also provided. The methodology is implemented for improving a hospital appointment system. The top-ranked 2 major project categories for improvements were identified to be system- and accessibility-related causes (45%) and capacity-related causes (28%), respectively. For each of the major project category, subprojects were then ranked for selecting the improvement needs. The methodology is useful in cases where an aggregate decision based on experts' opinions is expected. Some suggestions for practical implementations are provided.

  3. Effects of Meteorological Data Quality on Snowpack Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, S.; Marks, D. G.; Robertson, M.; Hedrick, A. R.; Johnson, M.

    2017-12-01

    Detailed quality control of meteorological inputs is the most time-intensive component of running the distributed, physically-based iSnobal snow model, and the effect of data quality of the inputs on the model is unknown. The iSnobal model has been run operationally since WY2013, and is currently run in several basins in Idaho and California. The largest amount of user input during modeling is for the quality control of precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, wind speed and wind direction inputs. Precipitation inputs require detailed user input and are crucial to correctly model the snowpack mass. This research applies a range of quality control methods to meteorological input, from raw input with minimal cleaning, to complete user-applied quality control. The meteorological input cleaning generally falls into two categories. The first is global minimum/maximum and missing value correction that could be corrected and/or interpolated with automated processing. The second category is quality control for inputs that are not globally erroneous, yet are still unreasonable and generally indicate malfunctioning measurement equipment, such as temperature or relative humidity that remains constant, or does not correlate with daily trends observed at nearby stations. This research will determine how sensitive model outputs are to different levels of quality control and guide future operational applications.

  4. Semen quality: variations among fathers and effects of moderate alcohol drinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor G Cooper

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Semen analysis results from over 750 fathers in the USA demonstrated marked differences in the quality of semen from men at different locations and of different ethnic groups. Another paper failed to demonstrate any effects of moderate alcohol consumption during the week before provision of an ejaculate on semen quality and few on serum hormones, of over 8300 men in Europe and the USA. While these observations are interesting, the reasons for regional and ethnic differences in semen quality of fathers are unclear. Although, there was no attempt to confirm the participant-provided level of alcohol consumption, an increase in serum testosterone in the men at the higher end of alcohol intake is compatible with an alcohol effect on liver metabolism, although whether alcohol intake was the cause of higher testosterone, or men with higher androgen levels consume more alcohol, is not known.

  5. Comparative effects of gamma irradiation and ozone treatment on hygienic quality of Korean red ginseng powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Myung-Woo; Yook, Hong-Sun; Kang, Il-Jun; Chung, Cha-Kwon; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Choi, Kang-Ju

    1998-06-01

    For the purpose of improving hygienic quality of Korean red ginseng powder, the comparative effects of gamma irradiation and ozone treatment on the microbial and physicochemical properties were investigated. Gamma irradiation at 7.5 kGy resulted in sterilization of total aerobic bacteria, molds and coliforms below detective levels, while ozone treatment for 8 hours up to 18 ppm did not sufficiently eliminate the microorganisms of the red ginseng powder. Physicochemical properties including compositions of the red ginseng saponin (ginsenosides) and fatty acids, pH and hydrogen donating activity were not significantly changed by gamma irradiation, whereas, ozone treatment caused significant changes in fatty acid compositions, TBA value, pH, acidity and hydrogen donating activity. The results from this study led us to conclude that gamma irradiation was more effective than ozone treatment both for the improvement of hygienic quality and for the maintenance of physicochemical quality of red ginseng powder.

  6. Comparative effects of gamma irradiation and ozone treatment on hygienic quality of Korean red ginseng powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Myung-Woo; Yook, Hong-Sun; Kang, Il-Jun; Chung, Cha-Kwon; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Choi, Kang-Ju

    1998-01-01

    For the purpose of improving hygienic quality of Korean red ginseng powder, the comparative effects of gamma irradiation and ozone treatment on the microbial and physicochemical properties were investigated. Gamma irradiation at 7.5 kGy resulted in sterilization of total aerobic bacteria, molds and coliforms below detective levels, while ozone treatment for 8 hours up to 18 ppm did not sufficiently eliminate the microorganisms of the red ginseng powder. Physicochemical properties including compositions of the red ginseng saponin (ginsenosides) and fatty acids, pH and hydrogen donating activity were not significantly changed by gamma irradiation, whereas, ozone treatment caused significant changes in fatty acid compositions, TBA value, pH, acidity and hydrogen donating activity. The results from this study led us to conclude that gamma irradiation was more effective than ozone treatment both for the improvement of hygienic quality and for the maintenance of physicochemical quality of red ginseng powder

  7. An obesity provoking behaviour negatively influences young normal weight subjects' health related quality of life and causes depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernersson, Asa; Frisman, Gunilla Hollman; Sepa Frostell, Anneli; Nyström, Fredrik H; Lindström, Torbjörn

    2010-12-01

    In many parts of the world the prevalence of a sedentary lifestyle in combination with high consumption of food has increased, which contributes to increased risk for becoming overweight. Our primary aim was, in an intervention, to examine the influence on health related quality of life (HRQoL) and mood in young normal weight subjects of both sexes, when adopting an obesity provoking behaviour by increasing the energy intake via fast food and simultaneously adopting a sedentary lifestyle. A secondary aim was to follow-up possible long-term effects on HRQoL and mood 6 and 12 months after this short-term intervention. In this prospective study, 18 healthy normal weight subjects (mean age 26±6.6 years), mainly university students were prescribed doubled energy intake, and maximum 5000 steps/day, during 4 weeks. An age and sex matched control group (n=18), who were asked to have unchanged eating habits and physical activity, was recruited. Before and after the intervention questionnaires including Short Form-36, Hospital Anxiety Depression scale, Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression scale, Sense of Coherence and Mastery scale were completed by the subjects in the intervention group and by the controls with 4 weeks interval. Six and 12 months after the intervention the subjects underwent the same procedure as at baseline and the controls completed the same questionnaires. During the intervention, subjects in the intervention group increased their bodyweight and developed markedly lower physical and mental health scores on Short Form-36 as well as depressive symptoms while no changes appeared in the controls. The increase of depressive symptoms was associated with increases of energy intake, body weight and body fat. When followed up, 6 and 12 months after the intervention, physical and mental health had returned completely to baseline values, despite somewhat increased body weight. In conclusion, adopting obesity provoking behaviour for 4 weeks decreases HRQo

  8. Effect of irradiation of sensory quality of cigarettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Min; Zhu Jiating; Yang Ping; Wang Dening; Gu Guiqiang

    2012-01-01

    3 brands of cigarettes were irradiated and smoked to make sure the effect of irradiation on sensory qualities of cigarettes, luster, aroma, harmony, offensive taste, irritancy, after taste and total scores of irradiated cigarettes were studied. The results showed that, compared with each index of CK, some indexes changed after irradiation, sensory quality of cigarettes might be improved by suitable dose. The sensory qualities of cigarettes of different brands or different styles change differently, though they were irradiated by the same dose. There was no obvious relation between score of any index and irradiation dose, when cigarette of a same brand irradiated by different doses. Above all, the changes of sensory quality of cigarette may meet the requirements of different smokers on the palate. (authors)

  9. Measuring the effect of managerial ability on earning quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Bahri Sales

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to measure the effect of managerial ability on earning quality on selected firms listed on Tehran Stock Exchange over the period 2007-2013. The proposed study uses data envelopment analysis to measure the relative efficiency of selected firms where Sales is considered as output and Cost of goods (COGS, Selling, General and Administrative Expenses (SG&A, Net Property Plant and Equipment (PPE, Net operating Leases (OpsLease, Research & Development (R&D, Purchased Good will (Goodwill and Other intangible assets (OtherIntan are considered as inputs. Earning quality in this survey consists of three parts of quality of accruals, earnings and earnings forecast persistence. The results of our survey have indicated that managerial ability influences positively on earning quality.

  10. Environmental cause/effect phenomena relating to technological development in the Canadian Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eedy, E

    1974-01-01

    The environmental cause/effect interrelationships observed as a consequence of man-mediated disruptions in Canadian Arctic regions are summarized. Sulfur dioxide pollution has destroyed vegetation in Southern Canada. Lichens are particularly vulnerable and have no defense mechanism against pollutants. In Fairbanks, ice fogs and stagnant air collect very high concentrations of pollutants, with the worst conditions arising from fossil fuel combustion and vehicle exhaust. In Yellowknife (Mackenzie) thermal inversions cause high local deposition of arsenic arising from smelter fumes. Concentrations are reported as high as 3 ppM. Fogs cause problems in the Edmonton (Alberta) air. Stable smoke clouds drifted north from a southern forest fire and reduced the solar radiation by 25 percent. Similar problems can occur with the plumes of industrial or thermoelectric stacks. (Air Pollut. Abstr.)

  11. Effect of Ultrasound Technology on Food and Nutritional Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Kumari S; Tiwari, Brijesh K; O'Donnell, Colm P

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound technology has been successfully demonstrated for several food processing and preservation applications. The majority of food processing applications reported refer to liquid foods. Ultrasound has been applied to solid foods in some niche applications, e.g., tenderization of meat, mass transfer applications, and drying. Similar to any other technology, ultrasound also has some positive and negative effects on food quality depending on the application and processing conditions employed. This chapter outlines various applications of ultrasound to food and its effect on food and nutritional quality. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Disentangling the effects of date, individual, and territory quality on the seasonal decline in fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pärt, Tomas; Knape, Jonas; Low, Matthew; Öberg, Meit; Arlt, Debora

    2017-08-01

    The seasonal timing of reproduction is a major fitness factor in many organisms. Commonly, individual fitness declines with time in the breeding season. We investigated three suggested but rarely tested hypotheses for this seasonal fitness decline: (1) time per se (date hypothesis), (2) late breeders are of lower quality than early ones (individual quality hypothesis), and (3) late breeders are breeding at poorer territories than early breeders (territory quality hypothesis). We used Bayesian variance component analyses to examine reproductive output (breeding success, number fledged, and number of recruits) from repeated observations of female Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) and individual territories from a 20-yr population study. The major part of the observed seasonal decline in reproductive output seemed to be driven by date-related effects, whereas female age and territory type (i.e., known indicators of temporary quality) contributed to a smaller degree. Other, persistent effects linked to individual and territory identity did not show any clear patterns on the seasonal decline in reproductive output. To better disentangle the quality effects (persistent and temporary) of individual and territory from effects caused by the deterioration of the environment we suggest a protocol combining experimental manipulation of breeding time with a variance-covariance partitioning method used here. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  13. Water quality degradation effects on freshwater availability: Impacts to human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, N.E.; Meybeck, Michel

    2000-01-01

    The quality of freshwater at any point on the landscape reflects the combined effects of many processes along water pathways. Human activities on all spatial scales affect both water quality and quantity. Alteration of the landscape and associated vegetation has not only changed the water balance, but typically has altered processes that control water quality. Effects of human activities on a small scale are relevant to an entire drainage basin. Furthermore, local, regional, and global differences in climate and water flow are considerable, causing varying effects of human activities on land and water quality and quantity, depending on location within a watershed, geology, biology, physiographic characteristics, and climate. These natural characteristics also greatly control human activities, which will, in turn, modify (or affect) the natural composition of water. One of the most important issues for effective resource management is recognition of cyclical and cascading effects of human activities on the water quality and quantity along hydrologic pathways. The degradation of water quality in one part of a watershed can have negative effects on users downstream. Everyone lives downstream of the effects of some human activity. An extremely important factor is that substances added to the atmosphere, land, and water generally have relatively long time scales for removal or clean up. The nature of the substance, including its affinity for adhering to soil and its ability to be transformed, affects the mobility and the time scale for removal of the substance. Policy alone will not solve many of the degradation issues, but a combination of policy, education, scientific knowledge, planning, and enforcement of applicable laws can provide mechanisms for slowing the rate of degradation and provide human and environmental protection. Such an integrated approach is needed to effectively manage land and water resources.

  14. Demographic, social, and economic effects on Mexican causes of death in 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, J B; Butler, E W

    1998-01-01

    This study examined spatial geographic patterns of cause of death and 28 demographic and socioeconomic influences on causes of death for 31 Mexican states plus the Federal District for 1990. Mortality data were obtained from the state death registration system and are age standardized. The 28 socioeconomic variables were obtained from Census records. Analysis included 2 submodels: one with all 28 socioeconomic variables in a stepwise regression, and one with each of the 4 groups of factors. The conceptual model is based on epidemiological transition theory and empirical findings. There are 4 stages in mortality decline. Effects are grouped as demographic, sociocultural, economic prosperity, and housing, health, and crime factors. Findings indicate that cancer and cardiovascular disease were strongly correlated and consistently high in border areas as well as the Federal District and Jalisco. Respiratory mortality had higher values in the Federal District, Puebla, and surrounding states, as well as Jalisco. The standardized total mortality rate was only in simple correlations associated inversely with underemployment. All cause specific mortality was associated with individual factors. Respiratory mortality was linked with manufacturing work force. Cardiovascular and cancer mortality were associated with socioeconomic factors. In submodel I, cause specific mortality was predicted by crowding, housing characteristics, marriage and divorce, and manufacturing work force. In submodel II, economic group factors had the strongest model fits explaining 33-60% of the "r" square. Hypothesized effects were only partially validated.

  15. Analyses of Blood Bank Efficiency, Cost-Effectiveness and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hwai-Tai Chen

    In view of the increasing costs of hospital care, it is essential to investigate methods to improve the labor efficiency and the cost-effectiveness of the hospital technical core in order to control costs while maintaining the quality of care. This study was conducted to develop indices to measure efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and the quality of blood banks; to identify factors associated with efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and quality; and to generate strategies to improve blood bank labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Indices developed in this study for labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness were not affected by patient case mix and illness severity. Factors that were associated with labor efficiency were identified as managerial styles, and organizational designs that balance workload and labor resources. Medical directors' managerial involvement was not associated with labor efficiency, but their continuing education and specialty in blood bank were found to reduce the performance of unnecessary tests. Surprisingly, performing unnecessary tests had no association with labor efficiency. This suggested the existence of labor slack in blood banks. Cost -effectiveness was associated with workers' benefits, wages, and the production of high-end transfusion products by hospital-based donor rooms. Quality indices used in this study included autologous transfusion rates, platelet transfusion rates, and the check points available in an error-control system. Because the autologous transfusion rate was related to patient case mix, severity of illness, and possible inappropriate transfusion, it was not recommended to be used for quality index. Platelet-pheresis transfusion rates were associated with the transfusion preferences of the blood bank medical directors. The total number of check points in an error -control system was negatively associated with government ownership and workers' experience. Recommendations for improving labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness

  16. Effect of nasal deviation on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Ramos, Sueli; Hochman, Bernardo; Gomes, Heitor Carvalho; Abla, Luiz Eduardo Felipe; Veiga, Daniela Francescato; Juliano, Yara; Dini, Gal Moreira; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2011-07-01

    Nasal deviation is a common complaint in otorhinolaryngology and plastic surgery. This condition not only causes impairment of nasal function but also affects quality of life, leading to psychological distress. The subjective assessment of quality of life, as an important aspect of outcomes research, has received increasing attention in recent decades. Quality of life is measured using standardized questionnaires that have been tested for reliability, validity, and sensitivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate health-related quality of life, self-esteem, and depression in patients with nasal deviation. Sixty patients were selected for the study. Patients with nasal deviation (n = 32) were assigned to the study group, and patients without nasal deviation (n = 28) were assigned to the control group. The diagnosis of nasal deviation was made by digital photogrammetry. Quality of life was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey questionnaire; the Rosenberg Self-Esteem/Federal University of São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina Scale; and the 20-item Self-Report Questionnaire. There were significant differences between groups in the physical functioning and general health subscales of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (p < 0.05). Depression was detected in 11 patients (34.4 percent) in the study group and in two patients in the control group, with a significant difference between groups (p < 0.05). Nasal deviation is an aspect of rhinoplasty of which the surgeon should be aware so that proper psychological diagnosis can be made and suitable treatment can be planned because psychologically the patients with nasal deviation have significantly worse quality of life and are more prone to depression. Risk, II.(Figure is included in full-text article.).

  17. Assessment of the Vibrations Effects Caused by Technical Seismicity Due to the Railway traffic on High-sensitivity Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papán, Daniel; Valašková, Veronika; Demeterová, Katarína

    2016-10-01

    The numerical and experimental approach in structural dynamics problems is more and more current nowadays. This approach is applied and solved in many research and developing institutions of the all the world. Vibrations effect caused by passing trains used in manufacturing facilities can affect the quality of the production activity. This effect is possible to be solved by a numerical or an experimental way. Numerical solution is not so financially and time demanding. The main aim of this article is to focus on just experimental measurement of this problem. In this paper, the case study with measurement due to cramped conditions realized in situ is presented. The case study is located close to railway. The vibration effect caused by passing trains on the high-sensitivity machinery contained in this object were observed. The structure was a high-sensitivity machine that was placed in a construction process. For the measurements, the high-sensitivity standard vibrations equipment was used. The assessments of measurements’ results were performed for the technological conditions and Slovak Standard Criteria. Both of these assessments were divided to amplitude and frequency domain. The amplitude criterion is also divided to peak particle velocity and RMS (Root Mean Square). Frequency domain assessment were realised using the frequency response curves obtained from high-sensitivity machinery manufacturer. The frequency limits are established for each axis of triaxle system. The measurement results can be predicted if the vibration have to be reduced. Measurement implemented in the production hall should obtain materials to determine the seismic loading and response of production machinery caused by technical seismicity.

  18. Effects of Low Light on Agronomic and Physiological Characteristics of Rice Including Grain Yield and Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-hua LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Light intensity is one of the most important environmental factors that determine the basic characteristics of rice development. However, continuously cloudy weather or rainfall, especially during the grain-filling stage, induces a significant loss in yield and results in poor grain quality. Stress caused by low light often creates severe meteorological disasters in some rice-growing regions worldwide. This review was based on our previous research and related research regarding the effects of low light on rice growth, yield and quality as well as the formation of grain, and mainly reviewed the physiological metabolism of rice plants, including characteristics of photosynthesis, activities of antioxidant enzymes in rice leaves and key enzymes involved in starch synthesis in grains, as well as the translocations of carbohydrate and nitrogen. These characteristics include various grain yield and rice quality components (milling and appearance as well as cooking, eating and nutritional qualities under different rates of shading imposed at the vegetative or reproductive stages of rice plants. Furthermore, we discussed why grain yield and quality are reduced under the low light environment. Next, we summarized the need for future research that emphasizes methods can effectively improve rice grain yield and quality under low light stress. These research findings can provide a beneficial reference for rice cultivation management and breeding program in low light environments.

  19. A global conformance quality model. A new strategic tool for minimizing defects caused by variation, error, and complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinckley, C. Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The performance of Japanese products in the marketplace points to the dominant role of quality in product competition. Our focus is motivated by the tremendous pressure to improve conformance quality by reducing defects to previously unimaginable limits in the range of 1 to 10 parts per million. Toward this end, we have developed a new model of conformance quality that addresses each of the three principle defect sources: (1) Variation, (2) Human Error, and (3) Complexity. Although the role of variation in conformance quality is well documented, errors occur so infrequently that their significance is not well known. We have shown that statistical methods are not useful in characterizing and controlling errors, the most common source of defects. Excessive complexity is also a root source of defects, since it increases errors and variation defects. A missing link in the defining a global model has been the lack of a sound correlation between complexity and defects. We have used Design for Assembly (DFA) methods to quantify assembly complexity and have shown that assembly times can be described in terms of the Pareto distribution in a clear exception to the Central Limit Theorem. Within individual companies we have found defects to be highly correlated with DFA measures of complexity in broad studies covering tens of millions of assembly operations. Applying the global concepts, we predicted that Motorola`s Six Sigma method would only reduce defects by roughly a factor of two rather than orders of magnitude, a prediction confirmed by Motorola`s data. We have also shown that the potential defects rates of product concepts can be compared in the earliest stages of development. The global Conformance Quality Model has demonstrated that the best strategy for improvement depends upon the quality control strengths and weaknesses.

  20. Cause-effect analysis: improvement of a first year engineering students' calculus teaching model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoff, Quay; Harding, Ansie

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the mathematics department at a South African university and in particular on teaching of calculus to first year engineering students. The paper reports on a cause-effect analysis, often used for business improvement. The cause-effect analysis indicates that there are many factors that impact on secondary school teaching of mathematics, factors that the tertiary sector has no control over. The analysis also indicates the undesirable issues that are at the root of impeding success in the calculus module. Most important is that students are not encouraged to become independent thinkers from an early age. This triggers problems in follow-up courses where students are expected to have learned to deal with the work load and understanding of certain concepts. A new model was designed to lessen the impact of these undesirable issues.

  1. Immunostimulatory Potential of β-Lactoglobulin Preparations: Effects Caused by Endotoxin Contamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Bovetto, L.; Fritsche, R.

    2003-01-01

    Background: The immunomodulating potential residing in cow's milk proteins is currently receiving increasing attention because of growing interest in functional foods and the complex problem of cow's milk allergy. One of the major cow's milk allergens, whey protein beta-lactoglobulin, has...... the immunomodulatory activity. Eventually, the immunostimulatory effect was found to be caused by endotoxin contamination.Conclusion: These results identify endotoxin as the main immunostimulatory component present in some commercial beta-lactoglobulin preparations. Moreover, the present study makes it evident...

  2. Trustworthiness of magnetic storms effect on biological and man caused processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozin, I.D.; Fedulina, I.N.; Sokolova, O.I.; Zakizhan, Z.Z.; Khalimov, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that relative variations of geomagnetic field components at the middle latitudes do not exceeds 1 % even during strong magnetic storms, and changes of a field vector angle are less than 1 degree. It is supposed that such changes can not effect life organism functioning, including human, as well as working of electricity transmission lines and other technological equipment. Different causes occurring during magnetic storms may be responsible for that. (author)

  3. Industrial PM2.5 cause pulmonary adverse effect through RhoA/ROCK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Junyan; Lai, Chia-Hsiang; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Chen, Chongjun; Wang, Wen-Cheng; Huang, Pin-I; Lin, Chia-Hua

    2017-12-01

    According to the Chinese Ministry of Health, industrial pollution-induced health impacts have been the leading cause of death in China. While industrial fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) is associated with adverse health effects, the major action mechanisms of different compositions of PM 2.5 are currently unclear. In this study, we treated normal human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells with industrial organic and water-soluble PM 2.5 extracts under daily alveolar deposition dose to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying adverse pulmonary effects induced by PM 2.5 , including oxidative damage, inflammatory response, lung epithelial barrier dysfunction, and the recruitment of macrophages. We found that water-soluble PM 2.5 extracts caused more severe cytotoxic effects on BEAS-2B cells compared with that of organic extracts. Both organic and water-soluble PM 2.5 extracts induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Inflammatory response, epithelial barrier dysfunction, and the activation of NF-кB caused by both PM 2.5 extracts were attenuated by ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. This indicated that both PM 2.5 extracts could cause damage to epithelial cells through RhoA/ROCK-dependent NF-кB activation. Furthermore, the upregulation of macrophage adhesion induced by both PM 2.5 extracts was also attenuated by Y-27632 in a co-culture model of macrophages and the epithelial cells. Therefore, our results support that industrial PM 2.5 extracts-induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK-dependent NF-кB pathway induces pulmonary adverse effect. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of ROCK activation might have therapeutic potential in preventing lung disease associated with PM 2.5 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Causes, effects and management of conflict among educators in the Mafikeng District / Simon Kelepile Manyedi

    OpenAIRE

    Manyedi, Simon Kelepile

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the causes, effects and management of conflict among school based educators. The dissertation acknowledge the existence of conflict in every human interaction. Conflict in organizations should be managed systematically. An appropriate approach in conflict management should aim at enhancing the benefits of conflict. The study aimed at determining whether site-managers possess the essential skill of managing healthy conflict while de...

  5. Effects of subfertility cause, smoking and body weight on the success rate of IVF

    OpenAIRE

    Lintsen, A.M.; Jong, P.C.M. Pasker-de; Boer, de, E.J.; Burger, C.W.; Jansen, C.A.; Braat, D.D.; Leeuwen, van, F.E.

    2005-01-01

    Background: We investigated the separate and combined effects of smoking and body mass index (BMI) on the success rate of IVF for couples with different causes of subfertility. Methods: The success rate of IVF was examined in 8457 women. Detailed information on reproduction and lifestyle factors was combined with medical record data on IVF treatment. All IVF clinics in The Netherlands participated in this study. The main outcome measures were live birth rate per first cycle of IVF differentia...

  6. Effectiveness of the stormwater quality devices to improve water quality at Putrajaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidek, L M; Basri, H; Puad, A H Mohd; Noh, M N Md; Ainan, A

    2013-01-01

    Development of Putrajaya has changed the character of the natural landform by covering the land with impervious surfaces. Houses, office buildings, commercial place and shopping centres have provided places to live and work. The route between buildings is facilitated and encouraged by a complex network of roads and car parks. However, this change from natural landforms and vegetative cover to impervious surfaces has major effect on stormwater which are water quality (non-point source pollution). This paper describes the effectiveness of the stormwater quality devices to improve water quality at selected Putrajaya for demonstration in order to evaluate low cost storm inlet type devices in the Putrajaya Catchment. Five stormwater quality devices were installed and monitored during the study. The devices include Ultra Drain Guard Recycle model, Ultra Curb Guard Plus, Ultra Grate Guard, Absorbent Tarp and Ultra Passive Skimmer. This paper will provide information on the benefits and costs of these devices, including operations and maintenance requirements. Applicability of these devices in gas stations, small convenience stores, residential and small parking lots in the catchment are possible due to their low cost.

  7. Liver irradiation causes distal bystander effects in the rat brain and affects animal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Mychasiuk, Richelle; Muhammad, Arif; Hossain, Shakhawat; Ilnytskyy, Slava; Ghose, Abhijit; Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kolb, Bryan

    2016-01-26

    Radiation therapy can not only produce effects on targeted organs, but can also influence shielded bystander organs, such as the brain in targeted liver irradiation. The brain is sensitive to radiation exposure, and irradiation causes significant neuro-cognitive deficits, including deficits in attention, concentration, memory, and executive and visuospatial functions. The mechanisms of their occurrence are not understood, although they may be related to the bystander effects.We analyzed the induction, mechanisms, and behavioural repercussions of bystander effects in the brain upon liver irradiation in a well-established rat model.Here, we show for the first time that bystander effects occur in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus regions upon liver irradiation, where they manifest as altered gene expression and somewhat increased levels of γH2AX. We also report that bystander effects in the brain are associated with neuroanatomical and behavioural changes, and are more pronounced in females than in males.

  8. Effect of limestone particle size on bone quality characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of different limestone particle sizes in layer diets on bone quality characteristics at end-of-lay hens. Calcitic limestone (360 g Ca/kg DM) that is extensively used in commercial poultry diets was obtained from a specific South African source. Limestone particles were graded as ...

  9. Health effects of air quality regulations in Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Andrew; Kumar, Naresh

    2011-03-01

    This, the first systematic study, quantifies the health effects of air quality regulations in Delhi, which adopted radical measures to improve air quality, including, for example, the conversion of all commercial vehicles to compressed natural gas (CNG), and the closure of polluting industries in residential areas from 2000 to 2002. Air pollution data, collected at 113 sites (spread across Delhi and its neighboring areas) from July-December 2003, were used to compute exposure at the place of residence of 3989 subjects. A socio-economic and respiratory health survey was administered in 1576 households. This survey collected time-use, residence histories, demographic information, and direct measurements of lung function with subjects. The optimal interpolation methods were used to link air pollution and respiratory health data at the place of their residence. Resident histories, in combination with secondary data, were used to impute cumulative exposure prior to the air-quality interventions, and the effects of recent air quality measures on lung function were then evaluated. Three important findings emerge from the analysis. First, the interventions were associated with a significant improvement in respiratory health. Second, the effect of these interventions varied significantly by gender and income. Third, consistent with a causal interpretation of these results, effects were the strongest among those individuals who spend a disproportionate share of their time out-of-doors.

  10. Linking flow, water quality and potential effects on aquatic biota ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Linking the potential effects of altered water quality on aquatic biota, that may result from a change in the flow (discharge) regime, is an essential step in the maintenance of riverine ecological functioning. Determination of the environmental flow requirement of a river (as well as other activities, such as classifying the ...

  11. Effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on menopausal quality of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent clinical trials have found an increased risk of health problems in women using menopausal hormone therapy. As a result, women are in search of alternative strategies to improve their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on quali...

  12. Effects of seasonal advancement on the forage availability, quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of seasonal advancement on the forage availability, quality and acceptability by grazing gudali cattle in the humid zone of Nigeria. ... There were significant (p<0.05) differences in the dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP) and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) contents of all the forages. DM content ranged from 9.6% (Tridax ...

  13. Effectiveness of streamside management zones on water quality: pretreatment measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.L. Boggs; G. Sun; S.G. McNulty; W. Swartley; E. Treasure

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paired watershed study is to quantify the effects of upland forest harvesting and Streamside Management Zones (SMZs) on stream water quantity and quality in North Carolina. Four watersheds ranging from 12 to 28 hectares (i.e., two on Hill Forest and two on Umstead Research Farm) with perennial stream channels were gauged for flow monitoring and...

  14. Effect of the Distribution System on Drinking Water Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grünwald

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this paper is to characterise the main aspects of water quality deterioration in a distribution system. The effect of residence time on chlorine uptake and the formation and evolution of disinfection by-products in distributed drinking water are discussed.

  15. Effect of Bioregulators on Apple Yield and Quality Attributes | Ouma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiments were conducted in 1995 and 1996 to investigate the effect of the two bioregulators; Accel and Carbaryl, sprayed two weeks before bloom on Apple fruit set, yield and quality and to relate the degree of fruit set reduction to the yield of three Apple cultivars namely, \\'Empire`, \\'Jon-A-Red\\' and `Braeburn\\'.

  16. Total Quality Management Practices and Their Effects on Organizational Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Richard Yu-Yuan; Lien, Bella Ya-Hui

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a study designed to examine the key concepts of Total Quality Management (TQM) implementation and their effects on organizational performance. Process Alignment and People Involvement are two key concepts for successful implementation of TQM. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how these two constructs affect organizational…

  17. Effect of Logging Activities on Water Quality and Benthic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to determine the effect of logging activities on water quality and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages for the Madek River basin. The study area was situated in Kluang, Johor, Malaysia. Two sampling stations 500 meters apart are upstream and the other, downstream located at Madek River ...

  18. Air quality effects of urban trees and parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Nowak; Gordon Heisler

    2010-01-01

    Parks are significant parts of the urban landscape and comprise about 6% of city and town areas in the conterminous United States. These urban parks are estimated to contain about 370 million trees with a structural value of approximately $300 billion. The number of park trees varies by region of the country, but they can produce significant air quality effects in and...

  19. The effect of hypertension on neurocognitive functioning and quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Hypertension has been reported as one of the most important etiologic factors in cardiovascular disease. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of hypertension on neurocognitive functioning and quality of life. Design: The study was cross sectional, and clinic based. The sample comprised of 50 ...

  20. Effect of commercial diets on egg quality characteristics | Ayanwale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of four commercial feeds in Niger State Nigeria on egg quality characteristics was studied. The feed designated diets 1, 2, 3 and 4 were fed to Rhode Island Red (RIR) hens and their eggs were collected as from 38 weeks of age for 4 weeks. A total of 384 eggs were analysed for both external and internal egg ...

  1. Feedback Effects of Teaching Quality Assessment: Macro and Micro Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the feedback effects of teaching quality assessment. Previous literature looked separately at the evolution of individual and aggregate scores to understand whether instructors and university performance depends on its past evaluation. I propose a new quantitative-based methodology, combining statistical distributions and…

  2. Effect of Thermo-extrusion Process Parameters on Selected Quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Thermo-extrusion Process Parameters on Selected Quality Attributes of Meat Analogue from Mucuna Bean Seed Flour. ... Nigerian Food Journal ... The product functional responses with coefficients of determination (R2) ranging between 0.658 and 0.894 were most affected by changes in barrel temperature and ...

