WorldWideScience

Sample records for qualitative developmental transition

  1. Qualitative methodology in developmental psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin; Mey, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative methodology presently is gaining increasing recognition in developmental psychology. Although the founders of developmental psychology to a large extent already used qualitative procedures, the field was long dominated by a (post) positivistic quantitative paradigm. The increasing...

  2. Developmental transitions: So what's new?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maas, H.L.J.; Hopkins, B.

    1998-01-01

    Structural approaches to development, such as Piaget's stage theory, have proved to be problematic in dealing with developmental transitions. More promising in this respect are models of qualitative change that address macroscopical phase shifts in non-linear dynamicalsystems that arise from quantit

  3. Qualitative methodology in developmental psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin; Mey, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative methodology presently is gaining increasing recognition in developmental psychology. Although the founders of developmental psychology to a large extent already used qualitative procedures, the field was long dominated by a (post) positivistic quantitative paradigm. The increasing...... recognition of the sociocultural embeddedness of human development, and of the importance to study individuals’ subjective experience, however, calls for adequate methodological procedures that allow for the study of processes of transformation across the life span. The wide range of established procedures...

  4. Transitioning from Clinical to Qualitative Research Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Hunt BSc (PT, PhD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper one aspect of the transition that must be made by experienced clinicians who become involved in conducting qualitative health research is examined, specifically, the differences between clinical and research interviewing. A clinician who is skillful and comfortable carrying out a clinical interview may not initially apprehend the important differences between these categories and contexts of interviewing. This situation can lead to difficulties and diminished quality of data collection because the purpose, techniques and orientation of a qualitative research interview are distinct from those of the clinical interview. Appreciation of these differences between interview contexts and genres, and strategies for addressing challenges associated with these differences, can help clinician researchers to become successful qualitative interviewers.

  5. Issues in qualitative and quantitative risk analysis for developmental toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, C A; Gaylor, D W

    1988-03-01

    The qualitative and quantitative evaluation of risk in developmental toxicology has been discussed in several recent publications. A number of issues still are to be resolved in this area. The qualitative evaluation and interpretation of end points in developmental toxicology depends on an understanding of the biological events leading to the end points observed, the relationships among end points, and their relationship to dose and to maternal toxicity. The interpretation of these end points is also affected by the statistical power of the experiments used for detecting the various end points observed. The quantitative risk assessment attempts to estimate human risk for developmental toxicity as a function of dose. The current approach is to apply safety (uncertainty) factors to the no observed effect level (NOEL). An alternative presented and discussed here is to model the experimental data and apply a safety factor to an estimated risk level to achieve an "acceptable" level of risk. In cases where the dose-response curves upward, this approach provides a conservative estimate of risk. This procedure does not preclude the existence of a threshold dose. More research is needed to develop appropriate dose-response models that can provide better estimates for low-dose extrapolation of developmental effects.

  6. Developmental transitions of Coxiella burnetii grown in axenic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Hansen, Bryan; Heinzen, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii undergoes a biphasic developmental cycle within its host cell that generates morphologically and physiologically distinct large cell variants (LCV) and small cell variants (SCV). During the lag phase of the C. burnetii growth cycle, non-replicating SCV differentiate into replicating LCV that in turn differentiate back into SCV during stationary phase. Nearly homogeneous SCV are observed in infected Vero cells after extended incubation (21 to 28days). In the current study, we sought to establish whether C. burnetii developmental transitions in host cells are recapitulated during host cell-free (axenic) growth in first and second generation acidified citrate cysteine media (ACCM-1 and ACCM-2, respectively). We show that ACCM-2 supported developmental transitions and viability. Although ACCM-1 also supported SCV to LCV transition, LCV to SCV transition did not occur after extended incubation (21days). Instead, C. burnetii exhibited a ghost-like appearance with bacteria containing condensed chromatin but otherwise devoid of cytoplasmic content. This phenotype correlated with a near total loss in viability between 14 and 21days of cultivation. Transcriptional profiling of C. burnetii following 14days of incubation revealed elevated expression of oxidative stress genes in ACCM-1 cultivated bacteria. ACCM-2 differs from ACCM-1 by the substitution of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (Mβ-CD) for fetal bovine serum. Addition of Mβ-CD to ACCM-1 at 7days post-inoculation rescued C. burnetii viability and lowered expression of oxidative stress genes. Thus, Mβ-CD appears to alleviate oxidative stress in ACCM-2 to result in C. burnetii developmental transitions and viability that mimic host cell-cultivated organisms. Axenic cultivation of C. burnetii in ACCM-2 and new methods of genetic manipulation now allow investigation of the molecular basis of C. burnetii biphasic development.

  7. RN to FNP: a qualitative study of role transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitz, Laura J; Steiner, Susan H; Burman, Mary E

    2004-09-01

    Registered nurses who return to school in a nurse practitioner program undergo role transition throughout the educational process and into the postgraduate period. This study examined the role transition that occurs in family nurse practitioner (FNP) students. A descriptive, qualitative design was used with in-depth telephone interviews of 9 female FNPs who had recently graduated. A conceptual model was generated that described the role transition from RN to FNP. Two phases of role transition occurred and were depicted by the central categories that emerged: extrinsic obstacles, intrinsic obstacles, turbulence, positive extrinsic forces, positive intrinsic forces, and role development. Although the central categories were found to be the same in Phase I and Phase II, the defining characteristics differed. This study has implications for FNPs, students, and educators regarding role transition. It presents new findings not identified in prior research: personal commitments and sacrifices were identified as specific obstacles encountered during the educational process, and differences were found between inexperienced and experienced RNs in relation to the FNP role transition during the educational period.

  8. Mixing Qualitative and Quantitative Research in Developmental Science: Uses and Methodological Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Weisner, Thomas S.; Kalil, Ariel; Way, Niobe

    2008-01-01

    Multiple methods are vital to understanding development as a dynamic, transactional process. This article focuses on the ways in which quantitative and qualitative methodologies can be combined to enrich developmental science and the study of human development, focusing on the practical questions of "when" and "how." Research situations that may…

  9. Transformation through Health Teaching for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focht-New, Ginny

    2012-01-01

    Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities have medical conditions similar to those among the general population but with more complex presentation, a extended life expectancy, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. These adults' health education has been inadequate. In this qualitative study, the author describes the…

  10. Transformation through Health Teaching for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focht-New, Ginny

    2012-01-01

    Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities have medical conditions similar to those among the general population but with more complex presentation, a extended life expectancy, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. These adults' health education has been inadequate. In this qualitative study, the author describes the…

  11. Developmental Coordination Disorder: Validation of a Qualitative Analysis Using Statistical Factor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Ahern

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates triangulation of the findings of a qualitative analysis by applying an exploratory factor analysis to themes identified in a phenomenological study. A questionnaire was developed from a phenomenological analysis of parents' experiences of parenting a child with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD. The questionnaire was administered to 114 parents of DCD children and data were analyzed using an exploratory factor analysis. The extracted factors provided support for the validity of the original qualitative analysis, and a commentary on the validity of the process is provided. The emerging description is of the compromises that were necessary to translate qualitative themes into statistical factors, and of the ways in which the statistical analysis suggests further qualitative study.

  12. Developmental Lessons of Seasoned Marital and Family Therapists: A Qualitative Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protinsky, Howard; Coward, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Explored development of seasoned marriage and family therapists (MFTs) in order to identify important events and themes in their personal and professional lives. The main developmental theme that emerged was the integration of personal and professional lives. Results might partially provide a map of possible transitions facing MFTs along their…

  13. Conducting a multicentre and multinational qualitative study on patient transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Julie K; Barach, Paul; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra

    2012-12-01

    A multicentre, multinational research study requires careful planning and coordination to accomplish the aims of the study and to ensure systematic and rigorous examination of all project methods and data collected. The aim of this paper is to describe the approach we used during the HANDOVER Project to develop a multicentre, multinational research project for studying transitions of patient care while creating a community of practice for the researchers. We highlight the process used to assure the quality of a multicentre qualitative study and to create a codebook for data analysis as examples of attending to the community of practice while conducting rigorous qualitative research. Essential elements for the success of this multinational, multilanguage research project included recruiting a strong research team, explicit planning for decision-making processes to be used throughout the project, acknowledging the differences among the study settings and planning the protocols to capitalise upon those differences. Although not commonly discussed in reports of large research projects, there is an underlying, concurrent stream of activities to develop a cohesive team that trusts and respects one another's skills and that engage independent researchers in a group process that contributes to achieving study goals. We discuss other lessons learned and offer recommendations for other teams planning multicentre research.

  14. Developmental Dyslexia With and Without Language Impairment: ERPs Reveal Qualitative Differences in Morphosyntactic Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantiani, Chiara; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Perego, Paolo; Molteni, Massimo; Guasti, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize neuropsychological and linguistic skills in children with Developmental Dyslexia (DD) with and without Language Impairment (LI). Behavioral tests of short-term memory, phonemic awareness, and morphosyntactic processing and electrophysiological responses to agreement violations were administered to 32 DD children (16 with additional LI) and 16 controls. Behavioral data revealed quantitative differences among groups: DD+LI children showed the worst performance, followed by DD-only children and controls. Event-related potential results confirmed atypical morphosyntactic processing in the DD-only group, highlighting qualitative differences between groups. These results support multifactor models of learning disabilities, where different patterns of deficits characterize different subgroups.

  15. Mastering developmental transitions in immigrant adolescents: the longitudinal interplay of family functioning, developmental and acculturative tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Anne K; Motti-Stefanidi, Frosso; Asendorpf, Jens B

    2014-03-01

    Immigrant youth differ in their adaptation, which is judged on the basis of how well they deal with developmental and acculturative tasks. While immigrant adolescents are faced with the realities of 2 different cultures, they also have to master age-salient tasks, such as self-efficacy and identity development. To get a better insight into the interplay of developmental and acculturative tasks and their relationship with family functioning, we used 3-wave longitudinal data over a 2-year period from 13-year-old immigrant students (N = 609) in Athens, Greece. Cross-lagged models revealed that family functioning and acculturation were resources for the mastery of developmental tasks. Involvement in the host culture prospectively predicted self-efficacy beliefs, and involvement in the ethnic culture prospectively predicted ethnic identity. These effects increased over time. Family functioning prospectively predicted self-efficacy and ethnic identity. These effects decreased over time. The findings suggest that a well-functioning family, for early adolescents, and being involved in the host culture and in ethnic cultures, for middle adolescents, are particularly important resources to master the tasks of their developmental period. Our findings underscore the importance of developmentally sensitive approaches and the need to account for acculturative challenges in order to understand individual differences in immigrant youth adaptation.

  16. "Cum Poterit"--Rhetorical Exercises for Transitional and Developmental Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, A. P.; Sigrell, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Recently, scholars of rhetoric and composition have shown much interest in the ancient composition exercises known as "progymnasmata". This paper explains how these exercises, which provided ancient students with a transitional curriculum between grammar and rhetoric, have theoretical and practical merit for contemporary compositional…

  17. The selfish to egalitarian transition in young children: developmental processes versus cooperative interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolis, H; Nicolis, S C

    2010-07-01

    There is evidence that a tendency to share resources equitably among members of a social group emerges in middle childhood. It is regarded by many investigators as a central and unique feature of human social life. In this work the relative roles of developmental processes and collective effects generated by interindividual interactions on the selfish to egalitarian transition observed in middle childhood are analyzed. Using mathematical modeling, conditions are identified under which the transition becomes sharp and gives rise to hysteretic behavior.

  18. Semantics of the transitive construction: prototype effects and developmental comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbotson, Paul; Theakston, Anna L; Lieven, Elena V M; Tomasello, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates whether an abstract linguistic construction shows the kind of prototype effects characteristic of non-linguistic categories, in both adults and young children. Adapting the prototype-plus-distortion methodology of Franks and Bransford (1971), we found that whereas adults were lured toward false-positive recognition of sentences with prototypical transitive semantics, young children showed no such effect. We examined two main implications of the results. First, it adds a novel data point to a growing body of research in cognitive linguistics and construction grammar that shows abstract linguistic categories can behave in similar ways to non-linguistic categories, for example, by showing graded membership of a category. Thus, the findings lend psychological validity to the existing cross-linguistic evidence for prototypical transitive semantics. Second, we discuss a possible explanation for the fact that prototypical sentences were processed differently in adults and children, namely, that children's transitive semantic network is not as interconnected or cognitively coherent as adults'.

  19. Examining Developmental Transitions in Civic Engagement across Adolescence: Evidence from a National U.S. Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray-Lake, Laura; Rote, Wendy M.; Benavides, Celina M.; Victorino, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Describing how much and what type(s) of change are evident in civic engagement across adolescence is a fundamental starting point for advancing developmental theory in the civic domain. Using five annual waves of data from a large national U.S. sample spanning 8th-12th grades, our study describes civic engagement typologies and transitions in and…

  20. African American Late Adolescents' Relationships with Parents: Developmental Transitions and Longitudinal Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.; Metzger, Aaron; Campione-Barr, Nicole

    2004-01-01

    Five-year longitudinal patterns and the influence of developmental transitions on 76 middle-class African American late adolescents' (M18.43 years) relationships with parents were examined. Late adolescents were closer to mothers than to fathers. Controlling for age, late adolescent females who had left home reported less negative relationships…

  1. Reinvention of early algebra : developmental research on the transition from arithmetic to algebra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerom, B.A. van

    2002-01-01

    In chapter 1 we give our reasons for carrying out this developmental research project on the transition from arithmetic to algebra, which includes the design of an experimental learning strand on solving equations. Chapter 2 describes the theoretical background of the book: current views on the teac

  2. Contriving Transitive Conditioned Establishing Operations to Establish Derived Manding Skills in Adults with Severe Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Rocio; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate derived manding skills in 2 adults with severe developmental disabilities and language deficits by contriving transitive conditioned establishing operations. Specifically, we evaluated whether a history of reinforced conditional discrimination learning would ultimately result in a derived mand…

  3. Emotional and Motivational Engagement at School Transition: A Qualitative Stage-Environment Fit Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, Jennifer; Hargreaves, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents typically like school less after making age-graded school transitions. Stage-environment fit theory (Eccles & Midgley, 1989) attributes this to a mismatch between developmental needs and new school environments. Our in vivo study provides a basis for future quantitative designs by uncovering the most prevalent stage-environment…

  4. Phase transition for gluon field: a qualitative analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The phase transition for SU(3) gauge field (without quarks) is considered. It is shown that the phase transition is due to the fact that at high temperatures the partition function should be calculated as for a gas of gluons, whereas at low temperatures as the sum over energy levels of correlated quantum states of SU(3) gauge field. A correlated quantum state for strongly interacting fields is defined as a nonperturbative quantum state of strongly interacting fields. The energy spectrum of these quantum states are discrete one. A lower bound of the phase transition temperature by comparing of the average energy for the perturbative and nonperturbative regimes is estimated (for glueball being in thermal equilibrium with the thermostat). It is shown that this quantity is associated with a mass gap. In a scalar model of glueball its energy is calculated. It is shown that this energy is the mass gap. If we set the glueball mass $ \\approx 1.5 \\cdot 10^3$ Mev then it is found that the corresponding value of couplin...

  5. A Qualitative Study of Characteristics, Competencies, and Strategies of Transition Staff Working with Urban Latino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Lorenzo, Omayra

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore characteristics, competencies, and strategies of transition program employment representatives who attain successful employment outcomes for urban Latino/a youths with disabilities. This study employed in-depth interviewing as a method of data collection. The central research question guiding…

  6. A Qualitative Study of Early Family Histories and Transitions of Homeless Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Kimberly A.

    2006-01-01

    Using intensive qualitative interviews with 40 homeless youth, this study examined their early family histories for abuse, neglect, and other family problems and the number and types of transitions that youth experienced. Multiple forms of child maltreatment, family alcoholism, drug use, and criminal activity characterized early family histories…

  7. The Career Transition Process: A Qualitative Exploration of Korean Middle-Aged Workers in Postretirement Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seon-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Today's society, shaped by demographic changes and a global economy, has created different employment trends and work lives that result in adults' engaging in postretirement second careers. This phenomenon is a common occurrence in rapidly aging societies like Korea. This qualitative study examined the postretirement career transition process of…

  8. Apoplastic and intracellular plant sugars regulate developmental transitions in witches’ broom disease of cacao

    OpenAIRE

    Barau, Joan; GRANDIS, Adriana; Carvalho, Vinicius Miessler de Andrade; Teixeira, Gleidson Silva; Zaparoli, Gustavo Henrique Alcalá; do Rio, Maria Carolina Scatolin; Rincones, Johana; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2014-01-01

    Witches’ broom disease (WBD) of cacao differs from other typical hemibiotrophic plant diseases by its unusually long biotrophic phase. Plant carbon sources have been proposed to regulate WBD developmental transitions; however, nothing is known about their availability at the plant–fungus interface, the apoplastic fluid of cacao. Data are provided supporting a role for the dynamics of soluble carbon in the apoplastic fluid in prompting the end of the biotrophic phase of infection. Carbon deple...

  9. Stages and transitions in the development of tooth brushing skills in children of Mexican immigrant families: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benadof, Dafna; Polk, Deborah; Documet, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Compared with white children, the oral health of Latino children in the United States is much worse. One factor contributing to oral health is tooth brushing. Few studies have addressed the formation of the tooth brushing habit in children, and only one of them studied a Latino population. The purpose of this study is to explore the development of the tooth brushing habit in children of Mexican immigrant families and develop hypothesis based on its results. This is an exploratory qualitative study, with a case study design based on 20 in-depth interviews. Participants were Mexican immigrant mothers living in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, PA. Participants had at least one child six-years-old or younger. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative analysis procedures. Four stages were identified in the tooth brushing learning process: initiation and entirely dependent tooth brushing, assisted tooth brushing, road to tooth brushing independence, and independent tooth brushing. Two factors influenced parents' teaching approaches: parents' perceptions of their child's achievement of physical, cognitive, and motor developmental milestones and parents' knowledge about oral hygiene. We identified four distinct stages and found evidence to hypothesize that transitions from one stage to the next are triggered not by the age of the child but by parents' knowledge about oral hygiene and their perceptions of their child's achievement of physical, cognitive, and motor developmental milestones. Future quantitative research studies should be conducted to test this hypothesis in larger groups of Latinos as well as other ethnic groups. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  10. Qualitative Analysis of Critical Transitions in Complex Disease Propagation from a Dynamical Systems Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Zou, Xiufen

    2016-12-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that in complex diseases the deteriorations are often abrupt, and can be viewed as a bifurcation or a critical transition from one asymptotically stable equilibrium to another one at a tipping point. Here, we propose some new ideas to detect early-warning signals of such critical transitions from the perspective of qualitative theory of ordinary differential equations. Specifically, we theoretically derive three indicators that serve as a general early-warning signal indicating an imminent bifurcation or sudden deterioration before the critical transition occurs. Then, we verify our theoretical results by numerical simulations for three examples. Our work forms a starting point to motivate new mathematical insights into predictability for critical transitions of dynamical systems from a new perspective.

  11. Transitioning a home telehealth project into a sustainable, large-scale service: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria A Wade; Taylor, Alan D.; Kidd, Michael R; Carati, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was a component of the Flinders Telehealth in the Home project, which tested adding home telehealth to existing rehabilitation, palliative care and geriatric outreach services. Due to the known difficulty of transitioning telehealth projects services, a qualitative study was conducted to produce a preferred implementation approach for sustainable and large-scale operations, and a process model that offers practical advice for achieving this goal. Methods Initially, semi-...

  12. The consequences of poor communication during transitions from hospital to skilled nursing facility: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Barbara J; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea L; Roiland, Rachel A; Polnaszek, Brock E; Bowers, Barbara J; Kind, Amy J H

    2013-07-01

    To examine how skilled nursing facility (SNF) nurses transition the care of individuals admitted from hospitals, the barriers they experience, and the outcomes associated with variation in the quality of transitions. Qualitative study using grounded dimensional analysis, focus groups, and in-depth interviews. Five Wisconsin SNFs. Twenty-seven registered nurses. Semistructured questions guided the focus group and individual interviews. SNF nurses rely heavily on written hospital discharge communication to transition individuals into the SNF effectively. Nurses cited multiple inadequacies of hospital discharge information, including regular problems with medication orders (including the lack of opioid prescriptions for pain), little psychosocial or functional history, and inaccurate information regarding current health status. These communication inadequacies necessitated repeated telephone clarifications, created care delays (including delays in pain control), increased SNF staff stress, frustrated individuals and family members, contributed directly to negative SNF facility image, and increased risk of rehospitalization. SNF nurses identified a specific list of information and components that they need to facilitate a safe, high-quality transition. Nurses note multiple deficiencies in hospital-to-SNF transitions, with poor quality discharge communication being identified as the major barrier to safe and effective transitions. This information should be used to refine and support the dissemination of evidence-based interventions that support transitions of care, including the Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers program. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. A developmental approach to diagnosis and treatment in a transitional living program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Scott

    2004-04-01

    We hope that the reader has been able to vicariously share with us in the excitement of work in a transitional living program. The young people with whom we share this environment stand on the threshold of adult life. They have suffered medical, psychological, environmental, and social insults. Psychosocial developmental assessment helps us define the details of threats to the foundations of adult personality functioning. These young men and women are woefully unprepared for self-care, social interaction, occupational choice, and adult personal relationships. The premise of transitional living is that relationship-based milieu therapy,guided by psychoanalytic develop mental principles, provides an opportunity to heal these conflicted and immature young people to a degree that can tip the scale of their future lives toward productivity, self-esteem, and commitment. Like residential therapy, transitional living provides milieu therapy, corrective education, and psychotherapy. Unlike residential therapy, transitional living is also embedded in the urban community. It facilitates the transition from dependent childhood to independent living by intensive work with the psychological conflicts and physical and social barriers to success in making this important step.

  14. Community perceptions of developmental and behavioral problems experienced by children living with epilepsy on the Kenyan coast: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Amina; Kariuki, Symon M.; Tumaini, Judith Dzombo; Gona, Joseph; Katana, Khamis; Phillips Owen, Jacqueline A.; Newton, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood epilepsy is common in Africa. However, there are little data on the developmental and behavioral problems experienced by children living with epilepsy, especially qualitative data that capture community perceptions of the challenges faced by these children. Identifying these perceptions using qualitative approaches is important not only to help design appropriate interventions but also to help adapt behavioral tools that are culturally appropriate. We documented the description of these problems as perceived by parents and teachers of children with or without epilepsy. The study involved 70 participants. Data were collected using in-depth interviews and focus group discussions and were analyzed using NVIVO to identify major themes. Our analysis identified four major areas that are perceived to be adversely affected among children with epilepsy. These included internalizing and externalizing problems such as aggression, temper tantrums, and excessive crying. Additionally, developmental delay, especially cognitive deficits and academic underachievement, was also identified as a major problematic area. There is a need to supplement these findings with quantitative estimates and to develop psychosocial and educational interventions to rehabilitate children with epilepsy who have these difficulties. PMID:25868003

  15. The Role of Age and Social Motivation in Developmental Transitions in Young and Old Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana eNikitin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two diary studies investigated the role of social approach and avoidance motivation in important developmental transitions in young and old adulthood. Study 1 comprised a sample of young adults (N = 93, M = 21.5 years who moved out of their parental homes. The sample of Study 2 consisted of older adults (N = 69, M = 76.95 years who moved into senior housing. In both studies, participants reported their habitual social approach and avoidance motives as well as their daily social experience and subjective well-being over the course of two weeks. In line with the literature, social approach motives and age were related to higher subjective well-being, whereas social avoidance motives were negatively associated with subjective well-being. Time since the transition was an important moderator of the association between social avoidance motives and negative outcomes. With increasing time from the transition, the negative effects of social avoidance motives decreased. The positive effects of social approach motives remained fairly stable over time. Importantly, age did not moderate any of the associations between social motivation and outcomes. Results are discussed in terms of transition-related instability and age-related stability.

  16. Apoplastic and intracellular plant sugars regulate developmental transitions in witches’ broom disease of cacao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barau, Joan; Grandis, Adriana; Carvalho, Vinicius Miessler de Andrade; Teixeira, Gleidson Silva; Zaparoli, Gustavo Henrique Alcalá; do Rio, Maria Carolina Scatolin; Rincones, Johana; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Witches’ broom disease (WBD) of cacao differs from other typical hemibiotrophic plant diseases by its unusually long biotrophic phase. Plant carbon sources have been proposed to regulate WBD developmental transitions; however, nothing is known about their availability at the plant–fungus interface, the apoplastic fluid of cacao. Data are provided supporting a role for the dynamics of soluble carbon in the apoplastic fluid in prompting the end of the biotrophic phase of infection. Carbon depletion and the consequent fungal sensing of starvation were identified as key signalling factors at the apoplast. MpNEP2, a fungal effector of host necrosis, was found to be up-regulated in an autophagic-like response to carbon starvation in vitro. In addition, the in vivo artificial manipulation of carbon availability in the apoplastic fluid considerably modulated both its expression and plant necrosis rate. Strikingly, infected cacao tissues accumulated intracellular hexoses, and showed stunted photosynthesis and the up-regulation of senescence markers immediately prior to the transition to the necrotrophic phase. These opposite findings of carbon depletion and accumulation in different host cell compartments are discussed within the frame of WBD development. A model is suggested to explain phase transition as a synergic outcome of fungal-related factors released upon sensing of extracellular carbon starvation, and an early senescence of infected tissues probably triggered by intracellular sugar accumulation. PMID:25540440

  17. Apoplastic and intracellular plant sugars regulate developmental transitions in witches' broom disease of cacao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barau, Joan; Grandis, Adriana; Carvalho, Vinicius Miessler de Andrade; Teixeira, Gleidson Silva; Zaparoli, Gustavo Henrique Alcalá; do Rio, Maria Carolina Scatolin; Rincones, Johana; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2015-03-01

    Witches' broom disease (WBD) of cacao differs from other typical hemibiotrophic plant diseases by its unusually long biotrophic phase. Plant carbon sources have been proposed to regulate WBD developmental transitions; however, nothing is known about their availability at the plant-fungus interface, the apoplastic fluid of cacao. Data are provided supporting a role for the dynamics of soluble carbon in the apoplastic fluid in prompting the end of the biotrophic phase of infection. Carbon depletion and the consequent fungal sensing of starvation were identified as key signalling factors at the apoplast. MpNEP2, a fungal effector of host necrosis, was found to be up-regulated in an autophagic-like response to carbon starvation in vitro. In addition, the in vivo artificial manipulation of carbon availability in the apoplastic fluid considerably modulated both its expression and plant necrosis rate. Strikingly, infected cacao tissues accumulated intracellular hexoses, and showed stunted photosynthesis and the up-regulation of senescence markers immediately prior to the transition to the necrotrophic phase. These opposite findings of carbon depletion and accumulation in different host cell compartments are discussed within the frame of WBD development. A model is suggested to explain phase transition as a synergic outcome of fungal-related factors released upon sensing of extracellular carbon starvation, and an early senescence of infected tissues probably triggered by intracellular sugar accumulation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. A qualitative study of the transition to adulthood for youth with physical disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D A; Law, M C; Rosenbaum, P; Willms, D G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences, perceptions, and needs of youth with physical disabilities in transition from adolescence to adulthood. Purposeful sampling strategies were used to select 34 study participants who lived in three regions of south-central Ontario, Canada. Data collection methods were individual and focus group interviews, and were guided by a set of open-ended questions. An editing style of analysis sorted the text into codes for description and interpretation. Themes emerged about context, the transition process, needs, and services. Participants identified a poor fit between young persons with disabilities and the adult world they were entering. They recommended that services be focused on environmental supports to enable them to "build their own bridges" to the adult world. Community-based transition services need to be planned in collaboration with youth with disabilities and their parents. Concepts of person-environment fit and health promotion can be incorporated into services to enable young persons with disabilities to experience a smooth transition from adolescence to adulthood.

  19. c-di-GMP signalling and the regulation of developmental transitions in streptomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Matthew J; Tschowri, Natalia; Schlimpert, Susan; Flärdh, Klas; Buttner, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    The complex life cycle of streptomycetes involves two distinct filamentous cell forms: the growing (or vegetative) hyphae and the reproductive (or aerial) hyphae, which differentiate into long chains of spores. Until recently, little was known about the signalling pathways that regulate the developmental transitions leading to sporulation. In this Review, we discuss important new insights into these pathways that have led to the emergence of a coherent regulatory network, focusing on the erection of aerial hyphae and the synchronous cell division event that produces dozens of unigenomic spores. In particular, we highlight the role of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) in controlling the initiation of development, and the role of the master regulator BldD in mediating c-di-GMP signalling.

  20. Developmental Idealism, Body Weight and Shape, and Marriage Entry in Transitional China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongwei

    2016-04-01

    New trends toward later and less marriage are emerging in post-reform China. Previous research has examined the changing individual-level socioeconomic and demographic characteristics shaping marriage entry in Chinese adults. Employing a cultural model known as developmental idealism (DI), this study argues that a new worldview specifying an ideal body type has become popular in the West and that this new worldview has been exported to China. This new part of the DI package is likely stratified by gender, has a stronger impact on women than on men, and has likely penetrated urban areas more than rural areas. Drawing on the 1991-2009 longitudinal data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey, this study employs discrete-time logit models to estimate the relationships between various body types and transition to first marriage in Chinese young adults 18-30 years old. Body weight status and body shape are measured by body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), respectively, and further divided into categories of underweight, normal, and obese. Regression results indicate that larger values of BMI and WHR were associated with delayed entry into first marriage in urban women, whereas being overweight or obese was associated with accelerated transition to first marriage in rural men. Not only were these associations statistically significant, but their strengths were substantively remarkable. Findings from this study suggest that both body weight and body shape have important implications for marital success, independent of individual-level socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, and contribute to evolving gender and rural-urban disparities, as China is undergoing a rapid nutrition transition.

  1. Transition from specialist to primary diabetes care: A qualitative study of perspectives of primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liddy Clare

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing prevalence of diabetes and heightened awareness of the benefits of early and intensive disease management have increased service demands and expectations not only of primary care physicians but also of diabetes specialists. While research has addressed issues related to referral into specialist care, much less has been published about the transition from diabetes specialists back to primary care. Understanding the concerns of family physicians related to discharge of diabetes care from specialist centers can support the development of strategies that facilitate this transition and result in broader access to limited specialist services. This study was undertaken to explore primary care physician (PCP perspectives and concerns related to reassuming responsibility for diabetes care after referral to a specialized diabetes center. Methods Qualitative data were collected through three focus groups. Sessions were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were coded and sorted with themes identified using a constant comparison method. The study was undertaken through the regional academic referral center for adult diabetes care in Ottawa, Canada. Participants included 22 primary care physicians representing a variety of referral frequencies, practice types and settings. Results Participants described facilitators and barriers to successful transition of diabetes care at the provider, patient and systems level. Major facilitators included clear communication of a detailed, structured plan of care, ongoing access to specialist services for advice or re-referral, continuing education and mentoring for PCPs. Identified provider barriers were gaps in PCP knowledge and confidence related to diabetes treatment, excessive workload and competing time demands. Systems deterrents included reimbursement policies for health professionals and inadequate funding for diabetes medications and supplies. At the PCP-patient interface

  2. Qualitative Reflections: CASA’s Trauma and Attachment Group (TAG) Program for Youth who have Experienced Early Developmental Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Chandra K.; O’Brien-Langer, Anna; Olson, Karin; Silverstone, Peter H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective We demonstrated previously that the Trauma and Attachment Group (TAG) program for youth in middle childhood significantly improved caregiver/child attachment relationships, reduced children’s symptoms of attachment trauma, and increased the caregiver’s ability for self-reflection. Here we examine the perspectives of both those administering and those taking part in this intensive dyad-based group intervention. Methods Utilizing an ethnographic design we collected and analyzed qualitative data obtained through a focus group and interviews with program facilitators, as well as interviews with participating caregivers. Data were collected from six TAG facilitators through a formal focus group interview (n=4), and informal interviews with TAG facilitators unable to attend the focus group (n=2). Four interviews were also carried out with caregivers (three females and one male). Thematic analysis of the focus group and interview transcripts was conducted. Results Three key themes were identified in the focus group and interview data: Relationship as locus of change, Group process, and Psychoeducation-based content. That the TAG program provides psychoeducation about the effects of trauma to caregiver/child dyads in a group setting appears important in supporting the effectiveness of the program. Structured parent-child play and sensory activities together (“kit-time”) were also highly valued. Conclusions This qualitative study suggests that establishment of a healthy and focused caregiver/child relationship may be the key mechanism to promoting change in relationships that have been challenged by adverse effects of early developmental trauma. Further evaluation may help to identify other components that contribute to the success of the program.

  3. Examining experiences of transition, instability and coping for young offenders in the community: A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Rebecca A; Priest, Helena M

    2016-04-01

    This article explores experiences of transition, instability and coping using a qualitative approach with young offenders within a specialist forensic child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS). Participants were four young people (aged 14-17 years) on community orders under the supervision of local youth offending teams (YOTs). Semi-structured interviews were conducted and data analysed using an inductive thematic analysis approach. Three main themes were identified: (i) people and places; (ii) growth; and (iii) managing difficult experiences. Findings suggest that young offenders are exposed to a wide range of challenging contextual factors including unpredictable or inadequate home environments, numerous transitions (between family members/foster placements and schools), limited engagement with educational settings and a lack of social support, supporting the findings of Paton et al. Findings also portrayed a sense of participants' 'psychological growth' with development along a trajectory from a young child 'acting out' in response to the environments in which they were living; through a more reflective stage, in which they were able to begin to consider the situations they found themselves in; before reaching a position in which they were able to look beyond their day-to-day circumstances with some hope that their lives could be different in the future. Furthermore, accounts revealed that these young people had a limited range of functional coping strategies and had largely negative experiences of services. Clinical implications and the need for further research developing professionals' understanding of the influence of early experiences on young offenders' behaviour are discussed.

  4. A Qualitative Study of Young Adult Experiences in the Bariatric Healthcare System: Psychosocial Challenges and Developmental Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube-Schiff, Marlene; Yufe, Shira; Kastanias, Patti; Weiland, Mary; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is an evidence-based treatment for severe obesity; however, the unique developmental and psychosocial needs of young adults often complicate care and, as yet, are not well understood. We sought to identify themes in young adult patients undergoing bariatric surgery regarding: 1) the psychosocial experiences of obese young adults (18 to 24) seeking bariatric surgery; 2) the experiences during the preoperative bariatric surgery process and 3) the postoperative experiences of young adult patients. In-depth, semistructured individual interviews were conducted with 13 young adult bariatric patients who were seeking or had undergone bariatric surgery within the past 5 years. Interviews were analyzed using a qualitative methodology. We found the following themes in our analyses: 1) the impact of relationships (with families and healthcare providers) on the bariatric healthcare experience; 2) preoperative experiences by young adults prior to undergoing surgery and 3) postoperative reflections and challenges experienced by young adult patients. Results revealed that patients' experiences appear to encompass impact on familial relationships, needs sought to be fulfilled by healthcare providers, and various preoperative and postoperative psychosocial concerns. By understanding the experiences of young adults, healthcare providers might be able to provide better care for these patients. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluctuations in spo0A transcription control rare developmental transitions in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Mirouze

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylated Spo0A is a master regulator of stationary phase development in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis, controlling the formation of spores, biofilms, and cells competent for transformation. We have monitored the rate of transcription of the spo0A gene during growth in sporulation medium using promoter fusions to firefly luciferase. This rate increases sharply during transient diauxie-like pauses in growth rate and then declines as growth resumes. In contrast, the rate of transcription of an rRNA gene decreases and increases in parallel with the growth rate, as expected for stable RNA synthesis. The growth pause-dependent bursts of spo0A transcription, which reflect the activity of the spo0A vegetative promoter, are largely independent of all known regulators of spo0A transcription. Evidence is offered in support of a "passive regulation" model in which RNA polymerase stops transcribing rRNA genes during growth pauses, thus becoming available for the transcription of spo0A. We show that the bursts are followed by the production of phosphorylated Spo0A, and we propose that they represent initial responses to stress that bring the average cell closer to the thresholds for transition to bimodally expressed developmental responses. Measurement of the numbers of cells expressing a competence marker before and after the bursts supports this hypothesis. In the absence of ppGpp, the increase in spo0A transcription that accompanies the entrance to stationary phase is delayed and sporulation is markedly diminished. In spite of this, our data contradicts the hypothesis that sporulation is initiated when a ppGpp-induced depression of the GTP pool relieves repression by CodY. We suggest that, while the programmed induction of sporulation that occurs in stationary phase is apparently provoked by increased flux through the phosphorelay, bet-hedging stochastic transitions to at least competence are induced by bursts in transcription.

  6. Lost in transition--a review of qualitative literature of newly qualified Registered Nurses' experiences in their transition to practice journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Yen Tjuin Eugene; Pua, Lay Hoon; Chan, Moon Fai

    2013-02-01

    The failure of newly qualified Registered Nurses to be appropriately transitioned into the new practice has been mentioned in numerous nursing literatures. Along with the need to decrease turnover rates, increase satisfaction rate of nurses and improve patient outcomes, nursing educators in Singapore are interested in the experiences of these nurses in their transition to practice journey. In this paper, the author attempts to critically review qualitative research conducted in that area to identify why nurses are leaving the profession and how nursing educators in Singapore can reduce stress and uncertainty in the newly qualified Registered Nurses during their transition to practice journey. In conducting a qualitative literature review, the author aims to explore interpretation of these nurses' subjective experiences and description of their social context, ultimately paying attention to lay knowledge as human behaviour is context specific rather than being represented in the quantitative form.

  7. Agentic personality as mediator of social capital on developmental outcomes in the transition to adulthood: Evidence from Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Rui; Ngai, Steven Sek-yum

    2016-01-01

    Drawing upon a sample of 1153 young people in Shanghai, China, this study investigates how agentic personality mediates between social capital embedded in a range of social contexts (family, friendship, association, and linking connection) and developmental outcomes during the transition to adulthood. The results of a structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis provide a good fit for the sample as a whole. The overall findings support the hypotheses that a higher level of agentic personality, including resilience, self-efficacy, and self-esteem, is associated with higher levels of developmental outcomes. Agentic personality also mediates the effects of family, friendship, associational, and linking social capital on developmental outcomes. Family social capital is predictive of university students' identity achievement and academic achievement, but not of their mental health. Linking social capital is only predictive of identity achievement. Unexpectedly, friendship social capital and associational social capital are predictive of a lower level of academic achievement and mental health, respectively, despite their positive influences on all three developmental outcomes through their significant effects on agentic personality. The study provides empirical support for the importance of social capital in promoting young people's transition to adulthood. Implications for theory, practice, and policy are also discussed.

  8. Developmental Transition of Motherhood: Treating Postpartum Depression Using a Feminist Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Gage, Darcie; Kettmann, Julie Jenks; Moel, Joy

    2010-01-01

    During the developmental lifeline for women, some individuals are affected by postpartum depression. This article describes the treatment of a Latina woman experiencing postpartum depression. The authors illustrate the feminist approach using counseling interventions that incorporate the client's developmental level, cultural background, and…

  9. A Qualitative Synthesis of Families’ and Students’ Hospital-to-School Transition Experiences Following Acquired Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura R. Hartman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Acquired brain injury (ABI is one of the greatest causes of death and disability among children in Canada. Following ABI, children are required to transition back to school and adapt to the physical, cognitive, behavioral, social, and emotional demands of the school environment. We conducted a qualitative systematic review of students’ and parents’ experiences of the transition back to school following ABI. We identified 20 articles that met our inclusion criteria. Six themes emerged: (a lack of ABI-specific education for families and professionals, (b communication-related factors as a facilitator and/or barrier to transition, (c emotional focus, (d peer relationships, (e supports, and (f ABI sequelae in the classroom. Students’ and families’ personal motivations and abilities and the support they receive in their environment affect their experiences of transitioning back to school and the disrupted occupations they face.

  10. Quantitative and qualitative transitions of methanogen community structure during the batch anaerobic digestion of cheese-processing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changsoo; Kim, Jaai; Shin, Seung Gu; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2010-08-01

    Qualitative and quantitative shifts in methanogen community structure, associated with process performance data, were investigated during the batch anaerobic digestion of a cheese-processing wastewater, whey permeate. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time PCR techniques were applied to obtain qualitative and quantitative microbial data sets, respectively, based on methanogen 16S rRNA genes. Throughout the operation, dynamic variations in both qualitative and quantitative community structures were observed, with repeated shifts in dominance between the aceticlastic Methanosarcinaceae (suggested mainly by the detection of a Methanosarcina-like population) and the hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales (suggested mainly by the detection of a Methanofollis-like population). This trend corresponded well to the diauxic utilization of acetate and longer-chain fatty acids (C(3)-C(6)), mainly propionate. Joint-plot non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS) analysis demonstrated that the qualitative and quantitative community shifts had significant correlations with the composition of residual organic acids and the methane production rate, respectively. This suggests the potential use of microbial community shift analysis as an indicative tool for diagnosing anaerobic digestion processes. The results suggest that more attention should be directed to quantitative, as well as qualitative, approaches for a better understanding of anaerobic digestion, particularly in terms of biogas production efficiency, under dynamic and transitional conditions.