  3. Effect of Environmental Quality on Property Rental Values in Peri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the effect of environmental quality on rental values of residential accommodation at the peripheral neighbourhoods of Minna, Nigeria. Cluster sampling method was employed in the selection of sampled areas and, six neighbourhoods were randomly selected. Sample size of 600 was drawn out of the ...

  4. Depression underdiagnosis and the effects on quality of life in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed to determine the frequency of depressive disorder in a sample of patients with HIV and its level of underdiagnosis by attending physicians. The study also explored the effect of depressive disorder on the quality of life (QOL) of patients with HIV. A sociodemographic questionnaire was administered to ...

  5. Effect of malting conditions on pearl millet malt quality

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pelembe, LAM

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of malting conditions on pearl millet malt quality in two varieties, SDMV 89004 and SDMV 91018, was investigated. Grain was steeped and germinated at four temperatures, 20degrees, 25degrees, 30degrees and 35degreesC, over 5 days...

  6. Effect of land cover, stream discharge, and precipitation on water quality in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. S.; Uriarte, M.

    2017-12-01

    In 2015, Puerto Rico experienced one of the worst droughts in its history, causing widespread water rationing and sparking concerns for future resources. The drought represents precipitation extremes that provide valuable insight into the effects of land cover (LC), on modulating discharge and water quality indices at varying spatial scales. We used data collected from 38 water quality and 55 precipitation monitoring stations in Puerto Rico from 2005 to 2016, paired with a 2010 land cover map to (1) determine whether temporal variability in discharge, precipitation, or antecedent precipitation was a better predictor of water quality, (2) find the spatial scale where LC has the greatest impact on water quality, and (3) quantify impacts of LC on water quality indices, including dissolved oxygen (mg/L), total nitrogen (mg/L), phosphorous (mg/L), turbidity (NTRU), fecal coliforms (colony units/100mL) and instantaneous discharge (ft3/s). The resulting linear mixed effects models account for between 36-68% of the variance in water quality. Preliminary results indicate that phosphorous and nitrogen were best predicted from instantaneous stream discharge, the log of discharge was the better predictor for turbidity and fecal coliforms, and summed 2 and 14-day antecedent precipitation indices were better predictors for dissolved oxygen and discharge, respectively. Increased urban and pasture area reliably decreased water quality in relation to forest cover, while agriculture and wetlands had little or mixed effects. Turbidity and nitrogen responded to a watershed level LC, while phosphorous, fecal coliforms, and discharge responded to LC in 60 m riparian buffers at the watershed scale. Our results indicate that LC modulates changing precipitation regimes and the ensuing impacts on water quality at a range of spatial scales.

  7. Effect of radiosynovectomy in patients with inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, S.; Klutmann, S.; Bohuslavizki, K.H.; Clausen, M.; Sawula, J.A.; Brenner, W.; Henze, E.

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Effect of radiosynovectomy (RS) should be evaluated both by subjective and objective parameters in patients with osteoarthritis and in patients with inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: A total of 98 joints in 61 patients were investigated. Patients were divided into two groups. The first group included 35 patients with therapy-resistant effusions caused by severe osteoarthritis (46 joints). The second group consisted of 26 patients (52 joints) with ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, undifferentiated spondylarthropathy, psoriatic arthritis, pigmented villo-nodular synovitis, and recurrent synovitis following surgery. Effect of RS was evaluated by a standardized questionnaire and quantified by T/B-ratios derived from blood pool images prior to and after RS. Results: Within the first patient group suffering from osteoarthritis, 40% showed a good or excellent improvement of clinical symptoms, 51% were unchanged, and in 9% symptoms worsened. Similar results were found in the second patient group. The majority of unchanged results were small finger joints. In contrast, wrist and knee joints showed a better improvement. Good correlation between results of bone scan and patients subjective impression was found in 38% and 67% in the first and the second patient group, respectively. Conclusion: Radiosynovectomy might be an effective treatment in osteoarthritis and inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.) [de

  8. Protective and therapeutic effects of fucoxanthin against sunburn caused by UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mio; Tanaka, Kosuke; Higashiguchi, Naoki; Okawa, Hisato; Yamada, Yoichi; Tanaka, Ken; Taira, Soichiro; Aoyama, Tomoko; Takanishi, Misaki; Natsume, Chika; Takakura, Yuuki; Fujita, Norihisa; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Fujita, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Mild exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is also harmful and hazardous to the skin and often causes a photosensitivity disorder accompanied by sunburn. To understand the action of UV on the skin we performed a microarray analysis to isolate UV-sensitive genes. We show here that UV irradiation promoted sunburn and downregulated filaggrin (Flg); fucoxanthin (FX) exerted a protective effect. In vitro analysis showed that UV irradiation of human dermal fibroblasts caused production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) without cellular toxicity. ROS production was diminished by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or FX, but not by retinoic acid (RA). In vivo analysis showed that UV irradiation caused sunburn and Flg downregulation, and that FX, but not NAC, RA or clobetasol, exerted a protective effect. FX stimulated Flg promoter activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Flg promoter deletion and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that caudal type homeo box transcription factor 1 (Cdx1) was a key factor for Flg induction. Cdx1 was also downregulated in UV-exposed skin. Therefore, our data suggested that the protective effects of FX against UV-induced sunburn might be exerted by promotion of skin barrier formation through induction of Flg, unrelated to quenching of ROS or an RA-like action. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Protective and therapeutic effects of fucoxanthin against sunburn caused by UV irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mio Matsui

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mild exposure to ultraviolet (UV radiation is also harmful and hazardous to the skin and often causes a photosensitivity disorder accompanied by sunburn. To understand the action of UV on the skin we performed a microarray analysis to isolate UV-sensitive genes. We show here that UV irradiation promoted sunburn and downregulated filaggrin (Flg; fucoxanthin (FX exerted a protective effect. In vitro analysis showed that UV irradiation of human dermal fibroblasts caused production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS without cellular toxicity. ROS production was diminished by N-acetylcysteine (NAC or FX, but not by retinoic acid (RA. In vivo analysis showed that UV irradiation caused sunburn and Flg downregulation, and that FX, but not NAC, RA or clobetasol, exerted a protective effect. FX stimulated Flg promoter activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Flg promoter deletion and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that caudal type homeo box transcription factor 1 (Cdx1 was a key factor for Flg induction. Cdx1 was also downregulated in UV-exposed skin. Therefore, our data suggested that the protective effects of FX against UV-induced sunburn might be exerted by promotion of skin barrier formation through induction of Flg, unrelated to quenching of ROS or an RA-like action.

  10. Pre-diagnosis quality of life (QoL) in patients with hematuria : Comparison of bladder cancer with other causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens-Laan, C.A.; Kil, P.J.M.; Bosch, J.L.; de Vries, J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To examine quality of life (QoL), health status, sexual function, and anxiety in patients with primary hematuria who later appear to have bladder cancer (BC) and patients with other diagnoses. Methods From July 2007 to July 2010, 598 patients with primary hematuria were enrolled in this

  11. Olive anthracnose: a yield- and oil quality-degrading disease caused by several species of Colletotrichum that differ in virulence, host preference and geographical distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talhinhas, Pedro; Loureiro, Andreia; Oliveira, Helena

    2018-03-08

    Olive anthracnose causes fruit rot leading to its drop or mummification, resulting in yield losses and the degradation of oil quality. The disease is caused by diverse species of Colletotrichum, mostly clustering in the C. acutatum species complex. Colletotrichum nymphaeae and C. godetiae are the prevalent species in the Northern Hemisphere, whereas C. acutatum sensu stricto is the most frequent species in the Southern Hemisphere, although it is recently and quickly emerging in the Northern Hemisphere. The disease has been reported from all continents, but it attains higher incidence and severity in the west of the Mediterranean Basin, where it is endemic in traditional orchards of susceptible cultivars. The pathogens are able to survive on vegetative organs. On the fruit surface, infections remain quiescent until fruit maturity, when typical anthracnose symptoms develop. Under severe epidemics, defoliation and death of branches can also occur. Pathogen species differ in virulence, although this depends on the cultivar. The selection of resistant cultivars depends strongly on pathogen diversity and environmental conditions, posing added difficulties to breeding efforts. Chemical disease control is normally achieved with copper-based fungicides, although this may be insufficient under highly favourable disease conditions and causes concern because of the presence of fungicide residues in the oil. In areas in which the incidence is high, farmers tend to anticipate harvest, with consequences in yield and oil characteristics. Olive production systems, harvest and post-harvest processing have experienced profound changes in recent years, namely new training systems using specific cultivars, new harvest and processing techniques and new organoleptic market requests. Changes are also occurring in both the geographical distribution of pathogen populations and the taxonomic framework. In addition, stricter rules concerning pesticide use are likely to have a strong impact

  12. Interaction between Allee effects caused by organism-environment feedback and by other ecological mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Qin

    Full Text Available Understanding Allee effect has crucial importance for ecological conservation and management because it is strongly related to population extinction. Due to various ecological mechanisms accounting for Allee effect, it is necessary to study the influence of multiple Allee effects on the dynamics and persistence of population. We here focus on organism-environment feedback which can incur strong, weak, and fatal Allee effect (AE-by-OEF, and further examine their interaction with the Allee effects caused by other ecological mechanisms (AE-by-OM. The results show that multiple Allee effects largely increase the extinction risk of population either due to the enlargement of Allee threshold or the change of inherent characteristic of Allee effect, and such an increase will be enhanced dramatically with increasing the strength of individual Allee effects. Our simulations explicitly considering spatial structure also demonstrate that local interaction among habitat patches can greatly mitigate such superimposed Allee effects as well as individual Allee effect. This implies that spatially structurized habitat could play an important role in ecological conservation and management.

  13. Interaction between Allee effects caused by organism-environment feedback and by other ecological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lijuan; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Wanxiong; Song, Weixin

    2017-01-01

    Understanding Allee effect has crucial importance for ecological conservation and management because it is strongly related to population extinction. Due to various ecological mechanisms accounting for Allee effect, it is necessary to study the influence of multiple Allee effects on the dynamics and persistence of population. We here focus on organism-environment feedback which can incur strong, weak, and fatal Allee effect (AE-by-OEF), and further examine their interaction with the Allee effects caused by other ecological mechanisms (AE-by-OM). The results show that multiple Allee effects largely increase the extinction risk of population either due to the enlargement of Allee threshold or the change of inherent characteristic of Allee effect, and such an increase will be enhanced dramatically with increasing the strength of individual Allee effects. Our simulations explicitly considering spatial structure also demonstrate that local interaction among habitat patches can greatly mitigate such superimposed Allee effects as well as individual Allee effect. This implies that spatially structurized habitat could play an important role in ecological conservation and management.

  14. In silico investigation of molecular effects caused by missense mutations in creatine transporter protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Schwatz, Charles; Alexov, Emil

    2011-03-01

    Creatine transporter (CT) protein, which is encoded by SLC6A8 gene, is essential for taking up the creatine in the cell, which in turn plays a key role in the spatial and temporal maintenance of energy in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. It was shown that some missense mutations in CT cause mental retardation, while others are harmless non-synonymous single nucleoside polymorphism (nsSNP). Currently fifteen missense mutations in CT are known, among which twelve are disease-causing. Sequence analysis reveals that there is no clear trend distinguishing disease-causing from harmless missense mutations. Because of that, we built 3D model of the CT using highly homologous template and use the model to investigate the effects of mutations of CT stability and hydrogen bond network. It is demonstrated that disease-causing mutations affect the folding free energy and ionization states of titratable group in much greater extend as compared with harmless mutations. Supported by grants from NLM, NIH, grant numbers 1R03LM009748 and 1R03LM009748-S1.

  15. Route effect on the perception of public transport services quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chica-Olmo, J.; Gachs-Sanchez, H.M.; Lizarraga, C.

    2016-07-01

    User satisfaction sets a basic example for public service quality, especially those considered as basic necessities. The quality in transport service related to conceptualization and measurement, as a decisive demand key, presents challenges for both economic and mobility policies.Several operator companies are involved in the transport sector. Therefore this report aims to design a model of overall satisfaction based on the level of satisfaction with a specific set of factors, considering individual characteristics of users and the differential effect of different bus lines.The current presentation has applied a combined method, using Nonlinear Principal Component Analysis (NLPCA) and a Logit Multilevel Model (LMLM) in two-steps. (Author)

  16. Effect of gamma irradiation on quality of dried potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Chao, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to obtain the effect of gamma irradiation on the quality of dried potato. Experiments were conducted to study the influence of different doses, air temperatures, slice thickness of potatoes on the dehydration rate, appearance quality (L-values), vitamin C content, and the rehydration ratio of dried potatoes. The greater the dose, the higher the dehydration rate, the lesser the vitamin C content, and the lower the rehydration ratio. The L-values for low-dose irradiation was greater than that for non-irradiated potatoes

  17. Effect of gamma irradiation on quality of dried potato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J. E-mail: jwang@zju.edu.cn; Chao, Y

    2003-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to obtain the effect of gamma irradiation on the quality of dried potato. Experiments were conducted to study the influence of different doses, air temperatures, slice thickness of potatoes on the dehydration rate, appearance quality (L-values), vitamin C content, and the rehydration ratio of dried potatoes. The greater the dose, the higher the dehydration rate, the lesser the vitamin C content, and the lower the rehydration ratio. The L-values for low-dose irradiation was greater than that for non-irradiated potatoes.

  18. Microscreen effects on water quality in replicated recirculating aquaculture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Paulo; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of three microscreen mesh sizes (100, 60 and 20 μm) on water quality and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) performance compared to a control group without microscreens, in triplicated recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). Operational conditions were kept....... Fish performed similarly in all treatments. Preliminary screening of trout gills did not reveal any pathological changes related to microscreen filtration and the resulting water quality. Biofilter performance was also unaffected, with 0′-order nitrification rates (k0a) being equivalent for all twelve...

  19. Absorbent products for incontinence: 'treatment effects' and impact on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getliffe, Kathryn; Fader, Mandy; Cottenden, Alan; Jamieson, Katharine; Green, Nicholas

    2007-10-01

    This study aimed to determine how the use and characteristics of absorbent products for incontinence impact on women's quality of life, and to examine the concept of 'treatment effects' in the context of pad use. Key pad performance characteristics were identified from the literature and focus group work. Semi-structured interviews with 99 women with light incontinence were used to investigate the impact of pad use on women's quality of life, including both positive and negative 'treatment effects', and to rank pad characteristics by their importance. Achieving effective and discrete containment of urine was the dominant factor impacting on women's lives. Sub-themes embraced physical effects, psychological impact and social functioning. The five pad characteristics ranked most important for day time use were: 'to hold urine, to contain smell, to stay in place, discreteness, and comfort when wet. For night use discreteness was replaced by to keep skin dry'. High levels of reported anxiety were associated with perceived risk of poor pad performance, lack of discreteness and need for complex regimes for pad management. Insufficient attention has been paid to the balance between the beneficial and negative treatment effects of absorbent pads to date. Existing continence-related quality of life measures are not designed for conditions where change in symptoms is not an outcome measure. The study findings provide the basis for developing a more sensitive, patient-oriented, quality of life measure for pad-users which can aid product selection, new product development and inform future evaluative comparisons between products/products and treatments. This paper illustrates the complex influence on quality of life caused by using absorbent pads to contain incontinence. It raises awareness of the importance of careful selection of the most appropriate pad for each individual to minimize unfavourable side effects, and the need for a new quality of life measure designed for pad-users.

  20. Can integrative catchment management mitigate future water quality issues caused by climate change and socio-economic development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honti, Mark; Schuwirth, Nele; Rieckermann, Jörg; Stamm, Christian

    2017-03-01

    The design and evaluation of solutions for integrated surface water quality management requires an integrated modelling approach. Integrated models have to be comprehensive enough to cover the aspects relevant for management decisions, allowing for mapping of larger-scale processes such as climate change to the regional and local contexts. Besides this, models have to be sufficiently simple and fast to apply proper methods of uncertainty analysis, covering model structure deficits and error propagation through the chain of sub-models. Here, we present a new integrated catchment model satisfying both conditions. The conceptual iWaQa model was developed to support the integrated management of small streams. It can be used to predict traditional water quality parameters, such as nutrients and a wide set of organic micropollutants (plant and material protection products), by considering all major pollutant pathways in urban and agricultural environments. Due to its simplicity, the model allows for a full, propagative analysis of predictive uncertainty, including certain structural and input errors. The usefulness of the model is demonstrated by predicting future surface water quality in a small catchment with mixed land use in the Swiss Plateau. We consider climate change, population growth or decline, socio-economic development, and the implementation of management strategies to tackle urban and agricultural point and non-point sources of pollution. Our results indicate that input and model structure uncertainties are the most influential factors for certain water quality parameters. In these cases model uncertainty is already high for present conditions. Nevertheless, accounting for today's uncertainty makes management fairly robust to the foreseen range of potential changes in the next decades. The assessment of total predictive uncertainty allows for selecting management strategies that show small sensitivity to poorly known boundary conditions. The identification

  1. The effect of irradiation, packaging and storage on the quality of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerak, D.I.; Stegeman, H.

    1983-01-01

    Spices are contaminated by nature with micro organisms. The processing industry, however, requires 'clean' spices. The most applied technique has been fumigation with ethylene oxide. However, fumigation causes a number of difficulties; viz. the presence of residues and the possible forming of toxic compounds like ethylene chlorohydrine. The latest method is the decontamination by means of ionizing rays. Research on the effect of irradiation and packaging on the different quality aspects of spices proves that an irradiation dose of 3-8 kGy produces the same or better results with regard to decontamination effect as a fumigation treatment does. The applied dose has no adverse effect on the sensoric and chemical properties of the product. With respect to the wholesomeness the irradiation process can be applied safely. Furthermore, this process offers the possibility to choose an optimal packaging for spices, thus preventing quality deterioration. (orig.)

  2. Effect of irradiation, packaging and storage on the quality of spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langerak, D I; Stegeman, H

    1983-09-29

    Spices are contaminated by nature with microorganisms. The processing industry, however, requires 'clean' spices. The most applied technique has been fumigation with ethylene oxide. However, fumigation causes a number of difficulties; viz. the presence of residues and the possible forming of toxic compounds like ethylene chlorohydrine. The latest method is the decontamination by means of ionizing rays. Research on the effect of irradiation and packaging on the different quality aspects of spices proves that an irradiation dose of 3-8 kGy produces the same or better results with regard to decontamination effect as a fumigation treatment does. The applied dose has no adverse effect on the sensoric and chemical properties of the product. With respect to the wholesomeness, the irradiation process can be applied safely. Furthermore, this process offers the possibility to choose an optimal packaging for spices, thus preventing quality deterioration. 22 references, 8 tables.

  3. Quality of inpatient pediatric case management for four leading causes of child mortality at six government-run Ugandan hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sears

    Full Text Available A better understanding of case management practices is required to improve inpatient pediatric care in resource-limited settings. Here we utilize data from a unique health facility-based surveillance system at six Ugandan hospitals to evaluate the quality of pediatric case management and the factors associated with appropriate care.All children up to the age of 14 years admitted to six district or regional hospitals over 15 months were included in the study. Four case management categories were defined for analysis: suspected malaria, selected illnesses requiring antibiotics, suspected anemia, and diarrhea. The quality of case management for each category was determined by comparing recorded treatments with evidence-based best practices as defined in national guidelines. Associations between variables of interest and the receipt of appropriate case management were estimated using multivariable logistic regression.A total of 30,351 admissions were screened for inclusion in the analysis. Ninety-two percent of children met criteria for suspected malaria and 81% received appropriate case management. Thirty-two percent of children had selected illnesses requiring antibiotics and 89% received appropriate antibiotics. Thirty percent of children met criteria for suspected anemia and 38% received appropriate case management. Twelve percent of children had diarrhea and 18% received appropriate case management. Multivariable logistic regression revealed large differences in the quality of care between health facilities. There was also a strong association between a positive malaria diagnostic test result and the odds of receiving appropriate case management for comorbid non-malarial illnesses - children with a positive malaria test were more likely to receive appropriate care for anemia and less likely for illnesses requiring antibiotics and diarrhea.Appropriate management of suspected anemia and diarrhea occurred infrequently. Pediatric quality

  4. The need for investigations to elucidate causes and effects of abnormal uterine bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Malcolm G; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Haththotuwa, Rohana; Tank, Jaydeep D; Fraser, Ian S

    2011-09-01

    This article describes a modern perspective on the basic investigations for abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) in low-resource settings compared with a much more detailed approach for high-resource settings, bearing in mind issues of effectiveness and cost effectiveness. AUB includes any one or more of several symptoms, and it should be evaluated for the characteristics of the woman's specific bleeding pattern, her "complaint" and the presence of other symptoms (especially pain), the impact on several aspects of body functioning and lifestyle, and the underlying cause(s), especially cancer. Ideally, the evaluation is comprehensive, considering each of the potential etiological domains defined by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics PALM-COEIN system for the classification of causes. However, the detail of the questions and the extent of investigations will be significantly influenced by the technologies available and the time allotted for a consultation. In general, investigations should be performed only if they will make a material difference to the management approaches that can be offered. This should be an important consideration when a range of costly high-technology tests is accessible or when certain tests only have limited availability. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  5. Effects of Main Pollution Sources on Parameters of Water Quality of the Prut River Within the Limits of Chernivtsi in the Last Seven Years and Consequent Environmental Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrytsku V.S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of the Prut River water quality monitoring in the last 7 years are dealt with. Attention is paid to situation of water quality worsening and to the reasons that caused it. Application of the method of water quality index’s integrated assessment has confirmed that it is not solely the degree of anthropogenic impact that affects the water quality, but also the effects of natural factors.

  6. Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, N.; Jeffries, J.; Mach, J.; Robson, M.; Pajot, D.; Harrigan, J.; Lebsack, T.; Mullen, D.; Rat, F.; Theys, P.

    1993-01-01

    What is quality? How do you achieve it? How do you keep it once you have got it. The answer for industry at large is the three-step hierarchy of quality control, quality assurance and Total quality Management. An overview is given of the history of quality movement, illustrated with examples from Schlumberger operations, as well as the oil industry's approach to quality. An introduction of the Schlumberger's quality-associated ClientLink program is presented. 15 figs., 4 ills., 16 refs

  7. Methods for Ensuring High Quality of Coding of Cause of Death. The Mortality Register to Follow Southern Urals Populations Exposed to Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Startsev, N; Dimov, P; Grosche, B; Tretyakov, F; Schüz, J; Akleyev, A

    2015-01-01

    To follow up populations exposed to several radiation accidents in the Southern Urals, a cause-of-death registry was established at the Urals Center capturing deaths in the Chelyabinsk, Kurgan and Sverdlovsk region since 1950. When registering deaths over such a long time period, quality measures need to be in place to maintain quality and reduce the impact of individual coders as well as quality changes in death certificates. To ensure the uniformity of coding, a method for semi-automatic coding was developed, which is described here. Briefly, the method is based on a dynamic thesaurus, database-supported coding and parallel coding by two different individuals. A comparison of the proposed method for organizing the coding process with the common procedure of coding showed good agreement, with, at the end of the coding process, 70  - 90% agreement for the three-digit ICD -9 rubrics. The semi-automatic method ensures a sufficiently high quality of coding by at the same time providing an opportunity to reduce the labor intensity inherent in the creation of large-volume cause-of-death registries.

  8. The development of effects-based air quality management regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, J. W. S.; Irwin, J. G.; Chatterton, T. J.; Hayes, E. T.; Leksmono, N. S.; Symons, J. K.

    This paper considers the evolution of attempts to control and manage air pollution, principally but not exclusively focussing upon the challenge of managing air pollution in urban environments. The development and implementation of a range of air pollution control measures are considered. Initially the measures implemented primarily addressed point sources, a small number of fuel types and a limited number of pollutants. The adequacy of such a source-control approach is assessed within the context of a changing and challenging air pollution climate. An assessment of air quality management in the United Kingdom over a 50-year timeframe exemplifies the range of issues and challenges in contemporary air quality management. The need for new approaches is explored and the development and implementation of an effects-based, risk management system for air quality regulation is evaluated.

  9. The effect of transport on the quality of rabbit meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Składanowska-Baryza, Joanna; Ludwiczak, Agnieszka; Pruszyńska-Oszmałek, Ewa; Kołodziejski, Paweł; Bykowska, Marta; Stanisz, Marek

    2018-04-01

    The analyzed material included 40 hybrid rabbits slaughtered at the age of 90 days. The control group was transported directly after weaning, while the transport group was transported directly prior to slaughter. The experiment was designed to assess the transport stress, carcass and meat quality implications, taking into account the muscle type and sex. The transported animals were characterized by a higher level of blood cortisol, glucose and triglycerides (P meat were affected by the transport (P meat from the control group was characterized by greater plasticity compared to the transport group (P = 0.003). The chemical composition of rabbit meat was not changed by the effect of transport (P = 0.643-0.979). To conclude, the quality traits of meat from the transported hybrid rabbits clearly indicated the development of dark firm and dry-like lower quality of meat. © 2018 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  10. Modelling the regional effects of climate change on air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorgi, F.; Meleux, F.

    2007-01-01

    The life cycle of pollutants is affected by chemical as well as meteorological factors, such as wind, temperature, precipitation, solar radiation. Therefore, climatic changes induced by anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases may be expected to have significant effects on air quality. Because of the spatial variability of the pollutant emissions and climate-change signals, these effects are particularly relevant at the regional to local scales. This paper first briefly reviews modelling tools and methodologies used to study regional climate-change impacts on air quality. Patterns of regional precipitation, temperature, and sea-level changes emerging from the latest set of general circulation model projections are then discussed. Finally, the specific case of climate-change effects on summer ozone concentrations over Europe is presented to illustrate the potential impacts of climate change on pollutant amounts. It is concluded that climate change is an important factor that needs to be taken into account when designing future pollution-reduction policies. (authors)

  11. Effectiveness of energy healing on Quality of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christina Gundgaard; Johannessen, Helle; Hjelmborg, Jacob V B

    2014-01-01

    and alternative medicine (CAM), and faith/spirituality at baseline, 1 week, and 2 months post-intervention. They also indicated, at baseline, whether they considered QoL, depressive symptoms, mood, and sleep quality as important outcomes to them. Results: Multilevel linear models revealed no overall effect......Purpose: Our aim was to explore the effectiveness of energy healing, a commonly used complementary and alternative therapy, on well-being in cancer patients while assessing the possible influence on the results of participating in a randomized controlled trial. Methods: 247 patients treated...... of healing on QoL (p = 0.156), depressive symptoms (p = 0.063), mood (p = 0.079), or sleep quality (p = 0.346) in the intervention groups (RH, SH) compared with control (SC). Effects of healing on mood were only found for patients who had a positive attitude toward CAM and considered the outcome in question...

  12. Effect of 1-methylcyclopropene on shelf life, visual quality and nutritional quality of netted melon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y; Wang, B L; Shui, D J; Cao, L L; Wang, C; Yang, T; Wang, X Y; Ye, H X

    2015-04-01

    The effects of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) on shelf life, fruit visual quality and nutritional quality were investigated. Netted melons were treated with air (control) and 0.6 µl l(-1) 1-MCP at 25 ℃ for 24 h, and then stored at 25 ℃ or 10 ℃ for 10 days. 1-MCP significantly extended the shelf life, inhibited weight loss and delayed firmness decline of melon fruits. Ethylene production was also inhibited and respiration rate was declined. 1-MCP retarded 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) increases and inhibited ACC synthase and ACC oxidase activity. Moreover, 1-MCP treatment reduced the decrease in total soluble solids and titratable acidity, as well as the decrease of the content of sugars (sucrose, fructose and glucose). These results indicated that 1-MCP treatment is a good method to extend melon shelf life and maintain fruit quality, and the combination of 1-MCP and low temperature storage resulted in more acceptable fruit quality. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Effect of hydrotherapy on quality of life, functional capacity and sleep quality in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Kyara Morgana Oliveira Moura; Tucano, Silvia Jurema Pereira; Kümpel, Claudia; Castro, Antonio Adolfo Mattos de; Porto, Elias Ferreira

    2012-12-01

    Fibromyalgia affects 8% of the population over the age of 40 years, and 75% of the patients with fibromyalgia have poor sleep quality. To assess the effects of hydrotherapy on the physical function and sleep quality of patients with fibromyalgia. Patients were under clinical care at the UNASP Outpatient Clinic. This study assessed 60 female patients with fibromyalgia aged between 30 and 65 years. Out of the 60 patients assessed, 20 were excluded and 10 left the study because they could not comply with the time schedule. All patients completed the following questionnaires: Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ); Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Training sessions were performed twice a week for two months, each session lasting 60 minutes. Patients' mean age was 45 years, 66% were active workers, and 34% had quit work. Right after the hydrotherapy program, the patients improved the following aspects assessed by use of the FIQ: physical function, work absenteeism, ability to do job, pain intensity, fatigue, morning tiredness, stiffness (P Hydrotherapy improves sleep quality, physical function, professional status, psychological disorders and physical symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of a pressure ulcer quality collaborative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Roland

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A quality improvement collaborative (QIC in the Dutch long-term care sector (nursing homes, assisted living facilities, home care used evidence-based prevention methods to reduce the incidence and prevalence of pressure ulcers (PUs. The collaborative consisted of a core team of experts and 25 organizational project teams. Our aim was to determine its cost-effectiveness from a healthcare perspective. Methods We used a non-controlled pre-post design to establish the change in incidence and prevalence of PUs in 88 patients over the course of a year. Staff indexed data and prevention methods (activities, materials. Quality of life (Qol weights were assigned to the PU states. We assessed the costs of activities and materials in the project. A Markov model was built based on effectiveness and cost data, complemented with a probabilistic sensitivity analysis. To illustrate the results of longer term, three scenarios were created in which change in incidence and prevalence measures were (1 not sustained, (2 partially sustained, and (3 completely sustained. Results Incidence of PUs decreased from 15% to 4.5% for the 88 patients. Prevalence decreased from 38.6% to 22.7%. Average Quality of Life (Qol of patients increased by 0.02 Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs in two years; healthcare costs increased by €2000 per patient; the Incremental Cost-effectiveness Ratio (ICER was between 78,500 and 131,000 depending on whether the changes in incidence and prevalence of PU were sustained. Conclusions During the QIC PU incidence and prevalence significantly declined. When compared to standard PU care, the QIC was probably more costly and more effective in the short run, but its long-term cost-effectiveness is questionable. The QIC can only be cost-effective if the changes in incidence and prevalence of PU are sustained.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of a pressure ulcer quality collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makai, Peter; Koopmanschap, Marc; Bal, Roland; Nieboer, Anna P

    2010-06-01

    A quality improvement collaborative (QIC) in the Dutch long-term care sector (nursing homes, assisted living facilities, home care) used evidence-based prevention methods to reduce the incidence and prevalence of pressure ulcers (PUs). The collaborative consisted of a core team of experts and 25 organizational project teams. Our aim was to determine its cost-effectiveness from a healthcare perspective. We used a non-controlled pre-post design to establish the change in incidence and prevalence of PUs in 88 patients over the course of a year. Staff indexed data and prevention methods (activities, materials). Quality of life (Qol) weights were assigned to the PU states. We assessed the costs of activities and materials in the project. A Markov model was built based on effectiveness and cost data, complemented with a probabilistic sensitivity analysis. To illustrate the results of longer term, three scenarios were created in which change in incidence and prevalence measures were (1) not sustained, (2) partially sustained, and (3) completely sustained. Incidence of PUs decreased from 15% to 4.5% for the 88 patients. Prevalence decreased from 38.6% to 22.7%. Average Quality of Life (Qol) of patients increased by 0.02 Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALY)s in two years; healthcare costs increased by euro2000 per patient; the Incremental Cost-effectiveness Ratio (ICER) was between 78,500 and 131,000 depending on whether the changes in incidence and prevalence of PU were sustained. During the QIC PU incidence and prevalence significantly declined. When compared to standard PU care, the QIC was probably more costly and more effective in the short run, but its long-term cost-effectiveness is questionable. The QIC can only be cost-effective if the changes in incidence and prevalence of PU are sustained.