  11. Perceived stress at transition to workplace: a qualitative interview study exploring final-year medical students’ needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moczko TR

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobias R Moczko,1,2,* Till J Bugaj,1,* Wolfgang Herzog,1 Christoph Nikendei1 1Department for General Internal and Psychosomatic Medicine, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Objectives: This study was designed to explore final-year medical students’ stressors and coping strategies at the transition to the clinical workplace. Methods: In this qualitative study, semi-standardized interviews with eight final-year medical students (five male, three female; aged 25.9±1.4 years were conducted during their internal medicine rotation. After verbatim transcription, a qualitative content analysis of students’ impressions of stress provoking and easing factors during final-year education was performed. Results: Students’ statements regarding burdens and dealing with stress were classified into four main categories: A perceived stressors and provoking factors, B stress-induced consequences, C personal and external resources for preventing and dealing with stress, and D final-year students’ suggestions for workplace improvement. Conclusion: Final-year medical students perceived different types of stress during their transition to medical wards, and reported both negative consequences and coping resources concerning perceived stress. As supervision, feedback, and coping strategies played an important role in the students’ perception of stress, final-year medical education curricula development should focus on these specifically. Keywords: undergraduate medical education, stress prevention, final-year medical education, workplace learning, qualitative research

  12. Parents' Experiences during Their Infant's Transition from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to Home: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Sharon W.; Spillet, Marydee A.; Cronin, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Limited literature exists which examines how parents of infants hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) transition from their infant's NICU hospital stay to home. This study examines the question, "What are the experiences of parents during their infant's transition from the NICU to home?" Grounded theory methods served as the…

  13. A Qualitative Analysis of an Advanced Practice Nurse-Directed Transitional Care Model Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradway, Christine; Trotta, Rebecca; Bixby, M. Brian; McPartland, Ellen; Wollman, M. Catherine; Kapustka, Heidi; McCauley, Kathleen; Naylor, Mary D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe barriers and facilitators to implementing a transitional care intervention for cognitively impaired older adults and their caregivers lead by advanced practice nurses (APNs). Design and Methods: APNs implemented an evidence-based protocol to optimize transitions from hospital to home. An…

  14. Transition from Pervasive Developmental Disorders to Autism Spectrum Disorder: Proposed Changes for the Upcoming DSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Tortamis Ozkaya

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available American Psychiatry Assosiation has scheduled to release The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5 in May 2013. According to the main changes being proposed about autism, there will be one unified Autism Spectrum Disorder diagnosis in the DSM-5 classification. This unified diagnosis will eliminate the distinct diagnostic categories under Pervasive Developmental Disorders in the DSM-IV-TR, namely autistic disorder, asperger syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified, and childhood disintegrative disorder. Rett syndrome will be excluded from autism spectrum disorder due to its genetic basis. In addition, severity of symptoms will be measured among individuals with autism spectrum disorder based on the support level required due to the impairment in their lives. The basic rationale behind this revision is that it is better to conceptualize autism as a spectrum including various individuals whose symptoms in different developmental areas range from mild to severe. It is aimed to increase the specificity of autism diagnosis by using one single diagnostic category with its specified severity rather than differentiating several subtypes. The major concern raised over the DSM-5 proposal has been the possibility that some of the individuals who were diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder according to the DSM-IV-TR might not get a diagnosis in this new system. After the DSM-5 is released, clinical, legal, and educational rearrengements regarding the use of new autism spectrum disorder diagnostic criteria are expected to accelerate worldwide and in Turkey. This paper aims to review briefly the upcoming autism spectrum disorder diagnosis planned to appear in the DSM-5, the rationale of the proposed revision, main critics to the DSM-5 draft that has been publicized, and some of the regulations expected to occur in practice after the changes.

  15. A Qualitative Study of Homeless Fathers: Exploring Parenting and Gender Role Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Holly S.; Coley, Rebekah L.

    2007-01-01

    The present qualitative research focuses on homeless fathers living with their children in family shelters. Data were collected through semistructured, face-to-face interviews with homeless fathers (n = 9) and shelter directors (n = 3). Findings suggest that how fathers made meaning of their experiences in a homeless shelter was related to…

  16. Finding Self: A Qualitative Study of Transgender, Transitioning, and Adulterated Silicone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Phyllis M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe the development and testing of a theory-based interview guide. To increase awareness of adulterated silicone use among Transgender. Design: A qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews. Setting: Interviews were conducted in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Method: Seven transgender adults aged 18 and over were interviewed…

  17. Comparison of the Qualitative and Developmental Scoring Systems for the Modified Version of the Bender-Gestalt Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannigan, Gary G.; Brunner, Nancy A.

    1993-01-01

    Examined two scoring systems for Modified Version of the Bender-Gestalt Test. Administered Bender-Gestalt and Otis-Lennon School Ability Test to 75 first-grade and 84 second-grade students. Both systems were significantly correlated with school ability. Results of tests for differences between correlations indicated that Qualitative Scoring System…

  18. Perceived stress at transition to workplace: a qualitative interview study exploring final-year medical students’ needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczko, Tobias R; Bugaj, Till J; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to explore final-year medical students’ stressors and coping strategies at the transition to the clinical workplace. Methods In this qualitative study, semi-standardized interviews with eight final-year medical students (five male, three female; aged 25.9±1.4 years) were conducted during their internal medicine rotation. After verbatim transcription, a qualitative content analysis of students’ impressions of stress provoking and easing factors during final-year education was performed. Results Students’ statements regarding burdens and dealing with stress were classified into four main categories: A) perceived stressors and provoking factors, B) stress-induced consequences, C) personal and external resources for preventing and dealing with stress, and D) final-year students’ suggestions for workplace improvement. Conclusion Final-year medical students perceived different types of stress during their transition to medical wards, and reported both negative consequences and coping resources concerning perceived stress. As supervision, feedback, and coping strategies played an important role in the students’ perception of stress, final-year medical education curricula development should focus on these specifically. PMID:26834503

  19. Theory of Infants' Transition Management from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to Home: a Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Namnabati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infant's transition is a challenge for parents and the health system that requires ongoing assessment and management to improve each newborn`s growth and development. The purpose of this study was to explore the management of infant` transition from neonatal intensive care unit (NICU to home.Materials and Methods: We used a grounded theory study to explore and describe the management of infants’ transition from the NICU to the home. Interviews were conducted with 31 professionals and 20 family members, and participant observations were made in hospitals, clinics, and one physician office. MAXQDA was utilized for coding and categorizing data.Results: The theory illustrated six phenomena: An unexpected separation; A crisis situation; Mother-infant rebonding; Protection of the infant’s health; Promotion of growth and development; and Inadequate management causing disability. Together, these formed a three-phase process consisting of: A threat to the infant's life, Efforts to save the infant's life, and Continuation of life. Conclusion: Development of the theory of  infants transition provides a three phases process ( A threat to the infant’s life, Efforts to save the infant’s life, and Continuation of life, that  can yield   guidelines to  manage  the infant` transition in prevent mother–infant separation, support parents in their role as primary caregivers, and follow up with individual home visits by nurses.

  20. Understanding Parent Advocacy during the Transition to School of Children with Developmental Disabilities: Three Canadian Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Nancy L.; Pyle, Angela; Villeneuve, Michelle; Dods, Jennifer; Dalton, C. J.; Minnes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown the benefits of parent involvement for student participation in education. Parent advocacy is a critical form of involvement by parents for children who are young, have disabilities, and are making transitions. Studies have classified forms of parent advocacy but have not illuminated the components necessary for effective parent…

  1. Understanding Parent Advocacy during the Transition to School of Children with Developmental Disabilities: Three Canadian Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Nancy L.; Pyle, Angela; Villeneuve, Michelle; Dods, Jennifer; Dalton, C. J.; Minnes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown the benefits of parent involvement for student participation in education. Parent advocacy is a critical form of involvement by parents for children who are young, have disabilities, and are making transitions. Studies have classified forms of parent advocacy but have not illuminated the components necessary for effective parent…

  2. Sleep as a mirror of developmental transitions in infancy: the case of crawling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Anat; Cohen, Dina

    2015-03-01

    The associations between the onset of crawling and changes in sleep were examined in 28 infants who were followed from 5 to 11 months-of-age. Motor development and sleep (actigraphy) were assessed at 2- to 3-week intervals. Along with the overall improvement in sleep consolidation, periods of increased long wake episodes were also manifested; the rise in sleep disruption was temporally linked to crawling onset. The results of the study highlight the dynamic interrelations between domains of development, indicate that emerging motor skills may involve periods of disrupted sleep, and point to the moderating effect of age. Clarifying the factors involved in the interplay between developmental milestones and sleep remains a challenge for future research.

  3. New Developmental Evidence Clarifies the Evolution of Wrist Bones in the Dinosaur–Bird Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, João Francisco; Ossa-Fuentes, Luis; Soto-Acuña, Sergio; Smith-Paredes, Daniel; Nuñez-León, Daniel; Salinas-Saavedra, Miguel; Ruiz-Flores, Macarena; Vargas, Alexander O.

    2014-01-01

    From early dinosaurs with as many as nine wrist bones, modern birds evolved to develop only four ossifications. Their identity is uncertain, with different labels used in palaeontology and developmental biology. We examined embryos of several species and studied chicken embryos in detail through a new technique allowing whole-mount immunofluorescence of the embryonic cartilaginous skeleton. Beyond previous controversy, we establish that the proximal–anterior ossification develops from a composite radiale+intermedium cartilage, consistent with fusion of radiale and intermedium observed in some theropod dinosaurs. Despite previous claims that the development of the distal–anterior ossification does not support the dinosaur–bird link, we found its embryonic precursor shows two distinct regions of both collagen type II and collagen type IX expression, resembling the composite semilunate bone of bird-like dinosaurs (distal carpal 1+distal carpal 2). The distal–posterior ossification develops from a cartilage referred to as “element x,” but its position corresponds to distal carpal 3. The proximal–posterior ossification is perhaps most controversial: It is labelled as the ulnare in palaeontology, but we confirm the embryonic ulnare is lost during development. Re-examination of the fossil evidence reveals the ulnare was actually absent in bird-like dinosaurs. We confirm the proximal–posterior bone is a pisiform in terms of embryonic position and its development as a sesamoid associated to a tendon. However, the pisiform is absent in bird-like dinosaurs, which are known from several articulated specimens. The combined data provide compelling evidence of a remarkable evolutionary reversal: A large, ossified pisiform re-evolved in the lineage leading to birds, after a period in which it was either absent, nonossified, or very small, consistently escaping fossil preservation. The bird wrist provides a modern example of how developmental and paleontological

  4. New developmental evidence clarifies the evolution of wrist bones in the dinosaur-bird transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, João Francisco; Ossa-Fuentes, Luis; Soto-Acuña, Sergio; Smith-Paredes, Daniel; Nuñez-León, Daniel; Salinas-Saavedra, Miguel; Ruiz-Flores, Macarena; Vargas, Alexander O

    2014-09-01

    From early dinosaurs with as many as nine wrist bones, modern birds evolved to develop only four ossifications. Their identity is uncertain, with different labels used in palaeontology and developmental biology. We examined embryos of several species and studied chicken embryos in detail through a new technique allowing whole-mount immunofluorescence of the embryonic cartilaginous skeleton. Beyond previous controversy, we establish that the proximal-anterior ossification develops from a composite radiale+intermedium cartilage, consistent with fusion of radiale and intermedium observed in some theropod dinosaurs. Despite previous claims that the development of the distal-anterior ossification does not support the dinosaur-bird link, we found its embryonic precursor shows two distinct regions of both collagen type II and collagen type IX expression, resembling the composite semilunate bone of bird-like dinosaurs (distal carpal 1+distal carpal 2). The distal-posterior ossification develops from a cartilage referred to as "element x," but its position corresponds to distal carpal 3. The proximal-posterior ossification is perhaps most controversial: It is labelled as the ulnare in palaeontology, but we confirm the embryonic ulnare is lost during development. Re-examination of the fossil evidence reveals the ulnare was actually absent in bird-like dinosaurs. We confirm the proximal-posterior bone is a pisiform in terms of embryonic position and its development as a sesamoid associated to a tendon. However, the pisiform is absent in bird-like dinosaurs, which are known from several articulated specimens. The combined data provide compelling evidence of a remarkable evolutionary reversal: A large, ossified pisiform re-evolved in the lineage leading to birds, after a period in which it was either absent, nonossified, or very small, consistently escaping fossil preservation. The bird wrist provides a modern example of how developmental and paleontological data illuminate

  5. New developmental evidence clarifies the evolution of wrist bones in the dinosaur-bird transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Francisco Botelho

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available From early dinosaurs with as many as nine wrist bones, modern birds evolved to develop only four ossifications. Their identity is uncertain, with different labels used in palaeontology and developmental biology. We examined embryos of several species and studied chicken embryos in detail through a new technique allowing whole-mount immunofluorescence of the embryonic cartilaginous skeleton. Beyond previous controversy, we establish that the proximal-anterior ossification develops from a composite radiale+intermedium cartilage, consistent with fusion of radiale and intermedium observed in some theropod dinosaurs. Despite previous claims that the development of the distal-anterior ossification does not support the dinosaur-bird link, we found its embryonic precursor shows two distinct regions of both collagen type II and collagen type IX expression, resembling the composite semilunate bone of bird-like dinosaurs (distal carpal 1+distal carpal 2. The distal-posterior ossification develops from a cartilage referred to as "element x," but its position corresponds to distal carpal 3. The proximal-posterior ossification is perhaps most controversial: It is labelled as the ulnare in palaeontology, but we confirm the embryonic ulnare is lost during development. Re-examination of the fossil evidence reveals the ulnare was actually absent in bird-like dinosaurs. We confirm the proximal-posterior bone is a pisiform in terms of embryonic position and its development as a sesamoid associated to a tendon. However, the pisiform is absent in bird-like dinosaurs, which are known from several articulated specimens. The combined data provide compelling evidence of a remarkable evolutionary reversal: A large, ossified pisiform re-evolved in the lineage leading to birds, after a period in which it was either absent, nonossified, or very small, consistently escaping fossil preservation. The bird wrist provides a modern example of how developmental and paleontological

  6. Using simulation learning through academic-practice partnership to promote transition to clinical practice: a qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Sok Ying; Palham, Sabrina; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi; Wong, Lai Fun; Lim, Fui Ping

    2015-05-01

    To explore the effect of an innovative simulation education programme on nursing students' transition-to-practice experiences. Academic-practice partnership is emerging as an important vehicle for improving nursing students' transition-to-practice. Using existing university resources, academic educators and alumni developed an innovative simulation educational programme known as the Simulated Professional Learning Environment (SIMPLE) to align the educational process with the realities of nursing practice. Educators and alumni collaborated to create and facilitate 15 hours of simulation sessions that comprised the learning platform for the SIMPLE programme. This was a descriptive qualitative study. Focus groups were conducted in 2012 with 22 final-year nursing students completing their transition-to-practice clinical practicum. The interview transcripts were analysed using content analysis. Three themes were identified from the analysis: 'experiencing the role of staff nurse'; 'knowing how to'; and 'learning from the 'seniors'. Experiencing the role of staff nurse in the programme showed the nursing students what to expect and how to prepare for their roles. Knowing how to focus on holistic patient care, manage 'difficult' clients and communicate with other healthcare professionals were the learning outcomes gained from the programme. Learning from the 'seniors' about hospital work processes positively influenced the nurses' transition-to-practice experiences. This study provides support for introducing the simulation education programme as an enhancement during nursing students' final year to improve their transition-to-practice experiences. A stronger collaborative relationship between academic educators and practising nurses could be further fostered by expanding this learning platform. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Women in Transition: A Qualitative Analysis of Definitions of Poverty and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh-McDonald, Crystale M.; Schroeder, Sybil

    2012-01-01

    A phenomenological approach examined the stories of ten women transitioning from childhood poverty to adult life. Women were chosen from a pool of participants in an Upward Bound program designed to assist low-income and/or first-generation college students in the Midwestern United States. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to…

  8. Mastering Developmental Transitions in Young and Middle Adulthood: The Interplay of Openness to Experience and Traditional Gender Ideology on Women's Self-Efficacy and Subjective Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, David; Freund, Alexandra M.; Wiese, Bettina S.

    2012-01-01

    The present research focuses on 2 factors that might help or hurt women to cope with the uncertainties associated with developmental transitions in modern societies (i.e., starting one's first job, graduating from high school, reentry to work after parental leave). We investigate (a) the role of openness to experience in coping with challenging…

  9. Social visual engagement in infants and toddlers with autism: early developmental transitions and a model of pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klin, Ami; Shultz, Sarah; Jones, Warren

    2015-03-01

    Efforts to determine and understand the causes of autism are currently hampered by a large disconnect between recent molecular genetics findings that are associated with the condition and the core behavioral symptoms that define the condition. In this perspective piece, we propose a systems biology framework to bridge that gap between genes and symptoms. The framework focuses on basic mechanisms of socialization that are highly-conserved in evolution and are early-emerging in development. By conceiving of these basic mechanisms of socialization as quantitative endophenotypes, we hope to connect genes and behavior in autism through integrative studies of neurodevelopmental, behavioral, and epigenetic changes. These changes both lead to and are led by the accomplishment of specific social adaptive tasks in a typical infant's life. However, based on recent research that indicates that infants later diagnosed with autism fail to accomplish at least some of these tasks, we suggest that a narrow developmental period, spanning critical transitions from reflexive, subcortically-controlled visual behavior to interactional, cortically-controlled and social visual behavior be prioritized for future study. Mapping epigenetic, neural, and behavioral changes that both drive and are driven by these early transitions may shed a bright light on the pathogenesis of autism.

  10. Social visual engagement in infants and toddlers with autism: Early developmental transitions and a model of pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klin, Ami; Shultz, Sarah; Jones, Warren

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to determine and understand the causes of autism are currently hampered by a large disconnect between recent molecular genetics findings that are associated with the condition and the core behavioral symptoms that define the condition. In this perspective piece, we propose a systems biology framework to bridge that gap between genes and symptoms. The framework focuses on basic mechanisms of socialization that are highly-conserved in evolution and are early-emerging in development. By conceiving of these basic mechanisms of socialization as quantitative endophenotypes, we hope to connect genes and behavior in autism through integrative studies of neurodevelopmental, behavioral, and epigenetic changes. These changes both lead to and are led by the accomplishment of specific social adaptive tasks in a typical infant's life. However, based on recent research that indicates that infants later diagnosed with autism fail to accomplish at least some of these tasks, we suggest that a narrow developmental period, spanning critical transitions from reflexive, subcortically-controlled visual behavior to interactional, cortically-controlled and social visual behavior be prioritized for future study. Mapping epigenetic, neural, and behavioral changes that both drive and are driven by these early transitions may shed a bright light on the pathogenesis of autism. PMID:25445180

  11. Characteristics of mentalization patterns in parents of children with difficulties in realizing developmental objectives of the latency stage - qualitative analysis results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejko, Karolina; Janusz, Bernadetta; Treger, Bartosz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to answer the question about the ability to mentalize emotional states in parents of children with difficulties in realizing developmental objectives of the latency stage. The research was exploratory in nature; the aim was formulated on the basis of notions from the field literature indicating a correlation between the attachment style and the ability to mentalize in the parents and psychosocial functioning of their children. The structured Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) was used as the main tool for the research. The analysis was performed with the Reflective Functioning Scale. Total of 9 narrations obtained through AAI were subjected to qualitative analysis. The conducted analysis showed that parents of children with difficulties in realizing developmental objectives of the latency stage are characterized by reduced mentalization skills. The mentalization pattern isolated in the analysis, characteristic for the studied group encompasses the tendency towards idealization, generalization, describing the relation at the behavioural level and avoidance of reflecting upon mental states experienced in the context of early attachment relations, and the lack of coherence. Difficulties in mentalization of relationships mainly concern the relation with the mother. Relations established later in life are better mentalized than the early relations with parents. Observed disturbance in mentalization may suggest possible disturbances in the process of reflecting and containing in the early developmental stages of the examined persons. Mentalization skills were developed later in life of the examined persons. Idealization turned out to be the process that is most impacting and interfering with free reflections upon one's own emotions and emotions of the others (including those of one's own child).

  12. Developmental Psychology in the 1920s: A Period of Major Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    A 1918 survey (H. E. Jones, 1956 ) indicated that only 3 psychologists in the United States expressed an interest in conducting research on child development. By the end of the 1920s there were more than 600 who expressed such an interest, and their areas of inquiry encompassed not only child development but also adolescence, the lifespan, and old age. The author explores the factors and people that contributed to this remarkable transition and highlights some of the major contributions that resulted from their work.

  13. Qualité de l’air et nuisances sonores dans les vallées alpines de transit

    OpenAIRE

    Jürg Thudium

    2009-01-01

    Les conséquences du trafic routier, en termes de nuisances sonores et de qualité de l’air, ont été analysées et comparées pour quatre vallées de transit alpin (Fréjus, Mont Blanc, Gothard et Brenner) durant l’année 2004. Au regard du trafic alpin dans son ensemble, des disparités considérables apparaissent entre les vallées étudiées, mais également à l’intérieur de ces mêmes vallées. Les immissions (concentration de polluants) produites par unité d’émission du trafic routier sont deux à trois...

  14. N-glycan transition of the early developmental stage in Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Risa; Hirotsu, Naoki; Miyanishi, Nobumitsu

    2016-08-26

    N-Glycosylation is one of the post-translational modifications. In animals, N-glycans linked to proteins function in cell-cell recognition, sorting, transport, and other biological phenomena. However, in plants, N-glycan-mediated biological functions remain obscure. In a previous study, we showed that the main type of N-glycan transition is from the paucimannosidic to complex type before and after germination in Oryza sativa, suggesting that transitions of N-glycan, including those of glycoproteins and glycosyltransferases, are closely associated with plant growth. To further elucidate the relationship between N-glycan structure and plant growth, we analyzed the structures of N-glycans expressed in O. sativa seedlings grown under light conditions and performed comparative analyses of the structures in the shoot and root. The analyses show that fundamental N-glycan structures are common to the shoot and root, whereas paucimannosidic-type N-glycans dramatically decreased in the root grown under light conditions. Further, to investigate the effects of light on N-glycan structures in O. sativa seedlings, we analyzed N-glycan structures in O. sativa seedlings grown in the dark. Understandably, N-glycan expression in the root was almost unaffected by light. However, despite a marked difference in phenotype, N-glycan expression in the shoot was also unaffected by light. This result suggests that the shoot and root of O. sativa have different glycoproteins and distinct N-glycan synthetic systems. Thus, we propose that the N-glycan synthetic system of the O. sativa shoot is almost unaffected by light conditions and that many photosynthesis-related proteins are not modified by N-glycans.

  15. Canada's international response to HIV during times of global transition: a qualitative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Stephanie

    2011-04-01

    Canada's international response to HIV may be under threat given CIDA's new aid priorities that appear to exclude health. Drivers of this recent priority shift have been the influence of global aid trends among public sector donors and changes within the global HIV milieu itself. However, this is not the first time Canada has shifted in response to these two global trends. The era from 2000-2004 also witnessed dramatic changes in both the HIV field and in global thinking around international aid. As such, this article presents an evaluation of the Government of Canada's international response to HIV during the first era of transition (2000-2004) in order to derive lessons for decision-making around HIV in the current climate of change. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 key informants with expertise regarding Canada's international response to HIV over time. Analysis involved multiple readings of transcripts to identify descriptive codes and establish intimacy with the data. Descriptive codes were then collapsed into thematic categories using a process of inductive reasoning. Canada's international response to HIV was perceived to be exemplary at times (e.g. seminal funding to WHO's "3-by-5" strategy), but also inconsistent (e.g., underutilized technical assistance capacity) and non-strategic (e.g., contradiction between investing in training health providers while poaching professionals to bolster Canada's workforce). Lessons from the 2000-2004 era of transition focus on strategic investments, the inextricable connection between HIV and development and strategy coherence. These results highlight that it is more constructive to ensure that Canadian development responses in all areas engage with both the upstream drivers of HIV as well as the impacts of the epidemic itself in order to achieve the greatest results from international investment and the most effective contributions to the lives of the people that these endeavours seek to

  16. Sub-circuits of a gene regulatory network control a developmental epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Lindsay R; McClay, David R

    2014-04-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a fundamental cell state change that transforms epithelial to mesenchymal cells during embryonic development, adult tissue repair and cancer metastasis. EMT includes a complex series of intermediate cell state changes including remodeling of the basement membrane, apical constriction, epithelial de-adhesion, directed motility, loss of apical-basal polarity, and acquisition of mesenchymal adhesion and polarity. Transcriptional regulatory state changes must ultimately coordinate the timing and execution of these cell biological processes. A well-characterized gene regulatory network (GRN) in the sea urchin embryo was used to identify the transcription factors that control five distinct cell changes during EMT. Single transcription factors were perturbed and the consequences followed with in vivo time-lapse imaging or immunostaining assays. The data show that five different sub-circuits of the GRN control five distinct cell biological activities, each part of the complex EMT process. Thirteen transcription factors (TFs) expressed specifically in pre-EMT cells were required for EMT. Three TFs highest in the GRN specified and activated EMT (alx1, ets1, tbr) and the 10 TFs downstream of those (tel, erg, hex, tgif, snail, twist, foxn2/3, dri, foxb, foxo) were also required for EMT. No single TF functioned in all five sub-circuits, indicating that there is no EMT master regulator. Instead, the resulting sub-circuit topologies suggest EMT requires multiple simultaneous regulatory mechanisms: forward cascades, parallel inputs and positive-feedback lock downs. The interconnected and overlapping nature of the sub-circuits provides one explanation for the seamless orchestration by the embryo of cell state changes leading to successful EMT.

  17. The microRNA bantam regulates a developmental transition in epithelial cells that restricts sensory dendrite growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Soba, Peter; Parker, Edward; Kim, Charles C; Parrish, Jay Z

    2014-07-01

    As animals grow, many early born structures grow by cell expansion rather than cell addition; thus growth of distinct structures must be coordinated to maintain proportionality. This phenomenon is particularly widespread in the nervous system, with dendrite arbors of many neurons expanding in concert with their substrate to sustain connectivity and maintain receptive field coverage as animals grow. After rapidly growing to establish body wall coverage, dendrites of Drosophila class IV dendrite arborization (C4da) neurons grow synchronously with their substrate, the body wall epithelium, providing a system to study how proportionality is maintained during animal growth. Here, we show that the microRNA bantam (ban) ensures coordinated growth of C4da dendrites and the epithelium through regulation of epithelial endoreplication, a modified cell cycle that entails genome amplification without cell division. In Drosophila larvae, epithelial endoreplication leads to progressive changes in dendrite-extracellular matrix (ECM) and dendrite-epithelium contacts, coupling dendrite/substrate expansion and restricting dendrite growth beyond established boundaries. Moreover, changes in epithelial expression of cell adhesion molecules, including the beta-integrin myospheroid (mys), accompany this developmental transition. Finally, endoreplication and the accompanying changes in epithelial mys expression are required to constrain late-stage dendrite growth and structural plasticity. Hence, modulating epithelium-ECM attachment probably influences substrate permissivity for dendrite growth and contributes to the dendrite-substrate coupling that ensures proportional expansion of the two cell types.

  18. Exploring the Self-Disclosure Process in Peer Mentoring Relationships for Transition-Age Youth With Developmental Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Cathryn T; Kramer, Jessica M; Cohn, Ellen S

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the self-disclosure process in regard to connection development and relationship quality in peer mentoring relationships between transition-age youth (ages 15-20) and young adults (ages 18-36) with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities. Self-disclosure is defined as "the disclosure of inner feelings and experiences to another person" that "fosters liking, caring, and trust, thereby facilitating the deepening of close relationships" ( Reis & Shaver, 1988 , p. 372). Nine peer mentoring dyads with varied interpersonal connections were purposefully selected from a larger intervention study. Recorded mentoring conversations were analyzed for self-disclosure content and peer mentor response. The findings demonstrated trends related to connection development and differences across degree of connection. In relationships with stronger connections, there was a higher quantity of self-disclosure and more frequent disclosure of emotions, and peer mentors responded more frequently with advice and reciprocated self-disclosure. Implications of findings for promoting higher-quality peer mentoring relationships are discussed.

  19. Can i have a second child? dilemmas of mothers of children with pervasive developmental disorder: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omiya Tomoko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pervasive developmental disorder (PDD has an uncertain etiology, no method of treatment, and results in communication deficiencies and other behavioral problems. As the reported recurrence risk is 5%-10% and there are no methods of either prevention or prenatal testing, mothers of PDD children may face unique challenges when contemplating second pregnancies. The purpose of this study was to explore the mothers' lived experiences of second child-related decision-making after the birth of a child with PDD. Methods The participants for this study were restricted to mothers living within the greater Tokyo metropolitan area who had given birth to a first child with PDD within the past 18 years. The ten participants were encouraged to describe their experiences of second-child related decision-making after the birth of a child with PDD on the basis of semi-structured interviews. Data analysis was performed by using Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA, which is concerned with understanding what the participant thinks or believes about the topic under discussion. Results We identified two superordinate themes. The first was balancing hopes and fears, in which hope was the potential joy to be gained by the birth of a new child without PDD and fears were characterized as uncertainty of PDD and perception of recurrence risk, burden on later-born children, and negative effects on a child with PDD. The second superordinate theme was assessing the manageability of the situation, which was affected by factors as diverse as severity of PDD, relationship between mother and father, and social support and acceptance for PDD. Our 10 participants suffered from extreme psychological conflict, and lack of social support and acceptance for PDD created numerous practical difficulties in having second children. Conclusions Our participants faced various difficulties when considering second pregnancies after the birth of children with PDD in

  20. A qualitative systematic review of maternal infant feeding practices in transitioning from milk feeds to family foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Michelle; Brodribb, Wendy; Hepworth, Julie

    2016-10-03

    Evidence supports the establishment of healthy feeding practices early in life to promote lifelong healthy eating patterns protective against chronic disease such as obesity. Current early childhood obesity prevention interventions are built on extant understandings of how feeding practices relate to infant's cues of hunger and satiety. Further insights regarding factors that influence feeding behaviors in early life may improve program designs and outcomes. Four electronic databases were searched for peer-reviewed qualitative studies published between 2000 to 2014 with transitional infant feeding practice rationale from developed countries. Reporting transparency and potential bias was assessed using the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research quality checklist. Thematic synthesis of 23 manuscripts identified three themes (and six sub-themes): Theme 1. Infant (physical cues and behavioural cues) focuses on the perceived signs of readiness to start solids and the feeding to influence growth and "health happiness." Theme 2. Mother (coping strategies and knowledge and skills) focuses on the early survival of the infant and the family and the feeding to satisfy hunger and influence infant contentment, and sleep. Theme 3. Community (pressure and inconsistent advice) highlights the importance of generational feeding and how conflicting feeding advice led many mothers to adopt valued familial or culturally established practices. Overall, mothers were pivotal to feeding decisions. Satisfying infant's needs to reach "good mothering" status as measured by societal expectations was highly valued but lacked consideration of nutrition, obesity, and long term health. Maternal interpretation of healthy infant feeding and successful parenting need attention when developing strategies to support new families.

  1. The Arabidopsis Mediator CDK8 module genes CCT (MED12) and GCT (MED13) are global regulators of developmental phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmor, C Stewart; Silva-Ortega, Claudia O; Willmann, Matthew R; Buendía-Monreal, Manuel; Poethig, R Scott

    2014-12-01

    Temporal coordination of developmental programs is necessary for normal ontogeny, but the mechanism by which this is accomplished is still poorly understood. We have previously shown that two components of the Mediator CDK8 module encoded by CENTER CITY (CCT; Arabidopsis MED12) and GRAND CENTRAL (GCT; Arabidopsis MED13) are required for timing of pattern formation during embryogenesis. A morphological, molecular and genomic analysis of the post-embryonic phenotype of gct and cct mutants demonstrated that these genes also promote at least three subsequent developmental transitions: germination, vegetative phase change, and flowering. Genetic and molecular analyses indicate that GCT and CCT operate in parallel to gibberellic acid, a phytohormone known to regulate these same three transitions. We demonstrate that the delay in vegetative phase change in gct and cct is largely due to overexpression of miR156, and that the delay in flowering is due in part to upregulation of FLC. Thus, GCT and CCT coordinate vegetative and floral transitions by repressing the repressors miR156 and FLC. Our results suggest that MED12 and MED13 act as global regulators of developmental timing by fine-tuning the expression of temporal regulatory genes.

  2. Qualité de l’air et nuisances sonores dans les vallées alpines de transit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürg Thudium

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Les conséquences du trafic routier, en termes de nuisances sonores et de qualité de l’air, ont été analysées et comparées pour quatre vallées de transit alpin (Fréjus, Mont Blanc, Gothard et Brenner durant l’année 2004. Au regard du trafic alpin dans son ensemble, des disparités considérables apparaissent entre les vallées étudiées, mais également à l’intérieur de ces mêmes vallées. Les immissions (concentration de polluants produites par unité d’émission du trafic routier sont deux à trois fois plus élevées dans ces vallées alpines qu’en plaine. Ceci s’explique principalement par la topographie et le climat particuliers de ces vallées. À de nombreux points d’observation, les seuils d’immission ont été dépassés. Les vallées sont également affectées durement par la pollution sonore. « L’effet amphithéâtre » transporte le bruit à des altitudes supérieures, qui n’auraient pas été exposées à autant d’irradiation acoustique si la source de nuisances était située à égale distance, mais dans un « paysage ouvert ». De plus, la protection contre le bruit qui se réfléchit sur les pentes est malaisée. En résumé, toutes les vallées de transit étudiées peuvent être considérées comme des régions sensibles.The environmental consequences of road transport with regard to air and noise in the transit valleys of Fréjus, Mont-Blanc, Gotthard, and Brenner have been analysed and compared with each other for the year 2004. In respect of the share of transport passing through the Alps in transport as a whole, there are in part considerable differences between the valleys under investigation as well as within the individual valleys. The air pollution produced per emission unit of road transport is two to three times higher than in the open country, mainly because of the topography and the climate. At numerous monitoring points, the thresholds for the air pollution were exceeded

  3. Transition of care: experiences and preferences of patients across the primary/secondary interface – a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekker Janny H

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coordination between care providers of different disciplines is essential to improve the quality of care, in particular for patients with chronic diseases. The way in which general practitioners (GP's and medical specialists interact has important implications for any healthcare system in which the GP plays the role of gatekeeper to specialist care. Patient experiences and preferences have proven to be increasingly important in discussing healthcare policy. The Dutch government initiated the development of a special website with information for patients on performance indicators of hospitals as well as information on illness or treatment. In the present study we focus on the transition of care at the primary – secondary interface with reference to the impact of patients' ability to make choices about their secondary care providers. The purpose of this study is to (a explore experiences and preferences of patients regarding the transition between primary and secondary care, (b study informational resources on illness/treatment desired by patients and (c determine how information supplied could make it easier for the patient to choose between different options for care (hospital or specialist. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured focus group interviews among 71 patients referred for various indications in the north and west of The Netherlands. Results Patients find it important that they do not have to wait, that they are taken seriously, and receive adequate and individually relevant information. A lack of continuity from secondary to primary care was experienced. The patient's desire for free choice of type of care did not arise in any of the focus groups. Conclusion Hospital discharge information needs to be improved. The interval between discharge from specialist care and the report of the specialist to the GP might be a suitable performance indicator in healthcare. Patients want to receive

  4. Transitions to Care in the Community for Prison Releasees with HIV: a Qualitative Study of Facilitators and Challenges in Two States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammett, Theodore M; Donahue, Sara; LeRoy, Lisa; Montague, Brian T; Rosen, David L; Solomon, Liza; Costa, Michael; Wohl, David; Rich, Josiah D

    2015-08-01

    One in seven people living with HIV in the USA passes through a prison or jail each year, and almost all will return to the community. Discharge planning and transitional programs are critical but challenging elements in ensuring continuity of care, maintaining treatment outcomes achieved in prison, and preventing further viral transmission. This paper describes facilitators and challenges of in-prison care, transitional interventions, and access to and continuity of care in the community in Rhode Island and North Carolina based on qualitative data gathered as part of the mixed-methods Link Into Care Study of prisoners and releasees with HIV. We conducted 65 interviews with correctional and community-based providers and administrators and analyzed the transcripts using NVivo 10 to identify major themes. Facilitators of effective transitional systems in both states included the following: health providers affiliated with academic institutions or other entities independent of the corrections department; organizational philosophy emphasizing a patient-centered, personal, and holistic approach; strong leadership with effective "champions"; a team approach with coordination, collaboration and integration throughout the system, mutual respect and learning between corrections and health providers, staff dedicated to transitional services, and effective communication and information sharing among providers; comprehensive transitional activities and services including HIV, mental health and substance use services in prisons, timely and comprehensive discharge planning with specific linkages/appointments, supplies of medications on release, access to benefits and entitlements, case management and proactive follow-up on missed appointments; and releasees' commitment to transitional plans. These elements were generally present in both study states but their absence, which also sometimes occurred, represent ongoing challenges to success. The qualitative findings on the

  5. Developmental trajectories of gene expression reveal candidates for diapause termination: a key life-history transition in the apple maggot fly Rhagoletis pomonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, Gregory J; Egan, Scott P; Feder, Jeffrey L; Berlocher, Stewart H; Hahn, Daniel A

    2011-12-01

    The timing of dormancy is a rapidly evolving life-history trait playing a crucial role in the synchronization of seasonal life cycles and adaptation to environmental change. But the physiological mechanisms regulating dormancy in animals remain poorly understood. In insects, dormancy (diapause) is a developmentally dynamic state, and the mechanisms that control diapause transitions affect seasonal timing. Here we used microarrays to examine patterns of gene expression during dormancy termination: a crucial life-history transition in the apple maggot fly Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh). This species is a model system for host race formation and ecological speciation via changes in diapause regulation of seasonality. Our goal was to pinpoint the timing of the transition from diapause to post-diapause development and to identify candidate genes and pathways for regulation of diapause termination. Samples were taken at six metabolically defined developmental landmarks, and time-series analysis suggests that release from metabolic depression coincides with preparation for or resumption of active cell cycling and morphogenesis, defining the 'end' of diapause. However, marked changes in expression, including members of pathways such as Wnt and TOR signaling, also occur prior to the metabolic rate increase, electing these pathways as candidates for early regulation of diapause termination. We discuss these results with respect to generalities in insect diapause physiology and to our long-term goal of identifying mechanisms of diapause adaptation in the Rhagoletis system.

  6. The experience of physical activity and the transition to retirement: a systematic review and integrative synthesis of qualitative and quantitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Inka; Guell, Cornelia; Ogilvie, David

    2012-08-16

    The transition to retirement has been recognised as a critical turning point for physical activity (PA). In an earlier systematic review of quantitative studies, retirement was found to be associated with an increase in recreational PA but with a decrease in PA among retirees from lower occupational groups. To gain a deeper understanding of the quantitative review findings, qualitative evidence on experiences of and views on PA around the transition to retirement was systematically reviewed and integrated with the quantitative review findings. 19 electronic databases were searched and reference lists were checked, citations tracked and journals hand-searched to identify qualitative studies on PA around the transition to retirement, published between January 1980 and August 2010 in any country or language. Independent quality appraisal, data extraction and evidence synthesis were carried out by two reviewers using a stepwise thematic approach. The qualitative findings were integrated with those of the existing quantitative systematic review using a parallel synthesis approach. Five qualitative studies met the inclusion criteria. Three overarching themes emerged from the synthesis of these studies: these related to retirees' broad concepts of PA, the motives for and the challenges to PA in retirement. Integrative synthesis of the qualitative findings with the quantitative evidence offered several potential explanations for why adults might engage in more recreational PA after the transition to retirement. These included expected health benefits, lifelong PA patterns, opportunities for socialising and personal challenges, and the desire for a new routine. A decrease in PA among retirees from lower occupational groups might be explained by a lack of time and a perceived low personal value of recreational PA. To encourage adoption and maintenance of PA after retirement, interventions should promote health-related and broader benefits of PA. Interventions for retirees

  7. "What the Hell Is Revise?": A Qualitative Study of Student Approaches to Coursework in Developmental English at One Urban-Serving Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perun, Stefan Austin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To learn how interactions among the content, professor, and students shaped passing and failing developmental English at one urban-serving community college (USCC). Method: I observed three sections of developmental English at USCC throughout a semester and conducted semi-structured interviews with all three professors and a sample of…

  8. Emerging versus Emancipating: The Transition to Adulthood for Youth in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzin, Stephanie Cosner; Singer, Erin; Hokanson, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adulthood has been defined as a distinct developmental stage in which youth experience opportunities for identity development and transition toward independence. While this period has been examined for youth in the general population, less is known about how foster youth experience this transition. This study uses qualitative interviews…

  9. Evolutionary developmental transition from median to paired morphology of vertebrate fins: Perspectives from twin-tail goldfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Gembu; Ota, Kinya G

    2016-12-07

    Vertebrate morphology has been evolutionarily modified by natural and/or artificial selection. The morphological variation of goldfish is a representative example. In particular, the twin-tail strain of ornamental goldfish shows highly diverged anal and caudal fin morphology: bifurcated anal and caudal fins. Recent molecular developmental genetics research revealed that a stop codon mutation in one of the two recently duplicated chordin genes is important for the highly diverged fin morphology of twin-tail goldfish. However, some issues still need to be discussed in the context of evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo). For example, the bifurcated anal and caudal fins of twin-tail goldfish provided early researchers with insights into the origin of paired fins (pectoral and pelvic fins), but no subsequent researchers have discussed this topic. In addition, although the fossil jawless vertebrate species Euphanerops is also known to have had a bifurcated anal fin, how the bifurcated anal fin of twin-tail goldfish is related to that of fossil jawless vertebrate species has never been investigated. In this review, we present an overview of the early anatomical and embryological studies of twin-tail goldfish. Moreover, based on the similarity of embryonic features between the secondarily bifurcated competent stripe in twin-tail goldfish and the trunk bilateral competent stripes in conventional gnathostomes, we hypothesized that they share the same molecular developmental mechanisms. We also postulate that the bifurcated anal fin of Euphanerops might be caused by the same type of modification of dorsal-ventral patterning that occurs in the twin-tail goldfish, unlike the previously suggested evolutionary process that required the co-option of paired fin developmental mechanisms. Understanding the molecular developmental genetics of twin-tail goldfish allows us to further investigate the evolutionary developmental mechanisms of the origin of paired fins.

  10. Sexual debut in young adults in Cali as transition: keys for care

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Patricia Valencia Molina; Gladys Eugenia Canaval Erazo; Teresita María Sevilla Peñuela; Linda Teresa Orcasita Pineda

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This work sought to understand sexual debut as a transitional process in the lives of a group of young adults and to interpret the meaning of this transition for them. Methodology. This was a qualitative research with 18 life stories of students from different socio-economic backgrounds and with diverse sexual orientations. Results. According to the middle-range theory of transitions, sexual debut can be considered a developmental transition. The initiative can be their own, motiv...

  11. Qualitative and quantitative histopathology in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder. An international investigation of intra- and interobserver reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Sasaki, M; Fukuzawa, S

    1994-01-01

    of both qualitative and quantitative grading methods. Grading of malignancy was performed by one observer in Japan (using the World Health Organization scheme), and by two observers in Denmark (using the Bergkvist system). A "translation" between the systems, grade for grade, and kappa statistics were....... The results obtained in this study stress the need for objective, quantitative histopathologic techniques substituting qualitative, subjective methods in prognosis-related grading of malignancy....... a random, systematic sampling scheme. RESULTS: The results were compared by bivariate correlation analyses and Kendall's tau. The international interobserver reproducibility of qualitative gradings was rather poor (kappa = 0.51), especially for grade 2 tumors (kappa = 0.28). Likewise, the interobserver...