  16. Qualities of an effective teacher: what do medical teachers think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Simerjit; Pai, Dinker R; Sinha, Nirmal K; Kaur, Avneet; Soe, Htoo Htoo Kyaw; Barua, Ankur

    2013-09-17

    Effective teaching in medicine is essential to produce good quality doctors. A number of studies have attempted to identify the characteristics of an effective teacher. However, most of literature regarding an effective medical teacher includes student ratings or expert opinions. Furthermore, interdisciplinary studies for the same are even fewer. We did a cross-sectional study of the characteristics of effective teachers from their own perspective across medicine and dentistry disciplines. A questionnaire comprising of 24 statements relating to perceived qualities of effective teachers was prepared and used. The study population included the faculty of medicine and dentistry at the institution. Respondents were asked to mark their response to each statement based on a 5-point Likert scale ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree. These statements were grouped these into four main subgroups, viz. Class room behaviour/instructional delivery, interaction with students, personal qualities and professional development, and analysed with respect to discipline, cultural background, gender and teaching experience using SPSS v 13.0. For bivariate analysis, t-test and one way ANOVA were used. Multiple linear regression for multivariate analysis was used to control confounding variables. The top three desirable qualities of an effective teacher in our study were knowledge of subject, enthusiasm and communication skills. Faculty with longer teaching experienced ranked classroom behaviour/instructional delivery higher than their less experienced counterparts. There was no difference of perspectives based on cultural background, gender or discipline (medicine and dentistry). This study found that the faculty perspectives were similar, regardless of the discipline, gender and cultural background. Furthermore, on review of literature similar findings are seen in studies done in allied medical and non-medical fields. These findings support common teacher training programs

  17. Effect of community activities on water qualities of the Bangpakong River, Chachoengsao Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paibulkichakul, C.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of community activities on water qualities of the Bangpakong River were investigated. Water from three different areas, Huasai temple, Thayai market and Sothorn temple, were sampled for quality monitoring for its physical, chemical and biological properties during July-September 2004. Analysis of variance was used for data analysis, and Duncan's Multiple Range Test was applied for means comparison at 95% confidence level.The results showed that ranges of dissolved oxygen, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and orthophosphatephosphorus in all stations were 4.10-6.35, 0.022-0.156, 0.012-0.050, 0.084-0.299 and 0.004-0.047 mg/L, res the large food market, had the lowest water quality. Sothorn temple, the well-known tourist temple, had water quality in the middle of the three stations. Huasai temple, the agricultural site, had the best water qualities. The differences of water quality may be caused by the differences of community activities. The other parameters of this study could not clearly indicate the resons for the difference on water qualities.However, water quality from three areas met the Surface Water Quality Standard, class 3. Bangpakong River, the main river of Chachoengsao Province, is not only the source of water supply for households consumption as well as agricultural and industrial activities, but also receives untreated waste water from households, markets and industrial estates. Consequently, unless wastewater has been treated properly before discharging into the Bangpakong River, there will be water pollution in the near future.

  18. Effectiveness of Positive Thinking Training Program on Nurses' Quality of Work Life through Smartphone Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motamed-Jahromi, Mohadeseh; Fereidouni, Zhila; Dehghan, Azizallah

    2017-01-01

    Job stress is a part of nurses' professional life that causes the decrease of the nurses' job satisfaction and quality of work life. This study aimed to determine the effect of positive thinking via social media applications on the nurses' quality of work life. This was a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study design with a control group. The samples were selected among the nurses in two hospitals in Fasa University of Medical Sciences and divided randomly into two interventional ( n = 50) and control ( n = 50) groups. Positive thinking training through telegrams was sent to the intervention group during a period of 3 months. Data were collected by using Brooks and Anderson's questionnaire of work life quality and analyzed by SPSS 18. The mean total scores of pretest and posttest in the intervention group improved noticeably and there were significant differences between mean scores of quality of work life in pretest and posttest scores in interventional groups ( p work life quality, home life ( p work design ( p work context ( p work world ( p = 0.003). This study concluded that positive thinking training via social media application enhanced nurses' quality of work life. This study is necessary to carry out on a larger sample size for generalizing findings better.

  19. Apocynin prevents vascular effects caused by chronic exposure to low concentrations of mercury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danize A Rizzetti

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Mercury increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and oxidative stress and alters vascular reactivity. This metal elicits endothelial dysfunction causing decreased NO bioavailability via increased oxidative stress and contractile prostanoid production. NADPH oxidase is the major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the vasculature. Our aim was to investigate whether treatment with apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, prevents the vascular effects caused by chronic intoxication with low concentrations of mercury. Three-month-old male Wistar rats were treated for 30 days with a intramuscular injections (i.m. of saline; b HgCl(2 (i.m. 1(st dose: 4.6 µg/kg, subsequent doses: 0.07 µg/kg/day; c Apocynin (1.5 mM in drinking water plus saline i.m.; and d Apocynin plus HgCl(2. The mercury treatment resulted in 1 an increased aortic vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine and reduced endothelium-dependent responses to acetylcholine; 2 the increased involvement of ROS and vasoconstrictor prostanoids in response to phenylephrine, whereas the endothelial NO modulation of such responses was reduced; and 3 the reduced activity of aortic superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx and increased plasma malondialdehyde (MDA levels. Treatment with apocynin partially prevented the increased phenylephrine responses and reduced the endothelial dysfunction elicited by mercury treatment. In addition, apocynin treatment increased the NO modulation of vasoconstrictor responses and aortic SOD activity and reduced plasma MDA levels without affecting the increased participation of vasoconstrictor prostanoids observed in aortic segments from mercury-treated rats. CONCLUSIONS: Mercury increases the vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine by reducing NO bioavailability and increasing the involvement of ROS and constrictor prostanoids. Apocynin protects the vessel from the deleterious effects caused by NADPH oxidase, but not from those

  20. ELECTRONIC TEXTBOOK AS AN EFFECTIVE TOOL FOR IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliia M. Shepetko

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of the material stated in article, is caused by requirements for use of information and communication technologies for educational process, in particular the electronic textbook which can facilitate perception of the information, diversify work forms, interest by technical possibilities. The article aims to proof the necessity of  electronic textbooks use as effective tool for improving the quality of education. Use of the electronic textbook at training will effectively and positively affect process of preparation of students taking into account the means of organization of educational process, structure, methodological requirements. Application of the electronic textbook at training will promote the further development of informative motivation of students.

  1. The effect of Buspirone on symptoms and quality of life in patients with functional dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed masood Tabib

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Functional dyspepsia (FD is a heterogeneous disorder of yet unknown etiology which causes a significant reduction in the quality of life. In this study, we compared the effect of buspirone as an agonist of serotonin 5HT1A receptor with amitriptyline and placebo on improving the symptoms and quality of life in patients with functional dyspepsia. Methods: This study was a double-blinded, randomized controlled clinical trial. Using a sequential sampling, patients with the diagnostic criteria of Rome 2 and normal gastrointestinal findings were selected. The subjects were randomly divided into three therapeutic groups receiving amitriptyline, buspirone, and placebo. We used Nepean Dyspepsia Inde (NDI to evaluate the quality of life before and after the treatment. Results: The mean age of subjects was 35.38±12.94 years. Symptom and quality of life scores of the three groups were equal at the beginning but at the end of treatment, these scores were different. Buspirone was more effective than both amitriptyline and placebo in reducing the symptom of early satiety. Buspirone showed a better improvement in quality of life compared to placebo. Both Buspirone and amitriptyline were more effective than placebo in decreasing the symptom of epigastric pain. Conclusion: Our study confirmed the positive effect of buspirone on the quality of life and symptoms (like early satiety and abdominal pain in patients with functional dyspepsia. Since the mechanism of action of buspirone and also the pathophysiology of functional dyspepsia are still unknown, further studies are necessary to clarify every aspect of the disease and therapeutic effects of various treatments on it.

  2. Effect of Gynostemma Pentaphyllum polysaccharide on boar spermatozoa quality following freezing-thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian-Hong; Li, Qing-Wang; Zhang, Ting; Jiang, Zhong-Liang

    2009-12-01

    Gynostemma Pentaphyllum Polysaccharide (GPP) was added at concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/ml to the extenders used to freeze boar semen and its effects on the quality of frozen-thawed sperm were assessed. The sperm motility was significantly higher in the extenders containing 0.25 and 0.5 mg/ml GPP, as compared to other groups (Pextender supplemented with 0.5 mg/ml GPP favored the highest intact membrane and intact acrosome percentages in comparison with other groups (Pextender supplemented with 0.25 and 0.5 mg/ml GPP significantly improved SOD levels, compared to other groups (P>0.05). However, the extenders supplemented with GPP did not cause significant differences in levels of CAT and GSH-Px, compared to the control (P>0.05). In summary, GPP exhibited a dose-related response and the lower concentration produced greater protective effect. According to the standard semen quality parameters and antioxidant activities measured in this study, the concentration of 0.5 mg/ml GPP caused a beneficial cryoprotective effects on the quality of frozen-thawed boar semen. It is proposed that an extender containing 0.5 mg/ml GPP could be used as cryoprotective medium of better efficiency.

  3. Management assessments of Quality Assurance Program implementation effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a method currently being used by UNC Nuclear Industries, Richland, Washington, to help assure the effectiveness of Quality Assurance (QA) Program implementation. Assessments are conducted annually by management in each department, and the results summarized to the president and his staff. The purpose of these assessments is to review the adequacy of the department's implementing procedures, training/instruction on implementing procedures, and procedure implementation effectiveness. The primary purpose is to assess effectiveness and take improvement action where the need is indicated. The QA organization provides only general guidance in conducting the assessments

  4. Effects of Soil Quality Enhancement on Pollinator-Plant Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin J. Cardoza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Both biotic and abiotic factors can affect soil quality, which can significantly impact plant growth, productivity, and resistance to pests. However, the effects of soil quality on the interactions of plants with beneficial arthropods, such as pollinators, have not been extensively examined. We studied the effects of vermicompost (earthworm compost, VC soil amendment on behavioral and physiological responses of pollinators to flowers and floral resources, using cucumbers, Cucumis sativus, as our model system. Results from experiments conducted over three field seasons demonstrated that, in at least two out of three years, VC amendment significantly increased visit length, while reducing the time to first discovery. Bumblebee (Bombus impatiens workers that fed on flowers from VC-amended plants had significantly larger and more active ovaries, a measure of nutritional quality. Pollen fractions of flowers from VC-grown plants had higher protein compared to those of plants grown in chemically fertilized potting soil. Nectar sugar content also tended to be higher in flowers from VC-grown plants, but differences were not statistically significant. In conclusion, soil quality enhancement, as achieved with VC amendment in this study, can significantly affect plant-pollinator interactions and directly influences pollinator nutrition and overall performance.

  5. Effects of freezing conditions on quality changes in blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xuehui; Zhang, Fangfang; Zhao, Dongyu; Zhu, Danshi; Li, Jianrong

    2018-03-12

    Freezing preservation is one of the most effective methods used to maintain the flavour and nutritional value of fruit. This research studied the effects of different freezing conditions, -20 °C, -40 °C, -80 °C, and immersion in liquid nitrogen, on quality changes of freeze-thawed blueberries. The water distribution estimates of blueberries were measured based on low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) analysis. The pectin content, drip loss, and fruit texture were also detected to evaluate quality changes in samples. The freezing curves of blueberry showed super-cooling points at -20 °C and - 40 °C, whereas super-cooling points were not observed at -80 °C or in liquid nitrogen. After freeze-thaw treatment, the relaxation time of the cell wall water (T 21 ), cytoplasm water and extracellular space (T 22 ), and vacuole water (T 23 ) were significantly shortened compared to fresh samples, which suggested a lower liquidity. Although the freezing speed for samples immersed in liquid nitrogen was faster than other treatments, samples treated at -80 °C showed better quality regarding vacuole water holding, drip loss, and original pectin content retention. This study contributed to understanding how freezing temperature affects the qualities of blueberries. The super-fast freezing rate might injure fruit, and an appropriate freezing rate could better preserve blueberries. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. A Study of Air Quality and its Effect on Health: A Geographical Perspective of Lucknow city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak Prasad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Erudite groups of people, scientists, planners, and policy-makers of different countries have come to realise that quality of environment is not necessarily a simple function of nature as in primitive earth. Today nature’s self-regulatory functions are inoperative. All the developed and developing countries are deeply concerned to make balance between their environmental anxiety and their economic development. Dreadful environmental conditions are affecting the biological segment of the ecosystem of these areas. Human being, ‘one of the most precious component in biosphere’, have regular predicament situation with accretion of sullied air, water, and soil degradation. Though water and land pollution is extremely dangerous, air pollution has its own peculiarities, due to its trans-boundary dispersion of pollutants over the entire world. The effect of air pollution on health is very complex as there are many different sources and their individual effect varying from one to other. It is not only the ambient air quality in the cities but also the indoor air quality in the rural and urban areas that are causing concern. The study is confined with the health impact of deteriorating air quality in Lucknow city. The aim of the present study is also to determine the consequences of ambient air quality on health of the people in the study area.

  7. Effect of antioxidant inclusion and oil quality on broiler performance, meat quality, and lipid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavárez, M A; Boler, D D; Bess, K N; Zhao, J; Yan, F; Dilger, A C; McKeith, F K; Killefer, J

    2011-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of antioxidant inclusion and oil quality on broiler performance, meat quality, shelf life, and tissue oxidative status. Ross 308 male broilers were allotted to a randomized complete block design in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Factors consisted of antioxidant (ethoxyquin and propyl gallate) inclusion at 2 levels (0 or 135 mg/kg) and oil quality (fresh soybean oil, control diet peroxide value dressing percentage (P = 0.906), breast yield (P = 0.708), or breast ultimate pH (P = 0.625) and had minimal effect on breast color. Antioxidant supplementation (P = 0.057) reduced breast thiobarbituric acid reactive substances after 7 d of display. Fresh oil decreased liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, whereas antioxidant inclusion increased serum and liver vitamin A and E concentration. The presence of an antioxidant in the feed protects lipids from further oxidizing, therefore increasing broiler performance and improving shelf life when using oxidized oil.

  8. Faculty Perceptions of Online Teaching Effectiveness and Indicators of Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Frazer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Online education programs in nursing are increasing rapidly. Faculty need to be competent in their role and possess the skills necessary to positively impact student outcomes. Existing research offers effective teaching strategies for online education; however, there may be some disconnect in the application of these strategies and faculty perceptions of associated outcomes. Focus groups were formed to uncover how nursing faculty in an online program define and describe teaching effectiveness and quality indicators in an asynchronous online environment. A semistructured interview format guided group discussion. Participants (n=11 included nurse educators from an online university with an average of 15 years of experience teaching in nursing academia and 6 years in an online environment. Teaching effectiveness, indicators of quality, and student success were three categories that emerged from the analysis of data. What materialized from the analysis was an overarching concept of a “dance” that occurs in the online environment. Effective online teachers facilitate, connect, lead, and work in synchrony with students to obtain indicators of quality such as student success, student improvement over time, and student application of knowledge to the professional role.

  9. Cost effectiveness of adopted quality requirements in hospital laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Alneil; Ahmed-Abakur, Eltayib; Abugroun, Elsir; Bakhit, Siham; Holi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed in quasi-experiment to assess adoption of the essential clauses of particular clinical laboratory quality management requirements based on international organization for standardization (ISO 15189) in hospital laboratories and to evaluate the cost effectiveness of compliance to ISO 15189. The quality management intervention based on ISO 15189 was conceded through three phases; pre - intervention phase, Intervention phase and Post-intervention phase. In pre-intervention phase the compliance to ISO 15189 was 49% for study group vs. 47% for control group with P value 0.48, while the post intervention results displayed 54% vs. 79% for study group and control group respectively in compliance to ISO 15189 and statistically significant difference (P value 0.00) with effect size (Cohen's d) of (0.00) in pre-intervention phase and (0.99) in post - intervention phase. The annual average cost per-test for the study group and control group was 1.80 ± 0.25 vs. 1.97 ± 0.39, respectively with P value 0.39 whereas the post-intervention results showed that the annual average total costs per-test for study group and control group was 1.57 ± 0.23 vs 2.08 ± 0.38, P value 0.019 respectively, with cost-effectiveness ratio of (0.88) in pre -intervention phase and (0.52) in post-intervention phase. The planned adoption of quality management requirements (QMS) in clinical laboratories had great effect to increase the compliance percent with quality management system requirement, raise the average total cost effectiveness, and improve the analytical process capability of the testing procedure.

  10. [Evaluation of Cellular Effects Caused by Lunar Regolith Simulant Including Fine Particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Masanori; Miki, Takeo; Honma, Yoshiyuki; Aoki, Shigeru; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has announced a plan to establish a manned colony on the surface of the moon, and our country, Japan, has declared its participation. The surface of the moon is covered with soil called lunar regolith, which includes fine particles. It is possible that humans will inhale lunar regolith if it is brought into the spaceship. Therefore, an evaluation of the pulmonary effects caused by lunar regolith is important for exploration of the moon. In the present study, we examine the cellular effects of lunar regolith simulant, whose components are similar to those of lunar regolith. We focused on the chemical component and particle size in particular. The regolith simulant was fractionated to lunar regolith simulant such as cell membrane damage, induction of oxidative stress and proinflammatory effect.

  11. Mentally walking through doorways causes forgetting: The location updating effect and imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Zachary; Peterson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have documented an intriguing phenomenon whereby simply walking through a doorway causes forgetting (the location updating effect). The Event Horizon Model is the most commonly cited theory to explain these data. Importantly, this model explains the effect without invoking the importance or reliance upon perceptual information (i.e., seeing oneself pass through the doorway). This generates the intriguing hypothesis that the effect may be demonstrated in participants who simply imagine walking through a doorway. Across two experiments, we explicitly test this hypothesis. Participants familiarised themselves with both real (Experiment 1) and virtual (Experiment 2) environments which served as the setting for their mental walk. They were then provided with an image to remember and were instructed to imagine themselves walking through the previously presented space. In both experiments, when the mental walk required participants to pass through a doorway, more forgetting occurred, consistent with the predictions laid out in the Event Horizon Model.

  12. Theoretical Investigation For The Effect of Fuel Quality on Gas Turbine Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdulRazzak khudair, Omar; Alwan Abass, Khetam; Saadi Abed, Noor; Hussain Ali, Khalid; AbdulAziz, Saad; Chlaib Shaboot, Ali

    2018-05-01

    Gas turbine engine power generation is declined dramatically because of the reduction in thermodynamic parameters as a work of turbine, compressor ratio, compressor work, and air mass flow rate and fuel consumption. There are two main objectives of this work, the first is related with the effect of fuel kinds and their quality on the operation of fuel flow divider and its performance specifically gear pump displacement and fuel flow rate to the combustion chambers of gas power plant. AL-DORA gas turbine power plant 35MW was chosen to predict these effects on its performance MATLAB Software program is used to perform thermodynamic calculations. Fuel distribution stage before the process of combustion and as a result of the kind and its quality, chemical reaction will occur between the fuel and the parts of the gear system of each pump of the flow divider, which causes the erosion of the internal pump wall and the teeth of the gear system, thus hampering the pump operation in terms of fuel discharge. The discharge of fuel form the eight external gates of flow divider is decreased and varied when going to the combustion chambers, so that, flow divider does not give reliable mass flow rate due to absence of accurate pressure in each of eight exit pipes. The second objective deals with the stage of fuel combustion process inside the combustion chamber. A comparative study based upon performance parameters, such as specific fuel consumption for gas and gasoil and power generation. Fuel poor quality causes incomplete combustion and increased its consumption, so that combustion products are interacted with the surface of the turbine blades, causing the erosion and create surface roughness of the blade and disruption of gas flow. As a result of this situation, turbulence flow of these gases will increase causing the separation of gas boundary layers over the suction surface of the blade. Therefore the amount of extracted gas will decrease causing retreat work done by

  13. Effect of HMM Glutenin Subunits on Wheat Quality Attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Horvat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutenin is a group of polymeric gluten proteins. Glutenin molecules consist of glutenin subunits linked together with disulphide bonds and having higher (HMM-GS and lower (LMM-GS molecular mass. The main objective of this study is the evaluation of the influence of HMM-GS on flour processing properties. Seven bread wheat genotypes with contrasting quality attributes and different HMM-GS composition were analyzed during three years. The composition and quantity of HMM-GS were determined by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC, respectively. The quality diversity among genotypes was estimated by the analysis of wheat grain, and flour and bread quality parameters. The presence of HMM glutenin subunits 1 and 2* at Glu-A1 and the subunits 5+10 at Glu-D1 loci, as well as a higher proportion of total HMM-GS, had a positive effect on wheat quality. Cluster analysis of the three groups of data (genotype and HMM-GS, flour and bread quality, and dough rheology yielded the same hierarchical structure for the first top three levels, and similarity of the corresponding dendrograms was proved by the principal eigenvalues of the corresponding Euclidian distance matrices. The obtained similarity in classification based on essentially different types of measurements reflects strong natural association between genetic data, product quality and physical properties. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to effectively reduce large data set into lower dimensions of latent variables amenable for the analysis. PCA analysis of the total set of data (15 variables revealed a very strong interrelationship between the variables. The first three PCA components accounted for 96 % of the total variance, which was significant to the level of 0.05 and was considered as the level of experimental error. These data imply that the quality of wheat cultivars can be contributed to HMM-GS data and should be taken into account in breeding programs assisted by computer models with the aim to

  14. Minimal vascular flows cause strong heat sink effects in hepatic radiofrequency ablation ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Kai S; Poch, Franz G M; Rieder, Christian; Schenk, Andrea; Stroux, Andrea; Frericks, Bernd B; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Holmer, Christoph; Kreis, Martin E; Ritz, Jörg P; Zurbuchen, Urte

    2016-08-01

    The present paper aims to assess the lower threshold of vascular flow rate on the heat sink effect in bipolar radiofrequency ablation (RFA) ex vivo. Glass tubes (vessels) of 3.4 mm inner diameter were introduced in parallel to bipolar RFA applicators into porcine liver ex vivo. Vessels were perfused with flow rates of 0 to 1,500 ml/min. RFA (30 W power, 15 kJ energy input) was carried out at room temperature and 37°C. Heat sink effects were assessed in RFA cross sections by the decrease in ablation radius, area and by a high-resolution sector planimetry. Flow rates of 1 ml/min already caused a significant cooling effect (P ≤ 0.001). The heat sink effect reached a maximum at 10 ml/min (18.4 mm/s) and remained stable for flow rates up to 1,500 ml/min. Minimal vascular flows of ≥1 ml/min cause a significant heat sink effect in hepatic RFA ex vivo. A lower limit for volumetric flow rate was not found. The maximum of the heat sink effect was reached at a flow rate of 10 ml/min and remained stable for flow rates up to 1,500 ml/min. Hepatic inflow occlusion should be considered in RFA close to hepatic vessels. © 2016 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  15. Total Quality Management in Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    1989. I Ishikawa , Kaoru . Guide to Quality Control. White Plains, New York: Asian Productivity Organization, 1982. 5 Kelso, Frank B. II, Admiral...category are explored to determine the most significant causes which produce the effect. Figure 24 shows a typical cause-and effect diagram. Kaoru ... Ishikawa describes cause-and-effect diagrams as I an effective tool "to clearly illustrate the various causes I affecting quality by sorting out and relating

  16. Differences of Rotavirus Vaccine Effectiveness by Country: Likely Causes and Contributing Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Desselberger

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses are a major cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children worldwide and in many other mammalian and avian host species. Since 2006, two live-attenuated rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix® and RotaTeq®, have been licensed in >100 countries and are applied as part of extended program of vaccination (EPI schemes of childhood vaccinations. Whereas the vaccines have been highly effective in high-income countries, they were shown to be considerably less potent in low- and middle-income countries. Rotavirus-associated disease was still the cause of death in >200,000 children of <5 years of age worldwide in 2013, and the mortality is concentrated in countries of sub-Saharan Africa and S.E. Asia. Various factors that have been identified or suggested as being involved in the differences of rotavirus vaccine effectiveness are reviewed here. Recognition of these factors will help to achieve gradual worldwide improvement of rotavirus vaccine effectiveness.

  17. An economic assessment of the health effects and crop yield losses caused by air pollution in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Weijie; Huang, Xin; Song, Yu

    2017-06-01

    Air pollution is severe in China, and pollutants such as PM 2.5 and surface O 3 may cause major damage to human health and crops, respectively. Few studies have considered the health effects of PM 2.5 or the loss of crop yields due to surface O 3 using model-simulated air pollution data in China. We used gridded outputs from the WRF-Chem model, high resolution population data, and crop yield data to evaluate the effects on human health and crop yield in mainland China. Our results showed that outdoor PM 2.5 pollution was responsible for 1.70-1.99 million cases of all-cause mortality in 2006. The economic costs of these health effects were estimated to be 151.1-176.9 billion USD, of which 90% were attributed to mortality. The estimated crop yield losses for wheat, rice, maize, and soybean were approximately 9, 4.6, 0.44, and 0.34 million tons, respectively, resulting in economic losses of 3.4 billion USD. The total economic losses due to ambient air pollution were estimated to be 154.5-180.3 billion USD, accounting for approximately 5.7%-6.6% of the total GDP of China in 2006. Our results show that both population health and staple crop yields in China have been significantly affected by exposure to air pollution. Measures should be taken to reduce emissions, improve air quality, and mitigate the economic loss. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Theoretical studies of finite size effects and screening effects caused by a STM tip in Luettinger liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigou, Marine

    2009-01-01

    This thesis takes place in the field of condensed matter. More precisely, we focus on the finite size effects and the screening effects caused by a STM tip in a quantum wire. For that, we use, first, the Luettinger liquid theory, which allows to describe strongly correlated systems and secondly, the Keldysh formalism, which is necessary to treat the out-of-equilibrium systems. For these studies, we consider, the currant, the noise and the conductance. The noise presents a non-Poissonian behaviour, when finite size effects appear. Through the photo-assisted transport, it is shown that those effects hide the effects of the Coulomb interactions. Considering the proximity between the STM tip, used as a probe or as an injector, and a quantum wire, screening effects appear. We can conclude that they play a similar role to those of Coulomb interactions. (author) [fr

  19. Natural Disasters under the Form of Severe Storms in Europe: the Cause-Effect Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Câmpeanu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available For more than 100 years, from 1900 to 2008, there were almost 400 storms natural disasters in Europe, 40% of which occurred in the 1990s. The international prognoses for the world weather suggest a tendency toward increasing in frequency and intensity of the severe storms as the climate warms. In these circumstances, for a researcher in the field of Environmental Economics, a natural question occurs, on whether people can contribute to reducing the frequency and the magnitude of severe storms that produce disastreous social and economic effects, by acting on their causes. In researching an answer to support the public policies in the field, a cause-effect analysis applied to Europe might make a contribution to the literature in the field. This especially considering the fact that international literature regarding the factors influencing global warming contains certainties in regard to the natural factors of influence, but declared incertitudes or skepticism in regard to anthropogenic ones. Skepticism, and even tension arised during the international negotiations in Copenhagen (December 2009 in regard to the agreement for limiting global warming, with doubts being raised about the methods used by experts of the International Climate Experts Group (GIEC, and thus the results obtained, which served as a basis for the negotiations. The object of critics was in regard to the form, and at times in regard to the content. It was not about contesting the phenomenon of Global warming during the negotiations, but the methods of calculation. The methodology relies on qualitative (type top down and quantitative (type correlations bottom up cause-effect analysis of the storm disasters in Europe. Based on the instruments used, we proposed a dynamic model of association of the evolution of storm disasters in Europe with anthropogenic factors, with 3 variants. Results: The diagram cause-effect (Ishikawa or fishbone diagram and quantitative correlation of sub

  20. Causes and Effects in Macroeconomics: 2011 Nobel Prize Lecture in Economic Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlair Abdulkhaleq Al-Zanganee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Noble Laureates Thomas Sargent and Christopher Sims have been granted the 2011 Noble Prize in economic sciences in appreciation of their empirical research on causes and effects in macroeconomics. The controversy on causality in macroeconomics was discussed in both of Sargent’s and Sims’s 2011 Prize lectures. While Sargent attempts to use the economic theory to interpret some historical events in order to gain insights on some contemporary issues, such as sovereign defaults, federal bailouts, and the coordination of monetary and fiscal policies, Sims is emphasizing the importance of large-scale economic models and calling for more research to be done in that area.

  1. Arsenic contamination of underground water in Bangladesh: cause, effect, separation, determination and remedy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of underground water of Bangladesh has become the gravest concern for the lives of millions of people of this land. Probable causes and effects of arsenic contamination of underground water of Bangladesh have been extensively discussed. The extent of current knowledge regarding the specification of arsenic in environmental waters in delineated. A simple, non-extractive, highly sensitive and selective quench photometric methods for the rapid determination of arsenic at trace levels in aqueous medium has been developed. This paper also presents a short review of the technologies used for arsenic removal of underground water in Bangladesh. (author)

  2. An improved probit method for assessment of domino effect to chemical process equipment caused by overpressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingguang, Zhang; Juncheng, Jiang

    2008-10-30

    Overpressure is one important cause of domino effect in accidents of chemical process equipments. Damage probability and relative threshold value are two necessary parameters in QRA of this phenomenon. Some simple models had been proposed based on scarce data or oversimplified assumption. Hence, more data about damage to chemical process equipments were gathered and analyzed, a quantitative relationship between damage probability and damage degrees of equipment was built, and reliable probit models were developed associated to specific category of chemical process equipments. Finally, the improvements of present models were evidenced through comparison with other models in literatures, taking into account such parameters: consistency between models and data, depth of quantitativeness in QRA.

  3. Aberration of a negative ion beam caused by space charge effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Wada, S; Hatayama, A

    2010-02-01

    Aberrations are inevitable when the charged particle beams are extracted, accelerated, transmitted, and focused with electrostatic and magnetic fields. In this study, we investigate the aberration of a negative ion accelerator for a neutral beam injector theoretically, especially the spherical aberration caused by the negative ion beam expansion due to the space charge effect. The negative ion current density profiles with the spherical aberration are compared with those without the spherical aberration. It is found that the negative ion current density profiles in a log scale are tailed due to the spherical aberration.

  4. Aberration of a negative ion beam caused by space charge effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, K.; Wada, S.; Hatayama, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrations are inevitable when the charged particle beams are extracted, accelerated, transmitted, and focused with electrostatic and magnetic fields. In this study, we investigate the aberration of a negative ion accelerator for a neutral beam injector theoretically, especially the spherical aberration caused by the negative ion beam expansion due to the space charge effect. The negative ion current density profiles with the spherical aberration are compared with those without the spherical aberration. It is found that the negative ion current density profiles in a log scale are tailed due to the spherical aberration.

  5. Aberration of a negative ion beam caused by space charge effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, K. [Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan); Wada, S.; Hatayama, A. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Aberrations are inevitable when the charged particle beams are extracted, accelerated, transmitted, and focused with electrostatic and magnetic fields. In this study, we investigate the aberration of a negative ion accelerator for a neutral beam injector theoretically, especially the spherical aberration caused by the negative ion beam expansion due to the space charge effect. The negative ion current density profiles with the spherical aberration are compared with those without the spherical aberration. It is found that the negative ion current density profiles in a log scale are tailed due to the spherical aberration.

  6. The Universal Causes and Effects of Women's Empowerment for Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Vildö, Lovisa

    2017-01-01

    Women’s empowerment has been thoroughly discussed during the last two decades, yet the research on the components of empowerment on the national level is still lacking. This paper aims to fill that gap by investigating which national causes and effects of women’s empowerment that are generally visible across developing countries. Previous studies on meso- and micro level have shown that an increase in women’s education, an increase in women’s economic independence as well as a strong legal fr...

  7. Effect of low emission sources on air quality in Cracow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedoma, J. [EKOPOL Environmental Engineering Studies and Design Office, Co. Ltd., Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents calculation of power engineering low emission and results of stimulation of the effect of this emission on air quality in Cracow, Poland. It has been stated that the segment of low emission in central areas of the town makes up ca. 40% of the observed concentration of sulfur dioxide. Furthermore it has been stated that the capital investment must be concentrated in the central part of the town in order to reach noticeable improvement of air quality in Cracow. Neither the output of a separate power source nor the emission level and its individual harmful effect, but the location of the source and especially packing density of the sources must decide the priority of upgrading actions.

  8. Effect of light quality on somatic embryogenesis of quince leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Onofrio, C.; Morini, S.; Bellocchi, G.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of light quality on somatic embryogenesis in quince BA 29 was investigated. 2,4-D induced leaves were exposed for 25 days to the following light quality treatments: dark, far-red, far-red+blue, far-red+red, blue, white, red+blue, red. After a further 20 days of white light exposure, somatic embryo production was recorded. Somatic embryogenesis was highest in cultures subjected to red light treatment, and decreased progressively with the transition to red+blue and to white. Overall, embryogenic competence showed a correlation with photoequilibrium. Phytochrome appeared to be inductive although this effect was adversely influenced by the blue absorbing photoreceptor, in particular at low photoequilibrium. Independently of light treatments applied, somatic embryos frequently showed severe morphological abnormalities. Conversion of somatic embryos to plantlets was not observed. (author)

  9. Ferrite bead effect on Class-D amplifier audio quality

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad , Kevin El; Mrad , Roberto; Morel , Florent; Pillonnet , Gael; Vollaire , Christian; Nagari , Angelo

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This paper studies the effect of ferrite beads on the audio quality of Class-D audio amplifiers. This latter is a switch-ing circuit which creates high frequency harmonics. Generally, a filter is used at the amplifier output for the sake of electro-magnetic compatibility (EMC). So often, in integrated solutions, this filter contains ferrite beads which are magnetic components and present nonlinear behavior. Time domain measurements and their equivalence in frequency do...

  10. Root causes, clinical effects, and outcomes of unintentional exposures to buprenorphine by young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavonas, Eric J; Banner, William; Bradt, Pamela; Bucher-Bartelson, Becki; Brown, Kimberly R; Rajan, Pradeep; Murrelle, Lenn; Dart, Richard C; Green, Jody L

    2013-11-01

    To characterize the rates, root causes, and clinical effects of unintentional exposures to buprenorphine sublingual formulations among young children and to determine whether exposure characteristics differ between formulations. Unintentional exposures to buprenorphine-containing products among children 28 days to less than 6 years old were collected from the Researched Abuse, Diversion, and Addiction-Related Surveillance System Poison Center Program and Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals' pharmacovigilance system from October 2009-March 2012. After adjustment for drug availability, negative binomial regression was used to estimate average exposure rates. Root cause assessment was conducted, and an expert clinician panel adjudicated causality and severity of moderate to severe adverse events (AEs). A total of 2380 cases were reviewed, including 4 deaths. Exposures to buprenorphine-naloxone combination film were significantly less frequent than exposures to buprenorphine tablets (rate ratio 3.5 [95% CI, 2.7-4.5]) and buprenorphine-naloxone combination tablets (rate ratio 8.8 [7.2-10.6]). The most commonly identified root causes were medication stored in sight, accessed from a bag or purse, and not stored in the original packaging. Among 536 panel review cases, the most common AEs reported for all formulations were lethargy, respiratory depression, miosis, and vomiting. The highest level AE severity did not differ significantly by formulation. Unintentional exposure to buprenorphine can cause central nervous system depression, respiratory depression, and death in young children. Exposure rates to film formulations are significantly less than to tablet formulations. Package and storage deficiencies contribute to unintentional exposures in young children. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pentachlorophenol exposure causes Warburg-like effects in zebrafish embryos at gastrulation stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Jing; Hu, Ping; Dong, Zhangji; Li, Jingyun; Zhang, Hongchang; Yin, Daqiang; Zhao, Qingshun

    2014-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a prevalent pollutant in the environment and has been demonstrated to be a serious toxicant to humans and animals. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanism underlying its toxic effects on vertebrate early development. To explore the impacts and underlying mechanisms of PCP on early development, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to PCP at concentrations of 0, 20 and 50 μg/L, and microscopic observation and cDNA microarray analysis were subsequently conducted at gastrulation stage. The morphological observations revealed that PCP caused a developmental delay of zebrafish embryos in a concentration-dependent manner. Transcriptomic data showed that 50 μg/L PCP treatment resulted in significant changes in gene expression level, and the genes involved in energy metabolism and cell behavior were identified based on gene functional enrichment analysis. The energy production of embryos was influenced by PCP via the activation of glycolysis along with the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). The results suggested that PCP acts as an inhibitor of OXPHOS at 8 hpf (hours postfertilization). Consistent with the activated glycolysis, the cell cycle activity of PCP-treated embryos was higher than the controls. These characteristics are similar to the Warburg effect, which occurs in human tumors. The microinjection of exogenous ATP confirmed that an additional energy supply could rescue PCP-treated embryos from the developmental delay due to the energy deficit. Taken together, our results demonstrated that PCP causes a Warburg-like effect on zebrafish embryos during gastrulation, and the affected embryos had the phenotype of developmental delay. - Highlights: • We treat zebrafish embryos with PCP at gastrula stage. • PCP acts as an oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor, not an uncoupler, in gastrulation. • Exogenous ATP injection will rescue the development of effected embryos. • The transcriptome of PCP

  12. Pentachlorophenol exposure causes Warburg-like effects in zebrafish embryos at gastrulation stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Jing [Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Hu, Ping [Key Laboratory of Model Animal for Disease Study, Ministry of Education, Model Animal Research Center, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210061 (China); State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Prenatal Diagnosis, Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Dong, Zhangji; Li, Jingyun [Key Laboratory of Model Animal for Disease Study, Ministry of Education, Model Animal Research Center, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210061 (China); Zhang, Hongchang [Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Yin, Daqiang, E-mail: yindq@tongji.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhao, Qingshun, E-mail: qingshun@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Model Animal for Disease Study, Ministry of Education, Model Animal Research Center, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210061 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a prevalent pollutant in the environment and has been demonstrated to be a serious toxicant to humans and animals. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanism underlying its toxic effects on vertebrate early development. To explore the impacts and underlying mechanisms of PCP on early development, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to PCP at concentrations of 0, 20 and 50 μg/L, and microscopic observation and cDNA microarray analysis were subsequently conducted at gastrulation stage. The morphological observations revealed that PCP caused a developmental delay of zebrafish embryos in a concentration-dependent manner. Transcriptomic data showed that 50 μg/L PCP treatment resulted in significant changes in gene expression level, and the genes involved in energy metabolism and cell behavior were identified based on gene functional enrichment analysis. The energy production of embryos was influenced by PCP via the activation of glycolysis along with the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). The results suggested that PCP acts as an inhibitor of OXPHOS at 8 hpf (hours postfertilization). Consistent with the activated glycolysis, the cell cycle activity of PCP-treated embryos was higher than the controls. These characteristics are similar to the Warburg effect, which occurs in human tumors. The microinjection of exogenous ATP confirmed that an additional energy supply could rescue PCP-treated embryos from the developmental delay due to the energy deficit. Taken together, our results demonstrated that PCP causes a Warburg-like effect on zebrafish embryos during gastrulation, and the affected embryos had the phenotype of developmental delay. - Highlights: • We treat zebrafish embryos with PCP at gastrula stage. • PCP acts as an oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor, not an uncoupler, in gastrulation. • Exogenous ATP injection will rescue the development of effected embryos. • The transcriptome of PCP

  13. Effect of Store and Forward Teledermatology on Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, John D.; Warshaw, Erin M.; Edison, Karen E.; Kapur, Kush; Thottapurathu, Lizy; Raju, Srihari; Cook, Bethany; Engasser, Holly; Pullen, Samantha; Parks, Patricia; Sindowski, Tom; Motyka, Danuta; Brown, Rodney; Moritz, Thomas E.; Datta, Santanu K.; Chren, Mary-Margaret; Marty, Lucinda; Reda, Domenic J.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Although research on quality of life and dermatologic conditions is well represented in the literature, information on teledermatology’s effect on quality of life is virtually absent. Objective To determine the effect of store and forward teledermatology on quality of life. Design Two-site, parallel-group, superiority randomized controlled trial. Setting Dermatology clinics and affiliated sites of primary care at 2 US Department of Veterans Affairs medical facilities. Participants Patients being referred to a dermatology clinic were randomly assigned, stratified by site, to teledermatology or the conventional consultation process. Among the 392 patients who met the inclusion criteria and were randomized, 326 completed the allocated intervention and were included in the analysis. Interventions Store and forward teledermatology (digital images and a standardized history) or conventional text-based consultation processes were used to manage the dermatology consultations. Patients were followed up for 9 months. Main Outcome Measures The primary end point was change in Skindex-16 scores, a skin-specific quality-of-life instrument, between baseline and 9 months. A secondary end point was change in Skindex-16 scores between baseline and 3 months. Results Patients in both randomization groups demonstrated a clinically significant improvement in Skindex-16 scores between baseline and 9 months with no significant difference by randomization group (P=.66, composite score). No significant difference in Skindex-16 scores by randomization group between baseline and 3 months was found (P=.39, composite score). Conclusions Compared with the conventional consultation process, store and forward teledermatology did not result in a statistically significant difference in skin-related quality of life at 3 or 9 months after referral. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00488293 PMID:23426111

  14. Quality of underground water and hydro-geological situation caused by oil exploitation in the area of Kikinda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pašić Milana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous oil fields were discovered in the area of North Banat and its regional centre, the city of Kikinda. These oil fields were explored and exploited in the second half of the XX century. Oil rigs in the area of the city zone can endanger the environment, as well as the quality of life of the citizens. In order to discover the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon we have applied GC/MSD technique, whereas we have applied GC/MSD Purge and trap. technique to discover the presence of aromatic hydrocarbon. Chemical analyses of water samples from the area of Kikinda did nit prove that underground water was polluted with oil. .

  15. Multiple lines of evidence to identify sewage as the cause of water quality impairment in an urbanized tropical watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirs, Marek; Kisand, Veljo; Wong, Mayee; Caffaro-Filho, Roberto A; Moravcik, Philip; Harwood, Valerie J; Yoneyama, Bunnie; Fujioka, Roger S

    2017-06-01

    Indicator bacteria, which are conventionally used to evaluate recreational water quality, can originate from various non-human enteric and extra-enteric sources, hence they may not be indicative of human health risk nor do they provide information on the sources of contamination. In this study we utilized traditional (enterococci and Escherichia coli) and alternative (Clostridium perfringens) indicator bacteria, F + -specific coliphage, molecular markers for microorganisms associated with human sewage (human-associated Bacteroides and polyomaviruses), and microbial community analysis tools (16S rRNA gene fragment amplicon sequencing), to identify and evaluate human sewage-related impact in the Manoa watershed in Honolulu, Hawaii. Elevated concentrations of enterococci (geometric mean ranging from 1604 to 2575 CFU 100 mL -1 ) and C. perfringens (45-77 CFU 100 mL -1 ) indicated impairment of the urbanized section of the stream, while indicator bacteria concentrations decreased downstream in the tidally influenced Ala Wai Canal. The threshold values triggering water quality violation notifications in Hawaii were exceeded in 33.3-75.0% of samples collected at sites in the urbanized section of Manoa Stream, but were not exceeded in any of the samples collected at an upstream site located in a forested area. Correlation between indicator bacteria concentrations and rainfall amounts was weak to moderate but significant (E. coli R = 0.251, P = 0.009; enterococci R = 0.369, P watershed, it was lower in the impaired section. Leaking sewer systems and illegal cross-connections are implicated in the impairment of the watershed, hence both the sewer and the storm water lines should be routinely inspected. Collectively, our data suggest that information derived from the analysis of microbial communities complements current marker-based microbial source tracking techniques and environmental monitoring programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative effects of gamma irradiation and phosphine fumigation on the quality of white ginseng

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, J.-H.Joong-Ho; Byun, M.-W.Myung-Woo; Kim, K.-S.Kang-Soo; Kang, I.-J.Il-Jun

    2000-03-01

    The hygienic, physicochemical, and organoleptic qualities of white ginseng were monitored during 6 months under accelerated conditions (40 deg. C, 90% r.h.) by observing its microbial populations, disinfestation, and some quality attributes following either gamma irradiation at 2.5-10 kGy or commercial phosphine (PH{sub 3}) fumigation. In a comparative study, both treatments were found to be effective for disinfecting the stored samples. Phosphine showed no appreciable decontaminating effects on microorganisms contaminated including coliforms, while 5 kGy irradiation was sufficient to control all microorganisms related to the quality of the packed samples. Irradiation at 5 kGy caused negligible changes in physicochemical attributes of the samples, such as ginsenosides, amino acids, fatty acids, and organoleptic properties, whereas phosphine fumigation was found detrimental to sensory flavor (P<0.01). Quality deterioration occurred in the commercially-packed samples was in the following order: the control, 10 kGy-, phosphine-, and 2.5-5 kGy-treated samples. Accordingly, irradiation at <5 kGy was found to be an effective alternative to phosphine fumigation for white ginseng. (author)

  17. Effects of different plant growth regulators on blueberry fruit quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. C.; Zhu, Y. Q.; Wang, Y. N.; Luo, C.; Wang, X.

    2017-08-01

    In order to understand the effects of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) on blueberry fruit growth, various concentrations of Abscisic acid (ABA), Methyl jasmonate (MJ), Brassinolide (BR), Melatonin (MT) were sprayed on blueberry cv. ‘Brigita’ fruits. The results showed that all the PGRs put into effect on improving the quality of blueberry fruit. Comparing with the control plants no PGR spraying,300 mg/L of MT treatment promoted effectively accumulation of the soluble sugar. ABA 20mg/L treatment in-creased effectively accumulation of anthocyanin, and significantly decreased titratable acid content. The treatment of MJ 10mg/L improved significantly the soluble solid content. The effect of the four PGRs treatments on appearance did not show obvious difference.

  18. Water quality effects of intermittent water supply in Arraiján, Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, John J; Smith, Charlotte D; Goodridge, Amador; Nelson, Kara L

    2017-05-01

    Intermittent drinking water supply is common in low- and middle-income countries throughout the world and can cause water quality to degrade in the distribution system. In this study, we characterized water quality in one study zone with continuous supply and three zones with intermittent supply in the drinking water distribution network in Arraiján, Panama. Low or zero pressures occurred in all zones, and negative pressures occurred in the continuous zone and two of the intermittent zones. Despite hydraulic conditions that created risks for backflow and contaminant intrusion, only four of 423 (0.9%) grab samples collected at random times were positive for total coliform bacteria and only one was positive for E. coli. Only nine of 496 (1.8%) samples had turbidity >1.0 NTU and all samples had ≥0.2 mg/L free chlorine residual. In contrast, water quality was often degraded during the first-flush period (when supply first returned after an outage). Still, routine and first-flush water quality under intermittent supply was much better in Arraiján than that reported in a previous study conducted in India. Better water quality in Arraiján could be due to better water quality leaving the treatment plant, shorter supply outages, higher supply pressures, a more consistent and higher chlorine residual, and fewer contaminant sources near pipes. The results illustrate that intermittent supply and its effects on water quality can vary greatly between and within distribution networks. The study also demonstrated that monitoring techniques designed specifically for intermittent supply, such as continuous pressure monitoring and sampling the first flush, can detect water quality threats and degradation that would not likely be detected with conventional monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of different fibers on dough properties and biscuit quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco Canalis, María S; Steffolani, María E; León, Alberto E; Ribotta, Pablo D

    2017-03-01

    This study forms part of a broader project aimed at understanding the role of fibers from different sources in high-fat, high-sugar biscuits and at selecting the best fibers for biscuit quality. The main purpose of this work was to understand the rheological and structural properties involved in fiber-enriched biscuit dough. High-amylose corn starch (RSII), chemically modified starch (RSIV), oat fiber (OF) and inulin (IN) were used at two different levels of incorporation (6 and 12 g) in dough formulation. The influence of fiber on the properties of biscuit dough was studied via dynamic rheological tests, confocal microscopy and spreading behavior. Biscuit quality was assessed by width/thickness factor, texture and surface characteristics, total dietary fiber and sensory evaluation. Main results indicated that IN incorporation increased the capacity of dough spreading during baking and thus improved biscuit quality. OF reduced dough spreading during baking and strongly increased its resistance to deformation. RSII and RSIV slightly affected the quality of the biscuits. Sensory evaluation revealed that the panel liked IN-incorporated biscuits as much as control biscuits. The increase in total dietary fiber modified dough behavior and biscuit properties, and the extent of these effects depended on the type of fiber incorporated. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Sleep disturbance caused by meaningful sounds and the effect of background noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, Seiichiro; Kuwano, Sonoko; Okamoto, Takehisa

    2004-10-01

    To study noise-induced sleep disturbance, a new procedure called "noise interrupted method"has been developed. The experiment is conducted in the bedroom of the house of each subject. The sounds are reproduced with a mini-disk player which has an automatic reverse function. If the sound is disturbing and subjects cannot sleep, they are allowed to switch off the sound 1 h after they start to try to sleep. This switch off (noise interrupted behavior) is an important index of sleep disturbance. Next morning they fill in a questionnaire in which quality of sleep, disturbance of sounds, the time when they switched off the sound, etc. are asked. The results showed a good relationship between L and the percentages of the subjects who could not sleep in an hour and between L and the disturbance reported in the questionnaire. This suggests that this method is a useful tool to measure the sleep disturbance caused by noise under well-controlled conditions.

  1. An Examination of the Causes and Effects of Building Collapse in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oke Ayodeji

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research investigated the causes and consequence of building collapse in Nigeria using historical data from 1974 to 2006 and also proffers appropriate solutions. Relevant books, seminar papers, workshop papers, articles, etc. were reviewed so as to examine the general view of individuals that have worked on similar study. Data for the study were obtained through historical data of past building collapse in Nigeria. The data were presented and analysed using tables, bar graphs, Pearson moment correlation coefficient (r and linear regression analysis to generate a model. Sixty (60 buildings that collapsed in the country were gathered, upon which the analysis was carried out. The study revealed that poor maintenance culture, design error, poor quality of materials and workmanship, natural phenomenon and excessive loading contributed to about 7%, 15%, 52%, 7% and 20% respectively of building collapse in Nigeria with most of them being private residential buildings executed by indigenous contractors. The study finally recommended that Standard Organisation of Nigeria (SON should increase their effort in sanitizing building materials in the market. More so, construction professionals should ensure proper supervision of workmen and efficient checking of materials before incorporation into building works.

  2. Internal risks of factoring business: identification, cause-effect relationships, accounting and management aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Vygivska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article identifies the risks of the economic activity of a factoring company. The identified risks are divided into internal (fraud risk, credit risk, liquidity, nonpayment, staff, supplier's failure to meet the terms of the supply / factoring contract and external (legal, inflation, currency, interest, industry risks, country risk. The cause-effect relationships of the identified risks have been established. The content of information requests of the leading part of the factoring company, as well as the management subsystems (accounting, economic analysis, control and planning, and the direction of information flows between them (to manage the company's internal risks is determined. These proposals contribute to the improvement of accounting and analytical support for risk management of the factoring business, the choice of alternative risk management methods, the impact on their possible consequences, minimizing the negative impact of risks on the financial condition of the company, and establishing the effectiveness of factoring operations under risk.

  3. ξ common cause failure model and method for defense effectiveness estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhaohuan

    1991-08-01

    Two issues have been dealt. One is to develop an event based parametric model called ξ-CCF model. Its parameters are expressed in the fraction of the progressive multiplicities of failure events. By these expressions, the contribution of each multiple failure can be presented more clearly. It can help to select defense tactics against common cause failures. The other is to provide a method which is based on the operational experience and engineering judgement to estimate the effectiveness of defense tactics. It is expressed in terms of reduction matrix for a given tactics on a specific plant in the event by event form. The application of practical example shows that the model in cooperation with the method can simply estimate the effectiveness of defense tactics. It can be easily used by the operators and its application may be extended

  4. Searching for effects caused by thunderstorms in midlatitude sporadic E layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Veronika; Haldoupis, Christos; Sátori, Gabriella; Buresova, Dalia; Chum, Jaroslav; Pozoga, Mariusz; Berényi, Kitti A.; Bór, József; Popek, Martin; Kis, Árpád; Bencze, Pál

    2017-08-01

    Possible thunderstorm - sporadic E (Es) layer coupling effects are investigated during two measurement periods, one in 2013 and one in 2014. The analysis was based on ionospheric observations obtained from a Digisonde at Pruhonice, the Czech Republic, an ionosonde at Nagycenk, Hungary, and a 3.59 MHz five-point continuous HF Doppler system located in the western part of the Czech Republic. The latter is capable of detecting ionospheric wave-like variations caused by neutral atmospheric waves generated by thunderstorms. The present study searches for possible impacts on Es layers caused by the presence of two active thunderstorms: one passing across the Czech Republic on June 20, 2013 (19:00-01:00 LT), and one through Hungary on July 30, 2014 (11:00-01:00 LT). During these two time periods, presence and parameters of Es layer were inferred from ionograms, recorded every minute at Pruhonice and every two minutes at Nagycenk, whereas concurrent lightning activity was monitored by the LINET detection network. In addition, transient luminous events (TLEs) were also observed during both nights from Sopron, Hungary and from Nýdek, the Czech Republic. A noticeable fact was the reduction and disappearance of the ongoing Es layer activity during part of the time in both of the traversing thunderstorms. The analysis indicated that the critical frequency foEs dropped below ionosonde detection levels in both cases, possibly because of thunderstorm activity effects. This option, however, needs more case studies in order to be further substantiated.

  5. Effect of Visual Angle on the Head Movement Caused by Changing Binocular Disparity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Maekawa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that vertical binocular disparity has no or little effect on the perception of visual direction (Banks et al., 2002. On the other hand, our previous study has reported that a continuous change of vertical disparity causes an involuntary sway of the head (Maekawa et al., 2009. We predict that the difference between those results attributes to the dissociation between the processes for perception and action in the brain. The aim of this study is to investigate in more details the condition that influences the process of disparity information. The present experiment particularly varied the visual angle of stimulus presentation and measured the head movement and body sway caused by changing vertical disparity. Results showed that the head movement was greater as the visual angle of the stimulus was smaller. It has been reported that stimulus of only small visual angle affect depth perception (Erklens et al., 1995. Thus, our result suggests that perception and action produced by vertical disparity are consistent as far as the effect of the stimulus size is concerned.

  6. Stochastic modelling to assess economic effects of treatment of chronic subclinical mastitis caused by Streptococcus uberis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeneveld, Wilma; Swinkels, Jantijn; Hogeveen, Henk

    2007-11-01

    Chronic subclinical mastitis is usually not treated during the lactation. However, some veterinarians regard treatment of some types of subclinical mastitis to be effective. The goal of this research was to develop a stochastic Monte Carlo simulation model to support decisions around treatment of chronic subclinical mastitis caused by Streptococcus uberis. Factors in the model included the probability of cure after treatment, probability of the cow becoming clinically diseased, transmission of infection to other cows, and physiological effects of the infection. Using basic input parameters for Dutch circumstances, the average economic costs per cow of an untreated chronic subclinical mastitis case caused by Str. uberis in a single quarter from day of diagnosis onwards was euro109. With treatment, the average costs were higher (euro120). Thus, for the average cow, treatment was not efficient economically. However, the risk of high costs was much higher when cows with chronic subclinical mastitis were not treated. A sensitivity analysis showed that profitability of treatment of chronic subclinical Str. uberis mastitis depended on farm-specific factors (such as economic value of discarded milk) and cow-specific factors (such as day of diagnosis, duration of infection, amount of transmission to other cows and cure rate). Therefore, herd level protocols are not sufficient and decision support should be cow specific. Given the importance of cow-specific factors, information from the current model could be applied to automatic decision support systems.

  7. The public committed effective dose caused by consumption of foods and foodstuffs in Ninh Thuan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Ngo; Nguyen Thanh Binh; Le Nhu Sieu; Truong Y; Nguyen Van Phuc; Nguyen Thi Linh; Nguyen Dinh Tung

    2014-01-01

    Based on the data set about radionuclides concentration in foods and foodstuffs obtained from the implementation of the National Projects on “Investigation on radionuclides and toxic elements concentration in the main kinds of foods and foodstuffs of Vietnam” and “Assessment of Marine Environmental Radioactivity Status for two selected sites of Nuclear Power Plant in the near future at Ninh Thuan Province”, a calculation software of the International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP), the public committed effective doses (for adult only) caused by consumption of main foods & foodstuffs in the studied experimental region were estimated. In general, the committed effective doses for adult public caused by the daily intake of radionuclides of U, 232 Th, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 226 Ra, 40 K, 90 Sr, 137 Cs and 239,240 Pu are: 7.9x10 -5 , 4.1x10 -6 , 1.1x10 -2 , 1.7x10 -1 , 1.4x10 -3 , 1.2x10 -1 , 2.32x10 -4 , 1.9x10 -4 , 2.7x10 -9 (mSv/year), respectively, and the contribution of U, Th series, 40 K and artificial radionuclides are 61.3%, 38.6% and 0.1%, respectively. (author)

  8. Effect of light on the quality of beverages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perscheid, M.; Zuern, F.

    1979-01-01

    It has long been known that the quality of beverages is influenced by light. Such light-induced changes are dependent on the kind of container, since its light permeability determines the energy and intensity of radiation which causes the change. In previous investigations we studied the influence of light on wine. We found a positive correlation between the transmission spectrum of the bottle glass and the degree of change in the wine. A theoretic discussion is given on the influence of light on fruit juices, furthermore, experiments are suggested, which in our opinion are suitable to investigate the influence of light on beverages. We propose the use of a special xenon gas-discharge lamp as radiation source to obtain fast and reproducible results. (orig.) [de

  9. Effectiveness of Different Classes of Fungicides on Botrytis cinerea Causing Gray Mold on Fruit and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon-Oh Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic pathogen causing a major problem in the export and post-harvest of strawberries. Inappropriate use of fungicides leads to resistance among fungal pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the sensitivity of B. cinerea to various classes of fungicide and to determine the effectiveness of different concentrations of commonly used fungicides. We thus evaluated the effectiveness of six classes of fungicide in inhibiting the growth and development of this pathogen, namely, fludioxonil, iprodione, pyrimethanil, tebuconazole, fenpyrazamine, and boscalid. Fludioxonil was the most effective (EC₅₀ < 0.1 μg/ml, and pyrimethanil was the least effective (EC₅₀ = 50 μg/ml, at inhibiting the mycelial growth of B. cinerea. Fenpyrazamine and pyrimethanil showed relatively low effectiveness in inhibiting the germination and conidial production of B. cinerea. Our results are useful for the management of B. cinerea and as a basis for monitoring the sensitivity of B. cinerea strains to fungicides.

  10. Effects of storage structures and moisture contents on seed quality attributes of quality protein maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Bhandari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to examine the effects of various storage structures and moisture contents on seed quality attributes of quality protein maize seed. The quality protein maize (QPM-1 seed was tested in conventional seed storage containers (Fertilizer sack and earthen pot and the improved hermetic ones (Metal bin, Super grain bag, and Purdue Improved Crop Storage (PICS bag at Seed Science and Technology Division, Khumaltar, Nepal during February, 2015 to January 2016. Ten treatments comprising 5 storage devices in two moisture regimes (11% and 9% replicated thrice and laid out in Completely Randomized Design (CRD. Data on temperature, relative humidity (RH, germination, electrical conductivity (EC, seed moisture content (MC were collected bimonthly. The conventional containers were found liable to the external environmental condition whereas the hermetic structures observed with controlled RH level below 40% in all combinations. Electrical conductivity (EC for seed vigor showed that hermetic containers provide higher seed vigor than the conventional ones. Up to 4 months all treatments were found statistically at par for germination. A significant difference was observed in each treatment after 4 months where PICS bag & Super grain bag showed best germination followed by metal bin while fertilizer bag & earthen-pot showed poorer and poorest germination respectively till one year. Almost all treatments with lower MC showed better results than the treatments with higher MC. A negative correlation (R2=69.7% was found between EC and Germination. All six figures from 2 to 12 months on MC showed statistically different where hermetic plastic bags were found maintaining MC as initial whereas MC of fertilizer bags and earthen pot was spiked than the basal figure. The finding evidenced that the hermetic containers and low MC are the seed storage approaches for retaining the quality of seed even in an ambient environmental condition for more than a year.

  11. Quality management and quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieroni, N.

    1991-01-01

    The main common difficulties are presented found in the implementation of effective Quality Management and Quality Assurance Programmes, based on the recommendations of the IAEA International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group, the information collected by the IAEA experts participating in its meetings, and the results of the IAEA Operational Safety Review Team missions. The difficulties were identified in several areas. The most relevant root causes can be characterized as lack of understanding of quality principles and difficulty in implementation by the responsible management. The IAEA programme is described attempting to provide advice and support in the implementation of an effective quality programme through a number of activities including: preparation of practical guidelines, training programmes for management personnel, assistance in building up qualified manpower, and promoting the quest for excellence through the exchange of experience in the implementation of effective Quality Management and Quality Assurance Programmes in nuclear power plants with good performance records. (Z.S.)

  12. Personal discovery in diabetes self-management: Discovering cause and effect using self-monitoring data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamykina, Lena; Heitkemper, Elizabeth M; Smaldone, Arlene M; Kukafka, Rita; Cole-Lewis, Heather J; Davidson, Patricia G; Mynatt, Elizabeth D; Cassells, Andrea; Tobin, Jonathan N; Hripcsak, George

    2017-12-01

    To outline new design directions for informatics solutions that facilitate personal discovery with self-monitoring data. We investigate this question in the context of chronic disease self-management with the focus on type 2 diabetes. We conducted an observational qualitative study of discovery with personal data among adults attending a diabetes self-management education (DSME) program that utilized a discovery-based curriculum. The study included observations of class sessions, and interviews and focus groups with the educator and attendees of the program (n = 14). The main discovery in diabetes self-management evolved around discovering patterns of association between characteristics of individuals' activities and changes in their blood glucose levels that the participants referred to as "cause and effect". This discovery empowered individuals to actively engage in self-management and provided a desired flexibility in selection of personalized self-management strategies. We show that discovery of cause and effect involves four essential phases: (1) feature selection, (2) hypothesis generation, (3) feature evaluation, and (4) goal specification. Further, we identify opportunities to support discovery at each stage with informatics and data visualization solutions by providing assistance with: (1) active manipulation of collected data (e.g., grouping, filtering and side-by-side inspection), (2) hypotheses formulation (e.g., using natural language statements or constructing visual queries), (3) inference evaluation (e.g., through aggregation and visual comparison, and statistical analysis of associations), and (4) translation of discoveries into actionable goals (e.g., tailored selection from computable knowledge sources of effective diabetes self-management behaviors). The study suggests that discovery of cause and effect in diabetes can be a powerful approach to helping individuals to improve their self-management strategies, and that self-monitoring data can

  13. QUANTITATIVE AND STRUCTURAL CHANGES OF TESTIS AND SEMEN QUALITY PARAMETERS CHANGES CAUSED BY PERORAL ADMINISTRATION OF DIAZINON IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svätoslav Hluchý

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find the quantitative and structural changes in the rat testis and changes of semen quality after a diazinon administration. METHODS: Rats received diazinon (99% purity in thier drinking water (40 mg.l-1 with free access. Age of rats at the beginning of the experiment was 30 days and experiment lasted for next 90 days. The histological samples were evaluated by histological and morphometric methods in light microscopy and the samples of semen were evaluated with CASA method. RESULTS: Disintergation of cellular associations in the seminiferous epithelium, germ cells evacuation into the tubule lumen and thier necrosis were mostly observed. Rarely vacuolisation and cracks of epithelium and fibrotisation of interstitial tissue were noted. Morphometric methods have shown extension of epithelium (P subcellular structures and their functions may be damaged which can lead to subfertility. Further investigation of diazinon is needed for verification of our hypothesis.doi:10.5219/188

  14. Health-related quality of life and all-cause mortality in patients with diabetes on dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Østhus Tone Britt

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study tests the hypotheses that health-related quality of life (HRQOL in prevalent dialysis patients with diabetes is lower than in dialysis patients without diabetes, and is at least as poor as diabetic patients with another severe complication, i.e. foot ulcers. This study also explores the mortality risk associated with diabetes in dialysis patients. Methods HRQOL was assessed using the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36, in a cross-sectional study of 301 prevalent dialysis patients (26% with diabetes, and compared with diabetic patients not on dialysis (n = 221, diabetic patients with foot ulcers (n = 127, and a sample of the general population (n = 5903. Mortality risk was assessed using a Kaplan-Meier plot and Cox proportional hazards analysis. Results Self-assessed vitality, general and mental health, and physical function were significantly lower in dialysis patients with diabetes than in those without. Vitality (p = 0.011 and general health (p Conclusions Physical aspects of HRQOL were perceived very low in dialysis patients with diabetes, and lower than in other dialysis patients and diabetic patients without dialysis. Mental aspects predicted mortality in dialysis patients with diabetes. Increased awareness and measures to assist physical function impairment may be particularly important in diabetes patients on dialysis.