  12. Developmental changes in electrophysiological properties and a transition from electrical to chemical coupling between excitatory layer 4 neurons in the rat barrel cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fliza eValiullina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During development, sensory systems switch from an immature to an adult mode of function along with the emergence of the active cortical states. Here, we used patch-clamp recordings from neocortical slices in vitro to characterize the developmental changes in the basic electrophysiological properties of excitatory L4 neurons and their connectivity before and after the developmental switch, which occurs in the rat barrel cortex in vivo at postnatal day P8. Prior to the switch, L4 neurons had lower resting membrane potentials, higher input resistance, lower membrane capacity, as well as action potentials (APs with smaller amplitudes, longer durations and higher AP thresholds compared to the neurons after the switch. A sustained firing pattern also emerged around the switch. Dual patch-clamp recordings from L4 neurons revealed that recurrent connections between L4 excitatory cells do not exist before and develop rapidly across the switch. In contrast, electrical coupling between these neurons waned around the switch. We suggest that maturation of electrophysiological features, particularly acquisition of a sustained firing pattern, and a transition from the immature electrical to mature chemical synaptic coupling between excitatory L4 neurons, contributes to the developmental switch in the cortical mode of function.

  13. Rise Time and Formant Transition Duration in the Discrimination of Speech Sounds: The Ba-Wa Distinction in Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Usha; Fosker, Tim; Huss, Martina; Mead, Natasha; Szucs, Denes

    2011-01-01

    Across languages, children with developmental dyslexia have a specific difficulty with the neural representation of the sound structure (phonological structure) of speech. One likely cause of their difficulties with phonology is a perceptual difficulty in auditory temporal processing (Tallal, 1980). Tallal (1980) proposed that basic auditory…

  14. Developmental trajectories of anxious and depressive problems during the transition from childhood to adolescence: Personality × Parenting interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinzie, P.; Harten, L. van; Deković, M.; Akker, A.L. van den; Shiner, R.L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined separate developmental trajectories of anxious and depressive symptoms from childhood to adolescence (9–15 years) in a community-based sample (N = 290). At three measurement points, mothers and fathers reported on their children's anxious and depressive symptoms, and at Time 1 th

  15. Developmental trajectories of anxious and depressive problems during the transition from childhood to adolescence : Personality x Parenting interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinzie, Peter; van Harten, Leanthe V.; Dekovic, Maja; van den Akker, Alithe L.; Shiner, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined separate developmental trajectories of anxious and depressive symptoms from childhood to adolescence (9-15 years) in a community-based sample (N = 290). At three measurement points, mothers and fathers reported on their children's anxious and depressive symptoms, and at Time 1 th

  16. Developmental trajectories of anxious and depressive problems during the transition from childhood to adolescence: personality x parenting interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinzie, P.; van Harten, L.V.; Deković, M.; van den Akker, A.L.; Shiner, R.L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined separate developmental trajectories of anxious and depressive symptoms from childhood to adolescence (9-15 years) in a community-based sample (N = 290). At three measurement points, mothers and fathers reported on their children's anxious and depressive symptoms, and at Time 1 th

  17. Developmental Investigation of the Domain-Specific Nature of the Life Satisfaction Construct across the Post-School Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xidan; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Parker, Philip D.; Marsh, Herbert W.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the nature of the life satisfaction construct with an emphasis on the comparison between a global or domain-specific operationalization during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. A combination of person-centered and variable-centered methods were used to analyze 7 waves of data covering the postschool transition from…

  18. Developmental trajectories of anxious and depressive problems during the transition from childhood to adolescence: personality × parenting interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzie, Peter; van Harten, Leanthe V; Deković, Maja; van den Akker, Alithe L; Shiner, Rebecca L

    2014-11-01

    This study examined separate developmental trajectories of anxious and depressive symptoms from childhood to adolescence (9-15 years) in a community-based sample (N = 290). At three measurement points, mothers and fathers reported on their children's anxious and depressive symptoms, and at Time 1 they reported on lower order child personality facets and on their parenting. By means of growth mixture modeling, three developmental trajectories were identified for anxious symptoms: steady low (82%), moderate increasing-decreasing (5.9%), and high declining groups (12.1%). For depressive symptoms, two developmental trajectories were found: steady low (94.1%) and moderate increasing groups (5.9%). Higher shyness, irritability, and altruism predicted membership in more problematic anxious and depressive groups. The personality facets energy, optimism, compliance, and anxiety were unique predictors for class membership for anxious symptoms, and the effects of shyness, irritability, and compliance were moderated by overreactive parenting. Shyness and irritability increased the probability of following the moderate increasing-decreasing anxiety trajectory, but only in the context of high or average levels of overreactive parenting. Compliance increased the probability of following the moderate increasing-decreasing and high decreasing trajectories in the context of high overreactive parenting. Our results indicate that childhood personality facets differentiate trajectories of anxious and depressive symptoms in theoretically compelling ways.

  19. Qualitative and quantitative histopathology in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder. An international investigation of intra- and interobserver reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Sasaki, M; Fukuzawa, S

    1994-01-01

    of both qualitative and quantitative grading methods. Grading of malignancy was performed by one observer in Japan (using the World Health Organization scheme), and by two observers in Denmark (using the Bergkvist system). A "translation" between the systems, grade for grade, and kappa statistics were....... The results obtained in this study stress the need for objective, quantitative histopathologic techniques substituting qualitative, subjective methods in prognosis-related grading of malignancy....... a random, systematic sampling scheme.RESULTS: The results were compared by bivariate correlation analyses and Kendall's tau. The international interobserver reproducibility of qualitative gradings was rather poor (kappa = 0.51), especially for grade 2 tumors (kappa = 0.28). Likewise, the interobserver...

  20. Athletic career transition : a qualitative inquiry into ex-athletes' experiences of the sports system in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Suptu, M. Faisal

    2012-01-01

    Anecdotally, studies on athletic career development and/ or transition revealed that athletes tend to have difficulty immersing their lifestyle into the societal norm after the termination of their athletic career. Based on a cross-cultural study by Alfermann & Stambulova (2002), the phenomenon of athletes coping with this change is no different whether it is voluntary or involuntary termination, and whether the country’s existing sports system does provide assistance in their transitions; wi...

  1. Chk1 is activated at the midblastula transition in Xenopus laevis embryos independently of DNA content and the cyclin E/Cdk2 developmental timer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjerid, Nassiba; Wroble, Brian N; Sible, Jill C

    2008-04-15

    Cell cycle checkpoints that are engaged in response to damaged and unreplicated DNA may serve additional, constitutive functions. In the developing Xenopus laevis embryo, the checkpoint kinase Chk1 is transiently activated at the midblastula transition (MBT), a period of extensive cell cycle remodeling including the acquisition of cell cycle checkpoints. The timing of many cell cycle remodeling events at the MBT, such as the lengthening of cell cycles, depends upon a critical nucleocytoplasmic (N/C) ratio. However, other events, including the degradation of maternal cyclin E, do not depend upon the N/C ratio, and are regulated by an autonomous developmental timer. To better understand what regulates Chk1 activation at the MBT, embryos were treated with aphidicolin, at different developmental times and for different lengths of time, to reduce the DNA content at the MBT. Chk1 was activated at the MBT in these embryos establishing that Chk1 activation occurs independently of the N/C ratio. Cdc25A is normally phosphorylated by Chk1 at the MBT and then degraded. The degradation of Cdc25A demonstrated partial dependence on DNA content, suggesting that factors other than Chk1 regulate its degradation. When the cyclin E developmental timer was disrupted with the Cdk2 inhibitor delta34-Xic1, Chk1 was still activated at the MBT, indicating that activation of Chk1 at the MBT was not directly linked to the cyclin E timer. Conversely, unreplicated or damaged DNA, delayed the degradation of cyclin E at the MBT, indicating that the cyclin E/Cdk2 timer is sensitive to engagement of cell cycle checkpoints.

  2. Outcomes of newly practicing nurses who applied principles of holistic comfort theory during the transition from school to practice: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Miki; Candela, Lori

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore if newly practicing nurses benefited from learning holistic comfort theory during their baccalaureate education, and to provide a conceptual framework to support the transition from school to practice. The study was conducted among graduates of an accelerated baccalaureate nursing program where holistic comfort theory was embedded as a learner-centered philosophy across the curriculum. A phenomenological process using van Manen's qualitative methodology in education involving semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis was used. The nurses recalled what holistic comfort meant to them in school, and described the lived experience of assimilating holistic comfort into their attitudes and behaviors in practice. Themes were established and a conceptual framework was developed to better understand the nurses' lived experiences. Results showed that holistic comfort was experienced as a constructive approach to transcend unavoidable difficulties during the transition from school to practice. Participants described meaningful learning and acquisition of self-strengthening behaviors using holistic comfort theory. Holistic comfort principles were credited for easing nurses into the realities of work and advocating for best patient outcomes. Patient safety and pride in patient care were incidental positive outcomes. The study offers new insights about applying holistic comfort to prepare nurses for the realities of practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Altered expression patterns of TCP and MYB genes relating to the floral developmental transition from initial zygomorphy to actinomorphy in Bournea (Gesneriaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiu-Ren; Wang, Yin-Zheng; Smith, James F; Chen, Rujin

    2008-01-01

    The shift from zygomorphy to actinomorphy has been intensively studied in molecular genetic model organisms. However, it is still a key challenge to explain the great morphological diversity of derived actinomorphy in angiosperms, since different underlying mechanisms may be responsible for similar external morphologies. Bournea (Gesneriaceae) is of particular interest in addressing this question, as it is a representative of primarily derived actinomorphy characteristic of a unique developmental transition from zygomorphy to actinomorphic flowers at anthesis. Using RNA in situ hybridization, the expression patterns were investigated of three different Bournea orthologues of TCP and MYB genes that have been shown to control floral symmetry in model species. Here, it is shown that the initial zygomorphic pattern in Bournea is likely a residual zygomorphy resulting from conserved expression of the adaxial (dorsal) identity gene BlCYC1. As a key novel event, the late downregulation of BlCYC1 and BlRAD and the correlative changes in the late specific expression of the abaxial (ventral) identity gene BlDIV should be responsible for the origin of the derived actinomorphy in Bournea. These results further indicate that there might be diverse pathways in the origin and evolution of derived actinomorphy through modifications of pre-existing zygomorphic developmental programs under dynamics of regulatory networks.

  4. Issues in the Medication Management Process in People Who Have Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Qualitative Study of the Caregivers' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Steven R.; Salgado, Teresa M.; Tian, Xi

    2016-01-01

    People who have intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) often rely on caregivers to assist in the medication management process. The aim of this study was to learn from caregivers, who are either family or support staff, what major issues arise throughout the process of managing medication and how these might be addressed. Problems…

  5. Cross-Cultural Issues in Parent-Professional Interactions: A Qualitative Study of Perceptions of Asian American Mothers of Children with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegatheesan, Brinda

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the perspectives of 23 first-generation Asian American mothers of children with developmental disabilities. The intent was to explore the working relationships between the mothers and professionals in health care and special education in the United States. The participants in this study were from China, Taiwan, Vietnam,…

  6. Qualitative and quantitative histopathology in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder. An international investigation of intra- and interobserver reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Sasaki, M; Fukuzawa, S

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Histopathologic, prognosis-related grading of malignancy by means of morphologic examination in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder (TCC) may be subject to observer variation, resulting in a reduced level of reproducibility. This may confound comparisons of treatment...... results. Using objective, unbiased stereologic techniques and ordinary histomorphometry, such problems may be solved. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A study of 110 patients with papillary or solid transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder in stage Ta through T4 was carried out, addressing reproducibility...

  7. Developmental investigation of the domain-specific nature of the life satisfaction construct across the post-school transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xidan; Morin, Alexandre J S; Parker, Philip D; Marsh, Herbert W

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the nature of the life satisfaction construct with an emphasis on the comparison between a global or domain-specific operationalization during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. A combination of person-centered and variable-centered methods were used to analyze 7 waves of data covering the postschool transition from a sample of 24,721 youth participating in Longitudinal Study of Australian Youth (LSAY) between 1998 and 2010. Evidence for the increasing importance of a domain-specific approach as adolescents entered adulthood was provided by: (1) factor analyses identifying a 3-factor model covering achievement, family, and leisure satisfaction that proved invariant across time waves; (2) factor mixture analyses showing shape-related differences between profiles (i.e., within-profile differences between domains) that increased as young people moved into adulthood.

  8. Feasibility of electronic peer mentoring for transition-age youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities: Project Teens making Environment and Activity Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Jessica M; Ryan, Cathryn T; Moore, Rachel; Schwartz, Ariel

    2017-03-01

    There is a need for mentoring interventions in which transition-age youth and young adults with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (I/DD) participate as both mentors and mentees. Project TEAM (Teens making Environment and Activity Modifications) is a problem-solving intervention that includes an electronic peer-mentoring component. Forty-two mentees and nine mentors with I/DD participated. The present authors analysed recorded peer-mentoring calls and field notes for mentee engagement, mentor achievement of objectives and supports needed to implement peer mentoring. Overall, mentees attended 87% of scheduled calls and actively engaged during 94% of call objectives. Across all mentoring dyads, mentors achieved 87% of objectives and there was a significant relationship between the use of supports (mentoring script, direct supervision) and fidelity. Transition-age mentees with I/DD can engage in electronic peer mentoring to further practice problem-solving skills. Mentors with I/DD can implement electronic peer mentoring when trained personnel provide supports and individualized job accommodations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Characteristics of mentalization patterns in parents of children with difficulties in realizing developmental objectives of the latency stage - qualitative analysis results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Dejko

    2016-06-01

    Observed disturbance in mentalization may suggest possible disturbances in the process of reflecting and containing in the early developmental stages of the examined persons. Mentalization skills were developed later in life of the examined persons. Idealization turned out to be the process that is most impacting and interfering with free reflections upon one’s own emotions and emotions of the others (including those of one’s own child.

  10. Female College Drinking and the Social Learning Theory: An Examination of the Developmental Transition Period from High School to College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBrie, Joseph W; Huchting, Karie; Pedersen, Eric R; Hummer, Justin F; Shelesky, Kristin; Tawalbeh, Summer

    2007-05-01

    Problematic drinking among college students remains a national issue with large percentages of college students reporting heavy episodic or binge drinking (Wechsler, Dowdall, Davenport, & Castillo, 1995) and experiencing severe alcohol-related consequences ranging from poor academic performance, to sexual assault, vandalism, and even death (Hingson, Heeren, Winter, & Wechsler, 2005; Wechsler et al., 2002). According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA, 2002), the first 6 weeks on a college campus are critical to first-year student success. However, during these first weeks many students initiate heavy drinking that may interfere with their ability to adapt to campus life, and patterns of drinking established during these first weeks persist throughout college (Schulenberg et al., 2001). Approximately one third of first-year students fail to enroll for their second year due to difficulties with the transition to college (Upcraft, 1995). Drinking may compromise successful negotiation of the transition into college and therefore jeopardize overall collegiate success. Therefore, the ability to identify specific students as they enter college who may develop problematic drinking patterns and related negative consequences would allow student affairs personnel to more effectively design and target risk-reduction programs and interventions.

  11. Field transcriptome revealed critical developmental and physiological transitions involved in the expression of growth potential in japonica rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamatsuki Kaori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant growth depends on synergistic interactions between internal and external signals, and yield potential of crops is a manifestation of how these complex factors interact, particularly at critical stages of development. As an initial step towards developing a systems-level understanding of the biological processes underlying the expression of overall agronomic potential in cereal crops, a high-resolution transcriptome analysis of rice was conducted throughout life cycle of rice grown under natural field conditions. Results A wide range of gene expression profiles based on 48 organs and tissues at various developmental stages identified 731 organ/tissue specific genes as well as 215 growth stage-specific expressed genes universally in leaf blade, leaf sheath, and root. Continuous transcriptome profiling of leaf from transplanting until harvesting further elucidated the growth-stage specificity of gene expression and uncovered two major drastic changes in the leaf transcriptional program. The first major change occurred before the panicle differentiation, accompanied by the expression of RFT1, a putative florigen gene in long day conditions, and the downregulation of the precursors of two microRNAs. This transcriptome change was also associated with physiological alterations including phosphate-homeostasis state as evident from the behavior of several key regulators such as miR399. The second major transcriptome change occurred just after flowering, and based on analysis of sterile mutant lines, we further revealed that the formation of strong sink, i.e., a developing grain, is not the major cause but is rather a promoter of this change. Conclusions Our study provides not only the genetic basis for functional genomics in rice but also new insight into understanding the critical physiological processes involved in flowering and seed development, that could lead to novel strategies for optimizing crop productivity.

  12. Understanding the relationship transitions and associated end of life clinical needs of young adults with life-limiting illnesses: A triangulated longitudinal qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget Johnston

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Care of young adults with life-limiting illnesses can often be complex due to the fact that they are growing and developing within the continuing presence of their illness. There is little research conducted nationally and internationally, which has examined the life issues of young adults or taken a longitudinal approach to understand such issues over a period of time. Aim: To gain clear understanding of one particular and pertinent life issue—relationship transition—occurring in the context of being a young adult with a life-limiting illness and the clinical needs arising from this. Design: This was a triangulated, longitudinal, qualitative study involving young adults with life-limiting illnesses and their significant others, namely, family members and healthcare professionals. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants and analysed using thematic analysis. Clinical case note reviews were also carried out. Setting/participants: A total of 12 young adults (aged between 17 and 23 years from 2 hospices and 22 nominated significant others participated in a total of 58 interviews. Results: Thematic analysis revealed 4 main themes and 11 subthemes. The main themes were ‘Dependence dichotomy’, ‘In it together’, ‘Biographical uncertainty’, and ‘Conserving integrity’. These themes helped to establish the nature of relationship transitions that the young adult participants from the study experienced and additionally allowed insight into their possible needs at their end of life. Conclusion: This study has identified the nature of relationship transitions pertinent to young adults and has highlighted associated end of life clinical needs. This study can influence further research into the transitions and end of life needs of this particular patient group receiving palliative care, while informing the lacking evidence base which exists internationally.

  13. Understanding the relationship transitions and associated end of life clinical needs of young adults with life-limiting illnesses: A triangulated longitudinal qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Bridget; Jindal-Snape, Divya; Pringle, Jan; Gold, Libby; Grant, Jayne; Dempsey, Raymond; Scott, Ros; Carragher, Pat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Care of young adults with life-limiting illnesses can often be complex due to the fact that they are growing and developing within the continuing presence of their illness. There is little research conducted nationally and internationally, which has examined the life issues of young adults or taken a longitudinal approach to understand such issues over a period of time. Aim: To gain clear understanding of one particular and pertinent life issue—relationship transition—occurring in the context of being a young adult with a life-limiting illness and the clinical needs arising from this. Design: This was a triangulated, longitudinal, qualitative study involving young adults with life-limiting illnesses and their significant others, namely, family members and healthcare professionals. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants and analysed using thematic analysis. Clinical case note reviews were also carried out. Setting/participants: A total of 12 young adults (aged between 17 and 23 years) from 2 hospices and 22 nominated significant others participated in a total of 58 interviews. Results: Thematic analysis revealed 4 main themes and 11 subthemes. The main themes were ‘Dependence dichotomy’, ‘In it together’, ‘Biographical uncertainty’, and ‘Conserving integrity’. These themes helped to establish the nature of relationship transitions that the young adult participants from the study experienced and additionally allowed insight into their possible needs at their end of life. Conclusion: This study has identified the nature of relationship transitions pertinent to young adults and has highlighted associated end of life clinical needs. This study can influence further research into the transitions and end of life needs of this particular patient group receiving palliative care, while informing the lacking evidence base which exists internationally. PMID:27781097

  14. Phenylalanine is required to promote specific developmental responses and prevents cellular damage in response to ultraviolet light in soybean (Glycine max) during the seed-to-seedling transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Joe H; Muhammad, DurreShahwar; Warpeha, Katherine M

    2014-01-01

    UV-radiation elicits a suite of developmental (photomorphogenic) and protective responses in plants, but responses early post-germination have received little attention, particularly in intensively bred plants of economic importance. We examined germination, hypocotyl elongation, leaf pubescence and subcellular responses of germinating and/or etiolated soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) seedlings in response to treatment with discrete wavelengths of UV-A or UV-B radiation. We demonstrate differential responses of germinating/young soybean seedlings to a range of UV wavelengths that indicate unique signal transduction mechanisms regulate UV-initiated responses. We have investigated how phenylalanine, a key substrate in the phenylpropanoid pathway, may be involved in these responses. Pubescence may be a key location for phenylalanine-derived protective compounds, as UV-B irradiation increased pubescence and accumulation of UV-absorbing compounds within primary leaf pubescence, visualized by microscopy and absorbance spectra. Mass spectrometry analysis of pubescence indicated that sinapic esters accumulate in the UV-irradiated hairs compared to unirradiated primary leaf tissue. Deleterious effects of some UV-B wavelengths on germination and seedling responses were reduced or entirely prevented by inclusion of phenylalanine in the growth media. Key effects of phenylalanine were not duplicated by tyrosine or tryptophan or sucrose, nor is the specificity of response due to the absorbance of phenylalanine itself. These results suggest that in the seed-to-seedling transition, phenylalanine may be a limiting factor in the development of initial mechanisms of UV protection in the developing leaf.

  15. Supporting Pupils with DCD and ASD with the Transition to Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulder-Hughes, Lynda; Prior, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) and developmental coordination disorder (DCD) are at an increased risk for a range of motor, sensory and social challenges which affect their ability to function at school. The current small scale, qualitative study sought to investigate how children with ASD and/or DCD felt about the transition to…

  16. Qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Lisa; Dertadian, George

    2017-08-07

    This narrative review aims to highlight key insights from qualitative research on drug use and drug users by profiling a selection of classic works. Consensus methods were used to identify and select four papers published in 1938, 1969, 1973 and 1984 considered to be classics. These landmark qualitative studies included the first account of addiction as a social process, demonstrating that people have meaningful responses to drug use that cannot be reduced to their pharmacological effects; the portrayal of inner-city heroin users as exacting, energetic and engaged social agents; identification of the interactive social learning processes involved in becoming a drug user; the application of the 'career' concept to understanding transitions and trajectories of drug use over time; and the articulation of a framework for understanding drug use that incorporates the interaction between pharmacology, psychology and social environments. These classic sociological and anthropological studies deployed qualitative research methods to show how drug use is shaped by complex sets of factors situated within social contexts, viewing drug users as agents engaged actively in social processes and worlds. Their findings have been used to challenge stereotypes about drug use and drug users, develop a deeper understanding of drug use among hidden, hard-to-research and under-studied populations, and provide the foundations for significant developments in scientific knowledge about the nature of drug use. They continue to retain their relevance, providing important correctives to biomedical and behaviourist paradigms, reminding us that drug use is a social process, and demonstrating how the inductive approach of qualitative research can strengthen the way we understand and respond to drug use and related harms. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Neoliberalism, welfare policy and health: a qualitative meta-synthesis of single parents' experience of the transition from welfare to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kay

    2012-09-01

    Following the United States' lead, the emergence of neoliberal welfare policy across the western world has resulted in employment programmes for single parents, who are predominantly single mothers. While some governments claim that employment will improve single parents' incomes and well-being, researchers dispute that single parents can unproblematically move into the workforce, with net positive effects. While researchers have quantified the socio-economic effect of these programmes, in particular on participant health, no study has yet synthesized participants' experiences of welfare-to-work. Here, I present a meta-synthesis of eight qualitative health-related studies of single parents' (and exclusively single mothers') welfare-to-work transition. I report that single mothers faced a combination of health and economic issues which made their transition from welfare to work difficult, including degrees of poor physical and mental health. For participants in the United States, these health issues were often compounded by a loss of health benefits on moving into low-wage employment. In countries where a return to employment was required before children reached school age, a lack of affordable and appropriate child care, especially for children with health problems, exacerbated these difficulties. As a result of scarce resources, single mothers in receipt of welfare benefits often relied on food banks or went without food. A return to the workforce did not alleviate this problem as additional child care and reduced government subsidies depleted the funds available for food. I conclude that welfare-to-work policies are underpinned by the neoliberal assumption that the market more efficiently distributes resources than the State. However, for the women in the studies examined here, labour market participation often depleted access to essential resources. Interventions to address the 'problem' of welfare dependency must recognize the complex interplay between work

  18. Phenylalanine is required to promote specific developmental responses and prevents cellular damage in response to ultraviolet light in soybean (Glycine max during the seed-to-seedling transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Sullivan

    Full Text Available UV-radiation elicits a suite of developmental (photomorphogenic and protective responses in plants, but responses early post-germination have received little attention, particularly in intensively bred plants of economic importance. We examined germination, hypocotyl elongation, leaf pubescence and subcellular responses of germinating and/or etiolated soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr. seedlings in response to treatment with discrete wavelengths of UV-A or UV-B radiation. We demonstrate differential responses of germinating/young soybean seedlings to a range of UV wavelengths that indicate unique signal transduction mechanisms regulate UV-initiated responses. We have investigated how phenylalanine, a key substrate in the phenylpropanoid pathway, may be involved in these responses. Pubescence may be a key location for phenylalanine-derived protective compounds, as UV-B irradiation increased pubescence and accumulation of UV-absorbing compounds within primary leaf pubescence, visualized by microscopy and absorbance spectra. Mass spectrometry analysis of pubescence indicated that sinapic esters accumulate in the UV-irradiated hairs compared to unirradiated primary leaf tissue. Deleterious effects of some UV-B wavelengths on germination and seedling responses were reduced or entirely prevented by inclusion of phenylalanine in the growth media. Key effects of phenylalanine were not duplicated by tyrosine or tryptophan or sucrose, nor is the specificity of response due to the absorbance of phenylalanine itself. These results suggest that in the seed-to-seedling transition, phenylalanine may be a limiting factor in the development of initial mechanisms of UV protection in the developing leaf.

  19. Adherence to a physical activity intervention among older adults in a post-transitional middle income country: a quantitative and qualitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, ML; Dangour, AD; Albala, C; Eguiguren, P; Allen, E; Uauy, R

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The effectiveness of community level interventions depends to a great extent on adherence. Currently, information on factors related to adherence in older adults from developing countries is scarce. Our aim was to identify factors associated to adherence to a physical activity intervention in older adults from a post-transitional middle income country. Design, setting and participants Using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods we studied 996 older Chilean subjects (65-67.9 years at baseline) with low to medium socioeconomic status from 10 health centers randomized to receive a physical activity intervention as part of the CENEX cluster trial (ISRCTN48153354). Measurements Using a multilevel regression model, the relationship between adherence (defined a priori as attendance at a minimum of 24 physical activity classes spread over at least 12 months) and individual, intervention-related and contextual factors was evaluated. We also conducted 40 semi-structured interviews with older adults (n=36) and instructors (n=4). Transcripts of the interviews were analyzed using content analysis to identify barriers and facilitators to adherence. Results Adherence to physical activity intervention was 42.6% (CI 95% 39.5 to 45.6). Depression, diabetes mellitus, percentage of impoverished households and rate of arrests for violent crimes in the neighborhood predicted less adherence (pbenefits attributed to the intervention and the opportunity the classes provided for social interaction with others. Conclusion In order to enhance effectiveness of community exercise interventions, strategies to improve participation should be targeted to older adults from deprived areas and those with psychological and medical conditions. PMID:23636549

  20. Qualitative studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qualitative Studies (QS) aims to become a central forum for discussions of qualitative research in psychology, education, communication, cultural studies, health sciences and social sciences in general...

  1. The Perspective of Young Adult Siblings of Individuals with Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism: An Exploration of Grief and Implications for Developmental Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Nicole R.

    2010-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) and high functioning autism are complex developmental disabilities that have a significant impact on the individual and his/her family. Asperger syndrome is characterized by challenges with understanding non-verbal communication, difficulties with social relationships, and restricted interests. Having a brother or sister…

  2. The Perspective of Young Adult Siblings of Individuals with Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism: An Exploration of Grief and Implications for Developmental Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Nicole R.

    2010-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) and high functioning autism are complex developmental disabilities that have a significant impact on the individual and his/her family. Asperger syndrome is characterized by challenges with understanding non-verbal communication, difficulties with social relationships, and restricted interests. Having a brother or sister…

  3. Medical and developmental impact of transition from subcutaneous insulin to oral glyburide in a 15-yr-old boy with neonatal diabetes mellitus and intermediate DEND syndrome: extending the age of KCNJ11 mutation testing in neonatal DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadi, Ali; Clark, Loretta M; Lipkin, Paul H; Mahone, E Mark; Wodka, Ericka L; Plotnick, Leslie P

    2010-05-01

    Mutations in the KCNJ11 gene, which encodes the Kir6.2 subunit of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel, often result in neonatal diabetes. Patients with this mutation have been successfully transitioned from insulin to sulfonylurea (SU) therapy without compromise in their glycemic control. Among patients with neonatal diabetes due to KCNJ11 mutations, approximately 25% have neurological findings including developmental delay, motor dysfunction, and epilepsy, known as DEND syndrome. There have been rare cases of juvenile patients with intermediate DEND syndrome (iDEND) reporting variable improvement in neurological function following transition from insulin to SU treatment. We describe the response to glyburide in a 15-yr-old boy with severe global developmental delays resulting from the KCNJ11 mutation V59M. The patient was discovered to have diabetes mellitus at 11.5 months of age, making this the oldest age at diagnosis of a KCNJ11 mutation-related case of neonatal diabetes. Because consensus has been to screen patients for this mutation only if younger than 6 months at the time of diagnosis, we suggest that all patients under the age of 12 months at diagnosis should receive genetic testing for monogenic causes of diabetes.

  4. Developmental Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    1994-01-01

    Developmental evaluation is proposed as a term to describe certain long-term partnering relationships with clients who are, themselves, engaged in ongoing program development. Rather than a model, developmental evaluation is a relationship founded on a shared purpose and is a way of being useful in innovative settings. (SLD)

  5. Exploring Best Practices in Developmental Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarella, Brian V.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, many community colleges are struggling with poor student success rates in developmental math. Therefore, this qualitative study focused on employing best practices in developmental mathematics at an urban community college in Dayton, Ohio. Guiding the study were the following research questions: What are the best practices utilized by a…

  6. Exploring Best Practices in Developmental Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarella, Brian V.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, many community colleges are struggling with poor student success rates in developmental math. Therefore, this qualitative study focused on employing best practices in developmental mathematics at an urban community college in Dayton, Ohio. Guiding the study were the following research questions: What are the best practices utilized by a…

  7. Qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelling, Leslie

    2015-03-25

    Qualitative research has an important role in helping nurses and other healthcare professionals understand patient experiences of health and illness. Qualitative researchers have a large number of methodological options and therefore should take care in planning and conducting their research. This article offers a brief overview of some of the key issues qualitative researchers should consider.

  8. Transitions to Care in the Community for Prison Releasees with HIV: a Qualitative Study of Facilitators and Challenges in Two States

    OpenAIRE

    Theodore M Hammett; Donahue, Sara; LeRoy, Lisa; Montague, Brian T.; Rosen, David L.; Solomon, Liza; Costa, Michael; Wohl, David; Rich, Josiah D.

    2015-01-01

    One in seven people living with HIV in the USA passes through a prison or jail each year, and almost all will return to the community. Discharge planning and transitional programs are critical but challenging elements in ensuring continuity of care, maintaining treatment outcomes achieved in prison, and preventing further viral transmission. This paper describes facilitators and challenges of in-prison care, transitional interventions, and access to and continuity of care in the community in ...

  9. Simultaneous mapping of membrane voltage and calcium in zebrafish heart in vivo reveals chamber-specific developmental transitions in ionic currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Hou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac action potential (AP and the consequent cytosolic Ca2+ transient are key indicators of cardiac function. Natural developmental processes, as well as many drugs and pathologies change the waveform, propagation, or variability (between cells or over time of these parameters. Here we apply a genetically encoded dual-function calcium and voltage reporter (CaViar to study the development of the zebrafish heart in vivo between 1.5 and 4 days post fertilization (dpf. We developed a high-sensitivity spinning disk confocal microscope and associated software for simultaneous three-dimensional optical mapping of voltage and calcium. We produced a transgenic zebrafish line expressing CaViar under control of the heart-specific cmlc2 promoter, and applied ion channel blockers at a series of developmental stages to map the maturation of the action potential in vivo. Early in development, the AP initiated via a calcium current through L-type calcium channels. Between 90 – 102 hours post fertilization (hpf, the ventricular AP switched to a sodium-driven upswing, while the atrial AP remained calcium driven. In the adult zebrafish heart, a sodium current drives the AP in both the atrium and ventricle. Simultaneous voltage and calcium imaging with genetically encoded reporters provides a new approach for monitoring cardiac development, and the effects of drugs on cardiac function.

  10. Developmental Scaffolding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2015-01-01

    . Within the developmental hierarchy, each module yields an inter-level relationship that makes it possible for the scaffolding to mediate the production of selectable variations. Awide range of genetic, cellular and morphological mechanisms allows the scaffolding to integrate these modular variations...... is eventually attained when the embryo acquires the capacity to impose a number of developmental constraints on its constituting parts in a top-down direction. The acquisition of this capacity allows a semiotic threshold to emerge between the living cellular world and the underlying nonliving molecular world...... to the complexity of sign recognition proper of a cellular community. In this semiotic perspective, the apparent goal directness of any developmental strategy should no longer be accounted for by a predetermined genetic program, but by the gradual definition of the relationships selected amongst the ones...

  11. Becoming a schoolchild - a positive developmental crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Lindqvist, Ditte Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    a schoolchild should be viewed as a positive developmental crisis. It is argued that institutional transitions are both characterized by preparation (institutionally and personally) and of actualization. A general descriptive model of identity tasks and developmental demands is offered to account...

  12. Developmental Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels; Hvid, Helge; Kristensen, Tage Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    Human Deveoplment and Working Life - Work for Welfare explores whether the development of human resources at company level can improve individuals' quality of life, companies' possibilities of development, and welfare and democracy in society. Chapter two discuss the concept "developmental work...

  13. Developmental Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels; Hvid, Helge; Kristensen, Tage Søndergaard;

    2003-01-01

    Human Deveoplment and Working Life - Work for Welfare explores whether the development of human resources at company level can improve individuals' quality of life, companies' possibilities of development, and welfare and democracy in society. Chapter two discuss the concept "developmental work...

  14. The developmental impact of two first grade preventive interventions on aggressive/disruptive behavior in childhood and adolescence: an application of latent transition growth mixture modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petras, Hanno; Masyn, Katherine; Ialongo, Nick

    2011-09-01

    We examine the impact of two universal preventive interventions in first grade on the growth of aggressive/disruptive behavior in grades 1-3 and 6-12 through the application of a latent transition growth mixture model (LT-GMM). Both the classroom-centered and family-centered interventions were designed to reduce the risk for later conduct problems by enhancing the child behavior management practices of teachers and parents, respectively. We first modeled growth trajectories in each of the two time periods with separate GMMs. We then associated latent trajectory classes of aggressive/disruptive behavior across the two time periods using a transition model for the corresponding latent class variables. Subsequently, we tested whether the interventions had direct effects on trajectory class membership in grades 1-3 and 6-12. For males, both the classroom-centered and family-centered interventions had significant direct effects on trajectory class membership in grades 6-12, whereas only the classroom-centered intervention had a significant effect on class membership in grades 1-3. Significant direct effects for females were confined to grades 1-3 for the classroom-centered intervention. Further analyses revealed that both the classroom-centered and family-centered intervention males were significantly more likely than control males to transition from the high trajectory class in grades 1-3 to a low class in grades 6-12. Effects for females in classroom-centered interventions went in the hypothesized direction but did not reach significance. © Society for Prevention Research 2011

  15. 对护理人员产科过渡期护士资质认知的质性研究%A qualitative study on nurse′s cognition of obstetrical nurse′s qualification during the transitional period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴艳丽

    2016-01-01

    目的:护理人员对产科过渡期护士资质认知的质性研究。方法通过焦点小组访谈法对临床产科管理专家及产科责任护士进行访谈。结果通过对访谈原始资料进行开放性译码、主轴译码和选择性译码之后,本研究提炼出产科过渡期护士岗位的4项胜任力特征,即护理评估能力、个性化护理方案制订能力、护理措施实施能力、护理效果评价能力。结论通过护理人员对产科过渡期护士资质认知,为更好地进行产科专科护士精细化管理和使用奠定了基础。%Objective To explore a nurse′s qualitative study on nurse′s cognition of obstetrical nurse qualification during the transitional period.Methods The focus group interviews were conducted in clinical obstetrical management experts and obstetrical nurses.Results The original data of interviews were carried out open decoding axial decoding and selective decoding,and then the study distilled four characteristics of obstetrical nurse′s competency during transitional period including nursing assessment ability,personal nursing planning making ability,implementation ability of nursing countermeasures and evaluation of nursing effects. Conclusions The nurse′s cognition of obstetrical nurse′s qualification during transitional period can contribute a foundation for a better obstetrical nurse specialist fine management and its usage.

  16. BASIC SUPPOSITIONS FOR ORGANIZING AND ESTABLISHING A COHERENT SYSTEM OF EARLY TREATMENT AND PRE-SCHOOL UPBRINGING OF CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DIFFICULTIES IN CONDITIONS OF TRANSITION (situation, problems and needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljupco Ajdinski

    1997-03-01

    with developmental difficulties especially in the early treatment, early detection, diagnostics and pre-school upbringing , is needed. In that context, it is considered that our Republic has the adequate potentials referring to the level of professionally developed though, number and structure of personnel, space capacities and technical aids, and economic conditions that strengthen in present conditions of transition of our society.On the basis of the presented conditions, is obvious the need for mobility of all the institutions applying adequate provisions that will lead towards successful continuation of the whole organization and work in the field of early treatment and pre-school upbringing of children with developmental difficulties.Accordingly, we want to propose some provisions that should be involved in the health and children care, education, upbringing, and normative regulations.

  17. Integrating Evidence From Systematic Reviews, Qualitative Research, and Expert Knowledge Using Co-Design Techniques to Develop a Web-Based Intervention for People in the Retirement Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Nicola; Heaven, Ben; Teal, Gemma; Evans, Elizabeth H; Cleland, Claire; Moffatt, Suzanne; Sniehotta, Falko F; White, Martin; Mathers, John C; Moynihan, Paula

    2016-08-03

    Integrating stakeholder involvement in complex health intervention design maximizes acceptability and potential effectiveness. However, there is little methodological guidance about how to integrate evidence systematically from various sources in this process. Scientific evidence derived from different approaches can be difficult to integrate and the problem is compounded when attempting to include diverse, subjective input from stakeholders. The intent of the study was to describe and appraise a systematic, sequential approach to integrate scientific evidence, expert knowledge and experience, and stakeholder involvement in the co-design and development of a complex health intervention. The development of a Web-based lifestyle intervention for people in retirement is used as an example. Evidence from three systematic reviews, qualitative research findings, and expert knowledge was compiled to produce evidence statements (stage 1). Face validity of these statements was assessed by key stakeholders in a co-design workshop resulting in a set of intervention principles (stage 2). These principles were assessed for face validity in a second workshop, resulting in core intervention concepts and hand-drawn prototypes (stage 3). The outputs from stages 1-3 were translated into a design brief and specification (stage 4), which guided the building of a functioning prototype, Web-based intervention (stage 5). This prototype was de-risked resulting in an optimized functioning prototype (stage 6), which was subject to iterative testing and optimization (stage 7), prior to formal pilot evaluation. The evidence statements (stage 1) highlighted the effectiveness of physical activity, dietary and social role interventions in retirement; the idiosyncratic nature of retirement and well-being; the value of using specific behavior change techniques including those derived from the Health Action Process Approach; and the need for signposting to local resources. The intervention

  18. Developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robin L; Pennington, Bruce F

    2015-01-01

    This review uses a levels-of-analysis framework to summarize the current understanding of developmental dyslexia's etiology, brain bases, neuropsychology, and social context. Dyslexia is caused by multiple genetic and environmental risk factors as well as their interplay. Several candidate genes have been identified in the past decade. At the brain level, dyslexia is associated with aberrant structure and function, particularly in left hemisphere reading/language networks. The neurocognitive influences on dyslexia are also multifactorial and involve phonological processing deficits as well as weaknesses in other oral language skills and processing speed. We address contextual issues such as how dyslexia manifests across languages and social classes as well as what treatments are best supported. Throughout the review, we highlight exciting new research that cuts across levels of analysis. Such work promises eventually to provide a comprehensive explanation of the disorder as well as its prevention and remediation.

  19. Support Needs of Siblings of People with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Catherine K.; Heller, Tamar; Kramer, John

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the support needs of adult siblings of people with developmental disabilities. A survey completed by 139 siblings of people with developmental disabilities captured the needs of adult siblings through 2 open-ended questions. A grounded theory approach was used, and the sibling responses anchored the analysis,…

  20. Towards a middle-range theory of mental health and well-being effects of employment transitions: Findings from a qualitative study on unemployment during the 2009-2010 economic recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntoli, Gianfranco; Hughes, Skye; Karban, Kate; South, Jane

    2015-07-01

    This article builds upon previous theoretical work on job loss as a status passage to help explain how people's experiences of involuntary unemployment affected their mental well-being during the 2009-2010 economic recession. It proposes a middle-range theory that interprets employment transitions as status passages and suggests that their health and well-being effects depend on the personal and social meanings that people give to them, which are called properties of the transitions. The analyses, which used a thematic approach, are based on the findings of a qualitative study undertaken in Bradford (North England) consisting of 73 people interviewed in 16 focus groups. The study found that the participants experienced their job losses as divestment passages characterised by three main properties: experiences of reduced agency, disruption of role-based identities, for example, personal identity crises, and experiences of 'spoiled identities', for example, experiences of stigma. The proposed middle-range theory allows us to federate these findings together in a coherent framework which makes a contribution to illuminating not just the intra-personal consequences of unemployment, that is, its impact on subjective well-being and common mental health problems, but also its inter-personal consequences, that is, the hidden and often overlooked social processes that affect unemployed people's social well-being. This article discusses how the study findings and the proposed middle-range theory can help to address the theoretical weaknesses and often contradictory empirical findings from studies that use alternative frameworks, for example, deprivation models and 'incentive theory' of unemployment.

  1. Developmental Constitutionalism

    OpenAIRE

    Skupien, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The search for adequate political and socio-economic models continues within recent constitutional reforms in Sub-Saharan post-colonial societies since 2005. This discourse goes back to the period of decolonisation but also to the transitions after 1989. Within this study, I assess the problem of representational crisis that come hand in hand with constitution making processes. Especially, I focus on the representation of different groups within the state, the safeguarding and extent of basic...