  15. The effect of voice quality on hiring decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Tylečková

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of voice quality on hiring decisions. Considering voice quality an important tool in an individual’s self-presentation in the job market, it may very well enhance his/her job prospects, while some voice qualities may affect employers’ judgments in a negative way. Five men and five women were recorded reading four different utterances representing answers to job interviewers’ questions in four different phonation guises: modal, breathy, creaky and pressed. 38 professional employment interviewers recorded the speakers’ hireability and personality ratings (likeability, self-confidence and trustworthiness on 7-point semantic differential scales based on the speakers’ voice. The results revealed a significant effect of the phonation guises on the speakers’ ratings with the modal voice being superior to the cluster of non-modal voices. Interestingly, the non-modal guises were evaluated in a very similar way, except for the self-confidence category with the breathy voice getting the lowest scores on the one hand and the pressed voice correlating with high self-confidence ratings on the other.

  16. Effect of exercise supplementation on dipyridamole thallium-201 image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, S.; Greenberg, I.D.; Corne, R.

    1991-01-01

    To determine the effect of different types of exercise supplementation on dipyridamole thallium image quality, 78 patients were prospectively randomized to one of three protocols: dipyridamole infusion alone, dipyridamole supplemented with isometric handgrip, and dipyridamole with low-level treadmill exercise. Heart-to-lung, heart-to-liver, and heart-to-adjacent infradiaphragmatic activity ratios were generated from anterior images acquired immediately following the test. Additionally, heart-to-total infradiaphragmatic activity was graded semiquantitatively. Results showed a significantly higher ratio of heart to subdiaphragmatic activity in the treadmill group as compared with dipyridamole alone (p less than 0.001) and dipyridamole supplemented with isometric handgrip exercise (p less than 0.001). No significant difference was observed between patients receiving the dipyridamole infusion, and dipyridamole supplemented with isometric handgrip exercise. The authors conclude that low-level treadmill exercise supplementation of dipyridamole infusion is an effective means of improving image quality. Supplementation with isometric handgrip does not improve image quality over dipyridamole alone

  17. Effects of packaging materials on storage quality of peanut kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaoji; Xing, Shengping; Xiong, Huiwei; Min, Hua; Zhu, Xuejing; He, Jialin; Mu, Honglei

    2018-01-01

    In order to obtain optimum packaging materials for peanut kernels, the effects of four types of packaging materials on peanut storage quality (coat color, acid value, germination rate, relative damage, and prevention of aflatoxin contamination) were examined. The results showed that packaging materials had a major influence on peanut storage quality indexes. The color of the peanut seed coat packaged in the polyester/aluminum/polyamide/polyethylene (PET/AL/PA/PE) composite film bag did not change significantly during the storage period. Color deterioration was slower with polyamide/polyethylene (PA/PE) packaging materials than with polyethylene (PE) film bags and was slower in PE bags than in the woven bags. The use of PET/AL/PA/PE and PA/PE bags maintained peanut quality and freshness for more than one year and both package types resulted in better germination rates. There were significant differences between the four types of packaging materials in terms of controlling insect pests. The peanuts packaged in the highly permeable woven bags suffered serious invasion from insect pests, while both PET/AL/PA/PE and PA/PE bags effectively prevented insect infection. Peanuts stored in PET/AL/PA/PE and PA/PE bags were also better at preventing and controlling aflatoxin contamination. PMID:29518085

  18. The effect of singing training on voice quality for people with quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamplin, Jeanette; Baker, Felicity A; Buttifant, Mary; Berlowitz, David J

    2014-01-01

    Despite anecdotal reports of voice impairment in quadriplegia, the exact nature of these impairments is not well described in the literature. This article details objective and subjective voice assessments for people with quadriplegia at baseline and after a respiratory-targeted singing intervention. Randomized controlled trial. Twenty-four participants with quadriplegia were randomly assigned to a 12-week program of either a singing intervention or active music therapy control. Recordings of singing and speech were made at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 6 months postintervention. These deidentified recordings were used to measure sound pressure levels and assess voice quality using the Multidimensional Voice Profile and the Perceptual Voice Profile. Baseline voice quality data indicated deviation from normality in the areas of breathiness, strain, and roughness. A greater percentage of intervention participants moved toward more normal voice quality in terms of jitter, shimmer, and noise-to-harmonic ratio; however, the improvements failed to achieve statistical significance. Subjective and objective assessments of voice quality indicate that quadriplegia may have a detrimental effect on voice quality; in particular, causing a perception of roughness and breathiness in the voice. The results of this study suggest that singing training may have a role in ameliorating these voice impairments. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of milk temperature during irradiation on total bacterial count and keeping quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbour, M.M.; Dawod, A.H.; Newigy, N.A.; Wahab, G.A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Cows' and buffaloes' milk samples were exposed to different doses of gamma radiation (100, 200 and 300 Kr) at 10 and 30°C. Irradiation of milk at 10°C caused more reduction in total bacterial count than that occurred at 30°C. The rate of microbial destruction due to irradiation at 10°C was higher than that occurred at 30°C. The keeping quality was determined daily for 15 days by clot-on-boiling test for samples kept at room temperature and in a refrigerator. The keeping quality recorded for cows' and buffaloes' milk samples in the refrigerator was 4 days, while it was only 1 day at room temperature. Irradiation of milk at 10°C was more effective than irradiation at 30°C, to increase the keeping quality of irradiated milk kept at refrigeration. Irradiation of milk samples at 10°C by 200 Kr increased the keeping quality for two weeks in the refrigerator, i.e. such a treatment increased the keeping quality by 4 folds

  20. Study of Temporal Effects on Subjective Video Quality of Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bampis, Christos George; Zhi Li; Moorthy, Anush Krishna; Katsavounidis, Ioannis; Aaron, Anne; Bovik, Alan Conrad

    2017-11-01

    HTTP adaptive streaming is being increasingly deployed by network content providers, such as Netflix and YouTube. By dividing video content into data chunks encoded at different bitrates, a client is able to request the appropriate bitrate for the segment to be played next based on the estimated network conditions. However, this can introduce a number of impairments, including compression artifacts and rebuffering events, which can severely impact an end-user's quality of experience (QoE). We have recently created a new video quality database, which simulates a typical video streaming application, using long video sequences and interesting Netflix content. Going beyond previous efforts, the new database contains highly diverse and contemporary content, and it includes the subjective opinions of a sizable number of human subjects regarding the effects on QoE of both rebuffering and compression distortions. We observed that rebuffering is always obvious and unpleasant to subjects, while bitrate changes may be less obvious due to content-related dependencies. Transient bitrate drops were preferable over rebuffering only on low complexity video content, while consistently low bitrates were poorly tolerated. We evaluated different objective video quality assessment algorithms on our database and found that objective video quality models are unreliable for QoE prediction on videos suffering from both rebuffering events and bitrate changes. This implies the need for more general QoE models that take into account objective quality models, rebuffering-aware information, and memory. The publicly available video content as well as metadata for all of the videos in the new database can be found at http://live.ece.utexas.edu/research/LIVE_NFLXStudy/nflx_index.html.

  1. Effect of irradiation decontamination on the qualities of green tea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jiating; Liu Chunquan; Yu Gang; Zhao Yongfu; Ji Ping; Jin Jie; Gu Guiqiang

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of irradiation on the main chemical components, such as heavy metal elements, pesticide residues as well as sensory qualities of green tea. The results indicated that irradiation had no significant impact on proteins, tea polyphenols, theine and heavy metal elements, slight differences in the contents of soluble sugar and amino acids. The content of cypermethrin reduced with the increase of irradiation dose. The color, liquor color, flavor and aroma of the tea decoction changed slightly when irradiated at the dose lower than 5 kGy. It was concluded that the optimal doses for the purpose of green team decontamination was at the range of 3-5 kGy according to the analysis of various quality factors. (authors)

  2. Mechanisms involved in reproductive damage caused by gossypol in rats and protective effects of vitamin E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia T Santana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gossypol is a chemical present in the seeds of cotton plants (Gossypium sp. that reduces fertility in farm animals. Vitamin E is an antioxidant and may help to protect cells and tissues against the deleterious effects of free radicals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms of reproductive toxicity of gossypol in rats and the protective effects of vitamin E. Forty Wistar rats were used, divided into four experimental groups (n = 10: DMSO/ saline + corn oil; DMSO/saline + vitamin E; gossypol + corn oil; and gossypol + vitamin E. RESULTS: Fertility was significantly reduced in male rats treated with gossypol in that a significant decrease in epididy-mal sperm count was observed (P 0.05. The levels of reduced glutathione and pyridine nucleotides in testis homogen-ate were significantly reduced by gossypol (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively and this reduction was accompanied by increased levels of oxidized glutathione (P < 0.05. Vitamin E showed a preventive effect on the changes in the levels of these substances. Gossypol significantly increased the levels of malondialdehyde (P < 0.01, a lipid peroxida-tion indicator, whereas treatment with vitamin E inhibited the action of the gossypol. Vitamin E prevented a decrease in mitochondrial ATP induced by gossypol (P < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the reproductive dysfunction caused by gossypol may be related to oxidative stress and mitochondrial bioenergetic damage and that treatment with vitamin E can prevent the infertility caused by the toxin.

  3. Exposure to Zearalenone During Early Pregnancy Causes Estrogenic Multitoxic Effects in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunishige, Kohji; Kawate, Noritoshi; Inaba, Toshio; Tamada, Hiromichi

    2017-03-01

    Although zearalenone (ZEN; Sigma Chemicals, St Louis, Missouri) is a well-known mycotoxin with estrogenic activity, the toxic effects of ZEN during pregnancy are unknown. This study compared the effects of daily subcutaneous injections of ZEN (2, 4, or 8 mg/kg) with those of 17β-estradiol (E2; [Sigma Chemicals] 0.8, 1.6, or 3.2 μg/kg) in mice. Injections were administered on gestational days (GDs) 1 to 5, the period including implantation which is sensitive to hormonal balance. The effects of ZEN or E2 were evaluated by comparing the number of live fetuses, their weight, and absorbed conceptuses on GD 18, with those in vehicle-treated controls. In addition, implantation, embryos in the oviducts and those in uteri without implantation sites were investigated on GD 5. In mice treated with the highest dose of ZEN or E2, decidual responses and plasma progesterone concentrations were measured on GDs 5 and 6, respectively, and delayed implantation was investigated on GDs 9 and 14. The results showed that treatment with ZEN, in a manner similar to that seen for E2, led to obstruction of essential processes for establishing and maintaining pregnancy, such as embryo migration from oviducts to uteri, the decidual response, and activation of luteal function. Zearalenone also induced delayed implantation and loss of conceptuses and at low doses caused a retarded growth of the fetuses after normal implantation. It was therefore concluded that ZEN causes multiple estrogenic toxic actions when administered during early pregnancy in mice.

  4. Posttranslational modifications of Rab proteins cause effective displacement of GDP dissociation inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterlin, Lena K; Goody, Roger S; Itzen, Aymelt

    2012-04-10

    Intracellular vesicular trafficking is regulated by approximately 60 members of the Rab subfamily of small Ras-like GDP/GTP binding proteins. Rab proteins cycle between inactive and active states as well as between cytosolic and membrane bound forms. Membrane extraction/delivery and cytosolic distribution of Rabs is mediated by interaction with the protein GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) that binds to prenylated inactive (GDP-bound) Rab proteins. Because the Rab:GDP:GDI complex is of high affinity, the question arises of how GDI can be displaced efficiently from Rab protein in order to allow the necessary recruitment of the Rab to its specific target membrane. While there is strong evidence that DrrA, as a bacterially encoded GDP/GTP exchange factor, contributes to this event, we show here that posttranslational modifications of Rabs can also modulate the affinity for GDI and thus cause effective displacement of GDI from Rab:GDI complexes. These activities have been found associated with the phosphocholination and adenylylation activities of the enzymes AnkX and DrrA/SidM, respectively, from the pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila. Both modifications occur after spontaneous dissociation of Rab:GDI complexes within their natural equilibrium. Therefore, the effective GDI displacement that is observed is caused by inhibition of reformation of Rab:GDI complexes. Interestingly, in contrast to adenylylation by DrrA, AnkX can covalently modify inactive Rabs with high catalytic efficiency even when GDP is bound to the GTPase and hence can inhibit binding of GDI to Rab:GDP complexes. We therefore speculate that human cells could employ similar mechanisms in the absence of infection to effectively displace Rabs from GDI.

  5. Observation on the effect of carbetocin in preventing postpartum hemorrhage caused by uterine inertia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Li Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of carbetocin in preventing postpartum hemorrhage caused by uterine inertia. Methods: A total of 256 puerpera with single full-term delivery who were admitted in our hospital from May, 2015 to May, 2016 were included in the study and divided into the vaginal delivery group and cesarean section group with 128 cases in each group according to the delivery ways. According to the medication, each group was divided into the carbetocin group and oxytocin group with 64 cases in each group. After fetus delivery, the puerpera in the carbetocin group were given intravenous injection of carbetocin (100 μg, while the puerpera in the oxytocin group were given intravenous injection of oxytocin (10 U+0.9% NaCl (500 mL for 2 h. The amount of bleeding at delivery, 2 h and 24 h after delivery in each group was observed. A volume of 5 mL elbow venous blood before delivery and 24 h after delivery was extracted. The automatic blood cell analyzer was used to detect the decreased value of 24 h hemoglobin in each group. The coagulation detector was used to detect PT, APTT, and FIB before delivery and 24 h after delivery. The blood pressure and heart rate before and after medication in each group were observed. Results: The amount of bleeding at delivery, 2 h and 24 h after delivery in the carbetocin group was significantly less than that in the oxytocin group (P0.05. The heart rate and blood pressure after medication in each group were not significantly changed when compared with before medication (P>0.05. Conclusions: Carbetocin can effectively prevent the postpartum hemorrhage caused by uterine inertia, and is safe and effective in application of vaginal delivery and cesarean section; therefore, it deserves to be widely recommended in the clinic.

  6. Study of quality effects on radiobiological actions, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanami, Shigeru; Nakazawa, Keiji; Matsubayashi, Takashi; Hashimoto, Shozo.

    1979-01-01

    In order to interpret the quality effects of high LET radiation on the radiobiological actions, the target theory formulated by Oda on basis of the microdose concept introduced by Rossi has been developed to express intertrack effect (cumulative effect) and intratrack effect (non-cumulative effect) separately. Analysis for the dose-survival relation by this theory have been discussed with comparison of those of Rossi or Bender. If the target for the intertrack effect was the same one for the intratrack effect, it was found in this theory that the contribution of the intertrack effect for the cell lethality was larger than that of the intratrack effect in the case of high LET radiation as well as in that of low LET ones. The survival rates of Escherichia coli B/r and B sub(s-1) irradiated with heavy ions such as He, C, N and O at 4 MeV/a.m.u. and neutrons at 1, 2 and 5 MeV were calculated with this theory. The results were in reasonable agreement with experimental ones. (author)

  7. Analysis of Antifungal Components in the Galls of Melaphis chinensis and Their Effects on Control of Anthracnose Disease of Chinese Cabbage Caused by Colletotrichum higginsianum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Chung Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal pathogens caused various diseases which resulted in heavy yield and quality losses on plants of commercial interests such as fruits, vegetables, and flowers. In our preliminary experimental results, the methanol extracts of four species of medicinal plants Melaphis chinensis, Eugenia caryophyllata, Polygonum cuspidatum, and Rheum officinale possessed antifungal activity to causal agent of cabbage anthracnose, Colletotrichum higginsianum. Thus it was conducted to identify and quantify the chemical constituents in these herbs and to assess the antifungal effects of these compounds. Among the tested principles, the indicator compound methyl gallate from M. chinensis was the most effective one against the conidial germination. In addition, it exhibited significant effects of controlling anthracnose disease of Chinese cabbage caused by C. higginsianum PA-01 in growth chamber. These results indicate that M. chinensis may be potential for further development of plant-derived pesticides for control of anthracnose of cabbage and other cruciferous crops.

  8. Oesophageal strictures caused by the ingestion of corrosive agents: effectiveness of balloon dilatation in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doo, E.-Y. [Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Shin, J.H. [Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jhshin@amc.seoul.kr; Kim, J.H.; Song, H.-Y. [Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    Aim: To evaluate the safety and clinical effectiveness of balloon dilatation in children for oesophageal strictures caused by the ingestion of corrosive agents. Materials and methods: The study comprised 11 children (median age 6 years; range 1-14 years) with oesophageal strictures caused by corrosive agents, who underwent a total of 36 balloon dilatation sessions. The technical and clinical success, recurrence of dysphagia, complications, and primary and secondary patency rates were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Technical success was achieved in 91% of patients and in 97% of balloon dilatation sessions. Clinical success (defined as improved food intake and reduced dysphagia within 1 month of the first balloon dilatation session) was achieved in 64% of patients (7/11). During the mean 35-month follow-up period (range 1-89 months), 10 (91%) patients experienced recurrence. Oesophageal rupture (types 1 or 2) occurred in 45% of patients and in 31% of balloon dilatation sessions. Primary patency rates at 6 months and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years were 36, 27, 14, 14, 14, and 14%, respectively. Secondary patency rates at 6 months and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years were 82, 82, 82, 56, 42, and 42%, respectively. The secondary patency rate was higher than the primary patency rate (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The present study examined oesophageal balloon dilatation for paediatric oesophageal strictures caused by the ingestion of corrosive agents. Although the technical success rate was high and there were no deaths, the clinical success rate was low owing to a high recurrence rate. However, repeated balloon dilatations resulted in an acceptable secondary patency rate.

  9. Dental practitioners and ill health retirement: a qualitative investigation into the causes and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K B; Burke, F J T; Brown, J; Macdonald, E B; Morris, A J; White, D A; Murray, K

    2010-09-11

    Data published in 1999 from the Government Actuary on the National Health Service Pension Scheme (1989-1994) have indicated that the frequency of ill health premature retirement (IHR) was four times more prevalent among dentists at age 42 years compared with doctors.Objective The aim of this project was to determine the factors that contributed to IHR in dental practitioners, and the effects of IHR on their lives. Semi-structured interviews were carried out during 2007. A topic list was developed, piloted and used to guide the interviewer. A purposive sampling technique was used to recruit the respondents from an insurance company database. A framework approach to data analysis was utilised. Twenty-three respondents were interviewed, 19 male and 4 female, aged between 39-59 years. Depression, stress and anxiety were reported by respondents to be major causes of their retirement, followed by musculoskeletal disease and premature disability caused by trauma. This is illustrated by the following: '...just went straight into general practice but with some regrets. Practice was so depressing' (GDS/NHS); 'I withdraw, I don't engage ... I found it more and more difficult and one morning... I collapsed in tears at the practice' (GDS/NHS). Dentists reported both negative and positive comments in relation to support received from their health insurance company. The main causes of IHR were depression, musculoskeletal disease and specific skin conditions. Respondents expressed concern regarding the level of support available to dentists in distress. Respondents to this study found that continuing to work had a positive impact on their health.

  10. Air quality in Beijing and its transition from coal burning caused problems to traffic exhaust related pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Shao, M.; Hu, M.; Tang, D.

    1997-01-01

    Air pollution in Beijing is characterized by coal smoke for a long time because of energy structure highly dependence on coal consumption. SO 2 , TSP, and NO x ambient concentration are kept in high levels, which exceed the guideline of WHO and National Air Quality Standard NAQS. The trend of SO 2 change is relative stable, its annual average concentration fluctuates around 100 g/m 3 since 1981. TSP show a fast decrease before 1986 and keep a slow decrease afterwards approaching the level of about 300 g/m 3 . NO x concentration increases continuously all the time. Since 1993, NO x concentration exceeds SO 2 to be the important pollutant next to TSP in Beijing, especially in summertime and traffic busy areas. As the consequence of NO x fast increase, the ozone pollution level is elevated greatly since 1980s. Several integrated field measurements were conducted to study the characteristics of photochemical smog and its formation mechanism. Hourly averaged ozone concentration usually exceeded the NAQS (80 ppb) in April to October. The O 3 formation is very sensitive to NO x concentration because of the high NMHC/NO x ratio. In recent years, high O 3 concentration is observed in early Spring and photochemical smog pollution is getting more and more severe with dramatically increase of vehicles in downtown Beijing. It is predicted that O 3 pollution will be expected to enhance greatly in next 20 years under the development plan of future urban transportation system and increment of vehicles, even in the case that control strategies suggested by municipal government are undertaken. So more strengthen control strategies in Beijing are needed

  11. Effect Of Light Qualities And Storage Periods On The Germination Of Pennisetum Polystachion Seeds*)

    OpenAIRE

    TJITROSEMITO, S

    1992-01-01

    Seeds of the yellowish inflorescence strain of Pennisetum polystachion, collected from the field in Indonesia, were kept in the dark for 30 days, then germinated in 12-h light and 24-h light under various light qualities, namely, white, black, blue, red and far-red. There was no effect of photo-period to seed germination. Percent of seed germination under white, red, far-red, blue and dark were 49, 43, 22, 11 and 2%, respectively. White and red light did not cause any diffe...

  12. Do bruxism and temporomandibular disorders have a cause-and-effect relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbezoo, F; Lavigne, G J

    1997-01-01

    Controversy continues to exist over the putative role of bruxism in the etiology of temporomandibular disorders. A commonly held concept is that bruxism leads to signs and symptoms characteristic of one or more of the subdiagnoses of temporomandibular disorders, while another hypothesis suggests that bruxism is a temporomandibular disorder itself that sometimes coexists with other forms of temporomandibular disorders. Following a thorough review of the literature in this article, it is concluded that the relationship between bruxism and temporomandibular disorders is still unclear. Future research should examine longitudinal epidemiologic and clinical/experimental data to establish or refute a cause-and-effect relationship. In doing so, the existence of various sub-groups of temporomandibular disorders should be taken into account, and sleep-related bruxism should be discriminated from its daytime variant.

  13. Corruption in Education Systems: A Review of Practices, Causes, Effects and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Cárdenas Denham

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Achieving higher levels of transparency and accountability in education systems is essential for attaining an adequate distribution of educational opportunities. Studies of corruption in education systems are important since they can contribute to increasing public awareness of the harmful effects of corruption and promote political support for the implementation of anti-corruption initiatives in education. This paper describes a typology of corrupt practices and develops a classification for the findings reported in the literature on corruption in education, such as causes, consequences and recommendations, as well as a classification of the methodologies applied to the study of corrupt practices. Finally, it describes the possible implications of these findings for policymakers.

  14. Ecological effectiveness as an essential quality requirement of innovational construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mkrtchyan Tamara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it seems to be very essential to develop national construction industry by implementation of innovative technologies. As an object of innovational construction «Smart house» or «green building» demonstrates the latest advances in ecological building materials, energy-saving structures and lean-technologies. According to the concept of TQM «green building» has tube compatible with environmental protection, environment sustainability and ecological effectiveness requirements. «Green certification» includes these terms into the National environment sustainability rating system. The main goal of this research work was to review and compare theoretical models and concepts of effectiveness and analyze their applicability to determine the term ecological effectiveness as the main Quality Score.

  15. Disorders in melanopsin effect of pupil constriction as a risk factor causing eye diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Kaptsov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Risks of eye damage and eyesight deterioration to a great extent depend on how efficient a biomechanical eye system is under energy-saving lighting conditions. The system's efficiency is determined by its adequacy in managing pupils and ciliary muscle. We analyzed mathematical models describing changes in pupil's diameter which were determined by light-technical parameters of illumination environment (luminance level and brightness. We highlighted the importance of ganglionic cells and the role they play in managing pupil's diameter (miosis when they are exposed to blue light within 480 nm spectrum. Basing on the assessment of a pupil's constriction under exposure to various light stimuli (blue, red, and green ones we worked out a melanopsin effect concept of a pupil's retention at miosis and showed that it could be a diagnostic sign of some diseases (age-related direct retinopathy, pancreatic diabetes under exposure to a blue light impulse with a certain wave length. Under exposure to blue light within 480 nm spectrum ganglionic cells form a managing signal for a sphincter muscle of a pupil and ciliary muscle which provides accommodation (as per Helmholtz and regulates aqueous humor flow in ciliary channel. All modern energy-saving light sources have a low energy level at wave length equal to 480 nm due to gap in their spectrum in comparison with sunlight spectrum with the same light temperature and luminance level. Inadequate management of pupil's diameter under artificial lighting conditions leads to melanopsin effect disorders and causes disharmony in managing aqueous humor outflow. All the above-stated factors under long-term visual load cause eye diseases risks in modern illumination environment. We detected that contemporary mathematic models describing pupil's diameter fluctuations needed to be refined allowing for new knowledge on functional peculiarities of retina cells and energy-saving light sources spectrum.

  16. [The endothelium injuries caused by homocysteine and treatmental effects of Tongxinluo powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun-Qing; Wu, Yi-Ling; Xu, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Shao-Hua; Jia, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Wei, Cong; Dong, Xiao-Wei

    2008-02-01

    To observe the effect of homocysteine (HCY) on the function of endothelium cell, and to discuss the possible mechanisms that Tongxinluo super powder affected. Healthy male Wistar rats were divided into randomly the control group, the model group, the Tongxinluo group. The effect of Ach on isolated rat thoracic aorta in vitro was examined, the microcirculation was observed by microcirculation meter, the activity of SOD and GSH-PX and content of NO, MDA, ET, Ang II, TXA2, PGI2 was detected. Compared with control group, the effect of Ach on isolated rat thoracic aorta in vitro weakened markablely (P homocystein might cause the contracted and dilated function decreased, it might get involved in endothelium disfunction as a result of the massive free radicals production and diastolic-contract factors balance disorder induced by high homocystein. (2) Tongxinluo powder could improve the function of endothelium-dependment dilation induced by high homocystein, that associated with inhibitting the excessive production of free radicals, and improved function of endothelium.

  17. Gauge invariance of color confinement due to the dual Meissner effect caused by Abelian monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tsuneo; Hasegawa, Masayasu; Ishiguro, Katsuya; Koma, Yoshiaki; Sekido, Toru

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of non-Abelian color confinement is studied in SU(2) lattice gauge theory in terms of the Abelian fields and monopoles extracted from non-Abelian link variables without adopting gauge fixing. First, the static quark-antiquark potential and force are computed with the Abelian and monopole Polyakov loop correlators, and the resulting string tensions are found to be identical to the non-Abelian string tension. These potentials also show the scaling behavior with respect to the change of lattice spacing. Second, the profile of the color-electric field between a quark and an antiquark is investigated with the Abelian and monopole Wilson loops. The color-electric field is squeezed into a flux tube due to monopole supercurrent with the same Abelian color direction. The parameters corresponding to the penetration and coherence lengths show the scaling behavior, and the ratio of these lengths, i.e., the Ginzburg-Landau parameter, indicates that the vacuum type is near the border of the type 1 and type 2 (dual) superconductors. These results are summarized in which the Abelian fundamental charge defined in an arbitrary color direction is confined inside a hadronic state by the dual Meissner effect. As the color-neutral state in any Abelian color direction corresponds to the physical color-singlet state, this effect explains non-Abelian color confinement and supports the existence of a gauge-invariant mechanism of color confinement due to the dual Meissner effect caused by Abelian monopoles.

  18. Effect of dietary protein source on piglet meat quality characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis E Simitzis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to examine the effects of different dietary protein sources (soybean meal vs whey protein on piglet meat quality characteristics. Eighteen castrated male Large White × Duroc × Landrace piglets were randomly assigned to 2 groups. Piglets were kept in individual metabolic cages and fed ad libitum over a period of 38 days the following 2 diets: diet SB, which was formulated to meet the nutrient requirements of piglets using soybean meal as the main crude protein source and diet WP, where SB was totally replaced by a mixture of whey proteins on equal digestible energy and crude protein basis. At the end of the experiment, piglets were weighed and slaughtered. After overnight chilling, samples of Longissimus dorsi muscle were taken and were used for meat quality measurements.          No significant differences were observed in the values of pH, colour, water holding capacity, shear force and intramuscular fat content of L. dorsi muscle between the dietary treatments. Measurement of lipid oxidation values showed that dietary supplementation with different protein sources did not influence meat antioxidant properties during refrigerated storage. The SB piglets had lower 14:0 (P<0.01 and higher 18:3n-3 (P<0.001 levels in intramuscular fat in comparison with WP piglets. However, these changes were attributed to background differences in the dietary FA profile and not to a direct protein source effect. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the examined dietary protein sources (soybean meal or whey protein do not have a significant effect on meat quality characteristics of piglets.

  19. A Splice Mutation in the PHKG1 Gene Causes High Glycogen Content and Low Meat Quality in Pig Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Junwu; Yang, Jie; Zhou, Lisheng; Ren, Jun; Liu, Xianxian; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Zhiyan; Ma, Huanban; Xie, Xianhua; Xing, Yuyun; Guo, Yuanmei; Huang, Lusheng

    2014-01-01

    Glycolytic potential (GP) in skeletal muscle is economically important in the pig industry because of its effect on pork processing yield. We have previously mapped a major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for GP on chromosome 3 in a White Duroc × Erhualian F2 intercross. We herein performed a systems genetic analysis to identify the causal variant underlying the phenotype QTL (pQTL). We first conducted genome-wide association analyses in the F2 intercross and an F19 Sutai pig population. The QT...

  20. Media advertising effects on consumer perception of orthodontic treatment quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Daenya T; Shroff, Bhavna; Lindauer, Steven J; Fowler, Chad E; Tufekci, Eser

    2008-09-01

    To determine the effect of media advertising on consumer perception of orthodontic treatment quality. A survey instrument was designed to evaluate factors influencing consumer selection of an orthodontist and consumer perception of different forms of media advertising (radio, television, newspaper, magazine, direct mail, and billboard) by orthodontic practices. The surveys were distributed by eight orthodontic offices in and around the Richmond, Virginia area. The survey return rate was 97%. Respondents most often cited dentist and patient referrals as how they learned of the orthodontic practices they visited (50% to 57%). A caring attitude and good practitioner reputation were the top reasons influencing actual selection of an orthodontist (53% and 49%, respectively). Of respondents, 14% to 24% felt that advertising orthodontists would offer a lower quality of care than nonadvertising orthodontists. Newspaper, magazine, and direct mail advertisements were viewed more favorably than radio, television, and billboard advertisements. Chi-square analyses revealed few statistically significant differences in perception between different income and education groups. The majority of patients do not perceive advertising to reflect poorly on the quality of orthodontic care. However, patients with different income and education levels perceive media advertising differently.

  1. Effect of wheat flour characteristics on sponge cake quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiraghi, Malena; de la Hera, Esther; Pérez, Gabriela T; Gómez, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    To select the flour parameters that relate strongly to cake-making performance, in this study the relationship between sponge cake quality, solvent retention capacity (SRC) profile and flour physicochemical characteristics was investigated using 38 soft wheat samples of different origins. Particle size average, protein, damaged starch, water-soluble pentosans, total pentosans, SRC and pasting properties were analysed. Sponge cake volume and crumb texture were measured to evaluate cake quality. Cluster analysis was applied to assess differences in flour quality parameters among wheat lines based on the SRC profile. Cluster 1 showed significantly higher sponge cake volume and crumb softness, finer particle size and lower SRC sucrose, SRC carbonate, SRC water, damaged starch and protein content. Particle size, damaged starch, protein, thickening capacity and SRC parameters correlated negatively with sponge cake volume, while total pentosans and pasting temperature showed the opposite effect. The negative correlations between cake volume and SRC parameters along with the cluster analysis results indicated that flours with smaller particle size, lower absorption capacity and higher pasting temperature had better cake-making performance. Some simple analyses, such as SRC, particle size distribution and pasting properties, may help to choose flours suitable for cake making. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Large Spatial and Temporal Separations of Cause and Effect in Policy Making - Dealing with Non-linear Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskill, John

    There can be large spatial and temporal separation of cause and effect in policy making. Determining the correct linkage between policy inputs and outcomes can be highly impractical in the complex environments faced by policy makers. In attempting to see and plan for the probable outcomes, standard linear models often overlook, ignore, or are unable to predict catastrophic events that only seem improbable due to the issue of multiple feedback loops. There are several issues with the makeup and behaviors of complex systems that explain the difficulty many mathematical models (factor analysis/structural equation modeling) have in dealing with non-linear effects in complex systems. This chapter highlights those problem issues and offers insights to the usefulness of ABM in dealing with non-linear effects in complex policy making environments.

  3. Effect of irradiation on quality of fresh fruits and vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basbayraktar, V.; Gueclue, H.

    2009-01-01

    There is an increasing trend for the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables in developing and developed countries. However, they carry the potential risk of contamination from soil, irrigation water and/or manure and result in food borne outbreaks. Since they are consumed without any treatments, they are the potential sources of contamination. Irradiation is a physical food preservation method; foods are exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation for sterilization or preservation purposes. Irradiation treatment has been shown to effectively enhance the microbial quality and increase the shelf-life by 3-5 times. Also, this treatment reduces the post harvest losses and controls the insects.

  4. Evidence for the Adverse Effect of Starvation on Bone Quality: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Kueper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition and starvation’s possible adverse impacts on bone health and bone quality first came into the spotlight after the horrors of the Holocaust and the ghettos of World War II. Famine and food restrictions led to a mean caloric intake of 200–800 calories a day in the ghettos and concentration camps, resulting in catabolysis and starvation of the inhabitants and prisoners. Severely increased risks of fracture, poor bone mineral density, and decreased cortical strength were noted in several case series and descriptive reports addressing the medical issues of these individuals. A severe effect of severely diminished food intake and frequently concomitant calcium- and Vitamin D deficiencies was subsequently proven in both animal models and the most common cause of starvation in developed countries is anorexia nervosa. This review attempts to summarize the literature available on the impact of the metabolic response to Starvation on overall bone health and bone quality.

  5. Evidence for the adverse effect of starvation on bone quality: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueper, Janina; Beyth, Shaul; Liebergall, Meir; Kaplan, Leon; Schroeder, Josh E

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and starvation's possible adverse impacts on bone health and bone quality first came into the spotlight after the horrors of the Holocaust and the ghettos of World War II. Famine and food restrictions led to a mean caloric intake of 200-800 calories a day in the ghettos and concentration camps, resulting in catabolysis and starvation of the inhabitants and prisoners. Severely increased risks of fracture, poor bone mineral density, and decreased cortical strength were noted in several case series and descriptive reports addressing the medical issues of these individuals. A severe effect of severely diminished food intake and frequently concomitant calcium- and Vitamin D deficiencies was subsequently proven in both animal models and the most common cause of starvation in developed countries is anorexia nervosa. This review attempts to summarize the literature available on the impact of the metabolic response to Starvation on overall bone health and bone quality.

  6. Effect of different pretreatments on dried chilli (Capsicum annum L.) quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoraga, S. B.; Sabarisman, I.; Ainuri, M.

    2018-03-01

    Chilli (Capsicum annum L.) has significant price fluctuation. When the chilli price is declined, it causes food waste from unsold chilli. Therefore, drying chilli is a solution for this condition. Futhermore, it can be processed for various product like chilli powder, chilli sauce, etc. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different pretreatments on dried chilli quality. Chilli was blenched with hot water and steam before drying. The purpose of this pretreatments is to inactivate enzyme that prevents color and vitamin C losses. The quality parameters were moisture content, colour, vitamin C content, and capsaicin. Changes were observed by gravimetri method for moisture content, chromameter in L* a * b * colour model, and iodine titration for vitamin C. After drying for 20 hours at 60°C, chilli with steam blanching pretreatment dried rapidly than other samples. Unpretreated chilli had higher vitamin C content and better color than blanched chilli.

  7. Effect of quality control implementation on image quality of radiographic films and irradiation doses to patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yuxi; Zhou Qipu; Ge Lijuan; Hou Changsong; Qi Xuesong; Yue Baorong; Wang Zuoling; Wei Kedao

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes in the image quality of radiographic films and the irradiation doses to patients after quality control (QC) implementation. Methods: The entrance surface doses (ESD) to patients measured with TLD and the image quality of radiographic films were evaluated on the basis of CEC image quality criteria. Results: The ESD to patients were significantly reduced after QC implementation (P 0.05), but the post-QC image quality was significantly improved in chest PA, lumbar spine AP and pelvis AP(P0.01 or P<0.05). Conclusion: Significantly reduced irradiation dose with improved image quality can be obtained by QC implementation

  8. Determination of effective irradiation dose to maintain quality of garlic cultivars during storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janagam, Venu Madhav; Sethi, Shruti; Kaur, Charanjit; Singh, Bhupinder; Pal, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.) is the second most widely cultivated allium vegetable next to onion. India is the second largest producer (4.46%) of garlic after China (81.02%). As freshly harvested garlic is available in the market for three to four months and there is urgent need to store huge quantity of garlic to fulfil the demand of the consumers during the off-season. The major causes of losses in garlic are sprouting, physiological loss in weight (PLW), decay and quality loss. Several investigators have proved the efficacy of the use of ionizing radiations to reduce the losses caused due to sprouting and other factors. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of irradiation on post harvest quality of garlic and to determine the irradiation dose for maximum quality retention. Two garlic varieties namely, Yamuna Safed (G-1) and Yamuna Safed-4 (G-323) were treated 120 days (just after dormancy break) postharvest with different doses of gamma irradiation (0.075, 0.01 and 0.15 kGy) and their quality parameters were studied upto 210 days at ambient conditions (18-32℃ and 55-65% RH). Effect of irradiation on physical, physiological and biochemical parameters during storage of both the varieties of garlic revealed that 0.1 kGy irradiation dose was most significant in checking sprouting, controlling decay, PLW, respiration rate and retention of total soluble solids (TSS), pyruvic acid, antioxidant activity, total phenols and amylase activity during storage in comparison to non-irradiated samples followed by 0.15 and 0.075 kGy. Among the two varieties studied, the variety G-323 performed better than G-1 with regard to changes in physiological and biochemical parameters during storage. (author)

  9. Effect of gamma irradiation on the flavour and flatulence causing oligosaccharides from broad bean (Vicia faba L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaddou, H.; Mhaisen, M.T.; Al-Adamy, L.Z.; Naji, E.Z.

    1985-01-01

    Effect of gamma-irradiation (2.5 to 10 KGy) on the flavour and flatulence causing oligosaccharides of broad bean were investigated. The method used for the cooked flavour analysis involved low temperature distillation. Gas-chromatography was used to separate the flavour extracts into their various constituents. The major volatile free fatty acids isolated are C16, C18, C18:1, and C20. Identification of the major peaks from the non-acid fraction were carried out. Identified peaks were hydrocarbons, alcohols, ketones, aldehydes and phenols. Most of the compounds found to increase with increase in radiation dose. On the other hand, sensory evaluation tests indicated no changes in broad bean flavour quality after irradiation. Sugars were also analysed by gas chromatographic method after TMS-ether derivatization. Fructose, α and β-glucose, sucrose, raffinose and stachyose were the major sugars present. The gas-forming oligosaccharides were found to decrease with increase in dose applied. On the other hand, other sugars found to increase with increase in radiation dose. (author)

  10. Effects of habitual coffee consumption on cardiometabolic disease, cardiovascular health, and all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, James H; Bhatti, Salman K; Patil, Harshal R; DiNicolantonio, James J; Lucan, Sean C; Lavie, Carl J

    2013-09-17

    Coffee, after water, is the most widely consumed beverage in the United States, and is the principal source of caffeine intake among adults. The biological effects of coffee may be substantial and are not limited to the actions of caffeine. Coffee is a complex beverage containing hundreds of biologically active compounds, and the health effects of chronic coffee intake are wide ranging. From a cardiovascular (CV) standpoint, coffee consumption may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, as well as other conditions associated with CV risk such as obesity and depression; but it may adversely affect lipid profiles depending on how the beverage is prepared. Regardless, a growing body of data suggests that habitual coffee consumption is neutral to beneficial regarding the risks of a variety of adverse CV outcomes including coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke. Moreover, large epidemiological studies suggest that regular coffee drinkers have reduced risks of mortality, both CV and all-cause. The potential benefits also include protection against neurodegenerative diseases, improved asthma control, and lower risk of select gastrointestinal diseases. A daily intake of ∼2 to 3 cups of coffee appears to be safe and is associated with neutral to beneficial effects for most of the studied health outcomes. However, most of the data on coffee's health effects are based on observational data, with very few randomized, controlled studies, and association does not prove causation. Additionally, the possible advantages of regular coffee consumption have to be weighed against potential risks (which are mostly related to its high caffeine content) including anxiety, insomnia, tremulousness, and palpitations, as well as bone loss and possibly increased risk of fractures. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of a quality improvement curriculum for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Tartaglia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As health systems find ways to improve quality of care, medical training programs are finding opportunities to prepare learners on principles of quality improvement (QI. The impact of QI curricula for medical students as measured by student learning is not well delineated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a QI curriculum for senior medical students as measured by student knowledge and skills. Methods: This study was an observational study that involved a self-assessment and post-test Quality Improvement Knowledge Application Tool (QIKAT for intervention and control students. A QI curriculum consisting of online modules, live discussions, independent readings and reflective writing, and participation in a mentored QI project was offered to fourth-year medical students completing an honor's elective (intervention group. Senior medical students who received the standard QI curriculum only were recruited as controls. Results: A total of 22 intervention students and 12 control students completed the self-assessment and QIKAT. At baseline, there was no difference between groups in self-reported prior exposure to QI principles. Students in the intervention group reported more comfort with their skills in QI overall and in 9 of the 12 domains (p<0.05. Additionally, intervention students performed better in each of the three case scenarios (p<0.01. Discussion: A brief QI curriculum for senior medical students results in improved comfort and knowledge with QI principles. The strengths of our curriculum include effective use of classroom time and faculty mentorship with reliance on pre-existing online modules and written resources. Additionally, the curriculum is easily expandable to larger groups of students and transferable to other institutions.

  12. Imatinib treatment causes substantial transcriptional changes in adult Schistosoma mansoni in vitro exhibiting pleiotropic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Buro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosome parasites cause schistosomiasis, one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. For decades Praziquantel (PZQ is the only drug widely used for controlling schistosomiasis. The absence of a vaccine and fear of PZQ resistance have motivated the search for alternatives. Studies on protein kinases (PKs demonstrated their importance for diverse physiological processes in schistosomes. Among others two Abl tyrosine kinases, SmAbl1 and SmAbl2, were identified in Schistosoma mansoni and shown to be transcribed in the gonads and the gastrodermis. SmAbl1 activity was blocked by Imatinib, a known Abl-TK inhibitor used in human cancer therapy (Gleevec/Glivec. Imatinib exhibited dramatic effects on the morphology and physiology of adult schistosomes in vitro causing the death of the parasites.Here we show modeling data supporting the targeting of SmAbl1/2 by Imatinib. A biochemical assay confirmed that SmAbl2 activity is also inhibited by Imatinib. Microarray analyses and qRT-PCR experiments were done to unravel transcriptional processes influenced by Imatinib in adult schistosomes in vitro demonstrating a wide influence on worm physiology. Surface-, muscle-, gut and gonad-associated processes were affected as evidenced by the differential transcription of e.g. the gynecophoral canal protein gene GCP, paramyosin, titin, hemoglobinase, and cathepsins. Furthermore, transcript levels of VAL-7 and egg formation-associated genes such as tyrosinase 1, p14, and fs800-like were affected as well as those of signaling genes including a ribosomal protein S6 kinase and a glutamate receptor. Finally, a comparative in silico analysis of the obtained microarray data sets and previous data analyzing the effect of a TGFβR1 inhibitor on transcription provided first evidence for an association of TGFβ and Abl kinase signaling. Among others GCP and egg formation-associated genes were identified as common targets.The data affirm broad negative effects of

  13. Prevention effect of hemabate on postpartum hemorrhage caused by uterine inertia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-Ying Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the prevention effect of hemabate on postpartum hemorrhage caused by uterine inertia. Methods: A total of 200 puerpera with single full-term delivery who were admitted in our hospital from May, 2015 to May, 2016 were included in the study and divided into vaginal delivery group and cesarean section with 100 cases in each group according to the delivery modes. According to the medication methods, each group was divided into hemabate group and oxytocin with 50 cases in each group. The puerpera in the hemabate group were given deep intramuscular injection of hemabate (250 μg after fetus delivery, and the injection interval and dosage were adjusted according to the condition, with the maximum dose not exceeding than 2 mg. The puerpera in the oxytocin group were given oxytocin (10 U and 0.9% NaCl after fetus delivery, iv drip, for 2 h. The amount of bleeding during delivery, 2 h and 24 h after delivery in each group was observed. A volume of 3 mL elbow venous blood before delivery and 24 h after delivery was extracted. The full automatic blood cell analyzer was used to detect 24 h hemoglobin decrease value in each group. The coagulation detector was used to detect the change of coagulation function (PT, APTT, and FIB before delivery and 24 h after delivery. The blood pressure and heart rate in each group were observed. Results: The amount of bleeding during delivery, 2 h and 24 h after delivery in hemabate group was significantly less than that in oxytocin group (P0.05. The heart rate and blood pressure after medication in each group were not significantly different from those before medication, and the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (P>0.05. Conclusions: Hemabate can effective prevent the postpartum hemorrhage caused by uterine inertia, significantly superior to that by oxytocin. It is safe and effective in application of vaginal delivery and cesarean section; therefore, it deserves to be

  14. In vitro chronic effects on hERG channel caused by the marine biotoxin Yessotoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Fernández Ferreiro

    2014-06-01

    Currently, published evidence indicates that hERG channel dysfunction can be due to more than one mechanism for many drugs (Guth, 2007. Alterations of hERG channel trafficking are considered an important factor in hERG-related cardiotoxicity. Actually, a screening study revealed that almost 40% of the drugs that block Ikr have also trafficking effects (Wible et al., 2005. Although YTX does not block hERG channels, it has been historically described as cardiotoxic due to in vivo damage to cardiomyocytes. Our results show that YTX induces a significant increase of hERG channel levels on the extracellular side of the plasma membrane in vitro. YTX causes cell death in many cell lines (Korsnes and Espenes, 2011 and the alterations of surface hERG levels might be related to the apoptotic process. However, annexin-V, a relatively early marker of apoptosis (Vermes et al., 1995, occurs later than the increase of surface hERG. Additionally, staurosporine triggered apoptosis without a simultaneous increase of surface hERG, so events are not necessarily related. Therefore YTX-induced elevated hERG in the plasma membrane seem to be independent of apoptosis. Functional implications of hERG currents have been described after alterations of cell surface hERG density (Guth, 2007. YTX did not cause significant alterations of hERG currents. Furthermore the hERG levels after YTX treatment were duplicated, so the effect on currents should be clearly evidenced if these channels were functional. The hERG channels on the cell surface are regulated by its production, translocation to the plasma membrane and degradation. The increase of extracellular channel could be a consequence of a higher production and externalization or a slower degradation. Higher synthesis in our cell model would not be physiologically relevant but our results demonstrated that the amount of immature hERG is reduced instead of increased. Fully glycosylated hERG seems slightly increased in these conditions but it is

  15. Effect of beach management policies on recreational water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Elizabeth A; Feng, Zhixuan; Gidley, Maribeth L; Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Kumar, Naresh; Donahue, Allison G; Reniers, Adrianus J H M; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

    2018-04-15

    When beach water monitoring programs identify poor water quality, the causes are frequently unknown. We hypothesize that management policies play an important role in the frequency of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) exceedances (enterococci and fecal coliform) at recreational beaches. To test this hypothesis we implemented an innovative approach utilizing large amounts of monitoring data (n > 150,000 measurements per FIB) to determine associations between the frequency of contaminant exceedances and beach management practices. The large FIB database was augmented with results from a survey designed to assess management policies for 316 beaches throughout the state of Florida. The FIB and survey data were analyzed using t-tests, ANOVA, factor analysis, and linear regression. Results show that beach geomorphology (beach type) was highly associated with exceedance of regulatory standards. Low enterococci exceedances were associated with open coast beaches (n = 211) that have sparse human densities, no homeless populations, low densities of dogs and birds, bird management policies, low densities of seaweed, beach renourishment, charge access fees, employ lifeguards, without nearby marinas, and those that manage storm water. Factor analysis and a linear regression confirmed beach type as the predominant factor with secondary influences from grooming activities (including seaweed densities and beach renourishment) and beach access (including charging fees, employing lifeguards, and without nearby marinas). Our results were observable primarily because of the very large public FIB database available for analyses; similar approaches can be adopted at other beaches. The findings of this research have important policy implications because the selected beach management practices that were associated with low levels of FIB can be implemented in other parts of the US and around the world to improve recreational beach water quality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All

  16. Protective Effects of Intralipid and Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Nephrotoxicity Caused by Dichlorvos in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Murat Celik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE and intralipid (IL on nephrotoxicity caused by acute Dichlorvos (D toxicity were investigated in this study. Forty-eight Wistar Albino rats were divided into 7 groups as follows: Control, D, CAPE, intralipid, D + CAPE, D + IL, and D + CAPE + IL. When compared to D group, the oxidative stress index (OSI values were significantly lower in Control, CAPE, and D + IL + CAPE groups. When compared to D + IL + CAPE group, the TOS and OSI values were significantly higher in D group (P<0.05. When mitotic cell counts were assessed in the renal tissues, it was found that mitotic cell count was significantly higher in the D group while it was lower in the D + CAPE, D + IL, and D + IL + CAPE groups when compared to the control group (P<0.05. Also, immune reactivity showed increased apoptosis in D group and low profile of apoptosis in the D + CAPE group when compared to the Control group. The apoptosis level was significantly lower in D + IL + CAPE compared to D group (P<0.05 in the kidneys. As a result, we concluded that Dichlorvos can be used either alone or in combination with CAPE and IL as supportive therapy or as facilitator for the therapeutic effect of the routine treatment in the patients presenting with pesticide poisoning.

  17. The nature, causes and effects of school violence in South African high schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vusumzi Nelson Ncontsa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to investigate the nature, causes and effects of school violence in four South African high schools. A purposive sample of five principals, 80 learners and 20 educators was selected from the four schools used in the study. A sequential mixed method approach was used in this study; both questionnaires and interviews were used. The design is divided into two phases, beginning with the collection and analysis of quantitative data, followed by the collection and analysis of qualitative data. The overall purpose of this design is that the qualitative data help explain or build upon initial quantitative results from the first phase of the study. The advantage of the design is that its two-phased nature makes it uncomplicated to implement and to report on. A combination of both quantitative and qualitative methods provides a better understanding of the research problem than either approach alone. A pilot study of the questionnaire was conducted in a school outside the province in which the study was done. Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the questionnaire was 0.72. This was a high positive coefficient and implied that the questionnaire used was reliable. The study found that bullying, vandalism, gangsterism, indiscipline, intolerance, and corporal punishment were prevalent in schools. Furthermore, the study found that school violence had the following effects on learners: loss of concentration; poor academic performance; bunking of classes; and depression. The implications of these findings are discussed in detail.

  18. Effects on the upstream flood inundation caused from the operation of Chao Phraya Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutham Visutimeteegorn

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During the flooding events, the operation of Chao Phraya Dam to control downstream water discharge is one of the causes of the inundation occuring over the upstream area. The purposes of this research are to study the effects of the operation of Chao Phraya Dam upon the upstream flood inundation and to find out the new measures of the flood mitigation in the upstream areas of Chao Phraya Dam by using a hydrodynamic model. The results show that Manning's n in the Chao Phraya River and its tributaries is 0.030-0.035 in the main channels and 0.050-0.070 in the flood plain areas. The backwater due to the operation of the Chao Praya dam affects as far as 110 kilometers upstream. New methods of water diversion can mitigate the flood inundation without the effect on the floating rice fields. The construction of reservoirs in the Upper Sakaekang River Basin and the Upper Yom River Basin will mitigate the flood not only in their own basins but also in the Lower Chao Phraya River Basin. The coordinated operation of the Chao Phraya Dam, the regulators and the upper basin reservoirs will efficiently mitigate the flood inundation.

  19. Protective effects of Curcuma longa against neurobehavioral and neurochemical damage caused by cerium chloride in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Yamina; Nciri, Riadh; Brahmi, Noura; Saidi, Saber; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Alwasel, Saleh; Aldahmash, Waleed; El Feki, Abdelfatteh; Allagui, Mohamed Salah

    2018-05-07

    Cerium chloride (CeCl 3 ) is considered an environmental pollutant and a potent neurotoxic agent. Medicinal plants have many bioactive compounds that provide protection against damage caused by such pollutants. Curcuma longa is a bioactive compound-rich plant with very important antioxidant properties. To study the preventive and healing effects of Curcuma longa on cerium-damaged mouse brains, we intraperitoneally injected cerium chloride (CeCl 3 , 20 mg/kg BW) along with Curcuma longa extract, administrated by gavage (100 mg/kg BW), into mice for 60 days. We then examined mouse behavior, brain tissue damage, and brain oxidative stress parameters. Our results revealed a significant modification in the behavior of the CeCl 3 -treated mice. In addition, CeCl 3 induced a significant increment in lipid peroxidation, carbonyl protein (PCO), and advanced oxidation protein product levels, as well as a significant reduction in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity remarkably increased in the brain of CeCl 3 -treated mice. Histopathological observations confirmed these results. Curcuma longa attenuated CeCl 3 -induced oxidative stress and increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes. It also decreased AChE activity in the CeCl 3 -damaged mouse brain that was confirmed by histopathology. In conclusion, this study suggests that Curcuma longa has a neuroprotective effect against CeCl 3 -induced damage in the brain.

  20. To Investigate the Effect of Colchicine in Prevention of Adhesions Caused by Serosal Damage in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İhsan Yıldız

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aim. Adhesion formation is a process which starts with an inflammation caused by a number of factors and eventually results in fibrosis. Colchicine prevents adhesion formation which is antifibrous process. The effectivity of colchicine in the prevention of adhesions was investigated. Materials and Methods. A total of 36 rats were equally divided into three groups: (I control group 1 (n=12, (II abrasion group 2 (n=12, and (III abrasion + colchicine group 3 (n=12. Group 1 underwent laparotomy and was orally given physiological serum 2 cc/day for 10 days. In Group 2, injury was created in the cecum serosa following laparotomy and they were orally given physiological serum 2 cc/day for 10 days. In Group 3, injury was created in the cecum serosa following laparotomy and the rats were orally given colchicine 50 mcg kg/day mixed with physiological serum 2 cc/day for 10 days. Laparotomy was performed and adhesions were examined both macroscopically and microscopically. Both macroscopic and microscopic examinations were performed using Zühlke’s score. Results. A significant difference was observed among the adhesion scores of the groups both macroscopically and microscopically. Macroscopic score was lower in group 3 than group 2. Microscopic score was lower in group 3 than group 2. Conclusion. Oral administration of colchicine is effective in the prevention of adhesions.

  1. Are effects of common ragwort in the Ames test caused by pyrrolizidine alkaloids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovee, Toine F H; Helsdingen, Richard J R; Hoogenboom, Ron L A P; de Nijs, Monique W C M; Liu, Xiaojie; Vrieling, Klaas; Klinkhamer, Peter G L; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Mulder, Patrick P J

    2015-08-01

    It has previously been demonstrated by others that acetone extracts of Senecio jacobaea (syn. Jacobaea vulgaris, common or tansy ragwort) test positive in the Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity test (Ames test). Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are thought to be responsible for these mutagenic effects. However, it was also observed that the major PA present in common ragwort, jacobine, produced a negative response (with and without the addition of rat liver S9) in Salmonella test strains TA98, TA100, TA1535 and TA1537. To investigate which compounds in the plant extracts were responsible for the positive outcome, the present study investigated the contents and mutagenic effects of methanol and acetone extracts prepared from dried ground S. jacobaea and Senecio inaequidens (narrow-leafed ragwort). Subsequently, a fractionation approach was set up in combination with LC-MS/MS analysis of the fractions. It was shown that the positive Ames test outcomes of S. jacobaea extracts are unlikely to be caused by PAs, but rather by the flavonoid quercetin. This study also demonstrates the importance of identifying compounds responsible for positive test results in bioassays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nonlinear effects caused by coupling misalignment in rotors equipped with journal bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennacchi, Paolo; Vania, Andrea; Chatterton, Steven

    2012-07-01

    Misalignment is one of the most common sources of trouble of rotating machinery when rigid couplings connect the shafts. Ideal alignment of the shafts is difficult to be obtained and rotors may present angular and/or parallel misalignment (defined also as radial misalignment or offset). During a complete shaft revolution, a periodical change of the bearings load occurs in hyperstatic shaft-lines, if coupling misalignment between the shafts is excessive. If the rotating machine is equipped with fluid-film journal bearings, the change of the loads on the bearing causes also the variation of their instantaneous dynamic characteristics, i.e. damping and stiffness, and the complete system cannot be considered any longer as linear. Despite misalignment is often observed in the practice, there are relatively few studies about this phenomenon in literature and their results are sometimes conflicting. The authors aim at modeling accurately this phenomenon, for the first time in this paper, and giving pertinent diagnostic information. The proposed method is suitable for every type of shaft-line supported by journal bearings. A finite element model is used for the hyperstatic shaft-line, while bearing characteristics are calculated by integrating Reynolds equation as a function of the instantaneous load acting on the bearings, caused also by the coupling misalignment. The results obtained by applying the proposed method are shown by means of the simulation, in the time domain, of the dynamical response of a hyperstatic shaft-line. Nonlinear effects are highlighted and the spectral components of the system response are analyzed, in order to give diagnostic information about the signature of this type of fault.

  3. On the Effects of Wind Turbine Wake Skew Caused by Wind Veer: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchfield, Matthew J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sirnivas, Senu [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Because of Coriolis forces caused by the Earth's rotation, the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer often contains wind-direction change with height, also known as wind-direction veer. Under low turbulence conditions, such as in stably stratified atmospheric conditions, this veer can be significant, even across the vertical extent of a wind turbine's rotor disk. The veer then causes the wind turbine wake to skew as it advects downstream. This wake skew has been observed both experimentally and numerically. In this work, we attempt to examine the wake skewing process in some detail, and quantify how differently a skewed wake versus a non skewed wake affects a downstream turbine. We do this by performing atmospheric large-eddy simulations to create turbulent inflow winds with and without veer. In the veer case, there is a roughly 8 degree wind direction change across the turbine rotor. We then perform subsequent large-eddy simulations using these inflow data with an actuator line rotor model to create wakes. The turbine modeled is a large, modern, offshore, multimegawatt turbine. We examine the unsteady wake data in detail and show that the skewed wake recovers faster than the non skewed wake. We also show that the wake deficit does not skew to the same degree that a passive tracer would if subject to veered inflow. Last, we use the wake data to place a hypothetical turbine 9 rotor diameters downstream by running aeroelastic simulations with the simulated wake data. We see differences in power and loads if this downstream turbine is subject to a skewed or non skewed wake. We feel that the differences observed between the skewed and nonskewed wake are important enough that the skewing effect should be included in engineering wake models.

  4. On the Effects of Wind Turbine Wake Skew Caused by Wind Veer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchfield, Matthew J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sirnivas, Senu [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Because of Coriolis forces caused by the Earth's rotation, the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer often contains wind-direction change with height, also known as wind-direction veer. Under low turbulence conditions, such as in stably stratified atmospheric conditions, this veer can be significant, even across the vertical extent of a wind turbine's rotor disk. The veer then causes the wind turbine wake to skew as it advects downstream. This wake skew has been observed both experimentally and numerically. In this work, we attempt to examine the wake skewing process in some detail, and quantify how differently a skewed wake versus a non skewed wake affects a downstream turbine. We do this by performing atmospheric large-eddy simulations to create turbulent inflow winds with and without veer. In the veer case, there is a roughly 8 degree wind direction change across the turbine rotor. We then perform subsequent large-eddy simulations using these inflow data with an actuator line rotor model to create wakes. The turbine modeled is a large, modern, offshore, multimegawatt turbine. We examine the unsteady wake data in detail and show that the skewed wake recovers faster than the non skewed wake. We also show that the wake deficit does not skew to the same degree that a passive tracer would if subject to veered inflow. Last, we use the wake data to place a hypothetical turbine 9 rotor diameters downstream by running aeroelastic simulations with the simulated wake data. We see differences in power and loads if this downstream turbine is subject to a skewed or non skewed wake. We feel that the differences observed between the skewed and nonskewed wake are important enough that the skewing effect should be included in engineering wake models.

  5. Effects of adenosine on the organ injury and dysfunction caused by hemorrhagic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Adenosine has been shown in animal and human studies to decrease the post-ischemic myocardial injury by lowering the levels of tumor necrosis factor-a. The objectives of the study was to examine the protective effects of adenosine on the organ injury (liver, kidney, pancreas) associated with hemorrhagic shock in rats. Methodology: The study was conducted at Cardiovascular Physiology laboratory, King Saud University, Riyadh in 2007-2008. Anesthetized male Sprague- Dawley rats were assigned to hemorrhage and resuscitation treated with 20mM adenosine , untreated, or similar time matched control groups (n=6 per group). Rats were hemorrhaged for one hour using a reservoir model. Arterial blood pressure was monitored for one hour, and maintained at a mean arterial blood pressure of 40 mmHg. Adenosine 20mM was injected intra-arterially, before resuscitation in the adenosine treated group. Resuscitation was performed by re infusion of the sheded blood for 30 minutes. Arterial blood samples were analyzed for biochemical indicators of multiple organ injury: 1) liver function: aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), 2) renal function: urea and creatinine, 3) pancreatic function: amylase. Results: In the control group there was no significant rise in the serum levels of (i) urea and creatinine, (ii) aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), (iii) amylase. While in the adenosine treated group, resuscitation from one hour of hemorrhagic shock resulted in significant rises in the serum levels of (i) urea and creatinine, (ii) aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), (iii) amylase. Treatment of rats with 20mM adenosine before resuscitation following one hour of hemorrhagic shock decreased the multiple organ injury and dysfunction caused by hemorrhagic shock. Conclusion: Adenosine attenuated the renal, liver and pancreatic injury caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats. Thus

  6. Effects of gentling on behavior and meat quality of lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sevi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Within few hours after parturition lambs develop a strong and selective relationship with their mothers (Poindron and Le Neindre, 1980. In order to increase the amount of milk available for transformation, lambs often are prematurely separated from the ewes, thus inducing an early disruption of the mother-young relationship. A number of authors demonstrated that the lack of the maternal bond can inhibit the welfare state of the lambs (Sevi et al., 2001 and reduced animal welfare can have detrimental effects on meat quality in many animals species (Gregory, 1998 as well as in sheep (Napolitano et al., 2002a. A possible recover from conditions of poor animal welfare may be attained through the administration of gentle contacts by humans (Boivin et al., 2000 which may supply an additional social bond with members of a different animal species. The present study aims to verify the effect of artificial rearing on lamb welfare and meat quality, and assess the possibility to increase both by means of gentling.