  2. Developmental Stages in the Conceptualization of Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamashiro, Roy T.

    1978-01-01

    "Marriage" is treated as a mental concept that evolves in a developmental sequence of four qualitatively distinct stages: Magical, Idealized Conventional, Individualistic, and Affirmational. Each stage is illustrated with excerpts from Ingmar Bergman's Scenes From a Marriage. Some applications for marriage counselors are suggested. (Author)

  3. Qualitative Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Michael; Clark II, Woodrow W

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is about science from a book that on Qualitative Economics (Clark and Fast 2008), specifically building a science of economics, grounded in understanding of organizations and what is beneath the surface of structures and activities. Economics should be, as a science, concerned with i...... things; it is about interaction and it is about construction. If we are not able to understand and describe how people interact and construct, we can not develop any theory of economics or understand human dynamics that is scientific.......This chapter is about science from a book that on Qualitative Economics (Clark and Fast 2008), specifically building a science of economics, grounded in understanding of organizations and what is beneath the surface of structures and activities. Economics should be, as a science, concerned with its...... assumptions and how to develop and formulate theories of ideas and reality that produce descriptions of how to understand phenomenon that create experiences, hypotheses generation and replicable data which need to be connected to everyday business life. Economics has to start with a discussion of philosophy...

  4. Developmental dyspraxia and developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, M; Möbs, I

    1995-12-01

    This article discusses the role developmental dyspraxia plays in developmental coordination disorder (DCD), based upon a review of literature on apraxia, developmental dyspraxia, and DCD. Apraxia and dyspraxia have often been equated with DCD. However, it is argued that apraxia and dyspraxia primarily refer to the problems of motor sequencing and selection, which not all children with DCD exhibit. The author proposes to distinguish developmental dyspraxia from DCD. Other issues discussed include the assessment, etiology, and treatment of developmental dyspraxia and DCD, and the relationship between DCD and learning disabilities. A research agenda is offered regarding future directions to overcome current limitation.

  5. Identifying support functions in developmental relationships: A self-determination perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Suzanne; Vuuren, van Mark; Jong, de Menno D.T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the content of developmental networks from the perspective of self-determination theory. We qualitatively examine 18 protégés' constellations of developmental relationships to identify specific types of developmental support functions. Our study shows that the adoption of self-de

  6. Identifying Support Functions in Developmental Relationships: A Self-Determination Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Suzanne; van Vuuren, Mark; de Jong, Menno D. T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the content of developmental networks from the perspective of self-determination theory. We qualitatively examine 18 proteges' constellations of developmental relationships to identify specific types of developmental support functions. Our study shows that the adoption of self-determination theory leads to a theory-based…

  7. Effective Developmental Math Instructional Practices That Facilitate Learning and Academic Success of Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Pamela Hilson

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the qualitative study was to discover instructional practices used by developmental math instructors that facilitate learning and academic success of students in developmental math courses at select community colleges in Alabama in order to generate improved instructional practices in the developmental education field. Emergent data…

  8. Qualitative Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Michael; Clark II, Woodrow W

                         This book is about science -- specifically, the science of economics. Or lack thereof is more accurate. The building of any science, let alone economics, is grounded in the understanding of what is beneath the "surface" of economics. Science, and hence economics, should...... be concerned with formulating ideas that express theories which produce descriptions of how to understand phenomenon and real world experiences.                       Economics must become a science, because the essence of economics in terms of human actions, group interactions and communities are in need...... of scientific inquiry. Academics and scholars need a scientific perspective that can hypothesize, theorize document, understand and analyze human dynamics from the individual to more societal interactions. And that is what qualitative economics does; it can make economics into becoming a science. The economic...

  9. The diversification of developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Nathan; Dietrich, Michael R; Alomepe, Beverly S; Antrim, Amelia F; ByrneSim, Bay Lauris; He, Yi

    2015-10-01

    In the 1960s, "developmental biology" became the dominant term to describe some of the research that had previously been included under the rubrics of embryology, growth, morphology, and physiology. As scientific societies formed under this new label, a new discipline took shape. Historians, however, have a number of different perspectives on what changes led to this new field of developmental biology and how the field itself was constituted during this period. Using the General Embryological Information Service, a global index of post-World War II development-related research, we have documented and visualized significant changes in the kinds of research that occurred as this new field formed. In particular, our analysis supports the claim that the transition toward developmental biology was marked by a growth in new topics and forms of research. Although many historians privilege the role of molecular biology and/or the molecularization of biology in general during this formative period, we have found that the influence of molecular biology is not sufficient to account for the wide range of new research that constituted developmental biology at the time. Overall, our work creates a robust characterization of the changes that occurred with regard to research on growth and development in the decades following World War II and provides a context for future work on the specific drivers of those changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Qualitative experiments in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I explore the meaning of experiments in early twentieth century psychology, focusing on the qualitative experimental methodology of psychologist Frederic BARTLETT. I begin by contextualizing BARTLETT's experiments within the continental research tradition of his time, which...... was in a state of transition from a focus on elements (the concern of psychophysics) to a focus on wholes (the concern of Gestalt psychology). The defining feature of BARTLETT's early experiments is his holistic treatment of human responses, in which the basic unit of analysis is the active person relating...... to some material within the constraints of a social and material context. This manifests itself in a number of methodological principles that contrast with contemporary understandings of experimentation in psychology. The contrast is further explored by reviewing the history of "replications...

  11. Using Developmental Evaluation Methods with Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Winkelen, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the use of developmental evaluation methods with community of practice programmes experiencing change or transition to better understand how to target support resources. Design/methodology/approach: The practical use of a number of developmental evaluation methods was explored in three organizations over a…

  12. Developmental coordination disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001533.htm Developmental coordination disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Developmental coordination disorder is a childhood disorder. It leads to ...

  13. Four Social Psychological Lenses for Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittoun, Tania; Perret-Clermont, Anne-Nelly

    2009-01-01

    How can the advances of social and developmental psychology be integrated? This conceptual paper proposes to examine four basic theoretical models of social situations through which learning and development have been observed in the post-piagetian tradition: the psychosocial triangle, the frame, models of transfer and transitions, and models…

  14. Four Social Psychological Lenses for Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittoun, Tania; Perret-Clermont, Anne-Nelly

    2009-01-01

    How can the advances of social and developmental psychology be integrated? This conceptual paper proposes to examine four basic theoretical models of social situations through which learning and development have been observed in the post-piagetian tradition: the psychosocial triangle, the frame, models of transfer and transitions, and models…

  15. The Domain of Developmental Psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroufe, L. Alan; Rutter, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Describes how developmental psychopathology differs from related disciplines, including abnormal psychology, psychiatry, clinical child psychology, and developmental psychology. Points out propositions underlying a developmental perspective and discusses implications for research in developmental psychopathology. (Author/RH)

  16. Inquiry cantos: poetics of developmental disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P

    2001-10-01

    Postmodern thought is increasingly critical of foundations central to modern, positivist research into the lives of people labeled as having so-called developmental disabilities and mental retardation. This approach has brought about changes in how developmental disability is both understood and, ultimately, created. Responding to what has been called the postmodern turn, some disability studies scholars are choosing to represent their work in alternative textual formats, including poetry and fiction. These texts, representing multiple subjectivities, offer ways to explicate, problematize, and reconstruct new ways of understanding so-called developmental disability that are complex and plural. Examples of alternative research texts are provided from a recent qualitative research project with self-advocates and their construction of choice, control, and power.

  17. What is developmental dyspraxia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, D

    1995-12-01

    The idea of developmental dyspraxia has been discussed in the research literature for almost 100 years. However, there continues to be a lack of consensus regarding both the definition and description of this disorder. This paper presents a neuropsychologically based operational definition of developmental dyspraxia that emphasizes that developmental dyspraxia is a disorder of gesture. Research that has investigated the development of praxis is discussed. Further, different types of gestural disorders displayed by children and different mechanisms that underlie developmental dyspraxia are compared to and contrasted with adult acquired apraxia. The impact of perceptual-motor, language, and cognitive impairments on children's gestural development and the possible associations between these developmental disorders and developmental dyspraxia are also examined. Also, the relationship among limb, orofacial, and verbal dyspraxia is discussed. Finally, problems that exist in the neuropsychological assessment of developmental dyspraxia are discussed and recommendations concerning what should be included in such an assessment are presented.

  18. Developmental transcriptome of Aplysia californica'

    KAUST Repository

    Heyland, Andreas

    2010-12-06

    Genome-wide transcriptional changes in development provide important insight into mechanisms underlying growth, differentiation, and patterning. However, such large-scale developmental studies have been limited to a few representatives of Ecdysozoans and Chordates. Here, we characterize transcriptomes of embryonic, larval, and metamorphic development in the marine mollusc Aplysia californica and reveal novel molecular components associated with life history transitions. Specifically, we identify more than 20 signal peptides, putative hormones, and transcription factors in association with early development and metamorphic stages-many of which seem to be evolutionarily conserved elements of signal transduction pathways. We also characterize genes related to biomineralization-a critical process of molluscan development. In summary, our experiment provides the first large-scale survey of gene expression in mollusc development, and complements previous studies on the regulatory mechanisms underlying body plan patterning and the formation of larval and juvenile structures. This study serves as a resource for further functional annotation of transcripts and genes in Aplysia, specifically and molluscs in general. A comparison of the Aplysia developmental transcriptome with similar studies in the zebra fish Danio rerio, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and other studies on molluscs suggests an overall highly divergent pattern of gene regulatory mechanisms that are likely a consequence of the different developmental modes of these organisms. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  19. Qualitative Research Process

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Dewan Mahboob

    2011-01-01

    This article provides with an overview of the qualitative research methods. Over last few decades, qualitative research is getting very popular in the fields of business, sociology, psychology and others. This article, in its introduction, gives a general idea about the qualitative research. Then it discusses the main differences between qualitative and quantitative research methods. The article also discusses about the ethical issues important for qualitative research. Lastly it discusses ab...

  20. Qualitative research in health

    OpenAIRE

    Ligia Regina Franco Sansigolo Kerr; Carl Kendall

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative research and health has become extremely popular in the last 30 years. Since the 80’s, more and more health professionals have engaged in qualitative research. Discriminating a “qualitative research” from quantitative research, though, is a misnomer, since all research is at least part qualitative. After all, when epidemiologists or biostatisticians count something, that category is a qualitative “something”.

  1. Developmental Diversity in the Academic Language-Learning Experiences of Adult English as a Second or Other Language Learners: A Constructive-Developmental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette-Schramm, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    Academic language is a challenging yet increasingly important skill for Adult Basic Education/English as a Second or Other Language learners. Related to academic language learning is an adult's developmental perspective. Developmental perspectives have been shown to vary in adulthood and shape qualitatively distinct ways of reasoning and learning…

  2. Administrative Theory in Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Daniel E.

    This monograph analyzes transition in educational administrative theory. A brief introductory section describes the theoretical movement, the substance and repercussions of Thomas Greenfield's critique of educational administrative theory in 1974, and emerging qualitative approaches. Seven readings, all written by the volume's author, view…

  3. Attachment in Middle Childhood: An Evolutionary-Developmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Middle childhood is a key transitional stage in the development of attachment processes and representations. Here I discuss the middle childhood transition from an evolutionary-developmental perspective and show how this approach offers fresh insight into the function and organization of attachment in this life stage. I begin by presenting an…

  4. Evolutionary developmental psychology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, Ashley C; Bjorklund, David F

    2010-01-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental psychology can potentially broaden the horizons of mainstream evolutionary psychology by combining the principles of Darwinian evolution by natural selection...

  5. Reproductive and developmental toxicology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Ramesh C

    2011-01-01

    .... Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology is a comprehensive and authoritative resource providing the latest literature enriched with relevant references describing every aspect of this area of science...

  6. Developmental Prosopagnosia: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kress

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the published literature on developmental prosopagnosia, a condition in which the ability to recognize other persons by facial information alone has never been acquired. Due to the very low incidence of this syndrome, case reports are sparse. We review the available data and suggest assessment strategies for patients suffering from developmental prosopagnosia. It is suggested that developmental prosopagnosia is not a unitary condition but rather consists of different subforms that can be dissociated on the grounds of functional impairments. On the basis of the available evidence, hypotheses about the aetiology of developmental prosopagnosia as well as about the selectivity of deficits related to face recognition are discussed.

  7. Developmental Plasticity in Child Growth and Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze'ev eHochberg

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a given genotype to produce different phenotypes in response to different environments is termed "plasticity", and is part of the organism's "adaptability" to environmental cues. The expressions of suites of genes, particularly during development or life-history transitions, probably underlie the fundamental plasticity of an organism. Plasticity in developmental programming has evolved in order to provide the best chances of survival and reproductive success to organisms under changing environments. Environmental conditions that are experienced in early life can profoundly influence human biology, child growth and maturation, and long-term health and longevity. Developmental origins of health and disease and life history transitions are purported to use placental, nutritional, and endocrine cues for setting long-term biological, mental, and behavioral strategies for child growth and maturation in response to local ecological and/or social conditions. The window of developmental plasticity extends from conception to early childhood, and even beyond to the transition from juvenility to adoelscence, and could be transmitted transgenerationally. It involves epigenetic responses to environmental changes, which exert their effects during life history phase-transitions.

  8. Developmental plasticity in child growth and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Ze'ev

    2011-01-01

    The ability of a given genotype to produce different phenotypes in response to different environments is termed "plasticity," and is part of the organism's "adaptability" to environmental cues. The expressions of suites of genes, particularly during development or life history transitions, probably underlie the fundamental plasticity of an organism. Plasticity in developmental programming has evolved in order to provide the best chances of survival and reproductive success to organisms under changing environments. Environmental conditions that are experienced in early life can profoundly influence human biology, child growth and maturation, and long-term health and longevity. Developmental origins of health and disease and life history transitions are purported to use placental, nutritional, and endocrine cues for setting long-term biological, mental, and behavioral strategies for child growth and maturation in response to local ecological and/or social conditions. The window of developmental plasticity extends from conception to early childhood, and even beyond to the transition from juvenility to adolescence, and could be transmitted transgenerationally. It involves epigenetic responses to environmental changes, which exert their effects during life history phase transitions.

  9. Qualitative Tourism Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buda, Dorina; Martini, Annaclaudia; Garcia, Luis-Manuel; Lowry, Linda

    Conducting qualitative research in tourism studies entails engaging with an entire approach, a set of methods that shape project design, conceptual frameworks, data analysis, and anticipated outcomes. Standard qualitative methods are individual interviews, focus groups and ethnography. Solicited

  10. [Qualitative research methodology in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedregal, Paula; Besoain, Carolina; Reinoso, Alejandro; Zubarew, Tamara

    2017-03-01

    Health care research requires different methodological approaches such as qualitative and quantitative analyzes to understand the phenomena under study. Qualitative research is usually the least considered. Central elements of the qualitative method are that the object of study is constituted by perceptions, emotions and beliefs, non-random sampling by purpose, circular process of knowledge construction, and methodological rigor throughout the research process, from quality design to the consistency of results. The objective of this work is to contribute to the methodological knowledge about qualitative research in health services, based on the implementation of the study, “The transition process from pediatric to adult services: perspectives from adolescents with chronic diseases, caregivers and health professionals”. The information gathered through the qualitative methodology facilitated the understanding of critical points, barriers and facilitators of the transition process of adolescents with chronic diseases, considering the perspective of users and the health team. This study allowed the design of a transition services model from pediatric to adult health services based on the needs of adolescents with chronic diseases, their caregivers and the health team.

  11. The qualitative research proposal

    OpenAIRE

    H Klopper

    2008-01-01

    Qualitative research in the health sciences has had to overcome many prejudices and a number of misunderstandings, but today qualitative research is as acceptable as quantitative research designs and is widely funded and published. Writing the proposal of a qualitative study, however, can be a challenging feat, due to the emergent nature of the qualitative research design and the description of the methodology as a process. Even today, many sub-standard proposals at post-graduate evaluation c...

  12. Genetics and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

  13. Genetics and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

  14. Peer Helpers in Hungary: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racz, Jozsef; Lacko, Zsuzsa

    2008-01-01

    Hungary is a country in transition that has no real tradition of peer helping. A qualitative study was carried out involving 13 peer helpers of two kinds (a) age-based peers, and (b) way-of-life-based peers (fellow helpers). The motivations for and the processes of becoming a peer helper were analyzed. Results showed the largest difference being…

  15. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  16. Child Care Providers' Competence and Confidence in Referring Children at Risk for Developmental Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Diane; Bingham, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Despite the benefits of early intervention for children, the majority of children with developmental delays are not identified prior to the age of 5 years. Child care providers could aid in recognition of children at risk for developmental delays; however, there is little research on this topic. This article reports on a qualitative research study…

  17. The Costs and Benefits of Development: The Transition From Crawling to Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Karen E; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S

    2014-12-02

    The transition from crawling to walking requires infants to relinquish their status as experienced, highly skilled crawlers in favor of being inexperienced, lowskilled walkers. Yet infants willingly undergo this developmental transition, despite incurring costs of shaky steps, frequent falls, and inability to gauge affordances for action in their new upright posture. Why do infants persist with walking when crawling serves the purpose of independent mobility? In this article, we present an integrative analysis of the costs and benefits associated with crawling and walking that challenges prior assumptions, and reveals deficits of crawling and benefits of upright locomotion that were previously overlooked. Inquiry into multiple domains of development reveals that the benefits of persisting with walking outweigh the costs: Compared to crawlers, walking infants cover more space more quickly, experience richer visual input, access and play more with distant objects, and interact in qualitatively new ways with caregivers.

  18. Diapause: delaying the developmental clock in response to a changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiesari, Luca; O'Connor, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal changes can induce organisms to modify their developmental growth. Many holometabolous insects, especially Lepidoptera, trigger diapause, an "actively induced" dormancy, for overwintering. Diapause is an alternative developmental pathway that reversibly blocks developmental growth during specific transitions and enhances the hibernating potential of the organism. Changes in environmental cues, such as light and temperature, trigger modifications in the levels, or in the timing, of developmental hormones. These in turn switch the developmental trajectory (diapause or direct development), strongly altering larval/pupal growth and inducing the appearance of diapause-bound seasonal morphs (polyphenism). We also discuss an example of vertebrate diapause using the killifish embryo as an example where diapause is an environmentally determined developmental switch analogous to that observed in lepidopteran dormancy. Based on the examples discussed here, we propose that the complex physiological responses leading to diapause might evolve quickly by relatively limited genetic changes in the regulation of hormonal signals that program normal developmental transitions.

  19. Academic Literacy as Language Policy in Community College Developmental Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Heather B.; Avni, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study offers critical insight into how language policy interacts with daily classroom decisions at a large and highly diverse urban community college in the United States. Specifically, it examines the challenges that faculty teaching developmental writing courses for English language learners experience when determining what…

  20. Incorporating Study Strategies in Developmental Mathematics/College Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, Selina Vasquez; Offer, Joey; Ward, Debra P.; Dochen, Carol W.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effectiveness of incorporating study strategies in a developmental mathematics/college algebra program. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected through a quasiexperimental methodology. Results show that students reported increases on the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI)…

  1. Sexual debut in young adults in Cali as transition: keys for care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Patricia Valencia Molina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This work sought to understand sexual debut as a transitional process in the lives of a group of young adults and to interpret the meaning of this transition for them. Methodology. This was a qualitative research with 18 life stories of students from different socio-economic backgrounds and with diverse sexual orientations. Results. According to the middle-range theory of transitions, sexual debut can be considered a developmental transition. The initiative can be their own, motivated by desire, or coerced by pressure from a partner or peers in which case underlay power relations either by age or hierarchy. Its features are shaped by the individual´s abilities, knowledge, and uncertainties, as much as by the circumstances surrounding the event and the socio-cultural precepts towards the topic. It is valued as a healthy transitional process when it is agreed upon by both members of the couple, planned and flows into symmetrical relations. Conclusion. The theory of transitions and analysis of the context are useful in understanding the phenomenon because the subjective experience is framed within normative, appreciative, and socio-cultural constructions. Nursing, as discipline, requires elements like those provided by this research to interpret the dynamics, meanings, as well as subjective and social processes in the sexual evolution of people in different contexts and historical moments.

  2. Sexual debut in young adults in Cali as transition: keys for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia Molina, Claudia Patricia; Canaval Erazo, Gladys Eugenia; Sevilla Peñuela, Teresita María; Orcasita Pineda, Linda Teresa

    2015-01-01

    This work sought to understand sexual debut as a transitional process in the lives of a group of young adults and to interpret the meaning of this transition for them. This was a qualitative research with 18 life stories of students from different socio-economic backgrounds and with diverse sexual orientations. According to the middle-range theory of transitions, sexual debut can be considered a developmental transition. The initiative can be their own, motivated by desire, or coerced by pressure from a partner or peers in which case underlay power relations either by age or hierarchy. Its features are shaped by the individual's abilities, knowledge, and uncertainties, as much as by the circumstances surrounding the event and the socio-cultural precepts towards the topic. It is valued as a healthy transitional process when it is agreed upon by both members of the couple, planned and flows into symmetrical relations. The theory of transitions and analysis of the context are useful in understanding the phenomenon because the subjective experience is framed within normative, appreciative, and socio-cultural constructions. Nursing, as discipline, requires elements like those provided by this research to interpret the dynamics, meanings, as well as subjective and social processes in the sexual evolution of people in different contexts and historical moments.

  3. Computer supported qualitative research

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, Luís; Sousa, Francislê; Moreira, António; Lamas, David

    2017-01-01

    This book contains an edited selection of the papers accepted for presentation and discussion at the first International Symposium on Qualitative Research (ISQR2016), held in Porto, Portugal, July 12th-14th, 2016. The book and the symposium features the four main application fields Education, Health, Social Sciences and Engineering and Technology and seven main subjects: Rationale and Paradigms of Qualitative Research (theoretical studies, critical reflection about epistemological dimensions, ontological and axiological); Systematization of approaches with Qualitative Studies (literature review, integrating results, aggregation studies, meta -analysis, meta- analysis of qualitative meta- synthesis, meta- ethnography); Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research (emphasis in research processes that build on mixed methodologies but with priority to qualitative approaches); Data Analysis Types (content analysis , discourse analysis , thematic analysis , narrative analysis , etc.); Innovative processes of Qualitative ...

  4. Life Span Developmental Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eryilmaz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Life Span Developmental Approach examines development of individuals which occurs from birth to death. Life span developmental approach is a multi-disciplinary approach related with disciplines like psychology, psychiatry, sociology, anthropology and geriatrics that indicates the fact that development is not completed in adulthood, it continues during the life course. Development is a complex process that consists of dying and death. This approach carefully investigates the development of individuals with respect to developmental stages. This developmental approach suggests that scientific disciplines should not explain developmental facts only with age changes. Along with aging, cognitive, biological, and socioemotional development throughout life should also be considered to provide a reasonable and acceptable context, guideposts, and reasonable expectations for the person. There are three important subjects whom life span developmental approach deals with. These are nature vs nurture, continuity vs discontinuity, and change vs stability. Researchers using life span developmental approach gather and produce knowledge on these three most important domains of individual development with their unique scientific methodology.

  5. A Taxonomy of Instructional Objectives for Developmentally Disabled Persons: Personal Maintenance and Development: Homemaking and Community Life; Leisure; and Travel Domains. Working Paper 85-2. COMPETE: Community-Based Model for Public-School Exit and Transition to Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Richard B.

    The purpose of Project COMPETE is to use previous research and exemplary practices to develop and validate a model and training sequence to assist retarded youth to make the transition from school to employment in the most competitive environment possible. The taxonomy described in this project working paper focuses on instructional objectives in…

  6. Facts about Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sets MADDS Case Definitions Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Multimedia & ... Developmental disabilities are a group of conditions due to an impairment in physical, learning, language, or behavior areas. These conditions begin during ...

  7. Socialization and Developmental Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccoby, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    Considers the divergent paths taken by research in cognitive development and research in social-emotional development, arguing that studies of socialization need to become more developmental. Discusses meanings of development that may affect the socialization process. (Author/CI)

  8. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  9. Developmental Idealism in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Arland; Xie, Yu

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines the intersection of developmental idealism with China. It discusses how developmental idealism has been widely disseminated within China and has had enormous effects on public policy and programs, on social institutions, and on the lives of individuals and their families. This dissemination of developmental idealism to China began in the 19(th) century, when China met with several military defeats that led many in the country to question the place of China in the world. By the beginning of the 20(th) century, substantial numbers of Chinese had reacted to the country's defeats by exploring developmental idealism as a route to independence, international respect, and prosperity. Then, with important but brief aberrations, the country began to implement many of the elements of developmental idealism, a movement that became especially important following the assumption of power by the Communist Party of China in 1949. This movement has played a substantial role in politics, in the economy, and in family life. The beliefs and values of developmental idealism have also been directly disseminated to the grassroots in China, where substantial majorities of Chinese citizens have assimilated them. These ideas are both known and endorsed by very large numbers in China today.

  10. Validity in Qualitative Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Vasco Lub

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a discussion on the question of validity in qualitative evaluation. Although validity in qualitative inquiry has been widely reflected upon in the methodological literature (and is still often subject of debate), the link with evaluation research is underexplored. Elaborating on epistemological and theoretical conceptualizations by Guba and Lincoln and Creswell and Miller, the article explores aspects of validity of qualitative research with the explicit objective of con...

  11. The qualitative research proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Klopper

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative research in the health sciences has had to overcome many prejudices and a number of misunderstandings, but today qualitative research is as acceptable as quantitative research designs and is widely funded and published. Writing the proposal of a qualitative study, however, can be a challenging feat, due to the emergent nature of the qualitative research design and the description of the methodology as a process. Even today, many sub-standard proposals at post-graduate evaluation committees and application proposals to be considered for funding are still seen. This problem has led the researcher to develop a framework to guide the qualitative researcher in writing the proposal of a qualitative study based on the following research questions: (i What is the process of writing a qualitative research proposal? and (ii What does the structure and layout of a qualitative proposal look like? The purpose of this article is to discuss the process of writing the qualitative research proposal, as well as describe the structure and layout of a qualitative research proposal. The process of writing a qualitative research proposal is discussed with regards to the most important questions that need to be answered in your research proposal with consideration of the guidelines of being practical, being persuasive, making broader links, aiming for crystal clarity and planning before you write. While the structure of the qualitative research proposal is discussed with regards to the key sections of the proposal, namely the cover page, abstract, introduction, review of the literature, research problem and research questions, research purpose and objectives, research paradigm, research design, research method, ethical considerations, dissemination plan, budget and appendices.

  12. The qualitative research proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopper, H

    2008-12-01

    Qualitative research in the health sciences has had to overcome many prejudices and a number of misunderstandings, but today qualitative research is as acceptable as quantitative research designs and is widely funded and published. Writing the proposal of a qualitative study, however, can be a challenging feat, due to the emergent nature of the qualitative research design and the description of the methodology as a process. Even today, many sub-standard proposals at post-graduate evaluation committees and application proposals to be considered for funding are still seen. This problem has led the researcher to develop a framework to guide the qualitative researcher in writing the proposal of a qualitative study based on the following research questions: (i) What is the process of writing a qualitative research proposal? and (ii) What does the structure and layout of a qualitative proposal look like? The purpose of this article is to discuss the process of writing the qualitative research proposal, as well as describe the structure and layout of a qualitative research proposal. The process of writing a qualitative research proposal is discussed with regards to the most important questions that need to be answered in your research proposal with consideration of the guidelines of being practical, being persuasive, making broader links, aiming for crystal clarity and planning before you write. While the structure of the qualitative research proposal is discussed with regards to the key sections of the proposal, namely the cover page, abstract, introduction, review of the literature, research problem and research questions, research purpose and objectives, research paradigm, research design, research method, ethical considerations, dissemination plan, budget and appendices.

  13. What Is Qualitative Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Takashi

    2017-01-01

     The article is an in-depth explanation of qualitative research, an approach increasingly prevalent among today's research communities. After discussing its present spread within the health sciences, the author addresses: 1. Its definition. 2. Its characteristics, as well as its theoretical and procedural background. 3. Its procedures. 4. Differences between qualitative and quantitative approaches. 5. Mixed methods incorporating quantitative research. And in conclusion: 6. The importance of establishing an epistemological perspective in qualitative research.

  14. Overview of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossoehme, Daniel H

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative research methods are a robust tool for chaplaincy research questions. Similar to much of chaplaincy clinical care, qualitative research generally works with written texts, often transcriptions of individual interviews or focus group conversations and seeks to understand the meaning of experience in a study sample. This article describes three common methodologies: ethnography, grounded theory, and phenomenology. Issues to consider relating to the study sample, design, and analysis are discussed. Enhancing the validity of the data, as well reliability and ethical issues in qualitative research are described. Qualitative research is an accessible way for chaplains to contribute new knowledge about the sacred dimension of people's lived experience.

  15. Qualitative Content Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Mayring

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes an approach of systematic, rule guided qualitative text analysis, which tries to preserve some methodological strengths of quantitative content analysis and widen them to a concept of qualitative procedure. First the development of content analysis is delineated and the basic principles are explained (units of analysis, step models, working with categories, validity and reliability. Then the central procedures of qualitative content analysis, inductive development of categories and deductive application of categories, are worked out. The possibilities of computer programs in supporting those qualitative steps of analysis are shown and the possibilities and limits of the approach are discussed. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0002204

  16. Transgenerational developmental programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Catherine E; Ozanne, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    The concept of developmental programming suggests that the early life environment influences offspring characteristics in later life, including the propensity to develop diseases such as the metabolic syndrome. There is now growing evidence that the effects of developmental programming may also manifest in further generations without further suboptimal exposure. This review considers the evidence, primarily from rodent models, for effects persisting to subsequent generations, and evaluates the mechanisms by which developmental programming may be transmitted to further generations. In particular, we focus on the potential role of the intrauterine environment in contributing to a developmentally programmed phenotype in subsequent generations. The literature was systematically searched at http://pubmed.org and http://scholar.google.com to identify published findings regarding transgenerational (F2 and beyond) developmental programming effects in human populations and animal models. Transmission of programming effects is often viewed as a form of epigenetic inheritance, either via the maternal or paternal line. Evidence exists for both germline and somatic inheritance of epigenetic modifications which may be responsible for phenotypic changes in further generations. However, there is increasing evidence for the role of both extra-genomic components of the zygote and the interaction of the developing conceptus with the intrauterine environment in propagating programming effects. The contribution of a suboptimal reproductive tract environment or maternal adaptations to pregnancy may be critical to inheritance of programming effects via the maternal line. As the effects of age exacerbate the programmed metabolic phenotype, advancing maternal age may increase the likelihood of developmental programming effects being transmitted to further generations. We suggest that developmental programming effects could be propagated through the maternal line de novo in generations

  17. Part two: Qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, J; Hall, S

    2015-01-01

    This second article in the series Spotlight on Research focuses on qualitative research, its applications, principles and methodologies. It provides an insight into how this approach can be used within the perioperative setting and gives advice for practitioners looking to undertake a qualitative research study.

  18. Validity in Qualitative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Lub

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a discussion on the question of validity in qualitative evaluation. Although validity in qualitative inquiry has been widely reflected upon in the methodological literature (and is still often subject of debate, the link with evaluation research is underexplored. Elaborating on epistemological and theoretical conceptualizations by Guba and Lincoln and Creswell and Miller, the article explores aspects of validity of qualitative research with the explicit objective of connecting them with aspects of evaluation in social policy. It argues that different purposes of qualitative evaluations can be linked with different scientific paradigms and perspectives, thus transcending unproductive paradigmatic divisions as well as providing a flexible yet rigorous validity framework for researchers and reviewers of qualitative evaluations.

  19. Qualitative research, tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Carina Bregnholm

    2016-01-01

    had opened up to new “alternative” paradigms and subsequent methodologies. By the turn of the millennium, qualitative research was increasingly gaining ground and has now become accepted as an essential and valid tourism research strategy to a broader audience of tourism scholars. This is exemplified...... of qualitative research in generating knowledge in and about tourism. In continuation to this, new issues and interests regarding the application and role of qualitative research can also be identified. One is a growing appreciation in business and management of the rich material and knowledge generated...... of qualitative research and knowledge production. Another issue related to the status and practice of qualitative tourism research is the emerging critique of the dichotomous perception of tourism research as either strictly instrumental or purely intrinsic. This understanding of research as divided into two...

  20. Cryptic Genetic Variation in Evolutionary Developmental Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalise B. Paaby

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary developmental genetics has traditionally been conducted by two groups: Molecular evolutionists who emphasize divergence between species or higher taxa, and quantitative geneticists who study variation within species. Neither approach really comes to grips with the complexities of evolutionary transitions, particularly in light of the realization from genome-wide association studies that most complex traits fit an infinitesimal architecture, being influenced by thousands of loci. This paper discusses robustness, plasticity and lability, phenomena that we argue potentiate major evolutionary changes and provide a bridge between the conceptual treatments of macro- and micro-evolution. We offer cryptic genetic variation and conditional neutrality as mechanisms by which standing genetic variation can lead to developmental system drift and, sheltered within canalized processes, may facilitate developmental transitions and the evolution of novelty. Synthesis of the two dominant perspectives will require recognition that adaptation, divergence, drift and stability all depend on similar underlying quantitative genetic processes—processes that cannot be fully observed in continuously varying visible traits.

  1. Child Health, Developmental Plasticity, and Epigenetic Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, R.; Constancia, M.; Fraga, M.; Junien, C.; Carel, J.-C.; Boileau, P.; Le Bouc, Y.; Deal, C. L.; Lillycrop, K.; Scharfmann, R.; Sheppard, A.; Skinner, M.; Szyf, M.; Waterland, R. A.; Waxman, D. J.; Whitelaw, E.; Ong, K.; Albertsson-Wikland, K.

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity in developmental programming has evolved in order to provide the best chances of survival and reproductive success to the organism under changing environments. Environmental conditions that are experienced in early life can profoundly influence human biology and long-term health. Developmental origins of health and disease and life-history transitions are purported to use placental, nutritional, and endocrine cues for setting long-term biological, mental, and behavioral strategies in response to local ecological and/or social conditions. The window of developmental plasticity extends from preconception to early childhood and involves epigenetic responses to environmental changes, which exert their effects during life-history phase transitions. These epigenetic responses influence development, cell- and tissue-specific gene expression, and sexual dimorphism, and, in exceptional cases, could be transmitted transgenerationally. Translational epigenetic research in child health is a reiterative process that ranges from research in the basic sciences, preclinical research, and pediatric clinical research. Identifying the epigenetic consequences of fetal programming creates potential applications in clinical practice: the development of epigenetic biomarkers for early diagnosis of disease, the ability to identify susceptible individuals at risk for adult diseases, and the development of novel preventive and curative measures that are based on diet and/or novel epigenetic drugs. PMID:20971919

  2. Cryptic Genetic Variation in Evolutionary Developmental Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paaby, Annalise B; Gibson, Greg

    2016-06-13

    Evolutionary developmental genetics has traditionally been conducted by two groups: Molecular evolutionists who emphasize divergence between species or higher taxa, and quantitative geneticists who study variation within species. Neither approach really comes to grips with the complexities of evolutionary transitions, particularly in light of the realization from genome-wide association studies that most complex traits fit an infinitesimal architecture, being influenced by thousands of loci. This paper discusses robustness, plasticity and lability, phenomena that we argue potentiate major evolutionary changes and provide a bridge between the conceptual treatments of macro- and micro-evolution. We offer cryptic genetic variation and conditional neutrality as mechanisms by which standing genetic variation can lead to developmental system drift and, sheltered within canalized processes, may facilitate developmental transitions and the evolution of novelty. Synthesis of the two dominant perspectives will require recognition that adaptation, divergence, drift and stability all depend on similar underlying quantitative genetic processes-processes that cannot be fully observed in continuously varying visible traits.

  3. The RN to BSN Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Brandt Anbari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 60% of registered nurses (RNs still enter practice with an associate’s degree or diploma in nursing (ADN. Due to recommendations to change entry level to practice to the bachelor’s degree in nursing (BSN, there are now more than 700 RN to BSN programs in the United States. The purpose of this qualitative systematic review was to understand more about what occurs when an RN returns to school for a BSN and to develop a model of the transition. The qualitative findings of 19 research reports were included, which translates to approximately 445 RNs’ perspectives on the RN to BSN transition. A visual representation of the RN to BSN transition was also generated. A seamless transition of the RN to a BSN does not exist at this time. The results are useful to nurses, academicians, and health care organizations as they move to meet current recommendations.

  4. Developmental disorders of vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaburda, Albert M; Duchaine, Bradley C

    2003-08-01

    This review of developmental disorders of vision focuses on only a few of the many disorders that disrupt visual development. Given the enormity of the human visual system in the primate brain and complexity of visual development, however, there are likely hundreds or thousands of types of disorders affecting high-level vision. The rapid progress seen in developmental dyslexia and WMS demonstrates the possibilities and difficulties inherent in researching such disorders, and the authors hope that similar progress will be made for congenital prosopagnosia and other disorders in the near future.

  5. Qualitative research in thanatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carverhill, Philip A

    2002-04-01

    A new research paradigm has been emerging which holds significant potential for the field of death studies. The qualitative project is a diverse collection of methodologies that focuses its interests on the words, narratives, and stories of individuals and groups. Part of its appeal may lie in the inherent closeness of fit between qualitative inquiry and applied work with the dying and the bereaved. The author introduces the individual articles in this special issue and outlines the development of the project as well as some current issues in qualitative research in thanatology.

  6. Developmental Patterns in the Solution of Verbal Analogies. Technical Report No. 3. Cognitive Development Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.; Nigro, Georgia

    Developmental patterns in the solution of verbal analogies, especially the recognition of higher-order analogical relations, were traced. The investigation sought to: (1) provide new developmental tests of a componential theory of analogical reasoning; (2) identify strategy changes during the transition from midchildhood (grade 3) to adulthood…

  7. Uses of symbolic resources in youth: Moving from qualitative to quantitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Biljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Youth is a period of intense changes during which young people engage in various transitions resulting in theirs acquisition of a longer time perspective and a system of orientation, enabling to set priorities and values, and to guide their actions accordingly. In a socio-cultural theoretical background, both the establishment of values and the ability to think time require some psychological distancing from the here and now, distancing which is foremost enabled by semiotic mediation. In our former studies on youth transitions, we observed that young people may use songs, movies, arts, or novels as symbolic resources, that is, as external mediators that seem to support these developmental processes. Through an abductive process linking qualitative, ideographic data and theoretical elaboration, we proposed a theoretical 7 dimensional model for analyzing people's uses of symbolic resources. This model was then turned to a first, provisional questionnaire aiming at testing the model, whose items were extracted from the first empirical investigation. In this paper, we attempted to tests this questionnaire on a population of young people in Serbia. The symbolic resources questionnaire was tested on a sample of young people (N=475. A SEM analysis was used to test the model. At large, the theoretical model is verified. However, an unexpected, very strong correlation between the dimensions had to be explained. We finally propose a further adaptation to the questionnaire.

  8. Developmental psychopathology: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sören; Petermann, Franz

    2009-09-17

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), formerly regarded as a typical childhood disorder, is now known as a developmental disorder persisting over the lifespan. Starting in preschool-age, symptoms vary depending on the age group affected. According to the variability of ADHD-symptoms and the heterogeneity of comorbid psychiatric disorders, a broad review of recent studies was performed. These findings were summarized in a developmental psychopathological model, documenting relevant facts on a timeline. Based on a genetic disposition and a neuropsychological deregulation, there is evidence for factors which persist across the lifespan, change age-dependently, or show validity in a specific developmental phase. Qualitative changes can be found for children in preschool-age and adults. These differences have implications for clinical practice as they can be used for prevention, diagnostic proceedings, and therapeutic intervention as well as for planning future studies. The present article is a translated and modified version of the German article "Entwicklungspsychopathologie der ADHS", published in Zeitschrift für Psychiatrie, Psychologie und Psychotherapie, 56, 2008, S. 265-274.

  9. Developmental psychopathology: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petermann Franz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD, formerly regarded as a typical childhood disorder, is now known as a developmental disorder persisting over the lifespan. Starting in preschool-age, symptoms vary depending on the age group affected. Method According to the variability of ADHD-symptoms and the heterogeneity of comorbid psychiatric disorders, a broad review of recent studies was performed. These findings were summarized in a developmental psychopathological model, documenting relevant facts on a timeline. Results Based on a genetic disposition and a neuropsychological deregulation, there is evidence for factors which persist across the lifespan, change age-dependently, or show validity in a specific developmental phase. Qualitative changes can be found for children in preschool-age and adults. Conclusion These differences have implications for clinical practice as they can be used for prevention, diagnostic proceedings, and therapeutic intervention as well as for planning future studies. The present article is a translated and modified version of the German article "Entwicklungspsychopathologie der ADHS", published in Zeitschrift für Psychiatrie, Psychologie und Psychotherapie, 56, 2008, S. 265-274.

  10. Developmental paediatric anaesthetic pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing

    2015-01-01

    Safe and effective drug therapy in neonates, infants and children require detailed knowledge about the ontogeny of drug disposition and action as well how these interact with genetics and co-morbidity of children. Recent advances in developmental pharmacology in children follow the increased...

  11. Learning Developmental Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James M.; Weintraub, Joseph R.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes an educational intervention designed to promote the ability and willingness of MBA students to lead through coaching. MBA leadership students are trained to serve as coaches for undergraduate business students in a developmental assessment center. In this compelling context, their main source of influence is the ability to…

  12. Arguments from Developmental Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckle-Schobel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I investigate a special type of argument regarding the role of development in theorizing about psychological processes and cognitive capacities. Among the issues that developmental psychologists study, discovering the ontogenetic trajectory of mechanisms or capacities underpinning our cognitive functions ranks highly. The order in which functions are developed or capacities are acquired is a matter of debate between competing psychological theories, and also philosophical conceptions of the mind - getting the role and the significance of the different steps in this order right could be seen as an important virtue of such theories. Thus, a special kind of strategy in arguments between competing philosophical or psychological theories is using developmental order in arguing for or against a given psychological claim. In this article, I will introduce an analysis of arguments from developmental order, which come in two general types: arguments emphasizing the importance of the early cognitive processes and arguments emphasizing the late cognitive processes. I will discuss their role in one of the central tools for evaluating scientific theories, namely in making inferences to the best explanation. I will argue that appeal to developmental order is, by itself, an insufficient criterion for theory choice and has to be part of an argument based on other core explanatory or empirical virtues. I will end by proposing a more concerted study of philosophical issues concerning (cognitive) development, and I will present some topics that also pertain to a full-fledged 'philosophy of development.'

  13. The Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Roman; Johansen, Søren; Rahbek, Anders

    We introduce the Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis (QEH) as a new approach to modeling macroeconomic and financial outcomes. Building on John Muth's seminal insight underpinning the Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH), QEH represents the market's forecasts to be consistent with the predictions...

  14. The Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Roman; Johansen, Søren; Rahbek, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis (QEH) as a new approach to modeling macroeconomic and financial outcomes. Building on John Muth's seminal insight underpinning the Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH), QEH represents the market's forecasts to be consistent with the predictions...

  15. Connecting Professional Development to Current Practices: An Examination of Implementation of Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadlovsky, Kelly R.

    2013-01-01

    This study uses a basic qualitative research design to uncover and understand how early childhood teachers apply developmentally appropriate practices and what successes and barriers they encounter. The new knowledge produced might help professional development practitioners by increasing their understanding of how developmentally appropriate…

  16. Developmental Purposes of Commercial Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Practical Pointers, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Listed are 45 table, target, manipulative, active, and creative games with such developmental purposes as associative learning, tactile discrimination, and visual motor integration. Information includes the name of the item, distributor, price, description, and developmental purpose. (JYC)

  17. Scaling Qualitative Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Burgin, Mark

    2017-01-01

    There are different approaches to qualitative probability, which includes subjective probability. We developed a representation of qualitative probability based on relational systems, which allows modeling uncertainty by probability structures and is more coherent than existing approaches. This setting makes it possible proving that any comparative probability is induced by some probability structure (Theorem 2.1), that classical probability is a probability structure (Theorem 2.2) and that i...

  18. Qualitative experiments in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I explore the meaning of experiments in early twentieth century psychology, focusing on the qualitative experimental methodology of psychologist Frederic BARTLETT. I begin by contextualizing BARTLETT's experiments within the continental research tradition of his time, which...... and extensions" of BARTLETT's experiments, demonstrating how his methodology was progressively changed and misunderstood over time. An argument is made for re-introducing an open, qualitative and idiographic experimental method similar to the one BARTLETT practiced....

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Gesell Developmental Assessment: A Critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Lorrie A.

    1992-01-01

    Critiques Walker's article in this issue. Argues that Walker's data do not meet technical standards regarding individual placement tests for normative comparisons, interjudge reliability, or predictive validity, and therefore do not justify the use of the Gesell test to place children in developmental kindergarten or transitional first grade. (GLR)

  20. Romantic Relationship Patterns in Young Adulthood and Their Developmental Antecedents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauer, Amy J.; Pettit, Gregory S.; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Bates, John E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    The delayed entry into marriage that characterizes modern society raises questions about young adults' romantic relationship trajectories and whether patterns found to characterize adolescent romantic relationships persist into young adulthood. The current study traced developmental transitions into and out of romantic relationships from age…

  1. Long-Term Association between Developmental Assets and Health Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleck, Jennifer; DeBate, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Based on internal and external assets, the positive youth development approach aims to increase the capacity among adolescents to overcome challenges as they transition to adulthood. Developmental assets have been found to be positively associated with academic achievement, a variety of health promoting behaviors, and improved…

  2. Qualitative research for international business

    OpenAIRE

    Yves Doz

    2011-01-01

    Qualitative research in international business has been rare, the main research streams of the field relying more on quantitative methods. This paper first outlines why qualitative research has been scant. It then presents areas, such as theory building, where qualitative research could make a substantial contribution. Third, it reviews approaches to high standards of qualitative research and criteria for evaluating qualitative research. Finally, some possible research areas where qualitative...

  3. Developmental Gerstmann's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PeBenito, R; Fisch, C B; Fisch, M L

    1988-09-01

    The tetrad of finger agnosia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, and right-left disorientation make up Gerstmann's syndrome. The tetrad has been infrequently described in children with learning disability and has been called developmental Gerstmann's syndrome (DGS). Developmental Gerstmann's syndrome may occur in brain-damaged and apparently normal children. Five children in whom DGS occurred in association with brain abnormalities underwent long-term observation, which indicated persistence of the deficits. The identification of these cases suggests that DGS may not be as rare as previously thought and may often be unrecognized. Testing for the Gerstmann elements in learning-disabled children may identify otherwise undiagnosed cases of DGS and should be routinely employed in the neurologic examination. Until appropriate teaching methods for DGS are found, "bypassing" the deficits and utilizing the child's strengths, plus counseling, seem to offer an effective treatment approach.

  4. Qualitative Robustness in Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Nasser

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Qualitative robustness, influence function, and breakdown point are three main concepts to judge an estimator from the viewpoint of robust estimation. It is important as well as interesting to study relation among them. This article attempts to present the concept of qualitative robustness as forwarded by first proponents and its later development. It illustrates intricacies of qualitative robustness and its relation with consistency, and also tries to remove commonly believed misunderstandings about relation between influence function and qualitative robustness citing some examples from literature and providing a new counter-example. At the end it places a useful finite and a simulated version of   qualitative robustness index (QRI. In order to assess the performance of the proposed measures, we have compared fifteen estimators of correlation coefficient using simulated as well as real data sets.

  5. Developmental Partial Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Duteil, Nastassia Pouradier; Rossi, Francesco; Boscain, Ugo; Piccoli, Benedetto

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the concept of Developmental Partial Differential Equation (DPDE), which consists of a Partial Differential Equation (PDE) on a time-varying manifold with complete coupling between the PDE and the manifold's evolution. In other words, the manifold's evolution depends on the solution to the PDE, and vice versa the differential operator of the PDE depends on the manifold's geometry. DPDE is used to study a diffusion equation with source on a growing surface whose gro...

  6. NIDCAP and developmental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Haumont

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal mortality in very low birth weight infants has dramatically decreased during the last decades. However, 15-25% of these infants will show neurodevelopmental impairment later on. The aim of implementing early developmental care (EDC, emerged as a new field in neonatology, is to create an intervention program designed to provide support for optimal neurobehavioral development during this highly vulnerable period of brain growth. The theoretical framework, which underlies the approach, is supported by research in different scientific fields, including neuroscience, psychology, medicine and nursing. EDC utilizes a range of medical and nursing interventions that aim to decrease the stress of preterm neonates in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs. The Neonatal Individualized Developmental Care Assessment Program (NIDCAP is an integrated and holistic form of family-centered developmental care. Changing the traditional NICU towards an EDC-NICU includes training nursing and medical staff, investing in their quality and most importantly keeping parents in proximity to the infants. The new challenge of modern neonatology is to restore the mother-infant dyad applying “couplet care” starting at birth until discharge. Most of the European NICUs apply some elements of EDC, but it is more consistent in northern Europe. The development of NIDCAP training centers in Europe demonstrates the evolution of care. It is likely that future research and intervention programs will optimize our practices. Developmental care could prove to be an important recent step in improving outcome in extremely preterm neonates. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

  7. Developmental dyslexia and vision

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Patrick Quercia,1 Léonard Feiss,2 Carine Michel31Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Dijon, France; 2Office of Ophthalmology, Beaune, France; 3University of Burgundy, Dijon, INSERM U1093, Cognition, Action et Plasticité Sensorimotrice, Dijon, FranceAbstract: Developmental dyslexia affects almost 10% of school-aged children and represents a significant public health problem. Its etiology is unknown. The consistent presence of phonological difficulties combin...

  8. Evolutionary developmental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ashley C; Bjorklund, David F

    2010-02-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental psychology can potentially broaden the horizons of mainstream evolutionary psychology by combining the principles of Darwinian evolution by natural selection with the study of human development, focusing on the epigenetic effects that occur between humans and their environment in a way that attempts to explain how evolved psychological mechanisms become expressed in the phenotypes of adults. An evolutionary developmental perspective includes an appreciation of comparative research and we, among others, argue that contrasting the cognition of humans with that of nonhuman primates can provide a framework with which to understand how human cognitive abilities and intelligence evolved. Furthermore, we argue that several aspects of childhood (e.g., play and immature cognition) serve both as deferred adaptations as well as imparting immediate benefits. Intense selection pressure was surely exerted on childhood over human evolutionary history and, as a result, neglecting to consider the early developmental period of children when studying their later adulthood produces an incomplete picture of the evolved adaptations expressed through human behavior and cognition.

  9. Qualitative research strategies in rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McReynolds, Connie J.; Koch, Lynn C.; Rumrill Jr, Phillip D.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the qualitative research methods that social scientists use to explore human phenomena. The authors describe the philosophical and historical foundations of qualitative research, coupled with illustrations of specific qualitative designs. Applications of qualitative methods in the contemporary rehabilitation literature are also presented.

  10. [Qualitative methods in psychiatric research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Claudia; Glaesmer, Heide

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the usage of qualitative methods in psychiatric research and presents the qualitative approach in more detail. Recent original empirical work of a German psychiatric journal was systematically reviewed. Methods used to collect and analyse the information are detailed. One third of the articles used a solely qualitative research design. One further article applied a combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Three kinds of the qualitative interviews were used (in depth, narrative and problem-focussed interview). Additionally, focus groups (group discussions) and qualitative content analysis were applied by studies. Qualitative approaches are an integral part of psychiatric research. Further work should assure to use adequate sampling strategies.

  11. Multiobjective Optimization and Phase Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Seoane, Luís F

    2015-01-01

    Many complex systems obey to optimality conditions that are usually not simple. Conflicting traits often interact making a Multi Objective Optimization (MOO) approach necessary. Recent MOO research on complex systems report about the Pareto front (optimal designs implementing the best trade-off) in a qualitative manner. Meanwhile, research on traditional Simple Objective Optimization (SOO) often finds phase transitions and critical points. We summarize a robust framework that accounts for phase transitions located through SOO techniques and indicates what MOO features resolutely lead to phase transitions. These appear determined by the shape of the Pareto front, which at the same time is deeply related to the thermodynamic Gibbs surface. Indeed, thermodynamics can be written as an MOO from where its phase transitions can be parsimoniously derived; suggesting that the similarities between transitions in MOO-SOO and Statistical Mechanics go beyond mere coincidence.

  12. How Does Transition from Elementary to Middle School Affect the Racial Achievement Gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlaar, Gudrun; Reardon, Sean F.; Kalogrides, Demetra

    2014-01-01

    Most research on the middle school transition focuses on developmental and psychological changes around the age of the transition, and investigates or discusses the impact of such changes on academic performance, motivation and behavior in schools. In addition to intrapersonal developmental changes that middle-school students experience, they also…

  13. Dissecting the seed-to-seedling transition in Arabidopsis thaliana by gene co-expression networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, A.T.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important developmental processes in the life-cycle of higher plants is the transition from a seed to a plant and from a generative to a vegetative developmental program. The major hallmark or end-point of the transition from seed to plant is the onset of photosynthesis and the conco

  14. Computer Simulation of Developmental Processes and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Recent progress in systems toxicology and synthetic biology have paved the way to new thinking about in vitro/in silico modeling of developmental processes and toxicities, both for embryological and reproductive impacts. Novel in vitro platforms such as 3D organotypic culture models, engineered microscale tissues and complex microphysiological systems (MPS), together with computational models and computer simulation of tissue dynamics, lend themselves to a integrated testing strategies for predictive toxicology. As these emergent methodologies continue to evolve, they must be integrally tied to maternal/fetal physiology and toxicity of the developing individual across early lifestage transitions, from fertilization to birth, through puberty and beyond. Scope: This symposium will focus on how the novel technology platforms can help now and in the future, with in vitro/in silico modeling of complex biological systems for developmental and reproductive toxicity issues, and translating systems models into integrative testing strategies. The symposium is based on three main organizing principles: (1) that novel in vitro platforms with human cells configured in nascent tissue architectures with a native microphysiological environments yield mechanistic understanding of developmental and reproductive impacts of drug/chemical exposures; (2) that novel in silico platforms with high-throughput screening (HTS) data, biologically-inspired computational models of

  15. The habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities—Beyond traditional nursing practices and principles?

    OpenAIRE

    Olli, Johanna; Vehkakoski, Tanja; Salanterä, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    Research-based descriptions of the contents of the habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities are lacking. The objective of this qualitative study was to describe the habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities in a Finnish children’s neurological ward. In addition, the purpose was to outline the principles that directed the nursing functions (which consisted of various nursing interventions). The data collection included observation, a retrospective...

  16. Do you have questions? A qualitative study of questions from energy transition to long-term energy research; Zijn er nog vragen? Een kwalitatief onderzoek naar vraagarticulatie vanuit energietransitie naar lange termijn energieonderzoek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macare, M.S.

    2006-08-15

    The aim of the study on the title subject is to inventory the bottlenecks and problems for stakeholders to ask the right questions with respect to energy transition and the long-term energy research strategy programmes in the Netherlands. Recommendations to solve the problems are presented. The most important effects of analyzing the so-called articulation of questions must be (1) an improved connection between the long-term research programme and the needs of industry and businesses, and (2) increasing the possibilities to apply for subsidies. [Dutch] Energieonderzoek en -innovatie vormen belangrijke en aan elkaar gerelateerde onderdelen van het energiebeleid om de overgang naar een duurzame energiehuishouding te realiseren. Voor de lange termijn bestaan op deze gebieden twee richtinggevende beleidssporen: de energieonderzoek subsidie: lange termijn (EOS-LT) en de energietransitie. In het eerste beleidsspoor, EOS-LT, wordt het publiek gefinancierd lange termijn energieonderzoek op een beperkt aantal aandachtsgebieden gericht. Hiervoor zijn lange termijn onderzoeksprogramma's opgesteld, waarin onderzoeksthema's zijn opgenomen die in aanmerking komen voor subsidie. Het tweede beleidsspoor, de energietransitie, richt zich op niet alleen op de technologische, maar ook de institutionele en politiek-bestuurlijke vernieuwingen om de duurzame energiehuishouding te realiseren. In samenspraak met verschillende stakeholders worden langetermijnvisies geformuleerd en de mogelijke wegen om deze visies te realiseren. Op basis hiervan worden kortetermijnexperimenten opgesteld om deze wegen te verkennen en aan te scherpen. EOS-LT en energietransitie zijn grotendeels onafhankelijk van elkaar tot stand gekomen, maar er zijn pogingen ondernomen om de aansluiting tussen beide trajecten te versterken. Het probleem in de praktijk is echter dat de vraag naar industrieel en fundamenteel energieonderzoek vanuit energietransitie tot nu in onvoldoende mate wordt gearticuleerd

  17. CONCEPTUAL MECHANICAL DESIGN METHOD BASED ON QUALITATIVE SIMULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jianming; Yang Ping; Zou Bailong; Yang Chengsan

    2005-01-01

    A model for conceptual design of mechanical devices is studied based on qualitative simulation. In this model, the desired functions are expressed by state-transit-diagrams(ST-diagrams)and design space is represented by qualitative-state-curves(QS-curves). The first design idea, called seeds idea, is proposed by the designer and then is abstracted into QS-curves. The qualitative simulation is implemented based on the QS-curves. By changing the motion of acting parts, the connection of parts and the motion of driving part, new design ideas are generated. With this model, a series of new design ideas derived from the seeds idea can be achieved.

  18. Demystifying Interdisciplinary Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greckhamer, Thomas; Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka; Cilesiz, Sebnem; Hayes, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    This article seeks to demystify, through deconstruction, the concept of "interdisciplinarity" in the context of qualitative research to contribute to a new praxis of knowledge production through reflection on the possibilities and impossibilities of interdisciplinarity. A review and discussion of disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity leads the…

  19. Entropy Is Simple, Qualitatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Frank L.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that qualitatively, entropy is simple. Entropy increase from a macro viewpoint is a measure of the dispersal of energy from localized to spread out at a temperature T. Fundamentally based on statistical and quantum mechanics, this approach is superior to the non-fundamental "disorder" as a descriptor of entropy change. (MM)

  20. Qualitative Collection Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Kathleen W.

    1985-01-01

    Describes qualitative evaluation of library holdings in a high school science collection that involved two methods: impressionistic method (relies on professional judgement of subject specialists, librarians, or scholars to evaluate collection); list-checking (compared holdings with "American Association for the Advancement of Science Book…

  1. [DEVELOPMENTAL CARE IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT ACCORDING TO NEWBORN INDIVIDUALIZED DEVELOPMENTAL CARE AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (NIDCAP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Dalia; Litmanovitz, Ita

    2016-01-01

    During hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the brain of the preterm infant undergoes a particularly vulnerable and sensitive period of development. Brain development might be negatively influenced by direct injury as well as by complications of prematurity. Over the past few years, stress has come to be increasingly recognized as a potential risk factor. The NICU environment contains numerous stress factors due to maternal deprivation and over-stimulation, such as light, sound and pain, which conflict with the brain's developmental requirements. Developmental care is a caregiving approach that addresses the early developmental needs of the preterm infant as an integral component of quality neonatal care. NIDCAP (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program) is a comprehensive program that aims to reduce environmental stress, to support the infant's neuro-behavioral maturation and organization, and to promote early parent-infant relationships. The implementation of developmental care based on NIDCAP principles is a gradual, in-depth systems change process, which affects all aspects of care in the NICU. This review describes the theoretical basis of the NIDCAP approach, summarizes the scientific evidence and addresses some of the implications of the transition from a traditional to a developmental care NICU.

  2. Conceptual foundations of qualitative life course research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R. Heinz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing biographies is a main field of qualitative social research that studies individuals’ sensemaking in regard to transitions and life projects. The paper presents concepts for linking the macrosocial and micro-social levels in life course analysis. First, the concept of “status passage” is reviewed, with a focus on social structure, institutions, and biography. Second, the concept of “selfsocialization” is introduced, highlighting the notion of the “biographical actor”. Third, recent elaborations of the concept of “agency” in life course research are discussed. Fourth, two examples of qualitative longitudinal research are presented: one on occupational careers, another on the process of family formation. Finally, methodological implications are sketched.

  3. Tensões cotidianas na transição da primeira série: um enfoque de desenvolvimento Tensiones cotidianas en la transición del primer año de la enseñanza primaria: un enfoque de desarrollo Daily hassles during the transition period to the first grade of the primary school: a developmental view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Maria Marturano

    2008-03-01

    transición por parte de los niños. En la última sección, se presenta el esquema conceptual, articulando tareas adaptativas de la transición y dominios de tensiones cotidianas, con previsiones sobre el impacto de la transición en el desarrollo. Temas de investigación son sugeridos a partir del esquema propuesto.This paper focuses on daily hassles during the transition to first grade. A theoretical framework has been posited to generate hypotheses and integrate research results on the stress of this transition. Framework is based on current knowledge on psychosocial stress during childhood, followed by a developmental view of child stress. The paper comprises three sections. The first one focuses on childhood psychosocial stress in four research fields: relationship between psychosocial stress and adjustment; daily hassles; a developmental view of the stress-adjustment relation; school as a source of daily hassles. In the second section, results on the first grade transition are given and contribute through indirect evidence towards the children's coping with the transition. The conceptual framework is presented in the last section, comprising an articulation between adaptive tasks and daily hassle domains, as well as hypotheses on the impact of transition on development. Relevant research issues are suggested on the basis of the proposed framework.

  4. Interoception and psychopathology: A developmental neuroscience perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Murphy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Interoception refers to the perception of the physiological condition of the body, including hunger, temperature, and heart rate. There is a growing appreciation that interoception is integral to higher-order cognition. Indeed, existing research indicates an association between low interoceptive sensitivity and alexithymia (a difficulty identifying one’s own emotion, underscoring the link between bodily and emotional awareness. Despite this appreciation, the developmental trajectory of interoception across the lifespan remains under-researched, with clear gaps in our understanding. This qualitative review and opinion paper provides a brief overview of interoception, discussing its relevance for developmental psychopathology, and highlighting measurement issues, before surveying the available work on interoception across four stages of development: infancy, childhood, adolescence and late adulthood. Where gaps in the literature addressing the development of interoception exist, we draw upon the association between alexithymia and interoception, using alexithymia as a possible marker of atypical interoception. Evidence indicates that interoceptive ability varies across development, and that this variance correlates with established age-related changes in cognition and with risk periods for the development of psychopathology. We suggest a theory within which atypical interoception underlies the onset of psychopathology and risky behaviour in adolescence, and the decreased socio-emotional competence observed in late adulthood.

  5. Developmental coordination disorders: state of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaivre-Douret, L

    2014-01-01

    In the literature, descriptions of children with motor coordination difficulties and clumsy movements have been discussed since the early 1900s. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), it is a marked impairment in the development of fine or global motor coordination, affecting 6% of school-age children. All these children are characterized for developmental coordination disorder (DCD) in motor learning and new motor skill acquisition, in contrast to adult apraxia which is a disorder in the execution of already learned movements. No consensus has been established about etiology of DCD. Intragroup approach through factor and cluster analysis highlights that motor impairment in DCD children varies both in severity and nature. Indeed, most studies have used screening measures of performance on some developmental milestones derived from global motor tests. A few studies have investigated different functions together with standardized assessments, such as neuromuscular tone and soft signs, qualitative and quantitative measures related to gross and fine motor coordination and the specific difficulties -academic, language, gnosic, visual motor/visual-perceptual, and attentional/executive- n order to allow a better identification of DCD subtypes with diagnostic criteria and to provide an understanding of the mechanisms and of the cerebral involvement.

  6. Interoception and psychopathology: A developmental neuroscience perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jennifer; Brewer, Rebecca; Catmur, Caroline; Bird, Geoffrey

    2017-02-01

    Interoception refers to the perception of the physiological condition of the body, including hunger, temperature, and heart rate. There is a growing appreciation that interoception is integral to higher-order cognition. Indeed, existing research indicates an association between low interoceptive sensitivity and alexithymia (a difficulty identifying one's own emotion), underscoring the link between bodily and emotional awareness. Despite this appreciation, the developmental trajectory of interoception across the lifespan remains under-researched, with clear gaps in our understanding. This qualitative review and opinion paper provides a brief overview of interoception, discussing its relevance for developmental psychopathology, and highlighting measurement issues, before surveying the available work on interoception across four stages of development: infancy, childhood, adolescence and late adulthood. Where gaps in the literature addressing the development of interoception exist, we draw upon the association between alexithymia and interoception, using alexithymia as a possible marker of atypical interoception. Evidence indicates that interoceptive ability varies across development, and that this variance correlates with established age-related changes in cognition and with risk periods for the development of psychopathology. We suggest a theory within which atypical interoception underlies the onset of psychopathology and risky behaviour in adolescence, and the decreased socio-emotional competence observed in late adulthood. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Qualitative Value Profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, Henrik Johannsen; Bjerre, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative value profiling (QVP) is a relatively unknown method of strategic analysis for companies in international business-to-business settings. The purpose of QVP is to reduce the information complexity that is faced by international companies in dealing with business partners. The QVP method...... and consequently, for the advancement of international development. Further use of QVP is recommended and suggestions for future research are provided....

  8. Interviews in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kath; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Interviews are a common method of data collection in nursing research. They are frequently used alone in a qualitative study or combined with other data collection methods in mixed or multi-method research. Semi-structured interviews, where the researcher has some predefined questions or topics but then probes further as the participant responds, can produce powerful data that provide insights into the participants' experiences, perceptions or opinions.

  9. [Qualitative case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debout, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The qualitative case study is a research method which enables a complex phenomenon to be explored through the identification of different factors interacting with each other. The case observed is a real situation. In the field of nursing science, it may be a clinical decision-making process. The study thereby enables the patient or health professional experience to be conceptualised. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Constructivist developmental theory is needed in developmental neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsalidou, Marie; Pascual-Leone, Juan

    2016-12-01

    Neuroscience techniques provide an open window previously unavailable to the origin of thoughts and actions in children. Developmental cognitive neuroscience is booming, and knowledge from human brain mapping is finding its way into education and pediatric practice. Promises of application in developmental cognitive neuroscience rests however on better theory-guided data interpretation. Massive amounts of neuroimaging data from children are being processed, yet published studies often do not frame their work within developmental models—in detriment, we believe, to progress in this field. Here we describe some core challenges in interpreting the data from developmental cognitive neuroscience, and advocate the use of constructivist developmental theories of human cognition with a neuroscience interpretation.

  11. Ecosystems and People: Qualitative Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both qualitative and quantitative techniques are crucial in researching human impacts from ecological changes. This matches the importance of ?mixed methods? approaches in other disciplines. Qualitative research helps explore the relevancy and transferability of the foundational ...

  12. Ecosystems and People: Qualitative Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both qualitative and quantitative techniques are crucial in researching human impacts from ecological changes. This matches the importance of ?mixed methods? approaches in other disciplines. Qualitative research helps explore the relevancy and transferability of the foundational ...

  13. Section for qualitative methods (Letter)

    OpenAIRE

    Todd, Z.; Madill, A.

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative research methods are increasingly used in all areas of psychology. We have proposed a new Section – the Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section – for anyone with an interest in using these research methods.

  14. Developmental peace missions: synergising peacekeeping and peacebuilding in transition periods

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gueli, R

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, the functional gap between peacekeeping and peacebuilding (or 'post-conflict' reconstruction) has received a lot of attention because it remains a weakness in the policy framework of the United Nation (UN) conflict resolution...

  15. A Developmentally Based Counseling Intervention Model for Managing Career Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Judy

    The counselor's role as an organizational change agent can be a catalytic force aimed at helping to create workplace wellness through psychological management of the change process. The Lewis and Lewis (1989) community counseling model provides helping professionals with guidelines to design comprehensive intervention strategies for assisting…

  16. Developmental Sentence Scoring for Japanese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Susanne; MacWhinney, Brian; Otomo, Kiyoshi; Sirai, Hidetosi; Oshima-Takane, Yuriko; Hirakawa, Makiko; Shirai, Yasuhiro; Sugiura, Masatoshi; Itoh, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the development and use of the Developmental Sentence Scoring for Japanese (DSSJ), a new morpho-syntactical measure for Japanese constructed after the model of Lee's English Developmental Sentence Scoring model. Using this measure, the authors calculated DSSJ scores for 84 children divided into six age groups between 2;8…

  17. [Developmental Placement.] Collected Research References.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, Gail

    Drawing on information and references in the ERIC system, this literature review describes research related to a child's developmental placement. The issues examined include school entrance age; predictive validity, reliability, and features of Gesell School Readiness Assessment; retention; and the effectiveness of developmental placement. A…

  18. Developmental Math: What's the Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarella, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Developmental mathematics has been under the radar within higher education for some time. The reality is that there are many proven best practices in developmental math. Unfortunately, there are many obstacles that prevent student success. Moreover, the high rates of attrition and failure have led state legislators and college administrators to…

  19. Developmentally Appropriate Peace Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewsader, Joellen; Myers-Walls, Judith A.

    2017-01-01

    Peace education has been offered to children for decades, but those curricula have been only minimally guided by children's developmental stages and needs. In this article, the authors apply their research on children's developmental understanding of peace along with peace education principles and Vygotsky's sociocultural theory to present…

  20. Developmental programming of happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Louis A; Fortier, Paz; Lahat, Ayelet; Tang, Alva; Mathewson, Karen J; Saigal, Saroj; Boyle, Michael H; Van Lieshout, Ryan J

    2017-09-01

    Being born at an extremely low birth weight (ELBW; programming hypotheses. Interfacing prenatal programming and differential susceptibility hypotheses, we tested whether individuals with ELBW in different childhood rearing environments showed different attention biases to positive and negative facial emotions in adulthood. Using the oldest known, prospectively followed cohort of ELBW survivors, we found that relative to normal birth weight controls (NBW; >2,500 grams), ELBW survivors displayed the highest and lowest attention bias to happy faces at age 30-35, depending on whether their total family income at age 8 was relatively low (environmental match) or high (environmental mismatch), respectively. This bias to happy faces was associated with a reduced likelihood of emotional problems. Findings suggest that differential susceptibility to positive emotions may be prenatally programmed, with effects lasting into adulthood. We discuss implications for integrating prenatal programming and differential susceptibility hypotheses, and the developmental origins of postnatal plasticity and resilience. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Developmental colour agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Nijboer, Tanja C W; de Haan, Edward

    2007-08-01

    Colour agnosia concerns the inability to recognise colours despite intact colour perception, semantic memory for colour information, and colour naming. Patients with selective colour agnosia have been described and the deficit is associated with left hemisphere damage. Here we report a case study of a 43-year-old man who was referred to us with a stroke in his right cerebellar hemisphere. During the standard assessment it transpired that he was unable to name coloured patches. Detailed assessment of his colour processing showed that he suffers from a selective colour agnosia. As he claimed to have had this problem all his life, and the fact that the infratentorial infarct that he had incurred was in an area far away from the brain structures that are known to be involved in colour processing, we suggest that he is the first reported case of developmental colour agnosia.

  2. Understanding and Evaluating Qualitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambert, Anne-Marie; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of the goals and procedures of qualitative research, and discusses linkages between epistemologies and methodology. Reviews possible guidelines involved in the several steps of the evaluation process of qualitative research, emphasizing naturalistic research with families. Reviews common problems with qualitative research.…

  3. Qualitative Studies in Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarker, Suprateek; Xiao, Xiao; Beaulieu, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    The authors discuss a review of qualitative papers on information systems (IS) published in various journals between 2001 and 2012. They explain trends related to qualitative research in the chosen journals and the key anatomical components of a qualitative research manuscript, including...

  4. Qualitative Studies in Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarker, Suprateek; Xiao, Xiao; Beaulieu, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    The authors discuss a review of qualitative papers on information systems (IS) published in various journals between 2001 and 2012. They explain trends related to qualitative research in the chosen journals and the key anatomical components of a qualitative research manuscript, including...

  5. [Neurotransmission in developmental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yoshihiro

    2008-11-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) is a heterogeneous developmental disorder with an etiology that is not fully understood. AD/HD has been considered to occur due to a disturbance in cathecholaminergic neurotransmission, with particular emphasis on dopamine. The neurotransmission of dopamine in subcortical regions such as the basal ganglia and limbic areas is synaptic; on the other hand, dopamine neurotransmission in the frontal cortex is quite different, because there are very few dopamine transporters (DAT) in the frontal cortex that allow dopamine to diffuse away from the dopamine synapse ("volume transmission"). It is now clear that noradrenergic neurons play a key regulatory role in dopaminergic function in the frontal cortex. Furthermore, serotonergic neurons exert an inhibitory effect on midbrain dopamine cell bodies, and they have an influence on dopamine release in terminal regions. There is accumulating neurobiological evidence pointing toward a role of the serotonin system in AD/HD. The etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is still unclear, but information from genetics, neuropathology, brain imaging, and basic neuroscience has provided insights into the understanding of this developmental disorder. In addition to abnormal circuitry in specific limbic and neocortical areas of the cerebral cortex, impairments in brainstem, cerebellar, thalamic, and basal ganglia connections have been reported. Numerous studies have pointed to abnormalities in serotonin and glutamate neurotransmission. Three important aspects involved in the pathophysiology of ASD have been proposed. The first is cell migration, the second is unbalanced excitatory-inhibitory networks, and the third is synapse formation and pruning, the key factors being reelin, neurexin, and neuroligin. Serotonin is considered to play an important role in all of these aspects of the pathophysiology of ASD. Finally, I would like to emphasize that it is crucial in the field of child

  6. Bullying and school transition: Context or development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weijun; Brittain, Heather; McDougall, Patricia; Vaillancourt, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    The relative impact of school transition versus development on peer victimization and bullying perpetration were examined in a natural experiment involving 698 students where half transitioned into middle school from Grade 5 to Grade 6 and the other half remained in their elementary school over the same period. Results indicated that, on average, peer victimization decreased over the transition period while bullying perpetration remained stable for the whole sample. Multilevel modeling was used to investigate the effects of school transition and sex on changes in victimization and perpetration. Results indicated that the effect of transition status on changes in peer victimization was moderated by sex. Middle school transition status predicted decreases in peer victimization for girls, but not for boys, who transitioned. However, school transition status and participants' sex (and their interaction) did not predict changes in perpetration over time. Our findings indicate that changes in student involvement with peer victimization are better understood as a contextual rather than a typical developmental process, whereas bullying perpetration may be better understood as developmental. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of three types of retirement preparation program: A qualitative study of civil servants in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leandro-França, C.; van Solinge, H.; Henkens, K.; Giardini Murta, S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the effectiveness of retirement planning programs are relatively scarce. Retirement preparation and planning programs may assist individuals to smooth the transition to retirement and subsequent adjustment. This qualitative study examines the effects of three retirement preparation progra

  8. Oocyte-to-embryo transition: kinase cabal plots regime change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, David; Lee, Laura A

    2006-02-07

    The transition from oocyte to embryo is among the most enthralling events in developmental biology. Recent studies of this transition in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed how conserved kinases administer the destruction of key oocyte meiotic regulators to create an embryo.

  9. Qualitative experiments in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2015-01-01

    was in a state of transition from a focus on elements (the concern of psychophysics) to a focus on wholes (the concern of Gestalt psychology). The defining feature of BARTLETT's early experiments is his holistic treatment of human responses, in which the basic unit of analysis is the active person relating...

  10. Phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Solé, Ricard V

    2011-01-01

    Phase transitions--changes between different states of organization in a complex system--have long helped to explain physics concepts, such as why water freezes into a solid or boils to become a gas. How might phase transitions shed light on important problems in biological and ecological complex systems? Exploring the origins and implications of sudden changes in nature and society, Phase Transitions examines different dynamical behaviors in a broad range of complex systems. Using a compelling set of examples, from gene networks and ant colonies to human language and the degradation o

  11. Qualitative Kinematics of Linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    links and the connections between them, the following algorithm computes an envisionment for that system . lotatioa(P1,P2) - CCV lotatioa(P1,P2) CCV...1988 Appendix A : Slider-Crank Envisionment Each qualitative state consists of a kinematic state representing the orientation of each link, and a...8 +++ 6 -- . f. 6 000 , 7 --0 7 ++0 8 +- -+ > 1 000 1 +0+ 8 000 8 000 7 --0 7 000 8 --- m 8 +++ Appendix B : Drag-Link Envisionment Kinematic State

  12. Why Are There Developmental Stages in Language Learning? A Developmental Robotics Model of Language Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Anthony F; Cangelosi, Angelo

    2017-02-01

    Most theories of learning would predict a gradual acquisition and refinement of skills as learning progresses, and while some highlight exponential growth, this fails to explain why natural cognitive development typically progresses in stages. Models that do span multiple developmental stages typically have parameters to "switch" between stages. We argue that by taking an embodied view, the interaction between learning mechanisms, the resulting behavior of the agent, and the opportunities for learning that the environment provides can account for the stage-wise development of cognitive abilities. We summarize work relevant to this hypothesis and suggest two simple mechanisms that account for some developmental transitions: neural readiness focuses on changes in the neural substrate resulting from ongoing learning, and perceptual readiness focuses on the perceptual requirements for learning new tasks. Previous work has demonstrated these mechanisms in replications of a wide variety of infant language experiments, spanning multiple developmental stages. Here we piece this work together as a single model of ongoing learning with no parameter changes at all. The model, an instance of the Epigenetic Robotics Architecture (Morse et al 2010) embodied on the iCub humanoid robot, exhibits ongoing multi-stage development while learning pre-linguistic and then basic language skills. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  13. Latinas/os in Community College Developmental Education: Increasing Moments of Academic and Interpersonal Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Gil, Nancy; Solorzano, Daniel G.; Santos, Ryan E.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the experiences of Latinas/os in community college English and math developmental education courses. Critical race theory in education and the theory of validation serve as guiding frameworks. The authors find that institutional agents provide academic validation by emphasizing high expectations, focusing on social…

  14. 30 Is the New 20: Emerging Adult Perspectives on Success in English Developmental Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston-Borja, Nadine Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    This study examined aspects of emerging adulthood that contribute to success in English developmental courses. The research approach included qualitative interviews with a collective case study of 12 emerging adults between the ages of 18-25 who successfully completed EN085 and EN085L at the University of Guam. The emerging adults shared…

  15. NADE Members Respond--Developmental Education Research Agenda: Survey of Field Professionals, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, D. Patrick; Martirosyan, Nara M.; Wentworth, Rebecca A.; Boylan, Hunter R.

    2015-01-01

    This is the final of a two-part article that provides the results of a qualitative study designed to document ideas and beliefs that professionals have regarding an appropriate research agenda on which the field of developmental education should focus in the near future. The participants of the study were members of the National Association for…

  16. Form and Function of Educational Technology in Developmental Curricula in a Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Patrice M.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative action research study examines the form (where and how) and function (specific use) of Educational Technology in developmental curricula at a community college. The study uses theoretical frameworks of Educational Technology and Instructional Systems Design to review and analyze curricular materials (print and electronic) and…

  17. The Connection between Role Model Relationships and Self-Direction in Developmental Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tommaso, Kathrynn

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative study that used classroom observations, faculty interviews, and student interviews to investigate the meaning and importance of seven non-cognitive variables to a cohort of developmental writing students at an urban community college. The variables studied included finances, study management, college surroundings,…

  18. Mexican American Adolescent Couples Communicating about Conflict: An Integrated Developmental and Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Heidi Adams; Williams, Lela Rankin

    2016-01-01

    Using observational methods on a small sample of committed Mexican American couples (N = 10, ages 15-17, M length of relationship = 26.5 months), we describe and categorize developmental and cultural communication patterns concerning the negotiation of conflict issues. Videotaped dyadic interactions were transcribed and qualitatively coded using…

  19. Descriptors of Friendship between Secondary Students with and without Autism or Intellectual and Developmental Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    This article reports findings from an interpretevist, qualitative study exploring the connections and dynamics of friendship among three groups of secondary school-aged young adults. Each group included an individual with autism or intellectual and developmental disabilities who had extensive or pervasive support needs, and at least one high…

  20. Feature Analysis of Singleton Consonant Errors in Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia (DVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoonen, G.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study attempted to quantify diagnostic characteristics related to consonant production of developmental verbal dyspraxia (DVD) in 11 Dutch children (ages 6 and 7). The study was able to quantify diagnostic characteristics but found very few qualitative differences in error patterns between children with DVD and 11 age-matched children with…

  1. Menstrual Support for Females with Developmental Disabilities: Survey and Interview of Parents or Caretakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Ran

    2013-01-01

    Menstruation is a difficult topic to address with as females with or without disabilities. It is a more significant challenge for females with developmental disabilities (DD) because it stimulates a variety of physical and psychological changes. Thus, some females with DD might have a qualitatively different experience compared to the general…

  2. Inclusion through Work and Productivity for Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaght, Rosemary; Petner-Arrey, Jami; Howell-Moneta, Angela; Cobigo, Virginie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Employment provides an important avenue to social inclusion for most adults. A range of productivity options exist for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) who wish to work, each offering unique challenges relative to inclusion. Methods: This qualitative study examined the productivity experiences of people…

  3. College student stressors: a review of the qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Carrie S; Baranik, Lisa E; Daniel, Francis

    2013-10-01

    A total of 40 qualitative studies were reviewed and coded according to the college student stressors they represented. These studies utilized a variety of qualitative methods to examine stressors representing the following themes: relationships, lack of resources, academics, the environment, expectations, diversity, transitions and other stressors. Relationship stressors were the most commonly reported theme and covered areas including stress associated with family, romantic, peer and faculty relationships. Three of the themes (relationships, diversity and other) are novel categories of stressors compared with quantitative reviews on the topic, highlighting the importance of gathering both quantitative and qualitative pieces of information. This review contributes to the stress literature by synthesizing and identifying trends in the qualitative student stress research.

  4. Impact of dementia on marriage: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David; Lee, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    This qualitative review explored the impact of dementia on marriage. The method was informed by systematic review and qualitative research methodologies. A comprehensive search of major databases was undertaken. The search identified 115 studies on the topic; 23 met the inclusion criteria and 19 were appraised as being of good methodological quality. Two major themes and five sub-themes emerged from the analysis of included studies, transition and loss. The theme of transition encompassed the three sub-themes of relationship, roles and intimacy and reflected the changes in the marriage and marital relationship that accompanied dementia. The theme of loss encompassed the two sub-themes of loss of a partner and loss of a marriage, which reflected the many losses that accompanied dementia. However, transition and loss were inter-related, because each change was accompanied by loss and each loss produced another change in the marriage.

  5. Attentional networks in developmental dyscalculia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henik Avishai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very little is known about attention deficits in developmental dyscalculia, hence, this study was designed to provide the missing information. We examined attention abilities of participants suffering from developmental dyscalculia using the attention networks test - interactions. This test was designed to examine three different attention networks--executive function, orienting and alerting--and the interactions between them. Methods Fourteen university students that were diagnosed as suffering from developmental dyscalculia--intelligence and reading abilities in the normal range and no indication of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder--and 14 matched controls were tested using the attention networks test - interactions. All participants were given preliminary tests to measure mathematical abilities, reading, attention and intelligence. Results The results revealed deficits in the alerting network--a larger alerting effect--and in the executive function networks--a larger congruity effect in developmental dyscalculia participants. The interaction between the alerting and executive function networks was also modulated by group. In addition, developmental dyscalculia participants were slower to respond in the non-cued conditions. Conclusions These results imply specific attentional deficits in pure developmental dyscalculia. Namely, those with developmental dyscalculia seem to be deficient in the executive function and alertness networks. They suffer from difficulty in recruiting attention, in addition to the deficits in numerical processing.

  6. A Qualitative Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Ackerman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. No in-depth qualitative research exists about the effects of therapeutic massage with children hospitalized to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT. The objective of this study is to describe parent caregivers' experience of the effects of massage/acupressure for their children undergoing HCT. Methods. We conducted a qualitative analysis of open-ended interviews with 15 parents of children in the intervention arm of a massage/acupressure trial. Children received both practitioner and parent-provided massage/acupressure. Results. Parents reported that their child experienced relief from pain and nausea, relaxation, and greater ease falling asleep. They also reported increased caregiver competence and closeness with their child as a result of learning and performing massage/acupressure. Parents supported a semistandardized massage protocol. Conclusion. Massage/acupressure may support symptom relief and promote relaxation and sleep among pediatric HCT patients if administered with attention to individual patients' needs and hospital routines and may relieve stress among parents, improve caregiver competence, and enhance the sense of connection between parent and child.

  7. Retirement Transition in Ballet Dancers: "Coping Within and Coping Without"

    OpenAIRE

    Roncaglia, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Retirement transitions in ballet dancers have been under researched. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experiences of career transition in ballet dancers, from a life course perspective. Drawing upon existing transition models (SCHLOSSBERG, 1981) and sport literature (TAYLOR & OGILVIE, 1994), the paper investigates how ballet dancers cope (or not) with the transition and explores the different factors influencing the coping process. Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interv...