  7. [Quality and effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions in workplaces sites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, Eliza

    2008-01-01

    According to the survey carried out by the National Centre for Workplace Health Promotion at the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, the level and quality of smoking cessation interventions implemented in Polish enterprises are insufficient. Therefore, the dissemination of good practices in this field is needed. The paper presents (on the basis of the literature review) chosen outcomes of the research focused on the effectiveness of workplace smoking cessation interventions. These are mostly methods influencing the turnout in such programs as well as reduction of smoking in the workplace. According to the papers in question, partnership relationships between the organizers of the program and its participants as well as ensuring the employees in the process of quitting various forms of social support are factors, which may contribute to effective reduction of smoking in the workplace. It seems necessary to increase awareness of this issue among Polish managers.

  8. The Effects of Agricultural Raw Product Exports on Environment Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hosein mohammadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The relationship between openness, trade and environmental damaging are the most important problems in the early 1990s. Some scientists assume the environmental quality is a normal good and increasing income increases demand for environmentally safe products. Therefore, Firms will be encouraging the using of safer and less polluting procedure. On the other hand other scientists assume international trade grows the environmental degradation through environmentally polluting industries and expand economics scales in developing countries. While environmental standards are low in these countries, the expansion of trade will lead to more pollution. Some experimental studies have confirmed a negative relationship between trade and environment. The effect of import and export of trade is not considered as important components of trade, despite very consideration of the relationship between openness, trade and environmental by researchers while in general part trade may have different effect on environmental. Materials and Methods: The base model is used to study the relationship between economic growth and environmental indexes and trade. Grossman and Krueger (1991 and Shafik and Bandvpady (1992 used the trade intensity variable, obtained from the ratio of exports plus imports divided by GDP as the World Trade openness of an economy measure. Grossman and Krueger (1991, the first person who developed environmental Kuznets curve (EKC used multiple versions of the model. Instrumental variable regression model has been estimated using panel data of period 1998 and 2009 for 73 countries, including 27 development countries and 46 developing countries. Countries with more than 0.9 Human Development Index eligible as developed countries and countries by Human Development Index between 0.7 to 0.9 considered as developing countries., based on the standard international trade classification. For exports of agricultural raw materials, 5

  9. Inhibitory effect of some spice essential oils on Penicillium digitatum causing postharvest rot in citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akgül, Attila

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study to control blue mould caused by Penicillium digitatum, essential oil of cumin was applied with filter paper discs of 6 mm diameter which were soaked in 0,04 ml oil and vapour effect inhibited completely mycelial growth and spore germination of pathogen in vitro. When filter paper discs soaked in essential oils of black thyme, dill, coriander and rosemary were placed on the culture medium (PDA, they had no effect on the mycelial growth. Their vapour effect inhibited mycelial growth of pathogen 85.8%, 82.8%, 80% and 71.4% respectively. Dill and rosemary oils also prevented mycelial colour.En este estudio para controlar las manchas azules causadas por Penicillium digitatum, se aplicó aceite esencial de comino en discos de papel de filtro de 6 mm de diámetro, los cuales fueron empapados en 0,04 ml de aceite y su vapor inhibió completamente el crecimiento micelar y la germinación de esporas del patógeno in vitro. Cuando los discos de papel de filtro empapados en aceites esenciales de tomillo, eneldo, culantro y romero se colocaron sobre el medio de cultivo (PDA, no se observó efecto sobre el crecimiento micelar. Los efectos de sus vapores inhibieron el crecimiento micelar de patógenos en un 85,8%, 82,8%, 80% y 71,4% respectivamente. Los aceites de eneldo y romero también evitaron la aparición del color micelar.

  10. Effect of viewing distance on 3D fatigue caused by viewing mobile 3D content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sungchul; Lee, Dong-Su; Park, Min-Chul; Yano, Sumio

    2013-05-01

    With an advent of autostereoscopic display technique and increased needs for smart phones, there has been a significant growth in mobile TV markets. The rapid growth in technical, economical, and social aspects has encouraged 3D TV manufacturers to apply 3D rendering technology to mobile devices so that people have more opportunities to come into contact with many 3D content anytime and anywhere. Even if the mobile 3D technology leads to the current market growth, there is an important thing to consider for consistent development and growth in the display market. To put it briefly, human factors linked to mobile 3D viewing should be taken into consideration before developing mobile 3D technology. Many studies have investigated whether mobile 3D viewing causes undesirable biomedical effects such as motion sickness and visual fatigue, but few have examined main factors adversely affecting human health. Viewing distance is considered one of the main factors to establish optimized viewing environments from a viewer's point of view. Thus, in an effort to determine human-friendly viewing environments, this study aims to investigate the effect of viewing distance on human visual system when exposing to mobile 3D environments. Recording and analyzing brainwaves before and after watching mobile 3D content, we explore how viewing distance affects viewing experience from physiological and psychological perspectives. Results obtained in this study are expected to provide viewing guidelines for viewers, help ensure viewers against undesirable 3D effects, and lead to make gradual progress towards a human-friendly mobile 3D viewing.

  11. The effects of congestions tax on air quality and health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Christer; Burman, Lars; Forsberg, Bertil

    The "Stockholm Trial" involved a road pricing system to improve the air quality and reduce traffic congestion. The test period of the trial was January 3-July 31, 2006. Vehicles travelling into and out of the charge cordon were charged for every passage during weekdays. The amount due varied during the day and was highest during rush hours (20 SEK = 2.2 EUR, maximum 60 SEK per day). Based on measured and modelled changes in road traffic it was estimated that this system resulted in a 15% reduction in total road use within the charged cordon. Total traffic emissions in this area of NO x and PM10 fell by 8.5% and 13%, respectively. Air quality dispersion modelling was applied to assess the effect of the emission reductions on ambient concentrations and population exposure. For the situations with and without the trial, meteorological conditions and other emissions than from road traffic were kept the same. The calculations show that, with a permanent congestion tax system like the Stockholm Trial, the annual average NO x concentrations would be lower by up to 12% along the most densely trafficked streets. PM10 concentrations would be up to 7% lower. The limit values for both PM10 and NO 2 would still be exceeded along the most densely trafficked streets. The total population exposure of NO x in Greater Stockholm (35 × 35 km with 1.44 million people) is estimated to decrease with a rather modest 0.23 μg m -3. However, based on a long-term epidemiological study, that found an increased mortality risk of 8% per 10 μg m -3 NO x, it is estimated that 27 premature deaths would be avoided every year. According to life-table analysis this would correspond to 206 years of life gained over 10 years per 100 000 people following the trial if the effects on exposures would persist. The effect on mortality is attributed to road traffic emissions (likely vehicle exhaust particles); NO x is merely regarded as an indicator of traffic exposure. This is only the tip of the ice

  12. A new formula for the lifetime of a round beam caused by the Touschek effect in an electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Yoshikazu

    1985-01-01

    The beam lifetime caused by the Touschek effect in an electron storage ring is calculated for a round beam, extending the existing theory for a ribbon beam. The result agrees with the observed lifetime in the SOR-RING. (author)

  13. Effects of Instruction on Preservice Elementary Teachers' Conceptions of the Causes of Night and Day and the Seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Ronald K.; Atwood, Virginia A.

    1997-01-01

    Details a study that tests the effectiveness of brief instruction on the causes of night and day and the seasons. Employs simple, inexpensive models. Findings are useful for science teacher educators. Contains 32 references. (DDR)

  14. Effect of Repeated Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Beef Quality and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Hafizur; Hossain, Mohammad Mujaffar; Rahman, Syed Mohammad Ehsanur; Hashem, Mohammad Abul

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to know the effect of repeated freeze-thaw cycles of beef on the sensory, physicochemical quality and microbiological assessment. The effects of three successive freeze-thaw cycles on beef forelimb were investigated comparing with unfrozen fresh beef for 75 d by keeping at −20±1℃. The freeze-thaw cycles were subjected to three thawing methods and carried out to know the best one. As the number of freeze-thaw cycles increased color and odor declined significantly before cook within the cycles and tenderness, overall acceptability also declined among the cycles after cook by thawing methods. The thawing loss increased and dripping loss decreased significantly (pcycles and then decreased. Cooking loss increased in cycle 1 and 3, but decreased in cycle 2. pH decreased significantly (pcycles. Moreover, drip loss, cooking loss and WHC were affected (pcycles. 2-Thiobarbituric acid (TBARS) value increased (pcycles and among the cycles by thawing methods. Total viable bacteria, total coliform and total yeast-mould count decreased significantly (pcycles in comparison to the initial count in repeated freeze-thaw cycles. As a result, repeated freeze-thaw cycles affected the sensory, physicochemical and microbiological qua- lity of beef, causing the deterioration of beef quality, but improved the microbiological quality. Although repeated freeze-thaw cycles did not affect much on beef quality and safety but it may be concluded that repeated freeze and thaw should be minimized in terms of beef color for commercial value and WHC and tenderness/juiciness for eating quality. PMID:26761286

  15. Effects of Enrofloxacin Administration on Semen Quality of Barbari bucks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrima Sinha

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to study the effect of enrofloxacin administration on semen quality of Barbari buck. Six normal, healthy adult Barbari bucks (25-30 Kg aged between 2 to 2.5 years were used as semen donors. The bucks were administered enrofloxacin at the dose of 5mg/kg body weight intra-muscularly daily for 7 days. From each buck biweekly eighteen semen ejaculates (1st to 18th were collected and one sample (0th from each buck was collected before administration of enrofloxacin, using a non-oestrous doe as dummy and investigated for semen quality parameters. There was no significant difference (P≥0.05 in seminal volume between different ejaculates. Mass motility decreased significantly (P≤0.01 and was lowest in 4th ejaculate as compared to mass motility prior to drug administration. Highest significant (P≤0.01 decrease in progressive motility was seen in 9th ejaculate as compared to progressive motility before drug administration. Sperm concentration decreased significantly (P≤0.01 and was found to be lowest in 4th ejaculate as compared to sperm concentration before enrofloxacin administration. Percent live spermatozoa decreased significantly (P≤0.01 and was found to be minmum in 12th ejaculate as compared to sperm concentration prior to drug administration. Highest significant increase (P≤ 0.01 in per cent head, mid-piece and tail abnormalities of spermatozoa was observed in 4th, 3rd and 6th ejaculate respectively following parentral administration of enrofloxacion as compared to ejaculate before drug administration. Following drug administration, the semen quality decreased progressively and then became slowly normal after 14th ejaculate.

  16. Effect of Spices Mixture and Gamma Irradiation on Sausage Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, M.M.; Sallam, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation was carried out to study the effect of spices mixture on reducing the oxidation of fat and to improve the quality and organoleptic characteristics as well as extension of shelf-life of beef sausage. Beef sausages were mixed with three different levels (0.5%, 1.5% and 2.5%) of spices mixture (cardamom, clove, cubeb, laurel leaves, cinnamon, black pepper, rosemary, parpicu, fennel and coriander). The sausages were packed in polyethylene bags and irradiated at 2.5, 5 and 7.5 kGy then stored at 5±1°C for 48 days. Microbiological, biochemical and physical analyses as well as organoleptic evaluation were carried out. Results indicated that increasing the spices level decreased the total bacterial count (TBC), molds, yeasts and psychrophilic bacteria (PB) while total volatile nitrogen (TVN), thiobarbituric acid (TBA), peroxide value (PV) and acid value (AV) were increased in treated samples (1.5% and 2.5%) as compared to control (0.5%). On the other hand, the spices decreased TVN, TBA, PV and AV in treated sausages during cold storage while the physical parameters were increased and the best qualities of cold irradiated sausages were observed at the level 2.5% then 1.5% of spices, and the cooking yield and cooking loss and the organoleptic scores (based on over all acceptability) were better than the control sample (0.5%). The results of spices mixture showed that the level 2.5% can reduce oxidation of fat and improve quality and organoleptic characteristics as well as extension of shelf-life of cold irradiated beef sausage stored for 48 days.

  17. The effects of multiple anaesthetic episodes on equine recovery quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, J P; Simon, B T; Coleman, M; Martinez, E A; Lepiz, M A; Watts, A E

    2018-01-01

    Although rare, 70% of equine fatalities during recovery from general anaesthesia (GA) are due to catastrophic fractures from poor recovery quality. To determine the effect of repeated GA recovery on GA recovery quality. Experimental blinded trial. Eight adult horses underwent six GA events on sevoflurane for distal limb MRI examination over a 14-week period. Prior to GA recovery, xylazine was administered. Randomly ordered video-recorded GA recoveries were scored by three blinded board certified veterinary anaesthesiologists, unaware of patient identity or GA event number, for nine parameters using a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) where 0 = worst and 100 = best. The number of attempts to stand, duration of lateral and sternal recumbency, total recovery duration and physiologic parameters during each GA event were recorded. Repeated measures ANOVA were used to detect differences. Agreement between observer VAS scores was determined via inter-rater reliability using an intraclass correlation. With GA recovery experience, VAS scores for balance and coordination, knuckling, and overall quality of recovery were improved and the duration of lateral recumbency was increased. There were no differences in total recovery duration, number of attempts to stand, physiologic parameters other than heart rate during GA, or VAS scores for activity in lateral recumbency, move to sternal, move to stand, or strength. Each GA event was relatively short and there was no surgical stimulation. The same results may not occur if there was surgical stimulation and pain during each GA event. Recovery from GA improves with multiple anaesthetic episodes in horses. Clinicians can advise clients that horses are likely to have better GA recovery on repeated GA recovery due to improved balance and coordination and reduced knuckling. Additionally, there is no change in anaesthetic morbidity with six repeated GA events over a 14-week period. © 2017 EVJ Ltd.

  18. The Effect of Job Performance Aids on Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosshage, Erik [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). System Surety Engineering

    2014-06-01

    Job performance aids (JPAs) have been studied for many decades in a variety of disciplines and for many different types of tasks, yet this is the first known research experiment using JPAs in a quality assurance (QA) context. The objective of this thesis was to assess whether a JPA has an effect on the performance of a QA observer performing the concurrent dual verification technique for a basic assembly task. The JPA used in this study was a simple checklist, and the design borrows heavily from prior research on task analysis and other human factors principles. The assembly task and QA construct of concurrent dual verification are consistent with those of a high consequence manufacturing environment. Results showed that the JPA had only a limited effect on QA performance in the context of this experiment. However, there were three important and unexpected findings that may draw interest from a variety of practitioners. First, a novel testing methodology sensitive enough to measure the effects of a JPA on performance was created. Second, the discovery that there are different probabilities of detection for different types of error in a QA context may be the most far-reaching results. Third, these results highlight the limitations of concurrent dual verification as a control against defects. It is hoped that both the methodology and results of this study are an effective baseline from which to launch future research activities.

  19. Variation detection and respondents’ feedback: the cause, effect, and solution of oil spills.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele Sunday Tologbonse

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Centred on occurrences of pipeline explosion and oil spills in a host community; a supervised classification technique, of land use/land cover variation detection was carried-out, with Landsat imageries of three time intervals, to determine the percentage of variation between the time intervals. Also carried-out, was a random sampling of questionnaires; dispatch to acquire respondents’ feedback. It addressed respondents’ demographic and social-economic composition of the sample population, the perception on the cause and the impact, and the effect of the oil spill and finally considered the possible solutions. Information was subjected to descriptive analysis and an F-test statistical analysis in a 95% confidence interval. Reports showed that land use/land cover classification had undergone series of percentage variation within the time interval considered, indicating ‘remarks’ of a rise or a decline. While, the measure of insecurity (of about 36.7% is a prevailing element to the unceasing attack on oil pipelines and only a sustaining security measure (of about 40.8% will evidently pave a way-out. Wherefore advocating for community based policing, and a comprehensive technological sensor system, for monitoring of oil pipelines/facilities across the Nation.

  20. Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Recurrent Hyperthyroidism Caused by Graves' Disease: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Wang, B; Chen, S R; Hou, X; Wang, X F; Zhao, S H; Song, J Q; Wang, Y G

    2016-09-01

    The effect of selenium supplementation on recurrent hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease is unclear. Our study aimed to assess the efficacy of selenium supplementation therapy on recurrent Graves' disease. Forty-one patients with recurrent Graves' disease were enrolled in this study. All patients received the routine treatment using methimazole (MMI), while patients allocated to the selenium group received additional selenium therapy for 6 months. The influence of selenium supplementation on the concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-TSH-receptor antibodies (TRAb), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) were assessed. The remission rate was also compared between 2 groups. There was no obvious difference in the demographic data and the levels of serum FT4, FT3, TSH, and TRAb between the 2 groups at baseline. Both FT4 and FT3 decreased more at 2 months in the selenium group than the controls, while the TSH level increased more in patients receiving selenium supplementation (pGraves' disease. Randomized trials with large number of participants are needed to validate the finding above. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. The healthy worker effect in asthma: work may cause asthma, but asthma may also influence work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moual, Nicole; Kauffmann, Francine; Eisen, Ellen A; Kennedy, Susan M

    2008-01-01

    Despite the increasing attention to the relationship between asthma and work exposures, occupational asthma remains underrecognized and its population burden underestimated. This may be due, in part, to the fact that traditional approaches to studying asthma in populations cannot adequately take into account the healthy worker effect (HWE). The HWE is the potential bias caused by the phenomenon that sicker individuals may choose work environments in which exposures are low; they may be excluded from being hired; or once hired, they may seek transfer to less exposed jobs or leave work. This article demonstrates that population- and workplace-based asthma studies are particularly subject to HWE bias, which leads to underestimates of relative risks. Our objective is to describe the HWE as it relates to asthma research, and to discuss the significance of taking HWE bias into account in designing and interpreting asthma studies. We also discuss the importance of understanding HWE bias for public health practitioners and for clinicians. Finally, we emphasize the timeliness of this review in light of the many longitudinal "child to young adult" asthma cohort studies currently underway. These prospective studies will soon provide an ideal opportunity to examine the impact of early workplace environments on asthma in young adults. We urge occupational and childhood asthma epidemiologists collaborate to ensure that this opportunity is not lost.

  2. The effects of low-level laser on muscle damage caused by Bothrops neuwiedi venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DM Dourado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to assess the effects of low-level laser (660 nm on myonecrosis caused by the insertion of Bothrops neuwiedi venom in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 24 each: Group S (0.9% saline solution; Group V (venom and Group VLLL (venom plus low-level laser. These categories were subdivided into four additional groups (n = 6 based on the euthanasia timing (3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days. The groups V and VLLL were inoculated with 100 µL of concentrated venom (40 µg/mL in the gastrocnemius muscle. The muscle was irradiated using a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser (GaAlAs at 35 mW power and 4 J/cm² energy density for 3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days or 7 days after venom inoculation. To evaluate the myotoxic activity of the venom, CK activity was measured and the muscle was histologically analyzed. The low-level laser reduced venom-induced CK activity in the groups euthanized at 3 hours, 24 hours and 3 days (p < 0.0001. Histological analysis revealed that low-level laser reduced neutrophilic inflammation as well as myofibrillar edema, hemorrhage and myonecrosis following B. neuwiedi envenomation. These results suggest that low-level laser can be useful as an adjunct therapy following B. neuwiedi envenomation.

  3. The effects of low-level laser on muscle damage caused by Bothrops neuwiedi venom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dourado, D.M.; Matias, R.; Almeida, M.F.; Paula, K.R. de; Carvalho, P.T.C. [University for the Development of the State and of the Region of Pantanal (UNIDERP), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Lab. of Experimental Histopathology]. E-mail: ccfi@uniderp.br; Vieira, R.P. [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Pathology and Physical Therapy; Oliveira, L.V.F. [Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Masters Program in Rehabilitation Sciences

    2008-07-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effects of low-level laser (660 nm) on myonecrosis caused by the insertion of Bothrops neuwiedi venom in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 24 each): Group S (0.9% saline solution); Group V (venom) and Group VLLL (venom plus low-level laser). These categories were subdivided into four additional groups (n = 6) based on the euthanasia timing (3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days). The groups V and VLLL were inoculated with 100 {mu}L of concentrated venom (40 {mu}g/mL) in the gastrocnemius muscle. The muscle was irradiated using a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser (GaAlAs) at 35 mW power and 4 J/cm{sup 2} energy density for 3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days or 7 days after venom inoculation. To evaluate the myotoxic activity of the venom, CK activity was measured and the muscle was histologically analyzed. The low-level laser reduced venom-induced CK activity in the groups euthanized at 3 hours, 24 hours and 3 days (p < 0.0001). Histological analysis revealed that low-level laser reduced neutrophilic inflammation as well as myofibrillar edema, hemorrhage and myonecrosis following B. neuwiedi envenomation. These results suggest that low-level laser can be useful as an adjunct therapy following B. neuwiedi envenomation. (author)

  4. The effects of low-level laser on muscle damage caused by Bothrops neuwiedi venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dourado, D.M.; Matias, R.; Almeida, M.F.; Paula, K.R. de; Carvalho, P.T.C.; Vieira, R.P.; Oliveira, L.V.F.

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effects of low-level laser (660 nm) on myonecrosis caused by the insertion of Bothrops neuwiedi venom in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 24 each): Group S (0.9% saline solution); Group V (venom) and Group VLLL (venom plus low-level laser). These categories were subdivided into four additional groups (n = 6) based on the euthanasia timing (3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days). The groups V and VLLL were inoculated with 100 μL of concentrated venom (40 μg/mL) in the gastrocnemius muscle. The muscle was irradiated using a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser (GaAlAs) at 35 mW power and 4 J/cm 2 energy density for 3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days or 7 days after venom inoculation. To evaluate the myotoxic activity of the venom, CK activity was measured and the muscle was histologically analyzed. The low-level laser reduced venom-induced CK activity in the groups euthanized at 3 hours, 24 hours and 3 days (p < 0.0001). Histological analysis revealed that low-level laser reduced neutrophilic inflammation as well as myofibrillar edema, hemorrhage and myonecrosis following B. neuwiedi envenomation. These results suggest that low-level laser can be useful as an adjunct therapy following B. neuwiedi envenomation. (author)

  5. Anisotropy effects during dwell-fatigue caused by δ-phase orientation in forged Inconel 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarimäki, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.saarimaki@liu.se [Division of Engineering Materials, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Colliander, Magnus Hörnqvist [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Göteborg (Sweden); GKN Aerospace Engine Systems, R& T Centre, SE-46181 Trollhättan (Sweden); Moverare, Johan J. [Division of Engineering Materials, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2017-04-24

    Inconel 718 is a commonly used superalloy for turbine discs in the gas turbine industry. Turbine discs are often subjected to dwell-fatigue as a result of long constant load cycles. The effect of anisotropy on dwell-fatigue cracking in forged turbine discs have not yet been thoroughly investigated. Crack propagation behaviour was characterised using compact tension (CT) samples cut in different orientations from a real turbine disc forging. Samples were also cut in two different thicknesses in order to investigate the influence of plane strain and plane stress condition on the crack propagation rates. The samples were subjected to dwell-fatigue tests at 550 °C with 90 s or 2160 s dwell-times at maximum load. Microstructure characterisation was done using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques such as electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and light optical microscopy (LOM). The forged alloy exhibits strong anisotropic behaviour caused by the non-random δ-phase orientation. When δ-phases were oriented perpendicular compared to parallel to the loading direction, the crack growth rates were approximately ten times faster. Crack growth occurred preferably in the interface between the γ-matrix and the δ-phase.

  6. Exposure to sorbitol during lactation causes metabolic alterations and genotoxic effects in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Felipe S; Araujo-Lima, Carlos F; Aiub, Claudia A F; Felzenszwalb, Israel

    2016-10-17

    Sorbitol is a polyol used by the food industry as a sweetener. Women are consuming diet and light products containing sorbitol during pregnancy and in the postnatal period to prevent themselves from excessive weight gain and maintain a slim body. Although there is no evidence for the genotoxicity of sorbitol in the perinatal period, this study focused on evaluating the effects of the maternal intake of sorbitol on the biochemical and toxicological parameters of lactating Wistar rat offspring after 14days of mother-to-offspring exposure. A dose-dependent reduction of offspring length was observed. An increase in sorbitol levels determined in the milk was also observed. However, we detected an inverse relationship between the exposition dose in milk fructose and triacylglycerols concentrations. There was an increase in the plasmatic levels of ALT, AST and LDLc and a decrease in proteins, cholesterol and glucose levels in the offspring. Sorbitol exposure caused hepatocyte genotoxicity, including micronuclei induction. Maternal sorbitol intake induced myelotoxicity and myelosuppression in their offspring. The Comet assay of the blood cells detected a dose-dependent genotoxic response within the sorbitol-exposed offspring. According to our results, sorbitol is able to induce important metabolic alterations and genotoxic responses in the exposed offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Synthesis of Sierran Forest Biomass Management Studies and Potential Effects on Water Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Weisberg

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Lake Tahoe basin, located along the California and Nevada border between the Carson and Sierra Nevada mountain ranges, represents a complex forested ecosystem consisting of numerous sub-watersheds and tributaries that discharge directly to Lake Tahoe. This synthesis focuses on historical and current nutrient pools and the effects of biomass management in watersheds of the basin relative to their potential impacts on nutrient (N, P related discharge water quality. An accumulating forest floor as a result of fire suppression has resulted in the build-up of large nutrient pools that now provide a “natural” source of long term nutrient availability to surface waters. As a consequence, stand and forest floor replacing wildfire may cause a large magnitude nutrient mobilization impact on runoff water quality. Hence, mechanical harvest and controlled burning have become popular management strategies. The most ecologically significant long-term effects of controlled fire appear to be the loss of C and N from the forest floor. Although the application of controlled fire may have some initial impact on overland/litter interflow nutrient loading, controlled burning in conjunction with mechanical harvest has the potential to improve runoff water quality by reducing N and P discharge and improving the overall health of forest ecosystems without the danger of a high intensity wildfire.

  8. The radiotherapy effect on the quality of life of patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Namie Okino; Dias, Adriana Marques; Zago, Marcia Maria Fontao

    2006-01-01

    In cases of head and neck cancer, surgical advances in combination with radiotherapy (RT) have brought an increase in patients' probability of cure. RT is widely used and aims to destroy cancer cells in order to reduce or eliminate a malignant tumor. However, RT also causes major changes in patients' quality of life during and after treatment. The current study aims to evaluate the side effects of RT in patients with head and neck cancer and its influence on quality of life. The study population included head and neck cancer patients submitted to RT at the University of Sao Paulo Hospital in Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. Data were collected with the FACT H and N instrument and McMaster University's Questionnaire for head and neck RT and submitted to quantitative statistical analysis using SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). The main side effects of RT that affected physical quality of life were related to salivation and nutritional problems, while the predominant emotional problems were depression and anxiety. (author)

  9. Effect of salinity on grain yield and grain quality of wheat (triticum aestivum l.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, G.; Saqib, M.; Rafique, Q.; Rahman, A.U.; Akhtar, J.; Haq, M.A.U.

    2013-01-01

    Salinity is one of the important stresses resulting in the reduction of growth and yield of different crops including wheat. In saline soils the concentration of Na/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/ is higher accompanied with the decreased K/sup +/: Na/sup +/ ratio thus severely affecting the growth and yield of crops. The effect of salinity on the growth and yield of wheat is well documented, whereas there is very little information about salinity tolerance and grain quality of wheat. Present study was conducted to assess the effect of salinity on yield components, ionic relations and grain quality and to understand the relationship among these parameters. A pot experiment was conducted using wheat genotype Pasban-90. There were two treatments i.e. non-saline (0.33 dS m/sup -1/) and saline (15 dS m/sup -1/) with five replications. Salinity resulted in a significant reduction of the grain protein, fat and fiber contents. Similarly yield components were significantly reduced. Maximum reduction was noted in case of number of tillers plant/sup -1/, followed by grain weight plant/sup -1/. High Na/sup +/ and low K/sup +/, P concentration and K/sup +/: Na/sup +/ ratio was observed in the shoot, root and grain. This disturbed ionic composition seems to be apparent cause of yield reduction and deterioration of wheat quality under salinity. (author)

  10. Chemical and isotopic seismic precursory signatures in deep groundwater: Cause and effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, D.V.; Nagabhushanam, P.

    2012-01-01

    Exploratory hydrochemical studies were initiated in Koyna, India, to examine the chemical changes in the deep groundwater due to seismic activity, 2 months before the occurrence of a M 5.1 earthquake on 14th March 2005. A few deep wells (100–250 m), out of a dozen, recorded hydrochemical anomalies induced by this earthquake, and the anomalies continued for the next 3 months. Periodical hydrochemical data of one of the wells indicated a linear increase in Cl − , SO 4 2- , F − and depleted δ 18 O from August 2006 to March 2009, though there is no long term change in groundwater level (except short duration seasonal change). The observed linear change is hypothesised as an effect of aquifer response to seismic stress related to an impending earthquake of M ⩾ 5. The observed temporal change in different chemical concentrations projected linearly to the levels of March 2005 and estimated the time of the impending earthquake (the same as that of March 2005 event) as 2011/12. Further, the time projection also made based on exponential increase in hydrochemistry after 3/2009, advanced the possible time window to 2010/11. This hypothesis was realized on 12 December 2009 with an earthquake of M 5.1. Even the simple arithmetic mean of the 45-a earthquake (M > 5) history of Koyna indicates a recurrence time of ∼5.4 a. To account for the observed temporal hydrochemical changes, a model, based on mixing of two aquifer waters caused by seismic stress, was proposed. Hourly monitoring of electrical conductivity (EC) of groundwater also recorded conductivity changes induced by the M 5.1 earthquake on 12th December 2009. A very important observation that emerges from this study is that the cyclic change in subsurface stress leads to earthquakes. Continuous monitoring of EC may be helpful in visualizing the effect of tectonic forces on groundwater chemistry.

  11. Effects of fluorotherapy on oral changes caused by a vegan diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, F; Laffranchi, L; Fontana, P; Dalessandri, D; Bonetti, S

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effects of fluorotherapy on the oral health of subjects who had been following a vegan diet (lacking in meat and animal derivatives) for a long period of time (at least 1 year and 6 months). A preliminary study (t0) evaluated 50 subjects, all from northern Italy and aged 24-60 years (28 male and 22 female) who had been following a vegan diet for a minimum of 18 months to a maximum of 20 years, and compared them with a control group of 50 individuals following a Mediterranean diet. All vegan subjects showed oral changes such as white spots, lesions invisible to the naked eye and decreased salivary pH values (~5-6). In a second study (t1), the 50 vegan subjects were randomly divided into two subgroups of 25. Subgroup SG1 underwent fluorotherapy with sodium fluoride (Elmex fluoride gel® 1.25%) administered once daily for 1 year. Subgroup SG2 served as controls and did not receive fluorotherapy. The following parameters were recorded before the start of fluorotherapy and again after 1 year: salivary pH; Decayed, Missing, Filled teeth Index; presence and location of white spots and lesions not visible to the naked eye; Plaque Index, and Gingival Index. In SG1, larger lesions became smaller in diameter and small lesions disappeared, a statistically significant improvement compared with SG2, despite the persistence of restricted eating habits and the oral hygiene conditions being similar to those at t0. Salivary pH showed no significant change in either subgroup. Daily application of a topical 1.25% fluoride gel is effective in reducing the incidence of white spot lesions caused by a vegan diet.