  8. Further Validation of the Qualitative Scoring System for the Modified Bender-Gestalt Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannigan, Gary G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Compares the Qualitative Scoring System and the Developmental Scoring Systems, both Bender-Gestalt tests, in predicting achievement on the Metropolitan Achievement Test (MAT). In this study, first through fourth graders (n=409) from regular elementary schools were subjected to both tests; both systems correlated significantly with school…

  9. Spontaneous motility in preterm, small-for-gestational age infants - II. Qualitative aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, AF; van Loon, AJ; Hadders-Algra, M; Martijn, A; Okken, A; Prechtl, HFR

    1997-01-01

    In order to document in detail the developmental course of qualitative aspects of early spontaneous motility in intrauterine growth-retarded infants, sequential videotape recordings were made in 19 preterm infants with a birth weight below the 5th percentile. The quality of general movements (GMs) w

  10. Southeast Asian Parents Raising a Child with Autism: A Qualitative Investigation of Coping Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, June; Yoder, Marian K.; Canham, Daryl

    2009-01-01

    Autism is a developmental disability increasing in incidence over the past decade. Parents of children with autism experience prolonged levels of stress and isolation. Using qualitative research design, nine parents of children with autism participated in this study that focused on the effect of autism on the family, coping styles, and support…

  11. Review: Adrian Holliday (2007. Doing and Writing Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish K. Thakur

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The book fruitfully combines discussions on qualitative research methods with the craft of academic writing. While detailing different stages involved in qualitative research, it accords appreciable attention to the fundamental epistemological premises of different qualitative research genres. Yet, its central concern is to demonstrate ways and means to manage researcher’s subjectivity in the writing of qualitative research. The book looks at the act of writing as crucial to the twin concerns of rigor and validity in qualitative research. It privileges writing as an important methodological resource that qualitative researchers employ to make the workings of their research procedures transparent and establish their accountability in relation to specificities of a given research setting. Given this focus, the eight chapters of the book discuss at length issues such as authorial voice, the trials and tribulations of transition from data to written study, the reflexivity of the researcher as writer, and the demanding expectations of cautious detachment in reporting the people, setting, and the worlds and sensitivities that are part of any qualitative research enterprise. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs090198

  12. Bridging Conceptions of Quality in Moments of Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael John Ravenek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Quality assessment in qualitative research has been, and remains, a contentious issue. The qualitative literature contains a diversity of opinions on definitions of and criteria for quality. This article attempts to organize this diversity, drawing on several examples of existing quality criteria, into four main approaches: qualitative as quantitative criteria, paradigm-specific criteria, individualized assessment, and bridging criteria. These different approaches can be mapped onto the historical transitions, or moments, in qualitative research presented by Denzin and Lincoln and, as such, they are presented alongside the various criteria reviewed. Socio-political conditions that have led us to a fractured future, where the value and significance of qualitative work may be marginalized, support the adoption of bridging criteria. These broadly applicable criteria provide means to assess quality and can be flexibly applied among the diversity of qualitative approaches used by researchers. Five categories that summarize the language used within bridging criteria are presented as a means to move forward in developing an approach to quality assessment that fosters communication and connections within the diversity of qualitative research, while simultaneously respecting and valuing paradigmatic and methodological diversity.

  13. Developmental dyslexia and vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quercia, Patrick; Feiss, Léonard; Michel, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia affects almost 10% of school-aged children and represents a significant public health problem. Its etiology is unknown. The consistent presence of phonological difficulties combined with an inability to manipulate language sounds and the grapheme-phoneme conversion is widely acknowledged. Numerous scientific studies have also documented the presence of eye movement anomalies and deficits of perception of low contrast, low spatial frequency, and high frequency temporal visual information in dyslexics. Anomalies of visual attention with short visual attention spans have also been demonstrated in a large number of cases. Spatial orientation is also affected in dyslexics who manifest a preference for spatial attention to the right. This asymmetry may be so pronounced that it leads to a veritable neglect of space on the left side. The evaluation of treatments proposed to dyslexics whether speech or oriented towards the visual anomalies remains fragmentary. The advent of new explanatory theories, notably cerebellar, magnocellular, or proprioceptive, is an incentive for ophthalmologists to enter the world of multimodal cognition given the importance of the eye's visual input.

  14. Developmental dyslexia and vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quercia P

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Quercia,1 Léonard Feiss,2 Carine Michel31Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Dijon, France; 2Office of Ophthalmology, Beaune, France; 3University of Burgundy, Dijon, INSERM U1093, Cognition, Action et Plasticité Sensorimotrice, Dijon, FranceAbstract: Developmental dyslexia affects almost 10% of school-aged children and represents a significant public health problem. Its etiology is unknown. The consistent presence of phonological difficulties combined with an inability to manipulate language sounds and the grapheme–phoneme conversion is widely acknowledged. Numerous scientific studies have also documented the presence of eye movement anomalies and deficits of perception of low contrast, low spatial frequency, and high frequency temporal visual information in dyslexics. Anomalies of visual attention with short visual attention spans have also been demonstrated in a large number of cases. Spatial orientation is also affected in dyslexics who manifest a preference for spatial attention to the right. This asymmetry may be so pronounced that it leads to a veritable neglect of space on the left side. The evaluation of treatments proposed to dyslexics whether speech or oriented towards the visual anomalies remains fragmentary. The advent of new explanatory theories, notably cerebellar, magnocellular, or proprioceptive, is an incentive for ophthalmologists to enter the world of multimodal cognition given the importance of the eye's visual input.Keywords: reading, ocular motility, dyslexia, neglect, spatial representation

  15. Ethics and the practice of qualitative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Ian Frank

    2016-01-01

    Ethics and the practice of qualitative research? Qualitative Social Work 7 (4): 400-414. Reprinted......Ethics and the practice of qualitative research? Qualitative Social Work 7 (4): 400-414. Reprinted...

  16. Marital transitions. A child's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetherington, E M; Stanley-Hagan, M; Anderson, E R

    1989-02-01

    Despite a recent leveling off of the divorce rate, almost half of the children born in the last decade will experience the divorce of their parents, and most of these children will also experience the remarriage of their parents. Most children initially experience their parents' marital rearrangements as stressful; however, children's responses to their parents marital transitions are diverse. Whereas some exhibit remarkable resiliency and in the long term may actually be enhanced by coping with these transitions, others suffer sustained developmental delays or disruptions. Others appear to adapt well in the early stages of family reorganizations but show delayed effects that emerge at a later time, especially in adolescence. The long-term effects are related more to the child's developmental status, sex, and temperament; the qualities of the home and parenting environments; and to the resources and support systems available to the parents and child than they are to divorce or remarriage per se. In recent years, researchers have begun to move away from the view that single-parent and remarried families are atypical or pathogenic families and are focusing on the diversity of children's responses and to the factors that facilitate or disrupt the development and adjustment of children experiencing their parents' marital transitions.

  17. Children with Developmental Disabilities and their Motivation to Play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey Askins

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how and when children with developmental disabilities aged nine to 12 years spontaneously demonstrated play behaviors indicative of intrinsic motivation. Data was collected from six child participants and four parent participants through the use of the Pediatric Volitional Questionnaire (PVQ and semi-structured photo-elicitation interviews. Overall, the children who participated in this study sought out play experiences with which they were familiar in their natural environments. Specifically, they sought out experiences that afforded them the opportunity to exercise control over their environment and create a sense of predictability. Each of the children assumed the role of “orchestrator” and conducted his or her engagement in play occupations. The children demonstrated some spontaneous play within their social environment; however, many developmentally age-appropriate behaviors were not observed.

  18. [The developmental process of employee maladjustment in work place].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, A; Kosugi, S

    1998-08-01

    A causal model of job stressors and stress reactions was examined to clarify the developmental process of employee maladjustment in work place. Two thousand seven hundred twenty-eight (2728) employees of a research institute in the automobile industry completed Job Stress Scale (JSS), which measured job stressors, stress reactions, coping strategies, and social support. Three hundred ninety-two (392) employees with high stress reaction scores were interviewed to obtain information to construct a theoretical model. Then, the model was evaluated with covariance structure analysis. Results showed that the quantitative job stressors had only an indirect effect, mediated by fatigue and irritability, on mental instability, whereas qualitative ones had both direct and indirect effects. The findings suggest that the developmental processes of employee maladjustment in work place differ depending on the kind of job stressors they experience.

  19. Developmental Differences in Infants' Fairness Expectations From 6 to 15 Months of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Talee; Sommerville, Jessica A

    2016-11-21

    The present research investigated the developmental trajectory of infants' fairness expectations from 6 to 15 months of age (N = 150). Findings revealed a developmental transition in infants' fairness expectations between 6 and 12 months, as indicated by enhanced visual attention to unfair outcomes of resource distribution events (a 3:1 distribution) relative to fair outcomes (a 2:2 distribution). The onset of naturalistic sharing behavior predicted infants' fairness expectations at transitional ages. Beyond this period of developmental transition, the presence of siblings and infants' prompted giving behavior predicted individual differences in infants' fairness concerns. These results provide evidence for the role of experience in the acquisition of fairness expectations and reveal early individual differences in such expectations. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  20. Neurobehavioural effects of developmental toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Landrigan, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    the known causes for this rise in prevalence. In 2006, we did a systematic review and identified five industrial chemicals as developmental neurotoxicants: lead, methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, arsenic, and toluene. Since 2006, epidemiological studies have documented six additional developmental...... neurotoxicants-manganese, fluoride, chlorpyrifos, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, and the polybrominated diphenyl ethers. We postulate that even more neurotoxicants remain undiscovered. To control the pandemic of developmental neurotoxicity, we propose a global prevention strategy. Untested...... chemicals should not be presumed to be safe to brain development, and chemicals in existing use and all new chemicals must therefore be tested for developmental neurotoxicity. To coordinate these efforts and to accelerate translation of science into prevention, we propose the urgent formation of a new...

  1. PREVALENCE AND EFFECT OF DEVELOPMENTAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uvp

    among children might even be higher, as medical and educational systems frequently fail to identify this ... A gender difference also occurs with regard to DCD. ..... developmental and physical disabilities, consecutively taught at the Movement ...

  2. Predictive Modeling of Developmental Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of alternative methods in conjunction with traditional in vivo developmental toxicity testing has the potential to (1) reduce cost and increase throughput of testing the chemical universe, (2) prioritize chemicals for further targeted toxicity testing and risk assessment,...

  3. Neurobehavioural effects of developmental toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Landrigan, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    neurotoxicants-manganese, fluoride, chlorpyrifos, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, and the polybrominated diphenyl ethers. We postulate that even more neurotoxicants remain undiscovered. To control the pandemic of developmental neurotoxicity, we propose a global prevention strategy. Untested...

  4. Qualitative Value Profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, Henrik Johannsen; Bjerre, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative value profiling (QVP) is a relatively unknown method of strategic analysis for companies in international business-to-business settings. The purpose of QVP is to reduce the information complexity that is faced by international companies in dealing with business partners. The QVP method...... allows the development of 1) profiles of the target country in which operations are to take place, 2) profiles of the buying center (i.e. the group of decision makers) in the partner company, and 3) profiles of the product/service offering. It also allows the development of a semantic scaling method...... for deeper analysis of all involved factors. This paper presents the method and compares and contrasts it with other similar methods like the PESTELE method known from corporate strategy, the STEEPAL method known from scenario analysis, and the Politics-Institutions-Economy (PIE) framework known from...

  5. Situating methodology within qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer-Kile, Marnie L

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative nurse researchers are required to make deliberate and sometimes complex methodological decisions about their work. Methodology in qualitative research is a comprehensive approach in which theory (ideas) and method (doing) are brought into close alignment. It can be difficult, at times, to understand the concept of methodology. The purpose of this research column is to: (1) define qualitative methodology; (2) illuminate the relationship between epistemology, ontology and methodology; (3) explicate the connection between theory and method in qualitative research design; and 4) highlight relevant examples of methodological decisions made within cardiovascular nursing research. Although there is no "one set way" to do qualitative research, all qualitative researchers should account for the choices they make throughout the research process and articulate their methodological decision-making along the way.

  6. Common Perspectives in Qualitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Marie

    2016-07-01

    The primary purpose of this column is to focus on several common core concepts that are foundational to qualitative research. Discussion of these concepts is at an introductory level and is designed to raise awareness and understanding of several conceptual foundations that undergird qualitative research. Because of the variety of qualitative approaches, not all concepts are relevant to every design and tradition. However, foundational aspects were selected for highlighting.

  7. Mathematical Foundations of Qualitative Reasoning

    OpenAIRE

    Trave-Massuyes, Louise; Ironi, Liliana; Dague, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    We examine different formalisms for modeling qualitatively physical systems and their associated inferential processes that allow us to derive qualitative predictions from the models. We highlight the mathematical aspects of these processes along with their potential and limitations. The article then bridges to quantitative modeling, highlighting the benefits of qualitative reasoning-based approaches in the framework of system identification, and discusses open research issues.

  8. Presenting and Evaluating Qualitative Research

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Claire

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help authors to think about ways to present qualitative research papers in the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. It also discusses methods for reviewers to assess the rigour, quality, and usefulness of qualitative research. Examples of different ways to present data from interviews, observations, and focus groups are included. The paper concludes with guidance for publishing qualitative research and a checklist for authors and reviewers.

  9. Developmental attentional dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Naama; Kerbel, Noa; Shvimer, Lilach

    2010-01-01

    Attentional dyslexia is a reading deficit in which letters migrate between neighboring words, but are correctly identified and keep their correct relative position within the word. Thus, for example, fig tree can be read as fig free or even tie free. This study reports on 10 Hebrew-speaking individuals with developmental attentional dyslexia and explores in detail the characteristics of their between-word errors. Each participant read 2290 words, presented in word pairs: 845 horizontally presented word pairs, 240 vertically presented word pairs, and 60 nonword pairs. The main results are that almost all migrations preserve the relative position of the migrating letter within the word, indicating that the between-word position can be impaired while the within-word position encoding remains intact. This result is also supported by the finding that the participants did not make many letter position errors within words. Further analyses indicated that more errors occur in longer words, that most migrations occur in final letters (which are the leftmost letters in Hebrew), and that letters migrate both horizontally and vertically, and more frequently from the first to the second word in horizontal presentation. More migrations occurred when the result of migration was an existing word. Similarity between words in a pair did not increase error rates, and more migrations occurred when the words shared fewer letters. The between-word errors included the classic errors of migration of a letter between words, but also omission of one instance of a letter that appeared in the same position in the two words, an error that constituted a considerable percentage of the between-word errors, and intrusion of a letter from one word to the corresponding position in the neighboring word without erasing the original letter in the same position.

  10. Qualitative research in transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, E; Lane, S

    2011-10-01

    Transfusion medicine research has traditionally employed quantitative methods to answer clinical research questions. Increasingly, qualitative research methods are being used in the field to address a wide variety of research questions in areas such as blood donation, transfusion practices and policy development. This article describes the key characteristics, methodologies and methods of qualitative research and draws on examples to show how qualitative research approaches have been applied in the field of transfusion medicine. It is hoped that this overview will inform and encourage the application of qualitative research in the field of transfusion medicine.

  11. The quality of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collingridge, Dave S; Gantt, Edwin E

    2008-01-01

    In general, an appreciation of the standards of qualitative research and the types of qualitative data analyses available to researchers have not kept pace with the growing presence of qualitative studies in medical science. To help rectify this problem, the authors clarify qualitative research reliability, validity, sampling, and generalizability. They also provide 3 major theoretical frameworks for data collection and analysis that investigators may consider adopting. These 3 approaches are ethnography, existential phenomenology, and grounded theory. For each, the basic steps of data collection and analysis involved are presented, along with real-life examples of how they can contribute to improving medical care.

  12. Basic information processing in children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Gitte

    Background: Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) is a diagnostic term covering a group of neuropsychiatric disorders marked by a core triad of impairments consisting of qualitative disturbances in social interaction and communication, and by stereotypical behaviour. Some children diagnosed...... of the psychophysiological tests, to differentiate sub-groups within the spectrum of PDD. 3. To compare potential subgroup within the spectrum of PDD with known schizophrenic subgroups. Material and methodology: A case-control study consisting of two groups of children 8-12 years old matched as to age and gender: 1...

  13. Dependency in State Transitions of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herp, Jürgen; Ramezani, Mohammad Hossein; S. Nadimi, Esmaeil

    2017-01-01

    the state transitions are based on a hidden variable relevant for the predictor, namely the information of the current state. Given an underlying predictive model based on a Student's t-distribution for the samples and a conditional prior on the state transition, it is shown that state transitions can...... configurations. Comparing to heuristic interpretations of the residuals both models can qualitatively inform about the time when a state transition occurs.......Abstracting turbine states and predicting the transition into failure states ahead of time is important in operation and maintenance of wind turbines. This study presents a method to monitor state transitions of a wind turbine based on the online inference on residuals. In a Bayesian framework...

  14. Career Adaptability: A Qualitative Understanding from the Stories of Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Mary; Watson, Mark; Bimrose, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on an international qualitative study investigating career pathways through the stories of transition and adaptability of older women. Informed by grounded theory, the study explored how this group of women coped with and adapted to changes and transitions related to career. Data were gathered by means of interviews with 36…

  15. The College-to-Career Transition: An Exploration of Emerging Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kerri A.; Blustein, David L.; Bohlig, Amanda J.; Platt, Melissa G.

    2010-01-01

    In this qualitative study, the authors explored the experience of recent college graduates transitioning from college to career within the first 3 years of their transition. Five men and 5 women were interviewed, and the narratives were analyzed using consensual qualitative research methodology. Several general themes emerged, including the role…

  16. Using Qualitative Metasummary to Synthesize Qualitative and Quantitative Descriptive Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Barroso, Julie; Voils, Corrine I.

    2008-01-01

    The new imperative in the health disciplines to be more methodologically inclusive has generated a growing interest in mixed research synthesis, or the integration of qualitative and quantitative research findings. Qualitative metasummary is a quantitatively oriented aggregation of qualitative findings originally developed to accommodate the distinctive features of qualitative surveys. Yet these findings are similar in form and mode of production to the descriptive findings researchers often present in addition to the results of bivariate and multivariable analyses. Qualitative metasummary, which includes the extraction, grouping, and formatting of findings, and the calculation of frequency and intensity effect sizes, can be used to produce mixed research syntheses and to conduct a posteriori analyses of the relationship between reports and findings. PMID:17243111

  17. Tessellations & Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes two sixth-grade lessons on the work of M. C. Escher: (1) the first lesson instructs students on tessellations, or tiles that interlock in a repeated pattern; (2) the second lesson explores Escher's drawings of transitions from two- to three-dimensional space. (DSK)

  18. Presidential Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-09

    Morton Mintz and Stuart Auerbach, “Ford Solicits Suggestions on No. 2 Man,” Washington Post, Aug. 11, 1974, p. A1. 64 Fred Austin, “Ford Begins Move...representatives of the federal departments and agencies to ensure a smooth transition. Management and organizational issues should be CRS-23 105 Carl Brauer

  19. CAQDAS and Qualitative Research Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bryda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is methodological reflection on dialectical relationship between the qualitative research process and the process of computer-assisted qualitative data analysis. Basing on many years of experience in the work with various CAQDAS tools, the author tries to show the impact they have on shifting the way of thinking on methodology, the process of data analysis and conducting qualitative research. The specificity of CAQDAS usage in research practice requires methodological rigor in the process of collection and archiving of data, as well as the accuracy and precision in the process of coding, analyzing, and visualizing data. The use of computer-aided analysis of qualitative data in research practice not only shapes a framework for the sociological interpretation but also changes the way of perceiving research problems. The essence of this process is a specific interaction between new technologies and traditional methodology, data analysis, and qualitative research. In this sense, the use of CAQDAS in qualitative research practice is shaping the personality and identity of qualitative researcher, his/her style of work, data analysis, and conducting the fieldwork; it develops his or her new analytical and computer skills without which it is difficult to imagine a modern qualitative sociological research.

  20. Using Numbers in Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    The use of numerical/quantitative data in qualitative research studies and reports has been controversial. Prominent qualitative researchers such as Howard Becker and Martyn Hammersley have supported the inclusion of what Becker called "quasi-statistics": simple counts of things to make statements such as "some," "usually," and "most" more…

  1. Qualitative Analysis of Somitogenesis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maschke-Dutz E.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Although recently the properties of a single somite cell oscillator have been intensively investigated, the system-level nature of the segmentation clock remains largely unknown. To elaborate qualitatively this question, we examine the possibility to transform a well-known time delay somite cell oscillator to dynamical system of differential equations allowing qualitative analysis.

  2. Quality assurance of qualitative analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ríos, Ángel; Barceló, Damiá; Buydens, Lutgarde

    2003-01-01

    The European Commission has supported the G6MA-CT-2000-01012 project on "Metrology of Qualitative Chemical Analysis" (MEQUALAN), which was developed during 2000-2002. The final result is a document produced by a group of scientists with expertise in different areas of chemical analysis, metrology......: traceability, reliability (uncertainty), validation, and internal/external quality control for qualitative methods.......The European Commission has supported the G6MA-CT-2000-01012 project on "Metrology of Qualitative Chemical Analysis" (MEQUALAN), which was developed during 2000-2002. The final result is a document produced by a group of scientists with expertise in different areas of chemical analysis, metrology...... and quality assurance. One important part of this document deals, therefore, with aspects involved in analytical quality assurance of qualitative analysis. This article shows the main conclusions reported in the document referring to the implementation of quality principles in qualitative analysis...

  3. Romantic Relationship Patterns in Young Adulthood and Their Developmental Antecedents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauer, Amy J.; Pettit, Gregory S.; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Bates, John E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    The delayed entry into marriage that characterizes modern society raises questions about young adults' romantic relationship trajectories and whether patterns found to characterize adolescent romantic relationships persist into young adulthood. The current study traced developmental transitions into and out of romantic relationships from age 18 through age 25 in a sample of 511 young adults. The developmental antecedents of these different romantic relationship experiences in both distal and proximal family and peer domains were also examined. Analyses included both person-oriented and variable-oriented approaches. Findings show 5 distinct clusters varying in timing, duration, and frequency of participation in romantic relationships that range from those who had only recently entered into a romantic relationship to those who had been in the same relationship from age 18 to age 25. These relationship outcome trajectory clusters were predicted by variations in competence in early relationships with family and peers. Interpersonal experiences in family and peer contexts in early childhood through adolescence thus may form a scaffold on which later competence in romantic relationships develops. Findings shed light on both normative and nonnormative developmental transitions of romantic relationships in young adulthood. PMID:23421803

  4. Transition risk method and example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, R.E. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Monroeville PA (United States); Farkas, S.E. [Hudson Global Resources (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Paragraph (a)(4) of the Maintenance Rule (10CFR-50.65) states that before performing maintenance activities, the licensees shall assess and manage the increase in risk that may result from the maintenance activities. Currently, most plants use a qualitative tool for assessing and controlling the risk of the various plant conditions during an outage. Fewer plants have any means of performing a quantitative or qualitative assessment of the associated risks of transitioning the plant in each configuration from power to 'cold shutdown'. Typically, only the end-state of shutdown is considered. Given the concern that the NRC may require quantitative risk assessments of plant transitions and plant configurations during shutdown operations, Omaha Public Power District (OPPD) pro-actively authorized Westinghouse Engineering Services to develop a method for assessing risk associated with a transition from all power to shutdown and back to full power. An outage schedule is highly plant specific. Accordingly, the duration of the transition largely depends on equipment maintenance activities driving the decision to shutdown and repair. The time spent in various parts of the transition is a strong determinant in the associated risk of the transition. A transition takes the plant through a series of Plant Operational States (POSs). The features important to the characterization of each of the POSs include decay-heat level, plant activities involved, available equipment, as well as RCS temperature and pressure. The risk of the entire transition comes from calculating a figure-of-merit of each POS which can be loosely thought of as a per-hour core-damage frequency (CDF). Our paper describes decomposing OPPD operating procedures into periods for which we quantified sequences. In particular, the method considers the dominant shutdown failure modes: loss of shutdown cooling, loss of inventory, and loss of offsite power (including both plant centered and grid-related events

  5. Sustainable Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    What. The chapter addresses designing for sustainability as interventions in socio-technical systems and social practices of users and communities. It calls for reflexive design practices challenging dominant regimes and shaping alternative design spaces. The specific case is the reconfiguration...... of agendas/vision, technologies, actors and institutions in the emergent design of an urban mobility system based on an electric car sharing system. Why. Designing for sustainability is a fundamental challenge for future design practices; designers have to obtain an ability to contribute to sustainable...... transition processes. Where. Addresses design processes aimed at sustainable transition enacted in complex social settings, socio-technical systems involving many different actors and agendas. How. The chapter outlines a conceptual and analytic framework for a reflexive design practice for sustainability...

  6. Transition Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Alcock-Zeilinger, Judith

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we give a generic algorithm of the transition operators between Hermitian Young projection operators corresponding to equivalent irreducible representations of SU(N), using the compact expressions of Hermitian Young projection operators derived in a companion paper. We show that the Hermitian Young projection operators together with their transition operators constitute a fully orthogonal basis for the algebra of invariants of $V^{\\otimes m}$ that exhibits a systematically simplified multiplication table. We discuss the full algebra of invariants over $V^{\\otimes 3}$ and $V^{\\otimes 4}$ as explicit examples. In our presentation we make use of various standard concepts such as Young projection operators, Clebsch-Gordan operators, and invariants (in birdtrack notation). We tie these perspectives together and use them to shed light on each other.

  7. Developmental analytic view on narcissism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Matjan Štuhec

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Narcissistic pathology is connected to the pathology of the self. This article makes an overview of definitions of developmental analytic theories and stops with Kohut, Kernberg, Masterson, Auerbach and Mollon. The self is understood as a separate personality structure and has its own developmental line. Narcissism is a personality disorder that has its roots in preodipal developmental phases, mostly in the practicing and rapprochement subphase and in the oedipal phase as well. Recent research shows that the oedipal phase and the relation between the mother, the child's father (or her partner in general and the child is crucial for the maintenance of the pathological narcissism. Mothers who do not believe in a satisfying relationship with a man in general, keep the child in the dyadic position and do not support the development of the child's own identity.

  8. Degrees of Separation: Latino Students' Transitions to a Texas HBCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Taryn Ozuna; Stone, Ashley N.

    2016-01-01

    A successful transition to college is the foundation for future academic success, and this process is particularly important for a quickly growing Latino population. This qualitative study explored the transitional experiences of eight Latino students who enrolled in a historically Black university in Texas. Focusing specifically on their…

  9. Spirituality and Young Women in Transition: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Kimberly A.; Cummings, Anne L.

    2009-01-01

    This study contributes to the growing body of knowledge about spirituality and life transitions. Through qualitative investigation, 9 young women in professional education programs described their definition of spirituality, their spiritual activities, and how they used their spirituality to cope with life transitions as they prepared to enter the…

  10. A Decidable Recursive Logic for Weighted Transition Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Bingtian; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Mardare, Radu Iulian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we develop and study the Recursive Weighted Logic (RWL), a multi-modal logic that expresses qualitative and quantitative properties of labelled weighted transition systems (LWSs). LWSs are transition systems labelled with actions and real-valued quantities representing the costs of ...

  11. Positivism and qualitative nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, J

    2001-01-01

    Despite the hostility to positivism shown by qualitative methodologists in nursing, as in other disciplines, the epistemological and ontological instincts of qualitative researchers seem to coincide with those of the positivists, especially Bayesian positivists. This article suggests that positivists and qualitative researchers alike are pro-observation, proinduction, pro-plausibility and pro-subjectivity. They are also anti-cause, anti-realist, anti-explanation, anti-correspondence, anti-truth. In only one respect is there a significant difference between positivist and qualitative methodologists: most positivists have believed that, methodologically, the natural sciences and the social sciences are the same; most qualitative researchers are adamant that they are not. However, if positivism fails as a philosophy of the natural sciences (which it probably does), it might well succeed as a philosophy of the social sciences, just because there is a methodological watershed between the two. Reflex antagonism to positivism might therefore be a major obstacle to understanding the real reasons why qualitative research and the natural sciences are methodologically divergent; and less hostility on the part of qualitative nurse researchers might bring certain advantages in its wake.

  12. The renaissance of developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Johnston, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Since its heyday in the 1980s and 90s, the field of developmental biology has gone into decline; in part because it has been eclipsed by the rise of genomics and stem cell biology, and in part because it has seemed less pertinent in an era with so much focus on translational impact. In this essay, I argue that recent progress in genome-wide analyses and stem cell research, coupled with technological advances in imaging and genome editing, have created the conditions for the renaissance of a new wave of developmental biology with greater translational relevance.

  13. Cardinal Direction Relations in Qualitative Spatial Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaman L. Sabharwal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Representation and reasoning with spatial information is a fundamental aspect of artificial intelligence. Qualitative methods have become prominent in spatial reasoning. In geophysical explorations, one of the aspects is to determine compass direction between the regions. In this paper, we present an efficient approach to cardinal directions between free form regions. The development is very simple, mathematically sound and can be implemented efficiently. The extension to 3D is seamless; it needs no additional formulation for transition from 2D to 3D.It has no adverse impact on the computational efficiency, as the technique is akin to 2D. This work is directly applicable to geographical information systems for location determination, robot navigation, and spatio-temporal networks databases where direction changes frequently

  14. Battelle Developmental Inventory and the Battelle Developmental Inventory Screening Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Robert; Snyder, Scott

    1990-01-01

    Two forms of the Battelle Developmental Inventory, intended for use with handicapped and nonhandicapped children ages 0-8, are examined. The instruments measure personal-social, adaptive, motor, communication, and cognitive skills, for use in screening, diagnosis, identification, assessment, and program evaluation. The paper discusses test…

  15. Causes of Ineradicable Spurious Predictions in Qualitative Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Say, A C Cem; 10.1613/jair.2065

    2011-01-01

    It was recently proved that a sound and complete qualitative simulator does not exist, that is, as long as the input-output vocabulary of the state-of-the-art QSIM algorithm is used, there will always be input models which cause any simulator with a coverage guarantee to make spurious predictions in its output. In this paper, we examine whether a meaningfully expressive restriction of this vocabulary is possible so that one can build a simulator with both the soundness and completeness properties. We prove several negative results: All sound qualitative simulators, employing subsets of the QSIM representation which retain the operating region transition feature, and support at least the addition and constancy constraints, are shown to be inherently incomplete. Even when the simulations are restricted to run in a single operating region, a constraint vocabulary containing just the addition, constancy, derivative, and multiplication relations makes the construction of sound and complete qualitative simulators i...

  16. Data Display in Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Verdinelli PsyD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Visual displays help in the presentation of inferences and conclusions and represent ways of organizing, summarizing, simplifying, or transforming data. Data displays such as matrices and networks are often utilized to enhance data analysis and are more commonly seen in quantitative than in qualitative studies. This study reviewed the data displays used by three prestigious qualitative research journals within a period of three years. The findings include the types of displays used in these qualitative journals, the frequency of use, and the purposes for using visual displays as opposed to presenting data in text.

  17. Quality assurance of qualitative analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ríos, Ángel; Barceló, Damiá; Buydens, Lutgarde

    2003-01-01

    The European Commission has supported the G6MA-CT-2000-01012 project on "Metrology of Qualitative Chemical Analysis" (MEQUALAN), which was developed during 2000-2002. The final result is a document produced by a group of scientists with expertise in different areas of chemical analysis, metrology...... and quality assurance. One important part of this document deals, therefore, with aspects involved in analytical quality assurance of qualitative analysis. This article shows the main conclusions reported in the document referring to the implementation of quality principles in qualitative analysis...

  18. Introduction: Qualitative Research in Criminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Meuser

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper begins with a brief overview of research traditions that paved the way for qualitative methods in criminological research (labeling approach and critical criminology. In addition, it outlines recent trends in qualitative criminology. The potentials and the limits of a perspective of "understanding from within" ("Verstehen" on deviance and social control are discussed. The contributions to the volume—examples of qualitative criminological research from German speaking countries—are introduced in reference to some current trends of conceptual and methodological discussions in criminology. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0201129

  19. Qualitative experiments in psychology: the case of Frederic Bartlett's methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Wagoner, Brady

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I explore the meaning of experiments in early twentieth century psychology, focusing on the qualitative experimental methodology of psychologist Frederic Bartlett. I begin by contextualizing Bartlett's experiments within the continental research tradition of his time, which was in a state of transition from a focus on elements (the concern of psychophysics) to a focus on wholes (the concern of Gestalt psychology). The defining feature of Barlett's early experiments is his hol...

  20. Qualitative Experiments in Psychology: The Case of Frederic Bartlett's Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Wagoner, Brady

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I explore the meaning of experiments in early twentieth century psychology, focusing on the qualitative experimental methodology of psychologist Frederic BARTLETT. I begin by contextualizing BARTLETT's experiments within the continental research tradition of his time, which was in a state of transition from a focus on elements (the concern of psychophysics) to a focus on wholes (the concern of Gestalt psychology). The defining feature of BARTLETT's early experiments is his ho...

  1. Developmental diversity in free-living flatworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Durán, José María; Egger, Bernhard

    2012-03-19

    Flatworm embryology has attracted attention since the early beginnings of comparative evolutionary biology. Considered for a long time the most basal bilaterians, the Platyhelminthes (excluding Acoelomorpha) are now robustly placed within the Spiralia. Despite having lost their relevance to explain the transition from radially to bilaterally symmetrical animals, the study of flatworm embryology is still of great importance to understand the diversification of bilaterians and of developmental mechanisms. Flatworms are acoelomate organisms generally with a simple centralized nervous system, a blind gut, and lacking a circulatory organ, a skeleton and a respiratory system other than the epidermis. Regeneration and asexual reproduction, based on a totipotent neoblast stem cell system, are broadly present among different groups of flatworms. While some more basally branching groups - such as polyclad flatworms - retain the ancestral quartet spiral cleavage pattern, most flatworms have significantly diverged from this pattern and exhibit unique strategies to specify the common adult body plan. Most free-living flatworms (i.e. Platyhelminthes excluding the parasitic Neodermata) are directly developing, whereas in polyclads, also indirect developers with an intermediate free-living larval stage and subsequent metamorphosis are found. A comparative study of developmental diversity may help understanding major questions in evolutionary biology, such as the evolution of cleavage patterns, gastrulation and axial specification, the evolution of larval types, and the diversification and specialization of organ systems. In this review, we present a thorough overview of the embryonic development of the different groups of free-living (turbellarian) platyhelminths, including the Catenulida, Macrostomorpha, Polycladida, Lecithoepitheliata, Proseriata, Bothrioplanida, Rhabdocoela, Fecampiida, Prolecithophora and Tricladida, and discuss their main features under a consensus phylogeny

  2. Developmental diversity in free-living flatworms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín-Durán José

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Flatworm embryology has attracted attention since the early beginnings of comparative evolutionary biology. Considered for a long time the most basal bilaterians, the Platyhelminthes (excluding Acoelomorpha are now robustly placed within the Spiralia. Despite having lost their relevance to explain the transition from radially to bilaterally symmetrical animals, the study of flatworm embryology is still of great importance to understand the diversification of bilaterians and of developmental mechanisms. Flatworms are acoelomate organisms generally with a simple centralized nervous system, a blind gut, and lacking a circulatory organ, a skeleton and a respiratory system other than the epidermis. Regeneration and asexual reproduction, based on a totipotent neoblast stem cell system, are broadly present among different groups of flatworms. While some more basally branching groups - such as polyclad flatworms - retain the ancestral quartet spiral cleavage pattern, most flatworms have significantly diverged from this pattern and exhibit unique strategies to specify the common adult body plan. Most free-living flatworms (i.e. Platyhelminthes excluding the parasitic Neodermata are directly developing, whereas in polyclads, also indirect developers with an intermediate free-living larval stage and subsequent metamorphosis are found. A comparative study of developmental diversity may help understanding major questions in evolutionary biology, such as the evolution of cleavage patterns, gastrulation and axial specification, the evolution of larval types, and the diversification and specialization of organ systems. In this review, we present a thorough overview of the embryonic development of the different groups of free-living (turbellarian platyhelminths, including the Catenulida, Macrostomorpha, Polycladida, Lecithoepitheliata, Proseriata, Bothrioplanida, Rhabdocoela, Fecampiida, Prolecithophora and Tricladida, and discuss their main features

  3. Developmental diversity in free-living flatworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Flatworm embryology has attracted attention since the early beginnings of comparative evolutionary biology. Considered for a long time the most basal bilaterians, the Platyhelminthes (excluding Acoelomorpha) are now robustly placed within the Spiralia. Despite having lost their relevance to explain the transition from radially to bilaterally symmetrical animals, the study of flatworm embryology is still of great importance to understand the diversification of bilaterians and of developmental mechanisms. Flatworms are acoelomate organisms generally with a simple centralized nervous system, a blind gut, and lacking a circulatory organ, a skeleton and a respiratory system other than the epidermis. Regeneration and asexual reproduction, based on a totipotent neoblast stem cell system, are broadly present among different groups of flatworms. While some more basally branching groups - such as polyclad flatworms - retain the ancestral quartet spiral cleavage pattern, most flatworms have significantly diverged from this pattern and exhibit unique strategies to specify the common adult body plan. Most free-living flatworms (i.e. Platyhelminthes excluding the parasitic Neodermata) are directly developing, whereas in polyclads, also indirect developers with an intermediate free-living larval stage and subsequent metamorphosis are found. A comparative study of developmental diversity may help understanding major questions in evolutionary biology, such as the evolution of cleavage patterns, gastrulation and axial specification, the evolution of larval types, and the diversification and specialization of organ systems. In this review, we present a thorough overview of the embryonic development of the different groups of free-living (turbellarian) platyhelminths, including the Catenulida, Macrostomorpha, Polycladida, Lecithoepitheliata, Proseriata, Bothrioplanida, Rhabdocoela, Fecampiida, Prolecithophora and Tricladida, and discuss their main features under a consensus phylogeny

  4. The developmental dynamics of the maize leaf transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pinghua; Ponnala, Lalit; Gandotra, Neeru; Wang, Lin; Si, Yaqing; Tausta, S Lori; Kebrom, Tesfamichael H; Provart, Nicholas; Patel, Rohan; Myers, Christopher R; Reidel, Edwin J; Turgeon, Robert; Liu, Peng; Sun, Qi; Nelson, Timothy; Brutnell, Thomas P

    2010-12-01

    We have analyzed the maize leaf transcriptome using Illumina sequencing. We mapped more than 120 million reads to define gene structure and alternative splicing events and to quantify transcript abundance along a leaf developmental gradient and in mature bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. We detected differential mRNA processing events for most maize genes. We found that 64% and 21% of genes were differentially expressed along the developmental gradient and between bundle sheath and mesophyll cells, respectively. We implemented Gbrowse, an electronic fluorescent pictograph browser, and created a two-cell biochemical pathway viewer to visualize datasets. Cluster analysis of the data revealed a dynamic transcriptome, with transcripts for primary cell wall and basic cellular metabolism at the leaf base transitioning to transcripts for secondary cell wall biosynthesis and C(4) photosynthetic development toward the tip. This dataset will serve as the foundation for a systems biology approach to the understanding of photosynthetic development.

  5. Multiple paths in educational transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2011-01-01

    In many countries educational branching points consist of more than two qualitatively different alternatives, and only some alternatives provide the opportunity of continuing into higher education. I develop a multinomial transition model for modeling the effects of family background...... characteristics and individual characteristics on these complex educational careers. The model controls for unobserved heterogeneity that may, if ignored, result in biased estimates. Compared to previous research, I explicitly include instrumental variables that ensure identification of the unobserved component....... I apply the model to the Danish case and analyze data which covers the educational careers of a cohort of Danes born around 1954. I find that the model brings forward non-trivial heterogeneity in the influence of family background and ability on qualitatively different choice alternatives both...

  6. Developmental reaction norms for water stressed seedlings of succulent cacti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Ulises; Zhou, Royce W; Castillo, Guillermo; Collazo-Ortega, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Succulent cacti are remarkable plants with capabilities to withstand long periods of drought. However, their adult success is contingent on the early seedling stages, when plants are highly susceptible to the environment. To better understand their early coping strategies in a challenging environment, two developmental aspects (anatomy and morphology) in Polaskia chichipe and Echinocactus platyacanthus were studied in the context of developmental reaction norms under drought conditions. The morphology was evaluated using landmark based morphometrics and Principal Component Analysis, which gave three main trends of the variation in each species. The anatomy was quantified as number and area of xylem vessels. The quantitative relationship between morphology and anatomy in early stages of development, as a response to drought was revealed in these two species. Qualitatively, collapsible cells and collapsible parenchyma tissue were observed in seedlings of both species, more often in those subjected to water stress. These tissues were located inside the epidermis, resembling a web of collapsible-cell groups surrounding turgid cells, vascular bundles, and spanned across the pith. Occasionally the groups formed a continuum stretching from the epidermis towards the vasculature. Integrating the morphology and the anatomy in a developmental context as a response to environmental conditions provides a better understanding of the organism's dynamics, adaptation, and plasticity.

  7. Developmental reaction norms for water stressed seedlings of succulent cacti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Rosas

    Full Text Available Succulent cacti are remarkable plants with capabilities to withstand long periods of drought. However, their adult success is contingent on the early seedling stages, when plants are highly susceptible to the environment. To better understand their early coping strategies in a challenging environment, two developmental aspects (anatomy and morphology in Polaskia chichipe and Echinocactus platyacanthus were studied in the context of developmental reaction norms under drought conditions. The morphology was evaluated using landmark based morphometrics and Principal Component Analysis, which gave three main trends of the variation in each species. The anatomy was quantified as number and area of xylem vessels. The quantitative relationship between morphology and anatomy in early stages of development, as a response to drought was revealed in these two species. Qualitatively, collapsible cells and collapsible parenchyma tissue were observed in seedlings of both species, more often in those subjected to water stress. These tissues were located inside the epidermis, resembling a web of collapsible-cell groups surrounding turgid cells, vascular bundles, and spanned across the pith. Occasionally the groups formed a continuum stretching from the epidermis towards the vasculature. Integrating the morphology and the anatomy in a developmental context as a response to environmental conditions provides a better understanding of the organism's dynamics, adaptation, and plasticity.

  8. Effects of Response Preparation on Developmental Improvements in Inhibitory Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz, Sarah; Stephanie, Davis; Luna, Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    Studies in adults indicate that response preparation is crucial to inhibitory control, but it remains unclear whether preparation contributes to improvements in inhibitory control over the course of childhood and adolescence. In order to assess the role of response preparation in developmental improvements in inhibitory control, we parametrically manipulated the duration of the instruction period in an antisaccade (AS) task given to participants ages 8 to 31 years. Regressions showing a protracted development of AS performance were consistent with existing research, and two novel findings emerged. First, all participants showed improved performance with increased preparation time, indicating that response preparation is crucial to inhibitory control at all stages of development. Preparatory processes did not deteriorate at even the longest preparatory period, indicating that the youngest participants were able to sustain preparation at even the longest interval. Second, developmental trajectories did not differ for different preparatory period lengths, highlighting that the processes supporting response preparation continue to mature in tandem with improvements in AS performance. Our findings suggest that developmental improvements are not simply due to an inhibitory system that is faster to engage but may also reflect qualitative changes in the processes engaged during the preparatory period. PMID:20347061

  9. Overview: developmental toxicology: new directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuey, Dana; Kim, James H

    2011-10-01

    Since regulatory agencies began implementing the use of standardized developmental toxicology protocols in the mid-1960s, our knowledge base of embryo-fetal development and technologies for experimentation has grown exponentially. These developmental toxicology protocols were a direct result of the thalidomide tragedy from earlier that decade, when large numbers of women were exposed to the drug and over 10,000 cases of phocomelia resulted. In preventing a recurrence of such tragedies, the testing protocols are immensely successful and the field of toxicology has been dedicated to using them to advance safety and risk assessment of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Recently, our perspectives on toxicity testing have been challenged by a growing awareness that while we have excelled in hazard identification, we are in dire need of improved methodologies for human health risk assessment, particularly with respect to the large numbers of environmental chemicals for which we have little toxicology data and to the growing sentiment that better alternatives to whole animals tests are needed. To provide a forum for scientists, researchers, and regulators, the Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee of the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute organized a 2-day workshop titled "Developmental Toxicology-New Directions" to evaluate lessons learned over the past 30 years and discuss the future of toxicology testing. The following four articles describe different presentations and discussions that were held over the course of those 2 days.

  10. Transforming Developmental Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Developmental Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, with support from the Texas Legislature, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has funded various developmental education initiatives, including research and evaluation efforts, to help Texas public institutions of higher education provide more effective programs and services to underprepared students. Based on evaluation…

  11. Developmental dyscalculia: a dysconnection syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucian, Karin; Ashkenazi, Simone Schwizer; Hänggi, Jürgen; Rotzer, Stephanie; Jäncke, Lutz; Martin, Ernst; von Aster, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Numerical understanding is important for everyday life. For children with developmental dyscalculia (DD), numbers and magnitudes present profound problems which are thought to be based upon neuronal impairments of key regions for numerical understanding. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible differences in white matter fibre integrity between children with DD and controls using diffusion tensor imaging. White matter integrity and behavioural measures were evaluated in 15 children with developmental dyscalculia aged around 10 years and 15 matched controls. The main finding, obtained by a whole brain group comparison, revealed reduced fractional anisotropy in the superior longitudinal fasciculus in children with developmental dyscalculia. In addition, a region of interest analysis exhibited prominent deficits in fibres of the superior longitudinal fasciculus adjacent to the intraparietal sulcus, which is thought to be the core region for number processing. To conclude, our results outline deficient fibre projection between parietal, temporal and frontal regions in children with developmental dyscalculia, and therefore raise the question of whether dyscalculia can be seen as a dysconnection syndrome. Since the superior longitudinal fasciculus is involved in the integration and control of distributed brain processes, the present results highlight the importance of considering broader domain-general mechanisms in the diagnosis and therapy of dyscalculia.

  12. Developmental Dyscalculia and Medical Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Ruth S.; Gross-Tsur, Varda

    1993-01-01

    Medical evaluation of seven third-grade children with developmental dyscalculia in a mainstream setting identified neurological conditions (including petit mal seizures, Gerstmann syndrome, and attention deficit disorder without hyperactivity) in all the children. Findings suggest that children who are not improving academically should undergo…

  13. Developmental control of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxem, M. (Mike)

    2002-01-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, cell divisions need to be coordinated with the developmental program of the entire organism. Although the mechanisms that drive cells through the division cycle are well understood, very little is known about the pathways that link extracellular signals

  14. Developmental Principles: Fact or Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Durston

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While still at school, most of us are deeply impressed by the underlying principles that so beautifully explain why the chemical elements are ordered as they are in the periodic table, and may wonder, with the theoretician Brian Goodwin, “whether there might be equally powerful principles that account for the awe-inspiring diversity of body forms in the living realm”. We have considered the arguments for developmental principles, conclude that they do exist and have specifically identified features that may generate principles associated with Hox patterning of the main body axis in bilaterian metazoa in general and in the vertebrates in particular. We wonder whether this exercise serves any purpose. The features we discuss were already known to us as parts of developmental mechanisms and defining developmental principles (how, and at which level? adds no insight. We also see little profit in the proposal by Goodwin that there are principles outside the emerging genetic mechanisms that need to be taken into account. The emerging developmental genetic hierarchies already reveal a wealth of interesting phenomena, whatever we choose to call them.

  15. Writing Stages: A Developmental Hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Joseph O.

    The developmental stages of writing can be related to Jean Piaget's final three stages of development (preoperational, concrete operational, and formal operational) and to the narrative, descriptive, explanative, analytical, and artistic rhetorical modes. As the child enters kindergarten or the first grade, narrative blooms. By this age most young…

  16. Developmental control of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxem, M. (Mike)

    2002-01-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, cell divisions need to be coordinated with the developmental program of the entire organism. Although the mechanisms that drive cells through the division cycle are well understood, very little is known about the pathways that link extracellular signals

  17. Vygotsky's Developmental and Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Peter E.

    2005-01-01

    Vygotsky is widely considered one of the most significant and influential psychologists of the twentieth century. Nevertheless, true appreciation of his theories has been hindered by a lack of understanding of the background to his thought. "Vygotsky's Developmental and Educational Psychology" aims to demonstrate how we can come to a new and…

  18. Causal Inference and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, E. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Causal inference is of central importance to developmental psychology. Many key questions in the field revolve around improving the lives of children and their families. These include identifying risk factors that if manipulated in some way would foster child development. Such a task inherently involves causal inference: One wants to know whether…

  19. Student Development and Developmental Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champaigne, John

    1982-01-01

    Reviews the nine-stage Perry Scheme of Intellectual and Ethical Development, detailing three major student orientations--dualism, multiplicity, and commitments in relativism. Suggests techniques developmental educators can use to communicate with, support, and challenge students to promote intellectual development. Underscores the importance of…

  20. Vygotsky's Developmental and Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Peter E.

    2005-01-01

    Vygotsky is widely considered one of the most significant and influential psychologists of the twentieth century. Nevertheless, true appreciation of his theories has been hindered by a lack of understanding of the background to his thought. "Vygotsky's Developmental and Educational Psychology" aims to demonstrate how we can come to a new and…

  1. Art/Dance Developmental Chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinda, Crystal L., Comp.; Hand, Leslie, Comp.

    A developmental chart of dance and art is presented according to Piaget's three stages of mental development: intuitive thought, concrete operations, and formal operations. Development is charted for dance/movement and art beginning with a sensorimotor unit (1 to 3 years), through self awareness (3 to 5 years), motor skills (5 to 7 years), form (7…

  2. Advances in developmental prosopagnosia research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, Tirta; Duchaine, Bradley

    2013-06-01

    Developmental prosopagnosia (DP) refers to face recognition deficits in the absence of brain damage. DP affects ∼2% of the population, and it often runs in families. DP studies have made considerable progress in identifying the cognitive and neural characteristics of the disorder. A key challenge is to develop a valid taxonomy of DP that will facilitate many aspects of research.

  3. The Developmental Psychopathology of Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertz, Sarah J.; Woodruff-Borden, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Although childhood generalized anxiety disorder is generally understudied, worry, the cardinal feature of GAD, appears to be relatively common in youth. Despite its prevalence, there are few conceptual models of the development of clinical worry in children. The current review provides a framework for integrating the developmental psychopathology…

  4. Person Constancy within Developmental Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccoby, Eleanor E.

    Using findings on the unstability of previously stable physical activity levels of young children as a kind of case study to aid thought about the trait-dimensional approach to developmental continuity and discontinuity, this discussion explores the applicability of a dual theory of concept formation to the problem of personal stability and…

  5. Early Writing: A Developmental Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Elizabeth; And Others

    This document consists of four papers on the acquisition of writing skills by young children. The first paper provides a historical and developmental perspective on early writing. Children's development of manual dexterity is briefly overviewed and aspects of the educational approaches of Pestalozzi, Montessori, Chomsky, Rogers and Ashton-Warner…

  6. Developmental trends in adaptive memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L; Smeets, Tom; Garner, Sarah R

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that memory is enhanced when information is processed for fitness-related purposes. The main objective of the current experiments was to test developmental trends in the evolutionary foundation of memory using different types of stimuli and paradigms. In Experiment 1, 11-year-olds and adults were presented with neutral, negative, and survival-related DRM word lists. We found a memory benefit for the survival-related words and showed that false memories were more likely to be elicited for the survival-related word lists than for the other lists. Experiment 2 examined developmental trends in the survival processing paradigm using neutral, negative, and survival-related pictures. A survival processing advantage was found for survival-related pictures in adults, for negative pictures in 11/12-year-olds, and for neutral pictures in 7/8-year-olds. In Experiment 3, 11/12-year-olds and adults had to imagine the standard survival scenario or an adapted survival condition (or pleasantness condition) that was designed to reduce the possibilities for elaborative processing. We found superior memory retention for both survival scenarios in children and adults. Collectively, our results evidently show that the survival processing advantage is developmentally invariant and that certain proximate mechanisms (elaboration and distinctiveness) underlie these developmental trends.

  7. Causal Inference and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, E. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Causal inference is of central importance to developmental psychology. Many key questions in the field revolve around improving the lives of children and their families. These include identifying risk factors that if manipulated in some way would foster child development. Such a task inherently involves causal inference: One wants to know whether…

  8. Qualitative futures research for innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Duin, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    This is about how commercial organisations use qualitative methods of futures research, such as scenarios, roadmapping and trend-analysis, in their innovation processes. The linkages etween innviation proceses and the methids can take place in different ways.

  9. Qualitative futures research for innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Duin, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    This is about how commercial organisations use qualitative methods of futures research, such as scenarios, roadmapping and trend-analysis, in their innovation processes. The linkages etween innviation proceses and the methids can take place in different ways.

  10. Conformational Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerminski, Ryszard; Roitberg, Adrian; Choi, Chyung; Ulitsky, Alexander; Elber, Ron

    1991-10-01

    Two computational approaches to study plausible conformations of biological molecules and the transitions between them are presented and discussed. The first approach is a new search algorithm which enhances the sampling of alternative conformers using a mean field approximation. It is argued and demonstrated that the mean field approximation has a small effect on the location of the minima. The method is a combination of the LES protocol (Locally Enhanced Sampling) and simulated annealing. The LES method was used in the past to study the diffusion pathways of ligands from buried active sites in myoglobin and leghemoglobin to the exterior of the protein. The present formulation of LES and its implementation in a Molecular Dynamics program is described. An application for side chain placement in a tetrapeptide is presented. The computational effort associated with conformational searches using LES grows only linearly with the number of degrees of freedom, whereas in the exact case the computational effort grows exponentially. Such saving is of course associated with a mean field approximation. The second branch of studies pertains to the calculation of reaction paths in large and flexible biological systems. An extensive mapping of minima and barriers for two different tetrapeptides is calculated from the known minima and barriers of alanine tetrapeptide which we calculated recently.1 The tetrapeptides are useful models for the formation of secondary structure elements since they are the shortest possible polymers of this type which can still form a complete helical turn. The tetrapeptides are isobutyryl-val(χ1=60)-ala-ala and isobutyryl-val(χ1=-60)-ala-ala. Properties of the hundreds of minima and of the hundreds intervening barriers are discussed. Estimates for thermal transition times between the many conformers (and times to explore the complete phase space) are calculated and compared. It is suggested that the most significant effect of the side chain size is

  11. Rapid transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamrin, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Solar energy programs are entering a critical transitional period as we move from the initial marketing of solar technologies into a phase of widespread commercialization. We face the dual challenge of trying to get enough solar systems in place fast enough to prove solar is a viable alternative, while trying to ensure the systems are designed and installed properly, proving the energy savings as promised. This is a period of both great opportunity and high risk as the field becomes crowded with new solar cheerleaders and supporters but seldom enough competent players. The status of existing and proposed programs for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy in California is described.

  12. Transit space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raahauge, Kirsten Marie

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with representations of one specific city, Århus, Denmark, especially its central district. The analysis is based on anthropological fieldwork conducted in Skåde Bakker and Fedet, two well-off neighborhoods. The overall purpose of the project is to study perceptions of space...... and the interaction of cultural, social, and spatial organizations, as seen from the point of view of people living in Skåde Bakker and Fedet. The focus is on the city dwellers’ representations of the central district of Århus with specific reference to the concept of transit space. When applied to various Århusian...

  13. Evaluating Measurement Invariance in the Measurement of Developmental Assets in Latino English Language Groups Across Developmental Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Bulut

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Noncognitive characteristics are gaining importance in addressing the persistent challenges facing youth in diverse settings. Measurement invariance of two youth developmental assets, Support and Positive Identity, is evaluated across grade levels and English language learner (ELL subgroups of Latino students in 6th through 12th grade. Explanatory item response modeling is used to evaluate measurement invariance. The measurement of Latino students’ sense of support and positive identity varies depending on their developmental stage and language status. Students at later grade levels tend to require higher levels of Support to endorse items in the Support measure. There is a nonlinear relation between students’ grade level and item functioning for Positive Identity; students’ transition from middle to high school may influence the way they respond to Positive Identity items. This has implications for the measurement of assets with diverse Latino youth and for Latino youth development.

  14. Developmental gene expression provides clues to relationships between sponge and eumetazoan body plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Sven; Adamski, Marcin; Bergum, Brith; Guder, Corina; Liu, Jing; Laplante, Mary; Bråte, Jon; Hoffmann, Friederike; Fortunato, Sofia; Jordal, Signe; Rapp, Hans Tore; Adamska, Maja

    2014-05-20

    Elucidation of macroevolutionary transitions between diverse animal body plans remains a major challenge in evolutionary biology. We address the sponge-eumetazoan transition by analyzing expression of a broad range of eumetazoan developmental regulatory genes in Sycon ciliatum (Calcispongiae). Here we show that many members of surprisingly numerous Wnt and Tgfβ gene families are expressed higher or uniquely in the adult apical end and the larval posterior end. Genes involved in formation of the eumetazoan endomesoderm, such as β-catenin, Brachyury and Gata, as well as germline markers Vasa and Pl10, are expressed during formation and maintenance of choanoderm, the feeding epithelium of sponges. Similarity in developmental gene expression between sponges and eumetazoans, especially cnidarians, is consistent with Haeckel's view that body plans of sponges and cnidarians are homologous. These results provide a framework for further studies aimed at deciphering ancestral developmental regulatory networks and their modifications during animal body plans evolution.

  15. Qualitative Methodology in Unfamiliar Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Christian Franklin

    2014-01-01

    on a qualitative methodology, conscious reflection on research design and objectivity is important when doing fieldwork. This case study discusses such reflections. Emphasis throughout is given to applied qualitative methodology and its contributions to the social sciences, in particular having to do...... with relational, emotional, and ethical issues associated with interviewing and personal observation. Although the empirical setting of this case is Southeast Asia, the various discussions and interrelatedness of methodology, theory, and empirical reflections will prove applicable to field studies throughout...

  16. Qualitative Research: Methods and Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Gabb, Jacqui

    2016-01-01

    This entry provides an overview of qualitative LGBTQ research. It begins by mapping out the qualities and character of studies that use this approach with particular attention to psycho-social research. It then highlights how reflexivity, the iterative process of self-identity making, has informed qualitative research, influencing both understandings of sexualities and also the underlying methodologies and research methods used. Finally, it considers how “the everyday” and a practices approac...

  17. Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Home > Programs & Activities > Administration on Disabilities > AIDD Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) Realizing the ... AIDD has a new address and phone number: Administration for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Administration for Community ...

  18. Fostering Friendships: Supporting Relationships among Youth with and without Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erik W.; Asmus, Jennifer; Moss, Colleen K.

    2013-01-01

    Friendships are important not only to youth development but also to the growth and expansion of social networks. Although there has long been acknowledgment of this importance for youth, such relationships can be especially elusive for transition-age students with autism, intellectual disability, and other developmental disabilities. This article…

  19. DEVELOPMENTAL RESEARCH ON ADOLESCENCE - EUROPEAN PERSPECTIVES FOR THE 1990S AND BEYOND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JACKSON, S; BOSMA, HA

    1992-01-01

    Present-day approaches to adolescent research are no longer characterized by the notion that adolescence is a period of 'storm and stress' but emphasize instead the processes of change and adjustment which take place in response to developmental transitions. This article considers these and other pe

  20. Dual Rubrics and the Process of Writing: Assessment and Best Practices in a Developmental English Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pireh, Diane Flanegan

    2014-01-01

    This article presents strategies for using two types of essay-writing rubrics in a developmental English class of students transitioning into college-level writing. One checklist rubric is student-facing, designed to serve as a guide for students throughout the writing process and as a self-assessment tool. The other checklist rubric is…

  1. Incorporating Religiosity into a Developmental Model of Positive Family Functioning across Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilman, Sarah K.; Neppl, Tricia K.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Schofield, Thomas J.; Conger, Rand D.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated a developmental model of intergenerational continuity in religiosity and its association with observed competency in romantic and parent-child relationships across 2 generations. Using multi-informant data from the Family Transitions Project, a 20-year longitudinal study of families that began during early adolescence (N =…

  2. Change in Knowledge and Attitudes among Students in an Undergraduate Developmental Psychology Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohr-Preston, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Non-parent college students enrolled in a lifespan developmental psychology course were assessed at two time points (beginning of the semester and shortly after midterm) on knowledge and attitudes that would likely to be useful for the transition to parenthood. Students reported perceived change in knowledge and attitudes, and repeated measures…

  3. Incorporating Religiosity into a Developmental Model of Positive Family Functioning across Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilman, Sarah K.; Neppl, Tricia K.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Schofield, Thomas J.; Conger, Rand D.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated a developmental model of intergenerational continuity in religiosity and its association with observed competency in romantic and parent-child relationships across 2 generations. Using multi-informant data from the Family Transitions Project, a 20-year longitudinal study of families that began during early adolescence (N =…

  4. First Year Experience Courses for Students in Developmental Education. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2016

    2016-01-01

    "First year experience courses for students in developmental education" are designed to ease the transition to college by providing academic and social development supports. Although course content and focus may vary, most are designed to introduce students to campus resources, provide training in time management and study skills, and…

  5. Qualitative Data Mining and Its Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bratko, Ivan; Šuc, Dorian

    2003-01-01

    In machine learning from numerical data, usually the target concept is a numerical function that facilitates quantitative prediction. In contrast to this, we consider qualitative data mining which aims at finding qualitative patterns, or qualitative relationships in numerical data. We present one approach to qualitative data mining, in which the target concepts are expressed as qualitative decision trees. We reviewsome case studies in qualitative data mining, and discuss typical application s...

  6. Qualitative methods for assessing risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahn, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hannaman, G.W. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Kryska, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) non-nuclear facilities generally require only a qualitative accident analysis to assess facility risks in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. Achieving a meaningful qualitative assessment of risk necessarily requires the use of suitable non-numerical assessment criteria. Typically, the methods and criteria for assigning facility-specific accident scenarios to the qualitative severity and likelihood classification system in the DOE order requires significant judgment in many applications. Systematic methods for more consistently assigning the total accident scenario frequency and associated consequences are required to substantiate and enhance future risk ranking between various activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). SNL`s Risk Management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Department has developed an improved methodology for performing qualitative risk assessments in accordance wi the DOE order requirements. Products of this effort are an improved set of qualitative description that permit (1) definition of the severity for both technical and programmatic consequences that may result from a variety of accident scenarios, and (2) qualitative representation of the likelihood of occurrence. These sets of descriptions are intended to facilitate proper application of DOE criteria for assessing facility risks.

  7. Qualitative methods for assessing risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahn, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hannaman, G.W. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Kryska, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) non-nuclear facilities generally require only a qualitative accident analysis to assess facility risks in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. Achieving a meaningful qualitative assessment of risk necessarily requires the use of suitable non-numerical assessment criteria. Typically, the methods and criteria for assigning facility-specific accident scenarios to the qualitative severity and likelihood classification system in the DOE order requires significant judgment in many applications. Systematic methods for more consistently assigning the total accident scenario frequency and associated consequences are required to substantiate and enhance future risk ranking between various activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). SNL`s Risk Management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Department has developed an improved methodology for performing qualitative risk assessments in accordance wi the DOE order requirements. Products of this effort are an improved set of qualitative description that permit (1) definition of the severity for both technical and programmatic consequences that may result from a variety of accident scenarios, and (2) qualitative representation of the likelihood of occurrence. These sets of descriptions are intended to facilitate proper application of DOE criteria for assessing facility risks.

  8. Developmental Education Repeaters: Stories about Repetition

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Jade J.

    2012-01-01

    Developmental education students make up almost half of the community college population in the United States (Bettinger & Long, 2005). Approximately 42% of first-time freshmen at community colleges must enroll in at least one developmental education course in English, reading and/or math (NCES, 2010). Many developmental education students are…

  9. Werner's Relevance for Contemporary Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    Considers the contributions of Heinz Werner to developmental psychology and identifies the tensions between Werner's theory and the practices of contemporary developmental psychology. Core issues of Werner's psychology concern: (1) development as heuristic, rather than phenomenon; (2) developmental process analysis; and (3) conceptions of the…

  10. 29 CFR 1902.33 - Developmental period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental period. 1902.33 Section 1902.33 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Section 18(e) of the Act Completion of Developmental Steps-Certification § 1902.33 Developmental period...

  11. The Accuracy of Three Developmental Screening Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glascoe, Frances Page; Byrne, Karen E.

    1993-01-01

    The accuracy of 3 developmental screening tests administered to 89 young children was compared. The Battelle Developmental Inventory Screening Test was more accurate than the Academic Scale of the Developmental Profile-II and the Denver-II, identifying correctly 72% of children with difficulties and 76% of children without diagnoses. (Author/JDD)

  12. Parental Adaptation to Out-of-Home Placement of a Child with Severe or Profound Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jeffrey B.; Roper, Susanne Olsen

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing grounded theory qualitative research methods, a model was developed for describing parental adaptation after voluntary placement of a child with severe or profound developmental disabilities in out-of-home care. Interviews of parents from 20 families were analyzed. Parents' cognitive appraisals of placement outcomes were classified…

  13. A Narrative Inquiry to Determine the Impact of Learning Communities on Attitude Change of Developmental College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyett, La Tonya R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this narrative inquiry research study was to explore how learning communities impact attitude changes of developmental college students. The qualitative research design enabled the researcher to determine attitudes, and changes in attitudes, via narratives shared by the participants about their personal experiences. The participants…

  14. Distress During the Menopause Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcianna Nosek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, nearly 400 million women worldwide were of menopause age (45-54. Although many women transition through menopause with ease, some experience distress and a subsequent decrease in quality of life. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the experiences of distress in women during the menopause transition. A narrative analysis methodology was used maintaining participants’ complete narratives when possible. In-person interviews of 15 midlife women were digitally audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Women shared narratives of distress related to menstrual changes, emotional instability, vaginal dryness, and decreased libido affected by their relationships with self, partners, work, and family. Some experiences were presented against a backdrop of the past and influenced by concerns for the future. Detailed stories illuminated the effect that distressful symptoms had on quality of life and captured how intricately woven symptoms were with the women’s interpersonal and social lives.

  15. Integrating developmental biology and the fossil record of reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skawiński, Tomasz; Tałanda, Mateusz

    2014-01-01

    Numerous new discoveries and new research techniques have influenced our understanding of reptile development from a palaeontological perspective. They suggest for example that transition from mineralized to leathery eggshells and from oviparity to viviparity appeared much more often in the evolution of reptiles than was previously thought. Most marine reptiles evolved from viviparous terrestrial ancestors and had probably genetic sex determination. Fossil forms often display developmental traits absent or rare among modern ones such as polydactyly, hyperphalangy, the presence of ribcage armour, reduction of head ornamentation during ontogeny, extreme modifications of vertebral count or a wide range of feather-like structures. Thus, they provide an empirical background for many morphogenetic considerations.

  16. A Qualitative Study of Urban Hispanic Youth in an After-School Program: Career, Cultural, and Educational Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Justin C.; Calhoun-Butts, Candice

    2012-01-01

    Based on a diverse sample of 11 urban Hispanic youth, the career, educational, and cultural domains of developmental adjustment were investigated through a triangulation of interview data and field notes within the context of delivering an after-school program. Consensual qualitative research (CQR) and content analysis were used to explore how…

  17. The Transition to Kindergarten for Children with and without Disabilities: An Investigation of Parent and Teacher Concerns and Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welchons, Leah Wildenger; McIntyre, Laura Lee

    2015-01-01

    The transition to kindergarten is regarded as a critical early childhood developmental milestone with important implications for later school outcomes. Despite its importance, few empirical studies examine kindergarten transition and fewer examine transition from the perspective of multiple stakeholders. The goal of the current study was to…

  18. [Qualitative research: a valid alternative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, J J; Pérez-Jover, V; Lorenzo, S; Aranaz, J; Vitaller, J

    2004-09-15

    To describe the main qualitative research techniques through systematic review of Spanish studies published during the previous 5 years. Systematic review. The Indice Médico Español (bibliographic database of items published in Spanish health sciences journals) was searched, and systematic searches of the journals Atención Primaria, Gaceta Sanitaria, and Revista de Calidad Asistencial were done. Study selection. We included studies carried out with any type of qualitative research technique. Also included were studies that reviewed qualitative research techniques. We excluded studies that used a qualitative technique but were based mainly on quantitative research techniques. The review was done during the period from April 1997 to April 2002. Most of the studies we reviewed used only one technique (80.5%). When more than one technique was used in combination (19.5% of the articles we reviewed), focus groups and interviews were usually used. The techniques identified were focus group (used in 34% of the articles reviewed), interview (24%), the Delphi technique (10%), content analysis (8%), nominal group (8%), metaplan (2%), and Philips 6/6 (2%). Qualitative research is a valid alternative, and if used with appropriate methodological rigor it can be of considerable use to health care professionals.

  19. Qualitative research as methodical hermeneutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, David L

    2012-09-01

    The proportion of publications of qualitative research in mainstream psychology journals is small. Thus, in terms of this important criterion, despite its recent rapid growth, qualitative research is marginalized in psychology. The author suggests that contributing to this situation is the lack of a coherent and unifying methodology of qualitative research methods that elucidates their credibility. He groups the many qualitative research methods into 3 main kinds, then applies to them 4 propositions offered as such a methodology: (1) Qualitative research is hermeneutical, entailing application of the method of the hermeneutic circle to text about experience and/or action. (2) Implicit in the use of the hermeneutic circle method is the activity of educing and articulating the meaning of text, an activity that modifies and interacts with C. S. Peirce's (1965, 1966) logical operations of abduction, theorematic deduction, and induction. (3) The cycling of these 4 moments enables demonstration, achieved rhetorically, of the validity of the understandings resulting from the exegesis of the text under study. (4) This demonstrative rhetoric is enhanced when researchers disclose reflexively those aspects of their perspectives they judge to have most relevant bearing on their understandings. The author compares abduction as formulated here with other recent uptakes of it. As an installment on the generality of the methodology, he explores its fit with the descriptive phenomenological psychological method, conversation analysis, and thematic analysis.

  20. Developmental insights into mature cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Frank C

    2015-02-01

    Three cases are described that illustrate new ways in which developmental research is informing the study of cognition in adults: statistical learning, neural substrates of cognition, and extended concepts. Developmental research has made clear the ubiquity of statistical learning while also revealing is limitations as a stand-alone way to acquire knowledge. With respect to neural substrates, development has uncovered links between executive processing and fronto-striatal circuits while also pointing to many aspects of high-level cognition that may not be neatly reducible to coherent neural descriptions. For extended concepts, children have made especially clear the weaknesses of intuitive theories in both children and adults while also illustrating other cognitive capacities that are used at all ages to navigate the socially distributed aspects of knowledge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Developmental assessment of Spanish grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toronto, A S

    1976-05-01

    The Developmental Assessment of Spanish Grammar (DASG) provides a language analysis procedure for Spanish-speaking children similar to the Developmental Sentence Scoring (DSS) procedure in English. The DASG is not an attempted translation of the DSS but was developed independently, taking into consideration the present knowledge of Spanish language acquisition. The purpose of the DASG is to evaluate the language of children with deficient grammatical skills in Spanish and to serve as a model for structuring Spanish language therapy. Proposed syntactic hierarchies for the following six grammatical categories are presented: indefinite pronouns and noun modifiers, personal pronouns, primary verbs, secondary verbs, conjunctions, and interrogative words. Weighted scores are assigned to groups of structures within the hierarchies and are used to score Spanish sentences children use spontaneously in conversation with an adult. The DASG was standardized on 128 Spanish-speaking children between the ages of 3.0 and 6.11 years. Norms and reliability measures are presented.

  2. Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Danielle; Banerjee, Abhishek; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome was long considered to be simply a disorder of postnatal development, with phenotypes that manifest only late in development and into adulthood. A variety of recent evidence demonstrates that the phenotypes of Rett Syndrome are present at the earliest stages of brain development, including developmental stages that define neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. These phenotypes arise from the pleotropic effects of MeCP2, which is expressed very early in neuronal progenitors and continues to be expressed into adulthood. The effects of MeCP2 are mediated by diverse signaling, transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms. Attempts to reverse the effects of Rett Syndrome need to take into account the developmental dynamics and temporal impact of MeCP2 loss.

  3. Analysis and Evaluation of the Learners’ESL in Terms of Developmental Acquisition Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔丹

    2013-01-01

      This essay aims at utilizing the acquisition criterion developed by researchers to analyze the data collected from the two learners of English in Australia. Drawn from the Processability theory and the theory of Second Language Acquisition, the findings in both quantitative and qualitative forms will be presented to draw a conclusion that the two students have reached at which developmental stage their L2 learning is.

  4. School-teachers awareness of developmental co-ordination delay (DCD) in children

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed Background: Developmental Co-ordination Delay (DCD) is estimated to affect 5-6% of school children (1). School-teachers play an integral role in noting delayed signs of motor development in children (2). Limited research has been carried out investigating the awareness that Irish school-teachers demonstrate of DCD. Objectives: To determine the awareness that Irish primary school-teachers have of DCD, in children. Methods: Qualitative methodology involving three focus grou...

  5. Children's Stress Behaviors and Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Family Child Care Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chih-Ying

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated and qualitatively compared differences in children's stress reactions across two levels of developmentally appropriate practice in family child care homes. Data were collected through observations. Six children, five boys and one girl from six different family child care homes, between the ages of 36 and 60 months, were observed for the type and frequency of stress behaviors. The six family child care homes were divided into two groups based on more or less use of a...

  6. "Nobody's just normal, you know": the social creation of developmental disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Valerie

    2007-10-01

    This paper examines the process through which early childhood developmental disability is socially created within a US public program called Early Intervention (EI). In doing so, the paper analyses and links the social creation of early childhood disability as a category at both the macro-level level and at the micro-level. The analysis is based on qualitative interview data from 31 parents and 19 professions involved in EI programs in Massachusetts. At the macro-level, the paper addresses how federal legislation and state regulations establish the boundary between normalcy and disability. At the micro-level, it analyses adults' social creation of developmental disability, measured as impairment. The paper also investigates the impairment categories that are produced by these processes, exposing the kinds of early childhood developmental delays that have been legislated as worthy of public intervention and discusses some implications of the disability determination process.

  7. Developmental facial paralysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Anesti, Katerina

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the confusing nomenclature and pathogenesis of Developmental Facial Paralysis, and how it can be differentiated from other causes of facial paralysis present at birth. Differentiating developmental from traumatic facial paralysis noted at birth is important for determining prognosis, but also for medicolegal reasons. Given the dramatic presentation of this condition, accurate and reliable guidelines are necessary in order to facilitate early diagnosis and initiate appropriate therapy, while providing support and counselling to the family. The 30 years experience of our center in the management of developmental facial paralysis is dependent upon a thorough understanding of facial nerve embryology, anatomy, nerve physiology, and an appreciation of well-recognized mishaps during fetal development. It is hoped that a better understanding of this condition will in the future lead to early targeted screening, accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment in this population of facially disfigured patients, which will facilitate their emotional and social rehabilitation, and their reintegration among their peers.

  8. Phenotypic screening for developmental neurotoxicity ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are large numbers of environmental chemicals with little or no available information on their toxicity, including developmental neurotoxicity. Because of the resource-intensive nature of traditional animal tests, high-throughput (HTP) methods that can rapidly evaluate chemicals for the potential to affect the developing brain are being explored. Typically, HTP screening uses biochemical and molecular assays to detect the interaction of a chemical with a known target or molecular initiating event (e.g., the mechanism of action). For developmental neurotoxicity, however, the mechanism(s) is often unknown. Thus, we have developed assays for detecting chemical effects on the key events of neurodevelopment at the cellular level (e.g., proliferation, differentiation, neurite growth, synaptogenesis, network formation). Cell-based assays provide a test system at a level of biological complexity that encompasses many potential neurotoxic mechanisms. For example, phenotypic assessment of neurite outgrowth at the cellular level can detect chemicals that target kinases, ion channels, or esterases at the molecular level. The results from cell-based assays can be placed in a conceptual framework using an Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) which links molecular, cellular, and organ level effects with apical measures of developmental neurotoxicity. Testing a wide range of concentrations allows for the distinction between selective effects on neurodevelopmental and non-specific

  9. The Epistemology of Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard S. Becker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses questions that are relevant to the epistemology of qualitative research. In order to do so, the presumed dichotomy between qualitative and quantitative research is discussed and challenged. According to the author, the similarities between these methods are more relevant than its differences. Both methods strive to describe the social reality and thus have the same epistemological basis, even though they emphasize different questions. To shed light in such dichotomy, the author explores the origins of epistemology as a discipline and its philosophical character. Finally, the particularities and advantages of qualitative research are discussed, especially ethnography and field research, through an analysis of some of its main aspects for observing social reality: its focus on the point of view of the actor; the observation of the everyday world and the full and thick description. 

  10. The Epistemology of Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard S. Becker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses questions that are relevant to the epistemology of qualitative research. In order to do so, the presumed dichotomy between qualitative and quantitative research is discussed and challenged. According to the author, the similarities between these methods are more relevant than its differences. Both methods strive to describe the social reality and thus have the same epistemological basis, even though they emphasize different questions. To shed light in such dichotomy, the author explores the origins of epistemology as a discipline and its philosophical character. Finally, the particularities and advantages of qualitative research are discussed, especially ethnography and field research, through an analysis of some of its main aspects for observing social reality: its focus on the point of view of the actor; the observation of the everyday world and the full and thick description. 

  11. Qualitative Inquiry in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    This book is a 'survival guide' for students and researchers who would like to conduct a qualitative study with limited resources. Brinkmann shows how everyday life materials such as books, television, the internet, the media and everyday conversations and interactions can help us to understand...... larger social issues. As living human beings in cultural worlds, we are constantly surrounded by 'data' that call for analysis, and as we cope with the different situations and episodes of our lives, we are engaged in understanding and interpreting the world as a form of qualitative inquiry. The book...... helps its reader develop a disciplined and analytic awareness informed by theory, and shows how less can be more in qualitative research. Each chapter introduces theoretical tools to think with, and demonstrates how they can be put to use in working concretely with everyday life materials....

  12. "Phenomenology" and qualitative research methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Y

    1994-01-01

    Phenomenology is generally based on phenomenological tradition from Husserl to Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. As philosophical stances provide the assumptions in research methods, different philosophical stances produce different methods. However, the term "phenomenology" is used in various ways without the definition being given, such as phenomenological approach, phenomenological method, phenomenological research, etc. The term "phenomenology" is sometimes used as a paradigm and it is sometimes even viewed as synonymous with qualitative methods. As a result, the term "phenomenology" leads to conceptual confusions in qualitative research methods. The purpose of this paper is to examine the term "phenomenology" and explore philosophical assumptions, and discuss the relationship between philosophical stance and phenomenology as a qualitative research method in nursing.

  13. Collective Analysis of Qualitative Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    What. Many students and practitioners do not know how to systematically process qualitative data once it is gathered—at least not as a collective effort. This chapter presents two workshop techniques, affinity diagramming and diagnostic mapping, that support collective analysis of large amounts...... of qualitative data. Affinity diagramming is used to make collective analysis and interpretations of qualitative data to identify core problems that need to be addressed in the design process. Diagnostic mapping supports collective interpretation and description of these problems and how to intervene in them. We...... explain the techniques through a case where they were used to analyze why a new elec- tronic medical record system introduced life-threatening situations for patients. Why. Collective analyses offer all participants a voice, visualize their contributions, combine different actors’ perspectives, and anchor...

  14. Commentary: Writing and evaluating qualitative research reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    An overview of qualitative methods is provided, particularly for reviewers and authors who may be less familiar with qualitative research. A question and answer format is used to address considerations for writing and evaluating qualitative research. When producing qualitative research, individuals ...

  15. Qualitative Research Articles: Guidelines, Suggestions and Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescentini, Alberto; Mainardi, Giuditta

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give ideas and suggestions to avoid some typical problems of qualitative articles. The aim is not to debate quality in qualitative research but to indicate some practical solutions. Design/methodology/approach: The paper discusses the design of qualitative research and the structure of a qualitative article…

  16. Qualitative Inquiry in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    This book is a 'survival guide' for students and researchers who would like to conduct a qualitative study with limited resources. Brinkmann shows how everyday life materials such as books, television, the internet, the media and everyday conversations and interactions can help us to understand...... helps its reader develop a disciplined and analytic awareness informed by theory, and shows how less can be more in qualitative research. Each chapter introduces theoretical tools to think with, and demonstrates how they can be put to use in working concretely with everyday life materials....

  17. Qualitative methods in theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Maslov, Dmitrii

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises a set of tools which allow researchers and students to arrive at a qualitatively correct answer without undertaking lengthy calculations. In general, Qualitative Methods in Theoretical Physics is about combining approximate mathematical methods with fundamental principles of physics: conservation laws and symmetries. Readers will learn how to simplify problems, how to estimate results, and how to apply symmetry arguments and conduct dimensional analysis. A comprehensive problem set is included. The book will appeal to a wide range of students and researchers.

  18. Quantitative vs qualitative research methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshman, M; Sinha, L; Biswas, M; Charles, M; Arora, N K

    2000-05-01

    Quantitative methods have been widely used because of the fact that things that can be measured or counted gain scientific credibility over the unmeasurable. But the extent of biological abnormality, severity, consequences and the impact of illness cannot be satisfactorily captured and answered by the quantitative research alone. In such situations qualitative methods take a holistic perspective preserving the complexities of human behavior by addressing the "why" and "how" questions. In this paper an attempt has been made to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of both the methods and also that a balanced mix of both qualitative as well as quantitative methods yield the most valid and reliable results.

  19. The Indo-Portuguese Creoles: Languages in Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Joseph Clancy

    1991-01-01

    Describes historical and current usage of Indo-Portuguese creoles in the Indian areas of Diu, Daman, and Korlai, examining such extralinguistic forces propelling language transition as social, cultural, developmental, and situational factors, and the nature of lexical and structural borrowing. (48 references) (CB)

  20. The Indo-Portuguese Creoles: Languages in Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Joseph Clancy

    1991-01-01

    Describes historical and current usage of Indo-Portuguese creoles in the Indian areas of Diu, Daman, and Korlai, examining such extralinguistic forces propelling language transition as social, cultural, developmental, and situational factors, and the nature of lexical and structural borrowing. (48 references) (CB)

  1. Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivorship Educational Programming: A Qualitative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer Dahlke, Deborah; Fair, Kayla; Hong, Yan Alicia; Kellstedt, Debra; Ory, Marcia G

    2017-02-10

    This program evaluation considers the need for increased professional and patient education for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivorship. Due to the high incidence of late effects of cancer treatment among AYA cancer survivors, knowledge sharing and communications are needed throughout the transition from cancer care into community care. AYA survivors are likely to need developmentally appropriate psychosocial care as well as extensive follow-on surveillance by physicians who are educated and aware of the likely chronic conditions and late effects that may occur in these patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of the After Cancer Care Ends, Survivorship Starts for Adolescent and Young Adults (ACCESS AYA) programming. The intent of the ACCESS AYA program was to build health literacy around AYA survivorship issues and to stimulate improved communications between survivors and health care providers. This paper addresses the central research question of "How did the ACCESS AYA program increase health literacy, communications, and understanding among AYA survivors and providers?" The primarily qualitative evaluation included a brief introductory survey of participant awareness and effectiveness of the ACCESS AYA project serving as a recruitment tool. Survey respondents were invited to participate in in-depth interviews based on interview guides tailored to the different stakeholder groups. The evaluation used the Atlas Ti qualitative database and software for coding and key word analyses. Interrater reliability analyses were assessed using Cohen kappa analysis with Stata 12.1 (StataCorp LLC) software. The key themes, which included survivor wellbeing, health care professional education, cancer advocates role and education, hospital and community-based resources, and the role of societal support, are presented in a concept map. The interrater reliability scores (ranging from 1 to minus 1) were .893 for first cycle coding and .784

  2. Final Technical Report: Variational Transition State Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truhlar, Donald G. [University of Minnesota; Truhlar, Donald G. [University of Minnesota

    2016-09-15

    Complex molecules often have many structures (conformations) of the reactants and the transition states, and these structures may be connected by coupled-mode torsions and pseudorotations; some but not all structures may have hydrogen bonds in the transition state or reagents. A quantitative theory of the reaction rates of complex molecules must take account of these structures, their coupledmode nature, their qualitatively different character, and the possibility of merging reaction paths at high temperature. We have recently developed a coupled-mode theory called multi-structural variational transition state theory (MS-VTST) and an extension, called multi-path variational transition state theory (MP-VTST), that includes a treatment of the differences in the multidimensional tunneling paths and their contributions to the reaction rate. The MP-VTST method was presented for unimolecular reactions in the original paper and has now been extended to bimolecular reactions. The MS-VTST and MPVTST formulations of variational transition state theory include multi-faceted configuration-space dividing surfaces to define the variational transition state. They occupy an intermediate position between single-conformation variational transition state theory (VTST), which has been used successfully for small molecules, and ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory (EAVTST), which has been used successfully for enzyme kinetics. The theories are illustrated and compared here by application to three thermal rate constants for reactions of ethanol with hydroxyl radical—reactions with 4, 6, and 14 saddle points.