  12. Green tea as an effective antimicrobial for urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda eReygaert

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are a very most common type of infection worldwide, and result in billions of dollars in medical care costs. Escherichia coli is the infective agent for 80%-90% of all UTIs. Green tea, derived from leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant has been shown to have various potential health benefits (e.g. cardiovascular disease and cancer. The major beneficial components of green tea have been characterized, and are now known to be polyphenolic catechins. The main catechins in green tea are (--epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG, (--epigallocatechin (EGC, (--epicatechin (EC, and (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG. EGCG and EGC have been shown to have antimicrobial effects, but only EGC has been shown to be excreted in urine. Isolates of E. coli from urinary tract infections collected between 2007-2008 were characterized for antimicrobial resistance to standard drugs. Then 80 of these isolates, representing a wide spectrum of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, were selected for testing using an extract of green tea.Results: The concentrations of green tea extract tested were 0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0 mg/ml. All of the strains tested, except one, had MICs of ≤4.0 mg/ml, with 40% of the isolates having an MIC of ≤2.5 mg/ml, 36% of the isolates having an MIC of ≤3.0 mg/ml, 18% of the isolates having an MIC of ≤3.5 mg/ml, and 5% of the isolates having an MIC of ≤4.0 mg/ml. Two control strains varied in susceptibility, one having an MIC of ≤2.5 mg/ml, another having an MIC of ≤3.5 mg/ml, and the third having an MIC of ≤4.0 mg/ml.Conclusion: Since EGC has been shown to have antimicrobial effects on E. coli, and EGC has been shown to be excreted in the urine in a high enough concentration to potentially be effective as an antimicrobial; these MIC results suggest that ingesting green tea could have potential antimicrobial effects on urinary tract infections caused by E. coli.

  13. Effect of ionizing radiation in the quality of exportable asparagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio C, T.; Espinoza B, J.; Godoy, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Due to the severe restriction which has been set upon the use of chemical fumigant by the importing countries of our horticulture products it has been studied the use of ionizing radiation in asparagus as an alternative treatment for quarantine restriction. The used are 0,15; 0,5; 1.0 y 2.0 kGy. Argenteuil and UC-157 varieties were used. The harvest, handing and storage conditions were the same as the ones export companies use. Both varieties were studied by the following quality parameters: pH, acidity, moisture, soluble solids, vitamin C, fibre content, dissecation, seeding and spreading, shooting, spear lengh, weight loss, microbial and moulds contamination, cutting resistance, respiratory rate, color and sensorial evaluation. From the result obtained it is possible to conclude that the irradiation did not produce deleterous effects on chemical, microbiological or organoleptic parameters in both varieties. From the point of view of the market quality the ionizing radiation could be used as a quarantine treatment under the normal marketing conditions used in Chile. Dose of 2.0 kGy does not produce a shelf life extention. (author)

  14. The Effect of Immunocastration on Some Meat Quality Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Andronie

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Surgical castration of male pigs has become increasingly less accepted at present due to the fact that it is a direct animal welfare concern. UE welfare conditions demand that this method be dropped starting 2018 in order to eliminate the stress and associated pain it induces. Immunocastration is one of the alternatives to surgical castration that ensures male pig welfare and eliminates the boar smell of the meat. The objective of this research has been to identify the immunocastration effects on meat quality, compared with the meat from surgically castrated pigs. The animals assessed during research were fattening PIC pigs, grouped into two lots: surgically castrated pigs (SC and immunocastrated pigs (IC. Pig immunization was achieved by means of ImprovacTM. The results have shown that immunocastrated pigs recorded a 60.2% carcass meat compared to the 59.69% carcass meat achieved in surgically castrated pigs, thus displaying statistically insignificant differences (p≥0.05. Fat layer thickness was significantly lower in immunocastrated pigs compared to the marker lot (p≤0.05. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae lung lesions recorded were lower in immunocastrated pigs compared to the surgically castrated animals (p≥0.05. Despite the fact that differences have been statistically insignificant, we are able to confirm that immunocastrated pigs display a lower incidence of respiratory disease compared to surgically castrated pigs.  In this study there were not significant differences in meat quality between surgically castrated pigs and immunocastrated pigs.

  15. Academic Procrastination in Mathematics: Causes, Dangers and Implications of Counselling for Effective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikhia, Olubusayo A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focused on causes and dangers of academic procrastination (a behavioural problem that involves delaying a task which needs to be accomplished) in mathematics and the need for counseling students who are procrastinators especially of mathematics. Thus, in order to have a comprehensive understanding of the topic, the meaning, causes and…

  16. The relative biological effectiveness of radiations of different quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is a review of the literature relevant to the selection of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for use in arriving at values of the quality factor (Q). Emphasis is placed on response to small ( M . In a wide variety of systems, the RBE M for fast (fission) neutrons, with low doses and dose rates, appears to be of the order of 20 or more compared to moderately filtered 250 kVp x rays and 40 or more compared to higher energy gamma rays. These values, which are much larger than those observed with large doses delivered at high dose rates, are due mainly, but not entirely, to a decrease in the slope of the curve for the ow-LET reference radiation at low dose

  17. Effectiveness of local air quality measures; Effectiviteit van likale luchtkwaliteitsmaatregelen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Bommel, R.; Van de Poll, T. [Royal Haskoning DHV, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    This article examines the effects of local air quality measures which are calculated by order of the city of Utrecht. The conclusions are that environmental zones and other local measures contribute to meet the targets and improve public health. It is also explained why this is the case, and the question is raised whether or not national measures would be better [Dutch] Dit artikel gaat in op de effecten van lokale maatregelen die zijn berekend in opdracht van de gemeente Utrecht. De conclusie: milieuzones en andere lokale maatregelen dragen bij aan het halen van normen en leveren gezondheidswinst op. Er wordt uitgelegd waarom dat zo is en de vraag wordt gesteld of landelijke maatregelen niet beter zijn.

  18. Tillage System and Cover Crop Effects on Soil Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2014-01-01

    ), and moldboard plowing (MP) with and without a cover crop were evaluated in a long-term experiment on a sandy loam soil in Denmark. Chemical, physical, and biological soil properties were measured in the spring of 2012. The field measurements included mean weight diameter (MWD) after the drop-shatter test......, penetration resistance, and visual evaluation of soil structure (VESS). In the laboratory, aggregate strength, water-stable aggregates (WSA), and clay dispersibility were measured. The analyzed chemical and biological properties included soil organic C (SOC), total N, microbial biomass C, labile P and K......Optimal use of management systems including tillage and winter cover crops is recommended to improve soil quality and sustain agricultural production. The effects on soil properties of three tillage systems (as main plot) including direct drilling (D), harrowing to a depth of 8 to 10 cm (H...

  19. Effects of Cold Plasma on Food Quality: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankaj, Shashi K; Wan, Zifan; Keener, Kevin M

    2018-01-01

    Cold plasma (CP) technology has proven very effective as an alternative tool for food decontamination and shelf-life extension. The impact of CP on food quality is very crucial for its acceptance as an alternative food processing technology. Due to the non-thermal nature, CP treatments have shown no or minimal impacts on the physical, chemical, nutritional and sensory attributes of various products. This review also discusses the negative impacts and limitations posed by CP technology for food products. The limited studies on interactions of CP species with food components at the molecular level offers future research opportunities. It also highlights the need for optimization studies to mitigate the negative impacts on visual, chemical, nutritional and functional properties of food products. The design versatility, non-thermal, economical and environmentally friendly nature of CP offers unique advantages over traditional processing technologies. However, CP processing is still in its nascent form and needs further research to reach its potential.

  20. Effects of irradiation on hygiene quality of moon cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fengjiao; Chen Bin; Guo Yaping; Gao Meixu; Li Haipeng; Sun Baozhong

    2007-01-01

    To explore the influence of controllable conditions with different doses of irradiation and store time on the safe and the quality of Moon Cake, the indexes including peroxide value, acid value, mould, coli group coliform group, total numbers of colony and taste of Moon Cake were concerned about. The results show that the peroxide value were increased and acid value were decreased gradually with the increased value of 60 Co γ-irradiation. Meanwhile, the microorganism growth in the moon cake were controlled. It is concluded that the taste of Moon Cake was not changed and the shelf life of ones were prolonged by 3 months when doses of irradiation was 8 kGy, in addition, Tea-polyphenols could prevent the lipid in Moon Cake from lipid oxidation effectively. (authors)

  1. Effects of characteristics of image quality in an immersive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duh, Henry Been-Lirn; Lin, James J W.; Kenyon, Robert V.; Parker, Donald E.; Furness, Thomas A.

    2002-01-01

    Image quality issues such as field of view (FOV) and resolution are important for evaluating "presence" and simulator sickness (SS) in virtual environments (VEs). This research examined effects on postural stability of varying FOV, image resolution, and scene content in an immersive visual display. Two different scenes (a photograph of a fountain and a simple radial pattern) at two different resolutions were tested using six FOVs (30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 deg.). Both postural stability, recorded by force plates, and subjective difficulty ratings varied as a function of FOV, scene content, and image resolution. Subjects exhibited more balance disturbance and reported more difficulty in maintaining posture in the wide-FOV, high-resolution, and natural scene conditions.

  2. The effect of quality circles on job satisfaction and quality of work-life of staff in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinabadi, Reza; Karampourian, Arezou; Beiranvand, Shoorangiz; Pournia, Yadollah

    2013-10-01

    Quality circles, as a participatory management technique, offer one alternative for dealing with frustration and discontent of today's workers. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of implementation of quality circles on nurses' quality of work-life and job satisfaction. In this study, two emergency medical services (EMS) of Hamedan province were selected and randomly assigned as the experimental and control groups. After the experimental group was trained and quality circles were established in this group, the levels of quality of work-life and job satisfaction were measured in the two groups. Then, the statistical analyses were performed using t-test. After the intervention, the results showed significant differences between the scores of motivational factors (p=0.001), the total scores of job satisfaction (p=0.003), and the scores of some quality of work life (QWL) conceptual categories including the use and development of capacities (p=0.008), the total space of life (p=0.003), and the total scores of QWL (p=0.031) in the experimental group compared to those in the control group. This study confirms the effectiveness of quality circles in improving quality of work-life and job satisfaction of nurses working in EMS, and offers their application as a management method that can be used by EMS managers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of susceptibility effects caused by dental materials in head magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strocchi, S.; Ghielmi, M.; Basilico, F.; Macchi, A.; Novario, R.; Ferretti, R.; Binaghi, E.

    2016-03-01

    This work quantitatively evaluates the effects induced by susceptibility characteristics of materials commonly used in dental practice on the quality of head MR images in a clinical 1.5T device. The proposed evaluation procedure measures the image artifacts induced by susceptibility in MR images by providing an index consistent with the global degradation as perceived by the experts. Susceptibility artifacts were evaluated in a near-clinical setup, using a phantom with susceptibility and geometric characteristics similar to that of a human head. We tested different dentist materials, called PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI, Keramit NP, ILOR F, Zirconia and used different clinical MR acquisition sequences, such as "classical" SE and fast, gradient, and diffusion sequences. The evaluation is designed as a matching process between reference and artifacts affected images recording the same scene. The extent of the degradation induced by susceptibility is then measured in terms of similarity with the corresponding reference image. The matching process involves a multimodal registration task and the use an adequate similarity index psychophysically validated, based on correlation coefficient. The proposed analyses are integrated within a computer-supported procedure that interactively guides the users in the different phases of the evaluation method. 2-Dimensional and 3-dimensional indexes are used for each material and each acquisition sequence. From these, we drew a ranking of the materials, averaging the results obtained. Zirconia and ILOR F appear to be the best choice from the susceptibility artefacts point of view, followed, in order, by PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI and Keramit NP.

  4. Radiation dermatitis caused by a bolus effect from an abdominal compression device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Michael; Wei, Randy L.; Yu, Suhong; Sehgal, Varun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA (United States); Klempner, Samuel J. [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California, Orange, CA (United States); Daroui, Parima, E-mail: pdaroui@uci.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 176 evaluated the dosimetric effects caused by couch tops and immobilization devices. The report analyzed the extensive physics-based literature on couch tops, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) frames, and body immobilization bags, while noting the scarcity of clinical reports of skin toxicity because of external devices. Here, we present a clinical case report of grade 1 abdominal skin toxicity owing to an abdominal compression device. We discuss the dosimetric implications of the utilized treatment plan as well as post hoc alternative plans and quantify differences in attenuation and skin dose/build-up between the device, a lower-density alternative device, and an open field. The description of the case includes a 66-year-old male with HER2 amplified poorly differentiated distal esophageal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemo-radiation and the use of an abdominal compression device. Radiation was delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 2 arcs using abdominal compression and image guidance. The total dose was 50.4 Gy delivered over 40 elapsed days. With 2 fractions remaining, the patient developed dermatitis in the area of the compression device. The original treatment plan did not include a contour of the device. Alternative post hoc treatment plans were generated, one to contour the device and a second with anterior avoidance. In conclusion, replanning with the device contoured revealed the bolus effect. The skin dose increased from 27 to 36 Gy. planned target volume (PTV) coverage at 45 Gy was reduced to 76.5% from 95.8%. The second VMAT treatment plan with an anterior avoidance sector and more oblique beam angles maintained PTV coverage and spared the anterior wall, however at the expense of substantially increased dose to lung. This case report provides an important reminder of the bolus effect from external devices such as abdominal compression. Special

  5. Radiation dermatitis caused by a bolus effect from an abdominal compression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Michael; Wei, Randy L.; Yu, Suhong; Sehgal, Varun; Klempner, Samuel J.; Daroui, Parima

    2016-01-01

    American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 176 evaluated the dosimetric effects caused by couch tops and immobilization devices. The report analyzed the extensive physics-based literature on couch tops, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) frames, and body immobilization bags, while noting the scarcity of clinical reports of skin toxicity because of external devices. Here, we present a clinical case report of grade 1 abdominal skin toxicity owing to an abdominal compression device. We discuss the dosimetric implications of the utilized treatment plan as well as post hoc alternative plans and quantify differences in attenuation and skin dose/build-up between the device, a lower-density alternative device, and an open field. The description of the case includes a 66-year-old male with HER2 amplified poorly differentiated distal esophageal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemo-radiation and the use of an abdominal compression device. Radiation was delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 2 arcs using abdominal compression and image guidance. The total dose was 50.4 Gy delivered over 40 elapsed days. With 2 fractions remaining, the patient developed dermatitis in the area of the compression device. The original treatment plan did not include a contour of the device. Alternative post hoc treatment plans were generated, one to contour the device and a second with anterior avoidance. In conclusion, replanning with the device contoured revealed the bolus effect. The skin dose increased from 27 to 36 Gy. planned target volume (PTV) coverage at 45 Gy was reduced to 76.5% from 95.8%. The second VMAT treatment plan with an anterior avoidance sector and more oblique beam angles maintained PTV coverage and spared the anterior wall, however at the expense of substantially increased dose to lung. This case report provides an important reminder of the bolus effect from external devices such as abdominal compression. Special

  6. HVAC design guidelines for effective indoor air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bladykas, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    Building owners, designers and occupants need to consider all the design measures that contribute to high indoor air quality. Building occupants, furnishings, equipment, and ambient air pollution all contribute to surmounting indoor air quality concerns. However, these can be minimized by following HVAC design guidelines which promote high indoor air quality while maintaining reasonable energy-efficiency. The possible liabilities and loss of business productivity due to air quality problems are too great to ignore

  7. Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Crescenzo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids.

  8. A model to evaluate quality and effectiveness of disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, K M M; Nieboer, A P; van Schayck, C P; Asin, J D; Huijsman, R

    2008-12-01

    Disease management has emerged as a new strategy to enhance quality of care for patients suffering from chronic conditions, and to control healthcare costs. So far, however, the effects of this strategy remain unclear. Although current models define the concept of disease management, they do not provide a systematic development or an explanatory theory of how disease management affects the outcomes of care. The objective of this paper is to present a framework for valid evaluation of disease-management initiatives. The evaluation model is built on two pillars of disease management: patient-related and professional-directed interventions. The effectiveness of these interventions is thought to be affected by the organisational design of the healthcare system. Disease management requires a multifaceted approach; hence disease-management programme evaluations should focus on the effects of multiple interventions, namely patient-related, professional-directed and organisational interventions. The framework has been built upon the conceptualisation of these disease-management interventions. Analysis of the underlying mechanisms of these interventions revealed that learning and behavioural theories support the core assumptions of disease management. The evaluation model can be used to identify the components of disease-management programmes and the mechanisms behind them, making valid comparison feasible. In addition, this model links the programme interventions to indicators that can be used to evaluate the disease-management programme. Consistent use of this framework will enable comparisons among disease-management programmes and outcomes in evaluation research.

  9. Application of Quality Assurance Mechanisms for Effective Library ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main strategy used for implementation of quality assurance was integration of the library` services quality assurance agenda into the university structures and the quality assurance mechanisms available and used in Nigerian university libraries were programme accreditation and benchmarking of library systems.

  10. Healthcare Access and Quality Index based on mortality from causes amenable to personal health care in 195 countries and territories, 1990-2015: a novel analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-15

    National levels of personal health-care access and quality can be approximated by measuring mortality rates from causes that should not be fatal in the presence of effective medical care (ie, amenable mortality). Previous analyses of mortality amenable to health care only focused on high-income countries and faced several methodological challenges. In the present analysis, we use the highly standardised cause of death and risk factor estimates generated through the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) to improve and expand the quantification of personal health-care access and quality for 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2015. We mapped the most widely used list of causes amenable to personal health care developed by Nolte and McKee to 32 GBD causes. We accounted for variations in cause of death certification and misclassifications through the extensive data standardisation processes and redistribution algorithms developed for GBD. To isolate the effects of personal health-care access and quality, we risk-standardised cause-specific mortality rates for each geography-year by removing the joint effects of local environmental and behavioural risks, and adding back the global levels of risk exposure as estimated for GBD 2015. We employed principal component analysis to create a single, interpretable summary measure-the Healthcare Quality and Access (HAQ) Index-on a scale of 0 to 100. The HAQ Index showed strong convergence validity as compared with other health-system indicators, including health expenditure per capita (r=0·88), an index of 11 universal health coverage interventions (r=0·83), and human resources for health per 1000 (r=0·77). We used free disposal hull analysis with bootstrapping to produce a frontier based on the relationship between the HAQ Index and the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a measure of overall development consisting of income per capita, average years of education, and total fertility rates. This

  11. Effect of uncertainty components such as recalibration on the performance of quality control charts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, P; Zhang, Nevin

    2005-01-01

    Uncertainty components (recalibration, new reagent lots, etc.) may be the source of random changes in the level of quality control (QC) values, thus causing false alarms. We propose a method for reducing false alarms.......Uncertainty components (recalibration, new reagent lots, etc.) may be the source of random changes in the level of quality control (QC) values, thus causing false alarms. We propose a method for reducing false alarms....

  12. Effect of Some Sudanese Traditional Hot Iron Branding on Cattle Hide Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehab Eltejani Abdelkarim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed in order to assess and evaluate the effect of hot iron branding on cattle hide quality. 62 shapes of hot iron branding were detected and classified. Branding damage was evaluated depending on: purpose of application, location in the animal body, branding area, tribe which applied and hide degree. The results showed that, Baggara tribes branding were causing the greater damage on cattle hides; where 71.4% of its brands placed in the abdominal and animal back area (middle of the hide; in proportion to Misseriya Zuraq tribes (68.4%. According to the location of branding, the less tribe that causing damages to the cattle hides were Darfur tribes (14.3%. In terms of branding area Darfur tribes were causing the most branding damages where 42.8% of its brands on cattle hides were between 20-30cm, followed by Baggara tribes where 57.1% of its brands were between 10-20cm then Misseriya Zuraq tribes by 52.6%, and finally North Kordofan tribes of 37.5%. grading of cattle hides depending on the presence of the brand marks the study revealed that, Misseriya Zuraq tribe's brands were obtained the highest percentage (89.4% of the rejected hides (Scarto= 4 and 5 grades, when compared with North Kordofan tribes (87.5%. For commercial reason brand's were mostly done in the area of 5-10cm but, their effect on cattle hide quality was greater, where 81% of the hides were classified as Scarto.

  13. The Compatibility between Cause and Effect According to the Theologies Suggested by Sadra and TafkῙk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MohammadMahdi Meshkati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The question of why different events have occurred has always been in human being's mind and challenged his curiosity. The question word "why" is used to ask about the cause of a phenomenon,and if man was not aware of the law of causality and did not confirm that every phenomenon needed a cause, he could not imagine any questions with "why". About this law and its related subjects such as compatibility between cause and effect, many schools and theories have emerged, among which, the schools of TafkῙk(Segregation and MulāṢadrāare of special importance. The proponents of TafkῙk believe in the segregation of philosophical – theosophical instructions and religious contents. They reject many of the principles of philosophy by referring to Quran and Hadiths and conclude that philosophy is in contradiction with Quranic teachings. The school of MulāṢadrā however, has a comprehensive view and incudes as its principles all teachings gained from wisdom, texts, theosophy and reasoning. One of the controversial issues discussed by both schools is the subject of compatibility between cause and effect. It is obvious that every effect does not stem from any cause and even there is not always causal relation between concurrent and subsequent phenomena, rather the causality exists only between specific beings. In other words, there must be specialcongruencybetween cause and effect which is referred to as compatibility between cause and effect. Since cause is what brings about the existence of effect and gives it reality, then it itself should possess the existence which it gives to the effect. When one object lacks something, it cannot give it to the other. Because by giving existence to the effect, the existence of cause will not be negated, it becomes clear that cause possesses the existence in a perfect way so that the existence of effect is regarded as a beam of light radiated from cause. The scholars of the school of TafkῙkhowever, believe

  14. Side-gate modulation effects on high-quality BN-Graphene-BN nanoribbon capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Xiaolong; Ye, Weiguang; Wu, Zefei; Han, Yu; Han, Tianyi; He, Yuheng; Cai, Yuan; Wang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    High-quality BN-Graphene-BN nanoribbon capacitors with double side-gates of graphene have been experimentally realized. The double side-gates can effectively modulate the electronic properties of graphene nanoribbon capacitors. By applying anti-symmetric side-gate voltages, we observed significant upward shifting and flattening of the V-shaped capacitance curve near the charge neutrality point. Symmetric side-gate voltages, however, only resulted in tilted upward shifting along the opposite direction of applied gate voltages. These modulation effects followed the behavior of graphene nanoribbons predicted theoretically for metallic side-gate modulation. The negative quantum capacitance phenomenon predicted by numerical simulations for graphene nanoribbons modulated by graphene side-gates was not observed, possibly due to the weakened interactions between the graphene nanoribbon and side-gate electrodes caused by the Ga + beam etching process

  15. [Neuroprotective effect of naloxone in brain damage caused by repeated febrile seizure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ying; Qin, Jiong; Chang, Xing-zhi; Yang, Zhi-xian

    2004-04-01

    The brain damage caused by repeated febrile seizure (FS) during developing age is harmful to the intellectual development of children. So how to decrease the related damage is a very important issue. The main purpose of the present study was to find out whether the non-specific opiate antagonist naloxone at low dose has the neuroprotective effect on seizure-induced brain damage. Warm water induced rat FS model was developed in this study. Forty-seven rats were randomly divided into two groups: normal control group (n = 10) and hyperthermic seizure groups (n = 37). The latter was further divided into FS control group (n = 13) and naloxone-treated group (n = 24). The dose of naloxone is different in two naloxone-treated groups (12/each group), in one group the dose was 1 mg/kg, in the other one 2 mg/kg. Seven febrile seizures were induced in each rat of hyperthermic seizure groups with the interval of 2 days. The rats were weighed and injected intraperitoneally with naloxone once the FS occurred in naloxone-treated group, while the rats of the other groups were injected with 0.9% sodium chloride. Latency, duration and grade of FS in different groups were observed and compared. HE-staining and the electron microscopy (EM) were used to detect the morphologic and ultrastructural changes of hippocampal neurons. In naloxone-treated group, the rats' FS duration and FS grade (5.02 +/- 0.63, 2.63 +/- 0.72) were significantly lower (t = 5.508, P seizure, it could lighten the brain damage resulted from repeated FS to some extent.

  16. EFFECTS OF PROTON PUMP INHIBITORS ON DENTAL EROSIONS CAUSED BY GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Vasile OLTEANU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous studies worldwide have assessed the association between dental erosions or other related oral manifestations, and the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Nowadays, one of the main therapeutic resources of GERD is represented by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs. Adequate salivary secretions and flow are considered mandatory for the protection of both teeth and esophageal mucosa. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible correlation between GERD treatment options and subsequent control of oral manifestation, taking as premises that either PPIs or dietary and lifestyle changes may control oral patterns of GERD by acting on salivary secretions. Methods: 48 clinically diagnosed GERD adult patients with oral manifestations, mainly erosions, were included in the study, none of which showing alarming symptoms that would require further gastroenterologic examination. Oral examination evaluated the DMF (decayed, missing, filled and OHI-S (Simplified Oral Hygiene indices. Salivary flow was evaluated by the Saxon test. 25 patients were prescribed dietary and lifestyle measures and PPIs (omeprazole – 20 mg, whereas 23 patients were managed only through dietary and lifestyle modifications. General assessment was performed at the time of diagnosis and 4 weeks afterwards. Results: No significant differences as to the DMF index, OHI-S index or Saxon test were found over the 4 weeks management between the groups. Conclusions: Oral manifestation of GERD may be caused by impaired salivary secretions and flow, otherwise no - positive or negative - effect could be secondary to PPI therapy. Accordingly, complex oral rehabilitation of GERD patients and collaboration between gastroenterologists and dentists should be promoted.

  17. Soluble transition metals cause the pro-inflammatory effects of welding fumes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeilly, Jane D.; Heal, Mathew R.; Beverland, Iain J.; Howe, Alan; Gibson, Mark D.; Hibbs, Leon R.; MacNee, William; Donaldson, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently reported a higher incidence of respiratory illnesses such as bronchitis, metal fume fever (MFF), and chronic pneumonitis among welders exposed to high concentrations of metal-enriched welding fumes. Here, we studied the molecular toxicology of three different metal-rich welding fumes: NIMROD 182, NIMROD c276, and COBSTEL 6. Fume toxicity in vitro was determined by exposing human type II alveolar epithelial cell line (A549) to whole welding fume, a soluble extract of fume or the 'washed' particulate. All whole fumes were significantly toxic to A549 cells at doses >63 μg ml -1 (TD 50; 42, 25, and 12 μg ml -1 , respectively). NIMROD c276 and COBSTEL 6 fumes increased levels of IL-8 mRNA and protein at 6 h and protein at 24 h, as did the soluble fraction alone, whereas metal chelation of the soluble fraction using chelex beads attenuated the effect. The soluble fraction of all three fumes caused a rapid depletion in intracellular glutathione following 2-h exposure with a rebound increase by 24 h. In addition, both nickel based fumes, NIMROD 182 and NIMROD c276, induced significant reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in A549 cells after 2 h as determined by DCFH fluorescence. ICP analysis confirmed that transition metal concentrations were similar in the whole and soluble fractions of each fume (dominated by Cr), but significantly less in both the washed particles and chelated fractions. These results support the hypothesis that the enhanced pro-inflammatory responses of welding fume particulates are mediated by soluble transition metal components via an oxidative stress mechanism

  18. Effect of mental fatigue caused by mobile 3D viewing on selective attention: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sungchul; Kim, Eun-Soo; Park, Min-Chul

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated behavioral responses to and auditory event-related potential (ERP) correlates of mental fatigue caused by mobile three-dimensional (3D) viewing. Twenty-six participants (14 women) performed a selective attention task in which they were asked to respond to the sounds presented at the attended side while ignoring sounds at the ignored side before and after mobile 3D viewing. Considering different individual susceptibilities to 3D, participants' subjective fatigue data were used to categorize them into two groups: fatigued and unfatigued. The amplitudes of d-ERP components were defined as differences in amplitudes between time-locked brain oscillations of the attended and ignored sounds, and these values were used to calculate the degree to which spatial selective attention was impaired by 3D mental fatigue. The fatigued group showed significantly longer response times after mobile 3D viewing compared to before the viewing. However, response accuracy did not significantly change between the two conditions, implying that the participants used a behavioral strategy to cope with their performance accuracy decrement by increasing their response times. No significant differences were observed for the unfatigued group. Analysis of covariance revealed group differences with significant and trends toward significant decreases in the d-P200 and d-late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes at the occipital electrodes of the fatigued and unfatigued groups. Our findings indicate that mentally fatigued participants did not effectively block out distractors in their information processing mechanism, providing support for the hypothesis that 3D mental fatigue impairs spatial selective attention and is characterized by changes in d-P200 and d-LPP amplitudes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Protective effect of dexmedetomidine combined with ulinastatin on cardiopulmonary function injury caused by cardiopulmonary bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Zhu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the protective effect of dexmedetomidine combined with ulinastatin on cardiopulmonary function impairment caused by cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Methods: A total of 78 patients who received valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass were divided into observation group and control group (n=39 according to random number table. Control group received intraoperative ulinastatin intervention and observation group received intraoperative dexmedetomidine combined with ulinastatin intervention. Differences in the levels of cardiac function indexes, myocardial injury markers, pulmonary function parameters, inflammatory indexes and so on were compared between two groups of patients 24 hours after operation. Results: Cardiac function parameters LSV, RSV and RVEF values of observation group 24 hours after operation were higher than those of control group while PAP value was lower than that of control group; serum myocardial injury markers H-FABP, cTn-T, CKMB, cTnⅠ and NT-proBNP levels were lower than those of control group; lung function parameters Cs and Cd values were higher than those of control group while RI, R5-R20, X5 and Fres values were lower than those of control group; serum pro-inflammatory factors IL-6 and TNF-α levels were lower than those of control group while anti-inflammatory factors sTNF-RI, IL-4 and IL-10 levels were higher than those of control group. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine combined with ulinastatin can protect the cardiopulmonary function in patients with cardiopulmonary bypass, and help to reduce the occurrence of postoperative cardiopulmonary dysfunction and other severe complications.

  20. Effect of bcl-2 overexpression in mice on ovotoxicity caused by 4-vinylcyclohexene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flaws, Jodi A.; Marion, Samuel L.; Miller, Kimberly P.; Christian, Patricia J.; Babus, Janice K.; Hoyer, Patricia B.

    2006-01-01

    The occupational chemical 4-vinylcyclohexene (VCH) destroys small preantral ovarian follicles in mice following repeated daily dosing. The cell survival gene bcl-2 is thought to protect against follicular death during embryogenesis because primordial follicle numbers in newborn bcl-2 overexpressing (OE) mice are greater than in wild-type (WT) controls. Thus, this study was designed to determine if overexpression of bcl-2 protects against VCH-induced follicle loss during embryonic development. Pregnant bcl-2 OE or WT mice were dosed (p.o.) daily with VCH (500 mg/kg) or sesame oil (vehicle control) on days 8-18 of pregnancy. Ovaries were collected from moms and female pups on pup postnatal day (PND) 8. Nonpregnant OE and WT females were also treated with VCH (500 mg/kg p.o.) or vehicle and evaluated in the same manner. As previously reported, ovaries from PND8 OE female pups contained 50% more primordial follicles than WT pups (P < 0.05). Unlike WT pups, relative to vehicle controls, in utero exposure to VCH resulted in a reduction in primordial (25% of control), primary (38% of control), and secondary (33% of control) follicles in ovaries of OE pups (P < 0.05). VCH had no significant effect on follicle numbers in OE or WT moms. Conversely, in nonpregnant adults, VCH did not affect WT mice but caused loss of primordial (55% of control), primary (51% of control), and secondary (69% of control) follicles in OE mice (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that bcl-2 overexpression does not protect against, but instead increases susceptibility to VCH-induced follicle loss in transplacentally exposed or in nonpregnant mice