  3. Evolution of the vertebrate jaw from developmental perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuratani, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Attainment of the biting jaw is regarded as one of the major novelties in the early history of vertebrates. Based on a comparison between lamprey and gnathostome embryos, evolutionary developmental studies have tried to explain this novelty as changes in the developmental patterning of the mandibular arch, the rostralmost pharyngeal arch, at the molecular and cellular levels. On the other hand, classical theories in the field of comparative morphology assumed the involvement of hypothetical premandibular arch(es) that ancestral animals would have possessed rostral to the mandibular arch, in the transition from agnathan to gnathostome states. These theories are highly biased toward the segmental scheme of the vertebrate head, and the concept of premandibular "arches" is no longer accepted by the current understanding. Instead, the premandibular domain has now become of interest in the understanding of cranial development, especially in its rostral part. As newer theories that consider involvement of the premandibular domain, the neoclassical and heterotopy theories are here compared from evolutionary developmental perspectives, in conjunction with the development of nasal and hypophyseal placodes, in the context of the evolutionary acquisition of the jaw. Given recent advances in understanding of the lamprey development, evolution of the Dlx code is also discussed together with the evolutionary scenario of jaw acquisition. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. PTK7 marks the first human developmental EMT in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N Chan

    Full Text Available Epithelial to mesenchymal transitions (EMTs are thought to be essential to generate diversity of tissues during early fetal development, but these events are essentially impossible to study at the molecular level in vivo in humans. The first EMT event that has been described morphologically in human development occurs just prior to generation of the primitive streak. Because human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs are thought to most closely resemble cells found in epiblast-stage embryos prior to formation of the primitive streak, we sought to determine whether this first human EMT could be modeled in vitro with pluripotent stem cells. The data presented here suggest that generating embryoid bodies from hESCs or hiPSCs drives a procession of EMT events that can be observed within 24-48 hours after EB generation. These structures possess the typical hallmarks of developmental EMTs, and portions also display evidence of primitive streak and mesendoderm. We identify PTK7 as a novel marker of this EMT population, which can also be used to purify these cells for subsequent analyses and identification of novel markers of human development. Gene expression analysis indicated an upregulation of EMT markers and ECM proteins in the PTK7+ population. We also find that cells that undergo this developmental EMT retain developmental plasticity as sorting, dissociation and re-plating reestablishes an epithelial phenotype.

  5. Noisy Transition to Turbulence in Microchannels

    CERN Document Server

    Lissandrello, C; Yakhot, V

    2015-01-01

    Here, we study noisy transition to turbulence in a microchannel. We use a microcantilever sensor embedded in the microchannel wall and perform two sets of experiments in the same microchannel: first, we study transition triggered by the natural imperfections of the walls; subsequently, we study transition under artificially added inlet noise. The two experiments result in random flows in which high-order moments of near-wall fluctuations differ by orders of magnitude. Surprisingly however, the lowest order statistics in both cases appear qualitatively similar and can be described by a proposed noisy Landau equation for a slow mode. The noise, regardless of its origin, regularizes the Landau singularity of the relaxation time and makes transitions driven by different noise sources appear similar.

  6. The chemical plant management qualitative support system

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to capture the benefits of common sense qualitative reasoning about process phenomena as displayed in the human behavior mental model. The control features of qualitative modeling and simulation were qualitative variable description and logic rules for manipulating variable values between systematic states. The additional measure of qualitative information value was introduced. This study is the first report in the literature showing the measure of qualitative inform...

  7. Association of Transition Readiness to Intentional Self-Regulation and Hopeful Future Expectations in Youth With Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Laura C; Pollock, McLean; Hill, Sherika; Maslow, Gary

    Little is known about how transition readiness relates to other developmental skills of adolescence in youth with chronic illness. Better understanding of how transition readiness relates to these other developmental skills could lead to a broader array of tools to improve transition readiness. Intentional self-regulation (ISR) and hopeful future expectations (HFE) are 2 developmental skills of adolescence that improve with participation in developmental programming and thus are modifiable. We explored associations between transition readiness, as measured by the Transition Readiness Assessment Questionnaire 29 (TRAQ-29) and ISR and HFE in youth with chronic illness recruited from a variety of subspecialty clinics from a major southeast medical center. A total of 71 adolescents with chronic illness were included in the analysis. The TRAQ-29 Self-Advocacy domain showed positive associations to both ISR (P = .03) and HFE (P = .009). In addition, the TRAQ-29 overall had positive associations to HFE (P = .04). The significant associations between TRAQ-29 Self-Advocacy domain scores and ISR and HFE suggest that transition readiness is developing within the context of other developmental areas in adolescence. More work is needed to see if the programming that improves these other developmental skills might also improve transition readiness. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transition to Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Quick summary of transition IDEA’s definition of transition services Considering the definition Students at the heart of planning their transition ... fix that! Keep reading… Back to top IDEA’s Definition of Transition Services Any discussion of transition services must begin with ...

  9. The Transition to Kindergarten: Predicting Socio-Behavioral Outcomes for Children with and without Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welchons, Leah Wildenger; McIntyre, Laura Lee

    2017-01-01

    The transition to kindergarten is regarded as a critical early childhood developmental milestone with important implications for later school outcomes. Little prior research has focused on predictors of socio-behavioral kindergarten outcomes using longitudinal research designs. Further, few studies have examined kindergarten transition using…

  10. Reconsidering Constructivism in Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheu-Jey George

    2012-01-01

    This article examines constructivism, a paradigm in qualitative research that has been propagated by Egon Guba, Yvonna Lincoln, and Norman Denzin. A distinction is made between whether the basic presuppositions of constructivism are credible compared to those of a competing paradigm and whether constructivism's beliefs are internally consistent.…

  11. Qualitative Research in Rehabilitation Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley-Maxwell, Cheryl; Al Hano, Ibrahim; Skivington, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Qualitative research approaches offer rehabilitation scholars and practitioners avenues into understanding the lives and experiences of people with disabilities and those people and systems with whom they interact. The methods used often parallel those used in counseling and appear to be well matched with the field of rehabilitation counseling.…

  12. Determining Validity in Qualitative Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Miller, Dana L.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that the choice of validity procedures in qualitative inquiry is governed by two perspectives: the lens researchers choose to validate their studies and the researchers' paradigm assumptions. The article advances a two-dimensional framework to help researchers identify appropriate validity procedures for their studies. Nine validity…

  13. Qualitative Evaluation Audits in Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jennifer C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Field experiences with external (qualitative) evaluation audits based on the work of E. G. Guba and Y. S. Lincoln (1981, 1985) are detailed, including evaluation contexts and purposes, procedures, and findings. Such audits represent a viable meta-evaluative tool for assessing the quality of naturalistic evaluation results. (SLD)

  14. Discourse Tracing as Qualitative Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGreco, Marianne; Tracy, Sarah J.

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces a qualitative research method called "discourse tracing". Discourse tracing draws from contributions made by ethnographers, discourse critics, case study scholars, and process tracers. The approach offers new insights and an attendant language about how we engage in research designed specifically for the…

  15. Qualitative Methodology in Unfamiliar Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Christian Franklin

    2014-01-01

    This case study discusses qualitative fieldwork in Malaysia. The trends in higher education led to investigating how and why young Indians and Chinese in Malaysia are using the university to pursue a life strategy. Given the importance of field context in designing and analysing research based...

  16. THE FUNCTION OF QUALITATIVE RESEARCH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HEYINK, JW; TYMSTRA, T

    1993-01-01

    Due to the prevailing positivistic view on science, qualitative research has only a modest place within the social sciences. There is, however, a growing awareness that a purely quantitative approach is not always satisfactory. This is for instance the case in the field of research into the quality

  17. Determining Validity in Qualitative Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Miller, Dana L.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that the choice of validity procedures in qualitative inquiry is governed by two perspectives: the lens researchers choose to validate their studies and the researchers' paradigm assumptions. The article advances a two-dimensional framework to help researchers identify appropriate validity procedures for their studies. Nine validity…

  18. Qualitative Assessment of Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stake, Robert; Munson, April

    2008-01-01

    Exploring the complicated issues of assessment in the arts, the authors discuss assessment of arts education and arts programs from a qualitative perspective: experiential, naturalistic, and ethnographic interpretation. With special attention to the practices of teaching, learning, and administration of education in the arts, quality is sought…

  19. Contradictions in qualitative management research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Richard; Dorland, Jens

    2016-01-01

    and remove them from the analytical work. The purpose of this paper is to re-visit and re-introduce a dissensus-based management research strategy in order to analytically be able to work with what appear to be contradictions and misinformation in qualitative research accounts, and give them a more profound...

  20. Reconsidering Constructivism in Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheu-Jey George

    2012-01-01

    This article examines constructivism, a paradigm in qualitative research that has been propagated by Egon Guba, Yvonna Lincoln, and Norman Denzin. A distinction is made between whether the basic presuppositions of constructivism are credible compared to those of a competing paradigm and whether constructivism's beliefs are internally consistent.…

  1. THE FUNCTION OF QUALITATIVE RESEARCH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HEYINK, JW; TYMSTRA, T

    Due to the prevailing positivistic view on science, qualitative research has only a modest place within the social sciences. There is, however, a growing awareness that a purely quantitative approach is not always satisfactory. This is for instance the case in the field of research into the quality

  2. Developmentalism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and women, or against people of different races.6 ..... history of Tanzania, these were strikes that were not concerned with pay or remuneration. ... equivalent to only 43 percent of imports and the trade gap was over Tshs 6 billion. Similarly ...

  3. Exceptional Points and Dynamical Phase Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Rotter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of non-Hermitian quantum physics, the relation between exceptional points,dynamical phase transitions and the counter intuitive behavior of quantum systems at high level density is considered. The theoretical results obtained for open quantum systems and proven experimentally some years ago on a microwave cavity, may explain environmentally induce deffects (including dynamical phase transitions, which have been observed in various experimental studies. They also agree(qualitatively with the experimental results reported recently in PT symmetric optical lattices.

  4. Philosophical foundations of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, C O

    1993-08-01

    Although new and still emerging for us, qualitative research approaches have been receiving considerable attention for some time in other disciplines. Along with philosophical debates, there are debates about whether there needs to be a debate. On a philosophical level, there is irreconcilable conflict between the quantitative and qualitative paradigms. It is important to recognize this conflict, avoiding illogical compromise. Yet, proponents of each paradigm need to applaud both the existence of the other and the hybrid paradigms that inevitably are born of conflict. An apt beginning would be broader definitions of what constitutes science and research in nursing, eliminating the sense-organ bias that is so contrary to our philosophy for practice. This alone would provide qualitative nurse researchers with the sanction they need to progress in their exploration of various approaches to creating a science and a body of knowledge in, for, and about nursing practice. In the chapters to follow, readers will be introduced to several qualitative research approaches. Each approach represents an interpretation of the qualitative paradigm in nursing research, grounded in the general perspective of phenomenological philosophy. This perspective focuses on phenomena as they appear and recognizes that reality is subjective and a matter of appearances for us in our social world. Subjectivity means that the world becomes real through our contact with it and acquires meaning through our interpretations of that contact. Truth, then, is a composite of realities, and access to truth is a problem of access to human subjectivity. This perspective guides the qualitative researcher in nursing to the subject matter of lived experiences, which are the original contacts with a world, and of the processes and content of interpretation--the meaning attributions that constitute realities and perspectives for a future of possibilities in the world. Other consequences of a phenomenological

  5. Exploring vulnerability to suicide in the developmental history of young men: a psychological autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Mette L; Haavind, Hanne; Dieserud, Gudrun; Dyregrov, Kari

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the developmental history of ten young men who completed suicide in the transition to adulthood. The young men, aged 18-30, had no previous history of suicide attempts or treatment in mental health. In-depth interviews with four to eight informants for each suicide were analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Three developmental issues from early age onwards emerged: (a) unsuccessful in becoming independent; (b) weakened competence to deal with shame; and (c) trapped in anger. The capacity to regulate emotions like shame and anger could make certain men vulnerable to suicide when facing adult challenges and defeats.

  6. Developmental modes and developmental mechanisms can channel brain evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine J Charvet

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Anseriform birds (ducks and geese as well as parrots and songbirds have evolved a disproportionately enlarged telencephalon compared with many other birds. However, parrots and songbirds differ from anseriform birds in their mode of development. Whereas ducks and geese are precocial (e.g., hatchlings feed on their own, parrots and songbirds are altricial (e.g., hatchlings are fed by their parents. We here consider how developmental modes may limit and facilitate specific changes in the mechanisms of brain development. We suggest that altriciality facilitates the evolution of telencephalic expansion by delaying telencephalic neurogenesis. We further hypothesize that delays in telencephalic neurogenesis generate delays in telencephalic maturation, which in turn foster neural adaptations that facilitate learning. Specifically, we propose that delaying telencephalic neurogenesis was a prerequisite for the evolution of neural circuits that allow parrots and songbirds to produce learned vocalizations. Overall, we argue that developmental modes have influenced how some lineages of birds increased the size of their telencephalon and that this, in turn, has influenced subsequent changes in brain circuits and behavior.

  7. Developmental Modes and Developmental Mechanisms can Channel Brain Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvet, Christine J; Striedter, Georg F

    2011-01-01

    Anseriform birds (ducks and geese) as well as parrots and songbirds have evolved a disproportionately enlarged telencephalon compared with many other birds. However, parrots and songbirds differ from anseriform birds in their mode of development. Whereas ducks and geese are precocial (e.g., hatchlings feed on their own), parrots and songbirds are altricial (e.g., hatchlings are fed by their parents). We here consider how developmental modes may limit and facilitate specific changes in the mechanisms of brain development. We suggest that altriciality facilitates the evolution of telencephalic expansion by delaying telencephalic neurogenesis. We further hypothesize that delays in telencephalic neurogenesis generate delays in telencephalic maturation, which in turn foster neural adaptations that facilitate learning. Specifically, we propose that delaying telencephalic neurogenesis was a prerequisite for the evolution of neural circuits that allow parrots and songbirds to produce learned vocalizations. Overall, we argue that developmental modes have influenced how some lineages of birds increased the size of their telencephalon and that this, in turn, has influenced subsequent changes in brain circuits and behavior.

  8. Long-Term Association Between Developmental Assets and Health Behaviors: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleck, Jennifer; DeBate, Rita

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Based on internal and external assets, the positive youth development approach aims to increase the capacity among adolescents to overcome challenges as they transition to adulthood. Developmental assets have been found to be positively associated with academic achievement, a variety of health promoting behaviors, and improved physical and mental health. The purpose of this exploratory study was to assess the long-term association between positive youth developmental assets with health risk and promoting behaviors. Method A continuous scale of developmental assets was created using 30 items from Wave I of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, when participants were in 7th to 12th grades. Health behavior outcomes including cigarette use, substance use, fast food consumption, and physical activity were measured at both Wave III (age 18-26) and Wave IV (age 24-32). Path analysis was employed to assess the relationship between these observed measures. Results The well-fitted path model revealed associations between developmental assets with each health behavior at Wave III. Developmental assets indirectly influenced each health behavior and direct associations were observed between assets with substance use and physical activity at Wave IV. Conclusion Findings provide additional support for the developmental assets approach to adolescent health. Implications include Healthy People 2020 objectives related to tobacco and alcohol use and nutrition and physical activity.

  9. The Influence of Developmentally Appropriate Practice on Children's Cognitive Development: A Qualitative Metasynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher P.; Lan, Yi-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Background: As policymakers and advocates across the United States look to early childhood educators to improve children's cognitive development so they enter elementary school ready to learn, debates have emerged over what types of practices these educators should be engaged in to achieve this goal. Historically, the field of early childhood…

  10. The Influence of Developmentally Appropriate Practice on Children's Cognitive Development: A Qualitative Metasynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher P.; Lan, Yi-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Background: As policymakers and advocates across the United States look to early childhood educators to improve children's cognitive development so they enter elementary school ready to learn, debates have emerged over what types of practices these educators should be engaged in to achieve this goal. Historically, the field of early childhood…

  11. Developmental robotics: manifesto and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Terry; Shadbolt, Nigel R

    2003-10-15

    We argue that all embodied organisms, whether robots or animals, face the same challenge: of adapting to bodies, brains and environments that undergo constant and inevitable change. After highlighting the evidence for the universal role of a class of molecular factors called neurotrophic factors in the response of animals to this challenge, we suggest that implementing models of neurotrophic interactions on robots may confer on them the adaptability and robustness exhibited by animals. We briefly review a mathematical model of neurotrophic interactions and then discuss its application in a robotic context. Finally, we examine the potential, or otherwise, of our approach to developmental robotics.

  12. Anesthetic-Induced Developmental Neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-RenLiu; Qian Liu; Jing Li; Sulpicio G. Soriano

    2011-01-01

    1 IntroductionMillions of newborn and infants receive anesthetic,sedative and analgesic drugs for surgery and painful procedures on a daily basis.Recent laboratory reports clearly demonstrate that anesthetic and sedative drugs induced both neuroapoptosis and neurocognitive deficits in laboratory models.This issue is of paramount interest to pediatric anesthesiologists and intensivists because it questions the safety of anesthetics used for fetal and neonatal anesthesia[1-2].In an attempt to summarize the rapidly expanding laboratorybased literature on anesthetic-induced developmental neurotoxicity (AIDN),this review will examine published reports on the characterization,mechanisms and alleviation of this phenomenon.

  13. An Introduction to Evolutionary Developmental Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Machluf

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary developmental psychology represents a synthesis of modern evolutionary theory and developmental psychology. Here we introduce the special issue on evolutionary developmental psychology by briefly discussing the history of this field and then summarizing the variety of topics that are covered. In this special issue, leading researchers provide a collection of theoretical and empirical articles that highlight recent findings and propose promising areas for future research.

  14. Early Intervention in Children with Developmental Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Beena Johnson

    2016-01-01

    Developmental disabilities consist of conditions that delay or impair the physical, cognitive, and/or psychological development of children. If not intervened at the earliest, these disabilities will cause significant negative impact on multiple domains of functioning such as learning, language, self-care and capacity for independent living. Common developmental disabilities include autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, developmental delay and cerebral palsy. About one fourth...

  15. An introduction to evolutionary developmental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machluf, Karin; Liddle, James R; Bjorklund, David F

    2014-04-29

    Evolutionary developmental psychology represents a synthesis of modern evolutionary theory and developmental psychology. Here we introduce the special issue on evolutionary developmental psychology by briefly discussing the history of this field and then summarizing the variety of topics that are covered. In this special issue, leading researchers provide a collection of theoretical and empirical articles that highlight recent findings and propose promising areas for future research.

  16. Applying cognitive developmental psychology to middle school physics learning: The rule assessment method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinen, Nicole R.; Chi, Min; Chin, Doris B.; Prempeh, Joe; Blair, Kristen P.; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive developmental psychology often describes children's growing qualitative understanding of the physical world. Physics educators may be able to use the relevant methods to advantage for characterizing changes in students' qualitative reasoning. Siegler developed the "rule assessment" method for characterizing levels of qualitative understanding for two factor situations (e.g., volume and mass for density). The method assigns children to rule levels that correspond to the degree they notice and coordinate the two factors. Here, we provide a brief tutorial plus a demonstration of how we have used this method to evaluate instructional outcomes with middle-school students who learned about torque, projectile motion, and collisions using different instructional methods with simulations.

  17. Sexual dysfunction within an adult developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, P J; Meyer, J K; Schmidt, C W

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the adult who has adequately mastered the oedipal stage of psychosexual development and who presents with a sexual dysfunction. Drawing on the developmental sequence of Erik Erikson, the authors suggest that failure to address adequately an adult psychosocial crisis may result in sexual dysfunction. There may be both adult developmental deficits and regression to adolescent and adult stages previously negotiated. Both may be symptomatically represented by sexual dysfunction. The authors urge that the sexual and marital problems be evaluated within an adult developmental framework and that the therapy address the psychosocial issues which are appropriate to the developmental stage of the patient.

  18. Context Matters: Support for Leader Developmental Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sara E; Reichard, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Leader developers need to consider support for leader developmental readiness by examining organizational culture, job design and rewards, social support, and availability and structure of leader development programming.

  19. Piaget's Structural Developmental Psychology. v. Ideology-Critique and the Possibility of a Critical Developmental Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, John M.

    1981-01-01

    This final essay in a five-part series examining Piaget's structural developmental psychology suggests that a psychological theory which integrates aspects of developmental structuralism within a critical social framework can be developed. (Author/RH)

  20. Qualitative Psychology Nexus, Vol. II: The Role of the Researcher in Qualitative Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Volume two of Qualitative Research Nexus focuses on the roles of qualitative researchers and their relationships within psychological studies. This book is a result of the presentations, discussions, and collaborations of participants at the second workshop "Qualitative Psychology" in October 2001 in Blaubeuren, Germany that was organized by the Center for Qualitative Psychology. The theme of the meeting was "the role of the researcher in qualitative psychology." Reading this volume of Qualit...

  1. From the world of children to the world of adults - a qualitative interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raunsbæk Knudsen, Line; Bjerrum, Merete

    using inductive content analysis. Results: Seven main categories described experiences with transition: The first encounter with the adult ward, The experience of an inadequate preparation for the transition, Differences between the child and adult world, The impression of and collaboration with doctors......Background: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic disease affecting 1200 children in Denmark. Research shows that the transition from the paediatric to the adult setting appears to be challenging for adolescents with JIA. However, few studies have explored the patient perspective...... on transition for adolescents with JIA. Objectives: To explore the transition from the paediatric to the adult setting from the perspective of adolescents with JIA, and to discover important factors in successful transition. Methods: Qualitative interviews with three adolescents with JIA. Data was analysed...

  2. The Transition to Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Fiona; Brain, Katherine E.; Edwards, Michelle; Jones, Rhiannon; Wallbank, Rachel; Robertson, Neil P.; Edwards, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Identifying the transition from relapsing-remitting to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) can be challenging for clinicians. Little previous research has explored how professionals experience working with patients during this specific stage of the disease. We explored the experiences of a group of multidisciplinary professionals who support patients in the transition to SPMS to describe this stage from a professional perspective. Methods: This qualitative semistructured interview study included 11 professionals (medical, nursing, and allied health professionals; specialists and generalists) working with patients with MS in South Wales, United Kingdom. Thematic analysis of the interview data was performed. Results: Two overarching themes were identified: the transition and providing support. The transition theme comprised issues related to recognizing and communicating about SPMS. Uncertainty influenced recognizing the transition and knowing how to discuss it with patients. The providing support theme included descriptions of challenging aspects of patient care, providing support for caregivers, using the multidisciplinary team, and working within service constraints. Providing adequate psychological support and engaging patients with self-management approaches were seen as particularly challenging. Conclusions: Caring for patients in the transition to SPMS generates specific challenges for professionals. Further research on health-care interactions and patients'/professionals' experiences regarding the transition phase may help identify strategies for professional development and learning and how to optimize the patient experience at this difficult stage of disease. PMID:27803641

  3. Microgravity Two-Phase Flow Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, M.; Chao, D.

    1999-01-01

    Two-phase flows under microgravity condition find a large number of important applications in fluid handling and storage, and spacecraft thermal management. Specifically, under microgravity condition heat transfer between heat exchanger surfaces and fluids depend critically on the distribution and interaction between different fluid phases which are often qualitatively different from the gravity-based systems. Heat transfer and flow analysis in two-phase flows under these conditions require a clear understanding of the flow pattern transition and development of appropriate dimensionless scales for its modeling and prediction. The physics of this flow is however very complex and remains poorly understood. This has led to various inadequacies in flow and heat transfer modeling and has made prediction of flow transition difficult in engineering design of efficient thermal and flow systems. In the present study the available published data for flow transition under microgravity condition are considered for mapping. The transition from slug to annular flow and from bubbly to slug flow are mapped using dimensionless variable combination developed in a previous study by the authors. The result indicate that the new maps describe the flow transitions reasonably well over the range of the data available. The transition maps are examined and the results are discussed in relation to the presumed balance of forces and flow dynamics. It is suggested that further evaluation of the proposed flow and transition mapping will require a wider range of microgravity data expected to be made available in future studies.

  4. Developmental constraints on behavioural flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holekamp, Kay E; Swanson, Eli M; Van Meter, Page E

    2013-05-19

    We suggest that variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility not accounted for by current socioecological models may be explained in part by developmental constraints. From our own work, we provide examples of constraints affecting variation in behavioural flexibility, not only among individuals, but also among species and higher taxonomic units. We first implicate organizational maternal effects of androgens in shaping individual differences in aggressive behaviour emitted by female spotted hyaenas throughout the lifespan. We then compare carnivores and primates with respect to their locomotor and craniofacial adaptations. We inquire whether antagonistic selection pressures on the skull might impose differential functional constraints on evolvability of skulls and brains in these two orders, thus ultimately affecting behavioural flexibility in each group. We suggest that, even when carnivores and primates would theoretically benefit from the same adaptations with respect to behavioural flexibility, carnivores may nevertheless exhibit less behavioural flexibility than primates because of constraints imposed by past adaptations in the morphology of the limbs and skull. Phylogenetic analysis consistent with this idea suggests greater evolutionary lability in relative brain size within families of primates than carnivores. Thus, consideration of developmental constraints may help elucidate variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility.

  5. Developmental constraint of insect audition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strauß Johannes

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insect ears contain very different numbers of sensory cells, from only one sensory cell in some moths to thousands of sensory cells, e.g. in cicadas. These differences still await functional explanation and especially the large numbers in cicadas remain puzzling. Insects of the different orders have distinct developmental sequences for the generation of auditory organs. These sensory cells might have different functions depending on the developmental stages. Here we propose that constraints arising during development are also important for the design of insect ears and might influence cell numbers of the adults. Presentation of the hypothesis We propose that the functional requirements of the subadult stages determine the adult complement of sensory units in the auditory system of cicadas. The hypothetical larval sensory organ should function as a vibration receiver, representing a functional caenogenesis. Testing the hypothesis Experiments at different levels have to be designed to test the hypothesis. Firstly, the neuroanatomy of the larval sense organ should be analyzed to detail. Secondly, the function should be unraveled neurophysiologically and behaviorally. Thirdly, the persistence of the sensory cells and the rebuilding of the sensory organ to the adult should be investigated. Implications of the hypothesis Usually, the evolution of insect ears is viewed with respect to physiological and neuronal mechanisms of sound perception. This view should be extended to the development of sense organs. Functional requirements during postembryonic development may act as constraints for the evolution of adult organs, as exemplified with the auditory system of cicadas.

  6. PyTransit: Transit light curve modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Hannu

    2015-05-01

    PyTransit implements optimized versions of the Giménez and Mandel & Agol transit models for exoplanet transit light-curves. The two models are implemented natively in Fortran with OpenMP parallelization, and are accessed by an object-oriented python interface. PyTransit facilitates the analysis of photometric time series of exoplanet transits consisting of hundreds of thousands of data points, and of multipassband transit light curves from spectrophotometric observations. It offers efficient model evaluation for multicolour observations and transmission spectroscopy, built-in supersampling to account for extended exposure times, and routines to calculate the projected planet-to-star distance for circular and eccentric orbits, transit durations, and more.

  7. Developmental DSP4 effects on cortical Arc expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jeff

    2016-04-08

    Activity Regulated Cytoskeleton Associated Protein (Arc) is an immediate early gene that is critical to brain plasticity. In this study, norepinephrine's regulation of Arc expression was examined during different stages of postnatal development. Rats were injected with N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP-4), a selective noradrenergic neurotoxin, during preadolescence (PND 0 or 13), adolescence (PND 23 or 48) or adulthood (PND 60). After each DSP4 treatment, brains were harvested later in development and Arc mRNA levels analyzed with in situ hybridization. Rats lesioned with DSP4 during preadolescence showed no differences in Arc level compared to saline treated controls. In contrast, adolescence was a time of changing Arc mRNA response to DSP4. Rats lesioned during early adolescence showed Arc expression increases, while rats lesioned during late adolescence showed dramatic Arc expression decreases. Decreases in Arc level caused by late adolescent DSP4 were similar to those found in lesioned adults. These findings highlight a qualitatively different regulation of Arc expression by norepinephrine according to developmental stage, and indicate that mature regulation is not intact until late adolescence. These data point to important developmental differences in norepinephrine's regulation of brain plasticity. These differences may underlie contrasting psychotropic responses in children and adolescents compared to adults.

  8. Spelling Errors Made By Persian Children With Developmental Dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadpanah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background According to recent estimates, approximately 4% - 12% of Iranians experience difficulty in learning to read and spell, possibly as a result of developmental dyslexia. Objectives The study was intended to investigate spelling error patterns among Persian children with developmental dyslexia and compare those patterns with the errors exhibited by control groups. Patients and Methods Some 90 students participated in this study. There were 30 fifth grade students who had been diagnosed as dyslexic by professionals, 30 normal fifth grade readers, and 30 younger normal readers. There were 15 boys and 15 girls in each of the groups. Qualitative and quantitative methods for the analysis of errors were used. Results This study found similar spelling error profiles among the dyslexic students and the reading-level-matched group, and these profiles were different from those of the age-matched group. However, the performances of the dyslexic group and the reading-level-matched group were different and inconsistent in some cases. Conclusions However, performances of dyslexic group and reading level matched group were different and inconsistent in some cases.

  9. Probing short-term face memory in developmental prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Punit; Gaule, Anne; Gaigg, Sebastian B; Bird, Geoffrey; Cook, Richard

    2015-03-01

    It has recently been proposed that the face recognition deficits seen in neurodevelopmental disorders may reflect impaired short-term face memory (STFM). For example, introducing a brief delay between the presentation of target and test faces seems to disproportionately impair matching or recognition performance in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The present study sought to determine whether deficits of STFM contribute to impaired face recognition seen in Developmental Prosopagnosia. To determine whether developmental prosopagnosics exhibit impaired STFM, the present study used a six-alternative-forced-choice match-to-sample procedure. Memory demand was manipulated by employing a short or long delay between the presentation of the target face, and the six test faces. Crucially, the perceptual demands were identical in both conditions, thereby allowing the independent contribution of STFM to be assessed. Prosopagnosics showed clear evidence of a category-specific impairment for face-matching in both conditions; they were both slower and less accurate than matched controls. Crucially, however, the prosopagnosics showed no evidence of disproportionate face recognition impairment in the long-interval condition. While individuals with DP may have problems with the perceptual encoding of faces, it appears that their representations are stable over short durations. These results suggest that the face recognition difficulties seen in DP and autism may be qualitatively different, attributable to deficits of perceptual encoding and perceptual maintenance, respectively.

  10. A strategy to apply quantitative epistasis analysis on developmental traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labocha, Marta K; Yuan, Wang; Aleman-Meza, Boanerges; Zhong, Weiwei

    2017-05-15

    Genetic interactions are keys to understand complex traits and evolution. Epistasis analysis is an effective method to map genetic interactions. Large-scale quantitative epistasis analysis has been well established for single cells. However, there is a substantial lack of such studies in multicellular organisms and their complex phenotypes such as development. Here we present a method to extend quantitative epistasis analysis to developmental traits. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we applied RNA interference on mutants to inactivate two genes, used an imaging system to quantitatively measure phenotypes, and developed a set of statistical methods to extract genetic interactions from phenotypic measurement. Using two different C. elegans developmental phenotypes, body length and sex ratio, as examples, we showed that this method could accommodate various metazoan phenotypes with performances comparable to those methods in single cell growth studies. Comparing with qualitative observations, this method of quantitative epistasis enabled detection of new interactions involving subtle phenotypes. For example, several sex-ratio genes were found to interact with brc-1 and brd-1, the orthologs of the human breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BARD1, respectively. We confirmed the brc-1 interactions with the following genes in DNA damage response: C34F6.1, him-3 (ortholog of HORMAD1, HORMAD2), sdc-1, and set-2 (ortholog of SETD1A, SETD1B, KMT2C, KMT2D), validating the effectiveness of our method in detecting genetic interactions. We developed a reliable, high-throughput method for quantitative epistasis analysis of developmental phenotypes.

  11. An Interpretation of Part of Gilbert Gottlieb's Legacy: Developmental Systems Theory Contra Developmental Behavior Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2015-01-01

    The main theme of this paper concerns the persistent critique of Gilbert Gottlieb on developmental behavior genetics and my reactions to this critique, the latter changing from rejection to complete acceptation. Concise characterizations of developmental behavior genetics, developmental systems theory (to which Gottlieb made essential…

  12. Qualitative Methods in Drug Utilization Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Bastholm Rahmner, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative research methods derive from the social sciences. Their use in drug utilization research is increasingly widespread, especially in understanding patient and prescriber perspectives. The main focus in qualitative research is exploration of a given phenomenon in order to get a wider...... understanding of why and how it appears. Qualitative research methods build on various theoretical underpinnings/schools of thought. The same validity and quality criteria cannot be used for both qualitative and quantitative methods....

  13. Contributions of Qualitative Research to Understanding Savings for Children and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherraden, Margaret; Peters, Clark; Wagner, Kristen; Guo, Baorong; Clancy, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores contributions of qualitative research to saving theory for children, youth, and parents in children's development account (CDAs) programs. It brings together findings from three studies: (1) elementary school age children saving for college, (2) youth transitioning from foster care saving for education and other purposes, and…

  14. Infusing Qualitative Traditions in Counseling Research Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Danica G.; Wood, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Research traditions serve as a blueprint or guide for a variety of design decisions throughout qualitative inquiry. This article presents 6 qualitative research traditions: grounded theory, phenomenology, consensual qualitative research, ethnography, narratology, and participatory action research. For each tradition, the authors describe its…

  15. Teaching Qualitative Research to Practitioner-Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Rebecca D.

    2012-01-01

    Practitioner-researchers are well-positioned to apply qualitative methods to the study of significant problems of educational practice. However, while learning the skills of qualitative inquiry, practitioners may be compelled by forces outside of qualitative research classrooms to think quantitatively. In this article, the author considers two…

  16. Publishing Qualitative Research in Counseling Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the essential elements to be included when developing a qualitative study and preparing the findings for publication. Using the sections typically found in a qualitative article, the author describes content relevant to each section, with additional suggestions for publishing qualitative research.

  17. Teaching Qualitative Research to Practitioner-Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Rebecca D.

    2012-01-01

    Practitioner-researchers are well-positioned to apply qualitative methods to the study of significant problems of educational practice. However, while learning the skills of qualitative inquiry, practitioners may be compelled by forces outside of qualitative research classrooms to think quantitatively. In this article, the author considers two…

  18. Infusing Qualitative Traditions in Counseling Research Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Danica G.; Wood, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Research traditions serve as a blueprint or guide for a variety of design decisions throughout qualitative inquiry. This article presents 6 qualitative research traditions: grounded theory, phenomenology, consensual qualitative research, ethnography, narratology, and participatory action research. For each tradition, the authors describe its…

  19. Publishing Qualitative Research in Counseling Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the essential elements to be included when developing a qualitative study and preparing the findings for publication. Using the sections typically found in a qualitative article, the author describes content relevant to each section, with additional suggestions for publishing qualitative research.

  20. Quantifying Qualitative Data Using Cognitive Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherp, Hans-Ake

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the article is to show how substantial qualitative material consisting of graphic cognitive maps can be analysed by using digital CmapTools, Excel and SPSS. Evidence is provided of how qualitative and quantitative methods can be combined in educational research by transforming qualitative data into quantitative data to facilitate…

  1. Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, Norman K., Ed.; Lincoln, Yvonna S., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry, Third Edition," the second volume in the paperback version of "The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research, 3rd Edition," consists of Part III of the handbook ("Strategies of Inquiry"). "Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry, Third Edition" presents the major tactics--historically, the research methods--that…

  2. Using Qualitative Research Methods in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenye, Wilhelmina C.; Robinson, Rhonda S.

    2005-01-01

    Researchers investigating issues related to computing in higher education are increasingly using qualitative research methods to conduct their investigations. However, they may have little training or experience in qualitative research. The purpose of this paper is to introduce researchers to the appropriate use of qualitative methods. It begins…

  3. Quantifying Qualitative Data Using Cognitive Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherp, Hans-Ake

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the article is to show how substantial qualitative material consisting of graphic cognitive maps can be analysed by using digital CmapTools, Excel and SPSS. Evidence is provided of how qualitative and quantitative methods can be combined in educational research by transforming qualitative data into quantitative data to facilitate…

  4. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience: Origins, Issues, and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Bruce F.; Snyder, Kelly A.; Roberts, Ralph J., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This commentary explains how the field of developmental cognitive neuroscience (DCN) holds the promise of a much wider interdisciplinary integration across sciences concerned with development: psychology, molecular genetics, neurobiology, and evolutionary developmental biology. First we present a brief history of DCN, including the key theoretical…

  5. Developmental Work Personality Scale: An Initial Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauser, David R.; Keim, Jeanmarie

    2002-01-01

    The research reported in this article involved using the Developmental Model of Work Personality to create a scale to measure work personality, the Developmental Work Personality Scale (DWPS). Overall, results indicated that the DWPS may have potential applications for assessing work personality prior to client involvement in comprehensive…

  6. Toward a Developmental Operational Definition of Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillham, Jane E.; Carter, Alice S.; Volkmar, Fred R.; Sparrow, Sara S.

    2000-01-01

    Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales scores and measures of intellectual functioning obtained for 44 children (ages 4-13) with autism, 21 with pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, and 30 with developmental disorders, indicated autism and combined nonautism groups could be differentiated on socialization, daily living skills, and…

  7. Developmental spinal canal stenosis and somatotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Nightingale, S.

    1989-01-01

    The hypothesis that somatotype and cervical spine developmental canal stenosis may be associated has been investigated by anthropometry and measurement of lateral projection cervical spine radiographs. A significant association of canal size with somatotype has been found such that those with developmentally narrow canals are more likely to have relatively shorter long-bones, particularly in the upper arm, and longer trunks.

  8. State of the States in Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddock, David; Hemp, Richard; Rizzolo, Mary Kay

    2008-01-01

    This is the latest edition of the "State of the States in Developmental Disabilities" study--a thorough and the only one of its kind investigation on public spending, revenues, and programmatic trends of intellectual and developmental programs and services within the United States since 1977. Directed by leading researcher, Dr. David Braddock, the…

  9. Psychological Resources of Adults with Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockiewicz, Marta; Bogdanowicz, Katarzyna M.; Bogdanowicz, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to describe specific psychological resources of adults with developmental dyslexia and compare them with psychological resources of adults without developmental dyslexia. Potential differences were analyzed in visual-spatial, creative, and motivational abilities. No evidence was found for either creative, or visuospatial…

  10. A Taxometric Investigation of Developmental Dyslexia Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Beth A.; Wolf, Maryanne; Lovett, Maureen W.

    2012-01-01

    Long-standing issues with the conceptualization, identification and subtyping of developmental dyslexia persist. This study takes an alternative approach to examine the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia using taxometric classification techniques. These methods were used with a large sample of 671 children ages 6-8 who were diagnosed with…

  11. Introducing Newspapers in Developmental Reading Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstadt, Roberta; Rey, Victoria M.

    2009-01-01

    Newspapers are an effective educational and motivational tool in developmental reading classes. However, many students are unfamiliar with newspapers and read them infrequently. In order to foster newspaper reading and familiarize the college freshmen enrolled in their developmental reading classes with newspapers, the writers of this article…

  12. Essential Role of Culture in Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joan G.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter argues for the essential role of culture in forming the basic constructs and theories of developmental psychology. The case is made for the need to overcome the cultural insularity of core developmental concepts and methods in order to create a psychology that is more truly universal.

  13. Developmentally Appropriate Practice: Myths and Facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galen, Harlene

    1994-01-01

    Debunks various myths and misperceptions concerning developmentally appropriate practices. Developmental appropriateness is a philosophy, not a curriculum. Despite using alternative learning strategies such as guided play, teachers are in control, facilitate real academic learning, and build on what they already know. DAP is universal and can…

  14. Piaget's Enduring Contribution to Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilin, Harry

    1992-01-01

    Describes Jean Piaget's transformation of society's conception of childhood thought. Emphasizes the enduring contribution to developmental psychology of Piaget's constructivism, his description of developmental mechanisms, his cognitivism, his explication of structural and functional analysis, and his addressing of epistemological issues and…

  15. Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH) Page ( 1 ) The hip is a “ball-and-socket” joint. In a normal hip, the ball at the ... American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. .org Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip cont. • Family history of DDH (parents or siblings) • ...

  16. 48 CFR 919.7011 - Developmental assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS The Department of Energy Mentor-Protege Program 919.7011 Developmental assistance. (a) The forms of developmental assistance a Mentor may provide to a Protege include, but are not... leased by Mentor; and (7) Temporary assignment of Mentor personnel to the Protege for purposes...

  17. Innovative Developmental Education Programs: A Texas Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Eric A.; Capraro, Mary Margaret; Capraro, Robert M.; Chaudhuri, Nandita; Dyer, James; Marchbanks, Miner P., III

    2014-01-01

    This article provides insights from a 2-year, cross-site evaluation of state funded developmental education sites and serves as a focus article for response by those sites. Receiving grants from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), nine sites (5 community colleges and 4 universities) implemented innovative developmental education…

  18. Essential Role of Culture in Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joan G.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter argues for the essential role of culture in forming the basic constructs and theories of developmental psychology. The case is made for the need to overcome the cultural insularity of core developmental concepts and methods in order to create a psychology that is more truly universal.

  19. Psychological Resources of Adults with Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockiewicz, Marta; Bogdanowicz, Katarzyna M.; Bogdanowicz, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to describe specific psychological resources of adults with developmental dyslexia and compare them with psychological resources of adults without developmental dyslexia. Potential differences were analyzed in visual-spatial, creative, and motivational abilities. No evidence was found for either creative, or visuospatial…

  20. A Taxometric Investigation of Developmental Dyslexia Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Beth A.; Wolf, Maryanne; Lovett, Maureen W.

    2012-01-01

    Long-standing issues with the conceptualization, identification and subtyping of developmental dyslexia persist. This study takes an alternative approach to examine the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia using taxometric classification techniques. These methods were used with a large sample of 671 children ages 6-8 who were diagnosed with…